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Sample records for bar sorptive extraction

  1. Automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction using robust montmorillonite/epoxy-coated stir bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Milad; Saraji, Mohammad; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Herein we present a simple, rapid and low cost strategy for the preparation of robust stir bar coatings based on the combination of montmorillonite with epoxy resin. The composite stir bar was implemented in a novel automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction system (MS-SBSE), and applied to the extraction of four chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as model compounds, followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. The different experimental parameters of the MS-SBSE, such as sample volume, selection of the desorption solvent, desorption volume, desorption time, sample solution pH, salt effect and extraction time were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were between 0.02 and 0.34μgL(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method for the analytes at 10μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 3.5% to 4.1% (as intra-day RSD) and from 3.9% to 4.3% (as inter-day RSD at 50μgL(-1) concentration level). Batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different stir bars was 4.6-5.1%. The enrichment factors were between 30 and 49. In order to investigate the capability of the developed technique for real sample analysis, well water, wastewater and leachates from a solid waste treatment plant were satisfactorily analyzed. PMID:27062720

  2. Automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction using robust montmorillonite/epoxy-coated stir bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Milad; Saraji, Mohammad; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Herein we present a simple, rapid and low cost strategy for the preparation of robust stir bar coatings based on the combination of montmorillonite with epoxy resin. The composite stir bar was implemented in a novel automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction system (MS-SBSE), and applied to the extraction of four chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as model compounds, followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. The different experimental parameters of the MS-SBSE, such as sample volume, selection of the desorption solvent, desorption volume, desorption time, sample solution pH, salt effect and extraction time were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were between 0.02 and 0.34μgL(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method for the analytes at 10μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 3.5% to 4.1% (as intra-day RSD) and from 3.9% to 4.3% (as inter-day RSD at 50μgL(-1) concentration level). Batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different stir bars was 4.6-5.1%. The enrichment factors were between 30 and 49. In order to investigate the capability of the developed technique for real sample analysis, well water, wastewater and leachates from a solid waste treatment plant were satisfactorily analyzed.

  3. Analysis of volatiles of malt whisky by solid-phase microextraction and stir bar sorptive extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyttenaere, Jan C R; Martínez, Jorge I Sánchez; Verhé, Roland; Sandra, Pat; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2003-01-24

    Blended Scotch whisky was analysed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to study the composition of the volatiles. For SPME analysis, three different fibres were compared, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) (100 microm). poly(acrylate) (PA) (85 microm) and divinylbenzene-Carboxen on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (DVB-CAR-(PDMS) (50/30 microm). It was found that the PDMS and DVB-CAR-PDMS fibres showed a higher enrichment capacity than PA as well as a better reproducibility. The influence of sampling time, temperature and salt addition on the enrichment of volatiles as well as the difference between liquid and headspace SPME were studied. An optimum SPME method was developed. Finally a more recent sample preparation technique, namely SBSE was evaluated to extract whisky volatiles.

  4. Development and application of novel clonazepam molecularly imprinted coatings for stir bar sorptive extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxu; Mei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Lei; Shen, Xin; Zhu, Wanying; Hong, Junli; Zhou, Xuemin

    2016-04-15

    The molecularly imprinted magnetic stir bar coatings were created based on graft-functional Fe3O4 nanoparticles with magnetic field-induced self-assembly. The magnetic complex including clonazepam as template, the graft-functional Fe3O4 nanoparticles and methacrylic acid as monomers was pre-assembled through π-π interaction and hydrogen bonding, then was directionally adsorbed on the surface of magnetic stir bar under the magnetic induction. The molecularly imprinted coating with well-ordered structure was generated by one-step copolymerization based on the cross linking of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The molecularly imprinted coating with multiple recognition sites could be manufactured and applied in polar solvents, and showed superior selectivity and fast binding kinetics for benzodiazepines. The analytes in herbal health foods, treated by stir bar sorptive extraction, were determined by HPLC-UV. Good linearity was observed in the range of 0.01-2 μg mL(-1). The content of clonazepam in the herbal health foods was found to be 44 ng g(-1), and the average recoveries were 89.8-103.3% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) <6.5%, demonstrating the successful application in real sample analysis. PMID:26851451

  5. Analysis of volatiles in Pinotage wines by stir bar sorptive extraction and chemometric profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldegergis, Berhane T; Crouch, Andrew M

    2008-11-12

    A fast, simple, cost-effective, and reliable method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) in the headspace mode was used for the analysis of 39 volatile components in Pinotage wines. The method was sensitive, with LODs ranging from 50.0 pg/L to 281 ng/L and LOQs between 180 pg/L and 938 ng/L. Precision was between 6 and 20%. The intermediate precision was within the acceptable range. Moreover, good calibration curves with R(2) > 0.99 for all compounds were achieved. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 87 young Pinotage wines of vintages 2005 and 2006 collected from various South African regions. To characterize the results based on vintage and origin, the obtained concentrations of the compounds were subjected to chemometric analysis. Exploratory factor analysis (FA), principal component analysis (PCA), and analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) were consecutively done. The chemometrics approach revealed a reasonable correlation among the volatile components of these wines, as well as with respect to their year of production.

  6. Environmentally friendly analysis of emerging contaminants by pressurized hot water extraction-stir bar sorptive extraction-derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G.; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the development, optimiza- tion, and validation of a new method for the simultaneous determination of a wide range of pharmaceuticals (beta- blockers, lipid regulators ... ) and personal care products (fragrances, UV filters, phthalates ... ) in both aqueous and solid environmental matrices. Target compounds were extracted from sediments using pressurized hot water ex- traction followed by stir bar sorptive extraction. The first stage wa...

  7. Investigation of Molecular Marker Lipids in Alpine Ice Cores Via Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makou, M. C.; Eglinton, T. I.; Thompson, L. G.; Hughen, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Recently developed analytical techniques were employed to identify and quantify organic molecular markers trapped in high-altitude ice. While various compounds represent potentially useful proxies for biomass burning, vegetation type, atmospheric circulation, and anthropogenic activity, prior attempts to measure organic compounds in ice cores have typically required large volumes of sample material that are incompatible with generation of high-resolution paleoclimate records. We employed stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption (TD), coupled with gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), to examine the organic content of small quantities (≤ 30 ml) of ice. To test the utility of the approach, post-industrial ice core samples from the Huascarán and Sajama sites (Andes), the Dasuopu and Puruogangri sites (Tibetan Plateau), and Mt. Kilimanjaro (east Africa) were tested. n-Alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl amides and nitriles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and various diterpenoids were identified in this suite of cores. These marker compounds suggest inputs from biomass burning, fresh vascular plant material, and anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion. Differences in distributions of the alkyl amide and nitrile homologues between the different sites suggest a predominantly local or regional supply of organic matter. Pre-industrial samples from the Sajama and Puruogangri ice cores were also analyzed in order to assess the character of biomarker assemblages in the absence of anthropogenic contributions and investigate changes in inputs over time. PAHs and diterpenoids, which may result from biomass burning and were observed in the modern Sajama samples, occurred in two Holocene Sajama samples, but not in a last glacial sample. Enhanced inputs of terrestrial vegetation combustion biomarkers were consistent with periods of enhanced aridity in both cores. This study demonstrates the utility of SBSE, TD

  8. A new anionic exchange stir bar sorptive extraction coating based on monolithic material for the extraction of inorganic anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojia; Lin, Jianbing; Yuan, Dongxing

    2010-07-23

    A novel anionic exchange stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coating based on poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic material for the extraction of inorganic anion was prepared. The effect of preparation conditions such as ratio of functional monomer to cross-linker, content of porogenic solvent on the extraction efficiencies were investigated in detailed. The monolithic material was characterized by elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. In order to investigate the extraction capacity of the new coating for inorganic anion, the new SBSE was combined with ionic chromatography with conductivity detection, Br-, NO3-, PO4(3-) and SO4(2-) were selected as detected solutes. Several extractive parameters, including pH value and ionic strength in sample matrix, desorption solvent, extraction and desorption time were optimized. The results showed that strongly ionic strength did not favor the extraction of anlaytes. Under the optimum experimental conditions, low detection limits (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) of the proposed method for the target anions were achieved within the range of 0.92-2.62 and 3.03-9.25 microg/L, respectively. The method also showed good linearity, simplicity, practicality and low cost for the extraction inorganic anions. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used to detect the two different trademarks of commercial purified water with satisfactory recovery in the range of 70.0-92.6%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first to use SBSE to enrich inorganic anions. PMID:20576270

  9. Determination of phthalate esters in polyvinyl chloride infusion bag by stir bar sorptive extraction combined with GC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Dai, Jinna; Wang, Xiaofan; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Chen, Xiaohui

    2012-12-01

    A novel, efficient, and sensitive stir bar sorptive extraction method coupled with GC for the detection of four kinds of phthalate esters in plasticized polyvinyl chloride infusion bag has been developed and validated. Some experimental parameters including stirring speed, stirring time, pH value, salt concentration, desorption mode, desorption solvents, and desorption time were investigated and optimized. Under optimum condition, the validated assay was found to be linear (r > 0.9945) and LODs were between 1.07 and 2.67 ng for the four analytes. The method exhibited excellent precision with RSD varied from 4.5 to 6.1% (n = 5). The recoveries of the four phthalate esters at two different concentrations ranged from 80.5 to 93.4%. The results showed that the validated method could meet the need of determination of targets and was successfully applied to the analysis of phthalate esters in real samples.

  10. Determination of dimethyl trisulfide in rabbit blood using stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Erica; Maslamani, Nujud; Petrikovics, Ilona; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2016-08-26

    Cyanide poisoning by accidental or intentional exposure poses a severe health risk. The current Food and Drug Administration approved antidotes for cyanide poisoning can be effective, but each suffers from specific major limitations concerning large effective dosage, delayed onset of action, or dependence on enzymes generally confined to specific organs. Dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), a sulfur donor that detoxifies cyanide by converting it into thiocyanate (a relatively nontoxic cyanide metabolite), is a promising next generation cyanide antidote. Although a validated analytical method to analyze DMTS from any matrix is not currently available, one will be vital for the approval of DMTS as a therapeutic agent against cyanide poisoning. Hence, a stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the analysis of DMTS from rabbit whole blood. Following acid denaturation of blood, DMTS was extracted into a polydimethylsiloxane-coated stir bar. The DMTS was then thermally desorbed from the stir bar and analyzed by GC-MS. The limit of detection of DMTS using this method was 0.06μM with dynamic range from 0.5-100μM. For quality control standards, the precision, as measured by percent relative standard deviation, was below 10%, and the accuracy was within 15% of the nominal concentration. The method described here will allow further investigations of DMTS as a promising antidote for cyanide poisoning. PMID:27477518

  11. A fast stir bar sorptive extraction method for the analysis of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol in source and drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauld, T; Teasdale, P; Stratton, H; Uwins, H

    2007-01-01

    The presence of unpleasant taste and odour in drinking water is an ongoing aesthetic concern for water providers worldwide. The need for a sensitive and robust method capable of analysis in both natural and treated waters is essential for early detection of taste and odour events. The purpose of this study was to develop and optimise a fast stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) method for the analysis of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) in both natural water and drinking water. Limits of detection with the optimised fast method (45 min extraction time at 60 degrees C using 24 microL stir bars) were 1.1 ng/L for geosmin and 4.2 ng/L for MIB. Relative standard deviations at the detection limits were under 17% for both compounds. Use of multiple stir bars can be used to decrease the detection limits further. The use of 25% NaCl and 5% methanol sample modifiers decreased the experimental recoveries. Likewise, addition of 1 mg/L and 1.5 mg/L NaOCI decreased the recoveries and this effect was not reversed by addition of 10% thiosulphate. The optimised method was used to measure geosmin concentrations in treated and untreated drinking water. MIB concentrations were below the detection limits in these waters.

  12. Potentialities of polyurethane foams for trace level analysis of triazinic metabolites in water matrices by stir bar sorptive extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Fátima C M; Pinto, Moisés L; Pires, João; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-06-01

    Polyurethane (PU) foams were applied for stir bar sorptive extraction of five triazinic metabolites (desethyl-2-hydroxyatrazine, desisopropylatrazine, desethylatrazine, 2-hydroxyatrazine and desethylterbuthylazine) in water matrices, followed by liquid desorption and high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (SBSE(PU)-LD/HPLC-DAD). The optimum conditions for SBSE(PU)-LD were 5h of extraction (1000 rpm) and 5% (v/v) of methanol for the analysis of desethyl-2-hydroxyatrazine and 2-hydroxyatrazine, 15% (w/v) of sodium chloride for the remaining compounds and acetonitrile as back-extraction solvent (5 mL) under ultrasonic treatment (60 min). The methodology provided recoveries up to 26.3%, remarkable precision (RSD0.9993) and convenient detection limits (0.4-1.3 microg/L). The proposed method was applied in the analysis of triazinic metabolites in tap, river and ground waters, with remarkable performance and negligible matrix effects. The comparison of the recoveries obtained by PU and commercial stir bars was also performed, where the yields achieved with the former were up to ten times higher proving that PU is appropriate for analysis at trace level of this type of polar compounds in water matrices. PMID:20434162

  13. Analysis for chloroanisoles and chlorophenols in cork by stir bar sorptive extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejon, R M; Troncoso, A M; Morales, M L

    2007-03-30

    A complete methodology for the determination of chloroanisoles and chlorophenols in cork material is proposed. The determination is accomplished by means of a previous liquid-solid extraction followed by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two different liquid-solid extraction experiments were conducted and eight compounds considered (2,6-dichloroanisole, 2,4-dichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, pentachloroanisole and pentachlorophenol). From the results obtained we can conclude that high volume extraction extending extraction time up to 24h is the best choice if we have to release compounds from the inner surfaces of cork stoppers. Recovery percentages ranged from 51% for pentachloroanisole to 81% for 2,4-dichloroanisole. This method allows the determination of an array of compounds involved in cork taint at very low levels from 1.2ng g(-1) for 2,4,6-tricholoroanisole to 23.03ng g(-1) for 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol. PMID:19071569

  14. A novel stir bar sorptive extraction coating based on monolithic material for apolar, polar organic compounds and heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojia; Qiu, Ningning; Yuan, Dongxing; Huang, Benli

    2009-04-15

    In this study, a novel stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) based on monolithic material (SBSEM) was prepared. The monolithic material was obtained by in situ copolymerization of vinylpyrrolidone and divinylbenzene in the presence of a porogen solvent containing cyclohexanol and 1-dodecanol with azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator. The influences of polymerization conditions on the extraction efficiencies were investigated, using phenol and p-nitrophenol as detected solutes. The monolithic material was characterized by various techniques, such as elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, infrared spectroscopy. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were used to investigate the extraction efficiencies of SBSEM for apolar analytes. Hormones, aromatic amines and phenols were selected as test analytes to investigate the extraction efficiencies of SBSEM for weakly and strongly polar compounds. The results showed that the new SBSEM could enrich the above-mentioned organic compounds effectively. It is worthy to mention that the SBSEM can enrich some heavy metal ions, such as Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+) and Cd(2+), through coordination adsorption. To our best knowledge, that is the first to use SBSE to enrich heavy metal ions. PMID:19174210

  15. Cyromazine imprinted polymers for selective stir bar sorptive extraction of melamine in animal feed and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenying; Gao, Mingqi; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-06-21

    In this work, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coated stir bar was prepared using a self-designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mold and in situ polymerization, with cyromazine as the dummy template for the target melamine. The prepared MIP coated stir bar presented a uniform and porous surface as well as good chemical stability and selectivity for melamine. Based on it, a method of MIP coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was developed for the quantification of melamine in food samples. Significant factors affecting the extraction efficiency of melamine by MIP-SBSE, such as the extraction solvent and time, stirring rate, desorption solvent and time, were investigated thoroughly. Under the optimal conditions, the analytical performance of this method was evaluated. The detection limit of the developed method was 0.54 μg L(-1) for melamine with an enrichment factor of 42-fold and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.1% (c = 5 μg L(-1), n = 7), and the linear range was 2-200 μg L(-1). The established method was applied for the determination of melamine in a variety of real samples including cat food, dog food, chicken feed A, chicken feed B and milk powder, and the recoveries for melamine in the spiked samples were in the range of 76.2-98.2%, 80.0-85.5%, 89.5-113%, 85.0-95.5% and 65.0-111%, respectively. The proposed method presented a good specific recognition ability and matrix interference resistance, and was demonstrated to be effective and sensitive for the analysis of melamine in animal food and milk samples.

  16. Cyromazine imprinted polymers for selective stir bar sorptive extraction of melamine in animal feed and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenying; Gao, Mingqi; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-06-21

    In this work, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coated stir bar was prepared using a self-designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mold and in situ polymerization, with cyromazine as the dummy template for the target melamine. The prepared MIP coated stir bar presented a uniform and porous surface as well as good chemical stability and selectivity for melamine. Based on it, a method of MIP coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was developed for the quantification of melamine in food samples. Significant factors affecting the extraction efficiency of melamine by MIP-SBSE, such as the extraction solvent and time, stirring rate, desorption solvent and time, were investigated thoroughly. Under the optimal conditions, the analytical performance of this method was evaluated. The detection limit of the developed method was 0.54 μg L(-1) for melamine with an enrichment factor of 42-fold and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.1% (c = 5 μg L(-1), n = 7), and the linear range was 2-200 μg L(-1). The established method was applied for the determination of melamine in a variety of real samples including cat food, dog food, chicken feed A, chicken feed B and milk powder, and the recoveries for melamine in the spiked samples were in the range of 76.2-98.2%, 80.0-85.5%, 89.5-113%, 85.0-95.5% and 65.0-111%, respectively. The proposed method presented a good specific recognition ability and matrix interference resistance, and was demonstrated to be effective and sensitive for the analysis of melamine in animal food and milk samples. PMID:25875596

  17. [Application of Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction and Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer to the Phthalic Acid Esters Analysis in Seawater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chen-chen; Li, Feng-min; Lu, Lun; Sun, Yue

    2015-10-01

    For the determination of trace amounts of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in complex seawater matrix, a stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SBSE-GC-MS) method was established. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) were selected as study objects. The effects of extraction time, amount of methanol, amount of sodium chloride, desorption time and desorption solvent were optimized. The method of SBSE-GC-MS was validated through recoveries and relative standard deviation. The optimal extraction time was 2 h. The optimal methanol content was 10%. The optimal sodium chloride content was 5% . The optimal desorption time was 50 min. The optimal desorption solvent was the mixture of methanol to acetonitrile (4:1, volume: volume). The linear relationship between the peak area and the concentration of PAEs was relevant. The correlation coefficients were greater than 0.997. The detection limits were between 0.25 and 174.42 ng x L(-1). The recoveries of different concentrations were between 56.97% and 124.22% . The relative standard deviations were between 0.41% and 14.39%. On the basis of the method, several estuaries water sample of Jiaozhou Bay were detected. DEP was detected in all samples, and the concentration of BBP, DEHP and DOP were much higher than the rest. PMID:26841630

  18. In situ application of stir bar sorptive extraction as a passive sampling technique for the monitoring of agricultural pesticides in surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    Assoumani, A.; Lissalde, S.; Margoum, C.; Mazzella, N.; Coquery, M.

    2013-01-01

    Grab sampling and automated sampling are not suitable or logistically too constraining for the monitoring of pesticides in dynamic streams located in agricultural watersheds. In this work, we applied stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) Twisters® directly in two small rivers of a French vineyard (herein referred to as 'passive SBSE'), for periods of one or two weeks during a month, for the passive sampling of 19 agricultural pesticides. We performed qualitative and semi-quantitative comparison...

  19. Comparison of the performances of Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE) coupled to GC-MS-MS and UHPLC-MS-MS for the analysis of pesticides in freshwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Guillemain, C.; Margoum, C.; Assoumani, A.; Coquery, M.

    2014-01-01

    The monitoring of freshwaters regarding organic micropollutants such as pesticides requires efficient analytical methods to determine reliable concentrations at low levels in natural waters. In this aim, two complementary methods were developed for the determination of several pesticides in surface waters using Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE) followed by liquid chromatography or gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. These two methods were validated and their analytical u...

  20. Metsulfuron-methyl Molecularly Imprinted Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction Coupled with High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Trace Sulfonylurea Herbicides Analysis in Complex Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhi-gang; DU Zhuo; LIAN Hai-xian; HU Yu-ling; LI Gong-ke

    2012-01-01

    Metsulfuron-methyl molecularly imprinted polymer(MIP)-coated stir bar was prepared for sorptive extraction of sulfonylurea herbicides in complex samples.The MIP-coating was about 21.3 μm thickness with the relative standard deviation(RSD) of 4.4%(n=10).It was homogeneous and porous with good thermal stability and chemical stability.The extraction capability of the MIP-coating was 2.8 timcs over that of the non-imprinted polymer (NIP)-coating in hexane.The MIP-coating exhibited selective adsorption ability to the template and its analogues.The extraction conditions,including extraction solvent,desorption solvent,extraction time,desorption time and stirring speed,were optimized.A method for the determination of six sulfonylurea herbicides by MIP-coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) was developed.The linear range was 10-200 μg/L and the detection limits were within a range of 2.0-3.3 μg/L.It was also applied to the analysis of sulfonylurea herbicides in spiked river water,soil and rice samples.

  1. Preparation of a novel sorptive stir bar based on vinylpyrrolidone-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate monolithic polymer for the simultaneous extraction of diazepam and nordazepam from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabizadeh, Mahsa; Talebpour, Zahra; Adib, Nuoshin; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2016-04-01

    A new monolithic coating based on vinylpyrrolidone-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate polymer was introduced for stir bar sorptive extraction. The polymerization step was performed using different contents of monomer, cross-linker and porogenic solvent, and the best formulation was selected. The quality of the prepared vinylpyrrolidone-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate stir bars was satisfactory, demonstrating good repeatability within batch (relative standard deviation ultrasound-assisted liquid desorption, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection for the simultaneous determination of diazepam and nordazepam in human plasma samples. To optimize the extraction step, a three-level, four-factor, three-block Box-Behnken design was applied. Under the optimum conditions, the analytical performance of the proposed method displayed excellent linear dynamic ranges for diazepam (36-1200 ng/mL) and nordazepam (25-1200 ng/mL), with correlation coefficients of 0.9986 and 0.9968 and detection limits of 12 and 10 ng/mL, respectively. The intra- and interday recovery ranged from 93 to 106%, and the relative standard deviations were less than 6%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of diazepam and nordazepam at their therapeutic levels in human plasma. The novelty of this study is the improved polarity of the stir bar coating and its application for the simultaneous extraction of diazepam and its active metabolite, nordazepam in human plasma sample. The method was more rapid than previously reported stir bar sorptive extraction techniques based on monolithic coatings, and exhibited lower detection limits in comparison with similar methods for the determination of diazepam and nordazepam in biological fluids. PMID:26840622

  2. Trace analysis of chlorophenols in river water samples by stir bar sorptive extraction with in situ derivatization and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, M.; Ishii, Y.; Okanouchi, N.; Sakui, N.; Ito, R.; Inoue, K.; Nakazawa, H. [Hoshi Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Saito, K. [Saitama Institute of Public Health, Saitama (Japan). Dioxin Research Group

    2004-09-15

    Many analytical methods for the determination of chlorophenols in water samples have been reported including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, GC-MS was initially used for the determination of phenol compounds even though derivatization was required. The derivatization leads to sharper peaks and hence to better separation and higher sensitivity for the phenols. However, the derivatization faces the risk of contamination and hence an overestimation of chlorophenols concentration. In order to overcome these problems, in situ derivatization has been developed, which involves the simple addition of a reagent to a liquid sample. Recently, a new sorptive extraction technique that uses a stir bar coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was developed. The technique is known as stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). We already reported that determination of 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-nonylphenol (NP) in river water4 and body fluid samples by using SBSE. In addition, SBSE with in situ derivatization has been successfully used in the determination of bisphenol A (BPA) in human body fluid samples6 and phenolic xenoestrogens in river water samples. The aim of this study is to determine trace amounts of chlorophenols in water samples by SBSE with in situ derivatization, followed by thermal desorption (TD)-GC-MS. The developed method was applied to determination of chlorophenols in river water samples.

  3. Simultaneous determination of preservatives in beverages, vinegar, aqueous sauces, and quasi-drug drinks by stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Takino, Masahiko; Yamashita, Satoru; Daishima, Shigeki; Heiden, Arnd C; Hoffmann, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven preservatives - sorbic acid, benzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl, isopropyl, propyl, isobutyl, and butyl esters - in beverages, vinegar, aqueous sauces, and quasi-drug drinks has been developed using the stir-bar sorptive extraction technique then thermal desorption GC-MS analysis. The extraction conditions - pH, sample volume, extraction temperature, salt addition, and extraction time - were examined. d5-Benzoic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid sec-butyl ester were added as surrogate internal standards to compensate for the effect of sample matrix and coexisting analytes on the sorptive extraction. The linearity of the method was good over the concentration range from 1 to 1000 microg mL(-1) for sorbic acid, 10-1000 microg mL(-1) for benzoic acid, and 0.1-100 microg mL(-1) for p-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl, isopropyl, propyl, isobutyl, and butyl esters, and the correlation coefficients were higher than 0.9984. The limit of detection ranged from 0.015 to 3.3 microg mL(-1). The recoveries (95-105%) and precision (RSD: 0.86-6.0%) of the method were examined by analyzing a sparkling soft drink, white wine, red wine, balsamic vinegar, soy sauce, and quasi-drug drink samples fortified at the 5 to 50 microg mL(-1) level.

  4. Stir bar sorptive-dispersive microextraction mediated by magnetic nanoparticles-nylon 6 composite for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedé, Juan L; Chisvert, Alberto; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Salvador, Amparo

    2016-07-01

    A new and sensitive analytical method based on the recently developed approach termed stir bar-sorptive dispersive microextraction (SBSDME) using a magnetic CoFe2O4@SiO2-nylon 6 composite as sorbent material is presented for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds. The simultaneous determination of four hydrophilic UV filters in environmental water samples has been chosen as a model analytical application due to the increasing awareness regarding the occurrence of sunscreen residuals in natural waters. The developed SBSDME approach combines the principles and benefits of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE) but allows for lower extraction time and easier post-extraction treatment. Moreover, most importantly, it enables the use of new magnetic materials that affords higher versatility and can be tailored to the needs of the analysis. The main experimental parameters involved in the SBSDME process (i.e. composite amount, extraction time, pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time) were evaluated to provide the best enrichment factors. Under the optimized conditions, the method was successfully validated showing good linearity, enrichment factors between 105 and 145 depending on the analyte, limits of detection and quantification in the low ng mL(-1) range (1.6-2.9 ng mL(-1) and 5.4-9.6 ng mL(-1), respectively) and good intra- and inter-day repeatability (RSD < 13%). The developed method was applied to the analysis of water samples of different origin (sea, river and swimming pool). Relative recovery values ranged between 90 and 115%, thus showing that the matrices under consideration do not affect the extraction process. PMID:27216394

  5. Polydimethylsiloxane/covalent triazine frameworks coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection for the determination of phenols in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cheng; He, Man; Liao, Huaping; Chen, Beibei; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    In this work, covalent triazine frameworks (CTFs) were introduced in stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and a novel polydimethylsiloxane(PDMS)/CTFs stir bar coating was prepared by sol-gel technique for the sorptive extraction of eight phenols (including phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, p-chloro-m-cresol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) from environmental water samples followed by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection. The prepared PDMS/CTFs coated stir bar showed good preparation reproducibility with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 3.5 to 5.7% (n=7) in one batch, and from 3.7 to 9.3% (n=7) among different batches. Several parameters affecting SBSE of eight target phenols including extraction time, stirring rate, sample pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time were investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.08-0.30 μg/L. The linear range was 0.25-500 μg/L for 2-nitrophenol, 0.5-500 μg/L for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol as well as 2,4-dimethylphenol, and 1-500 μg/L for p-chloro-m-cresol, 2,4-dichlorophenol as well as 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, respectively. The intra-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 4.3-9.4% (n=7, c=2 μg/L) and the enrichment factors ranged from 64.9 to 145.6 fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 200-fold). Compared with commercial PDMS coated stir bar (Gerstel) and PEG coated stir bar (Gerstel), the prepared PDMS/CTFs stir bar showed better extraction efficiency for target phenol compounds. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of phenols in environmental water samples and good relative recoveries were obtained with the spiking level at 2, 10, 50 μg/L, respectively.

  6. Aptamer-functionalized stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for selective enrichment and determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Saichai; Gan, Ning; Zhang, Jiabin; Qiao, Li; Chen, Yinji; Cao, Yuting

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel aptamer-functionalized stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) was developed for selective enrichment of the low abundance polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from fish samples. This approach was based on the immobilization of aptamer which could recognize 2,3',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB72) and 2',3',4',5,5'-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB106) on one kind of metal-organic frameworks (Zn4O(BDC)3, MOF-5). MOF-5 as a substrate was prepared by potential-controlled cathodic electrodeposition on stainless steel. This aptamer-functionalized stir bar sorptive extraction (Apt-MOF SBSE) fiber could be facile synthesized in one-step. PCB72 and PCB106 were employed as target analytes for selective extraction by the developed method. The adsorbed targets could be desorbed easily in pH 3.0 100mM glycine-HCl buffers and then extracted by the methylene chloride. Afterwards, the detection was carried out with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The Apt-MOF SBSE pretreatment coupled with GC-MS exhibited high selectivity, good binding capacity, stability and reproducibility for the detection of PCBs. It provided a linear range of 0.02-250ngmL(-1) with a good coefficient of determination (R(2)=0.9991-0.9996) and the detection limit was 0.003-0.004ngmL(-1). More importantly, the method was successfully utilized for the determination of PCBs in fish samples with good enrichment factor (1930-2304). Therefore, this new SBSE coating opens up the possibility of selective enrichment of a given target PCBs from complex fish samples. PMID:26717840

  7. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (APGC-ToF-MS) for the determination of regulated and emerging contaminants in aqueous samples after stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)

    OpenAIRE

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G.; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the development, optimization and validation of a multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of 102 contaminants, including fragrances, UV filters, repellents, endocrine disruptors, biocides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several types of pesticides in aqueous matrices. Water samples were processed using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) after the optimization of several parameters: agitation time, ionic streng...

  8. Water-compatible graphene oxide/molecularly imprinted polymer coated stir bar sorptive extraction of propranolol from urine samples followed by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenying; He, Man; You, Linna; Zhu, Xuewei; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Due to the high selectivity and stability, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been successfully applied in stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) as a special coating to improve the selective extraction capability for target analytes. However, traditional MIPs usually suffer from incompatibility in aqueous media and low adsorption capacity, which limit the application of MIP coated stir bar in aqueous samples. To solve these problems, a water-compatible graphene oxides (GO)/MIP composite coated stir bar was prepared in this work by in situ polymerization. The prepared water-compatible GO/MIP coated stir bar presented good mechanical strength and chemical stability, and its recognition ability in aqueous samples was improved due to the polymerization of MIP in water environment, the adsorption capacity for target analytes was also increased by the addition of GO in MIP pre-polymer solution. Based on it, a method of water-compatible GO/MIP coated stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detector (HPLV-UV) was proposed for the analysis of propranolol (PRO) in aqueous solution. The influencing factors of SBSE, such as sample pH, salt effect, stirring rate, extraction time, desorption solvent and desorption time, were optimized, and the analytical performance of the developed SBSE-HPLC-UV method was evaluated under the optimized conditions. The limit of detection (LOD) of the proposed method for PRO was about 0.37 μg L(-1), and the enrichment factor (EF) was 59.7-fold (theoretical EF was 100-fold). The reproducibility was also investigated at concentrations of 5 μg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 7.3% (n=7). The proposed method of GO/MIP coating-SBSE-HPLC-UV was successfully applied for the assay of the interested PRO drug in urine samples, and further extended to the investigation of the excretion of the drugs by monitoring the variation of the concentration of PRO in urine

  9. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, E D; Aalhus, J L; Summerfelt, S T; Davidson, J; Swift, B; Juárez, M

    2013-12-20

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SBSE-TD-GCMS). MIB and GSM were solid phase extracted using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated stir bars, analyzed by gas chromatography, and detected in full scan mode of mass selective detector (MSD). Using this method, the calibration curves of MIB and GSM were linear in the range of 0.3-100ng/L, with a correlation coefficient above 0.999 and RSDs less than 4% (n=4). The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3, n=6) and limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10, n=6) of MIB and GSM were both ∼0.3 and 1ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were 22% and 29% by spike in 30ng/L standard compounds, 23% and 30% by spike-in 100ng/L standard compounds in salmon tissue samples with good precision (<8% of RSDs, n=6), respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were better than reported methodologies using SPME fibres (<10%) in fish tissue samples. This method was successfully applied to monitor and characterize depurated salmon fillet samples (0, 3, 6 and 10 days).

  10. Quantitative 31P NMR for Simultaneous Trace Analysis of Organophosphorus Pesticides in Aqueous Media Using the Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S.; Talebpour, Z.; Molaabasi, F.; Bijanzadeh, H. R.; Khazaeli, S.

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of pesticides in water samples is of primary concern for quality control laboratories due to the toxicity of these compounds and their associated public health risk. A novel analytical method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), followed by 31P quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (31P QNMR), has been developed for simultaneously monitoring and determining four organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in aqueous media. The effects of factors on the extraction efficiency of OPPs were investigated using a Draper-Lin small composite design. An optimal sample volume of 4.2 mL, extraction time of 96 min, extraction temperature of 42°C, and desorption time of 11 min were obtained. The results showed reasonable linearity ranges for all pesticides with correlation coefficients greater than 0.9920. The limit of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.1 to 2.60 mg/L, and the recoveries of spiked river water samples were from 82 to 94% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values less than 4%. The results show that this method is simple, selective, rapid, and can be applied to other sample matrices.

  11. Sensitive monitoring of penicillin antibiotics in milk and honey treated by stir bar sorptive extraction based on monolith and LC-electrospray MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojia; Chen, Linli; Chen, Meng; Yuan, Dongxing; Nong, Shuyu

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, a convenient and sensitive method for determination of six penicillin antibiotics (amoxicillin, ampicillin, penicillin G, oxacillin, cloxacillin, and dicloxacillin) in milk and honey samples was developed. Milk and honey samples were diluted with water, then directly treated by stir bar sorptive extraction based on poly (vinylimidazole-divinylbenzene) monolithic material as coating. The analytes were analyzed by LC/ESI- MS/MS. Several extraction parameters including extraction and desorption time, pH value, and ionic strength in sample matrix were investigated in detail. Under the optimized extraction conditions, the calculated detection limits for the target compounds were as low as 0.23-2.66 ng/kg in milk and 0.18-1.42 ng/kg in honey, respectively. Good linearity was obtained for analytes with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) above 0.997. Excellent method reproducibility was achieved in terms of intraday and interday precisions, indicated by the RSDs of <5.0 and <10.0%, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of penicillin antibiotics residues in different milk and honey samples. PMID:23378165

  12. Polydimethylsiloxane/metal-organic frameworks coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-flame photometric detection for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zuowei; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2016-08-15

    In this work, the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MIL-101-Cr-NH2 was synthesized via a direct hydrothermal method, and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar was prepared by sol-gel technique. Good reproducibility was obtained for the preparation of PDMS/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 3.7 to 5.2% (n=7) in one batch, and from 5.4 to 9.2% (n=7) among different batches. With the high surface area and rich benzene ring structure of MIL-101-Cr-NH2, the prepared PDMS/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar presented higher extraction efficiency for target organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs, including phorate, diazinon, malathion, fenthion, quinalphos and ethion) over PDMS coated stir bar. Based on it, a new method of PDMS/MIL-101-Cr-NH2 coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled to gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) was proposed for the determination of six OPPs in environmental water samples. The operation parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of SBSE, including extraction time, stirring rate, desorption time and ionic strength, were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection (S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.043-0.085μgL(-1) for the six target OPPs, and the linear range was 0.5-100μgL(-1) for malathion and 0.2-100μgL(-1) for other five OPPs. The RSDs of the proposed method evaluated at 1µgL(-1) for each OPP were in the range of 5.9-8.7% (intra-day, n=7) and 6.1-10.7% (inter-day, n=5), respectively. The enrichment factors were varied from 110 to 151-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 200-fold). The proposed method was applied to the analysis of OPPs in East Lake and pond water samples with recoveries in the range of 89.3-115% and 80.0-113% for the spiked East Lake and pond water samples, respectively. PMID:27260444

  13. Passive sampling and stir bar sorptive extraction for the determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in water by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Emanuele; Di Carro, Marina; Liscio, Camilla

    2010-06-01

    A new method using the extraction and preconcentration capabilities of stir bar sorptive extraction, combined with high-resolution gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, was developed for the determination of five selected endocrine-disrupting compounds (4-n-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17beta-estradiol, and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol) in water. In situ derivatization to transform the phenolic compounds into lipophilic and volatile analytes was carried out with acetic anhydride. Two different methods of headspace derivatization to further improve the chromatographic properties of 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol were developed and compared. The optimized method provided good sensitivity (limits of quantitation 1.2-2.6 ng), repeatability (relative standard deviation 2-9%), and reproducibility (relative standard deviation 10-17%). Passive sampling by means of polar organic chemical integrative samplers was applied to monitor river waters used as supply sources for drinking water treatment plants in the Liguria region of Italy. The analytes showed a different distribution at the three sites considered; bisphenol A proved to be the most abundant, ranging from 185 to 459 ng per sampler.

  14. Determination of synthetic phenolic antioxidants in soft drinks by stir-bar sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic phenolic antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) were pre-concentrated by stir-bar sorptive extraction and thermally desorbed (SBSE-TD) before analysis by GC-MS. Several parameters affecting the derivatisation step and both SBSE extraction and thermal desorption were carefully optimised. When the analyses of BHA and TBHQ in their acetylated, silylated and underivatised forms were compared, the best results were obtained when the in-situ derivatisation procedure with acetic anhydride was employed. Quantification was carried out using carvacrol as the internal standard, providing quantification limits of between 0.11 and 0.15 ng ml(-1), depending on the compound. Recovery assays for samples spiked at two concentration levels, 1 and 5 ng ml(-1), provided recoveries in the 81-117% range. The proposed method was applied in the analysis canned soft drinks and the analytes were found in five of the 10 samples analysed. PMID:25622305

  15. Determination of five booster biocides in seawater by stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, I; Chaguaceda, E; Bujalance, M; Morales, E

    2013-01-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption (TD)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have been optimized for the determination of five organic booster biocides (Chlorothalonil, Dichlofluanid, Sea-Nine 211, Irgarol 1051 and TCMTB) in seawater samples. The parameters affecting the desorption and absorption steps were investigated using 10 mL seawater samples. The optimised conditions consisted of an addition of 0.2 g mL(-1) KCl to the sample, which was extracted with 10mm length, 0.5mm film thickness stir bars coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and stirred at 900 rpm for 90 min at room temperature (25 °C) in a vial. Desorption was carried out at 280 °C for 5 min under 50 mL min(-1) of helium flow in the splitless mode while maintaining a cryotrapping temperature of 20 °C in the programmed-temperature vaporization (PTV) injector of the GC-MS system. Finally, the PTV injector was ramped to a temperature of 280 °C and the analytes were separated in the GC and detected by MS using the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The detection limits of booster biocides were found to be in the range of 0.005-0.9 μg L(-1). The regression coefficients were higher than 0.999 for all analytes. The average recovery was higher than 72% (R.S.D.: 7-15%). All these figures of merit were established running samples in triplicate. This simple, accurate, sensitive and selective analytical method may be used for the determination of trace amounts of booster biocides in water samples from marinas. PMID:23246091

  16. In situ application of stir bar sorptive extraction as a passive sampling technique for the monitoring of agricultural pesticides in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoumani, Azziz; Lissalde, Sophie; Margoum, Christelle; Mazzella, Nicolas; Coquery, Marina

    2013-10-01

    Grab sampling and automated sampling are not suitable or logistically too constraining for the monitoring of pesticides in dynamic streams located in agricultural watersheds. In this work, we applied stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) Twisters® directly in two small rivers of a French vineyard (herein referred to as "passive SBSE"), for periods of one or two weeks during a month, for the passive sampling of 19 agricultural pesticides. We performed qualitative and semi-quantitative comparisons of the performances of passive SBSE firstly to automated sampling coupled to analytical SBSE, and secondly to the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS), a well-known passive sampler for hydrophilic micropollutants. Applying passive SBSE in river waters allowed the quantification of more pesticides and in greater amounts than analytical SBSE as shown for samples collected concurrently. Also, passive SBSE and POCIS proved to be complementary techniques in terms of detected molecules; but only passive SBSE was able to integrate a concentration peak triggered by a quick flood event that lasted 5 h. Passive SBSE could be an interesting tool for the monitoring of moderately hydrophobic to hydrophobic organic micropollutants in changing hydrosystems. In this purpose, further studies will focus on the accumulation kinetics of target pesticides and the determination of their sampling rates. PMID:23856404

  17. Quantification approach for assessment of sparkling wine volatiles from different soils, ripening stages, and varieties by stir bar sorptive extraction with liquid desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Elisabete; Coimbra, Manuel A; Nogueira, J M F; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2009-03-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction with liquid desorption followed by large volume injection coupled to gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-qMS) was applied for the quantification of varietal and fermentative volatiles in sparkling wines. The analytical data were performed by using suitable standards of monoterpene hydrocarbons (alpha-pinene), monoterpenols (linalool), sesquiterpenoids (E,E-farnesol, Z-nerolidol, and guaiazulene), C(13) norisoprenoids (beta-ionone), aliphatic and aromatic alcohols (hexanol and 2-phenylethanol), and esters (hexyl acetate and ethyl decanoate) as model compounds. The wine volatiles were quantified using the structurally related standards. The methodology showed good linearity over the concentration range tested, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.950 to 0.997, and a reproducibility of 9-18%. The SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-qMS methodology allowed, in a single run, the quantification of 71 wine volatiles that can be quantified accurately at levels lower than their respective olfactory thresholds. This methodology was used for assessment of sparkling wine volatiles from different soils, ripening stages, and varieties. The variety and soil influenced significantly the volatile composition of sparkling wines; lower effect was observed for the ripening stage of grapes picked up one week before or after the maturity state.

  18. Determination of alkylphenols and phthalate esters in vegetables and migration studies from their packages by means of stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for the determination of three alkylphenols (APs), 4-tert-octylphenol (tOP), 4-n-octylphenol (OP) and 4-nonylphenol (NP), and six phthalate esters (PEs), dimethylphthalate (DMP), diethylphthalate (DEP), di-n-butylphthalate (DBP), n-butylbenzylphthalate (BBP), di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) and di-n-octylphthalate (DOP), in vegetables using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) in combination with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). Ultrasonic radiation was used to extract the analytes from the solid food matrix, and the extract obtained was preconcentrated by SBSE. The different parameters affecting both stages were carefully optimized. The method was applied to analyze commercial vegetables, in the form of plastic packed salads and canned greens, as well as the corresponding filling liquids of the canned food. Quantification of the samples was carried out against aqueous standards using an internal standard (anthracene). The analysis of a 2 g vegetable sample provided detection limits between 12.7 and 105.8 pg g⁻¹ for OP and DEHP, respectively. Migration studies from the plastic packages of the vegetables samples analyzed were carried out. DEP, DBP and DEHP were found to have migrated from the bags to the simulant and the same compounds were quantified in lettuce, corn salad, arugula, parsley and chard, at concentration levels in the 8-51 ng g⁻¹ range. However, OP and NP were found in only two vegetable samples and one filling liquid, but neither was detected in any package. The proposed method provided recoveries of 83-118%.

  19. Calibration of a passive sampler based on stir bar sorptive extraction for the monitoring of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, Branislav; Komancová, Lucie; Sobotka, Jaromír

    2016-05-15

    A passive sampler based on stir bars coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was calibrated for the measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of hydrophobic micropollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides, in water. Stir bar/water partition coefficients were measured by equilibrating bars with sheets made of silicone rubber material for which partition coefficients had been reported previously. Kinetic parameters characterising the exchange of analytes between stir bars and water were determined under controlled exposure conditions using a passive dosing system. The dosing system consisted of silicone rubber sheets with a large surface area, spiked with analytes. During stir bar sampler exposure, analytes partitioned from dosing sheets to water in the exposure tank and maintained constant exposure concentrations. Reversible and isotropic exchange kinetics of analytes between sampler and water was confirmed by measuring the release of a range of performance reference compounds (PRCs) from stir bars. Application of a two-resistance model confirmed that, except for hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, uptake of the test compounds under the experimental conditions was controlled by diffusion in the water boundary layer. This permits the application of PRCs for in situ calibration of uptake kinetics of test compounds to stir bars. PMID:26992498

  20. Solvent-assisted stir bar sorptive extraction by using swollen polydimethylsiloxane for enhanced recovery of polar solutes in aqueous samples: Application to aroma compounds in beer and pesticides in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2016-07-15

    A novel solvent-assisted stir bar sorptive extraction (SA-SBSE) technique was developed for enhanced recovery of polar solutes in aqueous samples. A conventional PDMS stir bar was swollen in several solvents with log Kow ranging from 1.0 to 3.5 while stirring for 30min prior to extraction. After extraction, thermal desorption - gas chromatography - (tandem) mass spectrometry (TD-GC-(MS/)MS) or liquid desorption - large volume injection (LD-LVI)-GC-MS were performed. An initial study involved investigation of potential solvents for SA-SBSE by weighing of the residual solvent in the swollen PDMS stir bar before and after extraction. Compared to conventional SBSE, SA-SBSE using diethyl ether, methyl isobutyl ketone, dichloromethane, diisopropyl ether and toluene provided higher recoveries from water samples for test solutes with log Kow2.5. The performance of the SA-SBSE method using dichloromethane, diisopropyl ether, and cyclohexane is illustrated with analyses of aroma compounds in beer and of pesticides in wine. PMID:27289502

  1. Sol-gel coating of poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes for stir bar sorptive extraction and its application to the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekbatani Amlashi, Nadiya; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) grafted onto carboxyl-terminated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by the sol-gel technique as a stationary phase for stir bars. The analytical methodology included stir bar sorptive extraction with micellar desorption followed by liquid chromatography. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were used as the model compounds to evaluate the extraction performance. The extraction efficiency, for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples, was optimized based on a chemometrics approach. The effect of the experimental parameters on the extraction response was investigated and the optimum extraction conditions were selected. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method showed a good linearity within the different ranges for different analytes (e.g. 0.05-500 ng/mL for phenanthrene), a square of the correlation coefficient was higher than 0.999, and an appropriate limit of detection in the range of 0.013-0.072 ng/mL. The recoveries in all cases were above 94%, with relative standard deviations below 2.4%.

  2. Coupling of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/polydimethylsiloxane coated stir bar sorptive extraction with pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry for analysis of triazine herbicides in water and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nan; Yuan, Chunhao; Liu, Shaowen; Han, Yongtao; Li, Yanjie; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-07-29

    An analytical method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled with pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (PGD-IMS) was developed for analysis of three triazine pesticide residues in water and soil samples. An injection port with sealing device and stir bars hold device were designed and constructed to directly position the SBSE fiber including the extracted samples into the heating device, making desorption and detection of analytes proceeded simultaneously. The extraction conditions such as SBSE solid phase material, extraction time, extraction temperature, pH value and salt concentration were optimized. Mixture of MWCNTs-COOH and PDMS were shown to be effective in enriching the triazines. The LODs and LOQs of three triazines were found to be 0.006-0.015μgkg(-1) and 0.02-0.05μgkg(-1), and the linear range was 0.05-10μgL(-1) with determination coefficients from 0.9987 to 0.9993. The SBSE-PGD-IMS method was environmentally friendly without organic solvent consumption in the entire experimental procedures, and it was demonstrated to be a commendable rapid analysis technique for analysis of triazine pesticide residues in environmental samples on site. The proposed method was applied for the analysis of real ground water, surface water and soil samples. PMID:27371024

  3. Use of experimental design in the investigation of stir bar sorptive extraction followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of explosives in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Sébastien; Vailhen, Dominique; Bridoux, Maxime Cyril

    2016-02-12

    A method for the sensitive quantification of trace amounts of organic explosives in water samples was developed by using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by liquid desorption and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The proposed method was developed and optimized using a statistical design of experiment approach. Use of experimental designs allowed a complete study of 10 factors and 8 analytes including nitro-aromatics, amino-nitro-aromatics and nitric esters. The liquid desorption study was performed using a full factorial experimental design followed by a kinetic study. Four different variables were tested here: the liquid desorption mode (stirring or sonication), the chemical nature of the stir bar (PDMS or PDMS-PEG), the composition of the liquid desorption phase and finally, the volume of solvent used for the liquid desorption. On the other hand, the SBSE extraction study was performed using a Doehlert design. SBSE extraction conditions such as extraction time profiles, sample volume, modifier addition, and acetic acid addition were examined. After optimization of the experimental parameters, sensitivity was improved by a factor 5-30, depending on the compound studied, due to the enrichment factors reached using the SBSE method. Limits of detection were in the ng/L level for all analytes studied. Reproducibility of the extraction with different stir bars was close to the reproducibility of the analytical method (RSD between 4 and 16%). Extractions in various water sample matrices (spring, mineral and underground water) have shown similar enrichment compared to ultrapure water, revealing very low matrix effects. PMID:26777783

  4. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (APGC-ToF-MS) for the determination of regulated and emerging contaminants in aqueous samples after stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2014-12-01

    This work presents the development, optimization and validation of a multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of 102 contaminants, including fragrances, UV filters, repellents, endocrine disruptors, biocides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several types of pesticides in aqueous matrices. Water samples were processed using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) after the optimization of several parameters: agitation time, ionic strength, presence of organic modifiers, pH, and volume of the derivatizing agent. Target compounds were extracted from the bars by liquid desorption (LD). Separation, identification and quantification of analytes were carried out by gas chromatography (GC) coupled to time-of-flight (ToF-MS) mass spectrometry. A new ionization source, atmospheric pressure gas chromatography (APGC), was tested. The optimized protocol showed acceptable recovery percentages (50-100%) and limits of detection below 1ngL(-1) for most of the compounds. Occurrence of 21 out of 102 analytes was confirmed in several environmental aquatic matrices, including seawater, sewage effluent, river water and groundwater. Non-target compounds such as organophosphorus flame retardants were also identified in real samples by accurate mass measurement of their molecular ions using GC-APGC-ToF-MS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this technique has been applied for the analysis of contaminants in aquatic systems. By employing lower energy than the more widely used electron impact ionization (EI), AGPC provides significant advantages over EI for those substances very susceptible to high fragmentation (e.g., fragrances, pyrethroids). PMID:25440658

  5. Stir-bar-sorptive extraction and liquid desorption combined with large-volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for ultra-trace analysis of musk compounds in environmental water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Rita M; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-03-01

    Stir-bar-sorptive extraction with liquid desorption followed by large-volume injection and capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring acquisition mode (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) has been developed to monitor ultra-traces of four musks (celestolide (ADBI), galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN) and musk ketone (MK)) in environmental water matrices. Instrumental calibration (LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) and experimental conditions that could affect the SBSE-LD efficiency are discussed. Assays performed on 30-mL water samples spiked at 200 ng L(-1) under optimized experimental conditions yielded recoveries ranging from 83.7 ± 8.1% (MK) to 107.6 ± 10.8% (HHCB). Furthermore, the experimental data were in very good agreement with predicted theoretical equilibria described by octanol-water partition coefficients (K (PDMS/W) ≈ K (O/W)). The methodology also showed excellent linear dynamic ranges for the four musks studied, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9961, limits of detection and quantification between 12 and 19 ng L(-1) and between 41 and 62 ng L(-1), respectively, and suitable precision (ultra-trace level, overcoming several disadvantages presented by other sample-preparation techniques. PMID:20049588

  6. Development of a Method for the Quantitation of Three Thiols in Beer, Hop, and Wort Samples by Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction with in Situ Derivatization and Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Kishimoto, Toru

    2015-08-01

    A method for analysis of hop-derived polyfunctional thiols, such as 4-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-2-one (4S4M2Pone), 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (3SHol), and 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (3SHA), in beer, hop water extract, and wort at nanogram per liter levels was developed. The method employed stir bar sorptive extraction with in situ derivatization (der-SBSE) using ethyl propiolate (ETP), followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. A prior step involved structural identification of the ETP derivatives of the thiols by TD-GC-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with parallel sulfur chemiluminescence detection (Q-TOF-MS/SCD) after similar der-SBSE. The der-SBSE conditions of the ETP concentration, buffer concentration, salt addition, and extraction time profiles were investigated, and the performance of the method was demonstrated with spiked beer samples. The limits of detection (LODs) (0.19-27 ng/L) are below the odor threshold levels of all analytes. The apparent recoveries at 10-100 ng/L (99-101%) and the repeatabilities [relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3-7.2%; n = 6] are also good. The method was successfully applied to the determination of target thiols at nanogram per liter levels in three kinds of beer samples (hopped with Cascade, Citra, and Nelson Sauvin) and the corresponding hop water extracts and wort samples. There was a clear correlation between the determined values and the characteristics of citrus hop aroma for each sample.

  7. Development of a Method for the Quantitation of Three Thiols in Beer, Hop, and Wort Samples by Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction with in Situ Derivatization and Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Kishimoto, Toru

    2015-08-01

    A method for analysis of hop-derived polyfunctional thiols, such as 4-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-2-one (4S4M2Pone), 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (3SHol), and 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (3SHA), in beer, hop water extract, and wort at nanogram per liter levels was developed. The method employed stir bar sorptive extraction with in situ derivatization (der-SBSE) using ethyl propiolate (ETP), followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. A prior step involved structural identification of the ETP derivatives of the thiols by TD-GC-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with parallel sulfur chemiluminescence detection (Q-TOF-MS/SCD) after similar der-SBSE. The der-SBSE conditions of the ETP concentration, buffer concentration, salt addition, and extraction time profiles were investigated, and the performance of the method was demonstrated with spiked beer samples. The limits of detection (LODs) (0.19-27 ng/L) are below the odor threshold levels of all analytes. The apparent recoveries at 10-100 ng/L (99-101%) and the repeatabilities [relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3-7.2%; n = 6] are also good. The method was successfully applied to the determination of target thiols at nanogram per liter levels in three kinds of beer samples (hopped with Cascade, Citra, and Nelson Sauvin) and the corresponding hop water extracts and wort samples. There was a clear correlation between the determined values and the characteristics of citrus hop aroma for each sample. PMID:26166150

  8. Validation of a method for the analysis of 77 priority persistent organic pollutants in river water by stir bar sorptive extraction in compliance with the European Water Framework Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino-Sánchez, F J; Zafra-Gómez, A; Cantarero-Malagón, S; Vílchez, J L

    2012-01-30

    A multi-residue method for the analysis of semi-volatile organic pollutants in inland groundwater (river water) at ultra-trace levels in compliance with the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) has been developed and validated by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (SBSE-TD-GC-MS/MS(QqQ)). The method includes various families of compounds included in the WFD and other compounds listed as persistent organic pollutants that are banned in the Stockholm Convention of Persistent Organic Pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons, and other pesticides not included in the WFD. The method also can be applied for compliance with regional environmental laws. Extraction conditions were optimised in order to analyse simultaneously analytes with very different polarities and octanol-water partition coefficients, which is an important parameter in the optimisation of a SBSE method. The quantification limits (LOQs) obtained ranged from 0.14 to 10 ng L(-1), lower that others presented in previous publications, and complies with the requirement for analytical methods to be used in the analysis of the compounds included in the WFD. Several quality parameters as linearity, trueness and precision were studied with good results, and also uncertainty was estimated. The WFD requires that the level of uncertainty must be lower than 50%, and this requirement was met for all compounds. Precision (in terms of RSD) was lower than 30%, recoveries ranged between 74 and 111%, and determination coefficients were higher than 0.990 for all analytes. Different factors that affect the SBSE procedure were optimised. GC-MS/MS parameters have also been revised. The accuracy of the method was tested participating in a proficiency testing scheme for each group of analytes. PMID:22284499

  9. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography–time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (APGC–ToF-MS) for the determination of regulated and emerging contaminants in aqueous samples after stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G.; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A., E-mail: pablo.lara@uca.es

    2014-12-03

    Graphical abstract: Examples of identification of target (triclosan, TCS) and non-target (tributhyl phosphate, TBP) compounds in environmental water samples by APGC–ToF-MS. Some confirmation criteria are shown (i.e. mass spectra, isotopic distribution, and accurate mass). - Highlights: • 102 regulated and emerging contaminants are simultaneously extracted by SBSE. • APGC–ToF-MS is presented as an alternative to EI for the analysis of microcontaminants. • Identification of non-target compounds in environmental matrices is also explored. - Abstract: This work presents the development, optimization and validation of a multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of 102 contaminants, including fragrances, UV filters, repellents, endocrine disruptors, biocides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several types of pesticides in aqueous matrices. Water samples were processed using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) after the optimization of several parameters: agitation time, ionic strength, presence of organic modifiers, pH, and volume of the derivatizing agent. Target compounds were extracted from the bars by liquid desorption (LD). Separation, identification and quantification of analytes were carried out by gas chromatography (GC) coupled to time-of-flight (ToF-MS) mass spectrometry. A new ionization source, atmospheric pressure gas chromatography (APGC), was tested. The optimized protocol showed acceptable recovery percentages (50–100%) and limits of detection below 1 ng L{sup −1} for most of the compounds. Occurrence of 21 out of 102 analytes was confirmed in several environmental aquatic matrices, including seawater, sewage effluent, river water and groundwater. Non-target compounds such as organophosphorus flame retardants were also identified in real samples by accurate mass measurement of their molecular ions using GC-APGC–ToF-MS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this

  10. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography–time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (APGC–ToF-MS) for the determination of regulated and emerging contaminants in aqueous samples after stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Examples of identification of target (triclosan, TCS) and non-target (tributhyl phosphate, TBP) compounds in environmental water samples by APGC–ToF-MS. Some confirmation criteria are shown (i.e. mass spectra, isotopic distribution, and accurate mass). - Highlights: • 102 regulated and emerging contaminants are simultaneously extracted by SBSE. • APGC–ToF-MS is presented as an alternative to EI for the analysis of microcontaminants. • Identification of non-target compounds in environmental matrices is also explored. - Abstract: This work presents the development, optimization and validation of a multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of 102 contaminants, including fragrances, UV filters, repellents, endocrine disruptors, biocides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several types of pesticides in aqueous matrices. Water samples were processed using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) after the optimization of several parameters: agitation time, ionic strength, presence of organic modifiers, pH, and volume of the derivatizing agent. Target compounds were extracted from the bars by liquid desorption (LD). Separation, identification and quantification of analytes were carried out by gas chromatography (GC) coupled to time-of-flight (ToF-MS) mass spectrometry. A new ionization source, atmospheric pressure gas chromatography (APGC), was tested. The optimized protocol showed acceptable recovery percentages (50–100%) and limits of detection below 1 ng L−1 for most of the compounds. Occurrence of 21 out of 102 analytes was confirmed in several environmental aquatic matrices, including seawater, sewage effluent, river water and groundwater. Non-target compounds such as organophosphorus flame retardants were also identified in real samples by accurate mass measurement of their molecular ions using GC-APGC–ToF-MS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this

  11. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction–thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction -thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (SBSE -TD -GCMS). M...

  12. Quantitative analysis of phosphoric acid esters in aqueous samples by isotope dilution stir-bar sorptive extraction combined with direct analysis in real time (DART)-Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridoux, Maxime C., E-mail: maxime.bridoux@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Malandain, Hélène [SANTEN SAS, 1 rue Pierre Fontaine, Bâtiment Genavenir IV, F-91058 Evry (France); Leprince, Françoise; Progent, Frédéric; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Theory and modeling of organophosphorus SBSE extraction are presented. • Organophosphorus are quantitatively analyzed by isotopic dilution SBSE/DART/Orbitrap-MS. • PDMS coated Twisters™ extract phosphate acid esters in the neutral form from water samples. • Good linearity between concentrations and relative peak areas (0.1–750 ng mL{sup −1}). • This novel SBSE/DART/Orbitrap-MS method should be very valuable for on-site sampling/monitoring - Abstract: A novel hyphenated technique, namely the combination of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) with isotope dilution direct analysis in real time (DART) Orbitrap™ mass spectrometry (OT-MS) is presented for the extraction of phosphoric acid alkyl esters (tri- (TnBP), di- (HDBP), and mono-butyl phosphate (H2MBP)) from aqueous samples. First, SBSE of phosphate esters was performed using a Twister™ coated with 24 μL of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the extracting phase. SBSE was optimized for extraction pH, phase ratio (PDMS volume/aqueous phase volume), stirring speed, extraction time and temperature. Then, coupling of SBSE to DART/Orbitrap-MS was achieved by placing the Twister™ in the middle of an open-ended glass tube between the DART and the Orbitrap™. The DART mass spectrometric response of phosphate esters was probed using commercially available and synthesized alkyl phosphate ester standards. The positive ion full scan spectra of alkyl phosphate triesters (TnBP) was characterized by the product of self-protonation [M + H]{sup +} and, during collision-induced dissociation (CID), the major fragmentation ions corresponded to consecutive loss of alkyl chains. Negative ionization gave abundant [M − H]{sup −} ions for both HDnBP and H2MnBP. Twisters™ coated with PDMS successfully extracted phosphate acid esters (tri-, di- and mono-esters) granted that the analytes are present in the aqueous solution in the neutral form. SBSE/DART/Orbitrap-MS results show a good linearity between

  13. Determination of 20 Pesticides in Water Sample by GC - MS with Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction%搅拌棒吸附子萃取与GC-MS法测定水中20种有机氯农药

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱定姬; 黄克建; 林翠梧; 李宏森; 刘晓锋; 李璐; 罗正坚

    2009-01-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of 20 organochlorine pesticides, inclu-ding α-BHC, γ-BHC, β3-BHC, heptachlor, δ-BHC, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, γ-chlordane, cis-chlordane, endosulfan I , p, p'-DDE, dieldrin, endrin, p, p'-DDD, endosulfan Ⅱ , p, p'-DDT, endrin hexadrin, endosulfan sulfate, methoxychlor and endrin ketone in water samples was developed by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled with gas chromatography - mass spectrome-try (GC - MS). The samples was extracted by stir bar and desorbed by methanol. The analytes were separated on a J & W DB-35 MS(30 m × 0. 25 mm × 0. 25 μm) column, and detected by GC - MS un-der selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Effects of extraction time, addition of salt and methanol on extraction efficiency were studied. The calibration curves showed a good linearity between 2. 5 μg/L and 20 μg/L for 20 organochlorine pesticides. The limits of detection (S/N = 3 ) ranged from 0. 008 μg/L to 0. 118 μg/L. The average recoveries of 20 organochlorine pesticides in water sample at two spiked concentration levels of 2.5, 20 μg/L ranged from 52% to 117% with RSDs less than 13% (n = 6). The method was rapid, simple, sensitive, and was applied to determine the real water with satisfactory results.%建立了搅拌棒吸附子萃取/气相色谱-质谱法(SBSE/GC-MS)同时检测水中α-六六六、γ-六六六、β-六六六、七氯、δ-六六六、艾氏剂、环氧七氯、γ-氯丹、顺-氯丹、硫丹Ⅰ、p,p-滴滴伊、狄氏剂、异狄氏剂、p,p-滴滴滴、硫丹Ⅱ、p,p-滴滴涕、异狄氏剂醛、硫丹硫酸盐、甲氧滴滴涕、异狄氏剂酮20种有机氯农药含量的方法.样品在室温下经拌棒吸附子搅拌吸附,甲醇解吸附后,以J&W DB-35 MS(30 m×0.25 mm×0.25 μm)石英毛细管色谱柱为分析柱,气相色谱-质谱选择离子流模式检测.考察了萃取时间、氯化钠及甲醇加入量等对萃取的影响.实验结果表明:在2.5 ~20.0

  14. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria. PMID:27300591

  15. 搅拌棒磁子萃取-热脱附-气相色谱/质谱联用分析葫芦巴酊剂的挥发性成分%Analysis of Volatile Components in Fenugreek Tincture (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) by Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction-Thermal Desorption and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏勇; 冒德寿; 李智宇; 毛多斌

    2012-01-01

    The volatile constituents of fenugreek tincture were identified by stir bar sorptive extraction(SBS)-thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Different solvents and twister phases for stir bar sorptive extraction were discussed. Using water as solvent, PDMS twister was the optimal extractive and sorptive condition. The main constituents included ethyl palmitoleate (21. 81 %) , phenethyl phenylacetate(19. 94%), pentanoic acid(6. 58%) , ethyl octadecanoate (5. 06%) , hexanoic acid(4. 40%), ethyl octanoate (2. 96%) , ethyl myristate (2. 87%), ethyl pentadecanoate (2. 30%) , ethyl phenylace-tate (2. 27%), ethyl laurate (2. 18%), ethyl decanoate (1. 94%), ethyl nonanoate (1.26%). benzyl benzoate (1. 26%), vanillin (1.06%), and ethyl hexanoate (1.05%).%建立使用搅拌棒磁子萃取和热脱附系统,并结合气相色谱/质谱联用测定葫芦巴酊剂挥发性成分的方法.考察了溶剂与搅拌棒磁子对分析结果的影响,发现用水作溶剂,采用聚二甲基硅氧烷树脂搅拌棒磁子是最佳萃取和吸附条件.葫芦巴酊剂的主要挥发性成分是棕榈酸乙酯(21.81%)、苯乙酸苯乙酯(19.94%)、戊酸(6.58%)、硬脂酸乙酯(5.06%)、已酸(4.40%)、辛酸乙酯(2.96%)、肉豆蔻酸乙酯(2.87%)、十五酸乙酯(2.30%)、苯乙酸乙酯(2.27%)、月桂酸乙酯(2.18%)、癸酸乙酯(1.94%)、壬酸乙酯(1.26%)、苯甲酸苄酯(1.26%)、香兰索(1.06%)和已酸乙酯(1.05%)等.

  16. Characterisation, quantity and sorptive properties of microplastics extracted from cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napper, Imogen E; Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2015-10-15

    Cosmetic products, such as facial scrubs, have been identified as potentially important primary sources of microplastics to the marine environment. This study characterises, quantifies and then investigates the sorptive properties of plastic microbeads that are used as exfoliants in cosmetics. Polyethylene microbeads were extracted from several products, and shown to have a wide size range (mean diameters between 164 and 327 μm). We estimated that between 4594 and 94,500 microbeads could be released in a single use. To examine the potential for microbeads to accumulate and transport chemicals they were exposed to a binary mixture of (3)H-phenanthrene and (14)C-DDT in seawater. The potential for transport of sorbed chemicals by microbeads was broadly similar to that of polythene (PE) particles used in previous sorption studies. In conclusion, cosmetic exfoliants are a potentially important, yet preventable source of microplastic contamination in the marine environment. PMID:26234612

  17. Characterisation, quantity and sorptive properties of microplastics extracted from cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napper, Imogen E; Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2015-10-15

    Cosmetic products, such as facial scrubs, have been identified as potentially important primary sources of microplastics to the marine environment. This study characterises, quantifies and then investigates the sorptive properties of plastic microbeads that are used as exfoliants in cosmetics. Polyethylene microbeads were extracted from several products, and shown to have a wide size range (mean diameters between 164 and 327 μm). We estimated that between 4594 and 94,500 microbeads could be released in a single use. To examine the potential for microbeads to accumulate and transport chemicals they were exposed to a binary mixture of (3)H-phenanthrene and (14)C-DDT in seawater. The potential for transport of sorbed chemicals by microbeads was broadly similar to that of polythene (PE) particles used in previous sorption studies. In conclusion, cosmetic exfoliants are a potentially important, yet preventable source of microplastic contamination in the marine environment.

  18. 搅拌棒萃取-热脱附/气质联用法测定水中2-MIB和土臭素%Determination of 2-Methylisoborneol and Geosmin in Water Using Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction-Thermal Desorption/Gas Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范苓; 张晓赟; 秦宏兵; 顾海东

    2013-01-01

    A method using stir bar sorptive extraction ( SBSE)-thermal desorption ( TD)/gas chromatogra-phy coupled with mass spectrometry ( GCMS) was developed to determinate ultra-trace level of 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) and geosmin in water .SBSE and TD parameters were optimized through blank spiked sample .The method showed good linearity ( r>0 .999 ) over concentration range from 1 ng/L to 200 ng/L and high sensitivity ( the MDL of 2-MIB and geosmin were 0 .31 ng/L and 0 .15 ng/L respectively ) .The spiked recovery of blank and real samples ranged from 82 .4%to 116%with RSD <10%.%采用搅拌棒萃取-热脱附/气质联用法测定水中2-甲基异莰醇和土臭素,优化了搅拌棒萃取和热脱附进样的条件。试验表明:两种目标化合物在1.00 ng/L~200 ng/L范围内线性良好,2-甲基异莰醇的相关系数为0.9993,土臭素的相关系数为0.9997,方法检出限分别为0.31 ng/L和0.15 ng/L;空白和实际样品的加标回收率为82.4%~116%,测定结果的RSD<10%。

  19. 甲氧苄啶分子印迹涂层搅拌棒在复杂样品痕量甲氧苄啶和磺胺药物分析中的应用%Preparation of Trimethoprim Molecularly Imprinted Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction and Its Application for Trace Analysis of Trimethoprim and Sulfonamides in Complex Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志刚; 杜卓; 胡玉玲; 胡玉斐; 潘英朋; 李攻科

    2012-01-01

    研制了甲氧苄啶分子印迹吸附萃取搅拌棒涂层,并应用于复杂样品中痕量甲氧苄啶和磺胺药物的分析.分子印迹涂层的厚度约为21.5μm,相对标准偏差为5.9%(n=10),涂层均匀、致密,具有良好的热稳定性和化学稳定性.分子印迹涂层的萃取容量是非印迹涂层萃取容量的1.7倍,分子印迹涂层对抗菌增效剂、磺胺药物、三嗪化合物和甲氨蝶呤都表现出良好的选择性吸附萃取能力.建立了分子印迹吸附萃取搅拌棒联用高效液相色谱的分析方法,成功应用于加标尿样和血浆中痕量甲氧苄啶的分析,线性范围为5 ~ 200μg/L,检出限为1.6μg/L,在尿样和血浆中的回收率范围分别为84.5%~91.7%和71.9%~85.1%,标准偏差分别为29%~4 4%和3.0%~7.3%.该方法还应用于加标牛奶中痕量磺胺药物的分析,线性范围为10~200μg/L,检出限在4.5~6.1 μg/L之间,回收率为83.2%~110.2%,标准偏差为4.1%~8.0%.%Trimethoprim molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was prepared as the coating of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and applied to the trace analysis of trimethoprim and three sulfonamides in complex samples.The MIP-coating was about 21.5 μm thickness with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 5.9% (n=10).It was homogeneous and dense with good thermal and chemical stability.The extraction capability of the MIP-coating was 1.7 times over that of the non imprinted polymer (NIP) coating.The MIP coating exhibited selective adsorption ability to sulfonamides,triazines and methotrexate besides antibacterial synergists.The methods for the determination of trimethoprim and three sulfonamides by MIP-coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with HPLC were developed.It was successfully applied to the trace trimethoprim analysis in spiked urine and plasma samples.The linear range was 5 to 200 μg/L and the detection limit was 1.6 μg/L.The recoveries in urine and plasma

  20. Comparative study of different fabric phase sorptive extraction sorbents to determine emerging contaminants from environmental water using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakade, Sameer S; Borrull, Francesc; Furton, Kenneth G; Kabir, Abuzar; Fontanals, Núria; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2015-11-01

    A new sorptive extraction technique, fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE), using different coating chemistries: non-polar sol-gel poly(dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), medium polar sol-gel poly(tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), and polar sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PPG-PEG triblock) and sol-gel Carbowax 20 M were evaluated to extract a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) with wide range of polarity from environmental aqueous samples. Different parameters affecting FPSE such as sample pH, stirring speed, addition of salt, extraction time, sample volume, elution solvent and desorption time were optimized for each sorbent coated FPSE media. Under optimum conditions, FPSE media coated with sol-gel Carbowax 20 M provided the highest absolute recoveries (77-85%) for majority of the analytes with the exception of the most polar ones. Nevertheless, all four sorbents offered better recovery compared to the commercially available coating for stir-bar sorptive extraction based on Ethylene Glycol/Silicone (EG/Silicone). The method based on FPSE with sol-gel Carbowax 20 M media and liquid chromatography-(electrospray ionization) tandem mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI) MS/MS) was developed and validated for environmental water samples. Good apparent recoveries (41-80%), detection limits (1-50 ng L(-1)), repeatability (%RSD<15%, n=5) and reproducibility (%RSD<18%, n=5) were achieved. PMID:26452968

  1. Preparation of a stir bar sorptive extraction coating based on molecularly imprinted polymer and its application in the extraction of dienestrol and hexestrol in complicated samples%分子印迹固相萃取搅拌棒的制备及对复杂样品中双烯雌酚和己烷雌酚的萃取性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    农舒予; 林福华; 黄晓佳; 袁东星

    2012-01-01

    A new stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coating based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)with diethylstilbestrol as replaced template molecule was prepared.The influences of the contents of template molecule and monomer in the polymerization mixture on the extraction performance of MIP-SBSE were investigated thoroughly.The MIP was characterized by elemental analysis,scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy.In order to evaluate the usability of the new coating,the MIP-SBSE was combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and diode array detector (DAD) with dienestrol (DS) and hexestrol (HS) as detected solutes.To achieve optimally selective extraction performance for DS and HS,several parameters,including extraction and desorption times,desorption solvent,ionic strength and pH value in sample matrix were investigated.The results showed that under the optimized experimental conditions,the present method has high selectivity and sensitivity.When drying-redissolving procedure was taken during sample preparation,the limits of detection for DS and HS were as low as 0.04 μg/L and 0.14 μg/L,respectively.Good linearities were obtained for analytes with the correlation coefficients (R2) above 0.99.Finally,the proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of DS and HS in wastewater,honey and cow urine samples.The recoveries of spiked target compounds in real samples ranged from 61.3% to 120%.The developed method is simple,selective,sensitive and applicable for the analysis of trace DS and HS in complicated samples.%以己烯雌酚为替代模板,利用整体材料的"原位"合成技术制备了分子印迹聚合物,并将其作为固相萃取搅拌棒的涂层(MIP-SBSE)制备了新的搅拌棒.详细考察了分子印迹聚合物制备条件中模板分子及功能单体用量对MIP-SBSE选择性萃取性能的影响,同时利用元素分析、扫描电镜和红外光谱对聚合物进行表征.以双烯雌酚(DS)和

  2. Alternative sorptive extraction method for gas chromatography determination of halogenated anisoles in water and wine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain); Rodriguez, I. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)], E-mail: qnisaac@usc.es; Rubi, E.; Bollain, M.H.; Cela, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2007-09-05

    An alternative sorptive microextraction method for the determination of five halogenated anisoles in water and wine matrices is proposed. Analytes were concentrated in an inexpensive and disposable piece of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), desorbed with a small volume of organic solvent, and determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) or tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of several factors on the efficiency of extraction and desorption steps was investigated in detail and the observed behaviour justified on the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics of the solid-phase microextraction technique. Under optimised conditions, analytes were first extracted in the headspace (HS) mode, at room temperature, for 2.5 h and then desorbed with 1 mL of n-pentane. This extract was further evaporated to 50 {mu}L. The overall extraction yield of the procedure ranged from 40 to 55% and the limits of quantification remained between 0.5 and 20 ng L{sup -1}, depending on the compound considered and the detection technique. Precision and linearity of the method were excellent for all species with both GC-ECD and GC-MS/MS detection. Matrix effects were evaluated with different water and wine samples; moreover, the suitability of the PDMS sorbent for storage of analytes, under different conditions, was demonstrated.

  3. 搅拌棒磁子萃取-热脱附-气相色谱质谱联用分析葫芦巴浸膏的挥发性成分%Analysis of volatile components in fenugreek extract( Trigonella foenum-graecum L) by stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏勇; 冒德寿; 曲荣芬; 李智宇; 毛多斌

    2012-01-01

    Volatile components from fenugreek extract were analyzed by using stir bar soptive extraction-thermal desoption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry,and sixty-seven compounds were identified. 1,2- propylene glycol (38.83%), 2-phenylethyl2-phenylacetate (7.32%) ,2,4-dimethy1-1,3-dioxolane-2-methanol (5.33%), rinalool (3.67%) ,2-acetoxy- 1 -propanol (3.54%), isovaleric acid (2.75%) and 2-acetylfuran (2.06%) were the main components. In addition,the flavor mechanism was discussed. The research provided technological basis for quality control and exploit of fenugreek extract.%应用搅拌棒磁子萃取和热脱附系统,并结合气相色谱-质谱联用仪,测定了葫芦巴浸膏中的挥发性成分。从中鉴定出67个挥发性物质,主要成分为:l,2-丙二醇(38.83%)、苯乙酸苯乙酯(7.32%)、羟基丙酮丙二醇缩酮(5.33%)、芳樟醇(3.67%)、丙二醇单醋酸酯(3.54%)、异戊酸(2.75%)和2-乙酰基呋喃(2.06%)。此外,对葫芦巴浸膏的致香机理进行了探讨,研究为葫芦巴浸膏的品质控制和开发应用提供了技术依据。

  4. Plastic pellets sorptive extraction: Low-cost, rapid and efficient extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Chrysanthi-Elisabeth; Yiantzi, Evangelia; Psillakis, Elefteria

    2016-05-30

    For the first time, plastic pellets, a low-cost and easy to reach industrial raw material, are reported as an efficient sorbent material for the laboratory extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from environmental waters. The proposed methodology, termed plastic pellets sorptive extraction (P2SE), consisted of a two-step procedure whereby target analytes were initially adsorbed onto the surface of three low-density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets and then desorbed using microliters of an organic solvent. Interphase mass transfer was greatly accelerated by means of vortex agitation. Organic extracts were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. Different experimental parameters were controlled and the optimum conditions found were: three LDPE pellets (∼80 mg) added to 20 mL aqueous sample (20% w:v NaCl) followed by vortex agitation at 3000 rpm; for desorption, the three LDPE pellets were immersed in 100 μL of acetonitrile and the mixture was shaken at 3000 rpm for 5 min using the vortex agitator. The calculated calibration curves gave high levels of linearity yielding coefficients of determination (r(2)) greater than 0.9913. The precision of the proposed method was found to be good and the limits of the detection were calculated in the low ng L(-1) level. Matrix effects were determined by applying the proposed method to spiked river water, treated municipal wastewater and seawater samples. To compensate for the low recoveries of the more hydrophobic PAHs in spiked effluent wastewater and seawater samples the standard addition methodology was applied. The proposed method was applied to the determination of target pollutants in real seawater samples using the standard addition method. Overall, the performance of the proposed P2SE method suggests that the use of inexpensive and easy to reach sorbent materials for extracting analytes in the laboratory merits more intensive investigation. PMID:27154829

  5. Solvent-enhanced headspace sorptive extraction in the analysis of the volatile fraction of matrices of vegetable origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgorbini, Barbara; Budziak, Dilma; Cordero, Chiara; Liberto, Erica; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Sandra, Pat; Bicchi, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    The solvent-enhanced headspace sorptive extraction technique aims at modifying PDMS polarity using a solvent to increase its concentration capability. In solvent-enhanced headspace sorptive extraction, a PDMS tubing closed at both ends by small glass stoppers and filled with an organic solvent is suspended in the sample headspace for a fixed time. After sampling, the sampled analytes are recovered from the PDMS tubing by thermal desorption and online transferred to a GC-flame ionization detector or GC-MS system for analysis. Cyclohexane, iso-octane, ethyl acetate, acetone, acetonitrile and methanol were tested as PDMS modifiers to sample the volatile fractions of sage (Salvia lavandulifolia Vahl.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and roasted coffee. Ethyl acetate was found to be the most effective PDMS modifier for all matrices investigated; although to a lesser extent, cyclohexane also increased component recoveries with sage and thyme. Acetone, acetonitrile and methanol did not increase PDMS recovery, while isooctane was excluded because of its interaction with the polymer. The results show that solvent-modified PDMS extends the range of sampled headspace components with different polarities, increases the recovery of many of them, improves sensitivity in trace analysis, speeds up recovery and gives repeatability comparable with that of unmodified PDMS. PMID:20549665

  6. A novel sorptive extraction method based on polydimethylsiloxane frit for determination of lung cancer biomarkers in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Wang, Shuyu

    2012-04-29

    In this study, a porous polypropylene frit was coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as extraction medium, based on the home-made PDMS-frit, a rapid, simple and sensitive sorptive extraction method was established for analysis of potential biomarkers of lung cancer (hexanal and heptanal) in human serum samples. In the method, derivatization and extraction occurred simultaneously on the PDMS-frit, then the loaded frit was ultrasonically desorbed in acetonitrile. Polymerization, derivatization-extraction and desorption conditions were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, satisfactory results were gained, a wide linear application range was obtained in the range of 0.002-5.0 μmol L(-1) (R>0.997) for two aldehydes, the detection limits (SN(-1)=3) were 0.5 nmol L(-1) for hexanal and 0.4 nmol L(-1) for heptanal. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) of the method were below 7.9% and the recoveries were above 72.7% for the spiked serum. All these results hint that the proposed method is potential for disease markers analysis in complex biological samples. PMID:22483210

  7. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: An innovative sample preparation approach applied to the analysis of specific migration from food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, M; Alfaro, P; Nerin, C; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-09-14

    Additives added to food packaging materials can migrate to food in contact with them during storage and shelf life. A novel simple, fast and sensitive analyte extraction method based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE), followed by analysis using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection (UPLC-MS) was applied to the analysis of 18 common non-volatile plastic additives. Three FPSE media coated with different sol-gel sorbents characterized with different polarities including sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane), sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol) and sol-gel poly(tetrahydrofuran) were studied. All three FPSE media showed very satisfactory results. In general, compounds with low logP values seemed to have higher enrichment factors (EFs), especially with poly(tetrahydrofuran) and poly(ethylene glycol) media. For compounds with high logP values, the use of sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane) improved the enrichment capacity. Sample preparation time was optimized at 20 min for sample extraction and 10 min for solvent desorption. Acetonitrile was selected as desorption solvent since recoveries were over 70% for 13 out of 18 selected compounds in all FPSE media. The best extraction recovery values were obtained when compounds were dissolved in aqueous acetic acid solution (3%), where 17 out of 18 compounds showed improvement in their signal intensity after FPSE extraction and 10 obtained enrichment factors above 3 for all the tested FPSE media. When FPSE extracts were concentrated under nitrogen, 11 out of 18 compounds reached EFs values above 100. PMID:27566344

  8. Sensitive determination of estrogens in environmental waters treated with polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction and liquid chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Yuan, Dongxing

    2016-05-15

    A simple, sensitive and environmentally friendly method using polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC/DAD) has been developed for efficient quantification of six selected estrogens in environmental waters. To extract trace estrogens effectively, a poly (1-ally-3-vinylimidazolium chloride-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic cake was prepared and used as the sorbent of stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE). The effects of preparation conditions of sorbent and extraction parameters of SCSE for estrogens were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the developed method showed satisfactory analytical performance for targeted analytes. Low limits of detection (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) were achieved within the range of 0.024-0.057 µg/L and 0.08-0.19 µg/L, respectively. Good linearity of method was obtained for analytes with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) above 0.99. At the same time, satisfactory method repeatability and reproducibility was achieved in terms of intra- and inter-day precisions, respectively. Finally, the established SCSE-HPLC/DAD method was successfully applied for the determination of estrogens in different environmental water samples. Recoveries obtained for the determination of estrogens in spiked samples ranged from 71.2% to 108%, with RSDs below 10% in all cases.

  9. Determination of fluoroquinolones in environmental water and milk samples treated with stir cake sorptive extraction based on a boron-rich monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a new stir cake sorptive extraction using a boron-rich monolith as the adsorbent was prepared by the in situ copolymerization of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene. The effect of preparation parameters, including the ratio of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene, monomer mixture, and porogen solvent, on extraction performance was investigated thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the adsorbent were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Several conditions affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, a convenient and sensitive method for the determination of trace fluoroquinolones residues in water and milk samples was established by coupling stir cake sorptive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection. The limits of detection for the target compounds were 0.10-0.26 and 0.11-0.22 μg/L for water and milk samples, respectively. In addition, the developed method showed good linearity, repeatability, and precision. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of trace fluoroquinolones residues in environmental water and milk samples. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained for the determination of fluoroquinolones in spiking samples that ranged from 68.8 to 120%, with relative standard deviations below 10% in all cases.

  10. Determination of fluoroquinolones in environmental water and milk samples treated with stir cake sorptive extraction based on a boron-rich monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a new stir cake sorptive extraction using a boron-rich monolith as the adsorbent was prepared by the in situ copolymerization of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene. The effect of preparation parameters, including the ratio of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene, monomer mixture, and porogen solvent, on extraction performance was investigated thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the adsorbent were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Several conditions affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, a convenient and sensitive method for the determination of trace fluoroquinolones residues in water and milk samples was established by coupling stir cake sorptive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection. The limits of detection for the target compounds were 0.10-0.26 and 0.11-0.22 μg/L for water and milk samples, respectively. In addition, the developed method showed good linearity, repeatability, and precision. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of trace fluoroquinolones residues in environmental water and milk samples. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained for the determination of fluoroquinolones in spiking samples that ranged from 68.8 to 120%, with relative standard deviations below 10% in all cases. PMID:26990593

  11. Characterization of volatile organic gunshot residues in fired handgun cartridges by headspace sorptive extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Gallidabino M.; Romolo F.S.; Weyermann C.

    2015-01-01

    In forensic investigation of firearm-related cases, determination of the residual amount of volatile compounds remaining inside a cartridge could be useful in estimating the time since its discharge. Published approaches are based on following the decrease of selected target compounds as a function of time by using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME). Naphthalene, as well as an unidentified decomposition product of nitrocellulose (referred to as "TEA2"), are usually employed for this purpose....

  12. A comparison of sorptive extraction techniques coupled to a new quantitative, sensitive, high throughput GC-MS/MS method for methoxypyrazine analysis in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmeland, Anna K; Wylie, Philip L; Ebeler, Susan E

    2016-02-01

    Methoxypyrazines are volatile compounds found in plants, microbes, and insects that have potent vegetal and earthy aromas. With sensory detection thresholds in the low ng L(-1) range, modest concentrations of these compounds can profoundly impact the aroma quality of foods and beverages, and high levels can lead to consumer rejection. The wine industry routinely analyzes the most prevalent methoxypyrazine, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), to aid in harvest decisions, since concentrations decrease during berry ripening. In addition to IBMP, three other methoxypyrazines IPMP (2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine), SBMP (2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine), and EMP (2-ethyl-3-methoxypyrazine) have been identified in grapes and/or wine and can impact aroma quality. Despite their routine analysis in the wine industry (mostly IBMP), accurate methoxypyrazine quantitation is hindered by two major challenges: sensitivity and resolution. With extremely low sensory detection thresholds (~8-15 ng L(-1) in wine for IBMP), highly sensitive analytical methods to quantify methoxypyrazines at trace levels are necessary. Here we were able to achieve resolution of IBMP as well as IPMP, EMP, and SBMP from co-eluting compounds using one-dimensional chromatography coupled to positive chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Three extraction techniques HS-SPME (headspace-solid phase microextraction), SBSE (stirbar sorptive extraction), and HSSE (headspace sorptive extraction) were validated and compared. A 30 min extraction time was used for HS-SPME and SBSE extraction techniques, while 120 min was necessary to achieve sufficient sensitivity for HSSE extractions. All extraction methods have limits of quantitation (LOQ) at or below 1 ng L(-1) for all four methoxypyrazines analyzed, i.e., LOQ's at or below reported sensory detection limits in wine. The method is high throughput, with resolution of all compounds possible with a relatively rapid 27 min GC oven program. PMID:26653458

  13. A comparison of sorptive extraction techniques coupled to a new quantitative, sensitive, high throughput GC-MS/MS method for methoxypyrazine analysis in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmeland, Anna K; Wylie, Philip L; Ebeler, Susan E

    2016-02-01

    Methoxypyrazines are volatile compounds found in plants, microbes, and insects that have potent vegetal and earthy aromas. With sensory detection thresholds in the low ng L(-1) range, modest concentrations of these compounds can profoundly impact the aroma quality of foods and beverages, and high levels can lead to consumer rejection. The wine industry routinely analyzes the most prevalent methoxypyrazine, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), to aid in harvest decisions, since concentrations decrease during berry ripening. In addition to IBMP, three other methoxypyrazines IPMP (2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine), SBMP (2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine), and EMP (2-ethyl-3-methoxypyrazine) have been identified in grapes and/or wine and can impact aroma quality. Despite their routine analysis in the wine industry (mostly IBMP), accurate methoxypyrazine quantitation is hindered by two major challenges: sensitivity and resolution. With extremely low sensory detection thresholds (~8-15 ng L(-1) in wine for IBMP), highly sensitive analytical methods to quantify methoxypyrazines at trace levels are necessary. Here we were able to achieve resolution of IBMP as well as IPMP, EMP, and SBMP from co-eluting compounds using one-dimensional chromatography coupled to positive chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Three extraction techniques HS-SPME (headspace-solid phase microextraction), SBSE (stirbar sorptive extraction), and HSSE (headspace sorptive extraction) were validated and compared. A 30 min extraction time was used for HS-SPME and SBSE extraction techniques, while 120 min was necessary to achieve sufficient sensitivity for HSSE extractions. All extraction methods have limits of quantitation (LOQ) at or below 1 ng L(-1) for all four methoxypyrazines analyzed, i.e., LOQ's at or below reported sensory detection limits in wine. The method is high throughput, with resolution of all compounds possible with a relatively rapid 27 min GC oven program.

  14. Determination of androgens and progestogens in environmental and biological samples using fabric phase sorptive extraction coupled to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes-Alonso, Rayco; Ciofi, Lorenzo; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan; Bubba, Massimo Del; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-11

    Androgens and progestogens are two important groups of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) which are implicated to produce severe detrimental impact over aquatic biota, even at very low concentrations of ngL(-1). For this reason, one of the major challenges to analytical chemists is the development of sensitive and selective extraction processes which allow the rapid and green determination of these emerging pollutants at low concentrations in environmental samples. Fabric phase sorptive extraction is a new, highly sensitive, efficient and solvent minimized technique which combine the advantages of sol-gel derived microextraction sorbents and the rich surface chemistry of cellulose fabric substrate. This process has several advantages such as minimum usage of organic solvents, short extraction times, small sample volumes and high analyte preconcentration factors. In this study, an extraction method based on sorptive fabric phase coupled to ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection (FPSE-UHPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of four progestogens and six androgens in environmental and biological samples. All the parameters involved in the extraction, such as sample volume, extraction and desorption times, desorption solvent volume and sample pH values have been optimized. The developed method provides satisfactory limits of detection (between 1.7 and 264ngL(-1)), good recoveries and low relative standard deviations (below 10% in tap and osmosis water and below 20% in wastewater and urine). Subsequently, the method was used to analyse tap water, wastewater treated with different processing technologies and urine samples. The concentrations of the detected hormones ranged from 28.3 to 227.3 ngL(-1) in water samples and from 1.1 to 3.7μgL(-1) in urine samples.

  15. Sensitive determination of organic acid preservatives in juices and soft drinks treated by monolith-based stir cake sorptive extraction and liquid chromatography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fuhua; Nong, Shuyu; Huang, Xiaojia; Yuan, Dongxing

    2013-02-01

    A simple, efficient, and sensitive method for simultaneous determination of sorbic acid (SA), benzoic acid (BA), and cinnamic acid (CA) in juices and soft drinks was developed by stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE) coupling to high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The SCSE based on polymeric ionic liquid-based monolith (PILM) as extractive medium was used to concentrate these three organic acid preservatives. Because hydrophobic and ion-exchange interactions co-contributed to the extraction, the PILM-SCSE exhibited a high extractive capability towards analytes. To obtain optimum extraction performance, several SCSE parameters were investigated and discussed, including desorption solvent, pH value, ionic strength in the sample matrix, and the extraction and desorption time. Under the optimized extraction conditions, limits of detection of 0.16, 1.08, and 0.18 μg/L (S/N=3) and quantification limits of 0.52, 3.42, and 0.61 (S/N=10) were obtained for SA, BA, and CA, respectively. The method also showed good linearity and reproducibility, as well as advantages such as simplicity, low cost, and high feasibility. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of SA, BA, and CA in real juices and soft drinks, and the recoveries ranged from 63.0 to 107 %.

  16. A molecularly imprinted polymer as the sorptive phase immobilized in a rotating disk extraction device for the determination of diclofenac and mefenamic acid in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo, Valentina; Ulisse, Karla [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, P.O. Box 653, Santiago (Chile); Rodríguez, Inés [Department of Analytical and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepción (Chile); Pereira, Eduardo, E-mail: epereira@udec.cl [Department of Analytical and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepción (Chile); Richter, Pablo, E-mail: prichter@ciq.uchile.cl [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Chile, P.O. Box 653, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-08-19

    The microextraction of diclofenac and mefenamic acid from water samples was performed by using rotating disk sorptive extraction (RDSE) with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as the sorptive phase. The MIP was synthesized from the monomer 1-vinylimidazol (VI) together with the cross-linker divinylbenzene (DVB) using diphenylamine as the template molecule. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses of the MIP revealed clusters of spherical particles having a narrow size distribution, with diameters of approximately 1 μm. The optimized extraction conditions involved a disk rotation velocity of 3000 rpm, an extraction time of 120 min, a sample volume of 50 mL, and a sample pH of 2 as well as 25 mg of MIP immobilized in the disk. Desorption of the extracted analytes was performed with 5 mL of methanol for 10 min. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was carried out after derivatization of the analytes with N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Nonmolecularly imprinted polymer (NIP) was also synthesized for comparison. It was observed that under the same conditions, MIP extracted significantly more NSAIDs containing diphenylamine (or part of this molecule) in their structure than NIP. Higher significant differences between MIP and NIP were observed for diclofenac, mefenamic acid and paracetamol, clearly indicating the effect of the template on the extraction. Recoveries of the method were between 100 and 112%, with relative standard deviations of 5–6%. The limits of detection were between 60 and 223 ng L{sup −1}. Water samples from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) of Santiago de Chile, were found to contain concentrations of these acidic drugs between 1.6 and 4.3 μg L{sup −1} and between 1.4 and 3.3 μg L{sup −1} in the influent and effluent, respectively. - Highlights: • A MIP immobilized in a rotating disk sucessfully extracts NSAIDs from wastewater. • MIP had remarkably superior binding

  17. Preparation of stir cake sorptive extraction based on polymeric ionic liquid for the enrichment of benzimidazole anthelmintics in water, honey and milk samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yulei [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Siming Road, P.O. Box 1009, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Jie [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Huang, Xiaojia, E-mail: hxj@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Siming Road, P.O. Box 1009, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yuan, Dongxing [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Siming Road, P.O. Box 1009, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-08-20

    Highlights: • A new polymeric ionic liquid-based monolith was prepared. • The monolith was used as the extractive medium of stir cake sorptive extraction. • The SCSE–AMIIDB can extract benzimidazole anthelmintics (BAs) effectively. • A combination of SCSE–AMIIDB–LD–HPLC/DAD was developed. • The combination was applied to monitor trace BAs in water, milk and honey samples. - Abstract: In this work, a new stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE) using polymeric ionic liquid monolith as sorbent was prepared. The sorbent was obtained by in situ copolymerization of an ionic liquid, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoro methyl)sulfonyl]imide (AMII) and divinylbenzene (DB) in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide. The influence of the content of ionic liquid and the porogen in the polymerization mixture on extraction performance was studied thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the polymeric ionic liquid were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The usefulness of SCSE–AMIIDB was demonstrated by the enrichment of trace benzimidazole anthelmintics. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, and under the optimized conditions, a simple and effective method for the determination of trace benzimidazoles residues in water, milk and honey samples was established by coupling SCSE–AMIIDB with high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection (SCSE–AMIIDB–HPLC/DAD). Results indicated that the limits of detection (S/N = 3) for target compounds were 0.020–0.072 μg L{sup −1}, 0.035–0.10 μg L{sup −1} and 0.026–0.076 μg L{sup −1} in water, milk and honey samples, respectively. In addition, an acceptable reproducibility was achieved by evaluating the repeatability and intermediate precision with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 9% and 11%, respectively. Finally, the established AMII

  18. An automated flow injection system for metal determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry involving on-line fabric disk sorptive extraction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthemidis, A; Kazantzi, V; Samanidou, V; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-08-15

    A novel flow injection-fabric disk sorptive extraction (FI-FDSE) system was developed for automated determination of trace metals. The platform was based on a minicolumn packed with sol-gel coated fabric media in the form of disks, incorporated into an on-line solid-phase extraction system, coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This configuration provides minor backpressure, resulting in high loading flow rates and shorter analytical cycles. The potentials of this technique were demonstrated for trace lead and cadmium determination in environmental water samples. The applicability of different sol-gel coated FPSE media was investigated. The on-line formed complex of metal with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) was retained onto the fabric surface and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) was used to elute the analytes prior to atomization. For 90s preconcentration time, enrichment factors of 140 and 38 and detection limits (3σ) of 1.8 and 0.4μgL(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium determination, respectively, with a sampling frequency of 30h(-1). The accuracy of the proposed method was estimated by analyzing standard reference materials and spiked water samples. PMID:27260436

  19. Fabric phase sorptive extraction for the fast isolation of sulfonamides residues from raw milk followed by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgou, Eftychia; Manousi, Natalia; Samanidou, Victoria; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-04-01

    Fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE) is a novel sample preparation technique which utilizes advanced material properties of sol-gel derived microextraction sorbents and the hydrophilic property of the cellulose fabric substrate, resulting in a highly sensitive and fast microextraction device, capable of extracting target analyte(s) from any complex aqueous sample matrices. Due to the low organic solvent consumption, FPSE meets all green analytical chemistry (GAC) criteria. This technique was applied, for the first time, for the determination of sulfonamides residues in milk using a highly polar sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol) (sol-gel PEG) coated FPSE media. The developed HPLC method was validated according to the European Union Decision 2002/657/EC. Decision limit (CCα) values were 116.5 μg kg(-1) for sulfamethazine, 114.4 μg kg(-1) for sulfisoxazole and 94.7 μg kg(-1) for sulfadimethoxine, whereas the corresponding results for detection capability (CCβ) were 120.4 μg kg(-1) for sulfamethazine, 118.5 μg kg(-1) for sulfisoxazole and 104.1 μg kg(-1) for sulfadimethoxine. PMID:26593511

  20. Preparation of a polymeric ionic liquid-based adsorbent for stir cake sorptive extraction of preservatives in orange juices and tea drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-04-15

    In this study, a new polymeric ionic liquid-based adsorbent was prepared and used as the extraction medium of stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE) of three organic acid preservatives, namely, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, sorbic acid and cinnamic acid. The adsorbent was synthesized by the copolymerization of 1-ally-3-vinylimidazolium chloride (AV) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in the presence of a porogen solvent containing 1-propanol and 1,4-butanediol. The effect of the content of monomer and the porogen solvent in the polymerization mixture on the extraction performance was investigated thoroughly. The adsorbent was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. To obtain the optimal extraction conditions of SCSE/AVDVB for target analytes, key parameters including desorption solvent, adsorption and desorption time, ionic strength and pH value in sample matrix were studied in detail. The results showed that under the optimized conditions, the SCSE/AVDVB could extract the preservatives effectively through multiply interactions. At the same time, a simple and sensitive method by combining SCSE/AVDVB and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was developed for the simultaneous analysis of the target preservatives in orange juices and tea drinks. Low limits of detection (S/N = 3) and quantification limits (S/N = 10) of the proposed method for the target analytes were achieved within the range of 0.012-0.23 μg/L and 0.039-0.42 μg/L, respectively. The precision of the proposed method was evaluated in terms of intra- and inter-assay variability calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), and it was found that the values were all below 10%. Finally, the proposed method was used to detect preservatives in different orange juice and tea drink samples successfully. The recoveries were in the range of 71.9-116%, and the RSDs were below 10% in the all cases.

  1. Cadmium (II) imprinted 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane coated stir bar for selective extraction of trace cadmium from environmental water samples followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Nan [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu Bin, E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2012-04-20

    Graphical abstract: Ion imprinted 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) coated stir bar for selective extraction of trace Cd(II). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ion imprinted polymers were proposed as the coating for SBSE for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd(II) imprinted MPTS-silica coating was prepared by a double-imprinting concept. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel method of SBSE-ICP-MS was developed for the determination of Cd in waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method is rapid, selective, sensitive and applicable for determining trace Cd(II) in waters. - Abstract: Cd(II) imprinted 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS)-silica coated stir bar was prepared by sol-gel technique combining with a double-imprinting concept for the first time and was employed for stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) of trace Cd(II) from water samples followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. A tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) coating was first in situ created on the glass bar surface. Afterward, a sol solution containing MPTS as the functional precursor, ethanol as the solvent and both Cd(II) and surfactant micelles (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) as the template was again coated on the TMOS bar. The structures of the stir bar coating were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Round-bottom vial was used for the extraction of Cd(II) by SBSE to avoid abrasion of stir bar coatings. The factors affecting the extraction of Cd(II) by SBSE such as pH, stirring rate and time, sample/elution volume and interfering ions have been investigated in detail, and the optimized experimental parameters were obtained. Under the optimized conditions, the adsorption capacities of non-imprinted and imprinted coating stir bars were found to be 0.5 {mu}g and 0.8 {mu}g bar{sup -1}. The detection limit (3{sigma}) based on three times standard deviations of the method blanks by 7 replicates was 4.40 ng L{sup -1} and the relative standard

  2. Application of headspace sorptive extraction and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric and chemometric methods to the quantification of pine nuts and pecorino in Pesto Genovese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunin, Paola; Leardi, Riccardo; Boggia, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Headspace sorptive extraction and GC/MS, coupled with chemometric tools, were used to predict the amounts of pine nuts and Pecorino in Pesto Genovese, a typical Italian basil-based pasta sauce. Two groups of samples were prepared at different times and with ingredients from different batches for building the predicting models and testing their performances. Principal component analysis and partial least-squares regression (PLS) were applied to the chromatographic data. The 24 most-predictive variables were selected, and the application of PLS to the training set samples led to two models that explained approximately 70% of the variance in cross-validation, with prediction errors of 0.1 g for Pecorino and 0.6 g for pine nuts, thus confirming the reliability of the analytical method and the predicting ability of the models. The results obtained for the test set samples were not completely satisfactory, with a prediction error and a bias of 5.0 and -4.1 g, respectively, for Pecorino and corresponding values of 4.1 and 2.0 g for pine nuts. This preliminary study shows that the analytical methods used can allow construction of models with high predictive ability only if the great variability of the headspace composition of the ingredients and the effect of Twister are considered.

  3. Preparation of stir cake sorptive extraction based on polymeric ionic liquid for the enrichment of benzimidazole anthelmintics in water, honey and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulei; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Xiaojia; Yuan, Dongxing

    2014-08-20

    In this work, a new stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE) using polymeric ionic liquid monolith as sorbent was prepared. The sorbent was obtained by in situ copolymerization of an ionic liquid, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoro methyl)sulfonyl]imide (AMII) and divinylbenzene (DB) in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide. The influence of the content of ionic liquid and the porogen in the polymerization mixture on extraction performance was studied thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the polymeric ionic liquid were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The usefulness of SCSE-AMIIDB was demonstrated by the enrichment of trace benzimidazole anthelmintics. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, and under the optimized conditions, a simple and effective method for the determination of trace benzimidazoles residues in water, milk and honey samples was established by coupling SCSE-AMIIDB with high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection (SCSE-AMIIDB-HPLC/DAD). Results indicated that the limits of detection (S/N=3) for target compounds were 0.020-0.072 μg L(-1), 0.035-0.10 μg L(-1) and 0.026-0.076 μg L(-1) in water, milk and honey samples, respectively. In addition, an acceptable reproducibility was achieved by evaluating the repeatability and intermediate precision with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 9% and 11%, respectively. Finally, the established AMII-SCSE-HPLC/DAD method was successfully applied for the determination of benzimidazoles residues in milk, honey and environmental water samples. Recoveries obtained for the determination of benzimidazole anthelmintics in spiking samples ranged from 70.2% to 117.6%, with RSD below 12% in all cases.

  4. Preparation of stir cake sorptive extraction based on poly(4-vinylbenzoic acid-divinylbenzene) monolith and its application in sensitive determination of β-agonists in milk and swine urine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaojia, E-mail: hxj@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Linli; Yuan, Dongxing

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • A new poly(4-vinylbenzoic acid-divinylbenzene) monolith was first prepared. • The porous monolith was used as sorbent of stir cake sorptive extraction. • The new sorbent could extract β-agonists effectively by multiple interactions. • Method of determination of trace β-agonists in milk and urine samples was developed. -- Abstract: In this study, a new stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE) based on poly(4-vinylbenzoic acid-divinylbenzene) (VBADB) monolith was prepared. The effect of preparation conditions of monolith on extraction efficiencies was investigated in detail. Several characteristic techniques, such as elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the monolithic material. The combination of SCSE-VBADB with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) detection was developed for sensitive determination of ultra-trace β-agonists in milk and swine urine samples. In order to obtain the optimal extraction conditions of SCSE-VBADB for β-agonists, several extractive parameters, including pH values and ionic strength in sample matrix, extraction and desorption time were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the limits of detection (S/N = 3) for the target analytes were 0.007–0.030 μg/L in milk and 0.002–0.011 μg/L in swine urine, respectively. Excellent method reproducibility was achieved in terms of intraday and interday precisions, indicated by the RSDs of both <10.0%, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used to detect β-agonists in different milk and swine urines samples. Acceptable recoveries ranged from 50.3% to 113% and 50.1% to 92.2% for milk and swine urine samples, respectively; and the RSDs for reproducibility were less than 8.0% for target analytes in all real samples.

  5. Powdered activated carbons as effective phases for bar adsorptive micro-extraction (BAμE) to monitor levels of triazinic herbicides in environmental water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neng, N R; Mestre, A S; Carvalho, A P; Nogueira, J M F

    2011-02-15

    Bar adsorptive micro-extraction using three powdered activated carbons (ACs) as adsorbent phases followed by liquid desorption and high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (BAμE(ACs)-LD/HPLC-DAD), was developed to monitor triazinic herbicides (atrazine, simazine and terbutylazine) in environmental water matrices. ACs used present apparent surface areas around 1000 m(2) g(-1) with an important mesoporous volume and distinct surface chemistry characteristics (pH(PZC) ranging from 6.5 to 10.4). The textural and surface chemistry properties of the ACs adsorbent phases were correlated with the analytical data for a better understanding of the overall enrichment process. Assays performed on 10 mL water samples spiked at the 10.0 μg L(-1) levels under optimized experimental conditions yielded recoveries around 100% for the three herbicides under study. The analytical performance showed good precision (RSD0.9914). By using the standard addition method, the application of the present method on real water matrices, such as surface water and wastewater, allowed very good performances at the trace level. The proposed methodology proved to be a suitable sorptive extraction alternative for the analysis of priority pollutants with polar characteristics, showing to be easy to implement, reliable, sensitive and requiring a low sample volume to monitor triazinic compounds in water matrices. PMID:21238763

  6. Development of a powdered activated carbon in bar adsorptive micro-extraction for the analysis of morphine and codeine in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A F P; Neng, N R; Mestre, A S; Carvalho, A P; Nogueira, J M F

    2012-08-01

    In the present work, bar adsorptive microextraction using an activated carbon (AC) adsorbent phase followed by liquid desorption and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was developed to monitor morphine (MOR) and codeine (COD) in human urine. Under optimized experimental conditions, assays performed in aqueous media spiked at the 30.0 µg/L level yielded recoveries of 41.3 ± 1.3% for MOR and 38.4 ± 1.7% for COD, respectively. The textural and surface chemistry properties of the AC phase were also correlated with the analytical data for a better understanding of the overall enrichment process. The analytical performance showed good precision (relative standard deviation 0.991) from 10.0 to 330.0 µg/L. By using the standard addition methodology, the applications of this analytical approach to water and urine matrices allowed remarkable performance to monitor MOR and COD at the trace level. This new confirmatory method proved to be a suitable alternative to other sorptive micro-extraction methodologies in monitoring trace levels of opiate-related compounds, because it was easy to implement, reliable, sensitive and required a low sample volume. PMID:22562817

  7. Comparison of different extraction methods for the determination of α- and β-thujone in sage (Salvia officinalis L.) herbal tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arceusz, Agnieszka; Occhipinti, Andrea; Capuzzo, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E

    2013-09-01

    Salvia officinalis L. (sage) is an important industrial plant used both for food and pharmaceutical purposes. The terpene fraction of this plant is responsible for many of its therapeutic and culinary properties. We used different extraction methods Tenax TA® purge and trap, headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction, HS sorptive extraction, and stir bar sorptive extraction to analyze the terpene fraction extracted from sage tea by GC-MS. Twenty compounds were identified, including α-, β-thujone, and several other oxygenated monoterpenes (1,8-cineole, linalool, camphor, boneol, and bornyl acetate) and oxygenated sesquiterpenes (caryophyllene oxide, viridiflorol, humulene epoxide I, II, and III). Tenax TA® and HS sorptive extraction extracted a lower number of identified compounds, whereas HS solid-phase microextraction allowed the complete extraction of volatiles with particular reference to α- and β-thujone. The importance of the determination of thujones content in sage herbal tea is also discussed.

  8. Headspace sorptive solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with a spectrophotometry system: A simple glass devise for extraction and simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saidi, H M; Al-Harbi, Sami A; Aljuhani, E H; El-Shahawi, M S

    2016-10-01

    A simple, low cost and efficient headspace sorptive solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method for determination of cyanide has been developed. The system comprises of a glass tube with two valves and a moveable glass slide fixed at its centre. It includes an acceptor phase polyurethane foam treated mercury (II) dithizonate [Hg(HDz)2-PUF] complex fixed inside by a septum cap in a cylindrical configuration (5.0cm length and 1.0cm diameter). The extraction is based upon the contact of the acceptor phase to the headspace and subsequently measuring the absorbance of the recovered mercury (II) dithizonate from PUFs sorbent. Unlike other HSSE, extraction and back - extractions was carried out in a closed system, thereby improving the analytical performance by preventing the analyte loss. Under the optimized conditions, a linear calibration plot in the range of 1.0-50.0µmolL(-1) was achieved with limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 0.34, 1.2µmolL(-1) CN(-), respectively. Simultaneous analysis of cyanide and thiocyanate in saliva was also performed with satisfactory recoveries. PMID:27474290

  9. Comparison of Aroma-active Compounds in Raspberry Bushy Dwarf Virus-Resistant Transgenic 'Meeker' Red Raspberries Using Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) causes significant reduction in yield and quality in raspberry and raspberry-blackberry hybrid. Genetic modifications were made to 'Meeker' red raspberries to impart RBDV resistance. The RBDV-resistant transgenic and wild type 'Meeker' plants were grown in Oregon ...

  10. Extraction of the KK-bar isovector scattering length from pp -> d K^+ K-bar^0 data near threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Büscher, M; Kleber, V; Krewald, S; Lemmer, R H; Sassen, F P

    2006-01-01

    The results of a recent experiment measuring the reaction pp -> dK^+ K-bar^0 near threshold are interpreted in terms of a spectator model that encapsulates the main features of the observed K^+K-bar^0 invariant mass distribution. A chi^2 fit to this data determines the imaginary part of the isovector scattering length in the KK-bar channel as Im(a_1)=-(0.61\\pm 0.05) fm. We then use the Flatt\\'e representation of the scattering amplitude to infer a value Re(a_1)=-(0.02\\pm 0.03) fm for the real part under the assumption that scaling is approximately satisfied.

  11. Analysis of free and bound aroma compounds in grape berries using headspace solid-phase microextraction with GC-MS and a preliminary study of solid-phase extraction with LC-MS

    OpenAIRE

    Prosen, H.; Janes, L.; Strlic, M.; D. Rusjan; Kocar, D.

    2007-01-01

    An extraction procedure for the aroma compounds from musts and wines has been developed, using solid-phase microextraction (DVB/CAR/PDMS fibre) from the headspace of heated samples (50 degrees C). Analysis was performed with gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. The method was applicable to the analysis of different aroma compounds ( aliphatic, aromatic aldehydes, terpenes) in a broad concentration range (1-5000 mu g L-1). A stir-bar sorptive extraction procedure was also tested, but was no...

  12. Stir-bar supported micro-solid-phase extraction for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad; Basheer, Chanbasha

    2016-07-15

    In present work, a new configuration of micro-solid phase extraction was introduced and termed as stir-bar supported micro-solid-phase extraction (SB-μ-SPE). A tiny stir-bar was packed inside the porous polypropylene membrane along with sorbent material and the edges of membrane sheet were heat sealed to secure the contents. The packing of stir-bar inside the μ-SPE device does not allow the device to stick with the wall or any corner of the sample vial during extraction, which is, however, a frequent observation in routine μ-SPE. Moreover, it enhances effective surface area of the sorbent exposed to sample solution through continuous agitation (motion and rotation). It also completely immerses the SB-μ-SPE device in the sample solution even for non-polar sorbents. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were selected as model compounds and the method performance was evaluated in human serum samples. After extraction, samples were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The factors that affect extraction efficiency of SB-μ-SPE were optimized. Under optimum conditions, a good linearity (0.1-100ngmL(-1)) with coefficients of determinations ranging from 0.9868 to 0.9992 was obtained. Limits of detections were ranged between 0.003 and 0.047ngmL(-1). Acceptable values for inter-day (3.2-9.1%) and intra-day (3.1-7.2%) relative standard deviations were obtained. The optimized method was successfully applied to determine the concentration of PCB congeners in human serum samples. PMID:27291862

  13. Sorptive interactions between VOCs and indoor materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, D; Corsi, R L; Rynes, M

    2001-12-01

    This study was carried out using various materials (carpet, gypsum board, upholstery, vinyl and wood flooring, acoustic tiles, and fruit) that were exposed to eight gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (isopropanol, MTBE, cyclohexane, toluene, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene) in electro-polished stainless-steel chambers. Dynamic responses in VOC concentrations were used to determine linear adsorption and desorption rate coefficients and equilibrium partition coefficients. A linear adsorption/desorption model was used to effectively describe the interactions between VOCs and indoor surface materials for short-term source events (10 h). Relationships between sorption parameters and chemical vapor pressure and the octanol-air partition coefficient were observed. Carpet was identified as the most significant sorptive sink for non-polar VOCs. Virgin gypsum board was observed to be a significant sink for highly polar VOCs. Sorptive interactions between non-polar VOCs and indoor materials were not affected by variations in relative humidity. However, increases in relative humidity were observed to increase the degree of sorption of isopropanol to carpet. PMID:11761600

  14. Inclusive Semileptonic B Decays at BaBar and Extraction of HQE parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Flächer, H U

    2004-01-01

    A measurement of the first four moments of the hadronic mass distribution in B->Xc lv decays is presented for minimum lepton momenta varying between 0.9 and 1.6 GeV, using data recorded with the BaBar detector. Furthermore, a measurement of the inclusive electron energy spectrum for semileptonic B decays together with a measurement of its first, second and third moments for minimum electron energies between 0.6 and 1.5 GeV is reported. We determine the inclusive B->Xc lv branching fraction, B_clv, the CKM matrix element |V_cb|, and other heavy-quark parameters from a simultaneous fit to the measured moments.

  15. Solvent bar micro-extraction with graphite atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of silver in ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, José A; Herce-Sesa, Belén; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Main drawbacks for silver determination in seawater are the effects of samples matrix and that Ag appears in the sub ng L(-1). Available methods for sample preparation in Ag analysis are based on solid and liquid extraction using tedious process that increase the cost of analysis and the risk of sample contamination, producing important waste amounts. Solvent bar micro-extraction (SBME) allows the pre-concentration of Ag in a micro-volume of the ionic liquid Aliquat 336® in kerosene solution. For this reason, it is considered as a green alternative to standard methods. The method has been optimized using synthetic seawater samples, offering the highest response for samples at pH=2, using 5% Aliquat 336® dissolved in kerosene containing 5% dodecan-1-ol as acceptor solution and after 1h stirring at 800rpm. The method exhibited linearity up to 50ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.09ngL(-1), covering the concentration range of interest for environmental studies. Finally, it was applied for determination of Ag in real seawater samples, and the results were compared with the reference method of liquid-liquid extraction with 1-pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate and diethylammonium-diethyldithiocarbamate, showing the applicability of ionic liquid based SBME using Aliquat 336(®) for the simple monitoring of silver ultra-traces in seawater analysis.

  16. Solvent bar micro-extraction with graphite atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of silver in ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, José A; Herce-Sesa, Belén; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Main drawbacks for silver determination in seawater are the effects of samples matrix and that Ag appears in the sub ng L(-1). Available methods for sample preparation in Ag analysis are based on solid and liquid extraction using tedious process that increase the cost of analysis and the risk of sample contamination, producing important waste amounts. Solvent bar micro-extraction (SBME) allows the pre-concentration of Ag in a micro-volume of the ionic liquid Aliquat 336® in kerosene solution. For this reason, it is considered as a green alternative to standard methods. The method has been optimized using synthetic seawater samples, offering the highest response for samples at pH=2, using 5% Aliquat 336® dissolved in kerosene containing 5% dodecan-1-ol as acceptor solution and after 1h stirring at 800rpm. The method exhibited linearity up to 50ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.09ngL(-1), covering the concentration range of interest for environmental studies. Finally, it was applied for determination of Ag in real seawater samples, and the results were compared with the reference method of liquid-liquid extraction with 1-pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate and diethylammonium-diethyldithiocarbamate, showing the applicability of ionic liquid based SBME using Aliquat 336(®) for the simple monitoring of silver ultra-traces in seawater analysis. PMID:27474287

  17. On Modified Bar recursion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliva, Paulo Borges

    2002-01-01

    Modified bar recursion is a variant of Spector's bar recursion which can be used to give a realizability interpretation of the classical axiom of dependent choice. This realizability allows for the extraction of witnesses from proofs of forall-exists-formulas in classical analysis. In this talk I...... shall report on results regarding the relationship between modified and Spector's bar recursion. I shall also show that a seemingly weak form of modified bar recursion is as strong as "full" modified bar recursion in higher types....

  18. A hard thermal loop benchmark for the extraction of the nonperturbative $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential

    CERN Document Server

    Burnier, Yannis

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of the finite temperature heavy quark potential from lattice QCD relies on a spectral analysis of the Wilson loop. General arguments tell us that the lowest lying spectral peak encodes, through its position and shape, the real and imaginary part of this complex potential. Here we benchmark this extraction strategy using leading order hard-thermal loop (HTL) calculations. I.e. we analytically calculate the Wilson loop and determine the corresponding spectrum. By fitting its lowest lying peak we obtain the real- and imaginary part and confirm that the knowledge of the lowest peak alone is sufficient for obtaining the potential. Access to the full spectrum allows an investigation of spectral features that do not contribute to the potential but can pose a challenge to numerical attempts of an analytic continuation from imaginary time data. Differences in these contributions between the Wilson loop and gauge fixed Wilson line correlators are discussed. To better understand the difficulties in a nume...

  19. Sorptive capacities of lipids determined by passive dosing of non-polar organic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Bolinius, Damien;

    VMS), chlorobenzenes and polychlorinated biphenyls via a common headspace over an olive oil donor phase to transfer the same chemical activity into the samples; iii) sampling of EOM and olive oil controls at different time points; iv) purge-and-trap extraction of the model chemicals onto ENV+ SPE cartridges, elution...... and GC/MS analysis; v) characterization of the lipid composition in all samples via NMR. Our experiments demonstrate that the sorptive capacities of the EOM samples do not differ significantly from the olive oil controls if the EOM consists of neutral lipids only. However, the EOM samples show small...

  20. Preparation of polydimethylsiloxane/beta-cyclodextrin/divinylbenzene coated "dumbbell-shaped" stir bar and its application to the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles compounds in lake water and soil by high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunhe; Yao, Zhimin; Hu, Bin

    2009-05-01

    A "dumbbell-shaped" stir bar was proposed to prevent the friction loss of coating during the stirring process, and thus prolonged the lifetime of stir bars. The effects of the coating components, including polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and divinylbenzene (DVB) were investigated according to an orthogonal experimental design, using three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and four polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) as model analytes. Four kinds of stir bars coated with PDMS, PDMS/beta-CD, PDMS/DVB and PDMS/beta-CD/DVB were prepared and their extraction efficiencies for the target compounds were compared. It was demonstrated that PDMS/beta-CD/DVB-coated stir bar showed the best affinity to the studied compounds. The preparation reproducibility of PDMS/beta-CD/DVB-coated stir bar ranged from 3.2% to 15.2% (n = 6) in one batch, and 5.2% to 13.4% (n = 6) among batches. The "dumbbell-shaped" stir bar could be used for about 40 times, which were 10 extractions more than a normal stir bar. The prepared PDMS/beta-CD/DVB-coated "dumbbell-shaped" stir bar was used for stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) of PAHs and PASHs and the desorbed solution was introduced into HPLC-UV for subsequent analysis. The limits of detection of the proposed method for seven target analytes ranged from 0.007 to 0.103 microg L(-1), the relative standard deviations were in the range of 6.3-12.9% (n = 6, c = 40 microg L(-1)), and the enrichment factors were 19-86. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of seven target analytes in lake water and soil samples.

  1. A review of the extraction and chromatographic determination methods for the analysis of parabens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Chunying; Chen, Ligang; Wang, Yu

    2014-10-15

    Parabens are a family of most widely used antimicrobial preservatives in food ingredients, cosmetic consumer products and pharmaceutical preparations. But several recent studies have cautioned that exposure to parabens may have more harmful consequences on animal and human health than what we realized previously, which made the analysis of parabens necessary. In this paper, we reviewed main sample preparation methods and chromatographic analysis methods proposed in formerly published works dealing with the analysis of parabens in different matrices. The sample preparation methods included ultrasonic assisted extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, pressurized liquid extraction, solid phase extraction, solid phase microextraction, liquid phase microextraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, stir bar sorptive extraction and matrix solid phase dispersion. The chromatographic analysis methods involved liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis.

  2. HEURISTIC OPTIMIZATION AND ALGORITHM TUNING APPLIED TO SORPTIVE BARRIER DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    While heuristic optimization is applied in environmental applications, ad-hoc algorithm configuration is typical. We use a multi-layer sorptive barrier design problem as a benchmark for an algorithm-tuning procedure, as applied to three heuristics (genetic algorithms, simulated ...

  3. Solar sorptive cooling. Technologies, user requirements, practical experience, future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treffinger, P. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Hardthausen (Germany); Hertlein, H.P. [eds.] [Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Sorptive cooling techniques permit the use of low-temperature solar heat, i.e. a renewable energy of low cost and world-wide availability. The Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie intends to develop solar sorptive cooling technologies to the prototype stage and, in cooperation with the solar industry and its end users, to promote practical application in air conditioning of buildings and cold storage of food. The workshop presents an outline of the state of development of solar sorptive cooling from the view of users and developers. Exemplary solar cooling systems are described, and the potential of open and closed sorptive processes is assessed. Future central activities will be defined in an intensive discussion between planners, producers, users and developers. [German] Der Einsatz von Sorptionstechniken zur Kaelteerzeugung erlaubt es, als treibende Solarenergie Niedertemperatur-Solarwaerme einzusetzen, also eine regenerative Energie mit sehr geringen Kosten und weltweiter Verfuegbarkeit. Der Forschungsverbund Sonnenenergie hat sich als Aufgabe gestellt, die Techniken der solaren Sorptionskuehlung bis zum Prototyp zu entwickeln und mit Industrie und Nutzern die praktische Anwendung voranzubringen. Die Anwendungsfelder sind die Klimatisierung von Gebaeuden und die Kaltlagerung von Lebensmitteln. Der Workshop gibt einen Ueberblick zum Entwicklungsstand der solaren Sorptionskuehlung aus der Sicht der Anwender und Entwickler. Bereits ausgefuehrte Beispiele zur solaren Kuehlung werden vorgestellt und das Potential geschlossener und offener Sorptionsverfahren angegeben. In intensiver Diskussion zwischen Planern, Herstellern, Nutzern und Entwicklern sollen kuenftige Arbeitsschwerpunkte herausgearbeitet werden. (orig.)

  4. Easy Extraction Method To Evaluate δ13C Vanillin by Liquid Chromatography-Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry in Chocolate Bars and Chocolate Snack Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bononi, Monica; Quaglia, Giancarlo; Tateo, Fernando

    2015-05-20

    An easy extraction method that permits the use of a liquid chromatography-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) system to evaluate δ(13)C of vanillin in chocolate products and industrial flavorings is presented. The method applies the determination of stable isotopes of carbon to discriminate between natural vanillin from vanilla beans and vanillin from other sources (mixtures from beans, synthesis, or biotechnology). A series of 13 chocolate bars and chocolate snack foods available on the Italian market and 8 vanilla flavorings derived from industrial quality control processes were analyzed. Only 30% of products considered in this work that declared "vanilla" on the label showed data that permitted the declaration "vanilla" according to European Union (EU) Regulation 1334/2008. All samples not citing "vanilla" or "natural flavoring" on the label gave the correct declaration. The extraction method is presented with data useful for statistical evaluation. PMID:25965784

  5. Easy Extraction Method To Evaluate δ13C Vanillin by Liquid Chromatography-Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry in Chocolate Bars and Chocolate Snack Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bononi, Monica; Quaglia, Giancarlo; Tateo, Fernando

    2015-05-20

    An easy extraction method that permits the use of a liquid chromatography-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) system to evaluate δ(13)C of vanillin in chocolate products and industrial flavorings is presented. The method applies the determination of stable isotopes of carbon to discriminate between natural vanillin from vanilla beans and vanillin from other sources (mixtures from beans, synthesis, or biotechnology). A series of 13 chocolate bars and chocolate snack foods available on the Italian market and 8 vanilla flavorings derived from industrial quality control processes were analyzed. Only 30% of products considered in this work that declared "vanilla" on the label showed data that permitted the declaration "vanilla" according to European Union (EU) Regulation 1334/2008. All samples not citing "vanilla" or "natural flavoring" on the label gave the correct declaration. The extraction method is presented with data useful for statistical evaluation.

  6. Inelastic Rescattering in B Decays to $\\pi \\pi$, $\\pi K$, and $K\\bar{K}$, and Extraction of $\\gamma $

    OpenAIRE

    Zenczykowski, P.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss all contributions from inelastic SU(3)-symmetric rescattering in B decays into a final pair of pseudoscalar mesons $PP = \\pi \\pi$, $K\\bar{K}$, $\\pi K$. FSI-induced modifications of amplitudes obtained from the quark-line approach are described in terms of a few parameters which take care of all possible SU(3)-symmetric forms relevant for final-state interactions. Although in general it appears impossible to uniquely determine FSI effects from the combined set of all $\\pi \\pi$, $K \\...

  7. BEIJING BARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Cappuccino Bar Cappuccino Bar, at the intersection of Dongzhimenwai Dajie and Sanlitun Beijie, Beijing's most vibrant nightlife area, is a hot new destination for European food lovers. With its perfect combination of both energy and tranquility, and surrounded by diplomatic compounds, it is conveniently located near other Beijing destinations including Lady Street

  8. Mechano-sorptive creep of Portuguese pinewood chemically modified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroso Lopes Duarte

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chemical modification on mechano-sorptive creep in bending was studied by experimental work. Stakes with 20 × 20 × 400 mm RTL of Portuguese wood species (Pinus pinaster Aiton modified with 1,3-dimethylol-4,5- dihydroxyethyleneurea (DMDHEU, m-methylated melamine resin (MMF, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS and amid wax (WA were measured under asymmetric moistening conditions over a period of 42 days (app. 1000 hours with stress level (SL of 12 MPa, according to ENV 1156.

  9. Water compatible stir-bar devices imprinted with underivatised glyphosate for selective sample clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Bengoetxea, Olatz; Quintela, Amaia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-06-17

    This paper reports the development of stir bars with a new MIP based coating, for the selective sorptive extraction of the herbicide glyphosate (GLYP). Molecular imprinting of the polymer has directly been carried out employing underivatised GLYP as the template molecule. Due to the poor solubility of the target compound in organic solvents, the MIP methodology has been optimised for rebinding in aqueous media, being the synthesis and the rebinding steps carried out in water:methanol mixtures and pure aqueous media. The coating has been developed by radical polymerisation initiated by UV energy, using N-allylthiourea and 2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate as functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. Mechanical stability of the coating has been improved using 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the polymerisation mixture. Under the optimised conditions, the MIP has demonstrated excellent selectivity for the target compound in the presence of structural analogues, including its major metabolites. The applicability of the proposed method to real matrices has also been assessed using river water and soil samples. Registered mean recoveries ranged from 90.6 to 97.3% and RSD values were below 5% in all cases, what confirmed the suitability of the described methodology for the selective extraction and quantification of GLYP. PMID:27207580

  10. Water compatible stir-bar devices imprinted with underivatised glyphosate for selective sample clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Bengoetxea, Olatz; Quintela, Amaia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-06-17

    This paper reports the development of stir bars with a new MIP based coating, for the selective sorptive extraction of the herbicide glyphosate (GLYP). Molecular imprinting of the polymer has directly been carried out employing underivatised GLYP as the template molecule. Due to the poor solubility of the target compound in organic solvents, the MIP methodology has been optimised for rebinding in aqueous media, being the synthesis and the rebinding steps carried out in water:methanol mixtures and pure aqueous media. The coating has been developed by radical polymerisation initiated by UV energy, using N-allylthiourea and 2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate as functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. Mechanical stability of the coating has been improved using 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the polymerisation mixture. Under the optimised conditions, the MIP has demonstrated excellent selectivity for the target compound in the presence of structural analogues, including its major metabolites. The applicability of the proposed method to real matrices has also been assessed using river water and soil samples. Registered mean recoveries ranged from 90.6 to 97.3% and RSD values were below 5% in all cases, what confirmed the suitability of the described methodology for the selective extraction and quantification of GLYP.

  11. In-port derivatization coupled to different extraction techniques for the determination of alkylphenols in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, J; Monperrus, M; Amouroux, D; Preud'Homme, H; Prieto, A; Zuloaga, O

    2014-05-01

    Large volume injection (LVI)-in port silylation coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the determination of alkylphenols (APs) in water samples applying four different extraction approaches was evaluated. Among the variables studied for in-port derivatization, vent time, cryo-focusing temperature and the ratio solvent volume/N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) volume were optimized using an experimental design approach. Regarding the extraction techniques, different approaches previously optimized in the research group were tested. On the one hand different polymeric materials were tested: silicon rod (SR), polyethersulfone (PES) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the latter in the stir-bar sorptive extraction format (SBSE-PDMS). PES was chosen among the polymeric materials due to the higher recoveries (compared with SR) and lower price (compared to PDMS in the stir-bar sorptive extraction, SBSE-PDMS). Both MASE and PES protocols were selected at this point for further method validation and application to real samples. Finally, the developed methods were validated and applied to the determination of target analytes in various aqueous environmental matrices, including estuarine water and wastewater. Acceptable repeatability in the case of MASE (5-17%) and PES (7-21%) procedures and method detection limits (MDLs, 5-123 and 28-328 ng L(-1) for PES and MASE, respectively) were obtained for most analytes. In terms of apparent recoveries in the presence of matrix, estuarine and effluent samples showed no significant matrix effect (apparent recoveries in the 73-121% for PES and 74-128% for MASE), while a stronger matrix effect was observed for influent wastewater samples (98-132% for PES and 65-156% for MASE). Both MASE and PES extractions combined with LVI-in-port derivatization-GC-MS were applied to the determination of APs in the estuary of Bilbao (Gulf of Biscay, Spain).

  12. Transport simulation of sorptive contaminants considering sediment-associated processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ruijie; LU Shasha; ZHENG Jun

    2012-01-01

    Sediment-associated processes,such as sediment erosion,deposition,and pore water diffusion/advection affect sorptive contaminant transport.By considering these processes,we developed an equation to simulate contaminant transport.Erosion and deposition processes are considered as erosion and deposition fluxes of sediment,and adsorption-desorption processes of contaminants by sediment are simulated using the Langmuir Equation.Pore water diffusion is calculated based on the contaminant concentration gradient across the sediment-water interface.Pore water advection is estimated using pore water contained in the sediments of erosion flux.The equation is validated to simulate total phosphorus concentrations in Guanhe estuary in the northern Jiangsu,China.The simulated total phosphorus concentrations show better agreement with field observations compared to estimations that do consider sediment-associated processes.

  13. On the Relation between Spector's Bar Recursion and Modified Bar Recursion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliva, Paulo Borges

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a variant of Spector's Bar Recursion in finite types to give a realizability interpretation of the classical axiom of dependent choice allowing for the extraction of witnesses from proofs of Sigma_1 formulas in classical analysis. We also give a bar recursive definition of the fan...... functional and study the relationship of our variant of Bar Recursion with others....

  14. 聚(甲基丙烯酸-乙二醇二甲基丙烯酸酯)搅拌棒吸附萃取与液相色谱-质谱联用检测牛奶中的磺胺类药物%Stir rod sorptive extraction with poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) as coating and its application to the analysis of sulfonamides in milk samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马乔; 余琼卫; 罗彦波; 冯钰铸

    2011-01-01

    A poly ( methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate ) polymer ( poly ( MAA-co-EDMA ) ) was prepared via in-situ polymerization on the outside surface of vial glass insert and used as stir rod sorptive extraction ( SRSE ) coating. The extraction performance of the polymer coating toward four sulfonamides ( SAs ) was investigated. The effects of several parameters to SRSE, such as the pH value, inorganic salt and organic phase concentrations of the sample matrix, were investigated. It demonstrated that the sulfonamides were captured on the poly( MAA-co-EDMA ) coating mainly through cation-exchange and hydrophobic interactions. A novel approach is presented for the determination of four sulfonamide antibacterial residues in milk samples by coupling SRSE to liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry ( SRSE/LC-ESI-MS ). In this method, the detection limits ( S/N = 3 ) of 0.11 - 0.52 μg/L and quantification limits ( S/N = 10 ) of 0.35 - 1.72 μg/L were obtained. The method showed good linearity in the range of 1 - 500 μg/L. Good method reproducibility was also found by intra- and inter-day precisions , yielding the relative standard deviations ( RSDs ) less than 11.3%. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is simple, sensitive, low cost and suitable for the determination of sulfonamides in milk samples.%将聚(甲基丙烯酸-乙二醇二甲基丙烯酸酯)(poly(MAA-co-EDMA))聚合物原位聚合于玻璃内插管外表面上,得到一种多孔聚合物涂层;将其作为搅拌棒吸附萃取的萃取介质,考察了其对磺胺类药物的萃取性能;最后将其与高效液相色谱-电喷雾质谱(HPLC-ESI-MS)联用,建立了一种牛奶中4种磺胺类药物的检测方法.在最佳条件下,牛奶中4种磺胺类药物的检出限(S/N=3)和定量限(S/N=10)分别为0.11~0.52 μg/L和0.35~1.72μg/L.在1~500μg/L的范围内峰面积与质量浓度具有良好的线性关系,日内、日间测定

  15. 标刻在金属零件上的二维条码数据提取方法%2-D Bar Code Data Extraction on Metal Parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 何卫平; 雷蕾; 林清松; 李夏霜

    2012-01-01

    针对金属零件上二维条码光照分布不均、点扩散、对比度低与污染干扰等问题,提出一种基于原灰度图像小区域相邻模块对比提取二维条码数据的算法.首先通过峰度值排序法及模块区域微调法由粗到精定位每个二维条码模块位置,然后基于原灰度图像利用遗传算法提取二维条码的数据信息,得到最终的提取结果.与传统二维条码数据提取算法的实验结果证明,该算法对于复杂金属背景上的二维条码识读具有更高的可靠性.%This paper describes a 2D bar code extraction approach that is capable of processing pictures of 2D bar codes on metal parts with uneven distribution of light intensity, point spread, low contrast and pollution interference. The algorithm uses kurtosis value-sorting and module area fine tuning to locate each module's position which is detected from coarse-level to fine-level, then the final extraction data of 2D bar code is obtained by a genetic algorithm based on the original gray-scale image. Compared with traditional methods, the proposed algorithm has higher reliability for 2D bar code extraction on complex metal parts.

  16. Modeling the effect of initial soil moisture on sorptivity and infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ryan; Abou Najm, Majdi; Rupp, David; Selker, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil capillarity, often associated with the parameter sorptivity, is a primary control on infiltration during short-duration rainfall and irrigation events. However, most mathematical models used to quantify capillarity are only valid for dry antecedent conditions. In this study, we examine how the capillary component of sorptivity (i.e., wetting front potential) varies with initial soil water content, and use this finding to provide a simple modification to the classic Green-Ampt sorptivity model. The modified model has many practical applications, including 1) describing the relative sorptivity of a soil at various water contents; 2) quantifying saturated hydraulic conductivity from sorptivity measurements; and 3) interpreting transient time behavior of single ring infiltration (i.e., beerkan) measurements. The model is especially useful in low permeability soils, where steady-state conditions may not be attained for hours or even days, and in shrink-swell soils, where rapid infiltration measurements are often desired so as not to induce substantial material swelling.

  17. Bar dimensions and bar shapes in estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuven, Jasper; Kleinhans, Maarten; Weisscher, Steven; van der Vegt, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Estuaries cause fascinating patterns of dynamic channels and shoals. Intertidal sandbars are valuable habitats, whilst channels provide access to harbors. We still lack a full explanation and classification scheme for the shapes and dimensions of bar patterns in natural estuaries, in contrast with bars in rivers. Analytical physics-based models suggest that bar length in estuaries increases with flow velocity, tidal excursion length or estuary width, depending on which model. However, these hypotheses were never validated for lack of data and experiments. We present a large dataset and determine the controls on bar shape and dimensions in estuaries, spanning bar lengths from centimeters (experiments) to 10s of kilometers length. First, we visually identified and classified 190 bars, measured their dimensions (width, length, height) and local braiding index. Data on estuarine geometry and tidal characteristics were obtained from governmental databases and literature on case studies. We found that many complex bars can be seen as simple elongated bars partly cut by mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels. Data analysis shows that bar dimensions scale with estuary dimensions, in particular estuary width. Breaking up the complex bars in simple bars greatly reduced scatter. Analytical bar theory overpredicts bar dimensions by an order of magnitude in case of small estuarine systems. Likewise, braiding index depends on local width-to-depth ratio, as was previously found for river systems. Our results suggest that estuary dimensions determine the order of magnitude of bar dimensions, while tidal characteristics modify this. We will continue to model bars numerically and experimentally. Our dataset on tidal bars enables future studies on the sedimentary architecture of geologically complex tidal deposits and enables studying effects of man-induced perturbations such as dredging and dumping on bar and channel patterns and habitats.

  18. Comparative study of cerium (IV) sorptive properties in zeolite Y and clinoptilolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the problems of protecting the environment from radioactive contamination, the reduction of radioactive releases by improving monitoring, decontamination, and burial methods is one of the most important. Natural sorbents are gaining increased significance for solving this problem. Among these, zeolites deserve special attention since they have sufficient sorptive capacity, are highly radiation resistant, are widely distributed exhibit selectivity and are inexpensive. In the present work we determine experimentally the sorptive characteristics of clinoptilolite as a function of various factors and demonstrate that clinoptilolite is capable of sorbing Ce(IV) over a wide pH range. (Author)

  19. Barred Owl [ds8

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These data define the current range of Barred and hybrid Barred/Spotted Owls in California. The current range includes the coastal mountains of northern California...

  20. ${{\\bar{d}} - {\\bar{u}}}$ Flavor Asymmetry in the Proton in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamu, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing, 100049, China; Ji, Cheung-Ryong [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Melnitchouk, Wally [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Wang, P. [Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, CAS, Beijing, 100049, China

    2015-09-01

    The ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton arising from pion loops is computed using chiral effective field theory. The calculation includes both nucleon and Δ intermediate states, and uses both the fully relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. The x dependence of ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ extracted from the Fermilab E866 Drell–Yan data can be well reproduced in terms of a single transverse momentum cutoff parameter regulating the ultraviolet behavior of the loop integrals. In addition to the distribution at x > 0, corrections to the integrated asymmetry from zero momentum contributions are computed, which arise from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at x = 0. These have not been accounted for in previous analyses, and can make important contributions to the lowest moment of ${\\bar d-\\bar u}$ .

  1. A High Throughput Method for Measuring Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Seafood Using QuEChERS Extraction and SBSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Pfannkoch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Method NMFS-NWFSC-59 2004 is currently used to quantitatively analyze seafood for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH contamination, especially following events such as the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion that released millions of barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. This method has limited throughput capacity; hence, alternative methods are necessary to meet analytical demands after such events. Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE is an effective technique to extract trace PAHs in water and the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS extraction strategy effectively extracts PAHs from complex food matrices. This study uses SBSE to concentrate PAHs and eliminate matrix interference from QuEChERS extracts of seafood, specifically oysters, fish, and shrimp. This method provides acceptable recovery (65–138% linear calibrations and is sensitive (LOD = 0.02 ppb, LOQ = 0.06 ppb while providing higher throughput and maintaining equivalency between NOAA 2004 as determined by analysis of NIST SRM 1974b mussel tissue.

  2. Chocolate Bars Based on Human Nutritional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    International audience Key Points * The nutritional value of chocolate bars should be based on the nutritional value of the low energy dense late Paleolithic human diet to help reduce mental ill health, obesity, and other postprandial insults. * Current chocolate bars have a high energy density (>2 kcal/g). * Cocoa can be sweetened by the addition of calorie-free Purefruit™ (Tate & Lyle) monk fruit ( Siraitia grosvenorii ) extract. PUREFRUIT™ is approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar a...

  3. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment).

  4. An Analytical Method for Relationship Between Hydraulic Diffusivity and Soil Sorptivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Quan-Jiu; ZHANG Jiang-Hui; FAN Jun

    2006-01-01

    A simple method was developed to relate soil sorptivity to hydraulic diffusivity and water absorption experiments were conducted utilizing one-dimensional horizontal soil columns to validate the relationship. In addition, an estimation method for hydraulic diffusivity with disc infiltrometer was developed. The results indicated a favorable fit of the theoretical relation to the experimental data. Also, the experiment with disc infiltrometer for estimating the diffusivity showed that the new method was feasible.

  5. Observation of B0bar --> D0 K0bar and B0bar --> D0 K*0bar decays

    CERN Document Server

    Krokovnyi, P P

    2003-01-01

    We report on a search for B0bar --> D0 K(*)0bar decays based on 85 10^6 BBar events collected with the Belle detector at KEKB. The B0bar --> D0 K0bar and B0bar --> D0 K*0bar decays have been observed for the first time with the branching fractions Br(B0bar --> D0 K0bar) = (5.0^{+1.3}_{-1.2}+- 0.6) 10^{-5} and Br(B0bar --> D0 K*0bar) = (4.8^{+1.1}_{-1.0}+- 0.5) 10^{-5}. No significant signal has been found for the B0bar --> D*0 K(*)0bar and B0bar --> D(*)0bar K*0bar decay modes, and upper limits at 90% CL are presented.

  6. Sorptive stabilization of organic matter by amorphous Al hydroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.W. Schneider; T. Scheel; R. Mikutta; P. van Hees; K. Kaiser; K. Kalbitz

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous Al hydroxides (am-Al(OH)(3)) strongly sorb and by this means likely protect dissolved organic matter (OM) against microbial decay in soils. We carried out batch sorption experiments (pH 4.5; 40 mg organic C L-1) with OM extracted from organic horizons under a Norway spruce and a European b

  7. The four bars problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauroy, Alexandre; Taslakian, Perouz; Langerman, Stefan; Jungers, Raphaël

    2016-09-01

    A four-bar linkage is a mechanism consisting of four rigid bars which are joined by their endpoints in a polygonal chain and which can rotate freely at the joints (or vertices). We assume that the linkage lies in the 2-dimensional plane so that one of the bars is held horizontally fixed. In this paper we consider the problem of reconfiguring a four-bar linkage using an operation called a pop. Given a four-bar linkage, a pop reflects a vertex across the line defined by its two adjacent vertices along the polygonal chain. Our main result shows that for certain conditions on the lengths of the bars, the neighborhood of any configuration that can be reached by smooth motion can also be reached by pops. The proof relies on the fact that pops are described by a map on the circle with an irrational number of rotation.

  8. MMSE-GC-O结合OAV法鉴定蒸制崇明地区中华绒螯蟹中关键气味物质%Characterization of key odor compounds in steamed Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) farmed in Chongming region by monolithic material sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-olfatometry and odor activity value methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾赛麒; 吴娜; 张晶晶; 吉思茹; 陶宁萍; 王锡昌

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the volatile compounds in different edible parts of steamed male E. si-nensis farmed in Chongming region, select the key odor compounds (KOCs) from all the volatiles, and finally offer some theoretical basis to explain its outstanding flavor. Methods Seven adsorption rods made of Mono-Trap RCC18 were applied to extract the volatile compounds of 5 g crab sample under 100℃for 50 min under a headspace extraction mode. Those volatiles of crab samples were then separated and identified by GC-MS and quantified by an internal standard method. In order to select the KOCs from all the volatiles, a combination of GC-O and OAV methods were also employed. Results A total of 71 volatiles were finally identified in male E. sinensis farmed in Chongming region, among which 50, 48, 52 and 60 volatiles were identified in the abdomen, claw, leg meat and the gonad part, respectively. 19 KOCs were successfully selected from all 71 volatiles. Among them, 6 main key odor compounds (MKOCs), with an odor intensity value (OIV) over three and an odor activity value (OAV) over ten, were eventually obtained. Trimethylamine (fishy) was the only MKOC in all four parts. Besides, benzaldehyde (almond-like) and (Z)-4-heptenal (fishy) were the MKOC in the abdomen meat and leg meat, respectively. 3 MKOCs were found in the gonad part, including hexanal (grassy), 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom) and nonanal (grassy). Conclusion Six MKOCs were verified to have relative high odor activities by both OAV and GC-O methods. Those MKOCs might represent the key odor characteristics of different edible parts of male E. sinensis farmed in Chongming region. However, the task of revealing forma-tion mechanism for these MKOCs remains to be carried out in the future.%目的:分析蒸制雄性崇明地区中华绒螯蟹不同可食部位的挥发性成分,筛选关键气味物质,为解析其优良风味提供理论依据。方法采用7个MonoTrap RCC18吸附子在100℃下对5 g样品顶空萃取50

  9. Modelling infiltration and geostatistical analysis of spatial variability of sorptivity and transmissivity in a flood spreading area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi-Fashi, F.; Sharifi, F.; Kamali, K.

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of infiltration characteristics is useful in hydrological studies of agricultural soils. Soil hydraulic parameters such as steady infiltration rate, sorptivity, and transmissivity can exhibit appreciable spatial variability. The main objectives of this study were to examine several mathematical models of infiltration and to analyze the spatial variability of observed final infiltration rate, estimated sorptivity and estimated transmissivity in flood spreading and control areas in Ilam province, Iran. The suitability of geostatistics to describe such spatial variability was assessed using data from 30 infiltration measurements sampled along three lines. The Horton model provided the most accurate simulation of infiltration considering all measurements and the Philips two-term model provided less accurate simulation. A comparison of the measured values and the estimated final infiltration rates showed that the Kostiakov- Lewis, Kostiakov, and SCS models could not estimate the final infiltration rate as well as Horton model. Estimated sorptivity and transmissivity parameters of the Philips two-term model and final infiltration rate had spatial structure, and were considered to be structural variables over the transect pattern. The Gaussian model provided the best-fit theoretical variogram for these three parameters. Variogram values ranged from 99 and 88 m for sorptivity and final infiltration rate to 686 (spherical) and 384 m (Gaussian) for transmissivity. Sorptivity, transmissivity and final infiltration attributes showed a high degree of spatial dependence, being 0.99, 0.81 and 1, respectively. Results showed that kriging could be used to predict the studied parameters in the study area. (Author)

  10. X(5568) as a {su}\\bar{d}\\bar{b} tetraquark in a simple quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, Fl

    2016-10-01

    The S-wave eigenstates of tetraquarks of type {su}\\bar{d}\\bar{b} with J P = 0+, 1+ and 2+ are studied within a simple quark model with chromomagnetic interaction and effective quark masses extracted from meson and baryon spectra. It is tempting to see if this spectrum can accommodate the new narrow structure X(5568), observed by the DØ Collaboration, but not confirmed by the LHCb Collaboration. If it exists, such a tetraquark is a system with four different flavors and its study can improve our understanding of multiquark systems. The presently calculated mass of X(5568) agrees quite well with the experimental value of the DØ Collaboration. Predictions are also made for the spectrum of the charmed partner {su}\\bar{d}\\bar{c}. However we are aware of the difficulty of extracting effective quark masses, from mesons and baryons, to be used in multiquark systems.

  11. EXTRACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra;

    2016-01-01

    therefore developed an interactive annotation tool, EXTRACT, which helps curators identify and extract standard-compliant terms for annotation of metagenomic records and other samples. Behind its web-based user interface, the system combines published methods for named entity recognition of environment...... and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed.Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/....

  12. Bar-tailed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijns, S.; Hidayati, N.A.; Piersma, T.

    2013-01-01

    Capsule Across the European wintering range Bar-tailed Godwits Limosa lapponica lapponica selected polychaete worms and especially Ragworms Hediste diversicolor, with differences between areas due to variations in prey availability.Aims To determine the diet of Bar-tailed Godwits across their winter

  13. Probe $\\Lambda - \\bar{\\Lambda}$ oscillation in $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\Lambda\\,\\bar\\Lambda$ decay at BES-III

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, X. W.; H.B. Li; Lu, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the possible searching for the oscillation by coherent $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ production in $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\Lambda \\bar{\\Lambda}$ decay process. The sensitivity of measurement of $\\Lambda - \\bar{\\Lambda}$ oscillation in the external field at BES-III experiment is considered. These considerations indicate an alternative way to probe the $\\Delta B =2$ amplitude in addition to neutron oscillation experiments. Both coherent and time-dependent information can be used to extract $\\L...

  14. Penguin Pollution in $B\\to J/\\psi V$ Decays and Impact on the Extraction of the $B_s-\\bar B_s$ mixing phase

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xin; Xie, Yuehong

    2013-01-01

    We formulate the most-general time-dependent decay distributions of $B_s\\to J/\\psi (\\to l^+l^-) \\phi(\\to K^+K^-)$ in which the direct CP violation is explicitly incorporated. We then investigate the $B \\to J/\\psi V$ decays in the perturbative QCD approach where $V$ is a light vector meson. Apart from the leading-order factorizable contributions, we also take into account various QCD corrections and the hard-spectator diagrams. With the inclusion of these sizable corrections, our theoretical results for CP-averaged branching ratios, polarization fractions, CP-violating asymmetries, and relative phases are in good consistency with the available data. Based on the global agreement, we further explore the penguin contributions and point out that the $\\phi_s$ extracted from $B_s\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ can be shifted away by ${\\cal O}(10^{-3})$.

  15. Study of sorptive ability of nitrogen-containing wood derivatives with respect to ions of diverse metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorptive ability of wood oxidating ammonolysis products towards Fe3+, Cu2+, Cd2+ and Ca2+ ions was studied under equilibrium conditions. It was ascertained that exchange capacity of modified wood depends on the content of carboxylic groups and nitrogen compounds in it; for Cd2+ ions its value makes up 5.22 and 5.41 g-eq./g at cadmium concentration in the initial solution 0.01 and 0.1 g-eq./l respectively. It is shown that the high sorptive ability of nitrogen-containing wood derivatives towards multi-charged cations stems from their chelating properties

  16. Automated bar detection in local disc galaxies from the SDSS - The colors of bars

    CERN Document Server

    Consolandi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic isophotal fitting procedure that succeeds, without the support of any visual inspection of neither the images nor the ellipticity/P.A. radial profiles, at extracting a fairly pure sample of barred LTGs among thousands of optical images from the SDSS. The procedure relies on the methods described in Consolandi et al. (2016) to robustly extract the photometrical properties of a large sample of local SDSS galaxies and is tailored to extract bars on the basis of their well-known peculiarities in their P.A. and ellipticity profiles. It has been run on a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Local supercluster. The procedure extracted for each galaxy a color, an ellipticity and a position angle radial profile of the ellipses fitted to the isophotes. Examining automatically the profiles of 922 face-on late-type galaxies (B/A >0.7) the procedure found that ~ 36 % are barred. The local bar fraction strongly increases with stellar mass. The sample of barred galaxies is used to constr...

  17. Sports Season, Sports Bars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ For foreigners in Beijing, the sports bar is a special place, a place to gather for watching matches and a place to feel the familiarity of home, while for some sports enthusiasts it serves as their second home.

  18. The bar instability revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Chiodi, Filippo; Andreotti, Bruno; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relati...

  19. The influence of scale on calculated sorptivity values from imbibition experiments on welded and nonwelded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flint, A.L.; Richards, K.A. [U.S. Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (US); Flint, L.E. [Fenix and Scisson Inc., Mercury, NV (US)

    1991-12-31

    Imbibition experiments were conducted on welded and nonwelded volcanic tuffs to determine the influence of sample size on the calculation of Philip`s sorptivity parameter at four different scales. Rock cores, 3.2 and 6.1 cm in diameter by an average of 5 cm long, were used in two laboratory scale experiments. A horizontal borehole, 10 cm in diameter by 10 m long, was used for the two field scale experiments. Imbibition into the entire borehole was the largest scale experiment and neutron log data collected before and after the imbibition experiment yielded the intermediate scale data. The two sizes of core exhibited virtually the same sorptivity and either could be used to predict the results of the borehole scale experiment as long as the number of samples was large enough to represent the spatial heterogeneity. Core samples could be used to predict the neutron log data only if the unique system geometry was known and accounted for a priori. The neutron log data could be used to predict the results at the borehole scale but could not be used to predict the results of the core samples due to the spatial heterogeneity and the larger sampling volume. 6 figs.; 2 tabs.; 13 refs.

  20. Study about the capillary absorption and the sorptivity of concretes with Cuban limestone aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howland, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to demonstrate the possibility to obtain concretes in Cuba with values of effective porosity below of 10%, using limestone aggregates with high levels of absorption (higher than 1% in many cases, and values of Sorptivity below of 5 x 10-5 m/s1/2 as is established in the document prepared by the DURAR Latin Working Group, for structures exposed to very aggressive environments. The experimental results showed that the use of the trial method of capillary absorption of Göran Fagerlund, were obtained concretes with effective porosity below of the 10%, for water/cement ratios of 0.4 and 0.45, but the values of sorptivities were very high. Nevertheless the subsequent use of the trial method of the ASTM C1585, that use cylinders probes with bigger depth and different processing, permits to obtain the desired sorptivity values for water/cement ratios of 0.4 and 0.45 whenever would be fulfilled the Good Practices of the Construction.El objetivo del estudio fue demostrar la posibilidad de lograr en Cuba, con el empleo de áridos calizos de elevada absorción (mayores del 1% en muchos casos, hormigones con valores de porosidad efectiva inferiores al 10% y de velocidad de absorción capilar (Sorptividad inferiores a 5 x 10-5 m/s1/2, tal como establece el documento elaborado por la RED DURAR del CYTED para estructuras expuestas a ambientes muy agresivos. Los resultados experimentales mostraron que con la aplicación del método de ensayo de absorción capilar de Göran Fagerlund se obtuvieron porosidades efectivas inferiores al 10% para relaciones agua/cemento de 0,4 y 0,45, pero los valores de sorptividad fueron muy elevados. No obstante la aplicación posterior del método de ensayo de la ASTM C1585 que utiliza probetas de mayor espesor y diferente tratamiento, permitió obtener los valores indicados de sorptividad para relaciones agua/cemento de 0,4; 0,45 siempre que se cumplan las Buenas Prácticas constructivas.

  1. BaBar Data Aquisition

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, I; Grosso, P; Hamilton, R T; Huffer, M E; O'Grady, C; Russell, J J

    1998-01-01

    The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is designed to perform a search for CP violation by analysing the decays of a very large sample of B and Bbar mesons produced at the high luminosity PEP-11 accelerator. The data acquisition system must cope with a sustained high event rate, while supporting real time feature extraction and data compression with minimal dead time. The BaBar data acquisition system is based around a common VME interface to the electronics read-out of the separate detector subsystems. Data from the front end electronics is read into commercial VME processors via a custom "personality card" and PCI interface. The commercial CPUs run the Tornado operating system to provide a platform for detector subsystem code to perform the necessary data processing. The data are read out via a non-blocking network switch to a farm of commercial UNIX processors. Careful design of the core data acquisition code has enabled us to sustain events rates in excess of 20 kHz while maintaini...

  2. Miniscale Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with Full Evaporation Dynamic Headspace Extraction for the Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with 4000-to-14 000-fold Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Christina Shu Min; Li, Xiao; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-09-20

    A new sample preparation approach of combining a miniscale version of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), termed miniscale-LLE (msLLE), with automated full evaporation dynamic headspace extraction (FEDHS) was developed. Its applicability was demonstrated in the extraction of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene) from aqueous samples. In the first step, msLLE was conducted with 1.75 mL of n-hexane, and all of the extract was vaporized through a Tenax TA sorbent tube via a nitrogen gas flow, in the FEDHS step. Due to the stronger π-π interaction between the Tenax TA polymer and PAHs, only the latter, and not n-hexane, was adsorbed by the sorbent. This selectivity by the Tenax TA polymer allowed an effective concentration of PAHs while eliminating n-hexane by the FEDHS process. After that, thermal desorption was applied to the PAHs to channel them into a gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) system for analysis. Experimental parameters affecting msLLE (solvent volume and mixing duration) and FEDHS (temperature and duration) were optimized. The obtained results achieved low limits of detection (1.85-3.63 ng/L) with good linearity (r(2) > 0.9989) and high enrichment factors ranging from 4200 to 14 100. The optimized settings were applied to the analysis of canal water sampled from an industrial area and tap water, and this methodology was compared to stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). This innovative combined extraction-concentration approach proved to be fast, effective, and efficient in determining low concentrations of PAHs in aqueous samples.

  3. Mass transfer and sorptive properties of geological samples from the Drigg site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an experimental programme to determine the mass transfer and sorptive properties of selected glacial sand and clays from the Drigg Disposal Site operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc. The hydraulic conductivity of both the sand and clay has been determined and the sensitivity of this parameter to changing water chemistry investigated. The hydrodynamic dispersion properties of the glacial sand were measured in order to aid the interpretation of column sorption experiments. The sorption of strontium and uranium from groundwater onto clay and sand samples has been studied using through-diffusion, column and batch techniques. Employing the batch technique, the effect of a series of humic acid concentrations on distribution ratios for uranium and plutonium has also been investigated. Groundwater and trench leachate were used with both clay and sand. (Author)

  4. Mass transfer and sorptive properties of geological samples from the Drigg site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an experimental programme to determine the mass transfer and sorptive properties of selected glacial sand and clays from the Drigg Disposal Site operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc. The hydraulic conductivity of both the sand and clay has been determined and the sensitivity of this parameter to changing water chemistry investigated. The hydrodynamic dispersion properties of the glacial sand were measured in order to aid the interpretation of column sorption experiments. The sorption of strontium and uranium from groundwater onto clay and sand samples has been studied using through-diffusion, column and batch techniques. Employing the batch technique, the effect of a series of humic acid concentrations on distribution ratios for uranium and plutonium has also been investigated. Groundwater and trench leachate were used with both clay and sand. (author)

  5. Experimental approach about fracture process in timber elements under mechano-sorptive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauvat N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the fracture problem in timber structures subject to mechanical and climatic loadings. Mechanical tests illustrate local and global fracture properties at different moisture content levels on DCB specimens of douglas fire. It is shown the dependence of moisture content in terms of compliance and energy release rate. To highlight the hygro-mechanical coupling, tests employ an electromechanical press associated with an environmental chamber in which humidity and air temperature are regulated. Two families of tests are performed, the first in dry state conditions and the second in a wet state conditions. The main objective of this paper is to fix first experimental results in order to integrate, in future works, mechano-sorptive effects on the crack growth process by taking into account moisture content variations in the crack tip vicinity associated with sorption kinetics.

  6. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Writer, Jeffrey H.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Barber, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (Kom, L kg-1) for 17β-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17α-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17β-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  7. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Writer, J.H.; Ryan, J.N.; Barber, L.B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (K om, L kg-1) for 17??-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17??-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg -1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17??-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  8. Raising the Bar (3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, P.; Abreu, M.; Amaral, P.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Corrado, L.; Fingleton, B.; Fuerst, F.; Garretsen, H.; Igliori, D.; Le Gallo, J.; McCann, P.; Monastiriotis, V.; Pryce, G.; Yu, J.

    2016-01-01

    This editorial summarizes and comments on the papers published in issue 11(3) so as to raise the bar in applied spatial economic research and highlight new trends. The first paper proposes spatial and a-spatial indicators to describe the networks of airline companies around the world. The second pap

  9. The IPG BAR project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentink, B.; Henriquez, L.; Van Niekerk, L.; Verheul, R.

    2013-01-01

    The booklets 'Making Patterns' and 'Using Patterns' describe two aspects of the the pattern method within the urban design process. The accompanying IPG BAR Pattern Library is a small pattern library of urban-airport symbiosis patterns. These documents are the result of the Interdisciplinary Projec

  10. Highest Oxygen Bar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The world’s highest altitude Lhalu Wetland in Tibet is rebounding from past environmental damage In Lhasa, where the oxygen content is just 60 percent of that of the plain area, a place known as the "natural oxygen bar"is highly prized by residents.

  11. Raising the bar (2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, P.; Abreu, M.; Amaral, P.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Corrado, L.; Fingleton, B.; Fuerst, F.; Garretsen, H.; Igliori, D.; Le Gallo, J.; McCann, P.; Monastiriotis, V.; Pryce, G.; Yu, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this editorial we summarise and comment on the papers published in issue 11.2 so as to raise the bar in applied spatial economic research and highlight new trends. The first paper analyses which regions in Europe were resilient to the great Recession and which ones were not. The second and the th

  12. Dark Matter Trapping by Stellar Bars: The Shadow Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Michael S.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the complex interactions between the stellar disc and the dark-matter halo during bar formation and evolution using N-body simulations with fine temporal resolution and optimally chosen spatial resolution. We find that the forming stellar bar traps dark matter in the vicinity of the stellar bar into bar-supporting orbits. We call this feature the shadow bar. The shadow bar modifies both the location and magnitude of the angular momentum transfer between the disc and dark matter halo and adds 10 per cent to the mass of the stellar bar over 4 Gyr. The shadow bar is potentially observable by its density and velocity signature in spheroid stars and by direct dark matter detection experiments. Numerical tests demonstrate that the shadow bar can diminish the rate of angular momentum transport from the bar to the dark matter halo by more than a factor of three over the rate predicted by dynamical friction with an untrapped dark halo, and thus provides a possible physical explanation for the observed prevalence of fast bars in nature.

  13. Dark Matter Trapping by Stellar Bars: The Shadow Bar

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Michael S; Katz, Neal

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the complex interactions between the stellar disc and the dark-matter halo during bar formation and evolution using N-body simulations with fine temporal resolution and optimally chosen spatial resolution. We find that the forming stellar bar traps dark matter in the vicinity of the stellar bar into bar-supporting orbits. We call this feature the shadow bar. The shadow bar modifies both the location and magnitude of the angular momentum transfer between the disc and dark matter halo and adds 10 per cent to the mass of the stellar bar over 4 Gyr. The shadow bar is potentially observable by its density and velocity signature in spheroid stars and by direct dark matter detection experiments. Numerical tests demonstrate that the shadow bar can diminish the rate of angular momentum transport from the bar to the dark matter halo by more than a factor of three over the naive dynamical friction prediction, and thus provides a possible physical explanation for the observed prevalence of fast bars in nat...

  14. Cooling of rectangular bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solution of the time-transient Heat Transfer Differential Equation in rectangular coordinates is presented, leading to a model which describes the temperature drop with time in rectangular bars. It is similar to an other model for cilindrical bars which has been previously developed in the Laboratory of Mechanical Metallurgy of UFRGS. Following these models, a generalization has been made, which permits cooling time evaluation for all profiles. These results are compared with experimental laboratory data in the 1200 to 8000C range. Some other existing models were also studied which have the purpose of studing the same phenomenon. Their mathematical forms and their evaluated values are analyzed and compared with experimental ones. (Author)

  15. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  16. Breaking through the Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Katti

    2011-01-01

    Howard University School of Law had a problem, and school officials knew it. Over a 20-year period, 40 percent of its graduates who took the Maryland bar exam failed it on their first try. During the next 24 months--the time frame required to determine its "eventual pass rate"--almost 90 percent of the students did pass. What they did not know was…

  17. The BaBar Data Acquisition System

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, I; Grosso, P; Huffer, M E; O'Grady, C; Russell, J J

    1999-01-01

    The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is designed to perform a search for CP violation by ana-lyzing the decays of a very large sample of B and B(Bar) mesons produced at the high luminosity PEP-II accelerator. The data acquisition system must cope with a sustained high event rate, while supporting real time feature extraction and data compression with minimal dead time. The BaBar data acquisition system is based around a common VME interface to the electronics read-out of the separate detec-tor subsystems. Data from the front end electronics is read into commercial VME processors via a custom "Personality Card" and PCI interface. The commercial CPUs run the Tornado operating system to provide a platform for detector subsystem code to perform the necessary data processing. The data is read out via a non-blocking network switch to a farm of commercial UNIX processors. The current implementation of the BaBar data acquisition sys-tem has been shown to sustain a Level 1 trigger rate of 1.3...

  18. Observations of offshore bar decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian;

    2010-01-01

    Long-term, net offshore bar migration is a common occurrence on many multiple-barred beaches. The first stage of the process involves the generation of a longshore bar close to the shoreline that oscillates about a mean position for some time, followed by a stage of net offshore migration across...... the upper shoreface, and finally a stage of decaying bar form through loss of sediment volume at the outer boundary of the upper shoreface. The phenomenon has been previously documented in the Netherlands, the USA, the Canadian Great Lakes, and in New Zealand, but our present understanding...... of the morphodynamic processes and sediment transport pathways involved in bar decay is limited. In this paper, long-term, net offshore bar migration is investigated at Vejers Beach, located on the North Sea coast of Denmark where offshore bar migration rates are of the order of 45–55 m a-1. A wave height...

  19. Ukola Club. Bar americano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azpiazu, J. R.

    1961-03-01

    Full Text Available En la calle de Serrano, aprovechando un semisótano dedicado a otro negocio anteriormente, se ha instalado un bar americano, de cuyo interior ofrecemos algunos pormenores. Se han cuidado, especialmente, las condiciones acústicas, resueltas por medio de un techo de escayola perforada, con vitrofib en su parte superior, y paredes de madera, que contribuyen a darle un ambiente cálido y acogedor. El soporte de hierro laminado existente en el centro del local, cuya supresión hubiera sido costosa, se ha revestido con lajas de mármol que le convierten en un elemento decorativo.

  20. Sorptivity of rocks and soils of the van Genuchten-Mualem type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    One hydrological process that will have great relevance to the performance of the proposed underground radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is that of the absorption of water from a water-filled fracture into the adjacent unsaturated rock formation. The rate at which water is imbibed by a rock depends on the hydrological properties of the rock and on the initial saturation (or initial capillary suction) of the formation. The hydrological properties that affect imbibition are the relative permeability function and the capillary pressure function. These functions are often collectively referred to as the `characteristic functions` of the porous medium. For one-dimensional absorption, it can be shown that, regardless of the details of the characteristic functions, the total amount of water imbibed by the formation, per unit surface area, will be proportional to the square root of the elapsed time. Hence the ability of a rock or soil to imbibe water can be quantified by a parameter known as the sorptivity S, which is defined such that the cumulative volumetric liquid influx per unit area is given by Q = S{radical}t. The paper discusses the simplification of these characteristic functions of porous medium.

  1. Extracting CP violation and strong phase in D decays by using quantum correlations in psi(3770)-> D0\\bar{D}0 -> (V_1V_2)(V_3V_4) and psi(3770)->D0\\bar{D}0 -> (V_1V_2)(K pi)

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, J; Kang, X -W; Li, H -B; Lu, G -R

    2009-01-01

    The charm quark offers interesting opportunities to cross-check the mechanism of CP violation precisely tested in the strange and beauty sectors. In this paper, we exploit the angular and quantum correlations in the D\\bar{D} pairs produced through the decay of the psi(3770) resonance in a charm factory to investigate CP-violation in two different ways. We build CP-violating observables in psi(3770) -> D\\bar{D} -> (V_1V_2)(V_3 V_4) to isolate specific New Physics effects in the charm sector. We also consider the case of psi(3770) -> D\\bar{D} -> (V_1V_2)(K\\pi) decays, which provide a new way to measure the strong phase difference delta between Cabibbo-favored and doubly-Cabibbo suppressed D decays required in the determination of the CKM angle gamma. Neglecting the systematics, we give a first rough estimate of the sensitivities of these measurements at BES-III with an integrated luminosity of 20 fb^-1 at psi(3770) peak and at a future Super tau-charm factory with a luminosity of 10^35 cm^-2.s^-1.

  2. The decays \\bar{B}->\\bar{K}D and \\bar{B}-> \\bar{K}\\bar{D} and final state interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fayyazuddin, A

    2001-01-01

    The decays \\bar{B}-> \\bar{K}D and \\bar{B}-> \\bar{K}\\bar{D} taking into account final state interactions are discussed. These decays are described by four strong phases \\delta_0,\\delta_1,\\bar{\\delta}_0,\\bar{\\delta}_1 (subscripts 0 and 1 refers to I=0 and I=1 final states), one weak phase \\gamma and four real amplitudes. It is argued that strong interaction dynamics implies \\bar{\\delta}_1=0,\\delta_0=-\\delta_1. Rescattering has significant effects on weak amplitudes. Taking into account, rescattering, we find that direct CP--violating asymmetry in these decays may lie in the range \\mp 0.023\\sin \\gamma \\leq \\QTR{cal}{A}_{1,2}\\leq \\mp 0.086\\sin \\gamma.

  3. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  4. Dynamical Evolution of Barred Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Athanassoula, E

    2005-01-01

    Angular momentum redistribution within barred galaxies drives their dynamical evolution. Angular momentum is emitted mainly by near-resonant material in the bar region and absorbed by resonant material mainly in the outer disc and in the halo. This exchange determines the strength of the bar, the decrease of its pattern speed, as well as its morphology. If the galaxy has also a gaseous component and/or a companion or satellite, then these also take part in the angular momentum exchange. Durin...

  5. Vanillin-molecularly targeted extraction of stir bar based on magnetic field induced self-assembly of multifunctional Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles for detection of vanilla-flavor enhancers in infant milk powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhua; Yang, Zaiyue; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Wanying; Hong, Junli; Huang, Changgao; Zhou, Xuemin

    2015-03-15

    A molecularly imprinted stir bar was constructed based on Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles with magnetic field-induced self-assembly process. The monomer, methacrylic acid, was pre-assembled into the pre-polymers with vanillin as template by the formation of hydrogen bonds. After that, the magnetic complexes were generated by the hydrogen bonding, the hydrophobic and π-π interaction between the pre-polymers and Fe3O4@Polyaniline. The complexes were adsorbed on the surface of magnetic stir bar under the magnetic induction, and the coating of vanillin-molecularly imprinted polymers was generated by the one-step copolymerization basing on the cross linking of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The molecular imprinting stir bar showed superior selectivity and fast binding kinetics for vanillin, and was used for the enrichment of vanilla-flavor enhancers (vanillin, ethyl maltol and methyl vanillin) in infant milk powders. The results measured by HPLC-UV exhibited good linear ranges of 0.01-100, 0.02-100 and 0.03-100μgmL(-1) with the limit of detection of 2.5-10.0ngmL(-1), and the recoveries were 94.7-98.9%, 82.1-96.7% and 84.5-93.2% with RSD<7.2% for the three enhancers, respectively. PMID:25514645

  6. Vanillin-molecularly targeted extraction of stir bar based on magnetic field induced self-assembly of multifunctional Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles for detection of vanilla-flavor enhancers in infant milk powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhua; Yang, Zaiyue; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Wanying; Hong, Junli; Huang, Changgao; Zhou, Xuemin

    2015-03-15

    A molecularly imprinted stir bar was constructed based on Fe3O4@Polyaniline nanoparticles with magnetic field-induced self-assembly process. The monomer, methacrylic acid, was pre-assembled into the pre-polymers with vanillin as template by the formation of hydrogen bonds. After that, the magnetic complexes were generated by the hydrogen bonding, the hydrophobic and π-π interaction between the pre-polymers and Fe3O4@Polyaniline. The complexes were adsorbed on the surface of magnetic stir bar under the magnetic induction, and the coating of vanillin-molecularly imprinted polymers was generated by the one-step copolymerization basing on the cross linking of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The molecular imprinting stir bar showed superior selectivity and fast binding kinetics for vanillin, and was used for the enrichment of vanilla-flavor enhancers (vanillin, ethyl maltol and methyl vanillin) in infant milk powders. The results measured by HPLC-UV exhibited good linear ranges of 0.01-100, 0.02-100 and 0.03-100μgmL(-1) with the limit of detection of 2.5-10.0ngmL(-1), and the recoveries were 94.7-98.9%, 82.1-96.7% and 84.5-93.2% with RSD<7.2% for the three enhancers, respectively.

  7. Dynamical Evolution of Barred Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Athanassoula, E

    2005-01-01

    Angular momentum redistribution within barred galaxies drives their dynamical evolution. Angular momentum is emitted mainly by near-resonant material in the bar region and absorbed by resonant material mainly in the outer disc and in the halo. This exchange determines the strength of the bar, the decrease of its pattern speed, as well as its morphology. If the galaxy has also a gaseous component and/or a companion or satellite, then these also take part in the angular momentum exchange. During the evolution a bar structure forms in the inner parts of the halo as well. This bar is shorter and fatter than the disc bar and stays so all through the simulation, although its length grows considerably with time. Viewed edge-on, the bar in the disc component acquires a boxy or peanut shape. I describe the families of periodic orbits that explain such structures and review the observations showing that boxy/peanut `bulges' are in fact just bars seen edge-on.

  8. The Influence of Glass Leachate on the Hydraulic, Physical, Mineralogical and Sorptive Properties of Hanford Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Parker, Kent E.; Owen, Antionette T.; McCready, David E.; Young, James S.

    2003-08-26

    The Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) generated from the Hanford Site will be disposed of in a vitrified form. It is expected that leachate from the vitrified waste will have a high pH and high ionic strength. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of glass leachate on the hydraulic, physical, mineralogical, and sorptive properties of Hanford sediments. Our approach was to put solutions of NaOH, a simplified surrogate for glass leachate, in contact with quartz sand, a simplified surrogate for the Hanford subsurface sediment, and Warden soil, an actual Hanford sediment. Following contact with three different concentrations of sodium hydroxide solutions, changes in hydraulic conductivity, porosity, moisture retention, mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, and soil-radionuclide distribution coefficients were determined. Under chemical conditions approaching the most caustic glass leachate conditions predicted in the near-field of the ILAW disposal site, approximated by 0.3 M NaOH, significant changes in mineralogy were observed. The clay minerals of the Hanford sediment evidenced the greatest dissolution thereby increasing the relative proportions of the more resistant minerals, e.g., quartz, feldspar, and calcite, in the remaining mass. Some re-precipitation of solids (mostly amorphous gels) was observed after caustic contact with both solids; these precipitates increased the moisture retention in both sediments, likely because of water retained within the gel coatings. The hydraulic conductivities were slightly lower but, because of experimental artifacts, these reductions should not be considered significant. Thus, there does not seem to be large differences in the hydraulic properties of the quartz sand or Warden silt loam soil after 192 days of contact with caustic fluids similar to glass leachate. The long term projected impact of the increased moisture retention has not been evaluated but likely will not make past simplified performance

  9. Biochar characteristics produced from food-processing products and their sorptive capacity for mercury and phenanthrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2015-04-01

    Various organic-rich wastes including wood chips, animal manure, and crop residues have been used for biochar production. Biochar is used as an additive to soils to sequester carbon and improve soil fertility but its use as a sorbent for environmental remediation processes is gaining increased attention. Surface properties such as point of zero charge, surface area and pore volume, surface topography, surface functional groups and acid-base behavior are important factors, which affect sorption efficiency. Understanding the surface alteration of biochars increases our understanding of the pollutant-sorbent interaction. The scope of the present work was to evaluate the effect of key characteristics of biochars on their sorptive properties. Raw materials for biochar production were evaluated including byproducts from brewering, coffee, wine, and olive oil industry. The charring process was performed at different temperatures under limited-oxygen conditions using specialized containers. The surface area, the pore volume, and the average pore size of the biochars were determined. Open surface area and micropore volume were determined using t-plot method and Harkins & Jura equation. Raw food-processing waste demonstrates low surface area that increases by 1 order of magnitude by thermal treatment up to 750oC. At temperatures from 750 up to 900oC, pyrolysis results to biochars with surface areas 210-700 m2/g. For the same temperature range, a high percentage (46 to73%) of the pore volume of the biochars is due to micropores. Positive results were obtained when high surface area biochars were tested for their ability to remove organic (i.e. phenanthrene) and inorganic (i.e. mercury) compounds from aqueous solutions. All these properties point to new materials that can effectively be used for environmental remediation.

  10. Niobium in engineering bar steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of niobium as a microalloying addition to hot rolled and cold finished bars offers many opportunities to achieve enhanced mechanical properties in a very cost effective manner. By the addition of niobium (sometimes in combination with vanadium) to selected carbon steel grades, it is possible to produce hot rolled bars with minimum yield strengths up to 689 MPa (100 ksi) and cold finished bars with yield strengths up to 1035 MPa (150 ksi). These high-strength-low-alloy bars have a myriad of applications particularly for automotive parts such as shafts, stabilizer bars, tie rods, piston rods, fasteners such as U-bolts, brackets, and various transmission parts. Of particular value has been the specification of Nb-microalloyed steels for such hot forgings as connecting rods and caps, and weld yokes a situation which has permitted elimination of post-forging heat treatment (quenching and tempering). Significant reductions in cost and energy consumption have been realized

  11. Bars in Cuspy Dark Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinski, John; Shlosman, Isaac

    2008-01-01

    We examine the bar instability in models with an exponential disk and a cuspy NFW-like dark matter (DM) halo inspired by cosmological simulations. Bar evolution is studied as a function of numerical resolution in a sequence of models spanning 10K to 100M DM particles - including a multi-mass model with an effective resolution of 10G. The goal is to find convergence in dynamical behaviour. We characterize the bar growth, the buckling instability, pattern speed decay through resonant transfer of angular momentum, and possible destruction of the DM halo cusp. Overall, most characteristics converge in behaviour in detail for halos containing more than 10M particles. Notably, the formation of the bar does not destroy the density cusp in this case. These higher resolution simulations clearly illustrate the importance of discrete resonances in transporting angular momentum from the bar to the halo.

  12. Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS Barred Disks and Bar Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, B D; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L; Willett, Kyle W; Keel, William C; Smethurst, R J; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S; Bell, Eric F; Casteels, Kevin R V; Conselice, Christopher J; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M; McIntosh, Daniel H; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M; Finkelstein, Steven L; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N A; Grutzbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Haussler, Boris; Jek, Kian J; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bars in disk galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in disks decreases from the local Universe to z ~ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature disks should be extremely rare. Here we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disk galaxies at z ~ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from CANDELS. From within a sample of 876 disk galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a sub-sample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5< z < 2 (f_bar = 10.7 +6.3 -3.5% after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disk galaxies have evolved over the last 11 bil...

  13. The LHCb pentaquark as a $\\bar{D}^*\\Sigma_c-\\bar{D}^*\\Sigma_c^*$ molecular state

    CERN Document Server

    Roca, L; Oset, E

    2015-01-01

    We perform a theoretical analysis of the $\\Lambda_b \\to J/\\psi K^- p$ reaction from where a recent LHCb experiment extracts a $\\Lambda(1405)$ contribution in the $K^- p$ spectrum close to threshold and two baryon states of hidden charm in the $J/\\psi\\,p$ spectrum. We recall that baryon states of this type have been theoretically predicted matching the mass, width and $J^P$ of the experiment, concretely some states built up from the $J/\\psi\\, N$, $\\bar D^* \\Lambda_c$, $\\bar D^* \\Sigma_c$, $\\bar D \\Sigma^*_c$ and $\\bar D^* \\Sigma^*_c$ coupled channels. We assume that the observed narrow state around 4450 MeV has this nature and we are able to describe simultaneously the shapes and relative strength of the the $K^- p$ mass distribution close to threshold and the peak of the $J/\\psi\\,p$ distribution, with values of the $J/\\psi\\, p$ coupling to the resonance in line with the theoretical ones. The non trivial matching of many properties gives support to a $J^P=3/2^-$ assignment to this state and to its nature as a ...

  14. Repairing and strengthening a fractured Hader bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, D B

    1997-01-01

    Stresses from occlusion and metal fatigue over time can cause fracture of overdenture retention bars. Often failure of the bar necessitates the removal and remake of the bar. This may damage the abutment, especially if there are dowel posts involved. This article describes a method for reinforcing the existing bar without having to remove the bar or significantly alter the overdenture. The fractured bar can be prepared in the mouth to receive a reinforcing superstructure that will be cemented.

  15. Blurring in bar code signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong

    1997-10-01

    When a bar code symbol is passed over a scanner, it is struck across by a fast moving laser beam. The laser light is scattered by the bar code. The total scattered power is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces in the symbol. A fraction of the scattered light is collected and focused onto a photodetector that converts the light variation into an electronic signal. The electronic signal is then digitized for analysis by a computer. The scanning and detection process can be modeled by a convolution of the laser beam profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The switching between states in the digitized bar code signal, which represents transitions from a space to a bar or vice versa, is determined by a zero-crossing point in the second derivative of the analog signal. The laser profile acts like a smoothing function. It blurs the analog electronic signal. If the width of the laser profile is less than the minimum width of bars and spaces in the bar code reflectivity function, the transition point is not affected by the location of its neighboring edges. If the laser profile is wider than the minimum width in the bar code, the transition point can be shifted due to the locations of its neighboring edges. The behavior of the shift of transition is analyzed here for all cases in a UPC symbol. It is found that the amount of shift in the transition point is almost the same for several different cases within the depth of field of the scanner. The knowledge of the behavior of transition point shift can be used to accurately compensate printing errors in an over-printed bar code. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal function of the scanning laser beam. The MTF through focus for a scanning system is presented. By using an aperture with central obscuration in the laser focusing system, the high frequency resolution of bar code scanning can be enhanced and the depth of field of the scanner can

  16. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  17. Triply heavy tetraquark states with the $QQ\\bar{Q}\\bar{q}$ configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kan; Wu, Jing; Liu, Yan-Rui; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the color-magnetic interaction, we systematically investigate the mass splittings of the $QQ\\bar{Q}\\bar{q}$ tetraquark states and estimated their rough masses in this work. These systems include the explicitly exotic states $cc\\bar{b}\\bar{q}$ and $bb\\bar{c}\\bar{q}$ and the hidden exotic states $cc\\bar{c}\\bar{q}$, $cb\\bar{b}\\bar{q}$, $bc\\bar{c}\\bar{q}$, and $bb\\bar{b}\\bar{q}$. If a state around the estimated mass region could be observed, its nature as a genuine tetraquark is favored. The strong decay patterns shown here will be helpful to the experimental search for these exotic states.

  18. Strength Degradation of Gfrp Bars

    OpenAIRE

    Bhise, Vikrant Sudhakar

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to examine the strength degradation of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars at high temperature and alkalinity and determine if an Arrhenius type relationship can be used as a means of projecting life. The work done includes a thorough literature review, experiments and development of strength prediction models. The experimental work involves exposure of GFRP bars incased in cement mortar to lime-water solution at 30, 45 and 57°C. Overall 100 ...

  19. Multiprobe quantum spin Hall bars

    OpenAIRE

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED We analyze electron transport in multiprobe quantum spin Hall (QSH) bars using the B¨uttiker formalism and draw parallels with their quantum Hall (QH) counterparts. We find that in a QSH bar the measured resistance changes upon introducing side voltage probes, in contrast to the QH case. We also study four- and six-terminal geometries and derive the expressions for the resistances. For these our analysis is generalized from the single-channel to the multi-channel case...

  20. Nanoporosity of Si (100) bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, S. N.; Timoshenkov, S. P.; Minaev, V. S.; Goryunova, E. P.; Gerasimenko, N. N.; Smirnov, D. I.

    2016-09-01

    Si(100) samples cut from a typical bar (100 mm in diameter) prepared using industrial technology are studied. Measurements of the electron work function (EWF) show that the size effects in these samples (a reduction in thickness along with a sample's area and the EWF) detected earlier were due to nanostructure porosity that was buried by the technological treatment of a bar's surface. This hidden nanoporosity is assumed to be a manifestation of the secondary crystal structure.

  1. Comparison of mentha extracts obtained by different extraction methods

    OpenAIRE

    Milić Slavica; Lepojević Žika; Adamović Dušan; Mujić Ibrahim; Zeković Zoran

    2006-01-01

    The different methods of mentha extraction, such as steam distillation, extraction by methylene chloride (Soxhlet extraction) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) by carbon dioxide (CO J were investigated. SFE by CO, was performed at pressure of 100 bar and temperature of40°C. The extraction yield, as well as qualitative and quantitative composition of obtained extracts, determined by GC-MS method, were compared.

  2. An Approach for Measuring the Sorptive Behavior of Odorants Using a Multifunction Thermal Desorber Unit: Preliminary Tests on Reduced Sulfur Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woo Joo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorptive behavior of reduced sulfur compounds (RSC was investigated using a combination of thermal desorber (TD unit and gas chromatography (GC. To examine the sorptive properties of RSC on textile materials, two types of experiments were conducted under experimental conditions favorable for sorptive processes. In all the experiments, gaseous standards of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were supplied to initiate the adsorption processes on textile pieces. The textile pieces were then forced to release those adsorbed RSC under a fixed condition. It was found that the extent of adsorption, if evaluated quantitatively, occurred at approximately 1/1000 to 1/100 of the level of RSC standards supplied originally to induce adsorption. It also indicated that RSC adsorption was affected very sensitively by the initial exposure durations to induce RSC adsorption with an exponential decrease in relative recovery (RR values with increasing exposure time. The relative sorptive patterns, when compared between different RSCs, were affected most sensitively by such factors as molecular weight and/or physical contact conditions.

  3. Barred disks in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Marinova, I; Heiderman, A; Barazza, F D; Gray, M E; Barden, M; Wolf, C; Peng, C Y; Bacon, D; Balogh, M; Bell, E F; Bohm, A; Caldwell, J A R; Haussler, B; Heymans, C; Jahnke, K; van Kampen, E; Koposov, S; Lane, K; McIntosh, D H; Meisenheimer, K; Rix, H -W; Sanchez, S F; Taylor, A; Wisotzki, L; Zheng, X

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the properties of bright (MV <= -18) barred and unbarred disks in the Abell 901/902 cluster system at z~0.165 with the STAGES HST ACS survey. To identify and characterize bars, we use ellipse-fitting. We use visual classification, a Sersic cut, and a color cut to select disk galaxies, and find that the latter two methods miss 31% and 51%, respectively of disk galaxies identified through visual classification. This underscores the importance of carefully selecting the disk sample in cluster environments. However, we find that the global optical bar fraction in the clusters is ~30% regardless of the method of disk selection. We study the relationship of the optical bar fraction to host galaxy properties, and find that the optical bar fraction depends strongly on the luminosity of the galaxy and whether it hosts a prominent bulge or is bulgeless. Within a given absolute magnitude bin, the optical bar fraction increases for galaxies with no significant bulge component. Within each morphological ...

  4. Field observations of nearshore bar formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian;

    2008-01-01

      The formation of an inner nearshore bar was observed during a high-energy event at the sandy beach of Vejers, Denmark. The bar accreted in situ during surf zone conditions and the growth of the bar was associated with the development of a trough landward of the bar. Measurements of hydrodynamics...

  5. Measurement of the forward-backward charge asymmetry and extraction of $sin^2\\theta^{eff}_W$ in $p\\bar{p} \\to Z/\\gamma^{*}+X \\to e^+e^-+X$ events produced at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; sman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Dliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gel, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gmez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kura, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Lévêque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a measurement of the forward-backward charge asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in $p\\bar{p} \\to Z/\\gamma^{*}+X \\to e^+e^-+X$ events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 1.1 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. $A_{FB}$ is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the electron-positron pair, and found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. We use the $A_{FB}$ measurement to extract the effective weak mixing angle $sin^2Theta^{eff}_W = 0.2327 \\pm 0.0018 (stat.) \\pm 0.0006 (syst.)$.

  6. Measurement of the forward-backward charge asymmetry and extraction of $sin^2Theta^{eff}_W$ in $p\\bar{p} \\to Z/\\gamma^{*}+X \\to e^+e^-+X$ events produced at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Simon Fraser U.; Ahn, S.H.; /Korea U., KODEL; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-04-01

    We present a measurement of the forward-backward charge asymmetry (A{sub FB}) in p{bar p} {yields} Z/{gamma}* + X {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A{sub FB} is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the electron-positron pair, and found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. We use the A{sub FB} measurement to extract the effective weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2327 {+-} 0.0018 (stat.) {+-} 0.0006 (syst.).

  7. Modulation transfer function of bar code scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Milster, Tom D.

    1998-09-01

    Bar code scanners are ubiquitous in supermarkets. As a bar code is passed over a scanner, a laser beam scans across the bar code. The scattered light is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces of the bar code. The bar code scanning process can be described as a 1D convolution of the scanning laser profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal profile of the laser beam. The properties of the MTF of bar code scanning is similar to that of an incoherent imaging system. Measurements of the MTF of bar code scanning at one focus position are presented. The experimental results are then discussed.

  8. Gas flow in barred potentials II. Bar Driven Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Mattia C; Magorrian, John

    2015-01-01

    Spiral arms that emerge from the ends of a galactic bar are important in interpreting observations of our and external galaxies. It is therefore important to understand the physical mechanism that causes them. We find that these spiral arms can be understood as kinematic density waves generated by librations around underlying ballistic closed orbits. This is even true in the case of a strong bar, provided the librations are around the appropriate closed orbits and not around the circular orbits that form the basis of the epicycle approximation. An important consequence is that it is a potential's orbital structure that determines whether a bar should be classified as weak or strong, and not crude estimates of the potential's deviation from axisymmetry.

  9. Order 1/mb3 corrections to B→Xcscr(l)bar ν decay and their implication for the measurement of bar Λ and λ1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the order 1/mb3 nonperturbative contributions to the inclusive differential B→Xcscr(l)bar ν decay rate. They are parametrized by the expectation values of two local and four nonlocal dimension-six operators. We use our results to estimate part of the theoretical uncertainties in the extraction of matrix elements bar Λ and λ1 from the lepton spectrum in the inclusive semileptonic B decay and find them to be very large. We also compute the 1/mb3 corrections to the moments of the hadronic invariant mass spectrum in this decay, and combine them with the extracted values of bar Λ and λ1 to put an upper bound on the branching fraction B(B→D**scr(l)bar ν). copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. Galactic Bar/Spiral Arm Interactions in NGC3627

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, H; Schinnerer, E; Paladino, R; Leroy, A

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To gain insight into the expected gas dynamics at the interface of the Galactic bar and spiral arms in our own Milky Way galaxy, we examine as an extragalactic counterpart the evidence for multiple distinct velocity components in the cold, dense molecular gas populating a comparable region at the end of the bar in the nearby galaxy NGC3627. Methods: We assemble a high resolution view of molecular gas kinematics traced by CO(2-1) emission and extract line-of-sight velocity profiles from regions of high and low gas velocity dispersion. Results: The high velocity dispersions arise with often double-peaked or multiple line-profiles. We compare the centroids of the different velocity components to expectations based on orbital dynamics in the presence of bar and spiral potential perturbations. A model of the region as the interface of two gas-populated orbits families supporting the bar and the independently rotating spiral arms provides an overall good match to the data. An extent of the bar to the corotati...

  11. Measurement of B0bar -> D(*)0 K(*)0bar Branching Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Best, D S; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Yu K; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di, E; Marco; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the decays B0bar --> D(*)0 K(*)0bar using a sample of 226 million Y(4S) --> B Bbar decays collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e-collider at SLAC. We report evidence for the decay of B0 and B0bar mesons to the D*0 K0s final state with an average branching fraction BF(B0-tilde --> D*0 K0bar) := [ BF(B0bar --> D*0 K0bar) + BF(B0 --> D*0 K0) ]/2 = (3.6 +- 1.2 +- 0.3) x 10^-5. Similarly, we measure BF(B0-tilde --> D0 K0bar) := [ BF(B0bar --> D0 K0bar) + BF(B0 --> D0 K0) ]/2 = (5.3 +- 0.7 +- 0.3) x 10^-5 forthe D0 K0s final state. We measure BF(B0bar --> D0 K*0bar) =^(4.0 +- 0.7 +- 0.3) x 10^-5 and set a 90% confidence level upper limit BF(B0bar --> D0bar K*0bar) D0bar K*0bar)/A(B0bar --> D0 K*0bar)| to be less than 0.4 at the 90% confidence level.

  12. Dynamically possible pattern speeds of double bars

    CERN Document Server

    Maciejewski, Witold

    2009-01-01

    The method to study oscillating potentials of double bars, based on invariant loops, is introduced here in a new way, intended to be more intelligible. Using this method, I show how the orbital structure of a double-barred galaxy (nested bars) changes with the variation of nuclear bar's pattern speed. Not all pattern speeds are allowed when the inner bar rotates in the same direction as the outer bar. Below certain minimum pattern speed orbital support for the inner bar abruptly disappears, while high values of this speed lead to loops that are increasingly round. For values between these two extremes, loops supporting the inner bar extend further out as its pattern speed decreases, and they become more eccentric and pulsate more. These findings do not apply to counter-rotating inner bars.

  13. Kokum Fruit Bar Development via Response Surface Methodology (RSM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Bafna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A response surface methodology (RSM was used for the determination of optimum ingredients level to prepare kokum fruit bar. Kokum pulp was extracted using water extraction method at temperature (24.97ºC and time (30.42 min. The effects of ingredients levels on sensory parameters like texture, overall acceptability and calcium content of the prepared fruit bar were studied by employing a Box- Behnken Design (BBD. During the experimental trials the pulp quantity is kept fixed. The coefficient of determination R² for texture, overall acceptability and calcium content were 0.8298, 0.9239 and 0.9842 respectively. Analysis of variable (ANOVA performed on the experimental values showed that sugar and milk powder were the most important factors that affected characteristics of the kokum fruit bar as it exerted a highly significant influence (p < 0.05 on all the dependent variables. Based on surface and contour plots, optimum ingredients level for formation of kokum fruit bar were pulp, sugar, milk powder; 50g, 40g and 9.39g respectively.

  14. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Lewis J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  15. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  16. Rapid estimation of readily leachable triazine residues in soils using automatic kinetic bioaccessibility assays followed by on-line sorptive clean-up as a front-end to liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Ana C F; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Zagatto, Elias A G; Miró, Manuel

    2016-08-15

    An automatic batchwise bioaccessibility test was proposed for on-line monitoring of readily mobile pools of ametryn and atrazine residues in agricultural soils with different physicochemical properties. A 0.01molL(-1) CaCl2 solution mimicking rainwater percolation through the soil profiles was used for the herbicide extractions. The extract aliquots were successively sampled at regular time intervals in order to investigate the extraction kinetics. For extract clean-up and retention of freely dissolved target species, 30mg of restricted-access like copolymer were used as in-line sorptive material followed by elution with methanol and on-line heart-cut injection towards a C18 silica reversed-phase monolithic column (100×4.6mm) in a liquid chromatographic system. A mathematical model emphasized that the readily available pools vs time can be in most instances described by a first-order exponential equation, thus an asymptotical value is approached. Consequently, the leaching assays can be performed without attaining chemical equilibrium. Enhancement factors and detection limits were 10.2 and 18.8, and 0.40 and 0.37mgkg(-1) for ametryn and atrazine, respectively. The automatic method features good repeatability for leaching tests (r.s.d.: 11.8-10.2% for sandy and 3.7-6.2% for clayey soil). Reliable data, demonstrated with relative recoveries in the soil leachates ranging from 86 to 104%, were achieved in less than 35min, thus avoiding the need for up to 24h as recommended by standard leaching methods. PMID:27260437

  17. Bars in the Barkor Street

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In daytime,the Barkor Street is bustling with tourists,pious pilgrims and merchants crowded together.Only when darkness falls does the street become tranquil.Nevertheless,the area surrounding the Barkor Street(from Tibetan Hospital compound extending to east Beijing Road)is then revived by various kinds of bars.

  18. Bars in Beijing Old Town

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANYUNZHANG

    2003-01-01

    It's seven pm on a summer's evening by Shichahao Lake,central Beijing.A welcome breeze whispers across the lake,and the ruddy vestiges of sunset linger on roofs and treetops.A low hum emanates from bars on the lakeshore packed with young people chatting,drinking and generally

  19. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Edmond; Masters, Karen L; Nichol, Robert C; Bosma, A; Bell, Eric F; Faber, S M; Koo, David C; Lintott, Chris; Melvin, Thomas; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A; Willett, Kyle W

    2013-01-01

    Observations have shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy. In a parallel effort, simulations have shown that this connection is consistent with the theory of bar-driven secular evolution. But observational evidence of bar-driven secular evolution has been sparse. In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to look for evidence of this secular evolution. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 +/- 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. We characterize bars by the bar likelihood, the likelihood a bar is present in a given galaxy, and the bar length. These two bar properties show interesting correlations with the specific star formation rate and the inner central structure of galaxies. Comparing these observations to state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution, which include live halos and ...

  20. Determination of sulfonamides in butter samples by ionic liquid magnetic bar liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Hu, Mingzhu; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Ziming

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple, and environmentally friendly pretreatment method, ionic liquid magnetic bar liquid-phase microextraction, was developed for the determination of sulfonamides in butter samples by high-performance liquid chromatography. The ionic liquid magnetic bar was prepared by inserting a stainless steel wire into the hollow of a hollow fiber and immobilizing ionic liquid in the micropores of the hollow fiber. In the extraction process, the ionic liquid magnetic bars were used to stir the mixture of sample and extraction solvent and enrich the sulfonamides in the mixture. After extraction, the analyte-adsorbed ionic liquid magnetic bars were readily isolated with a magnet from the extraction system. It is notable that the present method was environmentally friendly since water and only several microliters of ionic liquid were used in the whole extraction process. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized, including the type of ionic liquid, sample-to-extraction solvent ratio, the number of ionic liquid magnetic bars, extraction temperature, extraction time, salt concentration, stirring speed, pH of the extraction solvent, and desorption conditions. The recoveries were in the range of 73.25-103.85 % and the relative standard deviations were lower than 6.84 %. The experiment results indicated that the present method was effective for the extraction of sulfonamides in high-fat content samples.

  1. BaBar Level 1 Drift Chamber Trigger Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, V

    2002-01-01

    As PEP-II is exceeding the original design luminosity, BaBar is currently upgrading its Level 1 Drift Chamber Trigger (DCT) to reduce the rate of background Level 1 triggers by more than 50% while preserving the high Level 1 trigger physics efficiency. New Z-Pt-Discriminator VME boards (ZPD) utilizing the stereo hit information from the drift chamber are being built to extract the track z coordinate at the beam line with a resolution of a few centimeters.

  2. Going Smokefree Matters - Bars and Restaurants Infographic

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Going Smokefree Matters – Bars and Restaurants Infographic which outlines key facts related to the effects of secondhand smoke exposure in bars and...

  3. Bar, Orliac-de-Bar, Beaumont, Saint–Augustin, Ussel

    OpenAIRE

    Simonnot, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Identifiant de l'opération archéologique : 2735 Date de l'opération : 2007 (PR) Inventeur(s) : Simonnot Bernard (BEN) La prospection sur les communes de Bar, Orliac-de-Bar, Beaumont et Saint-Augustin n’ayant pas donné pour le moment de nouveaux résultats satisfaisants, une reprise sera nécessaire lors de la prochaine campagne. Ceux découverts récemment demandent une étude plus approfondie. Cette année, la prospection s’est limitée à la partie ouest de la commune d’Ussel, dans la zone de renc...

  4. Bar instabilities in Coma cluster galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial distribution of bar versus nonbar galaxies within the Coma cluster shows that a significantly larger fraction of bar galaxies are members of the cluster core. This result can be used either to estimate the time scale for the decay of bar instabilities or to argue that galaxies in the core of Coma are confined within the core

  5. While in Shanghai,Enjoy Unigue Bars!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Today, bars are nothingnew for people who live inmajor cities. Bars have becomeso common that they have toseek a revolution for survival.It seems the only way tosurvive the fierce market competitionis to take the lead in being special. Asa result, some bars are attractingcustomers with unique features.Among them are:

  6. Bar code instrumentation for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a brief overview of the basic principles of bar codes and the equipment used to make and to read bar code labels, and a summary of some of the more important factors that need to be considered in integrating bar codes into an information system

  7. BARS curve in Romanian economy

    OpenAIRE

    Emilian Dobrescu

    2015-01-01

    The paper is consacrated to the binomial “public budget-global output” from the BARS curve perspective. The first section characterizes the main conceptual premises of this approach. The second is devoted to empirical analysis, using the statistical data (1990- 2013) for Romania, an European emergent economy: three cointegrating regressions (fully modified least squares, canonical cointegrating regression and dynamic least squares) and three algorithms based on instrumental variables (two-sta...

  8. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  9. Correlations between D and D-bar mesons in high energy photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; Link, J.; Reyes, M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.; Bediaga, I.; Gobel, C.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Miranda, J.M. de; Pepe, I.M.; Reis, A.C. dos; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vasquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; O' Reilly, B.; Ramirez, J.E.; Segoni, I.; Butler, J.N.; Cheung, H.W.K.; Chiodini, G.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P.H.; Garren, L.A.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Kasper, P.H.; Kreymer, A.E.; Kutschke, R.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.L.; Zallo, A.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D.Y.; Park, K.S.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Kryemadhi, A.; Chang, K.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Kang, J.S.; Ko, B.R.; Kwak, J.W.; Lee, K.B.; Cho, K.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Barberis, S.; Cerutti, A.; Boschini, M.; D' Angelo, P.; DiCorato, M.; Dini, P.; Edera, L.; Erba, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Pontoglio, C.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T.F.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Merlo, M.M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S.P.; Vitulo, P.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A.M.; Mendez, H.; Mendez, L.; Montiel, E.; Olaya, D.; Paris, A.; Quinones, J.; Rivera, C.; Xiong, W.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, J.R.; Handler, T.; Mitchell, R.; Engh, D.; Hosack, M.; Johns, W.E.; Nehring, M.; Sheldon, P.D.; Stenson, K.; Vaadering, E.W.; Webster, M.; Sheaff, M

    2003-04-01

    Over 7000 events containing a fully reconstructed D D-bar pair have been extracted from data recorded by the FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab. Preliminary results from a study of correlations between D and D-bar mesons are presented. Correlations are used to study perturbative QCD predictions and investigate non-perturbative effects. We also present a preliminary result on the production of {psi}(3770)

  10. Bs→K(∗)ℓν-bar, angular analysis, S-wave contributions and |Vub|

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the B-bars0→K+l−ν-bar and B-bars0→K∗+(→Kπ)ℓ−ν-bar decays that are valuable for extracting the CKM matrix element |Vub|. We calculate the differential and integrated partial widths in units of |Vub|2 based on various calculations of hadronic form factors and in particular the latest Lattice QCD calculation of the Bs→K∗ form factors. For the decay B-bars0→Kπℓν-bar, we formulate the general angular distributions with the inclusion of the various partial-wave Kπ contributions. Using the results for the Kπ scalar form factor calculated from unitarized chiral perturbation theory, we explore the S-wave effects on angular distribution variables and demonstrate that they may not be negligible, considering the high precision expected in future measurements. We also briefly discuss the impact of the S-wave ππ contributions in the B−→π+π−ℓν-bar decay and provide estimates for the mode B−→K+K−ℓν-bar. The studies of these channels in future can not only be used to determine |Vub|, but may also provide valuable information on the Kπ and ππ phase shifts

  11. Effect of bars on the galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Vera, Matias; Coldwell, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    Aims: With the aim of assessing the effects of bars on disc galaxy properties, we present an analysis of different characteristics of spiral galaxies with strong, weak and without bars. Method: We identified barred galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By visual inspection, we classified the face-on spiral galaxies brighter than g<16.5 mag into strong-bar, weak-bar and unbarred. In order to provide an appropiate quantification of the influence of bars on galaxy properties, we also constructed a suitable control sample of unbarred galaxies with similar redshift, magnitude, morphology, bulge sizes, and local density environment distributions to that of barred galaxies. Results: We found 522 strong-barred and 770 weak-barred galaxies, representing a 25.82% of the full sample of spiral galaxies, in good agreement with previous studies. We also found that strong-barred galaxies show less efficient star formation activity and older stellar populations compared to weak-barred and unbarred spirals from the c...

  12. Irradiation test of bar code label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation test of bar code label tagged on radioactive waste container was done to determine the effect of radiation. Low and medium radioactive waste is that below total activity of 4,000Bq/g according to the Korean nuclear law. The irradiation amount to radiate bar code label tagged on radioactive waste container was calculated by MCNP-4b computer code. The nuclide such as Co-60 and Cs-137 was assumed to contribute 50 % of total activity. Real irradiation amount for bar code label was finally calculated by the dimensions of the container and the bar code label. The identification of post and the physical deflection of irradiated bar code label was tested by the bar code reader. The coated bar code label was suitable to use on low and medium radioactive waste container

  13. Dispersive bounds on the shape of the B bar → D(*)lν bar form factor using spin symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most accurate method of extracting the parameter modulus of Vcb of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is based on the study of the B bar → D(*)lνbar decays. To calculate the relevant form factors entering the expression of the differential decay rate a method which combines QCD dispersion relations unitarity and heavy quark symmetry was devised. In the present paper the analysis of the correlation between the slope and the curvature of the physical form factor near zero recoil is extended by exploiting in a complete way the spin symmetry in the fundamental doublet of the BD mesons. We take into account simultaneously the unitarity inequalities for the polarization functions of the vector (Vμ c bar γμb) and axial weak current (Aμ c bar γμγ5b). All the form factors are included in the inequalities, taking into account properly for all of them the Bc poles, the specific unitarity thresholds, as well as the expressions given by heavy quark symmetry near zero recoil. We treat also in a rigorous way the kinematical constrains relating various form factors at q2 = 0. The increased theoretical input used in the analysis is shown to lead to quite strong constraints on the shape of the physical form factors near zero recoil

  14. Dispersion in oscillatory electro-osmotic flow through a parallel-plate channel with kinetic sorptive exchange at walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝安

    2014-01-01

    Dispersion in time-oscillatory electro-osmotic flows in a slit micro-channel under the effect of kinetic sorptive exchange at walls is theoretically investigated using the homogenization method. The two walls of the channel are considered to be made up of different materials, and therefore have different zeta potentials and sorption coefficients. A general expression for the Taylor disper-sion coefficient under different zeta potentials as well as various sorption conditions at the walls is derived analytically. The disper-sion coefficient is found to be dependent on the oscillation frequency, the Debye parameter, the species partition coefficient, the rea-ction kinetics and the ratio of the wall potentials. The results demonstrate that the presence of wall sorption tends to enhance the dispersion when the oscillation frequency is low, but the effect is negligible in high-frequency oscillatory flows. Moreover, it is found that the dispersion coefficient could be significantly changed by adjusting the relative wall potentials for low-frequency flows.

  15. Effect of the reinforcement bar arrangement on the efficiency of electrochemical chloride removal technique applied to reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces, P. [Dpto. Ing. de la Construccion, Obras Publicas e Infraestructura Urbana, Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: pedro.garces@ua.es; Sanchez de Rojas, M.J. [Dpto. Ing. de la Construccion, Obras Publicas e Infraestructura Urbana, Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Climent, M.A. [Dpto. Ing. de la Construccion, Obras Publicas e Infraestructura Urbana, Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2006-03-15

    This paper reports on the research done to find out the effect that different bar arrangements may have on the efficiency of the electrochemical chloride removal (ECR) technique when applied to a reinforced concrete structural member. Five different types of bar arrangements were considered, corresponding to typical structural members such as columns (with single and double bar reinforcing), slabs, beams and footings. ECR was applied in several steps. We observe that the extraction efficiency depends on the reinforcing bar arrangement. A uniform layer set-up favours chloride extraction. Electrochemical techniques were also used to estimate the reinforcing bar corrosion states, as well as measure the corrosion potential, and instant corrosion rate based on the polarization resistance technique. After ECR treatment, a reduction in the corrosion levels is observed falling short of the depassivation threshold.

  16. On the Fraction of Barred Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, Preethi B

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of ~14000 visually-classified nearby galaxies given in Nair & Abraham 2010(a). The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift.

  17. Results from bar pp colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results bar pp colliders are presented. From elastic scattering experiments at the Tevatron, an average value of σtot = 72.1±2 mb is reported, along with a new measurement of ρ = 0.13 ± 0.7. New measurements of jet direct photon and high pt W and Z production are compared to more precise, higher order predictions from perturbative QCD. Recently available data on the W mass and width give combined values for MW = 80.14±0.27 GeV/c2, and Γ(W) =2. 14 ± 0.08 GeV. From electroweak radiative corrections and MW, one finds Mtop = 130±40 GeV/c2, with a 95% C.L. upper limit at 210 GeV/c2. Current limits on Mtop are presented, along with a review of the prospects for top discovery. From jet data there is no evidence of quark substructure down to the distance scale of 1.4 x 10-17 cm, nor is there evidence for supersymmetry or heavy gauge bosons at bar pp colliders, allowing lower limits on MW, > 520 GeV/c2 and MZ 412 GeV/c2. 66 refs., 26 figs

  18. {bar K}-NUCLEAR Deeply Bound States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Avraham

    Following the prediction by Akaishi and Yamazaki of relatively narrow {bar K}-nuclear states, deeply bound by over 100 MeV where the main decay channel {bar K} N -> π Σ is closed, several experimental signals in stopped K- reactions on light nuclei have been interpreted recently as due to such states. In this talk I review (i) the evidence from K--atom data for a deep bar K-nucleus potential, as attractive as V{bar K}(ρ 0) ˜ -(150 - 200) MeV at nuclear matter density, that could support such states; and (ii) the theoretical arguments for a shallow potential, V{bar K}(ρ 0) ˜ -(40 - 60) MeV. I then review a recent work by Mareš, Friedman and Gal in which {bar K}-nuclear bound states are generated dynamically across the periodic table, using a RMF Lagrangian that couples the {bar K} to the scalar and vector meson fields mediating the nuclear interactions. The reduced phase space available for {bar K} absorption from these bound states is taken into account by adding a density- and energy-dependent imaginary term, underlying the corresponding {bar K}-nuclear level widths, with a strength constrained by K--atom fits. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for light nuclei, with central nuclear densities enhanced by almost a factor of two. The binding energies and widths calculated in this dynamical model differ appreciably from those calculated for a static nucleus. These calculations provide a lower limit of Γ {bar K} ˜ 50 ± 10 MeV on the width of nuclear bound states for {bar K} binding energy in the range B{bar K} = 100 - 200 MeV.

  19. Installation of Shimming Bars for CYCIAE-100

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV; Yin-long; WANG; Zhen-hui; ZHONG; Jun-qing; LIU; Geng-shou

    2012-01-01

    <正>The 100 MeV high intensity proton cyclotron, CYCIAE-100, is the most critical equipment of the BRIF project at CIAE. The shimming bars are used to get the isochronous magnetic field. In the process of magnetic mapping and shimming, the bars should be repeated the installed and disassembly for about 10 times. Each time the installation precision must be ensured. The bars installation schedule and quality are directly related to the BRIF project progress.

  20. Dynamical mechanisms supporting barred-spiral structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsis, P. A.

    We review some recent results of the orbital theory, related with the dynamics of barred-spiral galaxies. The method we use is to study the responses of stellar and gaseous disks when time-independent, external potentials are imposed. These potentials are directly estimated from near-infrared images of disk galaxies. The goal of the work is to detect dynamical mechanisms that reinforce the bars and the spirals in realistic systems. Besides the known mechanism for building bars by quasiperiodic orbits trapped around stable orbits of the {xx} family, we find cases where bars can be supported, to a large extent, by chaotic orbits. These bars are of the ``ansae'' type and their effective potentials are characterized by multiple Lagrangian points roughly along the major axis of the bar. On the other hand the spirals are supported mainly by chaotic orbits and extend usually beyond corotation. We find that the spirals and the outer parts of the bars share the same orbital content. However, we have found also barred-spiral systems with spirals inside corotation, consisting mainly by chaotic orbits. Finally we indicate, that in barred-spiral systems with different pattern speeds for the two components, the dynamics of the spirals can be similar to the dynamics of the spirals of normal spiral galaxies.

  1. Implant-supported overdenture with prefabricated bar attachment system in mandibular edentulous patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seung-Ryong; Song, Seung-Il; Hong, Seong-Tae; Kim, Gy-Young

    2012-01-01

    Implant-supported overdenture is a reliable treatment option for the patients with edentulous mandible when they have difficulty in using complete dentures. Several options have been used for implant-supported overdenture attachments. Among these, bar attachment system has greater retention and better maintainability than others. SFI-Bar® is prefabricated and can be adjustable at chairside. Therefore, laboratory procedures such as soldering and welding are unnecessary, which leads to fewer errors and lower costs. A 67-year-old female patient presented, complaining of mobility of lower anterior teeth with old denture. She had been wearing complete denture in the maxilla and removable partial denture in the mandible with severe bone loss. After extracting the teeth, two implants were placed in front of mental foramen, and SFI-Bar® was connected. A tube bar was seated to two adapters through large ball joints and fixation screws, connecting each implant. The length of the tube bar was adjusted according to inter-implant distance. Then, a female part was attached to the bar beneath the new denture. This clinical report describes two-implant-supported overdenture using the SFI-Bar® system in a mandibular edentulous patient. PMID:23236580

  2. Chiral Perturbation Theory and the $\\bar B \\bar B$ Strong Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhan-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have calculated the potentials of the heavy (charmed or bottomed) pseudoscalar mesons up to $O(\\epsilon^2)$ with the heavy meson chiral perturbation theory. We take into account the contributions from the football, triangle, box, and crossed diagrams with the 2$\\phi$ exchange and one-loop corrections to the contact terms. We notice that the total 2$\\phi$-exchange potential alone is attractive in the small momentum region in the channel ${\\bar B \\bar B}^{I=1}$, ${\\bar B_s \\bar B_s}^{I=0}$, or ${\\bar B \\bar B_s}^{I=1/2}$, while repulsive in the channel ${\\bar B \\bar B}^{I=0}$. Hopefully the analytical chiral structures of the potentials may be useful in the extrapolation of the heavy meson interaction from lattice QCD simulation.

  3. Measurement of the B0bar --> D*+ l- nubar_l Decay Rate and |Vcb|

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    We present a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vcb| based on a sample of about 53,700 B0bar --> D*+ l- nubar_l decays observed by the BaBar detector. We obtain the branching fraction averaged over l = e, mu, BR(B0bar --> D*+ l- nubar_l) = (4.90 +- 0.07(stat.) +0.36-0.35(syst.))%. We measure the differential decay rate as a function of w, the relativistic boost gamma of the D*+ in the B0bar rest frame. By extrapolating dGamma/dw to the kinematic limit w --> 1, we extract the product of |Vcb| and the axial form factor A_1(w=1). We combine this measurement with a lattice QCD calculation of A_1(w=1) to determine |Vcb| = (38.7 +- 0.3(stat.) +- 1.7(syst.) +1.5-1.3(theory)) * 10^-3.

  4. Exploring CP violation with $B_s^0 \\to \\bar{D^0} \\phi $ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, A K; Khanna, M P

    2002-01-01

    We note that it is possible to determine the weak phase $\\gamma$ from the time dependent measurements of the decays $B_s^0(t) (\\bar B_s^0 (t)) \\to \\bar D^0 \\phi$ without any hadronic uncertainties. These decays are described by the color suppressed tree diagrams and hence are free from the penguin pollutions. We further demonstrate that $\\gamma$ can also be extracted with no hadronic uncertainties from an angular analysis of corresponding vector vector modes, $B_s^0(t) (\\bar B_s^0 (t)) \\to \\bar D^{* 0} \\phi$. Although the branching ratios for these decay modes are quite small ${\\cal O} (10^{-5})$, the strategies presented here appear to be particularly interesting for the "second generation" experiments at hadronic B factories.

  5. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems. PMID:27423405

  6. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems.

  7. A study of B0bar --> D(*)0 K(*)bar decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the decays B0bar --> D(*)0 K(*)0bar using a sample of 124 million Upsilon(4S) --> B0bar B0 decays collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at SLAC. We report evidence for the decay of B0 and B0bar mesons to the D*0 K_S final state with an average branching fraction BF(B --> D*0 K0bar) = (4.5 +/- 1.9 +/- 0.5) x 10^-5. Similarly, we measure BF(B --> D0 K0bar) = (6.2 +/- 1.2 +/- 0.4) x 10^-5 for the D0 K_S final state. We also measure BF(B0bar --> D0 K*0bar) = (6.2 +/- 1.4 +/- 0.6) x 10^-5 and set a 90% C.L. upper limit BF(B0bar --> D0bar K*0bar) < 4.1 x 10^-5. All results presented in this paper are preliminary.

  8. Orbital Support of Fast and Slow Inner Bars in Double Barred Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maciejewski, Witold

    2010-01-01

    We analyze how the orbital support of the inner bar in a double-barred galaxy (nested bars) depends on the angular velocity (i.e. pattern speed) of this bar. We study orbits in seven models of double bars using the method of invariant loops. The range of pattern speed is covered exhaustively. We find that not all pattern speeds are allowed when the inner bar rotates in the same direction as the outer bar. Below a certain minimum pattern speed orbital support for the inner bar abruptly disappears, while at high values of this speed the orbits indicate an increasingly round bar that looks more like a twist in the nuclear isophotes than a dynamically independent component. For values between these two extremes, orbits supporting the inner bar extend further out as the bar's pattern speed decreases, their corresponding loops become more eccentric, pulsate more, and their rotation becomes increasingly non-uniform, as they speed up and slow down in their motion. Lower pattern speeds also lead to a less coherent bar...

  9. Too Much Bar and Not Enough Mitzvah? A Proposed Research Agenda on Bar/Bat Mitzvah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Jewish educators are understandably interested in research on how bar/bat mitzvah affect Jewish education or research on what Jewish schools have done to avoid the distortions of a focus on bar/bat mitzvah. Research might also focus on the somewhat different and more ambitious topic of the role that bar/bat mitzvah play in contemporary Jewish…

  10. Test of bar window with internal bars free from the glass surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe

    1998-01-01

    A sealed glazing unit with 3 horisontal and 3 vertical bars and a reference glazing without bars have been tested in a guarded hotbox. The difference in measured heat loss coefficient between the two test objects is a measure of the thermal influence of the bars. The difference in heat loss...

  11. Tubular stabilizer bars – calculations and construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam-Markus WITTEK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the calculation methods for tubular stabilizer bars. Modern technological and structural solutions in contemporary cars are reflected also in the construction, selection and manufacturing of tubular stabilizer bars. A proper construction and the selection of parameters influence the strength properties, the weight, durability and reliability as well as the selection of an appropriate production method.

  12. Stabilizer bars: Part 1. Calculations and construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam-Markus WITTEK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the calculation methods for stabilizer bars. Modern technological and structural solutions in contemporary cars are reflected also in the construction and manufacturing of stabilizer bars. A proper construction and the selection of parameters influence the strength properties, the weight, durability and reliability as well as the selection of an appropriate production method.

  13. The Bar Tack Machine. Module 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on the bar tack machine, one in a series dealing with industrial sewing machines, their attachments, and operation, covers one topic: performing special operations on the bar tack machine. These components are provided: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, a student self-check, and a…

  14. Bar Study Stories. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on the impact of the availability of drinks in licensed establishments, such as bars and taverns on student drinking. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Cheap Drinks at College Bars Can Escalate Student Drinking (John D. Clapp); (2) High Alcohol Outlet Density: A Problem for Campuses and…

  15. Constraints from microlensing on the COBE bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. S.

    Since the first review of converging evidences for a bar in the center of the Galaxy by de Zeeuw (1992) at the IAU Sym. 153 in Gent five years ago, the Galactic bar idea has been put on a solid footing by an influx of new data (COBE/DIRBE maps, star count data of bulge red clump giants, microlensing optical depth, and bulge stellar proper motions, etc.) and a burst of increasingly sophisticated theoretical models (triaxial luminosity models of Dwek et al. 1994, and Binney, Gerhard & Spergel 1997, steady state stellar bar dynamical model of Zhao 1996, combined luminosity, microlensing and gas kinematics models of Zhao, Rich & Spergel 1996, and Bissantz et al. 1997, etc.), which fit new data and improve upon earlier simple bulge/bar models (Kent 1992, Binney et al. 1991, Blitz & Spergel 1991). While research in this field shifts more and more to constraining the exact phase space and parameter space of the bar, both the non-uniqueness of and the mismatches among bars from different datasets start to show up. I compare the bar from microlensing data with the COBE bar and point out the effects the non-uniqueness.

  16. Nutritional Value and Consumer Acceptance of New Cereal Bars Offered to Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białek Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to determine consumer preferences by school-aged children and selected quality indicators of new, highly nutritive grain bars designed as a snack during school break. Consumer acceptance was evaluated by the scaling method using a five-point mimic hedonic scale. Triacylglycerols (TAG and fatty acids (FA composition was assayed in fats extracted from the designed bars (fresh and stored by gas chromatography. Contents of oxidation and hydrolysis products were determined using peroxide value (PV, anisidine value (AnV, and acidic value (AV. The antioxidant activity of the ethanolic extract from bars was measured by scavenging 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals and Folin-Ciocalteau methods. The overall liking of bars was high (4.05 pts on average in the 5-point scale. The majority of children (71% scored the designed bars as tasty and very tasty. The designed products contained 22.3% of fat with about 44 g/100 g FA of valuable fatty acids, e.g., short-chain saturated fatty acids (SCSFA, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and odd and branched chain fatty acids (OBCFA, recommended for young organisms. The content of CN52, CN54, CN50 and CN46 triacylglycerols (TAGs (about 49 g/100 g TAG was due to both milk and cocoa fat. Storage of bars did not influence their content of oxidation and hydrolysis products, resulting from a substantial content of total phenolics (TPC (53.64 mg GAE/100 mL of extract and DPPH scavenging activity at the level of 24%. The designed bars may be an interesting confectionery product for children and an alternative to snacks currently available in school shops.

  17. [Development of cereal bar with pineapple skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Renata Siqueira; Del Santo, Victor Rogério; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Pereira, Cíntia Alessandra Matiucci

    2011-06-01

    The cereal bars are multi-component products consisting of cereals, dried fruit and syrup binder and may be added to the consumable parts of fruits and vegetables which usually are not exploited and have high nutritional value, thereby reducing food waste. It was developed a jam with pineapple skin, which it was utilized in 13.5% in the cereal bar formulation. The cereal bar was sensorial evaluated and had its centesimal and mineral composition determined. The new product achieved average of 8.3 for global impression using 9 points hedonic scale, 91% of acceptance rate and 67% of purchase intent. In this first use of pineapple skin jam as food ingredient it can be concluded that its aggregation in the cereal bar formula is feasible, making an accepted product with fibers, proteins and minerals, as an alternative to traditional cereal bars.

  18. A COMPLETE THREE-DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE BAR-BAR TENSILE IMPACT APPARATUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万华培; 汪洋; 夏源明

    2003-01-01

    A complete three-dimensional FEM model of the Bar-Bar Tensile Impact Apparatus (BTIA) is constructed, in which the slots in the bars and the glue layers between the bars and the flat-shaped specimen are included. For elastic-plastic specimen material, Ly12cz aluminum alloy, the process of tensile impact experiments is simulated and the matching relation between the specimen geometry and the bars is investigated. Based on the FEM analysis, an iterative method is proposed to design a reasonable specimen geometry for obtaining the true dynamic stress-strain relation for a certain specimen material.

  19. Metallicity and kinematics of the bar in-situ

    CERN Document Server

    Babusiaux, C; Hill, V; Royer, F; Gomez, A; Arenou, F; Combes, F; Di Matteo, P; Gilmore, G; Haywood, M; Robin, A C; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N; Sartoretti, P; Schultheis, M

    2014-01-01

    Constraints on the Galactic bulge/bar structure and formation history from stellar kinematics and metallicities mainly come from relatively high-latitude fields (|b|>4) where a complex mix of stellar population is seen. We aim here to constrain the formation history of the Galactic bar by studying the radial velocity and metallicity distributions of stars in-situ (|b|<1). We observed red clump stars in four fields along the bar's major axis (l=10,6,-6 and b=0 plus a field at l=0,b=1) with low-resolution spectroscopy from VLT/FLAMES, observing around the CaII triplet. We developed robust methods for extracting radial velocity and metallicity estimates from these low signal-to-noise spectra. We derived distance probability distributions using Bayesian methods rigorously handling the extinction law. We present radial velocities and metallicity distributions, as well as radial velocity trends with distance. We observe an increase in the radial velocity dispersion near the Galactic plane. We detect the streamin...

  20. Oxidative stability and microstructure of 5% fish-oil-enriched granola bars added natural antioxidants derived from brown algaFucus vesiculosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadağ, Ayşe; Hermund, Ditte Baun; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard;

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to; 1) investigate the ability of Icelandic brown algae Fucus vesiculosus extracts to inhibit lipid oxidation in granola bars fortified with fish oil-in-water emulsion; 2) investigate whether addition of the seaweed extracts affected the physical microstructure...... of the oil droplets in granola bars. The oxidative stability of the bars at 20°C was evaluated over a period of 10 weeks by measuring the development of peroxides and volatile compounds using dynamic headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry (DHS GC-MS). The physical microstructure was determined using...... microscopy. All extracts - except water extract in low concentration - reduced lipid oxidation during 10 weeks of storage when added in a concentration of 0.5 or 1 g extract/100 g emulsion. EE and AE (in the lowest concentration) were found to be most efficient as antioxidants in the bars. The antioxidant...

  1. $\\bar K$-Nuclear Deeply Bound States?

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, A

    2006-01-01

    Following the prediction by Akaishi and Yamazaki of relatively narrow $\\bar K$-nuclear states, deeply bound by over 100 MeV where the main decay channel $\\bar K N \\to \\pi \\Sigma$ is closed, several experimental signals in stopped $K^-$ reactions on light nuclei have been interpreted recently as due to such states. In this talk I review (i) the evidence from $K^-$-atom data for a {\\it deep} $\\bar K$-nucleus potential, as attractive as $V_{\\bar K}(\\rho_0) \\sim -(150 - 200)$ MeV at nuclear matter density, that could support such states; and (ii) the theoretical arguments for a {\\it shallow} potential, $V_{\\bar K}(\\rho_0) \\sim -(40 - 60)$ MeV. I then review a recent work by Mare\\v{s}, Friedman and Gal in which $\\bar K$-nuclear bound states are generated dynamically across the periodic table, using a RMF Lagrangian that couples the $\\bar K$ to the scalar and vector meson fields mediating the nuclear interactions. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for light nuclei, with central nuclear densities...

  2. NGC 4340 Double Bar + Fossil Nuclear Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Erwin, P; Beckman, J E

    2000-01-01

    NGC 4340 is a double-barred SB0 galaxy in the Virgo cluster (Wozniak et al. 1995, A&AS 111, 115). Here, we show that this galaxy also posseses a luminous stellar nuclear ring of relatively old stars with little or no gas. The ring lies just outside the inner bar, at the probable inner inner Lindblad resonance (IILR) of the outer bar. Careful inspection of the isophotes and unsharp masks shows that the two bars are slightly misaligned, which suggests they may be independently rotating. The bright nuclear ring distorts the isophotes and ellipse fits and is most clearly seen in the unsharp mask (an inner bar also visible). B-R color maps show no features associated with the ring: it is the same color as the surrounding bulge, and thus probably an old, ``fossil'' remnant of an earlier star-formation episode. We use Simien & Prugniel's (1997, A&AS 126, 15) major-axis velocities to compute resonance curves; we use our spectrum along the outer-bar major axis to estimate that bar's pattern speed. The Omeg...

  3. Impact resistance of bar glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J P; Huggett, R H; Kidner, G

    1993-12-01

    Bar glasses are often used as weapons in interpersonal violence. Violence often erupts spontaneously and assailants use objects close to hand as weapons. After an initial national Accident and Emergency Department study to identify glass designs most often implicated in interpersonal violence, the impact resistance of 1-pint beer glasses was tested in a materials laboratory with a Zwick 5102 pendulum impact tester. Both straight-sided (nonik) glasses (annealed and tempered) and handled tankards (annealed) were tested to destruction. The impact resistance of new glasses was compared with that of glasses subjected to wear. The mean impact resistance of new annealed noniks did not differ significantly although new glasses were significantly more resistant than worn glasses (p shards although the thicker bases remained intact. The mean impact resistance of new annealed noniks was 0.5 J, of worn annealed noniks 0.08 J, of tempered new noniks > 4 J, of worn tempered noniks 0.18 J, and of tankards, 1.7 J.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8263994

  4. Star Formation Properties in Barred Galaxies(SFB). III. Statistical Study of Bar-driven Secular Evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend to be coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges towards stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the ...

  5. Tidally Induced Bars of Galaxies in Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łokas, Ewa L.; Ebrová, Ivana; del Pino, Andrés; Sybilska, Agnieszka; Athanassoula, E.; Semczuk, Marcin; Gajda, Grzegorz; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the formation and evolution of tidally induced bars in disky galaxies in clusters. Our progenitor is a massive, late-type galaxy similar to the Milky Way, composed of an exponential disk and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo. We place the galaxy on four different orbits in a Virgo-like cluster and evolve it for 10 Gyr. As a reference case, we also evolve the same model in isolation. Tidally induced bars form on all orbits soon after the first pericenter passage and survive until the end of the evolution. They appear earlier, are stronger and longer, and have lower pattern speeds for tighter orbits. Only for the tightest orbit are the properties of the bar controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the cluster at pericenter. The mechanism behind the formation of the bars is the angular momentum transfer from the galaxy stellar component to its halo. All of the bars undergo extended periods of buckling instability that occur earlier and lead to more pronounced boxy/peanut shapes when the tidal forces are stronger. Using all simulation outputs of galaxies at different evolutionary stages, we construct a toy model of the galaxy population in the cluster and measure the average bar strength and bar fraction as a function of clustercentric radius. Both are found to be mildly decreasing functions of radius. We conclude that tidal forces can trigger bar formation in cluster cores, but not in the outskirts, and thus can cause larger concentrations of barred galaxies toward the cluster center.

  6. Rotor broken-bar fault diagnosis of induction motor based on HHT of the startup electromagnetic torque

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Fa-liang; HUANG Jin; YANG Jia-qiang; CHEN Li-yuan; JIN Hai

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for rotor broken-bar fault diagnosis of induction motors.The asymmetry of the rotor caused by broken-bar fault will give rise to the appearance of additional frequency component of 2sfs (s is slip and fs is supply frequency) in the electromagnetic torque spectrum.The startup electromagnetic torque signal is decomposed into several intrinsic mode function (IMF) with empirical mode decomposition (EMD)based on the Hilbert-Huang Transform.Then,using the instantaneous frequency extraction principle of the Hilbert Transform, the rotor broken-bar fault characteristic frequency of 2sfs can be exactly extracted from the IMF component,which includes the rotor fault information.Moreover,the magnitude of the IMF which includes the rotor fault information can also give the number of rotor broken bars.Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed electromagnetic torque-based fault diagnosis method is feasible.

  7. Study of the charmed baryonic decays $\\bar{B}^0\\to\\Sigma_{\\mathrm{c}}^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^-$ and $\\bar{B}^0\\to\\Sigma_{\\mathrm{c}}^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Anipko, D; Aoki, K; Arakawa, T; Arinstein, K; Asano, Y; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V M; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Barbero, M; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, J H; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Dowd, R; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Enari, Y; Epifanov, D A; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Gorisek, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Jones, M; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kikuchi, N; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, T H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kishimoto, N; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovnyi, P P; Kubota, T; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, S E; Lee, Y J; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, C Y; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakagawa, T; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Ronga, F J; Root, N; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Saitoh, S; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Sato, N; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Seki, T; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, Y T; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stamen, R; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stöck, H; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takada, N; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tsai, Y T; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M Z; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Wu, C H; Xie, Q L; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, S; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Heyoung Yang; Yoshino, S; Yuan, Y; Yusa, Y; Zang, S L; Zhang, C C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Ziegler, T; Zupanc, A; Zürcher, D

    2006-01-01

    We study the three-body charmed baryonic decays $\\bar{B}^0\\to\\Sigma_{\\mathrm{c}}^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^-$ and $\\bar{B}^0\\to\\Sigma_{\\mathrm{c}}^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^+$ in the four-body final state $\\bar{B}^0\\to\\Lambda_{\\mathrm{c}}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^+\\pi^-$, based on a data sample of 357 fb$^{-1}$ accumulated at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric $e^+e^-$ collider. We measure branching fractions: ${\\cal B} (\\bar{B}^0\\to\\Sigma_{\\mathrm{c}}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^-)$=(\

  8. First Measurement of σ(gg → t$\\bar{t}$)/σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamdari, Shabnaz Pashapour [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2008-01-01

    The work presented here is the first measurement of the fraction of top quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion. We use an integrated luminosity of 0.96 ± 0.06 fb-1 of p{bar p} collisions at √s of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. We select t$\\bar{t}$ candidates by identifying a high-pT lepton candidate, a large missing ET as evidence for a neutrino candidate and at least four high ET jets, one of which has to be identified as originating from a b quark. The challenge is to discriminate between the two production processes with the identical final state, gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$. We take advantage of the fact that compared to a quark, a gluon is more likely to radiate a low momentum gluon and therefore, one expects a larger number of charged particles with low pT in a process involving more gluons. Given the large uncertainties associated with the modeling of the low pT charged particle multiplicity, a data-driven technique was employed. Using calibration data samples, we show there exists a clear correlation between the observed average number of low pT charged particles and the average number of gluons involved in the production process predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Given the correlation, one can identify low pT charged particle multiplicity distributions associated with specific average number of gluons. The W + 0 jet sample and dijets sample with leading jet ET in the range of 80-100 GeV are used to find no-gluon and gluon-rich low p{sub T} charged particle multiplicity distributions, respectively. Using these no-gluon and gluon-rich distributions in a likelihood fit, we find the fraction of gluon-rich events in t{bar t} candidates. This fraction has contributions from the signal and background events. Taking into account these contributions and the gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar

  9. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, Lewis J., E-mail: ll379@cam.ac.uk; Jardine, Andrew P. [SMF Fracture and Shock Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials.

  10. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Lewis J; Jardine, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials.

  11. Possible $D\\bar{D}$ and $B\\bar{B}$ Molecular states in a chiral quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Li, M T; Dong, Y B; Zhang, Z Y

    2012-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of the bound state problem of $D\\bar{D}$ and $B\\bar{B}$ systems by using effective interaction in our chiral quark model. Our results show that both the interactions of $D\\bar{D}$ and $B\\bar{B}$ states are attractive, which consequently result in $I^G(J^{PC})=0^+(0^{++})$ $D\\bar{D}$ and $B\\bar{B}$ bound states.

  12. Molecularly imprinted polymeric stir bar: Preparation and application for the determination of naftopidil in plasma and urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Xiao, Deli; He, Hua; Zhao, Hongyan; Wang, Cuixia; Shi, Tian; Shi, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, molecularly imprinting technology and stir bar absorption technology were combined to develop a microextraction approach based on a molecularly imprinted polymeric stir bar. The molecularly imprinted polymer stir bar has a high performance, is specific, economical, and simple to prepare. The obtained naftopidil-imprinted polymer-coated bars could simultaneously agitate and adsorb naftopidil in the sample solution. The ratio of template/monomer/cross-linker and conditions of template removal were optimized to prepare a stir bar with highly efficient adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, selectivity, and extraction capacity experiments showed that the molecularly imprinted polymer stir bar was prepared successfully. To utilize the molecularly imprinted polymer stir bar for the determination of naftopidil in complex body fluid matrices, the extraction time, stirring speed, eluent, and elution time were optimized. The limits of detection of naftopidil in plasma and urine sample were 7.5 and 4.0 ng/mL, respectively, and the recoveries were in the range of 90-112%. The within-run precision and between-run precision were acceptable (relative standard deviation performance liquid chromatography was a convenient, rapid, efficient, and specific method for the precise determination of trace naftopidil in clinical analysis. PMID:26541792

  13. A novel approach to bar adsorptive microextraction: Cork as extractor phase for determination of benzophenone, triclocarban and parabens in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Adriana Neves; da Silva, Ana Cristine; Simão, Vanessa; Merib, Josias; Carasek, Eduardo

    2015-08-12

    This study describes the use of cork as a new coating for bar adsorptive microextraction (BAμE) and its application in determining benzophenone, triclocarban and parabens in aqueous samples by HPLC-DAD. In this study bars with 7.5 and 15 mm of length were used. The extraction and liquid desorption steps for BAμE were optimized employing multivariate and univariate procedures. The desorption time and solvent used for liquid desorption were optimized by univariate and multivariate studies, respectively. For the extraction step the sample pH was optimized by univariate experiments while the parameters extraction time and ionic strength were evaluated using the Doehlert design. The optimum extraction conditions were sample pH 5.5, NaCl concentration 25% and extraction time 90 min. Liquid desorption was carried out for 30 min with 250 μL (bar length of 15 mm) or 100 μL (bar length of 7.5 mm) of ACN:MeOH (50:50, v/v). The quantification limits varied between 1.6 and 20 μg L(-1) (bar length of 15 mm) and 0.64 and 8 μg L(-1) (bar length of 7.5 mm). The linear correlation coefficients were higher than 0.98 for both bars. The method with 7.5 mm bar length showed recovery values between 65 and 123%. The bar-to-bar reproducibility and the repeatability were lower than 13% (n = 2) and 14% (n = 3), respectively.

  14. A novel approach to bar adsorptive microextraction: Cork as extractor phase for determination of benzophenone, triclocarban and parabens in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Adriana Neves; da Silva, Ana Cristine; Simão, Vanessa; Merib, Josias; Carasek, Eduardo

    2015-08-12

    This study describes the use of cork as a new coating for bar adsorptive microextraction (BAμE) and its application in determining benzophenone, triclocarban and parabens in aqueous samples by HPLC-DAD. In this study bars with 7.5 and 15 mm of length were used. The extraction and liquid desorption steps for BAμE were optimized employing multivariate and univariate procedures. The desorption time and solvent used for liquid desorption were optimized by univariate and multivariate studies, respectively. For the extraction step the sample pH was optimized by univariate experiments while the parameters extraction time and ionic strength were evaluated using the Doehlert design. The optimum extraction conditions were sample pH 5.5, NaCl concentration 25% and extraction time 90 min. Liquid desorption was carried out for 30 min with 250 μL (bar length of 15 mm) or 100 μL (bar length of 7.5 mm) of ACN:MeOH (50:50, v/v). The quantification limits varied between 1.6 and 20 μg L(-1) (bar length of 15 mm) and 0.64 and 8 μg L(-1) (bar length of 7.5 mm). The linear correlation coefficients were higher than 0.98 for both bars. The method with 7.5 mm bar length showed recovery values between 65 and 123%. The bar-to-bar reproducibility and the repeatability were lower than 13% (n = 2) and 14% (n = 3), respectively. PMID:26320959

  15. Blast Quantification Using Hopkinson Pressure Bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Samuel D; Fay, Stephen D; Rigby, Samuel E; Tyas, Andrew; Warren, James A; Reay, Jonathan J; Fuller, Benjamin J; Gant, Matthew T A; Elgy, Ian D

    2016-07-05

    Near-field blast load measurement presents an issue to many sensor types as they must endure very aggressive environments and be able to measure pressures up to many hundreds of megapascals. In this respect the simplicity of the Hopkinson pressure bar has a major advantage in that while the measurement end of the Hopkinson bar can endure and be exposed to harsh conditions, the strain gauge mounted to the bar can be affixed some distance away. This allows protective housings to be utilized which protect the strain gauge but do not interfere with the measurement acquisition. The use of an array of pressure bars allows the pressure-time histories at discrete known points to be measured. This article also describes the interpolation routine used to derive pressure-time histories at un-instrumented locations on the plane of interest. Currently the technique has been used to measure loading from high explosives in free air and buried shallowly in various soils.

  16. Intelligent bar chart plagiarism detection in documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Rehman, Amjad; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts.

  17. The DIRC detector at BaBar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dedicated particle identification system based on the Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (DIRC) light will be used in the BaBar detector. We provide an overview of the DIRC concept, design, and expected performance of the production device and a status report on its construction and commissioning. The DIRC is expected to be operating in the BaBar detector on beam line at the PEP-II B Factory in late spring 1999

  18. The Influence of Bars on Nuclear Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C; Sargent, W L W; Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    1997-01-01

    We test ideas on fueling of galactic nuclei by bar-driven inflow by comparing the detection rate and intensity of nuclear H II regions and AGNs among barred and unbarred galaxies in a sample of over 300 spirals selected from our recent optical spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies. Among late-type spirals (Sc-Sm), but not early-type (S0/a-Sbc), we observe in the barred group a very marginal increase in the detection rate of H II nuclei and a corresponding decrease in the incidence of AGNs. The minor differences in the detection rates, however, are statistically insignificant, most likely stemming from selection effects and not from a genuine influence from the bar. The presence of a bar seems to have no noticeable impact on the likelihood of a galaxy to host either nuclear star formation or an AGN. The nuclei of early-type barred spirals do exhibit measurably higher star-formation rates than their unbarred counterparts, as indicated by either the luminosity or the equivalent width of H-alpha emission. By co...

  19. Hot Disks And Delayed Bar Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sheth, Kartik; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Athanassoula, E; Weiner, Ben

    2012-01-01

    We present observational evidence for the inhibition of bar formation in dispersion-dominated (dynamically hot) galaxies by studying the relationship between galactic structure and host galaxy kinematics in a sample of 257 galaxies between 0.1 $<$ z $\\leq$ 0.84 from the All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) survey. We find that bars are preferentially found in galaxies that are massive and dynamically cold (rotation-dominated) and on the stellar Tully-Fisher relationship, as is the case for barred spirals in the local Universe. The data provide at least one explanation for the steep ($\\times$3) decline in the overall bar fraction from z=0 to z=0.84 in L$^*$ and brighter disks seen in previous studies. The decline in the bar fraction at high redshift is almost exclusively in the lower mass (10 $<$ log M$_{*}$(\\Msun)$<$ 11), later-type and bluer galaxies. A proposed explanation for this "downsizing" of the bar formation ...

  20. Possible Signatures of New Physics in e+e- and bar bar{p}p Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, H.

    1998-12-01

    A preon model with preonic charge predicts many unique new particles. Among them, several are expected to be relatively light, including the fermion lS, which is a stable WIMP, bosons U0 and U+ and the lepto-quark fermion q'. The production of these particles in e+e- and bar{p}p collisions is discussed, focusing on e+e- --> UlS(e) and bar{p}p --> bar{q}'q' + X. A signature of the latter is dilepton + 2 charm jets + missing energy. A discussion on reported unusual events in the dilepton + jets sample is made based on bar{q}'q' production.

  1. $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamu, Yusupujiang [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Ji, Chueng -Ryong [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Melnitchouk, W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, P. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, CAS, Beijing (China)

    2015-03-25

    We compute the $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory, including both nucleon and Δ degrees of freedom, within both relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. In addition to the distribution at $x>0$, we estimate the correction to the integrated asymmetry arising from zero momentum contributions from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at $x=0$, which have not been accounted for in previous analyses. In conclusion, we find that the empirical $x$ dependence of $\\bar d - \\bar u$ as well as the integrated asymmetry can be well reproduced in terms of a transverse momentum cutoff parameter.

  2. Supercritical fluid extraction of hops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZORAN ZEKOVIC

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Five cultivars of hop were extracted by the method of supercritical fluid extraction using carbon dioxide (SFE–CO2 as extractant. The extraction (50 g of hop sample using a CO2 flow rate of 97.725 L/h was done in the two steps: 1. extraction at 150 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (sample of series A was obtained and, after that, the same sample of hop was extracted in the second step: 2. extraction at 300 bar and 40 °C for 2.5 h (sample of series B was obtained. The Magnum cultivar was chosen for the investigation of the extraction kinetics. For the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the obtained hop extracts, the GC-MS method was used. Two of four themost common compounds of hop aroma (a-humulene and b-caryophyllene were detected in samples of series A. In addition, isomerized a-acids and a high content of b-acids were detected. The a-acids content in the samples of series B was the highest in the extract of the Magnum cultivar (it is a bitter variety of hop. The low contents of a-acids in all the other hop samples resulted in extracts with low a-acids content, i.e., that contents were under the prescribed a-acids content.

  3. Cultural Factors Related to Smoking in San Francisco's Irish Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M. J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In…

  4. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually...

  5. Branching fractions for chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega

    CERN Document Server

    Onyisi, P U E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hunt, J M; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Adams, S; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Tarbert, C M; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Xavier, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Xiao, T; Tomaradze, A; Brisbane, S; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Spradlin, P; Wilkinson, G; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Ricciardi, S; Thomas, C; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Lincoln, A; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Zhu, J; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Randrianarivony, K; Robichaud, A N; Tatishvili, G; White, E J; Briere, R A; Vogel, H

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of 25.9 million psi(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e^+e^- collider, we report branching fractions for the decays chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega, with J=0,1,2. Our results for B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar pi^0) and B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar eta) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar omega).

  6. Evidence for the existence of $u d \\bar{b} \\bar{b}$ and the non-existence of $s s \\bar{b} \\bar{b}$ and $c c \\bar{b} \\bar{b}$ tetraquarks from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bicudo, Pedro; Peters, Antje; Wagenbach, Björn; Wagner, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We combine lattice QCD results for the potential of two static antiquarks in the presence of two quarks $q q$ of finite mass and quark model techniques to study possibly existing $q q \\bar{b} \\bar{b}$ tetraquarks. While there is strong indication for a bound four-quark state for $q q = (ud-du) / \\sqrt{2}$, i.e. isospin $I=0$, we find clear evidence against the existence of corresponding tetraquarks with $q q \\in \\{ uu , (ud+du) / \\sqrt{2} , dd \\}$, i.e. isospin $I=1$, $q q = s s$ and $q q = c c$.

  7. Supercritical carbon dioxide hop extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfaf-Šovljanski Ivana I.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hop of Magnum cultivar was extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SFE-as extractant. Extraction was carried out in the two steps: the first one being carried out at 150 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (Extract A, and the second was the extraction of the same hop sample at 300 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (Extract B. Extraction kinetics of the system hop-SFE-CO2 was investigated. Two of four most common compounds of hop aroma (α-humulene and β-caryophyllene were detected in Extract A. Isomerised α-acids and β-acids were detected too. a-Acid content in Extract B was high (that means it is a bitter variety of hop. Mathematical modeling using empirical model characteristic time model and simple single sphere model has been performed on Magnum cultivar extraction experimental results. Characteristic time model equations, best fitted experimental results. Empirical model equation, fitted results well, while simple single sphere model equation poorly approximated the results.

  8. Measurement of soil sorptivity rate under different land uses by disc infiltrometer%利用圆盘入渗仪测定不同土地利用类型土壤吸渗率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘冬立; 高雪梅; 房凯

    2014-01-01

    探讨利用圆盘入渗仪测定不同利用类型土壤吸渗率的适用性,该文选用盘径分别为10和20 cm的圆盘入渗仪对3种利用土壤(菜地、草地和茶园)在0、-3、-6、-9 cm 4个压力水头下的吸渗过程进行测定。研究以Vandervaere法为参考方法,对Philip法、Haverkamp 三维吸渗法、Haverkamp 三维吸渗改进法的适用性进行比较分析。结果表明:吸渗率的不同计算公式所适应的吸渗过程时间尺度不同,且Haverkamp三维吸渗法所得吸渗率值与参考方法最接近。盘径对吸渗率测定差异的影响不显著。除0 cm压力水头外,不同利用类型土壤吸渗率差异显著,且不同压力水头下测得3种土壤吸渗率大小排序不同。当压力水头为-9和-6 cm时,菜地吸渗率(0.0104和0.0119 cm/s0.5)显著高于茶园(0.0017和0.0025 cm/s0.5)(P<0.05);当压力水头为-3 cm时,茶园吸渗率(0.0370 cm/s0.5)显著高于菜地和草地(0.0147和0.0132 cm/s0.5)(P<0.05)。该研究可为南方丘陵区土壤水力参数的测定提供理论依据。%Soil sorptivity is one of the most important soil hydraulic parameters, representing the capacity of soil to absorb and release the soil solution by capillary force. Quantifying soil sorptivity is essential for describing and modeling hydrological and biological processes, and promoting the theoretical research of the unsaturated soil water movement processes, as well as for the determination of rational irrigation and drainage technology parameters. However, obtaining sufficient and reliable soil sorptivity data is expensive and time consuming. Since the measurement is fast and good for the in-site measurement in fields, the disc infiltration method has been paid more attention gradually. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using a disc infiltrometer to determine soil sorptivity in 3 soils with different land uses (vegetable field, grass land

  9. The BaBar Event Building and Level-3 Trigger Farm Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Luitz, S; Dasu, S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Franek, B J; Hamilton, J; Jacobsen, R; Kotturi, D; Narsky, I; O'Grady, C; Perazzo, A; Rodríguez, R; Rosenberg, E I; Salnikov, A; Weaver, M; Wittgen, M; Group, for the BaBar Computing

    2003-01-01

    The BaBar experiment is the particle detector at the PEP-II B-factory facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. During the summer shutdown 2002 the BaBar Event Building and Level-3 trigger farm were upgraded from 60 Sun Ultra-5 machines and 100MBit/s Ethernet to 50 Dual-CPU 1.4GHz Pentium-III systems with Gigabit Ethernet. Combined with an upgrade to Gigabit Ethernet on the source side and a major feature extraction software speedup, this pushes the performance of the BaBar event builder and L3 filter to 5.5kHz at current background levels, almost three times the original design rate of 2kHz. For our specific application the new farm provides 8.5 times the CPU power of the old system.

  10. Electroweak effects in the B sup 0 -B-bar sup 0 mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Gambino, P; Pott, N

    1999-01-01

    We compute analytically the complete electroweak two-loop corrections to the B sup 0 -B sup 0 mixing. These corrections fix the normalization of the electroweak coupling employed in the extraction of vertical bar V sub t sub d vertical bar and reduce the theoretical uncertainty due to higher order electroweak effects from several percent to a few parts in a thousand. If the LO result is expressed in terms of G submu or of the MS-bar coupling g-circumflex(Mz), the two-loop corrections are O(1%), the exact value depending on the mass of the Higgs boson. We discuss in detail the renormalization procedure and the scheme and scale dependence, and provide practical formulas for the numerical implementation of our results. We also consider the heavy top mass expansion and show that in the case at hand it converges very slowly.

  11. Warp evidences in precessing galactic bar models

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Martin, Patricia; Masdemont, Josep J

    2016-01-01

    Most galaxies have a warped shape when they are seen from an edge-on point of view. The reason for this curious form is not completely known so far and in this work we apply dynamical system tools to contribute to its explanation. Starting from a simple, but realistic, model formed by a bar and a disc, we study the effect produced by a small misalignment between the angular momentum of the system and its angular velocity. To this end, a precession model is developed and considered, assuming that the bar behaves like a rigid body. After checking that the periodic orbits inside the bar keep being the skeleton of the inner system, even after inflicting a precession to the potential, we compute the invariant manifolds of the unstable periodic orbits departing from the equilibrium points at the ends of the bar to get evidences of their warped shapes. As it is well known, the invariant manifolds associated with these periodic orbits drive the arms and rings of barred galaxies and constitute the skeleton of these bu...

  12. Tidally induced bars of galaxies in clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lokas, Ewa L; del Pino, Andres; Sybilska, Agnieszka; Athanassoula, E; Semczuk, Marcin; Gajda, Grzegorz; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Using N-body simulations we study the formation and evolution of tidally induced bars in disky galaxies in clusters. Our progenitor is a massive, late-type galaxy similar to the Milky Way, composed of an exponential disk and an NFW dark matter halo. We place the galaxy on four different orbits in a Virgo-like cluster and evolve it for 10 Gyr. As a reference case we also evolve the same model in isolation. Tidally induced bars form on all orbits soon after the first pericenter passage and survive until the end of the evolution. They appear earlier, are stronger, longer and have lower pattern speeds for tighter orbits. Only for the tightest orbit the properties of the bar are controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the cluster at pericenters. The mechanism behind the formation of the bars is the angular momentum transfer from the galaxy stellar component to its halo. All bars undergo extended periods of buckling instability that occur earlier and lead to more pronounced boxy/peanut shapes when th...

  13. Warp evidence in precessing galactic bar models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, P.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Masdemont, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Most galaxies have a warped shape when they are seen edge-on. The reason for this curious form is not completely known so far, so in this work we apply dynamical system tools to contribute to its explanation. Starting from a simple, but realistic model formed by a bar and a disc, we study the effect of a small misalignment between the angular momentum of the system and its angular velocity. To this end, a precession model was developed and considered, assuming that the bar behaves like a rigid body. After checking that the periodic orbits inside the bar continue to be the skeleton of the inner system even after inflicting a precession to the potential, we computed the invariant manifolds of the unstable periodic orbits departing from the equilibrium points at the ends of the bar to find evidence of their warped shapes. As is well known, the invariant manifolds associated with these periodic orbits drive the arms and rings of barred galaxies and constitute the skeleton of these building blocks. Looking at them from a side-on viewpoint, we find that these manifolds present warped shapes like those recognised in observations. Lastly, test particle simulations have been performed to determine how the stars are affected by the applied precession, this way confirming the theoretical results.

  14. CP Asymmetries in bar B -> bar K* (-> bar K pi) l+ l- and Untagged bar B_s,B_s -> phi (-> K+ K-) l+ l- Decays at NLO

    CERN Document Server

    Bobeth, Christoph; Piranishvili, Giorgi

    2008-01-01

    The decay bar B -> bar K* (-> bar K pi) l+ l- offers great opportunities to explore the physics at and above the electroweak scale by means of an angular analysis. We investigate the physics potential of the seven CP asymmetries plus the asymmetry in the rate, working at low dilepton mass using QCD factorization at next-to leading order (NLO). The b ->s CP asymmetries are doubly Cabibbo-suppressed \\lesssim 1 % in the Standard Model and its extensions where the CKM matrix is the only source of CP violation. Three CP asymmetries are T-odd, and can be O(1) in the presence of non-standard CP violation. The T-even asymmetries can reach O(0.1), limited by the small strong phases in the large recoil region. We furthermore point out an easy way to measure CP phases from time-integrated, untagged bar B_d, B_d -> K* (-> K0 pi0) l+ l- and bar B_s,B_s -> phi (-> K+ K-) l+ l- decays. Analyses of these CP asymmetries can rule out, or further support the minimal description of CP violation through the CKM mechanism. Experim...

  15. Bar code application to nuclear material accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of efficient implementation of IAEA safeguards inspection, operators ought to prepare the information which is related to the strata for flow verification in a timely manner, such as physical inventory listing and summary of the fuel bundles. Today the use of bar code technique in tracing of products related data or counting number of items has been more and more applied to many facets of industry. From these points of view, the Japan Nuclear Fuel Company (NF) has been developing JNF Total Bar Code System. Now JNF has established an on-line input system of the fuel bundle accountability data by use of the bar code system to quickly prepare the information necessary for the inspection. As the first step, JNF implemented this bar code system at the flow verification to prepare physical inventory summary and location map of the fuel bundles in the storage. This paper reports that as a result of this, NF confirmed that this bar code system made it possible to input easily and quickly nuclear material accountancy information, and therefore this system is utilized as an effective and efficient measure of timely preparation for the inspection

  16. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The age old method of physically taking an inventory of materials by listing each item's identification number has lived beyond its usefulness. In this age of computerization, which offers the local grocery store a quick, sure, and easy means to inventory, it is time for nuclear materials facilities to automate accountability activities. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At that time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable; however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented

  17. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At this time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable, however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented

  18. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}Z$ and $t\\bar{t}W$ production cross sections in multilepton final states using 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at 13 TeV at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the $t\\bar{t}Z$ and $t\\bar{t}W$ production cross sections in final states with either two same charge muons, or three or four leptons (electrons or muons) is presented. The analysis uses a data sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ Te\\kern -0.1em V recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2015 corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of \\mbox{3.2 fb$^{-1}$}. The inclusive cross sections are extracted using likelihood fits to signal and control regions, resulting in $\\sigma_{t\\bar{t}Z} = 0.9 \\pm 0.3$ pb and $\\sigma_{t\\bar{t}W} = 1.4 \\pm 0.8$ pb, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  19. Jazz Chants Born in a Piano Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Graham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When I first arrived in New York in the late sixties, I began teaching ESL at New York University. I didn`t really think of teaching as a profession for me. I just thought it would pay the rent so I could do what I really wanted to do which was to sing and play ragtime piano in the piano bars. When I got my first piano job in an Irish Bar it was uptown, far away from NYU so I didn`t feel it was necessary to mention this night job to my boss.

  20. Newtorites in bar detectors of gravitational wave

    CERN Document Server

    Ronga, F

    2015-01-01

    The detection of particles with only gravitational interactions (Newtorites) in gravitational bar detectors was studied in 1984 by Bernard, De Rujula and Lautrup. The negative results of dark matter searches suggest to look to exotic possibilities like Newtorites. The limits obtained with the Nautilus bar detector will be presented and the possible improvements will be discussed. Since the gravitational coupling is very weak, the possible limits are very far from what is needed for dark matter, but for large masses are the best limits obtained on the Earth. An update of limits for MACRO particles will be given.

  1. Sine-Bar Attachment For Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    Sine-bar attachment for collets, spindles, and chucks helps machinists set up quickly for precise angular cuts that require greater precision than provided by graduations of machine tools. Machinist uses attachment to index head, carriage of milling machine or lathe relative to table or turning axis of tool. Attachment accurate to 1 minute or arc depending on length of sine bar and precision of gauge blocks in setup. Attachment installs quickly and easily on almost any type of lathe or mill. Requires no special clamps or fixtures, and eliminates many trial-and-error measurements. More stable than improvised setups and not jarred out of position readily.

  2. Track Finding Efficiency in BaBar

    CERN Document Server

    Allmendinger, T; Brown, D N; Choi, H; Christ, S; Covarelli, R; Davier, M; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Hafner, A; Kowalewski, R; Long, O; Lutz, A M; Martinelli, M; Muller, D R; Nugent, I M; Pegna, D Lopes; Purohit, M V; Prencipe, E; Roney, J M; Simi, G; Solodov, E P; Telnov, A V; Varnes, E; Waldi, R; Wang, W F; White, R M

    2012-01-01

    We describe several studies to measure the charged track reconstruction efficiency and asymmetry of the BaBar detector. The first two studies measure the tracking efficiency of a charged particle using $\\tau$ and initial state radiation decays. The third uses the $\\tau$ decays to study the asymmetry in tracking, the fourth measures the tracking efficiency for low momentum tracks, and the last measures the reconstruction efficiency of $K_S^0$ particles. The first section also examines the stability of the measurements vs BaBar running periods.

  3. BAR-MOM Code and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    BAR-MOM [1,2] code to calculate the height of the fission barrier Bf, the energy of the ground state, the compound nucleus stability by limit with respect to fission, i.e., the angular momentum(the spin value) Lmax at which the fission barrier disappears, the three principal axis moments of inertia at saddle point for a certain nucleus with atomic number Z, atomic mass number and angular momentum L for 19BAR-MOM code to include the results for Z≥102[3] by using more recent parameterization of the Thomas Fermi fission

  4. The Disability Dilemma: A Skeptical Bench & Bar

    OpenAIRE

    Wendy F. Hensel

    2008-01-01

    The legal profession is no stranger to the bias and prejudice present in American society. Members of the bar have been shown to engage in both conscious and subconscious sexism and racism, posing challenges to the profession as the profile of those practicing law has changed over the last several decades to admit increasing numbers of women and minorities.1 Nevertheless, it is notable that few, if any, members of the bar today would question openly whether women or people of color have the a...

  5. B Counting at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  6. Imaging of physeal bars in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, David C. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Deeney, Vincent; Roach, James W. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Orthopedics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Shah, Amisha J. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The growth plate, also known as the physis or epiphyseal plate, is essential for longitudinal growth of bones in the immature skeleton. A variety of insults to the growth plate from trauma to infection to idiopathic causes can lead to physeal bar formation, an interruption in normal growth plate cartilage, where a bony or fibrous bridge develops between the metaphysis and epiphysis. This bridge restricts subsequent bone growth, leading to limb shortening and/or angular deformities. Early recognition of the presence of a physeal bar can help direct appropriate surgical management to restore linear growth of the bone. (orig.)

  7. M33: THE EXISTENCE OF A BAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hernández-López

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A signi cant fraction of galaxies in the Local Universe classi ed as unbarred in the RC3 turn out to be barred in optical and NIR wavelengths. In the Local Group the Milky Way and M31 have shown to be barred as well, this also could be the case of M33. In this paper we present the results of the Ellipse tting and bidimensional Fourier Analysis, on the R and I bands, deprojected and non-deprojected, images of M33 obtained from DSS2 and Spitzer-IRAC.

  8. Application of magnetic solvent bar liquid-phase microextraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides in fruit juice samples by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Hu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Yu, Cui; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Ziming

    2015-06-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive sample pretreatment technique, magnetic solvent bar liquid-phase microextraction (MSB-LPME) was developed for extracting organophosphorus pesticides from fruit juice. The analytes were extracted from the sample to the organic solvent immobilized in the fiber. The magnetic solvent bar not only can be used to stir the samples but also extract the analytes. After extraction, the analyte-adsorbed magnetic solvent bar can be readily isolated from the sample solution by a magnet, which could greatly simplify the operation and reduce the whole pretreatment time. The bar was eluted with methanol. The elute was evaporated to dryness and residue was dissolved in hexane. Several experimental parameters were investigated and optimized, including type of extraction solvent, number of magnetic solvent bar, extraction temperature, extraction time, salt concentration, stirring speed, pH and desorption conditions. The recoveries were in the range of 81.3-104.6%, and good reproducibilities were obtained with relative standard deviation below 6.1%. PMID:25624224

  9. Forming Double-barred Galaxies From Dynamically Cool Inner Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P

    2015-01-01

    About one third of early-type barred galaxies host small-scale secondary bars. The formation and evolution of such double-barred galaxies remain far from being well understood. In order to understand the formation of such systems, we explore a large parameter space of isolated pure-disk simulations. We show that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady secondary bar while the outer disk forms a large-scale primary bar. The independent bar instabilities of inner and outer disks result in long-lived double-barred structures whose dynamical properties are comparable with observations. This formation scenario indicates that the secondary bar might form from the general bar instability, the same as the primary bar. Under some circumstances, the interaction of the bars and the disk leads to the two bars aligning or single, nuclear, bars only. Simulations that are cool enough of the center to experience clump instabilities may also generate steady double-barred ga...

  10. Observation of B+ --> K0bar K+ and B0 --> K0 K0bar

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del, P; Amo Sanchez; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo, M; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del, L; Buono; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We report observations of the b --> d penguin-dominated decays B+ --> K0bar K+ and B0 --> K0 K0bar in approximately 350 million Upsilon(4S) --> BBbar decays collected with the BaBar detector. We measure the branching fractions B(B+ --> K0bar K+) = (1.61 +/- 0.44 +/- 0.09) * 10^-6 and B(B0 --> K0 K0bar) = (1.08 +/- 0.28 +/- 0.11) * 10^-6, and the CP-violating charge asymmetry A_{CP}(K0bar K+) = 0.10 +/- 0.26 +/- 0.03. Using a vertexing technique previously employed in several analyses of all-neutral final states containing kaons, we report the first measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B0 --> K0 K0bar, obtaining S = -1.28 +0.80/-0.73 +0.11/-0.16 and C = -0.40 +/- 0.41 +/- 0.06. We also report improved measurements of the branching fraction B(B0 --> K0 pi+) = (23.9 +/- 1.1 +/- 1.0) * 10^-6 and CP-violating charge asymmetry A_{CP}(K0 pi+) = -0.029 +/- 0.039 +/- 0.010.

  11. Possible strange hidden-charm pentaquarks from $\\Sigma_c^{(*)}\\bar{D}_s^*$ and $\\Xi^{(',*)}_c\\bar{D}^*$ interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    In a one-boson-exchange model with one-pion and one-eta exchanges, we investigate possible strange hidden-charm pentaquarks produced from the $\\Lambda_c\\bar{D}_s^*$, $\\Sigma_c\\bar{D}_s^*$, $\\Sigma_c^*\\bar{D}_s^*$, $\\Xi_c\\bar{D}^*$, $\\Xi_c'\\bar{D}^*$, and $\\Xi_c^*\\bar{D}^*$ interactions with the S-D wave mixing. The Lagrangians with chiral symmetry, heavy quark symmetry, and/or hidden local symmetry are adopted to describe the interactions. With such Lagrangians, it is found that the $\\Lambda_c\\bar{D}_s^*$ and $\\Xi_c\\bar{D}^*$ interactions are forbidden. For the $\\Sigma_c\\bar{D}_s^*$ and $\\Sigma_c^*\\bar{D}_s^*$ systems where the one-pion exchange is forbidden and only one-eta exchange survives, there exist three molecular candidates at cutoffs about 3 GeV, i.e., a $\\Sigma_c\\bar{D}_s^*$ state with quantum number $I(J^P)=1(\\frac{3}{2}^-)$ and $\\Sigma_c^*\\bar{D}_s^*$ states with $1(\\frac{1}{2}^-)$ and $1(\\frac{3}{2}^-)$. For the $\\Xi_c'\\bar{D}^*$ and $\\Xi_c^*\\bar{D}^*$ systems where the one-pion exchange is allow...

  12. A piezo-bar pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, W. H.; Murphy, C. L.; Shanfield, I.

    1967-01-01

    Piezo-bar pressure type probe measures the impact velocity or pressure of a moving debris cloud. It measures pressures up to 200,000 psi and peak pressures may be recorded with a total pulse duration between 5 and 65 musec.

  13. Bar instability in disk-halo systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2016-01-01

    We show that the exponential growth rate of a bar in a stellar disk is substantially greater when the disk is embedded in a live halo than in a rigid one having the same mass distribution. We also find that the vigor of the instability in disk-halo systems varies with the shape of the halo velocity ellipsoid. Disks in rigid halos that are massive enough to be stable by the usual criteria, quickly form bars in isotropic halos and much greater halo mass is needed to avoid a strong bar; thus stability criteria derived for disks in rigid halos do not apply when the halo is responsive. The study presented here is of an idealized family of models with near uniform central rotation and that lack an extended halo; we present more realistic models with extended halos in a companion paper. The puzzle presented by the absence of strong bars in some galaxies having gently rising inner rotation curves is compounded by the results presented here.

  14. Blast Quantification Using Hopkinson Pressure Bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Samuel D; Fay, Stephen D; Rigby, Samuel E; Tyas, Andrew; Warren, James A; Reay, Jonathan J; Fuller, Benjamin J; Gant, Matthew T A; Elgy, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Near-field blast load measurement presents an issue to many sensor types as they must endure very aggressive environments and be able to measure pressures up to many hundreds of megapascals. In this respect the simplicity of the Hopkinson pressure bar has a major advantage in that while the measurement end of the Hopkinson bar can endure and be exposed to harsh conditions, the strain gauge mounted to the bar can be affixed some distance away. This allows protective housings to be utilized which protect the strain gauge but do not interfere with the measurement acquisition. The use of an array of pressure bars allows the pressure-time histories at discrete known points to be measured. This article also describes the interpolation routine used to derive pressure-time histories at un-instrumented locations on the plane of interest. Currently the technique has been used to measure loading from high explosives in free air and buried shallowly in various soils. PMID:27404117

  15. My Bar Graph Tells a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

  16. BaBar Explores CP Violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most recent results obtained by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC on CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions for neutral and charged B decays are presented here. The analysis was performed on a data sample of ∼ 88 million Υ(4S) → B(bar B) decays collected between 1999 and 2002. Using b → c(bar c)s decays, we measure sin2β = 0.741 ± 0.067(stat) ± 0.034(syst). We also present sin2β measurements from, b → s(bar s)s and b → c(bar c)d processes. From neutral B meson decays to two-body final states of charged pions and kaons, we derive for the CP violating parameters, Sππ = 0.02 ± 0.34 ± 0.05 [-0.54, +0.58] and Cππ = -0.30 ± 0.25 ± 0.04 [-0.72, +0.12]. First results for B → π+π-π0 and K±π±π0 final states dominated by the ρ± resonance, are also presented

  17. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Cao, Chen, E-mail: zmzhou@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: caochen@sdu.edu.cn [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  18. Search for the decay of a B0 or B0bar meson to K*0bar K0 or K*0 K0bar

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côte, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martínez-Vidal, F; Azzolini, V; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present a search for the decay of a B0 or B0bar meson to a K*0bar K0 or K*0 K0bar final state, using a sample of approximately 232 million BBbar events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e+e- collider at SLAC. The measured branching fraction is B(B0 --> K*0bar K0) + B(B0 --> K*0 K0bar) = (0.2+0.9-0.8+0.1-0.3)x 10-6. We obtain the following upper limit for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level: B(B0 --> K*0bar K0) + B(B0 --> K*0 K0bar) phi K0 from sin(2beta).

  19. The Morphology of Collisionless Galactic Rings Exterior to Evolving Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Bagley, Micaela; Quillen, Alice C

    2008-01-01

    The morphology of the outer rings of early-type spiral galaxies is compared to integrations of massless collisionless particles initially in nearly circular orbits. Particles are perturbed by a quadrupolar gravitational potential corresponding to a growing and secularly evolving bar. We find that outer rings with R1R2 morphology and pseudorings are exhibited by the simulations even though they lack gaseous dissipation. Simulations with stronger bars form pseudorings earlier and more quickly than those with weaker bars. We find that the R1 ring, perpendicular to the bar, is fragile and dissolves after a few bar rotation periods if the bar pattern speed increases by more than ~ 8%, bar strength increases (by >~ 140%) after bar growth, or the bar is too strong (Q_T>0.3). If the bar slows down after formation, pseudoring morphology persists and the R2 ring perpendicular to the bar is populated due to resonance capture. The R2 ring remains misaligned with the bar and increases in ellipticity as the bar slows down....

  20. Study of psi(2S) Decays to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} and Search for p bar{p} Threshold Enhancements

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, J P; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Adams, S; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Tarbert, C M; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Xavier, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Brisbane, S; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Spradlin, P; Wilkinson, G; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Ricciardi, S; Thomas, C; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Lincoln, A; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Zhu, J; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Randrianarivony, K; Tatishvili, G; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L

    2010-01-01

    The decays of psi(2S) into gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5 million psi(2S) events obtained from e^+e^- annihilations at sqrt{s} = 3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N^* resonances in p pi^0 and p eta channels in pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} decays, and f_2 states in gamma p bar{p} decay. Branching fractions for decays of psi(2S) to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been determined. No evidence for p bar{p} threshold enhancements was found in the reactions psi(2S)-> X p bar{p}, where X = gamma, pi^0, eta. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a p bar{p} threshold enhancement in J/psi-> gamma p bar{p} as previously reported by BES.

  1. Quality of Cosmetic Argan Oil Extracted by Supercritical Fluid Extraction from Argania spinosa L.

    OpenAIRE

    Chouaa Taribak; Lourdes Casas; Casimiro Mantell; Zoubaida Elfadli; Metni, Rédouane E.; Enrique J. Martínez de la Ossa

    2013-01-01

    Argan oil has been extracted using supercritical CO2. The influence of the variables pressure (100, 200, 300, and 400 bar) and temperature (35, 45, 55°C) was investigated. The best extraction yields were achieved at a temperature of 45°C and a pressure of 400 bar. The argan oil extracts were characterized in terms of acid, peroxide and iodine values, total tocopherol, carotene, and fatty acids content. Significant compositional differences were not observed between the oil samples obtained us...

  2. CP asymmetry Relations Between $\\bar B^0\\rightarrow \\pi\\pi$ and $\\bar B^0\\rightarrow \\pi K$ Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang(INPAC, SKLPPC and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China)

    1994-01-01

    We prove that CP violating rate difference $\\Delta (\\bar B^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-) = \\Gamma (\\bar B^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-) - \\Gamma ( B^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+)$ is related to $\\Delta (\\bar B^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^+ K^-) = \\Gamma (\\bar B^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^+K^-) - \\Gamma (B^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^-K^+)$ in the three generation Standard Model. Neglecting small annihilation diagrams, and in the SU(3) symmetry limit, we show $\\Delta (\\bar B^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-) = - \\Delta (\\bar B^0 \\rightarrow ...

  3. Nucleon strange $s\\bar s$ asymmetry to the $\\Lambda/\\bar\\Lambda$ fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, Yujie; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The difference between the $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar \\Lambda$ longitudinal spin transfers in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process is intensively studied. The study is performed in the current fragmentation region, by considering the intermediate hyperon decay processes and sea quark fragmentation processes, while the strange sea $s\\bar s$ asymmetry in the nucleon is taken into account. The calculation in the light-cone quark-diquark model shows that the strange sea asymmetry gives a proper trend to the difference between the $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar \\Lambda$ longitudinal spin transfers. When considering the nonzero final hadron transverse momentum, our results can explain the COMPASS data reasonably. The nonzero final hadron transverse momentum is interpreted as a natural constraint to the final hadron $z$ range where the longitudinal spin transfer is more sensitive to the strange sea $s\\bar s$ asymmetry.

  4. Osmundiron, cleaved iron bars and slags (Osmundjern, kloder og kalotslagger)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchwald, Vagn Fabritius

    1996-01-01

    Investigation of so-called Osmund iron, iron bars and slags from iron production in the medieval ages.......Investigation of so-called Osmund iron, iron bars and slags from iron production in the medieval ages....

  5. Rare kaon decays: $K^{+} → ^{+} \\bar{}$ and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bipul Bhuyan

    2004-03-01

    The experimental progress in the search for $K^{+} → ^{+} \\bar{}$ will be presented in this paper. Also the physics potential of the proposed BNL experiment to search for $K_{L}^{0} → ^{0} \\bar{}$ (KOPIO) will be discussed.

  6. Bar pattern speeds in CALIFA galaxies: I. Fast bars across the Hubble sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Aguerri, J A L; Falcón-Barroso, J; Amorin, A; Barrera-Ballesteros, J; Fernandes, R Cid; García-Benito, R; García-Lorenzo, B; Delgado, R M González; Husemann, B; Kalinova, V; Lyubenova, M; Marino, R A; Márquez, I; Mast, D; Pérez, E; Sánchez, S F; van de Ven, G; Walcher, C J; Backsmann, N; Cortijo-Ferrero, C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; del Olmo, A; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Pérez, I; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Wisotzki, L; Ziegler, B

    2015-01-01

    The bar pattern speed ($\\Omega_{\\rm b}$) is defined as the rotational frequency of the bar, and it determines the bar dynamics. Several methods have been proposed for measuring $\\Omega_{\\rm b}$. The non-parametric method proposed by Tremaine \\& Weinberg (1984; TW) and based on stellar kinematics is the most accurate. This method has been applied so far to 17 galaxies, most of them SB0 and SBa types. We have applied the TW method to a new sample of 15 strong and bright barred galaxies, spanning a wide range of morphological types from SB0 to SBbc. Combining our analysis with previous studies, we investigate 32 barred galaxies with their pattern speed measured by the TW method. The resulting total sample of barred galaxies allows us to study the dependence of $\\Omega_{\\rm b}$ on galaxy properties, such as the Hubble type. We measured $\\Omega_{\\rm b}$ using the TW method on the stellar velocity maps provided by the integral-field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey. Integral-field data solve the problem...

  7. Initial magnetic field distribution around high rectangular bus bars

    OpenAIRE

    Cividjian Grigore A.

    2014-01-01

    The one-dimensional transient electromagnetic field in and around a system of two nonmagnetic homogenous rectangular high thin bars can be analytically evaluated if the ratio of average initial magnetic field on the two sides of thin bar, or of the ratio of initial magnetic fields in middle of the bar height is known. In this paper, using appropriate conformal mappings, an exact analytical solution for these ratios are proposed in the case of very thin bars...

  8. Development of omega-3 rich energy bar with flaxseed

    OpenAIRE

    Mridula, D.; Singh, K. K.; Barnwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    Energy bar sample were prepared with different levels of flaxseed (0–20%) in addition to cereals and pulses with varying levels of sweeteners (45, 50, and 55%) to deliver a nutritious food to the consumer. The developed bars were evaluated for textural, colour, nutritional quality, sensory attributes and total microbial load. Different levels of flaxseed and sweeteners significantly affected the hue and chroma values of the energy bar. In general the level of flaxseed in energy bar did not af...

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Line-of-sight velocities from bar simulations (Molloy+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, M.; Smith, M. C.; Evans, N. W.; Shen, J.

    2016-02-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. (2015ApJ...804...80M). By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range 10°<~θbar<~25°. However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes. (1 data file).

  10. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  11. Applications of bar code technology at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar code is an emerging technology that can eliminate handwritten and keyboard data-entry errors. With application-specific software, bar code technology can provide inventory control, reducing staff time and paperwork. This paper summarizes bar code technology, describes hardware commercially available, and reviews application software systems for use in nuclear power plants

  12. Prediction of Vibration Transmission within Periodic Bar Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    The present analysis focuses on vibration transmission within semi-infinite bar structure. The bar is consisting of two different materials in a periodic manner. A periodic bar model is generated using two various methods: The Finite Element method (FEM) and a Floquet theory approach. A parameter...

  13. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section 886.5800...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by...

  14. $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ As the Lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ State

    CERN Document Server

    Lebed, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    The state $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ has recently been demoted by the Particle Data Group from its previous status as the conventional $c\\bar c$ $2 {}^3P_0$ state, largely due to the absence of expected $D\\bar D$ decays. We propose that $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ is actually the lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state, and calculate the spectrum of such states using the diquark model, identifying many of the observed charmoniumlike states that lack open-charm decay modes as $c\\bar c s \\bar s$. Among other results, we argue that $Y(4140)$ is a $J^{PC} = 1^{++}$ $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state that has been not been seen in two-photon fusion largely as a consequence of the Landau-Yang theorem.

  15. A train for the bus(bars)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On 8 April, the first SMACC (Superconducting Magnets and Circuits Consolidation) teams began work in the LHC tunnel. They are responsible for opening the interconnects between the magnets, laying the groundwork for the series of operations that will be performed by the team riding the ‘consolidation train’.   A technician installs the machine tool that allows them to prepare the surface of the section of the bar where the shunt will be fixed. The LHC’s 1,670 dipoles and quadrupoles are powered by power converters and connected by copper 'busbars’. The superconducting cables run through these bars, carrying a current of up to 11,850 amps. Six superconducting cables meet at each interconnect, where they are held together by a soldered (see box) electrical connection sandwiched between two pieces of copper, forming the splice between the busbars of the neighbouring magnets. The integrity of the electrical circuit is depen...

  16. Arbejdsulykker inden for BAR-SOSU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kirsten

    Denne rapport er udarbejdet til BAR SOSU, som har formuleret følgende opgave: 1. At få udarbejdet et overblik over den viden om ulykker indenfor SOSU´s område, som foreligger i eksisterende statistikker, med henblik på udviklingen over de seneste 5-10 år, ulykkernes konsekvenser i form af skadens...... art og i det omfang det er muligt også ulykkernes art. 2. At få gennemgået BAR SOSU´s nuværende materiale målrettet ulykkesforebyggelse og vurdere, hvad der kan udvikles yderligere til brug for at styrke det ulykkesforebyggende arbejde. 3. Med udgangspunkt i nyere forskning om ulykkesforebyggelse og...

  17. Bar-code automated waste tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bar-Code Automated Waste Tracking System was designed to be a site-Specific program with a general purpose application for transportability to other facilities. The system is user-friendly, totally automated, and incorporates the use of a drive-up window that is close to the areas dealing in container preparation, delivery, pickup, and disposal. The system features ''stop-and-go'' operation rather than a long, tedious, error-prone manual entry. The system is designed for automation but allows operators to concentrate on proper handling of waste while maintaining manual entry of data as a backup. A large wall plaque filled with bar-code labels is used to input specific details about any movement of waste

  18. The Disability Dilemma: A Skeptical Bench & Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy F. Hensel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The legal profession is no stranger to the bias and prejudice present in American society. Members of the bar have been shown to engage in both conscious and subconscious sexism and racism, posing challenges to the profession as the profile of those practicing law has changed over the last several decades to admit increasing numbers of women and minorities.1 Nevertheless, it is notable that few, if any, members of the bar today would question openly whether women or people of color have the ability to be successful, productive members of the profession. Instead, the conventional wisdom is that the greatest obstacles to their success will come in the form of external barriers and institutional policies based on preconceived norms that do not acknowledge the divergent challenges faced by these group members.

  19. A Distinct Structure Inside the Galactic Bar

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiyama, S; Baba, D; Haba, Y; Kadowaki, R; Kato, D; Kurita, M; Nagashima, C; Nagayama, T; Murai, Y; Nakajima, Y; Tamura, M; Nakaya, H; Sugitani, K; Naoi, T; Matsunaga, N; Tanabé, T; Kusakabe, N; Sato, S; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Baba, Daisuke; Haba, Yasuaki; Kadowaki, Ryota; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murai, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji; Naoi, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Sato, Shuji

    2005-01-01

    We present the result of a near-infrared (J H Ks) survey along the Galactic plane, -10.5deg < l < +10.5deg and b=+1.0deg, with the IRSF 1.4m telescope and the SIRIUS camera. Ks vs. H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams reveal a well-defined population of red clump (RC) stars whose apparent magnitude peak changes continuously along the Galactic plane, from Ks=13.4 at l=-10deg to Ks=12.2 at l=+10deg after dereddening. This variation can be explained by the bar-like structure found in previous studies, but we find an additional inner structure at |l| < 4deg, where the longitude - apparent magnitude relation is distinct from the outer bar, and the apparent magnitude peak changes by only 0.1 mag over the central 8deg. The exact nature of this inner structure is as yet uncertain.

  20. Bar-code automated waste tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The Bar-Code Automated Waste Tracking System was designed to be a site-Specific program with a general purpose application for transportability to other facilities. The system is user-friendly, totally automated, and incorporates the use of a drive-up window that is close to the areas dealing in container preparation, delivery, pickup, and disposal. The system features ``stop-and-go`` operation rather than a long, tedious, error-prone manual entry. The system is designed for automation but allows operators to concentrate on proper handling of waste while maintaining manual entry of data as a backup. A large wall plaque filled with bar-code labels is used to input specific details about any movement of waste.

  1. Does the enhancement observed in $\\gamma\\gamma\\to D\\bar{D}$ contain two $P$-wave higher charmonia?

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Solved is a new puzzle raised by the observation of an enhancement structure Z(3930) in $\\gamma\\gamma\\to D\\bar{D}$. If categorizing Z(3930) as $\\chi_{c2}(2P)$ suggested by Belle and BaBar, we must explain why $\\chi_{c0}(2P)$ dominantly decaying into $D\\bar{D}$ is missing in the $D\\bar{D}$ invariant mass spectrum. In this letter, we propose that the Z(3930) enhancement structure may contain two $P$-wave higher charmonia $\\chi_{c0}(2P)$ and $\\chi_{c2}(2P)$. We show that this assumption is supported by our analysis of the $D\\bar{D}$ invariant mass spectrum and $\\cos\\theta^\\ast$ distribution of $\\gamma\\gamma\\to D\\bar{D}$. In addition, we also extract the resonance parameters of $\\chi_{c0}(2P)$ and $\\chi_{c2}(2P)$ which show that these are two narrow resonances with masses very close to each other, i.e., $M_{\\chi_{c0}(2P)}=3.92$ GeV with $\\Gamma_{\\chi_{c0}(2P)}=8.07$ MeV and $M_{\\chi_{c2}(2P)}=3.94$ GeV with $\\Gamma_{\\chi_{c2}(2P)}=11.98$ MeV. These results would not only provide valuable information of two $P$-wa...

  2. Measurements of the braching fractions for psi(3770)--> D0D0-bar,D+D-,DD-bar$ and the resonance parameters of psi(3770) and psi(2S)

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M

    2006-01-01

    We report measurements of the branching fractions for $\\psi(3770)\\to D^0 \\bar D^0, D^+D^-, D\\bar D$ and resonance parameters of $\\psi(3770)$ and $\\psi(2S)$. By analyzing the line-shapes of the cross sections for inclusive hadron, $D^0 \\bar D^0$ and $D^+D^-$ event production in the range from 3.660 GeV to 3.872 GeV covering both $\\psi(2S)$ and $\\psi(3770)$ resonances, we extract the branching fractions for $\\psi(3770)$ decay into $D^0\\bar D^0 {\\rm and} D^+D^-$ respectively to be $B(\\psi(3770)\\to D^0 \\bar D^0)=(46.7 \\pm 4.7 \\pm 2.3)%$ and $B(\\psi(3770)\\to D^+ D^-)=(36.9 \\pm 3.7 \\pm 2.8)%$, which give $B(\\psi(3770)\\to D \\bar D)=(83.6 \\pm 7.3 \\pm 4.2)%$ and non-$D\\bar D$ branching fraction of $\\psi(3770)$ to be $B(\\psi(3770)\\to non-D \\bar D)=(16.4 \\pm 7.3 \\pm 4.2)%$. We meanwhile obtain the resonance parameters of $\\psi(3770)$ and $\\psi(2S)$ to be $M_{\\psi(3770)}=3772.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.3$ MeV, $\\Gamma^{\\rm tot}_{\\psi(3770)}=26.9 \\pm 2.4 \\pm 0.3$ MeV and $\\Gamma^{ee}_{\\psi(3770)}=251 \\pm 26 \\pm 11$ eV; $M_{\\psi(2S)}...

  3. Rock Bar BTR -liiketoimintasuunnitelma baariyrityksen perustamiseksi

    OpenAIRE

    Rieppo, Jani

    2015-01-01

    Laurea-ammattikorkeakoulu Tiivistelmä Laurea Leppävaara Hotelli- ja ravintola-alan liikkeenjohdon koulutusohjelma Rieppo, Jani Rock Bar BTR -liiketoimintasuunnitelma baariyrityksen perustamiseksi Vuosi 2015 Sivumäärä 58 Tämän toiminnallisen opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on liiketoimintasuunnitelman laatiminen uudelle rock-baarille, jonka avaaminen Joensuuhun on suunnitelman laatijan toimesta mahdollista joskus tulevaisuudessa. Tavo...

  4. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  5. The Expansion of Speakeasy Bar and Grill

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Joel

    2012-01-01

    This strategic analysis makes recommendations on a course of action for Speakeasy Bar and Grill, located in Vancouver, British Columbia, with regards to growth of the brand. The comprehensive analysis determined that Speakeasy currently generates a competitive source of advantage in large part from the high level of direct involvement of its owners as managers, both in terms of cost and customer value advantages. Sustaining this advantage as the company grows with greater demands being placed...

  6. Dowel Bar Retrofit Mix Design and Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, Yogini; Olek, Jan

    2012-01-01

    When dealing with the issue of repair of concrete pavement repair using dowel bar retrofit technique, it is very desirable for the repair material to have high fluidity that can ensure good compaction and facilitate flow to tight spaces, preferably without the use of a vibrator. The focus of this project was on identifying critical properties that control long-term performance of repair concrete, especially rapid-setting materials extended using pea gravel (maximum size aggregate 9.5 mm). ...

  7. DATA MODELING METHOD BASED ON PARTIAL LEAST SQUARE REGRESSION AND APPLICATION IN CORRELATION ANALYSIS OF THE STATOR BARS CONDITION PARAMETERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锐华; 高乃奎; 谢恒堃; 史维祥

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate various data message of the stator bars condition parameters under the condition that only a few samples are available, especially about correlation information between the nondestructive parameters and residual breakdown voltage of the stator bars. Methods Artificial stator bars is designed to simulate the generator bars. The partial didcharge( PD) and dielectric loss experiments are performed in order to obtain the nondestructive parameters, and the residual breakdown voltage acquired by AC damage experiment. In order to eliminate the dimension effect on measurement data, raw data is preprocessed by centered-compress. Based on the idea of extracting principal components, a partial least square (PLS) method is applied to screen and synthesize correlation information between the nondestructive parameters and residual breakdown voltage easily. Moreover, various data message about condition parameters are also discussed. Results Graphical analysis function of PLS is easily to understand various data message of the stator bars condition parameters. The analysis Results are consistent with result of aging testing. Conclusion The method can select and extract PLS components of condition parameters from sample data, and the problems of less samples and multicollinearity are solved effectively in regression analysis.

  8. INFINITELY VARIABLE TRANSMISSION USING FOUR BAR MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.N. ARUNKUMAR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the continuously variable transmission systems in automobiles now-a-days are non-positive drives. This means that they cannot be used in heavy vehicles that require very high torque to be transmitted. This new type of infinitely variable transmission is aimed at transmitting high torques by making it a positive drive, thus making continuously variable transmission systems to be suitable for heavy vehicles. Infinitely variable transmission system and continuously variable transmission system are both the same except that there is an extra zero gear ratio in infinitely variable transmission system. This newly developed transmission system is basically a four bar mechanism with variable crank radius which makes it possible to have continuously variable mechanical advantage. The output lever which oscillates in the four bar mechanism is connected to a ratchet mechanism which turns the output shaft intermittently, two four bar mechanisms with a phase difference of 180 degrees is used to avoid the intermittent rotation of the output shaft. A flywheel is used in the output shaft to reduce the fluctuations in both speed and torque.

  9. BAR-MOM code and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAR-MOM code for calculating the height of the fission barrier Bf , the energy of the ground state is presented; the compound nucleus stability by limit with respect to fission, i.e., the angular momentum (the spin value) Lmax at which the fission barrier disappears, the three principal axis moments of inertia at saddle point for a certain nucleus with atomic number Z, atomic mass number A and angular momentum L in units of ℎ for 19< Z<102, and the model used are introduced briefly. The generalized BAR-MOM code to include the results for Z ≥ 102 by using more recent parameterization of the Thomas Fermi fission barrier is also introduced briefly. We have learned the models used in Code BAR-MOM, and run it successfully and correctly for a certain nucleus with atomic mass number A, atomic number Z, and angular momentum L on PC by Fortran-90. The testing calculation values to check the implementation of the program show that the results of the present work are in good agreement with the original one

  10. Formation of Nuclear Spirals in Barred Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ann, H B; Thakur, Parijat

    2004-01-01

    We have performed smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations for the response of the gaseous disk to the imposed moderately strong non-axisymmetric potentials. The model galaxies are composed of the three stellar components (disk, bulge and bar) and two dark ones (supermassive black hole and halo) whose gravitational potentials are assumed to be invariant in time in the frame corotating with the bar. We found that the torques alone generated by the moderately strong bar that gives the maximum of tangential-to-radial force ratio as $(F_{Tan}/F_{Rad})_{max}= 0.3$ are not sufficient to drive the gas particles close to the center due to the barrier imposed by the inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs). In order to transport the gas particles towards the nucleus ($r<100$ pc), a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) and high sound speed of the gas are required to be present. The former is required to remove the inner inner Lindblad resonance (IILR) that prevents gas inflow close to the nucleus, while the latte...

  11. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  12. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  13. Inclusive dimuon and b-quark production cross sections in p bar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a preliminary measurement of the inclusive dimuon cross section in p bar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. From these results, we extract the inclusive b-quark production cross section for the kinematic range |yb| Tbmin < 25 GeV/c. The difference in azimuthal angle in the transverse plane for dimuon pairs from b bar b production is also shown

  14. Initial magnetic field distribution around high rectangular bus bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cividjian Grigore A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The one-dimensional transient electromagnetic field in and around a system of two nonmagnetic homogenous rectangular high thin bars can be analytically evaluated if the ratio of average initial magnetic field on the two sides of thin bar, or of the ratio of initial magnetic fields in middle of the bar height is known. In this paper, using appropriate conformal mappings, an exact analytical solution for these ratios are proposed in the case of very thin bars. Obtained values are compared with FEM results for relatively thick bars.

  15. Antihydrogen Production in $ \\bar{p} $ Z - interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS210 \\\\ \\\\ The production of the antihydrogen atom $ \\bar {H}^0 \\equiv \\bar{p}e $ as the simplest atomic bound state of antimatter has been studied. Nine $ \\bar {H}^0 $ have been observed.\\\\ \\\\ The production of $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is predominantly mediated by the two-photon mechanism in the antiproton-nucleus interaction. In principle $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is well suited for investigations of fundamental CPT violation studies under different forces, however, in the present experiment we concentrated on the production of this antimatter object, since so far it never had been observed.

  16. Heat Transfer in the LHC Main Superconducting Bus Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Granieri, P P; Richter, D

    2011-01-01

    CERN is performing a systematic analysis of the interconnecting bus bars of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) main magnets. Their thermal, electrical, mechanical and hydraulic performances are addressed. In the frame of these studies, the heat transfer between the main superconducting (SC) bus bars and the surrounding He bath is investigated. It represents a key parameter in the comprehension of the bus bars stability and quench propagation mechanisms, thus crucial for the analysis of the 2008 incident which was triggered by a defective bus bars joint. This paper reports on the experimental tests and relative analysis aiming at describing the thermal behavior of the LHC main bus bars.

  17. Dalitz Plot Analysis of D0-->K0bar K+ K-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai, F; Tehrani; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    A Dalitz plot analysis of approximately 12500 D0 events reconstructed in the hadronic decay D0-->K0bar K+ K- is presented. This analysis is based on a data sample of 91.5 fb-1 collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+ e- storage rings at SLAC running at center-of-mass energies on and 40 MeV below the Y4S resonance. The events are selected from e+ e- --> c cbar annihilations using the decay D*+ --> D0 pi+. The following ratio of branching fractions has been obtained: BR = Gamma(D0-->K0bar K+ K-)/Gamma(D0-->K0bar pi+ pi-) = (15.8+/-0.1(stat.)+/-0.5(syst.)x 10-2 Estimates of fractions and phases for resonant and non-resonant contributions to the Dalitz plot are also presented. The a0(980)-->K Kbar projection has been extracted with little background. A search for CP asymmetries on the Dalitz plot has been performed.

  18. Which bulges are favoured by barred S0 galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Barway, Sudhanshu; Vaghmare, Kaustubh; Kembhavi, Ajit K

    2016-01-01

    S0 galaxies are known to host classical bulges with a broad range of size and mass, while some such S0s are barred and some not. The origin of the bars has remained as a long-standing problem -- what made bar formation possible in certain S0s? By analysing a large sample of S0s with classical bulges observed by the Spitzer space telescope, we find that most of our barred S0s host comparatively low-mass classical bulges, typically with bulge-to-total ratio ($B/T$) less than $0.5$; whereas S0s with more massive classical bulges than these do not host any bar. Furthermore, we find that amongst the barred S0s, there is a trend for the longer and massive bars to be associated with comparatively bigger and massive classical bulges -- possibly suggesting bar growth being facilitated by these classical bulges. In addition, we find that the bulge effective radius is always less than the bar effective radius --indicating an interesting synergy between the host classical bulge and bars being maintained while bar growth ...

  19. On the galactic spin of barred disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Park, Changbom; Wang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter $\\lambda_{d}$ and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into galaxies hosting strong or weak bars, and non-barred galaxies. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting strong bars with the lowest $\\lambda_{d}$ values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with weak bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate $\\lambda_{d}$ values for the case of strong bars, while the maximum for weak bars is at high $\\lambda_{d}$. This bi-modality is in good agreement with previous studies finding stronger bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with low content of cold gas, while weak bars are found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies, usually gas rich. In addition, the...

  20. Slowly rotating bars-Morphologies introduced by bistability in barred-spiral galactic potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Tsigaridi, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of a \\textit{barred-spiral} model when the system is rotating slowly and corotation is located beyond the end of the spiral arms. In the characteristic of the central family of periodic orbits we find a "bistable region". In the response model we observe a ring surrounding the bar and spiral arms starting tangential to the ring. This is a morphology resembling barred-spiral systems with inner rings. However, the dynamics associated with this structure in the case we study is different from that of a typical bar ending close to corotation. The ring of our model is round, or rather elongated perpendicular to the bar. It is associated with a folding (an "S" shaped feature) of the characteristic of the central family, which is typical in bistable bifurcations. Along the "S" part of the characteristic we have a change in the orientation of the periodic orbits from a x1-type to a x2-type morphology. The orbits populated in the response model change rather abruptly their orientati...

  1. The relation between bar formation, galaxy luminosity, and environment

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, E M; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Aguerri, J A L; Zarattini, S

    2013-01-01

    We derive the bar fraction in three different environments ranging from the field to Virgo and Coma clusters, covering an unprecedentedly large range of galaxy luminosities (or, equivalently, stellar masses). We confirm that the fraction of barred galaxies strongly depends on galaxy luminosity. We also show that the difference between the bar fraction distributions as a function of galaxy luminosity (and mass) in the field and Coma cluster are statistically significant, with Virgo being an intermediate case. We interpret this result as a variation of the effect of environment on bar formation depending on galaxy luminosity. We speculate that brighter disk galaxies are stable enough against interactions to keep their cold structure, thus, the interactions are able to trigger bar formation. For fainter galaxies the interactions become strong enough to heat up the disks inhibiting bar formation and even destroying the disks. Finally, we point out that the controversy regarding whether the bar fraction depends on...

  2. Occurence of organic pollutants in constructed wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    TRSKOVÁ, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    Constructed wetlands are wetlands designed to improve the quality of water. In this work, four representatives of typical organic pollutants in Constructed wetlands are studied : DEET, cotinine, coprostanol and galaxolide as the representatives of insecticide, alkaloid,faecal sterol and musk compound respectively. Moreover three different types of extraction techniques : aqueous two phase extraction (ATPE), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) - are investiga...

  3. Supercritical CO2 extraction of mentha (Mentha piperita L.) at different solvent densities

    OpenAIRE

    DUŠAN ADAMOVIĆ; IBRAHIM MUJIĆ; SLAVICA MILIĆ; ŽIKA LEPOJEVIĆ; ZORAN ZEKOVIĆ

    2009-01-01

    The chemical composition of mentha essential oil and mentha extracts obtained at different pressures/temperatures by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) were studied by GC–MS. The menthol content was also determined spectrophotometrically. The predominant compounds in the essential oil and in the CO2 extract obtained at 100 bar were L-menthon and menthole but at higher pressures (from 150 to 400 bar), squalene was dominant. The equation of Naik et al. was used for modelling the mentha–superc...

  4. Dependence of Barred Galaxy Fraction on Galaxy Properties and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Gwang-Ho; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Choi, Yun-Young

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of occurrence of bars in galaxies on galaxy properties and environment. We use a volume-limited sample of 33,391 galaxies brighter than $M_{r}=-19.5+5$log$h$ at $0.02\\le z\\le0.05489$, drawn from the SDSS DR 7. We classify the galaxies into early and late types, and identify bars by visual inspection. Among 10,674 late-type galaxies with axis ratio $b/a>0.60$, we find 3,240 barred galaxies ($f_{bar}=30.4%$) which divide into 2,542 strong bars ($f_{SB1}=23.8%$) and 698 weak bars ($f_{SB2}=6.5%$). We find that $f_{SB1}$ increases as $u-r$ color becomes redder, and that it has a maximum value at intermediate velocity dispersion ($\\sigma\\simeq$150 km s$^{-1}$). This trend suggests that strong bars are dominantly hosted by intermediate-mass systems. Weak bars prefer bluer galaxies with lower mass and lower concentration. In the case of strong bars, their dependence on the concentration index appears only for massive galaxies with $\\sigma>150$ km s${}^{-1}$. We also find that $f_{bar}$ ...

  5. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  6. The Structure of the Milky Way's Bar Outside the Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Wegg, Christopher; Portail, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    While it is incontrovertible that the inner Galaxy contains a bar, its structure near the Galactic plane has remained uncertain, where extinction from intervening dust is greatest. We investigate here the Galactic bar outside the bulge, the long bar, using red clump giant (RCG) stars from UKIDSS, 2MASS, VVV, and GLIMPSE. We match and combine these surveys to investigate a wide area in latitude and longitude, |b|<9deg and |l|<40deg. We find: (1) The bar extends to l~25deg at |b|~5deg from the Galactic plane, and to l~30deg at lower latitudes. (2) The long bar has an angle to the line-of-sight in the range (28-33)deg, consistent with studies of the bulge at |l|<10deg. (3) The scale-height of RCG stars smoothly transitions from the bulge to the thinner long bar. (4) There is evidence for two scale heights in the long bar. We find a ~180pc thin bar component reminiscent of the old thin disk near the sun, and a ~45pc super-thin bar component which exists predominantly towards the bar end. (5) Constructing...

  7. How can double-barred galaxies be long-lived?

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, Herve

    2015-01-01

    Double-barred galaxies account for almost one third of all barred galaxies, suggesting that secondary stellar bars, which are embedded in large-scale primary bars, are long-lived structures. However, up to now it has been hard to self-consistently simulate a disc galaxy that sustains two nested stellar bars for longer than a few rotation periods. N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including star formation recipes have been performed. Their properties have been compared with the most recent observational data in order to prove that they are representative of double-barred galaxies, even SB0. Overlaps in dynamical resonances and bar modes have been looked for using Fourier spectrograms. Double-barred galaxies have been successfully simulated with lifetimes as long as 7 Gyr. The stellar population of the secondary bar is younger on average than for the primary large-scale bar. An important feature of these simulations is the absence of any resonance overlap for several Gyr. In particular, there is no overlap betw...

  8. Search for the decay of a B0 or B0bar meson to K*0bar K0 or K*0 K0bar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-06-27

    The authors present a search for the decay of a B{sup 0} or {bar B}{sup 0} meson to a {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0} or K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0} final state, using a sample of approximately 232 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. The measured branching fraction is {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) = (0.2{sub -0.8, -0.3}{sup +0.9, +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. They obtain the following upper limit for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) < 1.9 x 10{sup -6}. They use our result to constrain the Standard Model prediction for the deviation of the CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sup 0} from sin 2{beta}.

  9. System analysis of bar code laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianpu; Chen, Zhaofeng; Lu, Zukang

    1996-10-01

    This paper focuses on realizing the three important aspects of bar code scanner: generating a high quality scanning light beam, acquiring a fairly even distribution characteristic of light collection, achieving a low signal dynamic range over a large depth of field. To do this, we analyze the spatial distribution and propagation characteristics of scanning laser beam, the vignetting characteristic of optical collection system and their respective optimal design; propose a novel optical automatic gain control method to attain a constant collection over a large working depth.

  10. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance.

  11. BarLaurean mahdollisuudet saavuttaa Joutsenmerkki

    OpenAIRE

    Järveläinen, Tuomas; Paavola, Salme

    2009-01-01

    Joutsenmerkki on vapaaehtoinen yhteispohjoismainen Ympäristömerkki. Opinnäytetyö on osa kehittämistyötä, jonka tavoitteena on hakea Joutsenmerkintää BarLaurean toiminnalle. Joutsenmerkin anomiseen tähtäävät toimenpiteet on aloitettu keväällä 2009 tekemällä aiheesta alustava toimintasuunnitelma. Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on soveltaa käytäntöön toimintasuunnitelmassa kuvattuja toimenpiteitä, jotka dokumentoidaan Joutsenmerkkikansioon osana Joutsenmerkki-hakemusta. Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena ...

  12. CP Violation at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeche, Christophe; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2011-11-15

    We report recent measurements of the three CKM angles of the Unitarity Triangle using about 383 millions b{bar b} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. The results of the angles ({beta}, {alpha}, {gamma}) of the unitarity triangle are consistent with Belle results, and with other CKM constraints such as the measurement of {epsilon}{sub K}, the length of the sides of the unitarity triangle determined from the measurements of {Delta}m{sub d}, {Delta}m{sub s}, |V{sub ub}|. This is an impressive confirmation of Standard Model in quark-flavor sector.

  13. Warp evidences in precessing galactic bar models

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Martin, Patricia; Romero-Gomez, Merce; Masdemont, Josep J.

    2016-01-01

    Most galaxies have a warped shape when they are seen from an edge-on point of view. The reason for this curious form is not completely known so far and in this work we apply dynamical system tools to contribute to its explanation. Starting from a simple, but realistic, model formed by a bar and a disc, we study the effect produced by a small misalignment between the angular momentum of the system and its angular velocity. To this end, a precession model is developed and considered, assuming t...

  14. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  15. A Distinct Structure Inside the Galactic Bar

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Baba, Daisuke; Haba, Yasuaki; Kadowaki, Ryota; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murai, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji; Naoi, Takahiro

    2005-01-01

    We present the result of a near-infrared (J H Ks) survey along the Galactic plane, -10.5deg < l < +10.5deg and b=+1.0deg, with the IRSF 1.4m telescope and the SIRIUS camera. Ks vs. H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams reveal a well-defined population of red clump (RC) stars whose apparent magnitude peak changes continuously along the Galactic plane, from Ks=13.4 at l=-10deg to Ks=12.2 at l=+10deg after dereddening. This variation can be explained by the bar-like structure found in previous studies, ...

  16. Search for CPT and Lorentz Violation in B0-B0bar Oscillations with Dilepton Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-11-28

    We report results of a search for CPT and Lorentz violation in B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} oscillations using inclusive dilepton events from 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We find 2.8{sigma} significance, compatible with no signal, for variations in the complex CPT violation parameter z at the Earth's sidereal frequency and extract values for the quantities {Delta}a{sub {mu}} in the general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. The spectral powers for variations in z over the frequency range 0.26 year{sup -1} to 2.1 day{sup -1} are also compatible with no signal.

  17. DOUBLE FOUR-BAR CRANK-SLIDER MECHANISM DYNAMIC BALANCING BY META-HEURISTIC ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Emdadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method for dynamic balancing of double four-bar crank slider mechanism by metaheuristic-based optimization algorithms is proposed. For this purpose, a proper objective function which is necessary for balancing of this mechanism and corresponding constraints has been obtained by dynamic modeling of the mechanism. Then PSO, ABC, BGA and HGAPSO algorithms have been applied for minimizing the defined cost function in optimization step. The optimization results have been studied completely by extracting the cost function, fitness, convergence speed and runtime values of applied algorithms. It has been shown that PSO and ABC are more efficient than BGA and HGAPSO in terms of convergence speed and result quality. Also, a laboratory scale experimental doublefour-bar crank-slider mechanism was provided for validating the proposed balancing method practically.

  18. Double Four-Bar Crank-Slider Mechanism Dynamic Balancing by Meta-Heuristic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Emdadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method for dynamic balancing of double four-bar crank slider mechanism by meta-heuristic-based optimization algorithms is proposed. For this purpose, a proper objective function which is necessary for balancing of this mechanism and corresponding constraints has been obtained by dynamic modeling of the mechanism.Then PSO, ABC, BGA and HGAPSO algorithms have been applied for minimizing the defined cost function in optimization step. The optimization results have been studied completely by extracting the cost function, fitness, convergence speed and run time values of applied algorithms. It has been shown that PSO and ABC are more efficient than BGA and HGAPSO in terms of convergence speed and result quality. Also, a laboratory scale experimental double four-bar crank-slider mechanism was provided for validating the proposedbalancing method practicall

  19. Study of the ρ-bar, β-bar and Λ parameters of a light-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetic and perturbation equations are derived from the time-dependent transport equation. Kinetic equations depend only on the ratios a = ρ-bar/β-bar and b = β-bar/Λ, which are definite, while the reactivity ρ-bar, the delayed neutron fraction (β-bar and the generation time Λ are expressed in terms of an arbitrary function I. The 'static' definitions of these parameters, which reduce kinetic problems to a set of purely term dependent equations, introduce the effective fraction β-bar. One way of determining experimentally the ratio b is presented; it consists in analysing the power transient after a rapid variation of the reactivity, caused by the implosion of an empty glass-bull. A simple interpretation is proposed. The apparatus can be transformed easily into a reactimeter. The value of the effective delayed neutron fraction β-bar has been determined by averaging the reactivity effects of a copper sheet through out the reactor core. Experimental results: b = β-bar/Λ = 129 s-1 and β-bar 795.10-5, have been determined on a light-water moderated, enriched-uranium fuelled reactor. The calculated values of the effectiveness of delayed neutrons γ β-bar/β 1.23 and the generation time Λ 59.10-6s agrees fairly well with the experimental results. (author)

  20. Shepherding Tidal Debris with the Galactic Bar: The Ophiuchus Stream

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Kohei; Sanders, Jason L

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of stellar streams in rotating barred potentials is explained for the first time. Naturally, neighbouring stream stars reach pericentre at slightly different times. In the presence of a rotating bar, these neighbouring stream stars experience different bar orientations during pericentric passage and hence each star receives a different torque from the bar. These differing torques reshape the angular momentum and energy distribution of stars in the stream, which in turn changes the growth rate of the stream. For a progenitor orbiting in the same sense as the bar's rotation and satisfying a resonance condition, the resultant stream can be substantially shorter or longer than expected, depending on whether the pericentric passages of the progenitor occur along the bar's minor or major axis respectively. We present a full discussion of this phenomenon focusing mainly on streams confined to the Galactic plane. In stark contrast with the evolution in static potentials, which give rise to streams that g...

  1. Bar pattern speed evolution over the last 7 Gyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The tumbling pattern of a bar is the main parameter characterising its dynamics. From numerical simulations, its evolution since bar formation is tightly linked to the dark halo in which the bar is formed through dynamical friction and angular momentum exchange. Observational measurements of the bar pattern speed with redshift can restrict models of galaxy formation and bar evolution. Aims: We aim to determine for the first time the bar pattern speed evolution with redshift based on morphological measurements. Methods: We have selected a sample of 44 low-inclination ringed galaxies from the SDSS and COSMOS surveys covering the redshift range 0 electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgBased on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. Uncertainties in the Deprojection of the Observed Bar Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Yanfei; Li, Zhao-Yu

    2014-01-01

    In observations, it is important to deproject the two fundamental quantities characterizing a bar, i.e., its length ($a$) and ellipticity ($e$), to face-on values before any careful analyses. However, systematic estimation on the uncertainties of the commonly used deprojection methods is still lacking. Simulated galaxies are well suited in this study. We project two simulated barred galaxies onto a 2D plane with different bar orientations and disk inclination angles ($i$). Bar properties are measured and deprojected with the popular deprojection methods in the literature. Generally speaking, deprojection uncertainties increase with increasing $i$. All the deprojection methods behave badly when $i$ is larger than $60^\\circ$, due to vertical thickness of the bar. Thus, future statistical studies of barred galaxies should exclude galaxies more inclined than $60^\\circ$. At moderate inclination angles ($i\\leq60^\\circ$), 2D deprojection methods (analytical and image stretching) and Fourier-based methods (Fourier de...

  3. The application of bar coding technology at WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar coding at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) can be used to track waste containers within the facility, control transuranic (TRU) waste inventory flow, and reduce manpower and error in recording package identification or control parameters. By choosing where and when to bar code, precise timelines or time-and-motion studies can be conducted to aid in streamlining waste handling throughput at WIPP. Additionally, the use of bar codes as waste container identification (ID) numbers increases the accuracy of recording the ID numbers by four orders of magnitude. The bar code label can also be utilized for other functions, such as shipping labels. Also, the bar code is integrated with the waste management data base such that the entire data base can be accessed on a computer using a bar code

  4. Anti-seismic behavior of HRB400 reinforced steel bars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Bin; SHENG Guang-min; GONG Shi-hong

    2005-01-01

    The properties of anti-seismic HRB400 steel bars with 25 mm diameter were systematically investigated. The results showed that the properties of the HRB400 reinforced steel bars had been greatly enhanced comparing with HRB335 steel bars, i.e. coordination of strength and ductility, strain-aging sensibility, low temperature impact toughness, weld ability and high strain low cycle fatigue. The ductile-brittle transit temperatures of hot-rolled and strain-aged steel bars were evaluated as -17℃ and-8℃ respectively, and the low temperature impact toughness of HRB400 steel bars remains to be improved. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction showed little vanadium existed in ferrite as VN, most of which existed in pearlite as alloy cementite which resulted in the declination of impact toughness. Methods were suggested to improve the anti-seismic properties of steel bars.

  5. Asymptotic Orbits in Barred Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Harsoula, Maria; Contopoulos, George

    2010-01-01

    We study the formation of the spiral structure of barred spiral galaxies, using an $N$-body model. The evolution of this $N$-body model in the adiabatic approximation maintains a strong spiral pattern for more than 10 bar rotations. We find that this longevity of the spiral arms is mainly due to the phenomenon of stickiness of chaotic orbits close to the unstable asymptotic manifolds originated from the main unstable periodic orbits, both inside and outside corotation. The stickiness along the manifolds corresponding to different energy levels supports parts of the spiral structure. The loci of the disc velocity minima (where the particles spend most of their time, in the configuration space) reveal the density maxima and therefore the main morphological structures of the system. We study the relation of these loci with those of the apocentres and pericentres at different energy levels. The diffusion of the sticky chaotic orbits outwards is slow and depends on the initial conditions and the corresponding Jaco...

  6. Barómetro industrial LEON 50

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Álvarez Martínez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El Barómetro indusrial LEON 50 es un trabajo de investigación que tiene como objetivo esencial identificar características patrimoniales, financieras y económicas de una muestra de empresas que actúan dentro de la industria leonesa. El soporte de este estudio empírico es la información contable anual auditada que depositan en el Registro Mercantil las empresas integrantes de la muestra, recogida básicamente en el balance de situación, la cuenta de pérdidas y ganacias y el cuadro de finaciación referidos al bienio 2001-02. En esencia, el Barómetro Industrial LEON 50 pretende ser un avance en el análisis, diagnóstico y mejor conocimiento de la industria regional, aportando una visión actualizada sobre estrategias y pautas de actuación empresarial que serán objeto de observación en períodos

  7. STABILIZER BARS – CALCULATIONS, CONSTRUCTION AND PRODUCTION METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Marek WITTEK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the calculation and production methods for stabilizer bars. Modern technological and structural solutions in contemporary cars are reflected also in the construction and manufacturing of stabilizer bars. A proper construction and the selection of parameters influence the strength properties, the weight, durability and reliability as well as the selection of an appropriate production method. The selection of the manufacturing process has a fundamental impact on the quality and durability of the stabilizer bars.

  8. Fault bars and the risk of feather damage in cranes

    OpenAIRE

    Jovani, Roger; Blas, Julio; Stoffel, M.J.; Bortolotti, L.E.; Bortolotti, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    Fault bars are translucent areas across feathers grown under stressful conditions. They are ubiquitous across avian species and feather tracts. Because fault bars weaken feather structure and can lead to feather breakage, they may reduce flight performance and lower fitness. Therefore, natural selection might prime mechan- isms aimed at reducing the cost of fault bars, penalizing their occurrence in those feathers more relevant for flight. Here, we tested one prediction of this ‘fault...

  9. Principles and Practices of Bar and Beverage Management

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2013-01-01

    Principles and Practices of Bar and Beverage Management is a comprehensive text and resource book designed to explain the latest developments and new complexities of managing modern bars - be they stand alone or part of larger institutions such as hotels and resorts. Consumer expectations have changed, and a bar today must deliver an integrated social experience in a safe modern environment, which also offers the latest products and services in a professional and engaging fashion. Against ...

  10. The structure of the Milky Way's bar outside the bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2015-07-01

    While it is incontrovertible that the inner Galaxy contains a bar, its structure near the Galactic plane has remained uncertain, where extinction from intervening dust is greatest. We investigate here the Galactic bar outside the bulge, the long bar, using red clump giant (RCG) stars from United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Vista Variables in the Via Lactea and Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire. We match and combine these surveys to investigate a wide area in latitude and longitude, |b| ≤ 9° and |l| ≤ 40°. We find (i) the bar extends to l ˜ 25° at |b| ˜ 5° from the Galactic plane, and to l ˜ 30° at lower latitudes; (ii) the long bar has an angle to the line-of-sight in the range (28°-33°), consistent with studies of the bulge at |l| thin bar component reminiscent of the old thin disc near the Sun, and a ˜45 pc superthin bar components which exist predominantly towards the bar end; (v) constructing parametric models for the red clump magnitude distributions, we find a bar half-length of 5.0 ± 0.2 kpc for the two-component bar, and 4.6 ± 0.3 kpc for the thin bar component alone. We conclude that the Milky Way contains a central box/peanut bulge which is the vertical extension of a longer, flatter bar, similar as seen in both external galaxies and N-body models.

  11. Washing with contaminated bar soap is unlikely to transfer bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Heinze, J. E.; Yackovich, F.

    1988-01-01

    Recent reports of the isolation of microorganisms from used soap bars have raised the concern that bacteria may be transferred from contaminated soap bars during handwashing. Since only one study addressing this question has been published, we developed an additional procedure to test this concern. In our new method prewashed and softened commercial deodorant soap bars (0.8% triclocarban) not active against Gram-negative bacteria were inoculated with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginos...

  12. Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a Generalised El Farol Bar Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

  13. Comparing photometric results of real and N-body bars

    CERN Document Server

    Athanassoula, E; Carrasco, L; Bosma, A; De Souza, R E; Recillas, E

    2009-01-01

    We compare the results of the photometrical analysis of barred galaxies with those of a similar analysis from N-body simulations. The photometry is for a sample of nine barred galaxies observed in the J and Ks bands with the CANICA near infrared (NIR) camera at the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astrofisico Guillermo Haro (OAGH) in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. The comparison includes radial ellipticity profiles and surface brightness (density for the N-body galaxies) profiles along the bar major and minor axes. We find very good agreement, arguing that the exchange of angular momentum within the galaxy plays a determinant role in the evolution of barred galaxies.

  14. Stability of cassava flour-based food bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Caroline da Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of Brazilian cassava has been reduced due to a lack of adjustment to the modern lifestyle. To reverse this trend, new products could be developed specifically targeted to high-value niche markets. Cereal bars stand out as fast food high in nutritional value. A bar formula mimicking cereal bars was prepared using a mixture of Brazilian cassava flour, hydrogenated vegetable fat, dried bananas, ground cashew nuts, and glucose syrup. After being pressed, the bars were dried for 1 hour at 65 °C, packaged in films, and stored under ambient conditions. Its stability was continuously monitored for 210 days in order to ensure its safety and enable its introduction to the market. Texture loss was observed in the packed bars after 90 days of storage, but the sensory characteristics allowed the testers to perceive this tendency after only 30 days of storage. However, chemical, physical, and microbial analyses confirmed that the bars were safe for consumption for 180 days. The results showed that a 45 g cassava flour-based bar enriched with nuts and dried fruits can meet 6% of the recommended daily fiber intake with a caloric value between that of the common cereal bar and that of an energy bar. Adapting the formula with ingredients (fruits, nuts from different regions of Brazil may add value to this traditional product as a fast food.

  15. Musculoskeletal demands of progressions for the longswing on high bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Gareth; Kerwin, David G

    2007-09-01

    Kinetic analyses of the chalked bar longswing on high bar and its associated progressions were used to explain musculoskeletal contributions during the performance of these skills. Data on four international male gymnasts performing three series of chalked bar longswings and eight progressions were recorded. Customized body segment inertia parameters, two-dimensional kinematics (50 Hz), and bar forces (1000 Hz) were used as input to inverse dynamic modelling. The analysis focused on the relative contributions of the knees, hips, and shoulders with root mean squared differences between the chalked bar longswing and the progressions being used to rank the progressions. Seventy per cent of the total work occurred between 200 degrees and 240 degrees of angular rotation in the longswing, 67% of which was contributed by the shoulders. The shoulders were also dominant in all progressions, with the largest such contribution occurring in the looped bar longswing with "no action". The least similar progression was the looped bar pendulum swing, while the most similar was the chalked bar bent knee longswing. This study provides a useful means for ranking progressions based on their kinetic similarity to the chalked bar longswing and builds on earlier research in identifying that progressions can be classified into those similar in physical demand (kinetics) and those similar in geometry (kinematics).

  16. Strain analysis of nonlocal viscoelastic Kelvin bar in tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xue-chuan; LEI Yong-jun; ZHOU Jian-ping

    2008-01-01

    Based on viscoelastic Kelvin model and nonlocal relationship of strain and stress, a nonlocal constitutive relationship of viscoelasticity is obtained and the strain response of a bar in tension is studied. By transforming governing equation of the strain analysis into Volterra integration form and by choosing a symmetric exponential form of kernel function and adapting Neumann series, the closed-form solution of strain field of the bar is obtained. The creep process of the bar is presented. When time approaches infinite, the strain of bar is equal to the one of nonlocal elasticity.

  17. Shanghai’s Bars:Urban Romance and Sadness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuSha

    2002-01-01

    When speaking of Shanghai’s bars, what comes to people’s minds first must be Hengshan Street, a road known for its variety of bars. For many people, Hengshan Street is a landmark. On this street, bars in bold and unrestrained styles appeal to visitors. In fact, the whole street is a large open bar: the hurly-burly of "Hello" permeates every corner of the street; the resonant singing of "Rainbow Potato" echoes in the night sky; the rock’n roll of "Full House" fascinates passers-by with the wildness of John Lennon; even

  18. Monitoring the laser marking of a bar code label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bar code label which has been laser marked onto the end of a nuclear fuel tube is tested for unacceptable depth penetration of the heat affected zone. The average gray level value of the bar code label is compared with a predetermined standard. The label is optically sensed by a video camera and a set of discrete digital values representative of the bar code label is generated. The average digital value representative of the bar code label is calculated and compared to a predetermined standard level derived from measurements of acceptable laser marked tubes. (author)

  19. Measurement of the B0-bar Lifetime and the B0B0-bar Oscillation Frequency Using Partially Reconstructed B0-bar to D*+ l- nu-bar Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-27

    The authors present a simultaneous measurement of the {bar B}{sup 0} lifetime {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d}. We use a sample of about 50,000 partially reconstructed {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays identified with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at SLAC. The flavor of the other B meson in the event is determined from the charge of another high-momentum lepton.

  20. Multipacting Analysis of the Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is being considered for a number of applications. Multipacting can be a limiting factor to the performance of in any superconducting structure. In the parallel-bar cavity the main contribution to the deflection is due to the transverse deflecting voltage, between the parallel bars, making the design potentially prone to multipacting. This paper presents the results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of multipacting in the parallel-bar cavity with resonant voltage, impact energies and corresponding particle trajectories.

  1. Green Soap: An Extraction and Saponification of Avocado Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutheimer, Susan; Caster, Jacqueline M.; Smith, Simone H.

    2015-01-01

    An introductory level green chemistry experiment is described that places a new twist on soap-making in lab. In this experiment, oil is extracted from an avocado, after which the oil is saponified to produce bars of green craft soap. Commonly used extraction solvents, such as petroleum ether, methylene chloride, and hexane, are replaced with safer…

  2. The Quark Flavor Violating Higgs Decay $h \\rightarrow \\bar b s + b \\bar s$ in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, M E; Rehman, M

    2015-01-01

    We study the quark flavor violating Higgs-boson decay $h \\rightarrow \\bar b s + b \\bar s$ in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The decay is analyzed first in a model independent, and in a second step in the minimal flavor violationg (MFV) Constrained MSSM. The experimental constraints from $B$-Physics observables (BPO) and electroweak precision observables (EWPO) are also calculated and imposed on the parameter space. It is shown that in some cases the EWPO restrict the flavor violating parameter space stronger than the BPO. In the model independent analysis values of ${\\cal O}(10^{-4})$ can be found for ${\\rm BR}(h \\rightarrow \\bar b s + b \\bar s)$. In the MFV CMSSM such results can only be obtained in very restricted parts of the parameter space. The results show that it is not excluded to observe the decay $h \\rightarrow \\bar b s + b \\bar s$ in the MSSM at future $e^+e^-$ colliders.

  3. Kondo effect of $\\bar{D}_{s}$ and $\\bar{D}_{s}^{\\ast}$ mesons in nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    We study the Kondo effect for $\\bar{D}_{s}$ and $\\bar{D}_{s}^{\\ast}$ mesons as impurity particles in nuclear matter. The spin-exchange interaction between the $\\bar{D}_{s}$ or $\\bar{D}_{s}^{\\ast}$ meson and the nucleon induces the enhancement of the effective coupling in the low-energy scattering in the infrared region, whose scale of singularity is given by the Kondo scale. We investigate the Kondo scale in the renormalization group equation at nucleon one-loop level. We furthermore study the ground state with the Kondo effect in the mean-field approach, and present that the Kondo scale is related to the mixing strength between the $\\bar{D}_{s}$ or $\\bar{D}_{s}^{\\ast}$ meson and the nucleon in nuclear matter. We show the spectral function of the impurity when the Kondo effect occurs.

  4. A Search for B+→ K+ Nu v$\\bar{v}$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Paul D. [Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    A search for the rare, flavour-changing neutral current decay B+→ K+ Nu v$\\bar{v}$ is presented using 81.9 fb-1 of data collected at the Y(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment. Signal candidate events are selected through the identification of a high momentum charged kaon and significant missing energy, where the companion B- in the event has decayed semileptonically via B- → D0-$\\bar{v}$ X and X is kinematically constrained to be either nothing or a low momentum transition photon or π0. The analysis was performed blind and 6 candidates were selected with a background expectation of 3.4 ± 1.2. This leads to a limit on the branching fraction of β (B+ → K+ v$\\bar{v}$) < 7.2 x 10-5 at 90% confidence level. We also search for the reaction B+ → π+v$\\bar{v}$ and extract a limit on the branching fraction of β(B+ → π+v$\\bar{v}$) < 2.5 x 10-4 at 90% confidence level.

  5. Study of J/psi -> p(p)over-bar and J/psi -> n(n)over-bar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, Kun; Liu, P. L.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C. Morales; Motzko, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    The decays J/psi -> p (p) over bar and J/psi -> n (n) over bar have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 x 10(6) J/psi events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+)e(-) collider. The branching fractions are determined to be B(J/psi -> p (p) over bar) = (2.112 +/- 0.004 +/- 0.031 x

  6. A Fault Diagnosis Approach for Broken Rotor Bars Based on EMD and Envelope Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-wen; ZHU Ning-hui; YANG Li; YAO Qi; LU Qing

    2007-01-01

    Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) used to deal with non-linear and non-stable signals, is a time-frequency analytical method that has been developed recently. In this paper the EMD method is used to filter the noise from the stator current signal that arises when rotor bars break. Then a Hilbert Transform is used to extract the envelope from the filtered signal. With the EMD method again, the frequency band containing the fault characteristic-frequency components, 2sf, can be extracted from the signal's envelope. The last step is to use a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method to extract the fault characteristic frequency. This frequency can be detected in actual data from a faulty motor, as shown by example. Compared to the Extend Park Vector method this method is proved to be more sensitive under light motor load.

  7. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Aloysia triphylla (L'Hérit Britton extracts obtained by pressurized CO2 extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaylise Vey Parodi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the chemical composition of five different extracts of Aloysia triphylla and their activity against Aeromonas sp. The extracts were obtained from the dried leaves by pressurized CO2 extraction at 30, 50 and 70ºC, and 100, 150, and 200 bar, and analyzed by GC/FID and GC-MS. The antibacterial activity was assayed by the microdilution method. The tested microorganisms comprised seven Aeromonas isolates obtained from the kidney of infected silver catfish, Rhamdia quelen. The yield, chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the extracts were dependent on the extraction conditions. Mono and sesquiterpenoids were the major constituents of all the extracts and the highest extraction yield was obtained at 70ºC and 200 bar. A. triphylla presented moderate antibacterial activity against Aeromonas sp.

  8. Studies of $\\gamma\\gamma\\to\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda},\\Sigma^0\\bar{\\Sigma^0}$ production at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, C C; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Anipko, D; Aoki, K; Arakawa, T; Arinstein, K; Asano, Y; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V M; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Barbero, M; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, J H; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Dowd, R; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Enari, Y; Epifanov, D A; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Gorisek, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Jones, M; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kikuchi, N; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, T H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kishimoto, N; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovnyi, P P; Kubota, T; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, S E; Lee, Y J; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, C Y; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakagawa, T; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Ronga, F J; Root, N; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Saitoh, S; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Sato, N; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Seki, T; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, Y T; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stamen, R; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stöck, H; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takada, N; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanabe, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tsai, Y T; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M Z; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Wu, C H; Xie, Q L; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, S; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Heyoung Yang; Yoshino, S; Yuan, Y; Yusa, Y; Zang, S L; Zhang, C C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Ziegler, T; Zupanc, A; Zürcher, D; al., et

    2006-01-01

    Cross sections for hyperon pair production from two-photon collisions, $\\gamma\\gamma\\to\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda},\\Sigma^0\\bar{\\Sigma^0}$, are measured in the 2-4 GeV energy region at Belle, using 464 fb$^{-1}$ of data. A contribution from the intermediate resonance $\\eta_c(1S)$ is observed, and the products of the two-photon width of the $\\eta_c(1S)$ and its branching ratios to $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\Sigma^0\\bar{\\Sigma^0}$ are measured. The results will help test QCD models.

  9. Investigation of the $X(5568)$ as a fully open-flavor $su\\bar b\\bar d$ tetraquark state

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Steele, T G; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the newly observed charged $X(5568)$ meson as an exotic open-flavor tetraquark state $su\\bar b\\bar d$ with $J^P=0^+/1^+$ in the framework of QCD sum rules. We use the color antisymmetric $[\\mathbf{\\bar 3_c}]_{su} \\otimes [\\mathbf{3_c}]_{\\bar{b}\\bar d}$ tetraquark currents in both scalar and axial-vector channels to perform evaluations and numerical analyses. Our results imply that the $X(5568)$ can be interpreted as both the scalar $su\\bar b\\bar d$ tetraquark state and the axial-vector one, which are in good agreement with the experiment observation. We also investigate the possible decay patterns of the $X(5568)$ and suggest to search for its neutral partner in the radiative decay into $B_s^0 \\gamma$ and $B_s^* \\gamma$, which can be used to determine its spin-parity quantum numbers. Moreover, we predict its charmed partner state around $2.55$ GeV with the quark content $su\\bar c\\bar d$ and $J^P=0^+/1^+$.

  10. Nutritional Evaluation of NASA's Rodent Food Bar Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Joyce E.; Yu, Diane S.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    2000-01-01

    Tests are being conducted on NASA's rodent Food Bar in preparation for long-term use as the rat and mouse diet aboard the International Space Station. Nutritional analyses are performed after the bars are manufactured and then repeated periodically to determine nutritional stability. The primary factors analyzed are protein, ash, fat, fiber, moisture, amino acids, fatty acids, and minerals. Nutrient levels are compared to values published in the National Research Council's dietary requirements for rodents, and also to those contained in several commonly used commercial rodent lab diets. The Food Bar is manufactured from a powdered diet to which moisture is added as it is processed through an extruder. The bars are dipped into potassium sorbate, vacuum-sealed, and irradiated. In order to determine nutrient changes during extrusion and irradiation, the powdered diet, the non-irradiated bars, and the irradiated bars are all analyzed. We have observed lower values for some nutrients (iodine, vitamin K, and iron) in the Food Bars compared with NRC requirements. Many nutrients in the Food Bars are contained at a higher level than levels in the NRC requirements. An additional factor we are investigating is the 26% moisture level in the Food Bars, which drops to about 15% within a week, compared to a stable 10% moisture in many standard lab chow diets. In addition to the nutritional analyses, the food bar is being fed to several strains of rats and mice, and feeding study and necropsy results are being observed (Barrett et al, unpublished data). Information from the nutritional analyses and from the rodent studies will enable us to recommend the formulation that will most adequately meet the rodent Food Bar requirements for long-term use aboard the Space Station.

  11. INFLUENCING OF FRICTION IN HINGES FORCE SIZE OF BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOHOMAZ V. N.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. The size of critical force of bar on the traditional method of calculation is determined in supposition of ideal hinge in the place of fixing of bar. There are both a hinge resistance at the turn of bar ends and their moving in the real hinges. Thus, there is the necessity of influencing character determination of these hinge imperfections on the size of critical force. In the existent scientific labours is devoted the alike problems, influencing of friction in the hinges of bar fastening on the size of critical force was not taken into account. At determination of bars stability with no ideality of hinges friction in them it is possible to take into account by the eccentric appendix of loading or appendix of moment. However at such approach it is difficult enough to define the size of attached force or moment. Purpose. To set influencing of friction in the hinge of bar fastening on of his critical force size in sense of Euler, and also build dependences for determination of bar critical force taking into account mechanical descriptions of hinges materials. Conclusion. For the task of determination the size of bar critical force with the joint fastening on ends are got the dependences which take into account mechanical descriptions of material hinge. The received dependences allow to define more exact meaning of critical force for bars. The examples of calculation of whole bar and bar with undercuting in the middle are resulted that values of critical force, certain on a traditional method are overpriced.

  12. Bars and spheroids in gravimetry problem

    CERN Document Server

    Sizikov, Valery

    2016-01-01

    The direct gravimetry problem is solved by dividing each deposit body into a set of vertical adjoining bars, whereas in the inverse problem, each deposit body is modelled by a homogeneous ellipsoid of revolution (spheroid). Well-known formulae for the z-component of gravitational intensity for a spheroid are transformed to a convenient form. Parameters of a spheroid are determined by minimizing the Tikhonov smoothing functional with constraints on the parameters, which makes the ill-posed inverse problem by unique and stable. The Bulakh algorithm for initial estimating the depth and mass of a deposit is modified. The proposed technique is illustrated by numerical model examples of deposits in the form of two and five bodies. The inverse gravimetry problem is interpreted as a gravitational tomography problem or, in other words, as "introscopy" of Earth's crust and mantle.

  13. /bar p/p collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.

    1989-03-01

    This note encompasses a set of six lectures given at the summer school held at Campos Do Jordao in January of 1989 near Sao Paulo, Brazil. The intent of the lectures was to describe the physics of /bar p/p at CERN and Fermilab. Particular attention has been paid to making a self contained presentation to a prospective audience of graduate students. Since large Monte Carlo codes might not be available to all members of this audience, great reliance was placed on ''back of the envelope estimates.'' Emphasis was also placed on experimental data rather than theoretical speculation, since predictions for, for example, supersymmetric particle production are easily obtained by transcription of formulae already obtained. 9 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  15. A Distinct Structure inside the Galactic Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Baba, Daisuke; Haba, Yasuaki; Kadowaki, Ryota; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murai, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji; Naoi, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Sato, Shuji

    2005-03-01

    We present the result of a near-infrared (JHKs) survey along the Galactic plane, -10.5dSIRIUS camera. Ks versus H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams reveal a well-defined population of red clump stars whose apparent magnitude peak changes continuously along the Galactic plane, from Ks=13.4 at l=-10deg to Ks=12.2 at l=10deg after dereddening. This variation can be explained by the barlike structure found in previous studies, but we find an additional inner structure at |l|<~4deg, where the longitude-apparent magnitude relation is distinct from the outer bar and where the apparent magnitude peak changes by only ~0.1 mag over the central 8°. The exact nature of this inner structure is as yet uncertain.

  16. Predicting Vertical Jump Height from Bar Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amador García-Ramos, Igor Štirn, Paulino Padial, Javier Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Blanca De la Fuente, Vojko Strojnik, Belén Feriche

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax and final propulsive phase (FPV bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s-2. Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384 was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504 was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r2 = 0.307, while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r2 = 0.071. These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine.

  17. Applying Schwarzschild's orbit superposition method to barred or non-barred disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    We present an implementation of the Schwarzschild orbit superposition method which can be used for constructing self-consistent equilibrium models of barred or non-barred disc galaxies, or of elliptical galaxies with figure rotation. This is a further development of the publicly available code SMILE; its main improvements include a new efficient representation of an arbitrary gravitational potential using two-dimensional spline interpolation of Fourier coefficients in the meridional plane, as well as the ability to deal with rotation of the density profile and with multicomponent mass models. We compare several published methods for constructing composite axisymmetric disc--bulge--halo models and demonstrate that our code produces the models that are closest to equilibrium. We also apply it to create models of triaxial elliptical galaxies with cuspy density profiles and figure rotation, and find that such models can be found and are stable over many dynamical times in a wide range of pattern speeds and angula...

  18. New Observables In the Decay Mode \\bar B_d \\-->\\bar K^{0*} \\ell^+ \\ell^-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egede, U.; /Imperial Coll., London; Hurth, T.; /CERN /SLAC; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Reece, W.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2008-08-07

    We discuss the large set of observables available from the angular distributions of the decay {bar B}{sub d} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. We present a NLO analysis of all observables based on the QCD factorization approach in the low-dilepton mass region and an estimate of {Lambda}/m{sub b} corrections. Moreover, we discuss their sensitivity to new physics. We explore the experimental sensitivities at LHCb (10 fb{sup -1}) and SuperLHCb (100 fb{sup -1}) based on a full-angular fit method and explore the sensitivity to right handed currents. We also show that the previously discussed transversity amplitude A{sub T}{sup (1)} cannot be measured at the LHCb experiment or at future B factory experiments as it requires a measurement of the spin of the final state particles.

  19. Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype? KidsHealth > ... nutritivas: ¿Energía o mera exageración? The Buzz on Energy Foods Energy drinks and nutrition bars often make ...

  20. Barred galaxies in the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Algorry, David G; Abadi, Mario G; Sales, Laura V; Bower, Richard G; Crain, Robert A; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Frenk, Carlos S; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We examine the properties of barred disc galaxies in a LCDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulation from the EAGLE project. Our study follows the formation of 269 discs identified at z = 0 in the stellar mass range 10.6 < log Mstr /M < 11. These discs show a wide range of bar strengths, from unbarred discs to weak bars to strongly barred systems (= 20%). Bars in these systems develop after redshift = 1.3, on timescales that depend sen- sitively on the strength of the pattern. Strong bars develop relatively quickly (in a few Gyr, = 10 disc rotation periods) in systems that are disc dominated, gas poor, and have declining rotation curves. Weak bars develop more slowly in systems where the disc is less gravitation- ally important, and are still growing at z = 0. Unbarred galaxies are comparatively gas-rich discs whose rotation speeds do not exceed the maximum circular velocity of the halos they inhabit. Bar lengths compare favourably with observations, ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 times the radius containing 90%...

  1. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  2. Morphologies introduced by bistability in barred-spiral galactic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigaridi, L.; Patsis, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of a barred-spiral model when the system is rotating slowly and corotation is located beyond the end of the spiral arms. In the characteristic of the central family of periodic orbits, we find a `bistable region'. In the response model, we observe a ring surrounding the bar and spiral arms starting tangential to the ring. This is a morphology resembling barred-spiral systems with inner rings. However, the dynamics associated with this structure in the case we study is different from that of a typical bar ending close to corotation. The ring of our model is round, or rather elongated perpendicular to the bar. It is associated with a folding (an `S'-shaped feature) of the characteristic of the central family, which is typical in bistable bifurcations. Along the `S' part of the characteristic, we have a change in the orientation of the periodic orbits from an x1-type to an x2-type morphology. The orbits populated in the response model change rather abruptly their orientation when reaching the lowest energy of the `S'. The spirals of the model follow a standard `precessing ellipses flow' and the orbits building them have energies beyond the `S' region. The bar is structured mainly by sticky orbits from regions around the stability islands of the central family. This leads to the appearance of X features in the bars on the galactic plane. Such a bar morphology appears in the unsharp-masked images of some moderately inclined galaxies.

  3. Calculation of error bars for laser damage observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan W.

    2008-10-01

    The use of the error bar is a critical means of communicating the quality of individual data points and a processed result. Understanding the error bar for a processed measurement depends on the measurement technique being used and is the subject of many recent works, as such, the paper will confine its scope to the determination of the error bar on a single data point. Many investigators either ignore the error bar altogether or use a "one size error fits all" method, both of these approaches are poor procedure and misleading. It is the goal of this work to lift the veil of mysticism surrounding error bars for damage observations and make their description, calculation and use, easy and commonplace. This paper will rigorously derive the error bar size as a function of the experimental parameters and observed data and will concentrate on the dependent variable, the cumulative probability of damage. The paper will begin with a discussion of the error bar as a measure of data quality or reliability. The expression for the variance in the parameters is derived via standard methods and converted to a standard deviation. The concept of the coverage factor is introduced to scale the error bar to the desired confidence level, completing the derivation

  4. Theoretical approaches to low energy $\\bar{K}N$ interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cieply, Ales

    2016-01-01

    We provide a direct comparison of modern theoretical approaches based on the SU(3) chiral dynamics and describing the low energy $\\bar{K}N$ data. The model predictions for the $\\bar{K}N$ amplitudes and pole content of the models are discussed.

  5. Bar slowdown and the distribution of dark matter in barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Athanassoula, E

    2013-01-01

    `Conspiracy' between the dark and the baryonic mater prohibits an unambiguous decomposition of disc galaxy rotation curves into the corresponding components. Several methods have been proposed to counter this difficulty, but their results are widely discrepant. In this paper, I revisit one of these methods, which relies on the relation between the halo density and the decrease of the bar pattern speed. The latter is routinely characterised by the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the corotation radius $R_{CR}$ to the bar length $L_b$, ${\\cal R}=R_{CR}/L_b$. I use a set of $N$-body+SPH simulations, including sub-grid physics, whose initial conditions cover a range of gas fractions and halo shapes. The models, by construction, have roughly the same azimuthally averaged circular velocity curve and halo density and they are all submaximal, i.e. according to previous works they are expected to have all roughly the same ${\\cal R}$ value, well outside the fast bar range (1.2 $\\pm$ 0.2). Contrary to these expectations, however, th...

  6. Quality of Cosmetic Argan Oil Extracted by Supercritical Fluid Extraction from Argania spinosa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouaa Taribak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Argan oil has been extracted using supercritical CO2. The influence of the variables pressure (100, 200, 300, and 400 bar and temperature (35, 45, 55°C was investigated. The best extraction yields were achieved at a temperature of 45°C and a pressure of 400 bar. The argan oil extracts were characterized in terms of acid, peroxide and iodine values, total tocopherol, carotene, and fatty acids content. Significant compositional differences were not observed between the oil samples obtained using different pressures and temperatures. The antioxidant capacity of the argan oil samples was high in comparison to those of walnut, almond, hazelnut, and peanut oils and comparable to that of pistachio oil. The physicochemical parameters of the extracted oils obtained by SFE, Soxhlet, and traditional methods are comparable. The technique used for oil processing does not therefore markedly alter the quality of argan oil.

  7. Extraction of lapachol from Tabebuia avellanedae wood with supercritical CO2: an alternative to Soxhlet extraction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viana L.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The solubility of lapachol in supercritical CO2 was determined at 40°C and pressures between 90 and 210 bar. Supercritical fluid extraction of lapachol and some related compounds by CO2 from Tabebuia avellanedae wood is compared to Soxhlet extraction with different solvents. A standard macroscale (100-200 g wood and a microscale (~10 mg wood experimental setup are described and their results are compared. The latter involved direct spectrophotometric quantification in a high-pressure autoclave with an integrated optical path and a magnetic stirrer, fitted directly into a commercial spectrophotometer. The relative amount of lapachol extracted by supercritical CO2 at 40°C and 200 bar was about 1.7%, which is similar to the results of Soxhlet extractions. Lower contents of alpha- and beta-lapachone as well as dehydro-alpha-lapachone are also reported.

  8. Hydrodynamic and geomorphic controls on mouth bar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Christopher R.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Kolker, Alexander S.

    2013-04-01

    While river deltas are one of the major repositories for sediments and carbon on Earth, there exists a paucity of field data on the formation of distributary mouth bars—one of their key features. Here we present results from an experiment that tested a model of mouth bar development using hydroacoustic, optical, sedimentary, and geochemical tools on a mouth bar in a crevasse splay near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Our results validate an existing model for mouth bar development, which we extend to explain mouth bar stratigraphy. We propose that changes across a hydrological cycle are important for mouth bar development, resulting in a stratigraphy that has alternating fine and coarse grain sediments. Results also indicate that sand is carried up to 6 km from the main stem of the Mississippi River, despite repeated channel bifurcations, which has important implications for our interpretation of the rock record, understanding of coastal sedimentary systems, and the restoration of large deltas.

  9. Study of aging and embrittlement of microalloyed steel bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, B.; Perez, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-10-01

    The aging of hooks, anchors, and other bent reinforcing steel bars in concrete structures are considered in modern international standards. Rebend test procedures have been designed in order to predict the aging embrittlement susceptibility by submerging bent reinforcing bar specimens in boiling water. Subsequently the bars are rebent or straightened in order to determine the loss of ductility or embrittlement of the aged material. The present work considers the influence of carbon, sulfur, and niobium on the performance of reinforcing bars in rebend tests of 300 heats of microalloyed steel bars with a variety of compositions. The microstructural evidence and the statistical results clearly indicate the strong influence of carbon and sulfur on rebend failure, while niobium-rich precipitates contribute to the hardening of the ferrite grains during aging.

  10. Bar code technology improves positive patient identification and transfusion safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S G; Langeberg, A; Dohnalek, L

    2005-01-01

    As a result of human error, an estimated 1 in 12,000 blood transfusions is given to the wrong patient. The cause of nearly all of these errors is failure of hospital personnel to identify positively intended transfusion recipients, their blood samples for cross-matching, or their correct blood components. We describe our experience using a point-of-care bar code transfusion safety system that links patients' bar-coded wristbands, with bar-coded labels on blood sample tubes, blood component bags, and nurses' identification badges. The result was 100 % accuracy of matching patients, their blood samples, and components for transfusions. For verifying information before starting blood transfusions, nurses preferred bar code "double checks" to conventional visual "double checks" by a second nurse. Methods are needed to reinforce nurses' proficiency with technological approaches to transfusion safety, such as software-driven bar code scanning, in situations where transfusions are administered infrequently. PMID:16050151

  11. The ratio of pattern speeds in double-barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Font, Joan; Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Fathi, Kambiz; Epinat, Benoît; Amram, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained two-dimensional velocity fields in the ionized gas of a set of 8 double-barred galaxies, at high spatial and spectral resolution, using their H$\\alpha$ emission fields measured with a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. Using the technique by which phase reversals in the non-circular motion indicate a radius of corotation, taking advantage of the high angular and velocity resolution we have obtained the corotation radii and the pattern speeds of both the major bar and the small central bar in each of the galaxies; there are few such measurements in the literature. Our results show that the inner bar rotates more rapidly than the outer bar by a factor between 3.3 and 3.6.

  12. Characterizing Barred Galaxies in the Abell 901/902 Supercluster

    CERN Document Server

    Marinova, I; Bacon, D; Balogh, M; Barden, M; Barazza, F D; Bell, E F; Böhm, A; Caldwell, J A R; Gray, M E; Haussler, B; Heymans, C; Jahnke, K; Van Kampen, E; Koposov, S; Lane, K; McIntosh, D H; Meisenheimer, K; Peng, C Y; Rix, H -W; Sánchez, S F; Taylor, A; Wisotzki, L; Wolf, C; Zheng, X

    2008-01-01

    In dense clusters, higher densities at early epochs as well as physical processes, such as ram pressure stripping and tidal interactions become important, and can have direct consequences for the evolution of bars and their host disks. To study bars and disks as a function of environment, we are using the STAGES ACS HST survey of the Abell 901/902 supercluster (z~0.165), along with earlier field studies based the SDSS and the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey (OSUBSGS). We explore the limitations of traditional methods for characterizing the bar fraction, and in particular highlight uncertainties in disk galaxy selection in cluster environments. We present an alternative approach for exploring the proportion of bars, and investigate the properties of bars as a function of host galaxy color, Sersic index, stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), specific SFR, and morphology.

  13. Stellar population constraints on the ages of galactic bars

    CERN Document Server

    James, Phil A

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the stellar populations within the central regions of four nearby barred galaxies, and use a novel technique to constrain the duration of bar activity. We focus on the star formation 'desert', a region within each of these galaxies where star formation appears to have been suppressed by the bar. New H beta spectroscopic data are presented, and used to produce spectroscopic line indices which are compared with theoretical predictions from population synthesis models for simple stellar populations and temporally truncated star formation histories. This analysis shows that the dearth of star formation activity in these regions appears to have been continuing for at least 1 Gyr, with timescales of several Gyr indicated for two of the galaxies. This favours models in which strong bars can be long-lived features of galaxies, but our results also indicate a significant diversity in stellar population ages, and hence in the implied histories of bar activity in these four galaxies.

  14. Microbial contamination of "In use" bar soap in dental clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bar soap from 18 different dental clinics were investigated for microbial contamination, while it was "in-use". Of the 32 samples obtained from the bar soap, 100% yielded positive culture. A total of 8 different genera of organisms were isolated. Each bar soap was found to harbor 2-5 different genera of micro organisms. Heavily used soap had more micro organisms compared to less used soap. The microbial load of the "in-use" bar soap constituted a mixed flora of gram positive, gram negative, aerobes, anaerobes, and fungi. The results indicate that the bar soap under "in-use" condition is a reservoir of microorganisms and handwashing with such a soap may lead to spread of infection.

  15. Measurement of the proton form factor by studying $e^{+} e^{-}\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$

    CERN Document Server

    Lara,; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; un, Z T S; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    Using data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we measure the Born cross section of $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$ at 12 center-of-mass energies from 2232.4 to 3671.0 MeV. The corresponding effective electromagnetic form factor of the proton is deduced under the assumption that the electric and magnetic form factors are equal $(|G_{E}|= |G_{M}|)$. In addition, the ratio of electric to magnetic form factors, $|G_{E}/G_{M}|$, and $|G_{M}|$ are extracted by fitting the polar angle distribution of the proton for the data samples with larger statistics, namely at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 2232.4 and 2400.0 MeV and a combined sample at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 3050.0, 3060.0 and 3080.0 MeV, respectively. The measured cross sections are in agreement with recent results from BaBar, improving the overall uncertainty by about 30\\%. The $|G_{E}/G_{M}|$ ratios are close to unity and consistent with BaBar results in the same $q^{2}$ region, which indicates the data are consistent with the assumption that $|G_{E}|=|...

  16. Revealing galactic scale bars with the help of Galaxy Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Karen L.

    2015-03-01

    We use visual classifications of the brightest 250,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main Galaxy Sample provided by citizen scientists via the Galaxy Zoo project (www.galaxyzoo.org, Lintott et al. 2008) to identify a sample of local disc galaxies with reliable bar identifications. These data, combined with information on the atomic gas content from the ALFALFA survey (Haynes et al. 2011) show that disc galaxies with higher gas content have lower bar fractions. We use a gas deficiency parameter to show that disc galaxies with more/less gas than expected for their stellar mass are less/more likely to host bars. Furthermore, we see that at a fixed gas content there is no residual correlation between bar fraction and stellar mass. We argue that this suggests previously observed correlations between galaxy colour/stellar mass and (strong) bar fraction (e.g. from the sample in Masters et al. 2011, and also see Nair & Abraham 2010) could be driven by the interaction between bars and the gas content of the disc, since more massive, optically redder disc galaxies are observed to have lower gas contents. Furthermore we see evidence that at a fixed gas content the global colours of barred galaxies are redder than those of unbarred galaxies. We suggest that this could be due to the exchange of angular momentum beyond co-rotation which might stop a replenishment of gas from external sources, and act as a source of feedback to temporarily halt or reduce the star formation in the outer parts of barred discs. These results (published as Masters et al. 2012) combined with those of Skibba et al. (2012), who use the same sample to show a clear (but subtle and complicated) environmental dependence of the bar fraction in disc galaxies, suggest that bars are intimately linked to the evolution of disc galaxies.

  17. Lawyers for Literacy. A Bar Leadership Manual. A Special Service Publication of the American Bar Association's Task Force on Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Bar Association, Washington, DC.

    This manual is designed to provide materials to help state and local bar associations become involved with the literacy issue. Chapter 1 provides an overview of illiteracy as a very serious problem. Chapter 2 describes major public and private efforts to combat illiteracy. Chapter 3 explains why the bar associations should be involved. Chapter 4…

  18. ExperimentaI research on chIoride migration reguIarity around steeI-bar during eIectrochemicaI chIoride extraction for reinforced concrete%混凝土电化学除氯过程钢筋周围氯离子迁移规律试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞凯奇; 毛江鸿; 陈佳芸; 金伟良; 任旭初; 吴波明

    2015-01-01

    With the increase of service life,the durability deterioration of reinforced concrete structures in chloride environment has be-come increasingly outstanding. The electrochemical chloride extraction technology is an essential method for RC durability restoration, which can remove the chloride in concrete cover effectively. However,the regularity of chloride migrating outside of the concrete during the electrochemical chloride extraction should be studied further. This paper studied on the spatial characteristics of the chloride migra-tion during the electrochemical chloride extraction. The results showed that after electrochemical chloride extraction,the chloride concen-tration decreased significantly. Moreover,with the growth of radial distance from the reinforcement,the concentration of residual chloride became higher,which represented the non-uniform distribution of chloride obviously. This research results can provide further reference for durability evaluation and life prediction after electrochemical chloride extraction.%随着服役年限增长,氯盐环境中钢筋混凝土结构的耐久性劣化问题越来越突出。电化学除氯技术是钢筋混凝土耐久性修复重要方法,可有效排除保护层中氯离子,然而电化学除氯过程混凝土内部氯离子迁出规律有待研究。重点研究了电化学除氯过程中钢筋周围氯离子迁出的空间规律。结果表明,电化学除氯结束后,钢筋周围氯离子浓度降低显著,保护层内随着距离钢筋径向距离的增加,残余氯离子浓度增大,表现出明显的非均匀分布。研究成果可为进一步完善钢筋混凝土电化学除氯后的耐久性评估和寿命预测提供依据。

  19. The $K \\bar K \\pi$ decay of the $f_1(1285)$ and its nature as a $K^* \\bar K -cc$ molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Aceti, F.; Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, E

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the decay of $f_1(1285) \\to \\pi K \\bar K$ with the assumption that the $f_1(1285)$ is dynamically generated from the $K^* \\bar{K} - cc$ interaction. In addition to the tree level diagrams that proceed via $f_1(1285) \\to K^* \\bar{K} - cc \\to \\pi K \\bar K$, we take into account also the final state interactions of $K \\bar K \\to K \\bar K$ and $\\pi K \\to \\pi K$. The partial decay width and mass distributions of $f_1(1285) \\to \\pi K \\bar K$ are evaluated. We get a value for the part...

  20. Variation of Galactic Bar Length with Amplitude and Density as Evidence for Bar Growth over a Hubble Time

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Knapen, Johan H; Buta, Ronald J; Block, David L; Puerari, Ivanio

    2007-01-01

    K_s-band images of 20 barred galaxies show an increase in the peak amplitude of the normalized m=2 Fourier component with the R_25-normalized radius at this peak. This implies that longer bars have higher $m=2$ amplitudes. The long bars also correlate with an increased density in the central parts of the disks, as measured by the luminosity inside 0.25R_25 divided by the cube of this radius in kpc. Because denser galaxies evolve faster, these correlations suggest that bars grow in length and amplitude over a Hubble time with the fastest evolution occurring in the densest galaxies. All but three of the sample have early-type flat bars; there is no clear correlation between the correlated quantities and the Hubble type.

  1. Role of $Y(4630)$ in the $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_c\\bar{\\Lambda}_c$ reaction near threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Wang, En; li, De-Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the charmed baryon production reaction $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_c\\bar{\\Lambda}_c$ in an effective Lagrangian approach. Besides the $t$-channel $D^0$ and $D^{*0}$ mesons exchanges, the $s$-channel $Y(4630)$ meson exchange is taken into account. For the total cross sections, the $D^0$ and $D^{*0}$ mesons provide minor background contributions, while the $Y(4630)$ state gives a clear peak structure with the magnitude of 10 $\\mu$b at center of mass energy 4.63 GeV. Basing on the results, we suggest that the reaction of $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_c\\bar{\\Lambda}_c$ can be used to search for the $1^{--}$ charmonium-like $Y(4630)$ state, and our predictions can be tested in future by the $\\rm{\\bar PANDA}$ facility.

  2. Measurement of the $\\bar{p}p \\rightarrow \\bar{n}n$ Charge-Exchange Differential Cross-Section

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is a measurement of the differential cross-section of the $\\bar{p}$p $\\rightarrow$ $\\bar{n}$n charge-exchange reaction with a point-to-point precision of 1\\% in the forward direction, and an absolute normalization error of 3\\%. The high precision of the data should allow, inter alia, a determination of the $\\pi$NN coupling constant to better than 2\\%.\\\\ \\\\ The measurement will be done using the existing neutron and antineutron detectors built for experiment PS199 and liquid hydrogen target. In one week of running time, with a $\\bar{p}$ beam intensity of 3 $ 10 ^{5} $ $\\bar{p}$/sec, the reaction will be measured at a few $\\bar{p}$ momenta, in the range 500 to 900~MeV/c.

  3. Nuss bar procedure: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Robert J.; Kelly, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Repair of pectus excavatum began at the beginning of the 20th century before endotracheal intubation was standard practice. Surgeons therefore developed techniques that corrected the deformity using an open procedure via the anterior chest wall. Initial techniques were unsatisfactory, but by the 1930s the partial rib resection and sternal osteotomy technique had been developed and was used in combination with external traction post-operatively to prevent the sternum from sinking back into the chest. In 1949, Ravitch recommended complete resection of the costal cartilages and complete mobilization of the sternum without external traction, and in 1961 Adkins and Blades introduced the concept of a substernal strut for sternal support. The wide resection resulted in a very rigid anterior chest wall, and in some instances, the development of asphyxiating chondrodystrophy. The primary care physicians therefore became reluctant to refer the patients for repair. In 1987, Nuss developed a minimally invasive technique that required no cartilage or sternal resection and relied only on internal bracing by means of a sub-sternal bar, which is inserted into the chest through two lateral thoracic incisions and guided across the mediastinum with the help of thoracoscopy. After publication of the procedure in 1998, it became widely accepted and a flood of new patients suddenly started to appear, which allowed for rapid improvements and modifications of the technique. New instruments were developed specifically for the procedure, complications were recognized, and the steps taken to prevent them included the development of a stabilizer and the use of pericostal sutures to prevent bar displacement. Various options were developed for sternal elevation prior to mediastinal dissection to prevent injury to the mediastinal structures, allergy testing was implemented, and pain management improved. The increased number of patients coming for repair permitted studies of cardiopulmonary

  4. Nuss procedure: Technical modifications to ease bending of the support bar and lateral stabilizer placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Zeki Karakus

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative bending of the support bar according to anthropometric measurements and fixation of the lateral stabilizers to the support bar in inverted position facilitates bar shaping and lateral stabilizer placement.

  5. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Voids in AM60B Magnesium Tensile Bars Using Computed Tomography Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, A M

    2001-05-01

    In an effort to increase automobile fuel efficiency as well as decrease the output of harmful greenhouse gases, the automotive industry has recently shown increased interest in cast light metals such as magnesium alloys in an effort to increase weight savings. Currently several magnesium alloys such as AZ91 and AM60B are being used in structural applications for automobiles. However, these magnesium alloys are not as well characterized as other commonly used structural metals such as aluminum. This dissertation presents a methodology to nondestructively quantify damage accumulation due to void behavior in three dimensions in die-cast magnesium AM60B tensile bars as a function of mechanical load. Computed tomography data was acquired after tensile bars were loaded up to and including failure, and analyzed to characterize void behavior as it relates to damage accumulation. Signal and image processing techniques were used along with a cluster labeling routine to nondestructively quantify damage parameters in three dimensions. Void analyses were performed including void volume distribution characterization, nearest neighbor distance calculations, shape parameters, and volumetric renderings of voids in the alloy. The processed CT data was used to generate input files for use in finite element simulations, both two- and three-dimensional. The void analyses revealed that the overwhelming source of failure in each tensile bar was a ring of porosity within each bar, possibly due to a solidification front inherent to the casting process. The measured damage parameters related to void nucleation, growth, and coalescence were shown to contribute significantly to total damage accumulation. Void volume distributions were characterized using a Weibull function, and the spatial distributions of voids were shown to be clustered. Two-dimensional finite element analyses of the tensile bars were used to fine-tune material damage models and a three-dimensional mesh of an extracted

  6. A study of the $b$-fragmentation function in $t\\bar{t}$ production with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rey Idler, Julian Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The $r_{b}$ parameter in the Bowler modification to the $b$-quark fragmentation function is extracted from $t\\bar{t}$ $b$-jet shapes measured with the ATLAS detector, and from measurements of the $b$-fragmentation function at LEP using the Pythia 8 MC generator.

  7. Quality and characteristics of ginseng seed oil treated using different extraction methods

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Myung-Hee; Kim, Sung-Soo; Cho, Chang-Won; Choi, Sang-Yoon; In, Gyo; Kim, Kyung-Tack

    2013-01-01

    Ginseng seed oil was prepared using compressed, solvent, and supercritical fluid extraction methods of ginseng seeds, and the extraction yield, color, phenolic compounds, fatty acid contents, and phytosterol contents of the ginseng seed oil were analyzed. Yields were different depending on the roasting pretreatment and extraction method. Among the extraction methods, the yield of ginseng seed oil from supercritical fluid extraction under the conditions of 500 bar and 65℃ was the highest, at 1...

  8. Shepherding tidal debris with the Galactic bar: the Ophiuchus stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Kohei; Erkal, Denis; Sanders, Jason L.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of stellar streams in rotating barred potentials is explained for the first time. Naturally, neighbouring stream stars reach pericentre at slightly different times. In the presence of a rotating bar, these neighbouring stream stars experience different bar orientations during pericentric passage and hence each star receives a different torque from the bar. These differing torques reshape the angular momentum and energy distribution of stars in the stream, which in turn changes the growth rate of the stream. For a progenitor orbiting in the same sense as the bar's rotation and satisfying a resonance condition, the resultant stream can be substantially shorter or longer than expected, depending on whether the pericentric passages of the progenitor occur along the bar's minor or major axis, respectively. We present a full discussion of this phenomenon focusing mainly on streams confined to the Galactic plane. In stark contrast with the evolution in static potentials, which give rise to streams that grow steadily in time, rotating barred potentials can produce dynamically old, short streams. This challenges the traditional viewpoint that the inner halo necessarily consists of well phase-mixed material whilst the tidally disrupted structures in the outer halo are more spatially coherent. We argue that this mechanism may play an important role in explaining the mysteriously short Ophiuchus stream that was recently discovered near the bulge region of the Milky Way.

  9. Formation and evolution of bars in disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Athanassoula, E

    2002-01-01

    I follow a bar from its formation, via its evolution, to its destruction and, perhaps, regeneration. I discuss the main features at each stage and particularly the role of the halo. Bars can form even in sub-maximum discs. In fact, such bars can be stronger than bars which have grown in maximum discs. This is due to the response of the halo and, in particular, to the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the disc particles constituting the bar and the halo particles at resonance with it. The bar slowdown depends on the initial central concentration of the halo and the initial value of the disc Q. Contrary to the halo mass distribution, the disc changes its radial density profile considerably during the evolution. Applying the Sackett criterion, I thus find that discs become maximum in many simulations in which they have started off as sub-maximum. I briefly discuss the evolution if a gaseous component is present, as well as the destruction and regeneration of bars.

  10. The nature and nurture of bars and disks

    CERN Document Server

    Mendez-Abreu, J; Aguerri, J A L; Corsini, E M; Zarattini, S

    2012-01-01

    The effects that interactions produce on galaxy disks and how they modify the subsequent formation of bars need to be distinguished to fully understand the relationship between bars and environment. To this aim we derive the bar fraction in three different environments ranging from the field to Virgo and Coma clusters, covering an unprecedentedly large range of galaxy luminosities (or, equivalently, stellar masses). We confirm that the fraction of barred galaxies strongly depends on galaxy luminosity. We also show that the difference between the bar fraction distributions as a function of galaxy luminosity (and mass) in the field and Coma cluster are statistically significant, with Virgo being an intermediate case. The fraction of barred galaxies shows a maximum of about 50% at $M_r\\,\\simeq\\,-20.5$ in clusters, whereas the peak is shifted to $M_r\\,\\simeq\\,-19$ in the field. We interpret this result as a variation of the effect of environment on bar formation depending on galaxy luminosity. We speculate that b...

  11. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corradi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of near-surface mounted (NSM fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar’s pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm.

  12. Numerical Simulations of the Kolsky Compression Bar Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Kolsky compression bar, or split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), is an ex- perimental apparatus used to obtain the stress-strain response of material specimens at strain rates in the order of 10 2 to 10 4 1/s. Its operation and associated data re- duction are based on principles of one-dimensional wave propagation in rods. Second order effects such as indentation of the bars by the specimen and wave dispersion in the bars, however, can significantly affect aspects of the measured material response. Finite element models of the experimental apparatus were used here to demonstrate these two effects. A procedure proposed by Safa and Gary (2010) to account for bar indentation was also evaluated and shown to improve the estimation of the strain in the bars significantly. The use of pulse shapers was also shown to alleviate the effects of wave dispersion. Combining the two can lead to more reliable results in Kolsky compression bar testing.

  13. Washing with contaminated bar soap is unlikely to transfer bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, J E; Yackovich, F

    1988-08-01

    Recent reports of the isolation of microorganisms from used soap bars have raised the concern that bacteria may be transferred from contaminated soap bars during handwashing. Since only one study addressing this question has been published, we developed an additional procedure to test this concern. In our new method prewashed and softened commercial deodorant soap bars (0.8% triclocarban) not active against Gram-negative bacteria were inoculated with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to give mean total survival levels of 4.4 X 10(5) c.f.u. per bar which was 70-fold higher than those reported on used soap bars. Sixteen panelists were instructed to wash with the inoculated bars using their normal handwashing procedure. After washing, none of the 16 panelists had detectable levels of either test bacterium on their hands. Thus, the results obtained using our new method were in complete agreement with those obtained with the previously published method even though the two methods differ in a number of procedural aspects. These findings, along with other published reports, show that little hazard exists in routine handwashing with previously used soap bars and support the frequent use of soap and water for handwashing to prevent the spread of disease. PMID:3402545

  14. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}Z$ and $t\\bar{t}W$ production cross sections in multilepton final states using 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentoro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; 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Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; 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Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; 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Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the $t\\bar{t}Z$ and $t\\bar{t}W$ production cross sections in final states with either two same-charge muons, or three or four leptons (electrons or muons) is presented. The analysis uses a data sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2015, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$. The inclusive cross sections are extracted using likelihood fits to signal and control regions, resulting in $\\sigma_{t\\bar{t}Z} = 0.9 \\pm 0.3$ pb and $\\sigma_{t\\bar{t}W} = 1.5 \\pm 0.8$ pb, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  15. Spitzer reveals what's behind Orion's Bar

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Robert H; O'Dell, C R; McNabb, Ian A; Colgan, Sean W J; Zhuge, Scott Y; Ferland, Gary J; Hidalgo, Sergio A

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope observations of 11 regions SE of the Bright Bar in the Orion Nebula, along a radial from the exciting star theta1OriC, extending from 2.6 to 12.1'. Our Cycle 5 programme obtained deep spectra with matching IRS short-high (SH) and long-high (LH) aperture grid patterns. Most previous IR missions observed only the inner few arcmin. Orion is the benchmark for studies of the ISM particularly for elemental abundances. Spitzer observations provide a unique perspective on the Ne and S abundances by virtue of observing the dominant ionization states of Ne (Ne+, Ne++) and S (S++, S3+) in Orion and H II regions in general. The Ne/H abundance ratio is especially well determined, with a value of (1.01+/-0.08)E-4. We obtained corresponding new ground-based spectra at CTIO. These optical data are used to estimate the electron temperature, electron density, optical extinction, and the S+/S++ ratio at each of our Spitzer positions. That permits an adjustment for the total gas-phase S abundan...

  16. Influence of laser treatment on the fatigue of notched bar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangHui; LingWeiye; JiangShouwei

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue cutting is a new approach for separating material. Man-made fatigue can be realized by applying a rotating bending load to a notched bar. To better utilize the new method, laser treatment is adopted in this study. After laser radiation at the notch root, the fatigue cycle of the bar drops dramatically. Based on the experimental result, we draw the conclusion that the fatigue of the bar is influenced by the shape of the hardened area. A hardened area that has a small axial dimension and a relatively large radial dimension facilitates the fatigue. The desirable hardened area can be obtained by controlling the laser treatment parameters.

  17. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Nuclear Rings in Barred Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhi; Shen, Juntai; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Dust lanes, nuclear rings, and nuclear spirals are typical gas structures in the inner region of barred galaxies. Their shapes and properties are linked to the physical parameters of the host galaxy. We use high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations to study 2D gas flows in simple barred galaxy models. The nuclear rings formed in our simulations can be divided into two groups: one group is nearly round and the other is highly elongated. We find that roundish rings may not form when the bar pa...

  18. Temporal and spatial variations of the Huanghe River mouth bars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zuosheng; ZHANG Yong; LIU Zhan; WEI Helong; HE Shufeng

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the bathymetric records of 371 survey sections in the present Huanghe mouth area from 1996 to 2001, the temporal and spatial variations of the Huanghe mouth bars were studied by using GIS technology. The variation of the mouth bars is closely related to the water and sediment discharges from the Huanghe River to the sea that has been decreasing drastically in recent years, and to coastal hydrodynamic regimes. The characteristics of the mouth bars are unique in contrast with those of other estuaries in the world (1) The mouth bars of the Huanghe River consist of many small sandbars. Usually the sandbars are of ellipse-shape with the long axis of about 1~6 km, and short axis of about 1~4 kin. The long axis is parallel to the principal direction of tidal current, and the short axis is variable, depending on the local dynamics. The crest of the sandbars is only about 0.4 m below the water surface at low tide. They are distributed within an area of 20 km2, not far from the river mouth area. The present mouth bars are in small-medium size, quite different from the large one formed during the 1970s and 1980s, when the river sediment discharge was several times larger than that after 1996. (2) The scale of a river mouth bar is related to the river discharge of that year. In 1997 sediment discharge from the Huanghe River was 42 Mt, and the mouth bar consisted of several small scattered sandbars. In 1998 the size of mouth bars was much larger thar that in 1997, as the sediment discharge from the Huanghe River increased to 363 Mt. Variation of the mouth bars largely depends on the sediment discharge with a correlation coefficient of 0.78. The calculation of the volume of the mouth bar area shows that about 30%~40% of the river's into-sea sediment is deposited in the mouth bar area. (3) Compared with other large estuaries in the world, the Huanghe mouth bars have three unique features in responding to its high sediment concentration: small size, steep

  19. Print media coverage of California's smokefree bar law

    OpenAIRE

    Magzamen, S.; Charlesworth, A.; Glantz, S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the print media coverage of California's smokefree bar law in the state of California.
DESIGN—Content analysis of newspaper, trade journal, and magazine items.
SUBJECTS—Items regarding the smokefree bar law published seven months before and one year following the implementation of the smokefree bar law (June 1997 to December 1998). Items consisted of news articles (n = 446), opinion editorials (n = 31), editorials (n = 104), letters to the editor (n = 240), and cartoons (n...

  20. Torsion of elliptical composite bars containing neutral coated cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using complex variable methods and conformal mapping techniques, we establish the existence of coated cavities of various shapes that do not disturb the warping function in a host elliptical bar. These cavities are known as ‘partly neutral cavities’. Our results show that the two axes corresponding to the neutral elliptical coating are parallel to those of the host elliptical bar and that the centre of the elliptical coating can be located arbitrarily on the major axis of the host bar. Examples of neutral coated non-elliptical cavities are provided.

  1. The Effect of Alternating Bars Migration on River Bifurcation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miori, S.; Bertoldi, W.; Repetto, R.; Zanoni, L.; Tubino, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent theoretical analysis, field and laboratory observations pointed out that fluvial bifurcation show an intrinsic instability, leading to the establishment of an unbalanced flow and sediments distribution in the downstream branches. The existence of equilibrium configurations has been proved, which mainly depend on the hydraulic and morphologic conditions of the upstream flow. However, flow and sediment transport in braided networks are highly unsteady, so that the bifurcation can hardly reach an equilibrium configuration. One of the main causes of temporal fluctuations is the migration of alternate bars in the upstream channel, that can affect and control the flow partition in the distributaries. We analysed the bar - bifurcation interactions by experimental and analytical investigations. We performed a set of flume experiments on a Y shaped fixed banks and movable bed bifurcation. Laboratory results show that bar formation in the upstream channel perturbs the discharge distribution with a series of fluctuations strictly related to the period of bar migration. Four different behaviours have been identified, characterised by small perturbations of the equilibrium state (balanced or unbalanced), by the occurrence of large fluctuations or by the closure of one of the distributaries. The character of the bifurcation is controlled by the amplitude and speed of alternate bars that directly influence the amplitude and period of discharge oscillations. Consequently, at large values of the aspect ratio (high bars) and low sediment mobility (slow bars) the bifurcation dynamics is likely to be dominated by bars migration. Extending the one-dimensional model proposed by Bolla Pittaluga et al. (2003), we introduce the effect of bars migrating in the upstream channel. In the present model, the bifurcation is forced with spatial crosswise fluctuations of feeding conditions, in order to reproduce the transverse distribution of sediment and water of an alternate bar pattern as

  2. Effects of Different Extraction Methods and Conditions on the Phenolic Composition of Mate Tea Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Vladic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid HPLC method for determination of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid in mate tea extracts was developed and validated. The chromatography used isocratic elution with a mobile phase of aqueous 1.5% acetic acid-methanol (85:15, v/v. The flow rate was 0.8 mL/min and detection by UV at 325 nm. The method showed good selectivity, accuracy, repeatability and robustness, with detection limit of 0.26 mg/L and recovery of 97.76%. The developed method was applied for the determination of chlorogenic acid in mate tea extracts obtained by ethanol extraction and liquid carbon dioxide extraction with ethanol as co-solvent. Different ethanol concentrations were used (40, 50 and 60%, v/v and liquid CO2 extraction was performed at different pressures (50 and 100 bar and constant temperature (27 ± 1 °C. Significant influence of extraction methods, conditions and solvent polarity on chlorogenic acid content, antioxidant activity and total phenolic and flavonoid content of mate tea extracts was established. The most efficient extraction solvent was liquid CO2 with aqueous ethanol (40% as co-solvent using an extraction pressure of 100 bar.

  3. A Study of $e^+e^-\\to p\\bar{p}$ Using Initial StateRadiation with BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-12-13

    The e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} cross-section is determined over a range of p{bar p} masses, from threshold to 4.5 GeV/c{sup 2}, by studying the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p}{gamma} process. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 232 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring, at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy of 10.6 GeV. The mass dependence of the ratio of electric and magnetic form factors, |G{sub E}/G{sub M}|, is measured for p{bar p} masses below 3 GeV/c{sup 2}; its value is found to be significantly larger than 1 for masses up to 2.2 GeV/c{sup 2}. We also measure J/{psi} {yields} p{bar p} and {psi}(2S) {yields} p{bar p} branching fractions and set an upper limit on Y(4260) {yields} p{bar p} production and decay.

  4. Study of $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R B; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M B; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A C; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S P; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ulrich, M U; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M W; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A Z; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

    2012-01-01

    The decays $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 million $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p})=(2.112\\pm0.004\\pm0.031)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n})=(2.07\\pm0.01\\pm0.17)\\times10^{-3}$. Distributions of the angle $\\theta$ between the proton or anti-neutron and the beam direction are well described by the form $1+\\alpha\\cos^2\\theta$, and we find $\\alpha=0.595\\pm0.012\\pm0.015$ for $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $\\alpha=0.50\\pm0.04\\pm0.21$ for $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}$ decay.

  5. BaBar experiment: CP violation in the B0 B-bar0 system. Vector-vector channels of charmonium K*0 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a summary of CP violation phenomenology in the context of the Standard Model, we focus on the particular case of CP violation by interference between B0 B-bar0 mixing and decay to a CP final state. We study the feasibility of the unitary triangle parameter sin (2β) measurement in the vector-vector like decay channel Charmonium K*. A full angular analysis is required in order to separate contribution between final states of opposite CP. With simulated data, we develop a kinematic selection of signal events. A likelihood allows to extract the value of sin (2β) with an expecting resolution of 0.39 for the first 30 fb-1. This contribution constitutes the first quantitative analysis on this particular hadronic decay channel, in the framework of the BaBar experiment at the PEPII e+/e- asymmetric collider situated at SLAC (California). Besides, particle identification is assumed by a new type of Cherenkov detector (the DIRC), the principle, the architecture, the data acquisition and the online control system of which are fully described. (author)

  6. Chemical profile and antimicrobial activity of Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina extracts obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazutti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the effects of temperature (20 to 50ºC and pressure (100 to 250 bar on the extraction yield, chemical characteristics and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Peumus boldus Molina obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction. Results showed that the extraction variables affect the extraction yield and the chemical distribution of the major compounds present in the extracts. The extracts were chemically analyzed with regard to 1,8-cineole, trans-sabinene, pinocarveol, pinocarvone, 4-terpineol, ascaridole, piperitone oxide, limonene dioxide and n-eicosane in a GC/MSD. Antimicrobial tests demonstrated that the high-pressure CO2 extracts had activity against 13 bacteria and that better action was verified with extracts obtained at a lower CO2 extraction density and a higher temperature.

  7. Extracting $p\\Lambda$ scattering lengths from heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shapoval, V M; Lednicky, R; Sinyukov, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    The $p-\\Lambda \\oplus \\bar{p}-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\bar{p}-\\Lambda \\oplus p-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ correlation functions for 10% most central Au+Au collisions at top RHIC energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV are modeled with Lednicky and Lyuboshitz analytical formula using the source radii extracted from the hydrokinetic model (HKM) simulations. For the baryon-antibaryon case the corresponding spin-averaged strong interaction scattering length is obtained by fitting the STAR correlation function. In contrast to the experimental results, where extracted $p\\bar{\\Lambda}$ source radius value was found $\\sim 2$ times smaller than the corresponding $p\\Lambda$ one, the calculations in HKM show both $p\\Lambda$ and $p\\bar{\\Lambda}$ effective source radii to be quite close, as expected from theoretical considerations. To obtain the satisfactory fit to the measured baryon-antibaryon correlation function at this large source radius value, the modified analytical approximation to the correlation function, effectively accounting for the...

  8. Measurement of $\\boldsymbol{\\ttb}$ production in the tau + jets channel using $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\boldsymbol{\\sqrt{s} = 1.96}$~TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section multiplied by the branching ratio to tau lepton decaying semi-hadronically ({tau}{sub h}) plus jets, {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + X) {center_dot} BR(t{bar t} {yields} {tau}{sub h} + jets), at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. Assuming a top quark mass of 170 GeV, we measure {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} {center_dot} BR{sub {tau}{sub h}+j} = 0.60{sub -0.22}{sup +0.23}(stat){sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}(syst){+-}0.04 (lumi) pb. In addition, we extract the t{bar t} production cross section using the t{bar t} {yields} {tau}{sub h} + jets topology, with the result {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 6.9{sub -1.2}{sup +1.2}(stat){sub -0.7}{sup +0.8}(syst) {+-} 0.4 (lumi) pb. These findings are in good agreement with standard model predictions and measurements performed using other top quark decay channels.

  9. Angular distributions in J / ψ → p p bar π0 (η) decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, V. F.; Milstein, A. I.; Salnikov, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    The differential decay rates of the processes J / ψ → p p bar π0 and J / ψ → p p bar η close to the p p bar threshold are calculated with the help of the N N bar optical potential. The same calculations are made for the decays of ψ (2 S). We use the potential which has been suggested to fit the cross sections of N N bar scattering together with N N bar and six pion production in e+e- annihilation close to the p p bar threshold. The p p bar invariant mass spectrum is in agreement with the available experimental data. The anisotropy of the angular distributions, which appears due to the tensor forces in the N N bar interaction, is predicted close to the p p bar threshold. This anisotropy is large enough to be investigated experimentally. Such measurements would allow one to check the accuracy of the model of N N bar interaction.

  10. $B\\to \\eta^{(\\prime)} (\\ell^{-} \\bar\

    CERN Document Server

    Akeroyd, A G; Geng, C Q; Akeroyd, Andrew G.; Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In the quark-flavor mixing scheme, $\\eta$ and $\\eta'$ are linear combinations of flavor states $\\eta_{q}=(u\\bar{u}+d\\bar{d})/\\sqrt{2}$ and $\\eta_{s}=s\\bar{s}$ with the masses of $m_{qq}$ and $m_{ss}$, respectively. Phenomenologically, $m_{ss}$ is strictly fixed around 0.69, which is close to $\\sqrt{2m^{2}_{K}-m^{2}_{\\pi}}$ by the approximate flavor symmetry, while $m_{qq}$ is found to be $0.18\\pm 0.08$ GeV. For a large allowed value of $m_{qq}$, we show that the BRs for $B\\to \\eta^{(\\prime)} X$ decays with $X=(\\ell^{-} \\bar\

  11. Constant of heat conduction and stabilization of bus bar conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, G.

    Using the one-dimensional, time-independent conduction state, a constant of heat conduction is given bringing about the known stabilization theorem and a closed expression for the bus bar to be cryogenically stable in superconducting accelerators.

  12. Visual mining geo-related data using pixel bar charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ming C.; Keim, Daniel A.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Wright, Peter; Schneidewind, Joern

    2005-03-01

    A common approach to analyze geo-related data is using bar charts or x-y plots. They are intuitive and easy to use. But important information often gets lost. In this paper, we introduce a new interactive visualization technique called Geo Pixel Bar Charts, which combines the advantages of Pixel Bar Charts and interactive maps. This technique allows analysts to visualize large amounts of spatial data without aggregation and shows the geographical regions corresponding to the spatial data attribute at the same time. In this paper, we apply Geo Pixel Bar Charts to visually mining sales transactions and Internet usage from different locations. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of this technique for providing data distribution and exceptions from the map.

  13. Black silicon solar cells with black bus-bar strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Tang, Peter Torben; Mizushima, Io;

    2016-01-01

    We present the combination of black silicon texturing and blackened bus-bar strings as a potential method for obtaining all-black solar panels, while using conventional, front-contacted solar cells. Black silicon was realized by maskless reactive ion etching resulting in total, average reflectance...... below 0.5% across a 156x156 mm2 silicon wafer. Four different methods to obtain blackened bus-bar strings were compared with respect to reflectance, and two of these methods (i.e., oxidized copper and etched solder) were used to fabricate functional allblack solar 9-cell panels. The black bus-bars (e.......g., by oxidized copper) have a reflectance below 3% in the entire visible wavelength range. The combination of black silicon cells and blackened bus-bars results in aesthetic, all-black panels based on conventional, front-contacted solar cells without compromising efficiency....

  14. Bar Harbor, ME Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Bar Harbor, Maine Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  15. Optical System Design For High Speed Bar Code Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellekson, Ronald; Reddersen, Brad; Campbell, Scott

    1987-04-01

    Spectra-Physics recently introduced the Model 750 SL scanner for use in the European point-of-sale market, to meet the European requirement for a scanner of less than 13 cm height. The model 750 SL uses a higher density computer designed scan pattern with a retrodirective collection system to scan and detect UPC, EAN, and JAN bar codes. The scanner "reads" these bar codes in such a way that the user need not precisely align the bar code symbol with respect to the window in the scanner even at package speeds up to 100 inches per second. By using a unique geometrical arrangement of mirrors, a polygonal mirror assembly, and a custom-designed plastic bifocal lens, a design was developed to meet these requirements. This paper describes the design of this new low cost scanner, the use of computer-aided design in the development of this scanner, and some observations on the future of bar code scanning.

  16. Application of laser bar code technology in power fitting evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohong; Liu, Shuhuab

    2007-12-01

    In this work, an automatic encoding and management system on power fittings (PFEMS) is developed based on laser bar coding technology. The system can encode power fittings according to their types, structure, dimensions, materials, and technical characteristics. Both the character codes and the laser bar codes of power fittings can be produced from the system. The system can evaluate power fittings and search process-paper automatically. The system analyzes the historical values and technical information of congeneric fittings, and forms formulae of evaluation with recursive analytical method. And then stores the formulae and technical documents into the database for index. Scanning the bar code with a laser bar code reader, accurate evaluation and corresponding process-paper of the fittings can be produced. The software has already been applied in some power stations and worked very well.

  17. Obtention control bars patterns for a BWR using Tabo search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The obtained results when implementing the technique of tabu search, for to optimize patterns of control bars in a BWR type reactor, using the CM-PRESTO code are presented. The patterns of control bars were obtained for the designs of fuel reloads obtained in a previous work, using the same technique. The obtained results correspond to a cycle of 18 months using 112 fresh fuels enriched at the 3.53 of U-235. The used technique of tabu search, prohibits recently visited movements, in the position that correspond to the axial positions of the control bars, additionally the tiempotabu matrix is used for to manage a size of variable tabu list and the objective function is punished with the frequency of the forbidden movements. The obtained patterns of control bars improve the longitude of the cycle with regard to the reference values and they complete the restrictions of safety. (Author)

  18. Optimization of patterns of control bars using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the RENOPBC system that is based on a recurrent multi state neural network, for the optimization of patterns of control bars in a cycle of balance of a boiling water reactor (BWR for their initials in English) is presented. The design of patterns of bars is based on the execution of operation thermal limits, to maintain criticizes the reactor and that the axial profile of power is adjusted to one predetermined along several steps of burnt. The patterns of control bars proposed by the system are comparable to those proposed by human experts with many hour-man of experience. These results are compared with those proposed by other techniques as genetic algorithms, colonies of ants and tabu search for the same operation cycle. As consequence it is appreciated that the proposed patterns of control bars, have bigger operation easiness that those proposed by the other techniques. (Author)

  19. DIRC - A particle identification system for BaBar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) is a novel type of Cherenkov imaging device that has been developed, built and installed as part of the BaBar detector at the asymmetric B-factory PEP-II at SLAC. The DIRC is based on total internal reflection of Cherenkov photons produced and guided within thin, rectangular quartz bars covering the barrel region of BaBar. The photon detector is an array of photomultiplier tubes covering the photon phase space at the backward end of the bars. In its first few months of operation the DIRC performance has been found to achieve the design requirements. This note presents results from cosmic-ray data and an analysis of the first beam collision runs

  20. DIRC - a particle identification system for BaBar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIRC (an acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) is a novel type of Cherenkov imaging device that has been developed, built and installed as part of the BaBar detector at the asymmetric B-factory PEP-II at SLAC. The DIRC is based on total internal reflection of Cherenkov photons produced and guided within thin, rectangular quartz bars covering the barrel region of BaBar. The photon detector is an array of photomultiplier tubes covering the photon phase space at the backward end of the bars. In its first few months of operation the DIRC performance has been found to achieve the design requirements. This note presents results from cosmic ray data and an analysis of the first beam collision runs. (author)

  1. Confirmation of an End-On Bar in NGC-6503

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Emily; Chomiuk, Laura; Keenan, Ryan; Nelson, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    The nearby isolated galaxy NGC 6503 features several characteristics that suggest the possible presence of a strong bar. These include a star-forming inner ring, circumnuclear disk, central stellar velocity dispersion decrease (σ-drop), and a surface brightness profile with a quasi-exponential central peak followed by a plateau at moderate radii. In Freeland et al. (2009, submitted) we propose the existence of a strong end-on bar in NGC 6503 as an explanation for these observables. Bureau & Athanassoula (2005) demonstrate through simulations that a strong end-on bar in a highly inclined galaxy such as NGC 6503 (incl. 74 degrees) would be hidden from view morphologically (appearing as a round bulge), but should show a strong ``double-humped'' signature in its stellar rotation curve. We propose long-slit spectroscopic observations along the major axis of the NGC 6503 to determine stellar kinematics and search for the signature of a strong end-on bar.

  2. Wave decomposition phenomenon and spectrum evolution over submerged bars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Benxia; YU Xiping

    2009-01-01

    Wave decomposition phenomenon and spectrum evolution over submerged bars are investigated by a previously developed numerical model. First, the computed free surface displacements of regular waves at various locations are compared with the available experimental data to confirm the validity of the numerical model, and satisfactory agreements are obtained. In addition, variations of decomposition characteristics with incident wave parameters and the change of energy spectrum for regular waves are also studied. Then the spectrum evolution of irregular waves over submerged bars, as well as the influence of incident peak wave period and the steepness of the front slope of the bar on spectrum evolution, is investigated. Wave decomposition and spectral shape are found to be significantly influenced by the incident wave conditions. When the upslope of the bar becomes 1:2, the length of the slope becomes shorter and will not benefit the generation of high frequency energy, so spectrum evolution is not significant.

  3. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced ...

  4. Extraction of Oil from Wheat Germ by Supercritical CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Marongiu; Dessì, Maria A.; Silvia Porcedda; Danilo Falconieri; Alessandra Piras; Antonella Rosa

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the supercritical fluid extraction of wheat germ oil. The effects of pressure (200-300 bar at 40 °C) and extraction time on the oil quality/quantity were studied. A comparison was also made between the relative qualities of material obtained by SFE and by organic solvent extraction. The extracts were analyzed for α-tocopherol and polyunsaturated fatty acid content. The maximum wheat germ oil yield at about 9% was obtained with supercritical carbon dioxide extraction at 300...

  5. Extraction of Genistein from Sophora flavescens with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang-Nam; Kang, Choon-Hyoung [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    This study was directed to finding an optimum extraction condition of genistein from the S. flavescens with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent. In this effort, effects of the extraction conditions including pressure, temperature and a co-solvent on the extraction efficiency were investigated. The aqueous ethanol and methanol solutions were used as co-solvents while the tested operating pressure and temperature ranges were from 200 bar to 300 bar and from 308.15 K to 323.15 K, respectively. The concentration of genistein was determined by means of HPLC equipped with a UV detector. From the results, it was observed that an increase in pressure led to the higher extraction efficiency. Further, methanol showed better performance as a co-solvent than ethanol. The DPPH radical scavenging activities were measured to compare antioxidant activities of S. flavescens extracts.

  6. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars in the rock record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Ielpi, Alessandro; Aldinucci, Mauro; Fustic, Milovan

    2016-04-01

    Classical models developed for ancient fluvial point bars are based on the assumption that meander bends invariably increase their radius as meander-bend apices migrate in a direction transverse to the channel-belt axis (i.e., meander bend expansion). However, many modern meandering rivers are also characterized by down-valley migration of the bend apex, a mechanism that takes place without a significant change in meander radius and wavelength. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars (DMFPB) are the dominant architectural element of these types of meander belts. Yet they are poorly known from ancient fluvial-channel belts, since their disambiguation from expansional point bars often requires fully-3D perspectives. This study aims to review DMFPB deposits spanning in age from Devonian to Holocene, and to discuss their main architectural and sedimentological features from published outcrop, borehole and 3D-seismic datasets. Fluvial successions hosting DMFPB mainly accumulated in low accommodation conditions, where channel belts were affected by different degrees of morphological (e.g., valleys) or tectonic (e.g., axial drainage of shortening basins) confinement. In confined settings, bends migrate downstream along the erosion-resistant valley flanks and little or no floodplain deposits are preserved. Progressive floor aggradation (e.g., valley filling) allow meander belts with DMFPB to decrease their degree of confinement. In less confined settings, meander bends migrate downstream mainly after impinging against older, erosion-resistant channel fill mud. By contrast, tectonic confinement is commonly associated with uplifted alluvial plains that prevented meander-bend expansion, in turn triggering downstream translation. At the scale of individual point bars, translational morphodynamics promote the preservation of downstream-bar deposits, whereas the coarser-grained upstream and central beds are less frequently preserved. However, enhanced preservation of upstream-bar

  7. PECULIAR FEATURES PERTAINING TO STRIP FORMATION FROM BAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zdor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes results of calculations and presents experimental substantiation of the dependence of a strip width being rolled out of a 10-mm diameter bar on its final thickness. It has been shown that the formation technology of thin steel strips out of a round bar makes it possible without any difficulties to obtain rolled products with the given cross-section dimensions due to proper selection of single drafting.

  8. PECULIAR FEATURES PERTAINING TO STRIP FORMATION FROM BAR

    OpenAIRE

    G. N. Zdor; L. A. Isaevich; S. V. Ivanitsky

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes results of calculations and presents experimental substantiation of the dependence of a strip width being rolled out of a 10-mm diameter bar on its final thickness. It has been shown that the formation technology of thin steel strips out of a round bar makes it possible without any difficulties to obtain rolled products with the given cross-section dimensions due to proper selection of single drafting.

  9. THE MASS PROFILE AND SHAPE OF BARS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): SEARCH FOR AN AGE INDICATOR FOR BARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Zaritsky, Dennis [University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, 13388 Marseille (France); Holwerda, Benne [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200-AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Comerón, Sébastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, FIN-90014 (Finland); Knapen, Johan H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Hinz, Joannah L. [MMTO, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Buta, Ronald J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Kim, Minjin [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Madore, Barry F. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2015-01-20

    We have measured the radial light profiles and global shapes of bars using two-dimensional 3.6 μm image decompositions for 144 face-on barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. The bar surface brightness profile is correlated with the stellar mass and bulge-to-total (B/T) ratio of their host galaxies. Bars in massive and bulge-dominated galaxies (B/T > 0.2) show a flat profile, while bars in less massive, disk-dominated galaxies (B/T ∼ 0) show an exponential, disk-like profile with a wider spread in the radial profile than in the bulge-dominated galaxies. The global two-dimensional shapes of bars, however, are rectangular/boxy, independent of the bulge or disk properties. We speculate that because bars are formed out of disks, bars initially have an exponential (disk-like) profile that evolves over time, trapping more disk stars to boxy bar orbits. This leads bars to become stronger and have flatter profiles. The narrow spread of bar radial profiles in more massive disks suggests that these bars formed earlier (z > 1), while the disk-like profiles and a larger spread in the radial profile in less massive systems imply a later and more gradual evolution, consistent with the cosmological evolution of bars inferred from observational studies. Therefore, we expect that the flatness of the bar profile can be used as a dynamical age indicator of the bar to measure the time elapsed since the bar formation. We argue that cosmic gas accretion is required to explain our results on bar profile and the presence of gas within the bar region.

  10. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one graduate student meant that data acquisition with the packed bed systems ended up competing for the graduate student’s available time with the electrodynamic balance redesign and assembly portions of the project. This competition for available time was eventually mitigated to some extent by the later recruitment of an undergraduate student to help with data collection using the packed bed system. It was only the recruitment of the second student that allowed the single particle balance design and construction efforts to proceed as far as they did during the project period. It should be added that some significant time was also spent by the graduate student cataloging previous work involving graphite. This eventually resulted in a review paper being submitted and accepted (“Adsorption of Iodine on Graphite in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems: A Review,” Kyle L. Walton, Tushar K. Ghosh, Dabir S. Viswanath, Sudarshan K. Loyalka, Robert V. Tompson). Our specific revised objectives in this project were as follows: Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using an EDB and a temperature controlled EDB; Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using a packed column bed apparatus; Explore the effect that charge has on the adsorption isotherms of iodine by varying the charges on and the voltages used to suspend the microscopic particles in the EDB; and To interpret these results in terms of the existing models (Langmuir, BET, Freundlich, and others) which we will modify as necessary to include charge related effects.

  11. Hercules and Wolf 630 Stellar Streams and Galactic Bar Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bobylev, V V

    2016-01-01

    We have identified the four most significant features in the UV velocity distribution of solar neighborhood stars: H1, H2 in the Hercules stream and W1, W2 in the Wolf 630 stream. We have formulated the problem of determining several characteristics of the central Galactic bar independently from each of the identified features by assuming that the Hercules and Wolf 630 streams are of a bar-induced dynamical nature. The problem has been solved by constructing 2:1 resonant orbits in the rotating bar frame for each star in these streams. Analysis of the resonant orbits found has shown that the bar pattern speed is 45-55 km/s/kpc, while the bar angle lies within the range 40-60 degrees. The results obtained are consistent with the view that the Hercules and Wolf 630 streams could be formed by a long-term influence of the Galactic bar leading to a characteristic bimodal splitting of the UV velocity plane.

  12. Visual mining business service using pixel bar charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ming C.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Casati, Fabio

    2004-06-01

    Basic bar charts have been commonly available, but they only show highly aggregated data. Finding the valuable information hidden in the data is essential to the success of business. We describe a new visualization technique called pixel bar charts, which are derived from regular bar charts. The basic idea of a pixel bar chart is to present all data values directly instead of aggregating them into a few data values. Pixel bar charts provide data distribution and exceptions besides aggregated data. The approach is to represent each data item (e.g. a business transaction) by a single pixel in the bar chart. The attribute of each data item is encoded into the pixel color and can be accessed and drilled down to the detail information as needed. Different color mappings are used to represent multiple attributes. This technique has been prototyped in three business service applications-Business Operation Analysis, Sales Analysis, and Service Level Agreement Analysis at Hewlett Packard Laboratories. Our applications show the wide applicability and usefulness of this new idea.

  13. A numerical study of interactions and stellar bars

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; González-García, A César; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Stringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    For several decades it has been known that stellar bars in disc galaxies can be triggered by interactions, or by internal processes such as dynamical instabilities. In this work, we explore the differences between these two mechanisms using numerical simulations. We perform two groups of simulations based on isolated galaxies, one group in which a bar develops naturally, and another group in which the bar could not develop in isolation. The rest of the simulations recreate 1:1 coplanar fly-by interactions computed with the impulse approximation. The orbits we use for the interactions represent the fly-bys in groups or clusters of different masses accordingly to the velocity of the encounter. In the analysis we focus on bars' amplitude, size, pattern speed and their rotation parameter, ${\\cal R}=R_{CR}/R_{bar}$. The latter is used to define fast (${\\cal R}1.4$). Compared with equivalent isolated galaxies we find that bars affected or triggered by interactions: (i) remain in the slow regime for longer; (ii) are...

  14. Environmental regulation of cloud and star formation in galactic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, F; Emsellem, E; Agertz, O; Athanassoula, E; Combes, F; Elmegreen, B; Kraljic, K; Motte, F; Teyssier, R

    2015-01-01

    The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find tha...

  15. Gluon exchange potential and cross-section for pp-bar → ΛΛ-bar process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One and two-gluon exchange potentials (OGEP and TGEP) relevant to the pp-bar → ΛΛ-bar transition process are derived from the S-matrix in the approximation of order p2/m2. An effective transition potential obtained from these gluon exchange potentials by the constituent quark model is employed to calculate the differential and total cross-sections for the pp-bar → ΛΛ-bar reaction in the plane wave Born Approximation. The calculated result shows that the relativistic correction terms in the OGEP and TGEP give considerable improvements on the cross-section in comparison with the previous calculations performed by making use of the OGEP given in the extremely non-relativistic approximation

  16. Observation of $\\eta_{c}$ decay into $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$ final states

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Albayrak, O; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Coccetti, F; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q Z; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhong, Z; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    Using a data sample of $2.25\\times10^{8}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector, we present the first observation of the decays of $\\eta_{c}$ mesons to $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$. The branching fractions are measured to be $(2.11\\pm0.28_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.18_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.50_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ and $(0.89\\pm0.16_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.08_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.21_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ for $\\eta_{c} \\to \\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$, respectively. These branching fractions provide important information on the helicity selection rule in charmonium-decay processes.

  17. The ee-bar → ττ-bar cross section and forward-backward asymmetry at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precision measurements of the ee-bar → ττ-bar cross section and forward-backward asymmetry at a centre-of-mass energies around 91 GeV from the LEP Collaborations are presented. The results are found to be in good agreement with the standard model. In addition, the results from LEP-II at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 189 GeV are presented

  18. A Study of B→c$\\bar{c}$γK in the BaBar Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulsom, Brian Gregory [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-04-01

    The BABAR Collaboration is a high energy physics experiment located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The primary goal of the experiment is to study charge and parity violation in the B-meson sector, however the copious production of B mesons decaying to other final states allows for a wide-ranging physics program. In particular, one can access the charmonium system via colour-suppressed b → c decays of the type B → c$\\bar{c}$K. This thesis presents a study of B →c$\\bar{c}$γK decays where c$\\bar{c}$ includes J/Ψ and Ψ(2S), and K includes K±, KS0 and K*(892). The particular emphasis is on a search for the radiative decays X(3872) → J/Ψγ and X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ. The X(3872) state is a recently-discovered resonance of undetermined quark composition, speculatively a conventional charmonium state or exotic four-quark di-meson molecule. This research is also sensitive to the well-known radiative charmonium decays B → χc1,2K, which are used as verification for the analysis technique. This dissertation sets the best B → χc1K branching fraction measurements to date, and sees the first evidence for factorization-suppressed B0 → χc2}K*0 decay at a level of 3.6σ. It also provides evidence for X(3872) → J/Ψγ and X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ with 3.6σ and 3.3σ significance, respectively. The product of branching fractions β(B± → X(3872)K±) • β(X(3872) → J/Ψγ) = (2.8 ± 0.8(stat.) ± 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and β(B{± → X(3872)K±) → β(X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ) = (9.5 ± 2.7(stat.) ± 0.9(syst.)) x 10-6 are measured. These results improve upon previous X(3872) → J/Ψγ measurements, and represent the first evidence for X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ.

  19. Demographic response of northern spotted owls to barred owl removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, V. Lowell; Hamm, Keith A; Early, Desiree A; Lamphear, David W; Katie Dugger,; Yackulic, Charles B.; Schwarz, Carl J.; Carlson, Peter C.; McDonald, Trent L.

    2016-01-01

    Federally listed as threatened in 1990 primarily because of habitat loss, the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) has continued to decline despite conservation efforts resulting in forested habitat being reserved throughout its range. Recently, there is growing evidence the congeneric invasive barred owl (Strix varia) may be responsible for the continued decline primarily by excluding spotted owls from their preferred habitat. We used a long-term demographic study for spotted owls in coastal northern California as the basis for a pilot barred owl removal experiment. Our demography study used capture–recapture, reproductive output, and territory occupancy data collected from 1990 to 2013 to evaluate trends in vital rates and populations. We used a classic before-after-control-impact (BACI) experimental design to investigate the demographic response of northern spotted owls to the lethal removal of barred owls. According to the best 2-species dynamic occupancy model, there was no evidence of differences in barred or northern spotted owl occupancy prior to the initiation of the treatment (barred owl removal). After treatment, barred owl occupancy was lower in the treated relative to the untreated areas and spotted owl occupancy was higher relative to the untreated areas. Barred owl removal decreased spotted owl territory extinction rates but did not affect territory colonization rates. As a result, spotted owl occupancy increased in the treated area and continued to decline in the untreated areas. Prior to and after barred owl removal, there was no evidence that average fecundity differed on the 2 study areas. However, the greater number of occupied spotted owl sites on the treated areas resulted in greater productivity in the treated areas based on empirical counts of fledged young. Prior to removal, survival was declining at a rate of approximately 0.2% per year for treated and untreated areas. Following treatment, estimated survival was 0.859 for

  20. Using newly-designed lint cleaner grid bars to remove seed coat fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experiment was conducted to remove seed coat fragments at the saw-type lint cleaner using newly-designed grid bars. The test consisted of five experimental grid bar designs and one control. The experimental grid bars had angles from the sharp toe of the grid bar (or the angle from vertical) of ...

  1. Extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for extracting at least two desired constituents from a mineral, using a liquid reagent which produces the constituents, or compounds thereof, in separable form and independently extracting those constituents, or compounds. The process is especially valuable for the extraction of phosphoric acid and metal values from acidulated phosphate rock, the slurry being contacted with selective extractants for phosphoric acid and metal (e.g. uranium) values. In an example, uranium values are oxidized to uranyl form and extracted using an ion exchange resin. (U.K.)

  2. Developments and trends in fruit bar production and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego, C E; Salgado, N; Botero, C A

    2014-01-01

    Fruits serve as a source of energy, vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber. One of the barriers in increasing fruit and vegetables consumption is time required to prepare them. Overall, fruit bars have a far greater nutritional value than the fresh fruits because all nutrients are concentrated and, therefore, would be a convenience food assortment to benefit from the health benefits of fruits. The consumers prefer fruit bars that are more tasted followed by proper textural features that could be obtained by establishing the equilibrium of ingredients, the proper choosing of manufacturing stages and the control of the product final moisture content. Fruit bar preparations may include a mixture of pulps, fresh or dried fruit, sugar, binders, and a variety of minor ingredients. Additionally to the conventional steps of manufacturing (pulping, homogenizing, heating, concentrating, and drying) there have been proposed the use of gelled fruit matrices, dried gels or sponges, and extruders as new trends for processing fruit bars. Different single-type dehydration or combined methods include, in order of increasing process time, air-infrared, vacuum and vacuum-microwave drying convective-solar drying, convective drying, and freeze drying are also suggested as alternative to solar traditional drying stage. The dehydration methods that use vacuum exhibited not only higher retention of antioxidants but also better color, texture, and rehydration capacity. Antioxidant activity resulting from the presence of phenolic compounds in the bars is well established. Besides this, fruit bars are also important sources of carbohydrates and minerals. Given the wide range of bioactive factors in fresh fruits that are preserved in fruit bars, it is plausible that their uptake consumption have a positive effect in reducing the risk of many diseases.

  3. Crystal Structures of the BAR-PH and PTB Domains of Human APPL1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,J.; Mao, X.; Dong, L.; Liu, F.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    APPL1 interacts with adiponectin receptors and other important signaling molecules. It contains a BAR and a PH domain near its N terminus, and the two domains may function as a unit (BAR-PH domain). We report here the crystal structures of the BAR-PH and PTB domains of human APPL1. The structures reveal novel features for BAR domain dimerization and for the interactions between the BAR and PH domains. The BAR domain dimer of APPL1 contains two four-helical bundles, whereas other BAR domain dimers have only three helices in each bundle. The PH domain is located at the opposite ends of the BAR domain dimer. Yeast two-hybrid assays confirm the interactions between the BAR and PH domains. Lipid binding assays show that the BAR, PH, and PTB domains can bind phospholipids. The ability of APPL1 to interact with multiple signaling molecules and phospholipids supports an important role for this adaptor in cell signaling.

  4. Inhibition of Aspergillus flavus on agar media and brown rice cereal bars using cold atmospheric plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhem, Kitiya; Matan, Narumol; Nisoa, Mudtorlep; Matan, Nirundorn

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize the operating parameters of cold atmospheric plasma treatment to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus flavus on agar media and brown rice cereal bars. The effects of argon plasma jet treatment on the growth of A. flavus on malt extract agar (MEA) at powers of 20 W and 40 W with exposure times at 5, 15 and 25 min were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite face-centered (CCF) design. Multiple regression analysis indicated that plasma treatment at 40 W for 25 min is most effective for inhibiting growth of A. flavus on the agar medium. On brown rice cereal bars, plasma powered at 40 W for 20 min was capable of giving protection against A. flavus growth for up to 20 days under storage conditions of 25°C and 100% RH. These results demonstrated the potential of cold atmospheric plasma jet treatment to control mold growth on various food products.

  5. Influence of pressure and time on extraction process using supercritical CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mićić V.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE by carbon dioxide (CO2 of Salvia officinalis L. was investigated. SFE by CO2 was performed at different pressure (80, 100, 150, 200 and 300 bar and constant temperature of 40ºC (all other extraction conditions, such are flow rate, particle diameter of Salvia officinalis, extraction time were kept constant. The GC-MS method was used for determination of qualitative and quantitative composition of obtained extracts and essential oils.

  6. Supercritical CO2 extraction of Tetraclinis articulata: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and mathematical modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Herzi, Nejia; Camy, Séverine; Bouajila, Jalloul; Destrac, Philippe; Romdhane, Mehrez; Condoret, Jean-Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    International audience Operating conditions for extraction from the leaves of Tetraclinis articulata using supercritical carbon diox-ide (SCCO2) were studied to focus on the feasibility of obtaining volatile and nonvolatile fractions throughthe use of different extraction pressures (90, 280 and 1000 bar). In addition, influence of temperature,static pretreatment and dynamic extraction durations, particle size and CO2flow rate were investigated.All extracts were analyzed by GC-FID/MS and th...

  7. Calculating error bars for neutrino mixing parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Burroughs, H R; Escamilla-Roa, J; Latimer, D C; Ernst, D J

    2012-01-01

    One goal of contemporary particle physics is to determine the mixing angles and mass-squared differences that constitute the phenomenological constants that describe neutrino oscillations. Of great interest are not only the best fit values of these constants but also their errors. Some of the neutrino oscillation data is statistically poor and cannot be treated by normal (Gaussian) statistics. To extract confidence intervals when the statistics are not normal, one should not utilize the value for chisquare versus confidence level taken from normal statistics. Instead, we propose that one should use the normalized likelihood function as a probability distribution; the relationship between the correct chisquare and a given confidence level can be computed by integrating over the likelihood function. This allows for a definition of confidence level independent of the functional form of the !2 function; it is particularly useful for cases in which the minimum of the !2 function is near a boundary. We present two ...

  8. Magnetometry of micro-magnets with electrostatically defined Hall bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Bergeron, Laurent; Sarra-Bournet, Christian [Département de Physique, Université de Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1 Sherbrooke, Québec (Canada); Pioro-Ladrière, Michel, E-mail: michel.pioro-ladriere@usherbrooke.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1 Sherbrooke, Québec (Canada); CIFAR Program in Quantum Information Science, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), M5G 1Z8 Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-11-30

    Micro-magnets are key components for quantum information processing with individual spins, enabling arbitrary rotations and addressability. In this work, characterization of sub-micrometer sized CoFe ferromagnets is performed with Hall bars electrostatically defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. Due to the ballistic nature of electron transport in the cross junction of the Hall bar, anomalies such as the quenched Hall effect appear near zero external magnetic field, thus hindering the sensitivity of the magnetometer to small magnetic fields. However, it is shown that the sensitivity of the diffusive limit can be almost completely restored at low temperatures using a large current density in the Hall bar of about 10 A/m. Overcoming the size limitation of conventional etched Hall bars with electrostatic gating enables the measurement of magnetization curves of 440 nm wide micro-magnets with a signal-to-noise ratio above 10{sup 3}. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity of the stray magnetic field created by the micro-magnets is directly measured using the gate-voltage-dependent width of the sensitive area of the Hall bar.

  9. Bars rejuvenating bulges? Evidence from stellar population analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Coelho, Paula

    2011-01-01

    We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in Gadotti (2009b) and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age vs. metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than ~ 4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M_Sun while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulg...

  10. Detection of Steel Bars embedded in Concrete Using Electromagnetic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.K.; Song, Y.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea); Rhim, H.C. [Yonsei University, Seoul(Korea)

    2001-07-01

    In this study, detection of steel bars embedded in concrete has been performanced using commercial non-destructive test equipments for the purpose of evaluating performance of each equipment to detect steel bas embedded in concrete. The characteristics and limitation of each equipment were identified. Two types of radar detection systems and one electromagnetic detection system using the electromagnetic detection method were used in conducting the non-destructive test. Steel bars having various diameters of 13, 16, 19, 25 and 55 mm were embedded in concrete specimens for detection of them with their respective covering thecknesses being defferent, while a PVC pipe (30 mm), a sheath (50 mm), a wood piece (20 x 100 mm), a Styrofoam piece (20 x 100 mm) and a water container (150 x 300 mm) were embedded in concrete specimens for detection of them a internal defects with their respective covering thicknesses being defferent. Meanwhile, spacing lengths in the horizontal arrangement of steel bars were measured with such spacing lengths being made to range from 50 to 350 mm for detection of such spacing legths. As a result of detecting so, it has been demonstrated that the radar detection method is effective in detecting lacations of steel bars embedded in concrete and spacing lengths in the arrangement thereof, while the electromagnetic detection method is effective in detecting lacations of steel bars embedded in concrete. (author). 8 refs., 16 figs.

  11. Measuring and test equipment control through bar-code technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, the use, tracking, and documentation of measuring and test equipment (M ampersand TE) has become a major issue. New regulations are forcing companies to develop new policies for providing use history, traceability, and accountability of M ampersand TE. This paper discusses how the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company and located at the Hanford site in Rich- land, Washington, overcame these obstacles by using a computerized system exercising bar-code technology. A data base was developed to identify M ampersand TE containing 33 separate fields, such as manufacturer, model, range, bar-code number, and other pertinent information. A bar-code label was attached to each piece of M ampersand TE. A second data base was created to identify the employee using the M ampersand TE. The fields contained pertinent user information such as name, location, and payroll number. Each employee's payroll number was bar coded and attached to the back of their identification badge. A computer program was developed to automate certain tasks previously performed and tracked by hand. Bar-code technology was combined with this computer program to control the input and distribution of information, eliminate common mistakes, electronically store information, and reduce the time required to check out the M ampersand TE for use

  12. Observation of $B^{0} \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{(*)-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Y -Y; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adamczyk, K; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aushev, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Greenwald, D; Grzymkowska, O; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Hsu, C -L; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lai, Y -T; Lee, I S; Li, L; Li, Y; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Luki, P; Masuda, M; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Rauch, J; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seino, Y; Senyo, K; Seong, I S; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, P; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yelton, J; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report the first observation of the decays $B^0 \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{(*)-}$. The data sample of $711$ fb$^{-1}$ used in this analysis corresponds to $772$ million $B\\bar{B}$ pairs, collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider. We observe $19.8\\sigma$ and $10.8\\sigma$ excesses of events for the two decay modes and measure the branching fractions of $B^0 \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{-}$ and $B^0 \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{*-}$ to be $(25.1\\pm2.6\\pm3.5)\\times10^{-6}$ and $(33.6\\pm6.3\\pm4.4)\\times10^{-6}$, respectively, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. These results are not compatible with the predictions based on the generalized factorization approach. In addition, a threshold enhancement in the di-baryon ($p\\bar{\\Lambda}$) system is observed, consistent with that observed in similar $B$ decays.

  13. Adaptive Access Class Barring Method for Machine Generated Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaesung Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular network is provisioned to serve traffic demands generated by human being. The random access channel used for nodes to compete for a connection with an eNB is limited. Even though machines generate very small amount of data traffic, the signaling channel of a network becomes overloaded and collisions occur to fail the access if too many MTC (Machine Type Communication devices attempt to access network. To tackle the issue, 3GPP specifies an access class barring but leaves a specific algorithm as an implementation issue. In this paper, we propose an adaptive access barring method. Generally, an eNB does not know the number of MTC devices in its coverage area. Thus, it is difficult to control the barring factor by predicting the number of MTC devices in a service area of a cell. On the contrary, we control the barring factor based on the prediction of access intensity which can be measured at an eNB. Simulation results show that since the proposed method can manipulate the barring factor autonomously according to the access intensity, it is superior to the original method in terms of the access success probability and the collision probability.

  14. Dense Cloud Formation and Star Formation in a Barred Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Nimori, M; Sorai, K; Watanabe, Y; Hirota, A; Namekata, D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the properties of massive, dense clouds formed in a barred galaxy and their possible relation to star formation, performing a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation with the gravitational potential obtained from the 2Mass data from the barred spiral galaxy, M83. Since the environment for cloud formation and evolution in the bar region is expected to be different from that in the spiral arm region, barred galaxies are a good target to study the environmental effects on cloud formation and the subsequent star formation. Our simulation uses for an initial 80 Myr an isothermal flow of non-self gravitating gas in the barred potential, then including radiative cooling, heating and self-gravitation of the gas for the next 40 Myr, during which dense clumps are formed. We identify many cold, dense gas clumps for which the mass is more than $10^4M_{\\odot}$ (a value corresponding to the molecular clouds) and study the physical properties of these clumps. The relation of the velocity dispersion of the i...

  15. Supercritical extraction of sunflower oil: A central composite design for extraction variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amit; Mohanty, Bikash; Bhargava, Ravindra

    2016-02-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of sunflower seed for the production of vegetable oil is investigated and compared to conventional methods. The effects of extracting variables, namely pressure, temperatures, particle size, SC-CO2 flow rate and co-solvent, on SC-CO2 extraction are investigated. The maximum yield for sunflower oil is found to be about 54.37 wt%, and is obtained when SC-CO2 extraction is carried out at 80 °C, 400 bar, 0.75 mm particle and 10 g/min solvent flow with 5% co-solvent. A central composite design is used to develop the model and also to predict the optimum conditions. At optimum conditions obtained based on desirability function, 80.54 °C, 345 bar, 1.00 mm, 10.50 g/min and 7.58% ethanol, SC-CO2 extraction has performed and found that extraction yield dropped by 2.88% from the predicted value. Fatty acid composition of SC-CO2 and hexane