WorldWideScience

Sample records for bandgap fiber devices

  1. Liquid Crystal photonic Bandgap Fiber Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei

    presents bandgaps. These bandgaps can be tuned by applying an electric field or by varying the temperature. Therefore, tunable all-in-fiber devices with controllable optical properties can be realized. This thesis focuses on the design, fabrication and development of com-pact LCPBG fiber devices. An on......In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure....... The presence of liquid crystals (LCs) in the air-holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a total internal reflection (TIR) guiding type into a photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding type. The light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-filled air-holes and the transmission spectrum...

  2. Liquid Crystal Photonic bandgap Fibers: Modeling and Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes

    In this PhD thesis an experimental and numerical investigation of liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fibers (LCPBGs) is presented. A simulation scheme for modeling LCPBG devices including electrical tunability is presented. New experimental techniques, boundary coating and the applications...

  3. Electrically tunable Yb-doped fiber laser based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate...... an all-spliced laser cavity based on the liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040-1065 nm...

  4. Optical devices based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2005-01-01

    hole. The presence of a LC in the holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) guiding type into a Photonic BandGap (PBG) guiding type, where light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-billed holes. The high dielectric and optical anisotropy...... of LCs combined with the unique waveguiding features of PBG fibers gives the LC filled PCFs unique tunable properties. PBG guidance has been demonstrated for different mesophases of LCs and various functional compact fibers has been demonstrated, which utilitzes the high thermo-optical and electro......-optical effects of LCs. Thermally controlled spectral filters and broadband switching functionalities, electrically controlled switches, polarizers and polarization rotators and an all-optical modulator has been demonstrated. The waveguiding mechanism of anistotropic PBGs fibers has been analyzed and spectral...

  5. On-chip tunable long-period grating devices based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    We design and fabricate an on-chip tunable long-period grating device by integrating a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber on silicon structures. The transmission axis of the device can be electrically rotated in steps of 45° as well as switched on and off with the response time...

  6. Tunable photonic bandgap fiber based devices for optical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Scolari, Lara; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    In future all optical networks one of the enabling technologies is tunable elements including reconfigurable routers, switches etc. Thus, the development of a technology platform that allows construction of tuning components is critical. Lately, microstructured optical fibers, filled with liquid...... crystals, have proven to be a candidate for such a platform. Microstructured optical fibers offer unique wave-guiding properties that are strongly related to the design of the air holes in the cladding of the fiber. These wave-guiding properties may be altered by filling the air holes with a material......, for example a liquid crystal that changes optical properties when subjected to, for example, an optical or an electrical field. The utilization of these two basic properties allows design of tunable optical devices for optical networks. In this work, we focus on applications of such devices and discuss recent...

  7. Liquid crystal parameter analysis for tunable photonic bandgap fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the tunability of splay-aligned liquid crystals for the use in solid core photonic crystal fibers. Finite element simulations are used to obtain the alignment of the liquid crystals subject to an external electric field. By means of the liquid crystal director field the optical...

  8. Gaussian Filtering with Tapered Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    We present a device based on a tapered Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fiber that allows active all-in-fiber filtering. The resulting Photonic Bandgap Fiber device provides a Gaussian filter covering the wavelength range 1200-1600 nm......We present a device based on a tapered Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fiber that allows active all-in-fiber filtering. The resulting Photonic Bandgap Fiber device provides a Gaussian filter covering the wavelength range 1200-1600 nm...

  9. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser by using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an al...

  10. Liquid Crystals and Photonic Bandgap Fiber Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Wei, Lei; Scolari, Lara

    Liquid Crystal(LC)filled Photonic Crystal Fibers(PCFs) represent a promising platform for the design and the fabrication of tunable all-in fiber devices. Tunability is achieved by varying the refractive index of the LC thermally, optically or electrically. In this contribution we present important...... parts of the LC theory as well as an application of a LC infiltrated PCF subject to an external electrostatic field. The fiber is placed between two electrodes and the voltage is increased step by step leading to the reorientation of the LC in the fiber capillaries. This mechanism can be used to produce...... a swichable polarizer, and an on chip LC photonic bandgap fiber polarimeter is presented, which admits strong attenuation of one polarization direction while the other one is nearly unaffected....

  11. Advances in photonic bandgap fiber functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian

    In order to take advantage of the many intriguing optical properties of photonic bandgap fibers, there are some technological challenges that have to be addressed. Among other things this includes transmission loss and the fibers ability to maintain field polarization. The work presented in this ...

  12. Electrically controllable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber with dual-frequency control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Riishede, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We present an electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based on a dual frequency liquid crystal with pre-tilted molecules that allows the bandgaps to be continuously tuned. The frequency dependent behavior of the liquid crystal enables active shifting of the bandgaps toward...

  13. Gas sensing using air-guiding photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritar, Tuomo; Tuominen, J.; Ludvigsen, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the high sensitivity of gas sensing using a novel air-guiding photonic bandgap fiber. The bandgap fiber is spliced to a standard single-mode fiber at the input end for easy coupling and filled with gas through the other end placed in a vacuum chamber. The technique is applied...

  14. Modeling of realistic cladding structures for photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Nielsen, Martin Dybendal

    2004-01-01

    Cladding structures of photonic bandgap fibers often have airholes of noncircular shape, and, typically, close-to-hexagonal airholes with curved corners are observed. We study photonic bandgaps in such structures by aid of a two-parameter representation of the size and curvature. For the fundamen......Cladding structures of photonic bandgap fibers often have airholes of noncircular shape, and, typically, close-to-hexagonal airholes with curved corners are observed. We study photonic bandgaps in such structures by aid of a two-parameter representation of the size and curvature....... For the fundamental bandgap we find that the bandgap edges (the intersections with the air line) shift toward shorter wavelengths when the air-filling fraction f is increased. The bandgap also broadens, and the relative bandwidth increases exponentially with f2. Compared with recent experiments [Nature 424, 657 (2003...

  15. Transmission properties of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Hald, Jan; Petersen, Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers.......Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers....

  16. Optical tuning of photonic bandgaps in dye-doped nematic liquid crystal photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Hermann, David Sparre

    2005-01-01

    An all-optical modulator is demonstrated, which utilizes a pulsed 532 nm laser to modulate the spectral position of the bandgaps in a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal. In order to investigate the time response of the LCPBG fiber device, a low-power CW probe...

  17. Electrically controlled broadband liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber polarimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber based polarizer integrated in a double silicon v-groove assembly. The polarizer axis can be electrically controlled as well as switched on and off.......We demonstrate a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber based polarizer integrated in a double silicon v-groove assembly. The polarizer axis can be electrically controlled as well as switched on and off....

  18. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  19. Ultrasensitive twin-core photonic bandgap fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Town, Graham; Bang, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We propose a microfluidic refractive index sensor based on new polymer twin-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF). The sensor can achieve ultrahigh detection limit, i.e. >1.4times10-7RIU refractive index unit (RIU), by measuring the coupling wavelength shift.......We propose a microfluidic refractive index sensor based on new polymer twin-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF). The sensor can achieve ultrahigh detection limit, i.e. >1.4times10-7RIU refractive index unit (RIU), by measuring the coupling wavelength shift....

  20. Compact electrically controlled broadband liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber polarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm.......An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm....

  1. Polarization Maintaining Hybrid TIR/Bandgap All-Solid Photonic Crystal Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian; Mangan, Brian J.; Roberts, John

    2008-01-01

    We report on fabricated all-solid fibers which guide by a combination of bandgap and TIR mechanisms. The fibers show high birefringence and possess a dispersion characteristic similar to the pure bandgap guiding form....

  2. Dispersion properties of photonic bandgap guiding fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    We investigate low-index core photonic crystal fibers. Dispersion properties very different from standard fibers are found. Both Zero dispersion are very large dispersion is shown possible at 1550 nm wavelength....

  3. Polarization Maintaining Hybrid TIR/Bandgap All-Solid Photonic Crystal Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian; Mangan, Brian J.; Roberts, John

    2008-01-01

    We report on fabricated all-solid fibers which guide by a combination of bandgap and TIR mechanisms. The fibers show high birefringence and possess a dispersion characteristic similar to the pure bandgap guiding form.......We report on fabricated all-solid fibers which guide by a combination of bandgap and TIR mechanisms. The fibers show high birefringence and possess a dispersion characteristic similar to the pure bandgap guiding form....

  4. Monolithic all-PM femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser using photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    We present a monolithic Yb fiber laser, dispersion managed by an all-solid photonic bandgap fiber, and pulse compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The laser delivers 9 nJ, 275-fs long pulses at 1035 nm.......We present a monolithic Yb fiber laser, dispersion managed by an all-solid photonic bandgap fiber, and pulse compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The laser delivers 9 nJ, 275-fs long pulses at 1035 nm....

  5. Biased liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2008-01-01

    We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure.......We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure....

  6. Soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The formation of solitons upon compression of linearly chirped pulses in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers is investigated numerically. The dependence of soliton duration on the chirp and power of the input pulse and on the dispersion slope of the fiber is investigated, and the validity...... of an approximate scaling relation is tested. It is concluded that compression of input pulses of several ps duration and sub-MW peak power can lead to a formation of solitons with ∼100 fs duration and multi-megawatt peak powers. The dispersion slope of realistic hollow-core fibers appears to be the main obstacle...... for forming still shorter solitons...

  7. Biased liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Scolari, Lara

    2009-01-01

    A simulation scheme for the transmission spectrum of a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal and subject to an external bias is presented. The alignment of the biased liquid crystal is simulated using the finite element method to solve the relevant system of coupled...... element based finite element method. We demonstrate results for a splay aligned liquid crystal infiltrated into the capillaries of a four-ring photonic crystal fiber and compare them to corresponding experiments....... partial differential equations. From the liquid crystal alignment the full tensorial dielectric permittivity in the capillaries is derived. The transmission spectrum for the photonic crystal fiber is obtained by solving the generalized eigenvalue problem deriving from Maxwell’s equations using a vector...

  8. Photonic bandgap fibers: theory and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2000-01-01

    to localize modes in the core region by the photonic band gap (PBG) effect. The photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) were first proposed for a high-index-core region, surrounded by a periodic dielectric structure consisting of a matrix of microscopic holes placed in a silica-glass-base material....

  9. All-optical modulation in dye-doped nematic liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) have attracted significant attention during the last years and much research has been devoted to develop fiber designs for various applications, hereunder tunable fiber devices. Recently, thermally and electrically tunable PCF devices based on liquid crystals (LCs......) have been demonstrated. However, optical tuning of the LC PCF has until now not been demonstrated. Here we demonstrate an all-optical modulator, which utilizes a pulsed 532nm laser to modulate the spectral position of the bandgaps in a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a dye-doped nematic liquid...... crystal. We demonstrate a modulation frequency of 2kHz for a moderate pump power of 2-3mW and describe two pump pulse regimes in which there is an order of magnitude difference between the decay times....

  10. Design of photonic bandgap fibers by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Feurer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A method based on topology optimization is presented to design the cross section of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers for minimizing energy loss by material absorption. The optical problem is modeled by the timeharmonic wave equation and solved with the finite element program Comsol Multiphysics...... distribution and the lossy silica material is reduced and the energy flow is increased 375% in the core. Simplified designs inspired from optimized geometry are presented, which will be easier to fabricate. The energy flow is increased up to almost 300% for these cases....

  11. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the photonic bandgap effect and the thermal tunability of bandgaps in microstructured polymer optical fibers infiltrated with liquid crystal. Two liquid crystals with opposite sign of the temperature gradient of the ordinary refractive index (E7 and MDA-00- 1444) are used to demons......We demonstrate the photonic bandgap effect and the thermal tunability of bandgaps in microstructured polymer optical fibers infiltrated with liquid crystal. Two liquid crystals with opposite sign of the temperature gradient of the ordinary refractive index (E7 and MDA-00- 1444) are used...... to demonstrate that both signs of the thermal tunability of the bandgaps are possible. The useful bandgaps are ultimately bounded to the visible range by the transparency window of the polymer....

  12. Highly tunable large core single-mode liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate a highly tunable photonic bandgap fiber, which has a core diameter of 25mm, and a bandgap tuning sensitivity of 27nm/°C at room temperature. The insertion loss is estimated to be less than 0.5dB....

  13. Power-scalable long-wavelength Yb-doped photonic bandgap fiber sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Shirakawa, Akira; Maurayama, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Ytterbium-doped photonic-bandgap fiber sources operationg at the long-wavelength edge of the ytterbium gain band are being investigated for high power amplification. Artificial shaping of the gain spectrum by the characteristic distributed filtering effect of the photonic bandgap enables spontane...

  14. Electrially tunable photonic bandgap guidance in a liquid crystal filled photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakestad, Magnus W.; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Nielsen, Martin Dybendal

    2005-01-01

    Tunable bandgap guidance is obtained by filling the holes of a solid core photonic crystal fiber with a nematic liquid crystal and applying an electric field. The response times are measured and found to be in the millisecond range.......Tunable bandgap guidance is obtained by filling the holes of a solid core photonic crystal fiber with a nematic liquid crystal and applying an electric field. The response times are measured and found to be in the millisecond range....

  15. Low loss liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber in the near-infrared region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei; Gauza, S.

    2010-01-01

    We infiltrate a photonic crystal fiber with a perdeuterated liquid crystal, which has a reduced infrared absorption. The lowest loss ever reported (about 1 dB) in the middle of the near-infrared bandgap is achieved.......We infiltrate a photonic crystal fiber with a perdeuterated liquid crystal, which has a reduced infrared absorption. The lowest loss ever reported (about 1 dB) in the middle of the near-infrared bandgap is achieved....

  16. Electrically tunable photonic bandgap guidance in a liquid crystal filled photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakestad, Magnus W.; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Nielsen, Martin Dybendal

    2005-01-01

    Tunable bandgap guidance is obtained by filling the holes of a solid core photonic crystal fiber with a nematic liquid crystal and applying an electric field. The response times are measured and found to be in the millisecond range.......Tunable bandgap guidance is obtained by filling the holes of a solid core photonic crystal fiber with a nematic liquid crystal and applying an electric field. The response times are measured and found to be in the millisecond range....

  17. Hybrid air-core photonic bandgap fiber ring resonator and implications for resonant fiber optic gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuchao; Wang, Linglan; Ma, Huilian; Ying, Diqing; Jin, Zhonghe

    2015-07-01

    A novel hybrid polarization-maintaining (PM) air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) ring resonator is demonstrated by using a conventional PM fiber coupler formed by splicing a section of air-core PBF into the resonator. The coupling loss between the PM air-core PBF and the conventional solid-core PM fiber is reduced down to ˜1.8 dB per junction. With the countermeasures proposed to reduce the backscattering induced noise, a bias stability of approximately 0.007 °/s was observed over a 1 hour timeframe, which is the best result reported to date, to the best of our knowledge, for RFOGs equipped with a hybrid air-core PBF ring resonator.

  18. Simulation of push-pull inverter using wide bandgap devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-badri, Mustafa; Matin, Mohammed A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of wide bandgap devices (SiC-MOSFET) in the design of a push-pull inverter which provides inexpensive low power dc-ac inverters. The parameters used were 1200V SiC MOSFET(C2M0040120D) made by power company ROHM. This modeling was created using parameters that were provided from a device datasheet. The spice model is provided by this company to study the effect of adding this component on push-pull inverter ordinary circuit and compared results between SiC MOSFET and silicon MOSFET (IRFP260M). The results focused on Vout and Vmos stability as well as on output power and MOSFET power loss because it is a very crucial aspect on DC-AC inverter design. These results are done using the National Instrument simulation program (Multisim 14). It was found that power loss is better in the 12 and 15 vdc inverter. The Vout in the SIC MOSFET circuit shows more stability in the high current low resistance load in comparison to the Silicon MOSFET circuit and this will improve the overall performance of the circuit.

  19. Enhancement of transmission efficiency in a photonic bandgap fiber introducing nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Abhilash; Hota, Mihir; Tripathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces the importance of nonlinearity in a Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Fiber using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation. It is shown that, the amplification of the weaker optical signal in a PBG fiber due to the constructive interference between two incoming signals can be controlled using nonlinearity.

  20. Highly tunable large core single-mode liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate a highly tunable photonic bandgap fiber, which has a large-core diameter of 25 mu m and an effective mode area of 440 mu m(2). The tunability is achieved by infiltrating the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber with an optimized liquid-crystal mixture having a large temperature...

  1. Low index-contrast photonic bandgap fiber for transmission of short pulsed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riishede, Jesper; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Broeng, Jes

    2004-01-01

    The use of low-index-contrast photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber for transmission of short pulsed light is discussed. PBG fibers have positive waveguide dispersion at long wavelengths at which conventional index-guiding fibers have negative waveguide dispersion. PBG fibers with low-index contrast can...... be used to obtain fibers with zero dispersion and a large mode area below 800 nm$+3$/. The results show that the PBG fiber is less sensitive to nonlinear effects and allows transmission of considerably larger intensities....

  2. All-optical dynamic photonic bandgap control in an all-solid double-clad tellurite photonic bandgap fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tonglei; Tanaka, Shunta; Tuan, Tong Hoang; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2017-06-15

    All-optical dynamic photonic bandgap (PBG) control by an optical Kerr effect (OKE) is investigated in an all-solid double-clad tellurite photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF) which is fabricated based on TeO2-Li2O-WO3-MoO3-Nb2O5 (TLWMN, high-index rod) glass, TeO2-ZnO-Na2O-La2O3 (TZNL, inner cladding) glass, and TeO2-ZnO-Li2O-K2O-Al2O3-P2O5 (TZLKAP, outer cladding) glass. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of all-optical dynamic PBG control in optical fibers. This PBGF has a high nonlinear refractive index which can lead to a significant OKE and induce the generation of all-optical dynamic PBG control. The transmission spectrum is simulated with the pump peak power increasing from 0 to 300 kW, which shows an obvious PBG shift. Dynamic PBG control is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally at the pump peak power of 200 kW (ON or OFF) at the signal of 1570 nm.

  3. Compact Electrically tunable Waveplate Based on Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Keller, Stephan Urs

    2009-01-01

    A compact tunable waveplate based on negative dielectric liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers is presented. The birefringence can be tuned electrically to work as a quarter-wave or a half-wave plate in the wavelength range 1520nm-1600nm.......A compact tunable waveplate based on negative dielectric liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers is presented. The birefringence can be tuned electrically to work as a quarter-wave or a half-wave plate in the wavelength range 1520nm-1600nm....

  4. Fabrication and characterization of porous-core honeycomb bandgap THz fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical and experimental investigation of a low-loss porous-core honeycomb fiber for terahertz wave guiding. The introduction of a porous core with hole size of the same dimension as the holes in the surrounding honeycomb cladding results in a fiber that can be drawn with much higher...... precision and reproducibility than a corresponding air-core fiber. The high-precision hole structure provides very clear bandgap guidance and the location of the two measured bandgaps agree well with simulations based on finite-element modeling. Fiber loss measurements reveal the frequency......-dependent coupling loss and propagation loss, and we find that the fiber propagation loss is much lower than the bulk material loss within the first band gap between 0.75 and 1.05 THz....

  5. A 98 W 1178 nm Yb-doped solid-core photonic bandgap fiber oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Xinyan; Chen, Mingchen; Shirakawa, Akira; Ueda, Ken-ichi; Olausson, Christina B; Broeng, Jes

    2013-01-01

    A high-power ytterbium-doped solid-core photonic bandgap fiber laser directly oscillating at 1178 nm is reported. The sharp-cut bandpass distributed filtering effect of photonic bandgap fiber can suppress amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in the conventional high-gain spectral region. The oscillator is composed of a high reflection fiber Bragg grating spliced with a 39 m gain fiber and a Fresnel fiber end surface. A model based on rate equations is investigated numerically. A record output power of 98 W is achieved with a slope efficiency of 54%. The laser linewidth is 0.5 nm. The spectrum at 98 W indicates that ASE and parasitic lasing are suppressed effectively. (letter)

  6. Hollow core photonic bandgap fiber with microfluid-infiltrated air holes for slow-light propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liyong; Liang, Jian; Yun, Maojin

    2012-10-01

    Slow light plays an important role in the fields of all-optical signal processing and integration photonics. It has shown many potential applications, such as realizing optical delay lines or buffers, enhancing linear and nonlinear light-matter interactions, as well as increasing the sensitivity of the interferometers and transducers. In this paper, hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers made from high index glasses are designed by infiltrating microfluid into the air-holes to tailor the fiber dispersion for slow-light propagation under low pulse distortion. In such a fiber made from Si material, group index ng~8 is obtained with a bandwidth up to 30 nm, where the group index fluctuation is restricted in ±10 % of the ng, while ng~6 is obtained with a bandwidth over 100 nm when the chalcogenide material is selected instead. Such a ±10 % criterion determines a regarded flatland region accordingly, and in this region the group velocity dispersion can be negligible. It is found that for the same fiber length the slow-light time delay in the photonic bandgap fiber is much larger as compared with that in the single mode fiber. This kind of photonic bandgap fiber may have many potential applications in short-distance fiber communications and delay lines.

  7. A 158 fs 5.3 nJ fiber-laser system at 1 mu m using photonic bandgap fibers for dispersion control and pulse compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C.K.; Jespersen, Kim Giessmann; Keiding, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate a 158 fs 5.3 nJ mode-locked laser system based on a fiber oscillator, fiber amplifier and fiber compressor. Dispersion compensation in the fiber oscillator was obtained with a solid-core photonic bandgap (SC-PBG) fiber spliced to standard fibers, and external compression is obtained...

  8. Theory of adiabatic pressure-gradient soliton compression in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, John

    2009-01-01

    Adiabatic soliton compression by means of a pressure gradient in a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber is investigated theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the dureation of the compressed pulse is limited mainly by the interplay between third-order dispersion and the Raman-induced soliton...

  9. Thermally tunable bandgaps in a hybrid As2S3/silica photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a hybrid silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with integrated chalcogenide glass layers and we show how the bandgaps of the fiber can be thermally tuned. The formation of the high-index chalcogenide films on the inner surface of the PCF holes...... revealed resonances as strong as similar to 35 dB both in the visible and infrared regime. Temperature measurements indicate that the transmission windows can be tuned with a sensitivity as high as similar to 3.5 nm/degrees C. The proposed fiber has potential for all-fiber filtering and temperature sensing....

  10. Ultrasensitive refractive index sensor based on twin-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Town, Graham E.; Bang, Ole

    We have theoretically investigated twin-core all-solid photonic bandgap fibers (PBGFs) for evanescent wave sensing of refractive index within one single microfluidic analyte channel centered between the two cores. The sensor can achieve ultrahigh sensitivity by detecting the change in transmission....... We find novel features in the sensing characteristics: the sensitivity is higher at the short wavelength edge of a bandgap than at the long wavelength edge, the effective index of the odd supermode (nodd) is more sensitive to ambient refractive index change compared with that of the even supermode...

  11. Single-mode ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic bandgap rod fiber amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Scolari, Lara; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Enabling Single-Mode (SM) operation in Large-Mode-Area (LMA) fiber amplifiers and lasers is critical, since a SM output ensures high beam quality and excellent pointing stability. In this paper, we demonstrate and test a new design approach for achieving SM LMA rod fibers by using a photonic...... bandgap structure. The structure allows resonant coupling of higher-order modes from the core and acts as a spatially Distributed Mode Filter (DMF). With this approach, we demonstrate passive SM performance in an only ~50cm long and straight ytterbium-doped rod fiber. The amplifier has a mode field...

  12. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Miguel V.

    In this paper we present the main research activities of the Laboratorio de Fibras Opticas del Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia. We show some of the main results obtained for devices based on tapered fibers, fiber Bragg gratings, acousto-optic effects and photonic crystal fibers.

  13. THz Photonic Band-Gap Prisms Fabricated by Fiber Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Stefan F.; Xu, Lipeng; Stecher, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a novel form of polymeric based 3D photonic crystal prisms for THz frequencies which could be fabricated using a standard fiber drawing technique. The structures are modeled and designed using a finite element analyzing technique. Using this simulation software we theoretically study...

  14. Microstructured and Photonic Bandgap Fibers for Applications in the Resonant Bio- and Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Skorobogatiy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review application of microstructured and photonic bandgap fibers for designing resonant optical sensors of changes in the value of analyte refractive index. This research subject has recently invoked much attention due to development of novel fiber types, as well as due to development of techniques for the activation of fiber microstructure with functional materials. Particularly, we consider two sensors types. The first sensor type employs hollow core photonic bandgap fibers where core guided mode is confined in the analyte filled core through resonant effect in the surrounding periodic reflector. The second sensor type employs metalized microstructured or photonic bandgap waveguides and fibers, where core guided mode is phase matched with a plasmon propagating at the fiber/analyte interface. In resonant sensors one typically employs fibers with strongly nonuniform spectral transmission characteristics that are sensitive to changes in the real part of the analyte refractive index. Moreover, if narrow absorption lines are present in the analyte transmission spectrum, due to Kramers-Kronig relation this will also result in strong variation in the real part of the refractive index in the vicinity of an absorption line. Therefore, resonant sensors allow detection of minute changes both in the real part of the analyte refractive index (10−6–10−4 RIU, as well as in the imaginary part of the analyte refractive index in the vicinity of absorption lines. In the following we detail various resonant sensor implementations, modes of operation, as well as analysis of sensitivities for some of the common transduction mechanisms for bio- and chemical sensing applications. Sensor designs considered in this review span spectral operation regions from the visible to terahertz.

  15. Photonic Bandgap Propagation in All-Solid Chalcogenide Microstructured Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Caillaud

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An original way to obtain fibers with special chromatic dispersion and single-mode behavior is to consider microstructured optical fibers (MOFs. These fibers present unique optical properties thanks to the high degree of freedom in the design of their geometrical structure. In this study, the first all-solid all-chalcogenide MOFs exhibiting photonic bandgap transmission have been achieved and optically characterized. The fibers are made of an As38Se62 matrix, with inclusions of Te20As30Se50 glass that shows a higher refractive index (n = 2.9. In those fibers, several transmission bands have been observed in mid infrared depending on the geometry. In addition, for the first time, propagation by photonic bandgap effect in an all-chalcogenide MOF has been observed at 3.39 µm, 9.3 µm, and 10.6 µm. The numerical simulations based on the optogeometric properties of the fibers agree well with the experimental characterizations.

  16. In-line flat-top comb filter based on a cascaded all-solid photonic bandgap fiber intermodal interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Youfu; Li, Xuejin; Tan, Xiaoling; Deng, Yuanlong; Yu, Yongqin

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, an in-line comb filter with flat-top spectral response is proposed and constructed based on a cascaded all-solid photonic bandgap fiber modal interferometer. It consists of two short pieces of all-solid photonic bandgap fiber and two standard single-mode fibers as lead fibers with core-offset splices between them. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that by employing a cut and resplice process on the central position of all-solid photonic bandgap fiber, the interference spectra are well tailored and flat-top spectral profiles could be realized by the controllable offset amount of the resplice. The channel position also could be tuned by applying longitudinal torsion with up to 4 nm tuning range. Such a flat-top fiber comb filter is easy-to-fabricate and with a designable passband width and flat-top profile.

  17. Gaussian Filtering with Tapered Oil-Filled Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara; Scolari, Lara; Weirich, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A tunable Gaussian filter based on a tapered oil-filled photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The filter is centered at X=1364nm with a bandwidth (FWHM) of 237nm. Tunability is achieved by changing the temperature of the filter. A shift of 210nm of the central wavelength has been observed by in...... by increasing the temperature from 25°C to 100°C. The measurements are compared to a simulated spectrum obtained by means of a vectorial Beam Propagation Method model....

  18. Influence of air pressure on soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, Peter John

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Soliton formation during dispersive compression of chirped few-picosecond pulses at the microjoule level in a hollow-core photonic bandgap (HC-PBG) fiber is studied by numerical simulations. Long-pass filtering of the emerging frequency-shifted solitons is investigated with the objective...... of obtaining pedestal-free output pulses. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of the air pressure in the HC-PBG fiber. It is found that a reduction in air pressure enables an increase in the fraction of power going into the most redshifted soliton and also improves the quality of the filtered pulse...

  19. Fabrication and characterization of porous-core honeycomb bandgap THz fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    We have fabricated a porous-core honeycomb fiber in the cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) Topas® by drill-draw technology [1]. A cross-sectional image of the fabricated fiber is shown in the left Panel of Fig. 1. Simulation of the electromagnetic properties of the fiber shows two wide bandgaps within...... the frequency range 0.1 to 2 THz, and numerous sharp resonant features are visible in the core power ratio, indicative of resonant coupling between the reflected field from the outer interface of the fiber and the core mode. The fiber is experimentally characterized with a commercial fiber-coupled THz......-TDS system (Picometrix T-Ray 4000). The reference pulse before coupling into the fiber is shown in Fig. 1(a) and the time trace of the THz pulse after propagation through a 5-cm long segment of fiber is shown in Fig. 1(b) (blue curve). After adding some water on the outside of the fiber surface...

  20. Photometric device using optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, Gilbert; Perez, J.-J.

    1981-02-01

    Remote measurements in radioactive environment are now possible with optical fibers. Measurement instruments developed by CEA are constitued of: - an optical probe (5 mm to 1 meter optical path length), - a photometric measurement device, - optical fiber links. 'TELEPHOT' is a photometric device for industrial installations. It is uses interferentiel filters for 2 to 5 simultaneous wave lengths. 'CRUDMETER' measures the muddiness of water. It can be equipped with a high sensitivity cell of 50 cm optical path length tested up to 250 bars. Coupling a double beam spectrophotometer to a remote optical probe, up to 1 meter optical path length, is carried out by means of an optical device using optical fibers links, eventually several hundred meter long. For these equipments special step index large core fibers, 1 to 1.5 mm in diameter, have been developed as well connectors. For industrial control and research these instruments offer new prospect thanks to optical fibers use [fr

  1. Transmission and radiation of an accelerating mode in a photonic band-gap fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-K. Ng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A hollow-core photonic band-gap (PBG lattice in a dielectric fiber has been proposed as a high-gradient low-cost particle accelerator operating in the optical regime where the accelerating mode confined to a defect in the PBG fiber can be excited by high-power lasers [X. Lin, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 051301 (2001PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.4.051301]. Developing efficient methods of coupling laser power into these structures requires a thorough examination of the propagating mode and its near and far-field radiation. In this paper, we develop a simulation method using the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P to calculate the radiation of the propagating accelerator mode into free space at the end of the fiber. The far-field radiation will be calculated and the mechanism of coupling power from an experimental laser setup will be discussed.

  2. Thermally controlled mid-IR band-gap engineering in all-glass chalcogenide microstructured fibers: a numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, Ravi K.; Pal, Bishnu P.

    2017-01-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-glass low refractive index (RI) contrast chalcogenide (Ch) microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) is investigated numerically. The effect of external temperature on the position of band-gap is explored to realize potential fiber-based wavelength filters....../sensors at functional mid-IR spectral range. The cross-sectional geometry of the MOF is formed by considering a Ch glass to form the overall background cross-section as well as the central fiber core. The core region is surrounded by periodically arranged (hexagonal pattern) smaller holes, which are assumed...

  3. Demodulation of DPSK signals up to 40 Gb/s using a highly birefringent photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Geng, Yan; Zsigri, Beata

    2006-01-01

    Phase-to-intensity modulation conversion of differential phase-shift keying signals is successfully demonstrated at 10 and 40 Gb/s using a polarization Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer implemented with only 2.4 m of a highly birefringent air-guiding photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber. Such a PBG fiber...

  4. Reduced thermal sensitivity of hybrid air-core photonic band-gap fiber ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-shuang; Wang, Kai; Jiao, Hong-chen; Wang, Jun-jie; Liu, Dan-ni; Yang, Zhao-hua

    2018-01-01

    A novel hybrid air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) ring resonator with twin 90° polarization-axis rotated splices is proposed and demonstrated. Frist, we measure the temperature dependent birefringence coefficient of air-core PBF and Panda fiber. Experimental results show that the relative temperature dependent birefringence coefficient of air-core PBF is 1.42×10-8/°C, which is typically 16 times less than that of Panda fiber. Then, we extract the geometry profile of air-core PBF from scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. Numerical modal is built to distinguish the fast axis and slow axis in the fiber. By precisely setting the length difference in air-core PBF and Panda fiber between two 90° polarization-axis rotated splicing points, the hybrid air-core PBF ring resonator is constructed, and the finesse of the resonator is 8.4. Environmental birefringence variation induced by temperature change can be well compensated, and experimental results show an 18-fold reduction in thermal sensitivity, compared with resonator with twin 0° polarization-axis rotated splices.

  5. Strain and temperature sensitivities of an elliptical hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber based on Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gilhwan; Cho, Taiyong; Hwang, Kyujin; Lee, Kwanil; Lee, Kyung S; Han, Young-Geun; Lee, Sang Bae

    2009-02-16

    We fabricated an elliptical hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (EC-PBGF) by controlling lateral tension in the hollow core region during the fiber drawing process. The absolute value of group modal birefringence becomes relatively high near the bandgap boundaries. We also experimentally measured the strain and temperature sensitivities of the fabricated EC-PBGF-based Sagnac loop interferometer. The strain and temperature sensitivities were very much dependent upon the wavelength. Moreover this PBGF-based interferometer can be a good sensor of physical parameters such as strain and temperature.

  6. Analysis of liquid crystal properties for photonic crystal fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Wei, Lei

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the bandgap structure of Liquid Crystal infiltrated Photonic Crystal Fibers depending on the parameters of the Liquid Crystals by means of finite element simulations. For a biased Liquid Crystal Photonic Crystal Fiber, we show how the tunability of the bandgap position depends...... on the Liquid Crystal parameters....

  7. Thermally controlled mid-IR band-gap engineering in all-glass chalcogenide microstructured fibers: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, A.; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.; Sanghera, J.; Shaw, L. B.

    2017-06-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-glass low refractive index (RI) contrast chalcogenide (Ch) microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) is investigated numerically. The effect of external temperature on the position of band-gap is explored to realize potential fiber-based wavelength filters/sensors at functional mid-IR spectral range. The cross-sectional geometry of the MOF is formed by considering a Ch glass to form the overall background cross-section as well as the central fiber core. The core region is surrounded by periodically arranged (hexagonal pattern) smaller holes, which are assumed to be filled up with another Ch glass. Thermally compatible and fabrication suitable, two Ch glasses are chosen, one (higher RI) as background material and the other (of lower RI) to fill up the holes. Two sets of such pairs of thermally compatible Ch-glasses are considered as fiber structural materials with relative RI contrast of ∼12% and ∼24%. For both such low RI contrast hexagonal structures, PBG appears only for suitable finite values of longitudinal wave vector. The structures are suitable to realize band-gap at mid-IR wavelengths and specifically optimized for operation around the ∼2 μm region. Then the temperature sensitivity of band-gaps is investigated to design fiber-based mid-IR wavelength filters/sensors.

  8. Design of a Polymer-Based Hollow-Core Bandgap Fiber for Low-Loss Terahertz Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, Ravi K.; Pal, Bishnu P.

    2016-01-01

    wavelength-scale circular air holes in a hexagonal pattern, embedded in a uniform Teflon matrix. The THz guidance in this fiber is achieved by exploiting the photonic bandgap (PBG) effect. In our low index contrast Teflon-air (1.44:1) hexagonal periodic lattice, the PBG appears only for a certain range...

  9. Experimental investigation of backreflection at air-core photonic bandgap fiber terminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Yan, Ming; Wu, Chunxiao; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Chunxi

    2017-07-01

    Backreflection from the termination of air-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBFs) is experimentally investigated based on a range-extended Mach-Zehnder and Michelson hybrid (M2) interferometer. For primary waves generated by the fundamental modes, the reflectivity is about -90 dB; for secondary waves caused by other modes, the reflectivity is less than -80 dB when compared to the intensity of the primary wave and -20 to -50 dB when compared to their own incident intensity. To suppress the reflection, 3-centimeter PBF at the end is filled with alcohol through the capillary effect, and this proposed method is shown to be much more convenient and effective than the conventional angle cleaving method.

  10. Photolithography of thick photoresist coating for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Khomtchenko, Elena; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    Thick photoresist coating for electrode patterning in an anisotropically etched V-groove is investigated for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices. The photoresist step coverage at the convex corners is compared with and without soft baking after photoresist spin...... coating. Two-step UV exposure is applied to achieve a complete exposure for the thick photoresist layer at the bottom of the V-groove, and minimise the reduction in resolution and image distortion. The resolution reduction of the different open window width for electrode pattern transfer is also...

  11. Wild Band Edges: The Role of Bandgap Grading and Band-Edge Fluctuations in High-Efficiency Chalcogenide Devices: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repins, Ingrid; Mansfield, Lorelle; Kanevce, Ana; Jensen, Soren A.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Glynn, Stephen; Barnes, Teresa; Metzger, Wyatt; Burst, James; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Dippo, Patricia; Harvey, Steve; Teeter, Glenn; Perkins, Craig; Egaas, Brian; Zakutayev, Andriy; Alsmeier, J.-H.; Lussky, T.; Korte, L.; Wilks, R. G.; Bar, M.; Yan, Y.; Lany, Stephan; Zawadzki, Pawel; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Suhuai

    2016-06-16

    Band-edge effects -- including grading, electrostatic fluctuations, bandgap fluctuations, and band tails -- affect chalcogenide device efficiency. These effects now require more careful consideration as efficiencies increase beyond 20%. Several aspects of the relationships between band-edge phenomena and device performance for NREL absorbers are examined. For Cu(In,Ga)Se2 devices, recent increases in diffusion length imply changes to optimum bandgap profile. The origin, impact, and modification of electrostatic and bandgap fluctuations are also discussed. The application of the same principles to devices based on CdTe, kesterites, and emerging absorbers (Cu2SnS3, CuSbS2), considering differences in materials properties and defect formation energies, is examined.

  12. Optical Spectra Tuning of All-Glass Photonic Bandgap Fiber Infiltrated with Silver Fast-Ion-Conducting Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Konidakis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Silver iodide metaphosphate glasses of the xAgI + (1−xAgPO3 family are embedded inside the air capillaries of a commercial silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF by means of vacuum-assisted infiltration technique. In this paper, we report on tuning the photonic bandgap (PBG guidance characteristics of the fabricated all-glass photonic bandgap fibers, by varying the composition of the fast-ion-conducting phosphate glass infiltration medium. Doping AgPO3 metaphosphate glass with AgI significantly alters the PBG guidance patterns in the examined range between 350 and 1750 nm, as it leads to the introduction of numerous additional transmission stop-bands, while affecting scattering dependant losses. The effect of phosphate glass cooling method during sample fabrication on the transmission behavior of the xAgI + (1−xAgPO3/PCFs is also considered.

  13. Optical Spectra Tuning of All-Glass Photonic Bandgap Fiber Infiltrated with Silver Fast-Ion-Conducting Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konidakis, Ioannis; Pissadakis, Stavros

    2014-08-07

    Silver iodide metaphosphate glasses of the x AgI + (1- x )AgPO₃ family are embedded inside the air capillaries of a commercial silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF) by means of vacuum-assisted infiltration technique. In this paper, we report on tuning the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance characteristics of the fabricated all-glass photonic bandgap fibers, by varying the composition of the fast-ion-conducting phosphate glass infiltration medium. Doping AgPO₃ metaphosphate glass with AgI significantly alters the PBG guidance patterns in the examined range between 350 and 1750 nm, as it leads to the introduction of numerous additional transmission stop-bands, while affecting scattering dependant losses. The effect of phosphate glass cooling method during sample fabrication on the transmission behavior of the x AgI + (1- x )AgPO₃/PCFs is also considered.

  14. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  15. Thermal modeling of wide bandgap semiconductor devices for high frequency power converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharath Sundar Ram, S.; Vijayakumari, A.

    2018-02-01

    The emergence of wide bandgap semiconductors has led to development of new generation semiconductor switches that are highly efficient and scalable. To exploit the advantages of GaNFETs in power converters, in terms of reduction in the size of heat sinks and filters, a thorough understanding of the thermal behavior of the device is essential. This paper aims to establish a thermal model for wideband gap semiconductor GaNFETs commercially available, which will enable power electronic designers to obtain the thermal characteristics of the device more effectively. The model parameters is obtained from the manufacturer’s data sheet by adopting an exponential curve fitting technique and the thermal model is validated using PSPICE simulations. The model was developed based on the parametric equivalence that exists between the thermal and electrical components, such that it responds for transient thermal stresses. A suitable power profile has been generated to evaluate the GaNFET model under different power dissipation scenarios. The results were compared with a Silicon MOSFETs to further highlight the advantages of the GaN devices. The proposed modeling approach can be extended for other GaN devices and can provide a platform for the thermal study and heat sink optimization.

  16. Bandgap Engineering of 1300 nm Quantum Dots/Quantum Well Nanostructures Based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Alhashim, Hala H.

    2016-05-29

    The main objectives of this thesis are to develop viable process and/or device technologies for bandgap tuning of 1300-nm InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) laser structures, and broad linewidth 1300-nm InGaAsP/InP quantum well (QW) superluminescent diode structures. The high performance bandgap-engineered QD laser structures were achieved by employing quantum-dot intermixing (QDI) based on impurity free vacancy diffusion (IFVD) technique for eventual seamless active-passive integration, and bandgap-tuned lasers. QDI using various dielectric-capping materials, such as HfO2, SrTiO3, TiO2, Al2O3 and ZnO, etc, were experimented in which the resultant emission wavelength can be blueshifted to ∼ 1100 nm ─ 1200 nm range depending on process conditions. The significant results extracted from the PL characterization were used to perform an extensive laser characterization. The InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers with QDs transition energies were blueshifted by ~185 nm, and lasing around ~1070 – 1190 nm was achieved. Furthermore, from the spectral analysis, a simultaneous five-state lasing in the InAs/InGaAs intermixed QD laser was experimentally demonstrated for the first time in the very important wavelength range from 1030 to 1125 nm. The QDI methodology enabled the facile formation of a plethora of devices with various emission wavelengths suitable for a wide range of applications in the infrared. In addition, the wavelength range achieved is also applicable for coherent light generation in the green – yellow – orange visible wavelength band via frequency doubling, which is a cost-effective way of producing compact devices for pico-projectors, semiconductor laser based solid state lighting, etc. [1, 2] In QW-based superluminescent diode, the problem statement lies on achieving a flat-top and ultra-wide emission bandwidth. The approach was to design an inhomogeneous active region with a comparable simultaneous emission from different transition states in the QW stacks, in

  17. Prospects of IMPATT devices based on wide bandgap semiconductors as potential terahertz sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Aritra; Banerjee, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the potentiality of impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT) devices based on different semiconductor materials such as GaAs, Si, InP, 4H-SiC and Wurtzite-GaN (Wz-GaN) has been explored for operation at terahertz frequencies. Drift-diffusion model is used to design double-drift region (DDR) IMPATTs based on different materials at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) and terahertz (THz) frequencies. The performance limitations of these devices are studied from the avalanche response times at different mm-wave and THz frequencies. Results show that the upper cut-off frequency limits of GaAs and Si DDR IMPATTs are 220 GHz and 0.5 THz, respectively, whereas the same for InP and 4H-SiC DDR IMPATTs is 1.0 THz. Wz-GaN DDR IMPATTs are found to be excellent candidate for generation of RF power at THz frequencies of the order of 5.0 THz with appreciable DC to RF conversion efficiency. Further, it is observed that up to 1.0 THz, 4H-SiC DDR IMPATTs excel Wz-GaN DDR IMPATTs as regards their RF power outputs. Thus, the wide bandgap semiconductors such as Wz-GaN and 4H-SiC are highly suitable materials for DDR IMPATTs at both mm-wave and THz frequency ranges.

  18. Performance analysis of an optical passive ring-resonator gyro with a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber sensing coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. L.; Jin, W.; Ying, D. Q.

    2010-11-01

    We evaluate the measurement errors induced by various deleterious effects in an optical passive ring-resonator gyro (OPRG) with a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) sensing coil. The uncertainties in measuring rotation rate due to Kerr, Shupe, and Faraday effects are found to be reduced respectively by 2~3, 1, and 1~2 orders of magnitude as compared with an OPRG with a conventional single mode fiber (SMF) sensing coil of similar parameters. The errors due to shot and coherent backscatter noises are larger for the OPRG made of the current state-of-the-art HC-PBF than for the OPRG with a conventional SMF coil, but are expected to reduce in future with improved fiber manufacture technologies.

  19. Next Generation Solar Cells Based on Graded Bandgap Device Structures Utilising Rod-Type Nano-Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyhamy M. Dharmadasa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Current solar cells under research and development utilise mainly one absorber layer limiting the photon harvesting capabilities. In order to develop next generation solar cells, research should move towards effective photon harvesting methods utilising low-cost solar energy materials. This will lead to reduce the $W−1 figure for direct solar energy conversion to electrical energy. In this work, a graded bandgap solar cell has been designed to absorb all photons from the UV, visible and IR regions. In addition, impurity PV effect and impact ionisation have been incorporated to enhance charge carrier creation within the same device. This new design has been experimentally tested using the most researched MOCVD grown GaAs/AlGaAs system, in order to confirm its validity. Devices with high Voc ~ 1175 mV and the highest possible FF ~ (0.85–0.87 have been produced, increasing the conversion efficiency to ~20% within only two growth runs. These devices were also experimentally tested for the existence of impurity PV effect and impact ionisation. The devices are PV active in complete darkness producing over 800 mV, Voc indicating the harvesting of IR radiation from the surroundings through impurity PV effect. The quantum efficiency measurements show over 140% signal confirming the contribution to PV action from impact ionisation. Since the concept is successfully proven, the low-cost and scalable electrodeposited semiconducting layers are used to produce graded bandgap solar cell structures. The utilisation of nano- and micro-rod type materials in graded bandgap devices are also presented and discussed in this paper. Preliminary work on glass/FTO/n-ZnS/n-CdS/n-CdTe/Au graded bandgap devices show 10%–12% efficient devices indicating extremely high Jsc values ~48 mA·cm−2, showing the high potential of these devices in achieving higher efficiencies. The detailed results on these low-cost and novel graded bandgap devices are presented in a separate

  20. Robust Control of Wide Bandgap Power Electronics Device Enabled Smart Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tong

    In recent years, wide bandgap (WBG) devices enable power converters with higher power density and higher efficiency. On the other hand, smart grid technologies are getting mature due to new battery technology and computer technology. In the near future, the two technologies will form the next generation of smart grid enabled by WBG devices. This dissertation deals with two applications: silicon carbide (SiC) device used for medium voltage level interface (7.2 kV to 240 V) and gallium nitride (GaN) device used for low voltage level interface (240 V/120 V). A 20 kW solid state transformer (SST) is designed with 6 kHz switching frequency SiC rectifier. Then three robust control design methods are proposed for each of its smart grid operation modes. In grid connected mode, a new LCL filter design method is proposed considering grid voltage THD, grid current THD and current regulation loop robust stability with respect to the grid impedance change. In grid islanded mode, micro synthesis method combined with variable structure control is used to design a robust controller for grid voltage regulation. For grid emergency mode, multivariable controller designed using Hinfinity synthesis method is proposed for accurate power sharing. Controller-hardware-in-the-loop (CHIL) testbed considering 7-SST system is setup with Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS). The real TMS320F28335 DSP and Spartan 6 FPGA control board is used to interface a switching model SST in RTDS. And the proposed control methods are tested. For low voltage level application, a 3.3 kW smart grid hardware is built with 3 GaN inverters. The inverters are designed with the GaN device characterized using the proposed multi-function double pulse tester. The inverter is controlled by onboard TMS320F28379D dual core DSP with 200 kHz sampling frequency. Each inverter is tested to process 2.2 kW power with overall efficiency of 96.5 % at room temperature. The smart grid monitor system and fault interrupt devices (FID

  1. Distributed optical fibre devices based on liquid crystal infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Broeng, Jes; Hermann, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new class of hybrid photonic crystal fibers, which are liquid crystal infiltrated fibers. Using these fibers, we demonstrate 'distributed' tunable filter and switching functionalities operating by the photonic bandgap effect....

  2. Analysis of High Switching Frequency Quasi-Z-Source Photovoltaic Inverter Using Wide Bandgap Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayiranga, Thierry

    Power inverters continue to play a key role in todays electrical system more than ever. Power inverters employ power semiconductors to converter direct current (DC) into alternating current (AC). The performance of the semiconductors is based on speed and efficiency. Until recently, Silicon (Si) semiconductors had been established as mature. However, the continuous optimization and improvements in the production process of Si to meet today technology requirements have pushed Si materials to their theoretical limits. In an effort to find a suitable replacement, wide bandgap devices mainly Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Silicon Carbide (SiC), have proved to be excellent candidates offering high operation temperature, high blocking voltage and high switching frequency; of which the latter makes GaN a better candidate in high switching low voltage in Distributed Generations (DG). The single stage Quasi-Z-Source Inverter (qZSI) is also able to draw continuous and constant current from the source making ideal for PV applications in addition to allowing shoot-through states. The qZSI find best applications in medium level ranges where multiples qZS inverters can be cascaded (qZS-CMI) by combining the benefit of the qZSI, boost capabilities and continuous and constant input current, and those of the CMI, low output harmonic content and independent MPPT. When used with GaN devices operating at very high frequency, the qZS network impedance can be significantly reduced. However, the impedance network becomes asymmetric. The asymmetric impedance network (AIN-qZSI) has several advantages such as increased power density, increases system lifetime, small size volume and size making it more attractive for module integrated converter (MIC) concepts. However, there are technical challenges. With asymmetric component, resonance is introduced in the system leading to more losses and audible noise. With small inductances, new operation states become available further increasing the system

  3. Wide-bandgap CIAS thin-film photovoltaics with transparent back contacts for next generation single and multi-junction devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Lawrence M.; Kalla, Ajay; Gonzalez, Damian; Ribelin, Rosine

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance, testing, and problems of copper indium aluminum diselenide (CIAS) thin-film devices with CIAS co-evaporated in a large-area moving substrate deposition system on transparent back contact technology. The CIAS alloy is being developed for use as a wide-bandgap radiation-resistant semiconductor for application as both a high-voltage single-junction photovoltaic (PV) cell using low-cost thin-films on lightweight flexible substrates, and as a top cell in efficient two-terminal monolithic tandem (multi-junction) PV cells. After significant development, it appears that conventionally formed CIAS devices experience a drop-off in performance with CIAS bandgaps above 1.5 eV, in addition to decreased zero bias depletion widths, and increased J L (V) effects with increasing CIAS bandgap. However, the performance drop-off is above the single-junction optimum bandgap, and higher-bandgap devices have not been tested with better-matched buffer layers. This paper also discusses CIAS devices with transparent back contacts. A wide-bandgap CIAS device with infra-red (IR) transparent back contacts and substrates can offer better performance over standard CIGS devices by being better tuned to the optimum bandgap for AM0 solar spectrum, reduced ohmic losses, and temperature dependencies compared to that typical of low-bandgap CIS alloys, reduced operating temperature with better IR transparency, the option of backside light collection with a suitable visibly transparent substrate, and is a precursor for use as a top cell in a monolithic tandem device configuration. CIAS devices with transparent back contacts show no loss in performance compared to standard Mo back contacts

  4. Solid-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibers for Cladding-Pumped Raman Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    that the cladding is uniformly-pumped at its maximum numerical aperture and that the photonic band gap ( PBG ) structure comprised of a triangular array...published 3 Jun 2011 (C) 2011 OSA 6 June 2011 / Vol. 19, No. 12 / OPTICS EXPRESS 11855 beyond the PBG structure. In this case, the high pump cladding...exhibit lower loss [16]. For high order bandgaps to exist in the cladding, the inclusions forming the PBG structure must support a large number of guided

  5. Investigation on the Effect of Underwater Acoustic Pressure on the Fundamental Mode of Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, microstructured optical fibers have become the subject of extensive research as they can be employed in many civilian and military applications. One of the recent areas of research is to enhance the normalized responsivity (NR to acoustic pressure of the optical fiber hydrophones by replacing the conventional single mode fibers (SMFs with hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBFs. However, this needs further investigation. In order to fully understand the feasibility of using HC-PBFs as acoustic pressure sensors and in underwater communication systems, it is important to study their modal properties in this environment. In this paper, the finite element solver (FES COMSOL Multiphysics is used to study the effect of underwater acoustic pressure on the effective refractive index neff of the fundamental mode and discuss its contribution to NR. Besides, we investigate, for the first time to our knowledge, the effect of underwater acoustic pressure on the effective area Aeff and the numerical aperture (NA of the HC-PBF.

  6. Multi-material optoelectronic fiber devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, F.; Yan, Wei; Volpi, Marco; Page, Alexis G.; Nguyen Dang, Tung; Qu, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The recent ability to integrate materials with different optical and optoelectronic properties in prescribed architectures within flexible fibers is enabling novel opportunities for advanced optical probes, functional surfaces and smart textiles. In particular, the thermal drawing process has known a series of breakthroughs in recent years that have expanded the range of materials and architectures that can be engineered within uniform fibers. Of particular interest in this presentation will be optoelectronic fibers that integrate semiconductors electrically addressed by conducting materials. These long, thin and flexible fibers can intercept optical radiation, localize and inform on a beam direction, detect its wavelength and even harness its energy. They hence constitute ideal candidates for applications such as remote and distributed sensing, large-area optical-detection arrays, energy harvesting and storage, innovative health care solutions, and functional fabrics. To improve performance and device complexity, tremendous progresses have been made in terms of the integrated semiconductor architectures, evolving from large fiber solid-core, to sub-hundred nanometer thin-films, nano-filaments and even nanospheres. To bridge the gap between the optoelectronic fiber concept and practical applications however, we still need to improve device performance and integration. In this presentation we will describe the materials and processing approaches to realize optoelectronic fibers, as well as give a few examples of demonstrated systems for imaging as well as light and chemical sensing. We will then discuss paths towards practical applications focusing on two main points: fiber connectivity, and improving the semiconductor microstructure by developing scalable approaches to make fiber-integrated single-crystal nanowire based devices.

  7. Air-Guiding Photonic Bandgap Fibers: Spectral Properties, Macrobending Loss, and Practical Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Theis Peter; Broeng, Jes; Jakobsen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    For development of hollow-core transmission fibers, the realizable fibers lengths, bandwidth, characterization, and compatibility with standard technology are important issues. We report record-length air-guiding fiber, spectral properties, splicing, and optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) m...

  8. Compact Design of an Electrically Tunable and Rotatable Polarizer Based on a Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    fixing structures during the device assembly. The total insertion loss of this all-in-fiber device is 2.7 dB. An electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio of 21.3 dB is achieved with 45$^{circ}$ rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in the wavelength range of 1300–1600 nm....

  9. Electrically tunable bandpass filter based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2010-01-01

    An electrically tunable bandpass filter based on two photonic crystal fibers filled with different liquid crystals is demonstrated. Both the short-wavelength and long-wavelength edge are tuned individually or simultaneously with the response time in milliseconds.......An electrically tunable bandpass filter based on two photonic crystal fibers filled with different liquid crystals is demonstrated. Both the short-wavelength and long-wavelength edge are tuned individually or simultaneously with the response time in milliseconds....

  10. Electrically tunable long-period gratings in liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordegraaf, Danny; Scolari, Lara; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate an aLl-electrically tunable long period grating in a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal. The spectral dips and the resonance wavelengths are tuned electrically and thermally, respectively.......We demonstrate an aLl-electrically tunable long period grating in a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal. The spectral dips and the resonance wavelengths are tuned electrically and thermally, respectively....

  11. Highly efficient high power single-mode fiber amplifier utilizing the distributed mode filtering bandgap rod fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2012-01-01

    We report on an ytterbium doped single mode distributed mode filtering rod fiber in an amplifier configuration delivering high average output power, up to 292 watts, using a mode-locked 30ps source at 1032nm with good power conversion efficiency. We study the modal stability of the output beam...... at high average output power levels and demonstrate a 44% power improvement before the threshold-like onset of mode instabilities by operating the rod fiber in a leaky waveguide regime. We investigate the guiding dynamics of the rod fiber and explain the improved performance by thermally induced...

  12. Polarization Properties of Elliptical-Hole Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartarini, Giovanni; Pansera, Marco; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of triangular photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with elliptical holes filled with a nematic liquid crystal (LC) are investigated theoretically. The analysis that is carried out using the finite-element method, including material dispersion effects, shows that LC anisotropy and hole...

  13. Low loss liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber in the near-infrared region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei; Gauza, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    We infiltrate a perdeuterated liquid crystal with a reduced infrared absorption in a photonic crystal fiber. The H atoms of this liquid crystal were substituted with D atoms in order to move the vibration bands which cause absorption loss to longer wavelengths and therefore reduce the absorption...

  14. Modeling loss and backscattering in a photonic-bandgap fiber using strong perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Aghaie, Kiarash; Digonnet, Michel J. F.; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-02-01

    We use coupled-mode theory with strong perturbation to model the loss and backscattering coefficients of a commercial hollow-core fiber (NKT Photonics' HC-1550-02 fiber) induced by the frozen-in longitudinal perturbations of the fiber cross section. Strong perturbation is used, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, because the large difference between the refractive indices of the two fiber materials (silica and air) makes conventional weak-perturbation less accurate. We first study the loss and backscattering using the mathematical description of conventional surface-capillary waves (SCWs). This model implicitly assumes that the mechanical waves on the core wall of a PBF have the same power spectral density (PSD) as the waves that develop on an infinitely thick cylindrical tube with the same diameter as the PBF core. The loss and backscattering coefficients predicted with this thick-wall SCW roughness are 0.5 dB/km and 1.1×10-10 mm-1, respectively. These values are more than one order of magnitude smaller than the measured values (20-30 dB/km and ~1.5×10-9 mm-1, respectively). This result suggests that the thick-wall SCW PSD is not representative of the roughness of our fiber. We found that this discrepancy occurs at least in part because the effect of the finite thickness of the silica membranes (only ~120 nm) is neglected. We present a new expression for the PSD that takes into account this finite thickness and demonstrates that the finite thickness substantially increases the roughness. The predicted loss and backscattering coefficients predicted with this thin-film SCW PSD are 30 dB/km and 1.3×10-9 mm-1, which are both close to the measured values. We also show that the thin-film SCW PSD accurately predicts the roughness PSD measured by others in a solid-core photonic-crystal fiber.

  15. Temperature assisted band-gap engineering in all-solid chalcogenide holey fiber for mid-IR application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.; Sanghera, J.; Shaw, L. B.

    2015-06-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-solid microstructured optical fiber (MOF), made of two fabrication compatible chalcogenide (Ch) glasses is theoretically investigated for potential application in the functional mid-infrared (IR) wavelength range. Cross-section of the MOF is formed by assuming periodically arranged wavelength scale circular air holes in a hexagonal pattern embedded in a uniform matrix. One type of Ch-glass is considered as the background material whereas another type of Ch-glass is assumed to fill the air holes. The relative index contrast between these two Ch-glasses is ~ 24%, for which PBG appears only for a suitable range of non-zero longitudinal wave vector. We have studied the scalability of this PBG by varying the lattice parameter of MOF and optimized the cross-section to attain the PBG at ~ 2 μm wavelength. Then by utilizing the thermo-optic properties of the glasses, the effect of external temperature (T) on the PBG is studied, and finally we have proposed a T-tunable wavelength filter/sensor at mid-IR wavelength with tuning sensitivity as high as ~ 140 pm/°C.

  16. Design of single-polarization coupler based on dual-core photonic band-gap fiber implied in resonant fiber optic gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Zhang, Chunmei; Ling, Weiwei; Liu, Pan; Xia, Linlin; Yang, Hanrui

    2016-12-01

    A novel (to our knowledge) type of single-polarization (SP) coupler based on a dual-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is proposed. The effects of structure parameters on the performance of this coupler are studied numerically based on the full vector finite element method (FEM). Finally, an optimal design with a length of 0.377 mm at the wavelength of 1.55 μm is achieved, and its implication in PBF-based fiber ring resonator (FRR), the effect of angular misalignment on the SP coupler are analyzed as well. When the SP coupler is incorporated into a PBF-based FRR, it functions as the power splitter and the polarizer simultaneously, and can extinct the secondary eigenstate of polarization (ESOP) propagating in the FRR. The mode field of SP coupler can match with the polarization-maintaining (PM) PBF with ultra-low temperature sensitivity proposed in previous study, and an all PM-PBF based FRR can be established, which is of great significance in suppressing the temperature-related polarization fluctuation and improving the long-term stability for RFOG, and the SP coupler has high angular misalignment tolerance as well.

  17. Fiber Bragg grating based arterial localization device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Li, Weijie; Razavi, Mehdi; Song, Gangbing

    2017-06-01

    A critical first step to many surgical procedures is locating and gaining access to a patients vascular system. Vascular access allows the deployment of other surgical instruments and also the monitoring of many physiological parameters. Current methods to locate blood vessels are predominantly based on the landmark technique coupled with ultrasound, fluoroscopy, or Doppler. However, even with experience and technological assistance, locating the required blood vessel is not always an easy task, especially with patients that present atypical anatomy or suffer from conditions such as weak pulsation or obesity that make vascular localization difficult. With recent advances in fiber optic sensors, there is an opportunity to develop a new tool that can make vascular localization safer and easier. In this work, the authors present a new fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based vascular access device that specializes in arterial localization. The device estimates the location towards a local artery based on the bending of a needle inserted near the tissue surrounding the artery. Experimental results obtained from an artificial circulatory loop and a mock artery show the device works best for lower angles of needle insertion and can provide an approximately 40° range of estimation towards the location of a pulsating source (e.g. an artery).

  18. High Efficiency Three-phase Power Factor Correction Rectifier using Wide Band-Gap Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouchaki, Alireza

    power devices. Therefore, the PFC switching frequency using WBG devices can potentially be increased. This advantage helps the reactive components to be reduced in size. However, it also brings challenges such as identifying a proper material for inductive components that has lower loss and layout...... hardware design using WBG devices to improve the conversion efficiency and 2) Identifying the impact on the efficiency by current controller. Part 1 is presented in Chapter ‎3. The converter topology is a two-level bidirectional boost voltage source converter (VSC). SiC devices (i.e. MOSFET and diode...

  19. Optical fiber end-facet polymer suspended-mirror devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mian; Wu, Jushuai; Zhang, A. Ping; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Wai, P. K. A.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a novel optical fiber device based on a polymer suspended mirror on the end facet of an optical fiber. With an own-developed optical 3D micro-printing technology, SU-8 suspended-mirror devices (SMDs) were successfully fabricated on the top of a standard single-mode optical fiber. Optical reflection spectra of the fabricated SU- 8 SMDs were measured and compared with theoretical analysis. The proposed technology paves a way towards 3D microengineering of the small end-facet of optical fibers to develop novel fiber-optic sensors.

  20. Improving Device Efficiencies in Organic Photovoltaics through the Manipulation of Device Architectures and the Development of Low-Bandgap Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Andrew Hideo

    Over the past two decades, vast amounts of research have been conducted in the pursuit of suitable organic semiconductors to replace inorganic materials in electronic applications due to their advantages of being lightweight, flexible, and solution-processible. However, before organic photovoltaics (OPVs) can be truly competitive and commercially viable, their efficiencies must be improved significantly. In this examination, we pursue higher efficiency OPVs in two different ways. Our attempts focus on 1) altering the microstructure of devices to improve charge dissociation, charge transport, and our understanding of how these devices function, and 2) tailoring materials to achieve optimal band gaps and energy levels for use in organic electronics. First, we demonstrate how the vertical morphology of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, with an active layer consisting of self-assembled poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanowires and (6,6)-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), can be beneficially influenced. Most device fabrication routes using similar materials employ an annealing step to influence active layer morphology, but this process can create an unfavorable phase migration where P3HT is driven toward the cathode. In contrast, we demonstrate devices that exhibit an increase in relative fullerene concentration at the top of the active layer by introducing the donor phase as a solid nanowire in the active layer solution and altering the pre-spin drying time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and conductive and photoconductive atomic force microscopy (cAFM and pcAFM) provide detailed information about how the surface of the active layer can be influenced; this is done by tracking the concentration and alignment of P3HT and PCBM domains. Using this new procedure, devices are made with power conversion efficiencies surpassing 2%. Additionally, we show that nanowires grown in the presence of the fullerene perform differently than those that are grown and

  1. Quantum Efficiency and Bandgap Analysis for Combinatorial Photovoltaics: Sorting Activity of Cu–O Compounds in All-Oxide Device Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    All-oxide-based photovoltaics (PVs) encompass the potential for extremely low cost solar cells, provided they can obtain an order of magnitude improvement in their power conversion efficiencies. To achieve this goal, we perform a combinatorial materials study of metal oxide based light absorbers, charge transporters, junctions between them, and PV devices. Here we report the development of a combinatorial internal quantum efficiency (IQE) method. IQE measures the efficiency associated with the charge separation and collection processes, and thus is a proxy for PV activity of materials once placed into devices, discarding optical properties that cause uncontrolled light harvesting. The IQE is supported by high-throughput techniques for bandgap fitting, composition analysis, and thickness mapping, which are also crucial parameters for the combinatorial investigation cycle of photovoltaics. As a model system we use a library of 169 solar cells with a varying thickness of sprayed titanium dioxide (TiO2) as the window layer, and covarying thickness and composition of binary compounds of copper oxides (Cu–O) as the light absorber, fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The analysis on the combinatorial devices shows the correlation between compositions and bandgap, and their effect on PV activity within several device configurations. The analysis suggests that the presence of Cu4O3 plays a significant role in the PV activity of binary Cu–O compounds. PMID:24410367

  2. Fiber-shaped energy harvesting and storage devices

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Huisheng

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book covers flexible fiber-shaped devices in the area of energy conversion and storage. The first part of the book introduces recently developed materials, particularly, various nanomaterials and composite materials based on nanostructured carbon such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, metals and polymers for the construction of fiber electrodes. The second part of the book focuses on two typical twisted and coaxial architectures of fiber-shaped devices for energy conversion and storage. The emphasis is placed on dye-sensitized solar cells, polymer solar cells, lithium-ion b

  3. 77 FR 65713 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Institution... certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications, components thereof, and products containing... optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications, components thereof, and products containing the same that...

  4. 78 FR 16296 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination... United States after importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications... Fiber IP (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. of Singapore (``Avago Fiber IP''); Avago General IP and Avago...

  5. Pulse quality analysis on soliton pulse compression and soliton self-frequency shift in a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Baquedano, N; Torres-Gómez, I; Arzate, N; Ferrando, A; Ceballos-Herrera, D E

    2013-04-08

    A numerical investigation of low-order soliton evolution in a proposed seven-cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber is reported. In the numerical simulation, we analyze the pulse quality evolution in soliton pulse compression and soliton self-frequency shift in three fiber structures with different cross-section sizes. In the simulation, we consider unchirped soliton pulses (of 400 fs) at the wavelength of 1060 nm. Our numerical results show that the seven-cell hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, with a cross-section size reduction of 2%, promotes the pulse quality on the soliton pulse compression and soliton self-frequency shift. For an input soliton pulse of order 3 (which corresponds to an energy of 1.69 μJ), the pulse gets compressed with a factor of up to 5.5 and a quality factor of 0.73, in a distance of 12 cm. It also experiences a soliton-self frequency shift of up to 28 nm, in a propagation length of 6 m, with a pulse shape quality of ≈ 0.80.

  6. Tuning direct bandgap GeSn/Ge quantum dots' interband and intraband useful emission wavelength: Towards CMOS compatible infrared optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baira, Mourad; Salem, Bassem; Madhar, Niyaz Ahamad; Ilahi, Bouraoui

    2018-05-01

    In this work, interband and intraband optical transitions from direct bandgap strained GeSn/Ge quantum dots are numerically tuned by evaluating the confined energies for heavy holes and electrons in Г-and L-valley. The practically exploitable emission wavelength ranges for efficient use in light emission and sensing should fulfill specific criteria imposing the electrons confined states in Г-valley to be sufficiently below those in L-valley. This study shows that GeSn quantum dots offer promising opportunity towards high efficient group IV based infrared optical devices operating in the mid-IR and far-IR wavelength regions.

  7. Q-switching and efficient harmonic generation from a single-mode LMA photonic bandgap rod fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Saby, Julien; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a Single-Mode (SM) Large-Mode-Area (LMA) ytterbium-doped PCF rod fiber laser with stable and close to diffraction limited beam quality with 110W output power. Distributed-Mode-Filtering (DMF) elements integrated in the cladding of the rod fiber provide a robust spatial mode with a ...

  8. An in-fiber integrated optofluidic device based on an optical fiber with an inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Yuan, Tingting; Teng, Pingping; Kong, Depeng; Liu, Chunlan; Li, Entao; Zhao, Enming; Tong, Chengguo; Yuan, Libo

    2014-06-21

    A new kind of optofluidic in-fiber integrated device based on a specially designed hollow optical fiber with an inner core is designed. The inlets and outlets are built by etching the surface of the optical fiber without damaging the inner core. A reaction region between the end of the fiber and a solid point obtained after melting is constructed. By injecting samples into the fiber, the liquids can form steady microflows and react in the region. Simultaneously, the emission from the chemiluminescence reaction can be detected from the remote end of the optical fiber through evanescent field coupling. The concentration of ascorbic acid (AA or vitamin C, Vc) is determined by the emission intensity of the reaction of Vc, H2O2, luminol, and K3Fe(CN)6 in the optical fiber. A linear sensing range of 0.1-3.0 mmol L(-1) for Vc is obtained. The emission intensity can be determined within 2 s at a total flow rate of 150 μL min(-1). Significantly, this work presents information for the in-fiber integrated optofluidic devices without spatial optical coupling.

  9. Cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device based on thermoelectric cooling of metal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Shokouh Hosseinzadeh; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-04-03

    A new cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device was designed and constructed based on thermoelectric cooling. A three-stage thermoelectric cooler (TEC) was used for cooling a copper rod coated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) hollow fiber, which served as the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The copper rod was mounted on a commercial SPME plunger and exposed to the cold surface of the TEC, which was enclosed in a small aluminum box. A heat sink and a fan were used to dissipate the generated heat at the hot side of the TEC. By applying an appropriate dc voltage to the TEC, the upper part of the copper rod, which was in contact to the cold side of the TEC, was cooled and the hollow fiber reached a lower temperature through heat transfer. A thermocouple was embedded in the cold side of the TEC for indirect measurement of the fiber temperature. The device was applied in quantitative analysis of off-flavors in a rice sample. Hexanal, nonanal, and undecanal were chosen as three off-flavors in rice. They were identified according to their retention times and analyzed by GC-flame ionization detection instrument. Headspace extraction conditions (i.e., temperature and time) were optimized. Standard addition calibration graphs were obtained at the optimized conditions and the concentrations of the three analytes were calculated. The concentration of hexanal was also measured using a conventional solvent extraction method (697+/-143ng/g) which was comparable to that obtained from the cold fiber SPME method (644+/-8). Moreover, the cold fiber SPME resulted in better reproducibility and shorter analysis time. Cold fiber SPME with TEC device can also be used as a portable device for field sampling.

  10. Bandgap tunable Csx(CH3NH3)1-xPbI3perovskite nanowires by aqueous solution synthesis for optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dongdong; Deng, Hui; Hu, Chao; Song, Huaibing; Qiao, Keke; Yang, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jian; Cai, Fensha; Tang, Jiang; Song, Haisheng

    2017-01-26

    To date, all the lead halide based full-inorganic or organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have been synthesized from organic solvent, such as N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), by a solution method. Herein, water has been utilized as a 'green' solvent to develop an efficient synthetic route to grow various kinds of lead halide perovskite nanowires (NWs). By controlling the proportion of the hybrid cations, Cs x (CH 3 NH 3 ) 1-x PbI 3 perovskite NWs were successfully synthesized. Every Cs x (CH 3 NH 3 ) 1-x PbI 3 perovskite NW demonstrated single crystal characteristics with uniform stoichiometric element distribution. Because of the controllable cation composition, the NW bandgaps could be finely tuned from 1.5 to 1.7 eV. Transient photoluminescence spectra showed superior NW quality when compared with those of the conventional DMF-based NWs. Based on the abovementioned high quality single Cs 0.5 (CH 3 NH 3 ) 0.5 PbI 3 perovskite NW, a reliable single-NW photodetector was fabricated to investigate the optoelectronic application. It demonstrated a responsivity of 23 A/W, exceeding most of the reported values in the perovskite nanowire photoconductive detectors, and the shot-noise normalized detectivity was 2.5 × 10 11 Jones comparable to the parameters of the commercial silicon-based nanowires. The green and robust synthesis method, finely tunable NW bandgaps, and superior optoelectronic properties are expected to open a new door for the development of perovskite optoelectronic devices.

  11. Photosensitive and all-optically fast-controllable photonic bandgap device and laser in a dye-doped blue phase with a low-concentration azobenzene liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-De; Lin, Yu-Meng; Mo, Ting-Shan; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2014-04-21

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a novel photosensitive and all-optically fast-controllable photonic bandgap (PBG) device based on a dye-doped blue phase (DDBP), embedded with a low-concentration azobenzene liquid crystal (azo-LC). PBG of the DDBP can be reversibly fast-tuned off and on with the successive illumination of a weak UV and green beams. UV irradiation can transform the trans azo-LCs into bend cis isomers, which can easily disturb LCs at the boundary between the double twisting cylinders (DTCs) and the disclinations, and, then, quickly destabilize BPI to become a BPIII-like texture with randomly-oriented DTCs. Doing so may quickly destroy the BP PBG structure. However, with the successive illumination of a green beam, the BPI PBG device can be fast-turned on, owing to the fast disappearance of the disturbance of the azo-LCs on the boundary LCs via the green-beam-induced cis → trans back isomerization. The response time and irradiated energy density for turning off (on) the BP PBG device under the UV (green) beam irradiation are only 120 ms (120 ms) and 0.764 mJ/cm(2) (2.12 mJ/cm(2)), respectively, which are a thousand-fold reduction in photoswitching a traditional cholesteric LC (CLC) PBG device based on similar experimental conditions (i.e., materials used, azo-LC concentration (1 wt%), spectral position of PBG peak, sample thickness, and temperature difference for a working temperature lower than the clearing one). The BP PBG device can significantly contribute to efforts to develop a photosensitive and all-optically fast-controlling LC laser.

  12. Modeling fiber Bragg grating device networks in photomechanical polymer optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Joseph T.; Kuzyk, Mark G.; Sullivan, Dennis M.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the modeling of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer fibers doped with azo dyes. Our target is the development of Photomechanical Optical Devices (PODs), comprised of two FBGs in series, separated by a Fabry-Perot cavity of photomechanical material. PODs exhibit photomechanical multi-stability, with the capacity to access multiple length states for a fixed input intensity when a mechanical shock is applied. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical methods, we modeled the photomechanical response of both Fabry-Perot and Bragg-type PODs in a single polymer optical fiber. The polymer fiber was modeled as an instantaneous Kerr-type nonlinear χ(3) material. Our model correctly predicts the essential optical features of FBGs as well as the photomechanical multi-stability of nonlinear Fabry-Perot cavity-based PODs. Networks of PODs may provide a framework for smart shape-shifting materials and fast optical computation where the decision process is distributed over the entire network. In addition, a POD can act as memory, and its response can depend on input history. Our models inform and will accelerate targeted development of novel Bragg grating-based polymer fiber device networks for a variety of applications in optical computing and smart materials.

  13. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, James S. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) have been investigated since the late 1970s. Some devices have been developed that withstand tens of kilovolts and others that switch hundreds of amperes. However, no single device has been developed that can reliably withstand both high voltage and switch high current. Yet, photoconductive switches still hold the promise of reliable high voltage and high current operation with subnanosecond risetimes. Particularly since good quality, bulk, single crystal, wide bandgap semiconductor materials have recently become available. In this chapter we will review the basic operation of PCSS devices, status of PCSS devices and properties of the wide bandgap semiconductors 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and 2H-GaN.

  14. Lab-on-fiber electrophoretic trace mixture separating and detecting an optofluidic device based on a microstructured optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Guo, Xiaohui; Li, Song; Kong, Depeng; Liu, Zhihai; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-04-15

    We report an in-fiber integrated electrophoretic trace mixture separating and detecting an optofluidic optical fiber sensor based on a specially designed optical fiber. In this design, rapid in situ separation and simultaneous detection of mixed analytes can be realized under electro-osmotic flow in the microstructured optical fiber. To visually display the in-fiber separating and detecting process, two common fluorescent indicators are adopted as the optofluidic analytes in the optical fiber. Results show that a trace amount of the mixture (0.15 μL) can be completely separated within 3.5 min under a high voltage of 5 kV. Simultaneously, the distributed information of the separated analytes in the optical fiber can be clearly obtained by scanning along the optical fiber using a 355 nm laser. The emission from the analytes can be efficiently coupled into the inner core and guides to the remote end of the optical fiber. In addition, the thin cladding around the inner core in the optical fiber can prevent the fluorescent cross talk between the analytes in this design. Compared to previous optical fiber optofluidic devices, this device first realizes simultaneously separating treatment and the detection of the mixed samples in an optical fiber. Significantly, such an in-fiber integrated separating and detecting optofluidic device can find wide applications in various analysis fields involves mixed samples, such as biology, chemistry, and environment.

  15. Magnetostrictive pressure device for thermoplastic fiber placement process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Markus; Mallick, Vishal

    1999-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composites offer excellent specific stiffness and strength and are therefore interesting for rotating machinery applications. The main disadvantage of high performance composites is the manufacturing process which is labor intensive and thus slow and expensive. The Thermoplastic Fiber Placement process overcomes these difficulties due to its high degree of automation. During the process, an impregnated tape is heated up and then consolidated in-situ under pressure. The process which is used at ABB consists of a six axis robot, a heat source and a pressure device for consolidation. Today mechanical roller element are used to apply the forces normal to the surface to the composite part. These forces are necessary for proper consolidation. The roller action prevents damage due to shearing of the tape during lay down. To improve the processing sped, and to expand the use of the Thermoplastic Fiber Placement process for more complex structures, two severe drawbacks of the solid roller approach need to be overcome; the small pressure contact area which limits the speed of the process and the poor conformability which prevents the process from being applied to highly 3D surfaces. Smart materials such as piezoelectrics, electrostrictives and magnetostrictives can produce high forces at high operating frequencies and enable a large, conformable actuated surface to be realized. A pressure device made with a magnetostrictive actuator has been tested. The main design goal is to apply the consolidation pressure correctly, without introducing shear forces on the tape, in order to produce parts with optimal mechanical properties.

  16. Device & System Research in Millimeter Wave Fiber-Optic Link & Distributed Antenna Networks for Cellular and Personal Communitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lau, Kam

    2000-01-01

    .... The infrastructure is fiber based, but with the key criterion of being low cost. From the device end, VCSELs were investigated as optical sources for the fiber optic network, since these devices are being mass manufactured for fiber network applications...

  17. Development of an efficient DC-DC SEPIC converter using wide bandgap power devices for high step-up applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-bayati, Ali M. S.; Alharbi, Salah S.; Alharbi, Saleh S.; Matin, Mohammad

    2017-08-01

    A highly efficient high step-up dc-dc converter is the major requirement in the integration of low voltage renewable energy sources, such as photovoltaic panel module and fuel cell stacks, with a load or utility. This paper presents the development of an efficient dc-dc single-ended primary-inductor converter (SEPIC) for high step-up applications. Three SEPIC converters are designed and studied using different combinations of power devices: a combination based on all Si power devices using a Si-MOSFET and a Si-diode and termed as Si/Si, a combination based on a hybrid of Si and SiC power devices using the Si-MOSFET and a SiC-Schottky diode and termed as Si/SiC, and a combination based on all SiC power devices using a SiC-MOSFET and the SiC-Schottky diode and termed as SiC/SiC. The switching behavior of the Si-MOSFET and SiC-MOSFET is characterized and analyzed within the different combinations at the converter level. The effect of the diode type on the converter's overall performance is also discussed. The switching energy losses, total power losses, and the overall performance effciency of the converters are measured and reported under different switching frequencies. Furthermore, the potential of the designed converters to operate efficiently at a wide range of input voltages and output powers is studied. The analysis and results show an outstanding performance efficiency of the designed SiC/SiC based converter under a wide range of operating conditions.

  18. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems

  19. Two-phase jet impingement cooling for high heat flux wide band-gap devices using multi-scale porous surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Shailesh N.; Dede, Ercan M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Jet impingement with phase change on multi-scale porous surfaces is investigated. • Porous coated flat, pin-fin, open tunnel, and closed tunnel structures are studied. • Boiling curve, heat transfer coefficient, and pressure drop metrics are reported. • Flow visualization shows vapor removal from the surface is a key aspect of design. • The porous coated pin-fin surface exhibits superior two-phase cooling performance. - Abstract: In the future, wide band-gap (WBG) devices such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride will be widely used in automotive power electronics due to performance advantages over silicon-based devices. The high heat fluxes dissipated by WBG devices pose extreme cooling challenges that demand the use of advanced thermal management technologies such as two-phase cooling. In this light, we describe the performance of a submerged two-phase jet impingement cooler in combination with porous coated heat spreaders and multi-jet orifices. The cooling performance of four different porous coated structures was evaluated using R-245fa as the coolant at sub-cooling of 5 K. The results show that the boiling performance of a pin-fin heat spreader is the highest followed by that for an open tunnel (OPT), closed tunnel (CLT), and flat heat spreader. Furthermore, the flat heat spreader demonstrated the lowest critical heat flux (CHF), while the pin-fin surface sustained a heat flux of 218 W/cm 2 without reaching CHF. The CHF values of the OPT and CLT surfaces were 202 W/cm 2 and 194 W/cm 2 , respectively. The pin-fin heat spreader has the highest two-phase heat transfer coefficient of 97,800 W/m 2 K, while the CLT surface has the lowest heat transfer coefficient of 69,300 W/m 2 K, both at a heat flux of 165 W/cm 2 . The variation of the pressure drop of all surfaces is similar for the entire range of heat fluxes tested. The flat heat spreader exhibited the least pressure drop, 1.73 kPa, while the CLT surface had the highest, 2.17 kPa at a

  20. Hibiscus fiber carbon for fuel cell device material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanik Indayaningsih; Anne Zulfia; Dedi Priadi; Suprapedi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is carbon of hibiscus fibers for the application as basic material of fuel cell device. The carbon is made using a pyrolysis process in inert gas (nitrogen) for 1 hour at temperature of 500 °C, 700 °C and 900 °C. The X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Impedance-Capacitance-Resistance-meter are used to find out the microstructure, morphology and electrical properties respectively. The results of the experiment showed that the carbon had a structure of amorphous, and as the semiconductor material the electrical conductivity was 5 x 10 -5 S.cm -1 to 4.9 x 10 -5 S.cm -1 increasing in accordance with the pyrolysis temperature. The morphology resembled to plaited mats constructed by porous fibers having width of 50 µm to 300 µm, thickness of 25 µm to 35 µm, and the porous size of 0.5 µm to 5 µm. This morphology enables carbon to be applied as a candidate for a basic material of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell. (author)

  1. Novel Crosstalk Measurement Method for Multi-Core Fiber Fan-In/Fan-Out Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Ono, Hirotaka; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new crosstalk measurement method for multi-core fiber fan-in/fan-out devices utilizing the Fresnel reflection. Compared with the traditional method using core-to-core coupling between a multi-core fiber and a single-mode fiber, the proposed method has the advantages of high reliability...

  2. Modifying Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) (PVA) from Insulator to Small-Bandgap Polymer: A Novel Approach for Organic Solar Cells and Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Shujahadeen B.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative method has been used to reduce the bandgap of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymer by addition of a nontoxic, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly material. The resulting materials are small-bandgap polymers, hence opening new frontiers in green chemistry. The doped PVA films showed a wide range of light absorption of the solar spectrum from 200 nm to above 800 nm. Nonsharp absorption behavior versus wavelength was observed for the samples. The refractive index exhibited a wide range of dispersion. Shift of the absorption edge from 6.2 eV to 1.5 eV was observed. The energy bandgap of PVA was diminished to 1.85 eV upon addition of black tea extract solution, lying in the range of small-bandgap polymers. Increase of the optical dielectric constant was observed with increasing tea solution addition. The results indicate that small-bandgap PVA with good film-forming ability could be useful in terms of cost-performance tradeoff, solving problems of short lifetime, cost, and flexibility associated with conjugated polymers. The decrease of the Urbach energy upon addition of black tea extract solution indicates modification of PVA from a disordered to ordered material. X-ray diffraction results confirm an increase of the crystalline fraction in the doped samples.

  3. Photolithography of thick photoresist coating in anisotropically etched V-grooves for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Khomtchenko, Elena; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    Thick photoresist coating for electrode patterning in anisotropically etched v-grooves is investigated. The photoresist coverage is compared with and without soft baking. Two-step exposure is applied for a complete exposure and minimizing the resolution loss.......Thick photoresist coating for electrode patterning in anisotropically etched v-grooves is investigated. The photoresist coverage is compared with and without soft baking. Two-step exposure is applied for a complete exposure and minimizing the resolution loss....

  4. Darcy Permeability of Hollow Fiber Bundles Used in Blood Oxygenation Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Heather E; Eash, Heidi J; Federspiel, William J

    2011-10-15

    Many industrial and biomedical devices (e.g. blood oxygenators and artificial lungs) use bundles of hollow fiber membranes for separation processes. Analyses of flow and mass transport within the shell-side of the fiber bundles most often model the bundle for simplicity as a packed bed or porous media, using a Darcy permeability coefficient estimated from the Blake-Kozeny equation to account for viscous drag from the fibers. In this study, we developed a simple method for measuring the Darcy permeability of hollow fiber membrane bundles and evaluated how well the Blake-Kozeny (BK) equation predicted the Darcy permeability for these bundles. Fiber bundles were fabricated from commercially available Celgard® ×30-240 fiber fabric (300 μm outer diameter fibers @ 35 and 54 fibers/inch) and from a fiber fabric with 193 μm fibers (61 fibers/inch). The fiber bundles were mounted to the bottom of an acrylic tube and Darcy permeability was determined by measuring the elapsed time for a column of glycerol solution to flow through a fiber bundle. The ratio of the measured Darcy permeability to that predicted from the BK equation varied from 1.09 to 0.56. A comprehensive literature review suggested a modified BK equation with the "constant" correlated to porosity. This modification improved the predictions of the BK equation, with the ratio of measured to predicted permeability varying from 1.13 to 0.84.

  5. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN

    2012-07-24

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  6. Evaluation of a completely automated cold fiber device using compounds with varying volatility and polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruifen; Carasek, Eduardo; Risticevic, Sanja; Cudjoe, Erasmus; Warren, Jamie; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-09-12

    A fully automated cold fiber solid phase microextraction device has been developed by coupling to a GERSTEL multipurpose (MPS 2) autosampler and applied to the analysis of volatiles and semi-volatiles in aqueous and solid matrices. The proposed device was thoroughly evaluated for its extraction performance, robustness, reproducibility and reliability by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). With the use of a septumless head injector, the entire automated setup was capable of analyzing over 200 samples without any GC injector leakages. Evaluation of the automated cold fiber device was carried out using a group of compounds characterized by different volatilities and polarities. Extraction efficiency as well as analytical figures of merit was compared to commercial solid phase microextraction fibers. The automated cold fiber device showed significantly improved extraction efficiency compared to the commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and cold fiber without cooling for the analysis of aqueous standard samples due to the low temperature of the coating. Comparing results obtained from cold fiber and commercial divinylbenzene/carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/CAR/PDMS) fiber temperature profile demonstrated that the temperature gap between the sample matrix and the coating improved the distribution coefficient and therefore the extraction amount. The linear dynamic range of the cold fiber device was 0.5 ng mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) with a linear regression coefficient ≥0.9963 for all compounds. The limit of detection for all analytes ranged from 1.0 ng mL(-1) to 9.4 ng mL(-1). The newly automated cold fiber device presents a platform for headspace analysis of volatiles and semi-volatiles for large number of samples with improved throughput and sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. CLASP (Capture and Locking alignment Spring Positioner): A micromachined fiber auto-positioning device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, S.H.; word, J.C.; Bauer, T.M.; Seigal, P.K.; Armendariz, M.G.

    1996-03-01

    This work provides a method of mechanical alignment of an array of single mode fibers to an array of optical devices. The technique uses a micromachined metal spring, which captures a vertical, pre- positioned fiber, moves it into accurate alignment, and holds it for attachment. The spring is fabricated from electroplated mickel, using photodefined polyimide as a plating mask. The nickel is plated about 80 {mu}m thick, so that a large fiber depth is captured. In one application, the nickel springs can be aligned to optics on the back side of the substrate. This entire concept is referred to as CLASP (Capture and Locking Alignment Spring Positioner). These springs can be used for general alignment and capture of any fiber to any optical input or output device. Passive alignment of fiber arrays to {plus}/{minus} 2{mu}m accuracy has been demonstrated, with a clear path to improved accuracy.

  8. Nanostructure Core Fiber With Enhanced Performances: Design, Fabrication and Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.; Yan, Min; Ren, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    -mode-area (LMA) structure with a typical high birefringence in the order of 10(-4) can be easily realized. The attenuation of the fabricated NCF is as low as 3.5 dB/km at 1550 nm. Higher macro- and micro-bending losses compared with those of the single-mode fiber (SMF) due to the reduced index difference have......We report a new type of silica-based all-solid fiber with a 2-D nanostructure core. The nanostructure core fiber (NCF) is formed by a 2-D array of high-index rods of sub-wavelength dimensions. We theoretically study the birefringence property of such fibers over a large wavelength range. Large...... been observed experimentally, which suggests that the NCF is potentially useful for curvature and strain sensing applications. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) inscribed in such a novel fiber is side-polished to make use of its evanescent field for refractive index sensing. The refractive index sensitivity...

  9. Optical fiber sensors for IoT and smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    Domingues, Maria de Fátima F

    2017-01-01

    This brief provides a review of the evolution of optical fiber sensing solutions and related applications. Unique production methods are presented and discussed, highlighting their evolution and analyzing their complexity. Under this scope, this brief presents the existing silica optical fiber sensors and polymer optical fiber sensors solutions, comparing its field of action (sensitivity, accuracy), complexity of manufacture and economic cost. Special attention is given to low-cost production methods. This brief evaluates the different existing techniques, assessing the accuracy and suitability of these sensors for possible Internet of Things (IoT) integration in different considered scenarios. Critical analytical techniques, also covered in this brief, are expected to play a key role in the world of IoT and the smart city of tomorrow.

  10. Application of copper-carbon fiber composites to power semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Sakaue, Tadashi; Minorikawa, Hitoshi; Akeyama, Kenji; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    1988-01-01

    Copper-carbon composite electrodes are used in a series of power semiconductor devices, i.e., resin molded diodes, button-type diodes, stud-type diodes, power modules, and integrated circuit igniter modules. The properties of these power semiconductor devices compare favorably with those conventional devices using Mo or W electrodes. In thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical and mechanical characteristics of these devices are observed. The new composite electrode with carbon fibers satisfies all of the major requirements for the electrodes in power semiconductor devices.

  11. Electrically Tunable Bandgaps in Bilayer MoS₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tao; Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rahman, Rajib; Chen, Zhihong

    2015-12-09

    Artificial semiconductors with manufactured band structures have opened up many new applications in the field of optoelectronics. The emerging two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor materials, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), cover a large range of bandgaps and have shown potential in high performance device applications. Interestingly, the ultrathin body and anisotropic material properties of the layered TMDs allow a wide range modification of their band structures by electric field, which is obviously desirable for many nanoelectronic and nanophotonic applications. Here, we demonstrate a continuous bandgap tuning in bilayer MoS2 using a dual-gated field-effect transistor (FET) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) is employed to calculate the field dependent band structures, attributing the widely tunable bandgap to an interlayer direct bandgap transition. This unique electric field controlled spontaneous bandgap modulation approaching the limit of semiconductor-to-metal transition can open up a new field of not yet existing applications.

  12. Review of wide band-gap semiconductors technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC and gallium nitride (GaN are typical representative of the wide band-gap semiconductor material, which is also known as third-generation semiconductor materials. Compared with the conventional semiconductor silicon (Si or gallium arsenide (GaAs, wide band-gap semiconductor has the wide band gap, high saturated drift velocity, high critical breakdown field and other advantages; it is a highly desirable semiconductor material applied under the case of high-power, high-temperature, high-frequency, anti-radiation environment. These advantages of wide band-gap devices make them a hot spot of semiconductor technology research in various countries. This article describes the research agenda of United States and European in this area, focusing on the recent developments of the wide band-gap technology in the US and Europe, summed up the facing challenge of the wide band-gap technology.

  13. Experimental arrangement to measure dispersion in optical fiber devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas Rivera, Ivan [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias de la Electronica (Mexico); Beltran Perez, Georgina; Castillo Mixcoatl, Juan; Munoz Aguirre, Severino [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas (Mexico); Zaca Moran, Placido, E-mail: ivan_rr1@hotmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Fisicoquimica de Materiales ICUAP (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    Dispersion is a quite important parameter in systems based on optical fiber, especially in pulsed emission lasers, where the temporal width is affected by such parameter. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the dispersion provoked by each component in the cavity. There are various experimental interferometric arrangements to evaluate this parameter. Generally, these systems modify the wavelength to obtain information about the n({lambda}) dependency, which is contained in the interferogram phase. However, this makes the system quite slow and it requires tunable and narrow bandwidth laser sources. In the present work, results obtained from an arrangement based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer where one of the arms is the optical fiber under study, while the reference one is air, are presented. In order to determine the n({lambda}) dependency, a wide spectrum light source was used in the wavelength range of interest. The phase information was evaluated from the interferometric signal measured by an optical spectrum analyzer.

  14. Darcy Permeability of Hollow Fiber Membrane Bundles Made from Membrana Polymethylpentene Fibers Used in Respiratory Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhani, Shalv P; D'Aloiso, Brandon D; Frankowski, Brian; Federspiel, William J

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are used in blood oxygenators for cardiopulmonary bypass or in next generation artificial lungs. Flow analyses of these devices is typically done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling HFM bundles as porous media, using a Darcy permeability coefficient estimated from the Blake-Kozeny (BK) equation to account for viscous drag from fibers. We recently published how well this approach can predict Darcy permeability for fiber bundles made from polypropylene HFMs, showing the prediction can be significantly improved using an experimentally derived correlation between the BK constant (A) and bundle porosity (ε). In this study, we assessed how well our correlation for A worked for predicting the Darcy permeability of fiber bundles made from Membrana polymethylpentene (PMP) HFMs, which are increasingly being used clinically. Swatches in the porosity range of 0.4 to 0.8 were assessed in which sheets of fiber were stacked in parallel, perpendicular, and angled configurations. Our previously published correlation predicted Darcy within ±8%. A new correlation based on current and past measured permeability was determined: A = 497ε - 103; using this correlation measured Darcy permeability was within ±6%. This correlation varied from 8% to -3.5% of our prior correlation over the tested porosity range.

  15. Darcy permeability of hollow fiber membrane bundles made from Membrana® Polymethylpentene (PMP) fibers used in respiratory assist devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhani, Shalv. P.; D’Aloiso, Brandon. D.; Frankowski, Brian.; Federspiel, William. J.

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are used in blood oxygenators for cardiopulmonary bypass or in next generation artificial lungs. Flow analyses of these devices is typically done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling HFM bundles as porous media, using a Darcy permeability coefficient estimated from the Blake – Kozeny (BK) equation to account for viscous drag from fibers. We recently published how well this approach can predict Darcy permeability for fiber bundles made from polypropylene HFMs, showing the prediction can be significantly improved using an experimentally derived correlation between the BK constant (A) and bundle porosity (ε). In this study, we assessed how well our correlation for A worked for predicting the Darcy permeability of fiber bundles made from Membrana® polymethylpentene (PMP) HFMs, which are increasingly being used clinically. Swatches in the porosity range of 0.4 to 0.8 were assessed in which sheets of fiber were stacked in parallel, perpendicular and angled configurations. Our previously published correlation predicted Darcy within ±8%. A new correlation based on current and past measured permeability was determined: A=497ε-103; using this correlation measured Darcy permeability was within ±6%. This correlation varied from 8% to −3.5% of our prior correlation over the tested porosity range. PMID:26809086

  16. Innovative architecture of switching device for expanding the applications in fiber to the home (FTTH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Fayed, Heba A.; Aly, Moustafa H.; Aboul Seoud, A. K.

    2011-08-01

    A new device, optical cross add drop multiplexer (OXADM), is proposed and analyzed. It uses the combination concept of optical add drop multiplexer (OADM) and optical cross connect (OXC). It enables a wavelength switch while implementing add and drop functions simultaneously. So, it expands the applications in fiber to the home (FTTH) and optical core networks. A very high isolation crosstalk level (~ 60 dB) is achieved. Also, a bidirectional OXADM and N×N OXADM are proposed. Finally, a multistage OXADM is presented making some sort of wavelength buffering. To make these devices operate more efficient, tunable fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) switches are used to control the operation mechanism.

  17. Design, Manufacturing and Experimental Validation of Optical Fiber Sensors Based Devices for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela CORICCIATI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of optical fiber sensors is a promising and rising technique used for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM, because permit to monitor continuously the strain and the temperature of the structure where they are applied. In the present paper three different types of smart devices, that are composite materials with an optical fiber sensor embedded inside them during the manufacturing process, are described: Smart Patch, Smart Rebar and Smart Textile, which are respectively a plate for local exterior intervention, a rod for shear and flexural interior reinforcement and a textile for an external whole application. In addition to the monitoring aim, the possible additional function of these devices could be the reinforcement of the structures where they are applied. In the present work, after technology manufacturing description, the experimental laboratory characterization of each device is discussed. At last, smart devices application on medium scale masonry walls and their validation by mechanical tests is described.

  18. The applications of carbon nanomaterials in fiber-shaped energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingxia; Hong, Yang; Wang, Bingjie

    2018-01-01

    As a promising candidate for future demand, fiber-shaped electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors and lithium-ion batteries have obtained considerable attention from academy to industry. Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotube and graphene, have been widely investigated as electrode materials due to their merits of light weight, flexibility and high capacitance. In this review, recent progress of carbon nanomaterials in flexible fiber-shaped energy storage devices has been summarized in accordance with the development of fibrous electrodes, including the diversified electrode preparation, functional and intelligent device structure, and large-scale production of fibrous electrodes or devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 21634003, 21604012).

  19. Wide bandgap matrix switcher, amplifier and oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2016-08-16

    An electronic device comprising an optical gate, an electrical input an electrical output and a wide bandgap material positioned between the electrical input and the electrical output to control an amount of current flowing between the electrical input and the electrical output in response to a stimulus received at the optical gate can be used in wideband telecommunication applications in transmission of multi-channel signals.

  20. 78 FR 77166 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-860] Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...

  1. Analysis of flavor and perfume using an internally cooled coated fiber device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Begnaud, Frédéric; Chaintreau, Alain; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2007-05-01

    A miniaturized internally cooled coated fiber device was applied for the analysis of flavors and fragrances from various matrices. Its integration with a CTC CombiPAL autosampler enabled high throughput for the analysis of analytes in complex matrices that required simultaneous heating of the matrices and cooling of the fiber coating to achieve high extraction efficiency. It was found that up to ten times increase of extraction efficiencies was observed when the device was used to extract flavor compounds in water, even when limited sample temperatures were used to preserve the integrity of target compounds. The extraction of the flavor compounds in water with the device was reproducible, with RSD not larger than 15%. The lower limits of the linear ranges were in the low ppb range, which was about one order of magnitude smaller than those obtained with the commercialized 100 microm PDMS fibers. Exhaustive extraction of some perfume ingredients from a complex matrix (shampoo) was realized. All achieved recoveries were not less than 80%. The repeatability of the extraction of the perfume compounds from shampoo was better than 10%. The linear ranges were about 1-3000 microg/g, and the LOD was about 0.2-1 microg/g. The automated internally cooled coated fiber device was demonstrated to be a powerful sample preparation tool in flavor and fragrance analysis.

  2. Electrospun fibers of PLA/P3HT blends for device and sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, William; Pinto, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The thermoplastic aliphatic polyester, poly (lactic acid) (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer that is sometimes used in implant screws for bone repair. Our focus was to fabricate fibers of this polymer and its blends with p-doped poly (3-hexylthiophene)-(P3HT) in order to extend its use to devices and/or sensors. PLA/P3HT fibers were prepared in air at room temperature using the electrospinning technique that is cheap, fast and reliable. Scanning Electron Microscope images of the fibers reveal that the presence of P3HT does not affect the fabrication of PLA fibers at low or high polymer concentrations in chloroform, retaining the same morphological structure of pure PLA fibers. The fiber diameters were in the range 1-10 microns. A slight increase in fiber formation results with the addition of P3HT, most likely due to a reduction of the solution surface tension. Results of the electrical characterization of this material will be presented. DoD and NSF

  3. Integrated and miniaturized endoscopic devices for use during high power infrared fiber laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher Ryan

    rates comparable to those of the 100-mum-core traditional fiber used in TFL lithotripsy while providing an additional safety feature for initial fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel. Working channel flow rates were explored in regards to diameter and geometry. Illumination sources and configurations were explored in regards to optimized wavelength selection as well as physical geometry of the ureteroscope tip. Ureteroscope designs were devised, modeled, fabricated, and tested, implementing a reduced working channel, and optimized illumination geometry, culminating in an integrated, miniaturized ureteroscope for use in TFL lithotripsy. This final device, coupled with the proven TFL and optimized laser parameters may establish the TFL as a viable replacement to the conventional Ho:YAG laser for treatment of kidney stones.

  4. A mock heart engineered with helical aramid fibers for in vitro cardiovascular device testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen-Park, So-Hyun; Hsu, Po-Lin; Müller, Indra; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Abel, Dirk; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Rossaint, Rolf; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Mock heart circulation loops (MHCLs) serve as in-vitro platforms to investigate the physiological interaction between circulatory systems and cardiovascular devices. A mock heart (MH) engineered with silicone walls and helical aramid fibers, to mimic the complex contraction of a natural heart, has been developed to advance the MHCL previously developed in our group. A mock aorta with an anatomical shape enables the evaluation of a cannulation method for ventricular assist devices (VADs) and investigation of the usage of clinical measurement systems like pressure-volume catheters. Ventricle and aorta molds were produced based on MRI data and cast with silicone. Aramid fibers were layered in the silicone ventricle to reproduce ventricle torsion. A rotating hollow shaft was connected to the apex enabling the rotation of the MH and the connection of a VAD. Silicone wall thickness, aramid fiber angle and fiber pitch were varied to generate different MH models. All MH models were placed in a tank filled with variable amounts of water and air simulating the compliance. In this work, physiological ventricular torsion angles (15°-26°) and physiological pressure-volume loops were achieved. This MHCL can serve as a comprehensive testing platform for cardiovascular devices, such as artificial heart valves and cannulation of VADs.

  5. Ultrasensitive tunability of the direct bandgap of 2D InSe flakes via strain engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Tianmeng; Wu, Meng; Cao, Ting; Chen, Yanwen; Sankar, Raman; Ulaganathan, Rajesh K.; Chou, Fangcheng; Wetzel, Christian; Xu, Cheng-Yan; Louie, Steven G.; Shi, Su-Fei

    2018-04-01

    InSe, a member of the layered materials family, is a superior electronic and optical material which retains a direct bandgap feature from the bulk to atomically thin few-layers and high electronic mobility down to a single layer limit. We, for the first time, exploit strain to drastically modify the bandgap of two-dimensional (2D) InSe nanoflakes. We demonstrated that we could decrease the bandgap of a few-layer InSe flake by 160 meV through applying an in-plane uniaxial tensile strain to 1.06% and increase the bandgap by 79 meV through applying an in-plane uniaxial compressive strain to 0.62%, as evidenced by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The large reversible bandgap change of ~239 meV arises from a large bandgap change rate (bandgap strain coefficient) of few-layer InSe in response to strain, ~154 meV/% for uniaxial tensile strain and ~140 meV/% for uniaxial compressive strain, representing the most pronounced uniaxial strain-induced bandgap strain coefficient experimentally reported in 2D materials. We developed a theoretical understanding of the strain-induced bandgap change through first-principles DFT and GW calculations. We also confirmed the bandgap change by photoconductivity measurements using excitation light with different photon energies. The highly tunable bandgap of InSe in the infrared regime should enable a wide range of applications, including electro-mechanical, piezoelectric and optoelectronic devices.

  6. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  7. A comparative study between SMS interferometers and lossy mode resonace optical fiber devices for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, A. B.; Hernaez, M.; Del Villar, I.; Corres, J. M.; Arregui, F. J.; Matias, I. R.

    2015-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are of great interest due to their intrinsic advantages over electronic sensors. In this work, the sensing characteristics of two different and novel optical fiber devices are compared, after simultaneously depositing a thin-film using the layer-by-layer assembly deposition process. The first one is an SMS structure, formed by splicing two single-mode fiber pigtails on both sides of a coreless multimode fiber segment. This structure induces an interferometric phenomenon that generates several attenuation and transmission bands along the spectrum. These bands are sensitive to variations in the surrounding refractive index, although this sensitivity has been enhanced by a TiO2/PSS thin-film. The other device is a 40 mm uncladded segment of a 200 μm-core multimode optical fiber. When coated by a TiO2/PSS thinfilm, part of the light transmitted into the uncladded core is coupled into the thin-film, generating a lossy mode resonance (LMR). The absorption peaks due to these phenomena red-shift as long as the thin-film thickness increases or the external RI becomes higher. The performance of these devices as refractometers and relative humidity sensors are tested. Results show that the LMR-based sensor is more sensitive in both situations, in spite of its lower sensitivity. Particularly, it presents a 7-fold sensitivity enhancement when measuring surrounding medium refractive index changes and a 10-fold sensitivity enhancement when measuring environmental relative humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a comparative study between SMS and LMR sensors is performed.

  8. Multidimensional microstructured photonic device based on all-solid waveguide array fiber and magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; He, Yong; Zhang, Hongmin; Yang, Xiaoping; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    An all-solid waveguide array fiber (WAF) is one kind of special microstructured optical fiber in which the higher-index rods are periodically distributed in a low-index silica host to form the transverse two-dimensional photonic crystal. In this paper, one kind of multidimensional microstructured optical fiber photonic device is proposed by using electric arc discharge method to fabricate periodic tapers along the fiber axis. By tuning the applied magnetic field intensity, the propagation characteristics of the all-solid WAF integrated with magnetic fluid are periodically modulated in both radial and axial directions. Experimental results show that the wavelength changes little while the transmission loss increases for an applied magnetic field intensity range from 0 to 500 Oe. The magnetic field sensitivity is 0.055 dB/Oe within the linear range from 50 to 300 Oe. Meanwhile, the all-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for both high- and low-refractive index glasses, and thermal drifts have a little effect on the mode profile. The results show that the temperature-induced transmission loss is waveguides and controlling light propagation, the all-solid WAF would be found great potential applications to develop new micro-nano photonic devices for optical communications and optical sensing applications.

  9. Multidimensional microstructured photonic device based on all-solid waveguide array fiber and magnetic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yinping

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An all-solid waveguide array fiber (WAF is one kind of special microstructured optical fiber in which the higher-index rods are periodically distributed in a low-index silica host to form the transverse two-dimensional photonic crystal. In this paper, one kind of multidimensional microstructured optical fiber photonic device is proposed by using electric arc discharge method to fabricate periodic tapers along the fiber axis. By tuning the applied magnetic field intensity, the propagation characteristics of the all-solid WAF integrated with magnetic fluid are periodically modulated in both radial and axial directions. Experimental results show that the wavelength changes little while the transmission loss increases for an applied magnetic field intensity range from 0 to 500 Oe. The magnetic field sensitivity is 0.055 dB/Oe within the linear range from 50 to 300 Oe. Meanwhile, the all-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for both high- and low-refractive index glasses, and thermal drifts have a little effect on the mode profile. The results show that the temperature-induced transmission loss is <0.3 dB from 26°C to 44°C. Further tuning coherent coupling of waveguides and controlling light propagation, the all-solid WAF would be found great potential applications to develop new micro-nano photonic devices for optical communications and optical sensing applications.

  10. Densely Aligned Graphene Nanoribbon Arrays and Bandgap Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Justin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Chen, Changxin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gong, Ming [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kenney, Michael [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Graphene has attracted great interest for future electronics due to its high mobility and high thermal conductivity. However, a two-dimensional graphene sheet behaves like a metal, lacking a bandgap needed for the key devices components such as field effect transistors (FETs) in digital electronics. It has been shown that, partly due to quantum confinement, graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with ~2 nm width can open up sufficient bandgaps and evolve into semiconductors to exhibit high on/off ratios useful for FETs. However, a challenging problem has been that, such ultra-narrow GNRs (~2 nm) are difficult to fabricate, especially for GNRs with smooth edges throughout the ribbon length. Despite high on/off ratios, these GNRs show very low mobility and low on-state conductance due to dominant scattering effects by imperfections and disorders at the edges. Wider GNRs (>5 nm) show higher mobility, higher conductance but smaller bandgaps and low on/off ratios undesirable for FET applications. It is highly desirable to open up bandgaps in graphene or increase the bandgaps in wide GNRs to afford graphene based semiconductors for high performance (high on-state current and high on/off ratio) electronics. Large scale ordering and dense packing of such GNRs in parallel are also needed for device integration but have also been challenging thus far. It has been shown theoretically that uniaxial strains can be applied to a GNR to engineer its bandgap. The underlying physics is that under uniaxial strain, the Dirac point moves due to stretched C-C bonds, leading to an increase in the bandgap of armchair GNRs by up to 50% of its original bandgap (i.e. bandgap at zero strain). For zigzag GNRs, due to the existence of the edge states, changes of bandgap are smaller under uniaxial strain and can be increased by ~30%. This work proposes a novel approach to the fabrication of densely aligned graphene nanoribbons with highly smooth edges afforded by anisotropic etching and uniaxial strain for

  11. Influence of analyzed signals fiber-optic transmission system on spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Vasily I.; Moskaletz, Oleg D.; Paraskun, Arthur S.; Zhdanov, Arseny Yu.

    2017-08-01

    Fiber-optic transmission system of analyzed signal is considered to allow signals transmission from optical sources with either impossible or undesirable contact. Diffraction grating spectral device is chosen as investigation system. It should be noted that diffraction grating operates with transmitted light but not reflected. Influence of optical fiber consists in the distortion of wave front incident on the spectral device. Front distortion leads to a broadening of the device spread function in all diffraction orders, and as a consequence, to a deterioration in the device resolution. In this case, the complex spread function is a reaction of the device to the homogeneous plane monochromatic wave which clearly links the input-output of spectral device. Fiber-optic system influence is determined by introducing a fictitious transparency located directly in front of the diffraction grating. Research of the effect the fiber-optic system has on the spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device is made in two ways. On one hand, mathematical model is proposed to describe the influence of a single-mode optical fiber to a spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device. We performed computer simulations of the analyzed signal transmission from the end of the optical fiber to the photodetector based on the proposed model. The calculations are performed for a single-mode optical fiber with a core diameter of 8 microns. On the other hand, experimental laboratory set up of the diffraction grating spectral device with a fiber optic transmission system is created. Theoretical calculations are compared with the experimental results.

  12. A passive micromachined device for alignment of arrays of single-mode fibers for hermetic photonic packaging - the CLASP concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigal, P.K.; Kravitz, S.H.; Word, J.C.; Bauer, T.M. [and others

    1997-02-01

    A micro-machined fiber alignment device, called CLASP (Capture and Locking Alignment Spring Positioner) has been fabricated. It uses a nickel leaf spring to passively capture vertical arrays of single-mode fibers with {approximately} 2 {mu}m accuracy.

  13. Coupled Acoustic-Mechanical Bandgaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Kook, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the existence of coupled bandgaps for corrugated plate structures and acoustic channels. The study is motivated by the observation that the performance of traditional bandgap structures, such as periodic plates, may be compromised due to the coupling to a surrounding acoustic...... medium and the presence of acoustic resonances. It is demonstrated that corrugation of the plate structure can introduce bending wave bandgaps and bandgaps in the acoustic domain in overlapping and audible frequency ranges. This effect is preserved also when taking the physical coupling between the two...... domains into account. Additionally, the coupling is shown to introduce extra gaps in the band structure due to modal interaction and the appearance of a cut-on frequency for the fundamental acoustic mode....

  14. Time-resolved triton burnup measurement using the scintillating fiber detector in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Nishitani, T.; Murakami, S.; Seki, R.; Nakata, M.; Takada, E.; Kawase, H.; Pu, N.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved measurement of triton burnup is performed with a scintillating fiber detector system in the deuterium operation of the large helical device. The scintillating fiber detector system is composed of the detector head consisting of 109 scintillating fibers having a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 100 mm embedded in the aluminum substrate, the magnetic registrant photomultiplier tube, and the data acquisition system equipped with 1 GHz sampling rate analogies to digital converter and the field programmable gate array. The discrimination level of 150 mV was set to extract the pulse signal induced by 14 MeV neutrons according to the pulse height spectra obtained in the experiment. The decay time of 14 MeV neutron emission rate after neutral beam is turned off measured by the scintillating fiber detector. The decay time is consistent with the decay time of total neutron emission rate corresponding to the 14 MeV neutrons measured by the neutron flux monitor as expected. Evaluation of the diffusion coefficient is conducted using a simple classical slowing-down model FBURN code. It is found that the diffusion coefficient of triton is evaluated to be less than 0.2 m2 s-1.

  15. Tunable all-optical devices based on liquid-filled photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    , it is desirable to identify accessible experimental platforms that combine the advantages of high-quality fabricated structures with the attractiveness of tunable and strongly nonlinear materials for light control. In this work we suggest to use liquid-filled photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) for the study...... high-precision fabrication procedures, and provides high tunability and nonlinearity at moderate laser powers while taking advantage of a compact experimental setup. The increasingly broad range of PCF structures available could stimulate further efforts in applying them in discrete nonlinear optics...... and all-optical devices. The long propagation lengths accessible in fiber-based discrete systems could even allow for experimental studies of combined spatial and temporal nonlinear effects and thus pave the road for future demonstrations of spatiotemporal control of light....

  16. Fiber free plug and play on-chip scattering cytometer module – for implementation in microfluidic point of care devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report on recent progress toward the development of a plug and play on-chip cytometer based on light scattering. By developing a device that does not depend on the critical alignment and cumbersome handling of fragile optical fibers, we approach a device that is suitable for non...

  17. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James Stephen

    Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches Semi-insulating Gallium Nitride, 4H and 6H Silicon Carbide are attractive materials for compact, high voltage, extrinsic, photoconductive switches due to their wide bandgap, high dark resistance, high critical electric field strength and high electron saturation velocity. These wide bandgap semiconductors are made semi-insulating by the addition of vanadium (4H and 6H-SiC) and iron (2H-GaN) impurities that form deep acceptors. These deep acceptors trap electrons donated from shallow donor impurities. The electrons can be optically excited from these deep acceptor levels into the conduction band to transition the wide bandgap semiconductor materials from a semi-insulating to a conducting state. Extrinsic photoconductive switches with opposing electrodes have been constructed using vanadium compensated 6H-SiC and iron compensated 2H-GaN. These extrinsic photoconductive switches were tested at high voltage and high power to determine if they could be successfully used as the closing switch in compact medical accelerators. The successful development of a vanadium compensated, 6H-SiC extrinsic photoconductive switch for use as a closing switch for compact accelerator applications was realized by improvements made to the vanadium, nitrogen and boron impurity densities. The changes made to the impurity densities were based on the physical intuition outlined and simple rate equation models. The final 6H-SiC impurity 'recipe' calls for vanadium, nitrogen and boron densities of 2.5 e17 cm-3, 1.25e17 cm-3 and ≤ 1e16 cm-3, respectively. This recipe was originally developed to maximize the quantum efficiency of the vanadium compensated 6H-SiC, while maintaining a thermally stable semi-insulating material. The rate equation models indicate that, besides increasing the quantum efficiency, the impurity recipe should be expected to also increase the carrier recombination time. Three generations of 6H-SiC materials were tested. The

  18. Study on magnetic fluid optical fiber devices for optical logic operations by characteristics of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chieh, J. J.; Hong, C. Y.; Yang, S. Y.; Horng, H. E.; Yang, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    We propose two optical fiber-based schemes using two magnetic fluid optical fiber modulators in series or in parallel for optical logic signal processing and operation. Here, each magnetic fluid optical fiber modulator consists of a bare multimode fiber surrounded by magnetic fluid in which the refractive index is adjustable by applying external magnetic fields amplifying the input electrical signal to vary the transmission intensity of the optical fiber-based scheme. The physical mechanisms for the performances of the magnetic fluid optical fiber devices, such as the transmission loss related to Boolean number of the logic operation as well as the dynamic response, are studied by the characteristics of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and magnetic fluids. For example, in the dynamic response composed of the retarding and response sub-procedures except the response times of the actuation coil, the theoretical evaluation of the retarding time variation with cladding magnetic fluids length has good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. CMOS bandgap references and temperature sensors and their applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.

    2005-01-01

    Two main parts have been presented in this thesis: device characterization and circuit. In integrated bandgap references and temperature sensors, the IC(VBE, characteristics of bipolar transistors are used to generate the basic signals with high accuracy. To investigate the possibilities to

  20. Efficient CsF interlayer for high and low bandgap polymer solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitul, Abu Farzan; Sarker, Jith; Adhikari, Nirmal; Mohammad, Lal; Wang, Qi; Khatiwada, Devendra; Qiao, Qiquan

    2018-02-01

    Low bandgap polymer solar cells have a great deal of importance in flexible photovoltaic market to absorb sun light more efficiently. Efficient wide bandgap solar cells are always available in nature to absorb visible photons. The development and incorporation of infrared photovoltaics (IR PV) with wide bandgap solar cells can improve overall solar device performance. Here, we have developed an efficient low bandgap polymer solar cell with CsF as interfacial layer in regular structure. Polymer solar cell devices with CsF shows enhanced performance than Ca as interfacial layer. The power conversion efficiency of 4.5% has been obtained for PDPP3T based polymer solar cell with CsF as interlayer. Finally, an optimal thickness with CsF as interfacial layer has been found to improve the efficiency in low bandgap polymer solar cells.

  1. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation of...

  2. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  3. Design and analysis of all-optical switches based on fiber parametric devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Jiang, Chun

    2008-05-01

    We propose a novel 2 × 2 wavelength-convertible optical switch based on dual-pump fiber parametric devices: one is driven by linearly parallel pumps, and the other one by perpendicular pumps. Theoretical analysis is made on the polarization effects on the switching performance of the two devices. The result predicts that two incident signals which are positioned symmetrically with respect to one pump can be switched independently, with judicious combinations of the relative pump-signal polarization states. Simulations performed in OptiSystem show that the scheme can achieve crosstalk-free packet switching with acceptable extinction ratios for both signals. Besides, future applications of this novel scheme in high-speed switching nodes are discussed.

  4. Experimental Methods for Implementing Graphene Contacts to Finite Bandgap Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob

    Present Ph.D. thesis describes my work on implanting graphene as electrical contact to finite bandgap semiconductors. Different transistor architectures, types of graphene and finite bandgap semiconductors have been employed. The device planned from the beginning of my Ph.D. fellowship...... contacts to semiconductor nanowires, more specifically, epitaxially grown InAs nanowires. First, we tried a top down method where CVD graphene was deposited on substrate supported InAs nanowires followed by selective graphene ashing to define graphene electrodes. While electrical contact between...

  5. Comparison of Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors for Power Electronics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozpineci, B.

    2004-01-02

    Recent developmental advances have allowed silicon (Si) semiconductor technology to approach the theoretical limits of the Si material; however, power device requirements for many applications are at a point that the present Si-based power devices cannot handle. The requirements include higher blocking voltages, switching frequencies, efficiency, and reliability. To overcome these limitations, new semiconductor materials for power device applications are needed. For high power requirements, wide-bandgap semiconductors like silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond, with their superior electrical properties, are likely candidates to replace Si in the near future. This report compares wide-bandgap semiconductors with respect to their promise and applicability for power applications and predicts the future of power device semiconductor materials.

  6. Bandgap Opening in Graphene Induced by Patterned Hydrogen Adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Jørgensen, Bjarke; Nilsson, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Graphene, a single layer of graphite, has recently attracted considerable attention owing to its remarkable electronic and structural properties and its possible applications in many emerging areas such as graphene-based electronic devices. The charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac...... fermions, and graphene shows ballistic charge transport, turning it into an ideal material for circuit fabrication. However, graphene lacks a bandgap around the Fermi level, which is the defining concept for semiconductor materials and essential for controlling the conductivity by electronic means. Theory...... predicts that a tunable bandgap may be engineered by periodic modulations of the graphene lattice, but experimental evidence for this is so far lacking. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a bandgap opening in graphene, induced by the patterned adsorption of atomic hydrogen onto the Moiré superlattice...

  7. Large Bandgap Semiconductors for Solar Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malizia, Mauro

    Photoelectrochemical water splitting represents an eco-friendly technology that could enable the production of hydrogen using water as reactant and solar energy as primary energy source. The exploitation of solar energy for the production of hydrogen would help modern society to reduce the reliance...... (bismuth vanadate) was investigated in view of combining this 2.4 eV large bandgap semiconductor with a Si back-illuminated photocathode. A device obtained by mechanical stacking of BiVO4 photoanode and standard Si photocathode performs non-assisted water splitting under illumination with Solar......-to-Hydrogen efficiency lower than 0.5%. In addition, BiVO4 was synthesized on the back-side of a Si back-illuminated photocathode to produce a preliminary monolithic solar water splitting device.The Faradaic efficiency of different types of catalysts for the electrochemical production of hydrogen or oxygen was evaluated...

  8. Phosphorene nanoribbons: Passivation effect on bandgap and effective mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li-Chun, E-mail: xulichun@tyut.edu.cn; Song, Xian-Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Cao, Ling; Liu, Rui-Ping; Li, Xiu-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation and fluorination can passivate the metallic edge states of zPNRs. • The bandgap of each type of zPNRs decreases as the ribbon's width increases duo to the quantum confinement effect. • Two local configurations of passivated atoms can coexist in nanoribbons and affect the bandgap of narrow nanoribbons. • New passivation configuration can effectively reduce the effective mass of electrons. - Abstract: The edge passivation effect of phosphorene nanoribbons is systematically investigated using density functional theory. Hydrogen and fluorine atoms passivate the metallic edge states of nanoribbons and can open a bandgap up to 2.25 eV. The two configurations of passivated atoms can exist at two edges and affect the bandgap of narrow nanoribbons. The bandgap of each type of zPNRs decreases as the ribbon's width increases, which can be attributed to the quantum confinement effect. The new configuration, named C{sub b}, can effectively reduce the effective mass of electrons, which benefits the future design of phosphorene-based electronic devices.

  9. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the treatment of diverticulosis , diabetes , and heart disease . ... fiber is found in oat bran, barley, nuts, seeds, beans, lentils, peas, ... heart disease. Insoluble fiber is found in foods such as ...

  10. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not getting enough fiber. According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, teen girls (14 to 18 years) should get 25 grams of fiber per day and teen boys (14 to 18 years) should get 31 grams of fiber per day. The best sources are fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts and legumes, ...

  11. Single fiber UV detector based on hydrothermally synthesized ZnO nanorods for wearable computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Tae Hoon; Han, Jeong In

    2018-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in zinc oxide (ZnO) based ultraviolet (UV) sensing devices over the last several decades owing to their diverse range of applications. ZnO has extraordinary properties, such as a wide band gap and high exciton binding energy, which make it a beneficial material for UV sensing device. Herein, we show a ZnO UV sensing device fabricated on a cylindrical Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) monofilament. The ZnO active layer was synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis and the Cu electrodes were deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. Cu thin film was deposited uniformly on a single PET fiber by rotating it inside the sputtering chamber. Various characteristics were investigated by changing the concentration of the seed solution and the growth solution. The growth of ZnO nanorods was confirmed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to see the surface state and structure, followed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Also, current-voltage (I-V) curves were obtained to measure photocurrent and conductance. Furthermore, falling response time, rising response time, and responsivity were calculated by analyzing current-time (I-t) curves.

  12. Dosimetric characterization of carbon fiber stabilization devices for post-operative particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastella, E; Molinelli, S; Magro, G; Mirandola, A; Russo, S; Vai, A; Mairani, A; Choi, K; Fiore, M R; Fossati, P; Cuzzocrea, F; Gasbarrini, A; Benazzo, F; Boriani, S; Valvo, F; Orecchia, R; Ciocca, M

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact caused by recently introduced carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) stabilization devices, in comparison with conventional titanium (Ti) implants, for post-operative particle therapy (PT). As a first step, protons and carbon ions Spread-Out Bragg Peaks (SOBPs) were delivered to CF/PEEK and Ti screws. Transversal dose profiles were acquired with EBT3 films to evaluate beam perturbation. Effects on image quality and reconstruction artifacts were then investigated. CT scans of CF/PEEK and Ti implants were acquired according to our clinical protocol and Hounsfield Unit (HU) mean values were evaluated in three regions of interest. Implants and artifacts were then contoured in the sample CT scans, together with a target volume to simulate a spine tumor. Dose calculation accuracy was assessed by comparing optimized dose distributions with Monte Carlo simulations. In the end, the treatment plans of nine real patients (seven with CF/PEEK and two with Ti stabilization devices) were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the dosimetric impact potentially occurring if improper management of the spine implant was carried out. As expected, CF/PEEK screw caused a very slight beam perturbation in comparison with Ti ones, leading to a lower degree of dose degradation in case of contouring and/or set-up uncertainties. Furthermore, CF/PEEK devices did not determine appreciable HU artifacts on CT images thus improving image quality and, as a final result, dose calculation accuracy. CF/PEEK spinal fixation devices resulted dosimetrically more suitable than commonly-used Ti implants for post-operative PT. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Developing a compact multiple laser diode combiner with a single fiber stub output for handheld IoT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minseok; June, Seunghyeok; Kim, Sehwan

    2018-01-01

    Many biomedical applications require an efficient combination and localization of multiple discrete light sources ( e.g., fluorescence and absorbance imaging). We present a compact 6 channel combiner that couples the output of independent solid-state light sources into a single 400-μm-diameter fiber stub for handheld Internet of Things (IoT) devices. We demonstrate average coupling efficiencies > 80% for each of the 6 laser diodes installed into the prototype. The design supports the use of continuous wave and intensity-modulated laser diodes. This fiber-stub-type beam combiner could be used to construct custom multi-wavelength sources for tissue oximeters, microscopes and molecular imaging technologies. In order to validate its suitability, we applied the developed fiber-stub-type beam combiner to a multi-wavelength light source for a handheld IoT device and demonstrated its feasibility for smart healthcare through a tumor-mimicking silicon phantom.

  14. Graded bandgap perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergen, Onur; Gilbert, S. Matt; Pham, Thang; Turner, Sally J.; Tan, Mark Tian Zhi; Worsley, Marcus A.; Zettl, Alex

    2017-05-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite materials have emerged as attractive alternatives to conventional solar cell building blocks. Their high light absorption coefficients and long diffusion lengths suggest high power conversion efficiencies, and indeed perovskite-based single bandgap and tandem solar cell designs have yielded impressive performances. One approach to further enhance solar spectrum utilization is the graded bandgap, but this has not been previously achieved for perovskites. In this study, we demonstrate graded bandgap perovskite solar cells with steady-state conversion efficiencies averaging 18.4%, with a best of 21.7%, all without reflective coatings. An analysis of the experimental data yields high fill factors of ~75% and high short-circuit current densities up to 42.1 mA cm-2. The cells are based on an architecture of two perovskite layers (CH3NH3SnI3 and CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx), incorporating GaN, monolayer hexagonal boron nitride, and graphene aerogel.

  15. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-07-03

    Semi-insulating Gallium Nitride, 4H and 6H Silicon Carbide are attractive materials for compact, high voltage, extrinsic, photoconductive switches due to their wide bandgap, high dark resistance, high critical electric field strength and high electron saturation velocity. These wide bandgap semiconductors are made semi-insulating by the addition of vanadium (4H and 6HSiC) and iron (2H-GaN) impurities that form deep acceptors. These deep acceptors trap electrons donated from shallow donor impurities. The electrons can be optically excited from these deep acceptor levels into the conduction band to transition the wide bandgap semiconductor materials from a semi-insulating to a conducting state. Extrinsic photoconductive switches with opposing electrodes have been constructed using vanadium compensated 6H-SiC and iron compensated 2H-GaN. These extrinsic photoconductive switches were tested at high voltage and high power to determine if they could be successfully used as the closing switch in compact medical accelerators.

  16. Small-tilt micromirror-device-based multiwavelength three-dimensional 2X2 fiber optic switch structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2000-02-01

    Small-tilt micromirror-based 2 X 2 fiber optic switch array structures are proposed using fixed mirrors and fiber interconnections. A multiwavelength 2 X 2 fiber optic switch based on this small-tilt micromirror is experimentally demonstrated. The key innovation in this architecture is the use of a specially located fixed mirror to form a symmetric 2 X 2 retrorefractive switching structure. These 2 X 2 fiber optic switch structures can also provide a fault-tolerant design using a macropixel approach. A 2D digital micromirror device (2D-DMD) from Texas Instruments (TI) designed to operate in the visible band is used to represent the small-tilt micromirrors in our experimental demonstration. Multiwavelength switch operation is characterized by changing the operating wavelength of the tunable laser. The measured average optical coherent crosstalk is -22 dB with +/- 0.9 dB fluctuation over 40 nm, limited by the on-off ratio of the 2D-DMD. The measured average optical loss is 14.8 dB at a 1.55-micrometers operating wavelength, limited by the visible wavelength design TI 2D- DMD, three-port optical circulators, fiber adapters, and free-space-to-fiber coupling efficiency.

  17. A surface plasmon resonance probe without optical fibers as a portable sensing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Takuo; Wada, Syunsuke; Karube, Isao

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor integrating a small sensor probe, a laser emission diode, a photo detector, and a polarizer was developed as a portable sensing device. The sensor probe was made with a glass cylinder, 50 mm long and 1.5 mm in diameter, that was connected directly to a beam splitter without optical fibers. The SPR spectrum obtained with this probe system showed a 10% reflectivity minimum at 690 nm. Shifts of the SPR spectrum induced by refractive index (RI) changes in the sample were measured by detecting the reflection light intensity at 670 nm. When the sensitivity was compared using a BIAcore TM SPR instrument, the lowest sensor response of 1 mV observed with the SPR probe system coincided with 1.4 x 10 -6 of the RI changes. The RI resolution of the SPR probe was estimated with experimentally evaluated noise on the signal, and, consequently, it was concluded that the RI resolution was 1.2 x 10 -5 . Moreover, immunoreaction was demonstrated with adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA antibody as an analyte. As a result, 50 ng mL -1 of the lower detection limit was estimated

  18. Medical devices utilizing optical fibers for simultaneous power, communications and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Joseph P.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Hagans, Karla G.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter; Benett, William J.; Clough, Robert E.; DaSilva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-06-10

    A medical device is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a proximal end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiberoptic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a proximal end for external coupling of laser light energy. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive light from the distal end of the fiber optic cable and may include a photo-voltaic cell and an electromechanical motor or a heat-sensitive photo-thermal material. An electronic sensor is connected to receive electrical power from said distal end of the fiberoptic cable and is connected to provide signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable to the proximal end thereof. A mechanical sensor is attached to the distal end of the fiberoptic cable and connected to provide light signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable.

  19. Optimal design of tunable phononic bandgap plates under equibiaxial stretch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, M S; Guest, James K

    2016-01-01

    Design and application of phononic crystal (PhCr) acoustic metamaterials has been a topic with tremendous growth of interest in the last decade due to their promising capabilities to manipulate acoustic and elastodynamic waves. Phononic controllability of waves through a particular PhCr is limited only to the spectrums located within its fixed bandgap frequency. Hence the ability to tune a PhCr is desired to add functionality over its variable bandgap frequency or for switchability. Deformation induced bandgap tunability of elastomeric PhCr solids and plates with prescribed topology have been studied by other researchers. Principally the internal stress state and distorted geometry of a deformed phononic crystal plate (PhP) changes its effective stiffness and leads to deformation induced tunability of resultant modal band structure. Thus the microstructural topology of a PhP can be altered so that specific tunability features are met through prescribed deformation. In the present study novel tunable PhPs of this kind with optimized bandgap efficiency-tunability of guided waves are computationally explored and evaluated. Low loss transmission of guided waves throughout thin walled structures makes them ideal for fabrication of low loss ultrasound devices and structural health monitoring purposes. Various tunability targets are defined to enhance or degrade complete bandgaps of plate waves through macroscopic tensile deformation. Elastomeric hyperelastic material is considered which enables recoverable micromechanical deformation under tuning finite stretch. Phononic tunability through stable deformation of phononic lattice is specifically required and so any topology showing buckling instability under assumed deformation is disregarded. Nondominated sorting genetic algorithm (GA) NSGA-II is adopted for evolutionary multiobjective topology optimization of hypothesized tunable PhP with square symmetric unit-cell and relevant topologies are analyzed through finite

  20. New Light-Harvesting Materials Using Accurate and Efficient Bandgap Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Hüser, Falco; Pandey, Mohnish

    2014-01-01

    of materials for different applications where the bandgaps are used as descriptors for the efficiency of a photoelectrochemical device. Here, new light harvesting materials are proposed to be used in a one-photon photoelectrochemical device for water splitting by combining the estimation of the bandgaps...... with the stability analysis using Pourbaix diagrams and with the evaluation of the position of the band edges. Using this methodology, 25 candidate materials are obtained and 5 of them appear to have a realistic possibility of being used as photocatalyst in a one-photon water splitting device. © 2014 WILEY...

  1. Rapid Prototyping of Slot Die Devices for Roll to Roll Production of EL Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingham, Alyssa; Bromhead, Nicholas; Fontecchio, Adam

    2017-05-29

    There is a growing interest in fibers supporting optoelectrical properties for textile and wearable display applications. Solution-processed electroluminescent (EL) material systems can be continuously deposited onto fiber or yarn substrates in a roll-to-roll process, making it easy to scale manufacturing. It is important to have precise control over layer deposition to achieve uniform and reliable light emission from these EL fibers. Slot-die coating offers this control and increases the rate of EL fiber production. Here, we report a highly adaptable, cost-effective 3D printing model for developing slot dies used in automatic coating systems. The resulting slot-die coating system enables rapid, reliable production of alternating current powder-based EL (ACPEL) fibers and can be adapted for many material systems. The benefits of this system over dip-coating for roll-to-roll production of EL fibers are demonstrated in this work.

  2. Stability and bandgaps of layered perovskites for one- and two-photon water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Hüser, Falco

    2013-01-01

    in the Ruddlesden–Popper phase of the layered perovskite structure. Based on screening criteria for the stability, bandgaps and band edge positions, we suggest 20 new materials for the light harvesting photo-electrode of a one-photon water splitting device and 5 anode materials for a two-photon device with silicon...

  3. Small bandgap polymers for organic solar cells (polymer material development in the last 5 years)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Renee; Lenes, Martijn; Hummelen, Jan C.; Blom, Paul W.M.; Boer, Bert de

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade the field of polymer photovoltaics has seen a tremendous improvement in both device efficiency and understanding of the underlying physical processes. One has come to a point in which the prototypical large bandgap material system P3HT:PCBM is nearing optimal device

  4. Development of a thermodynamic control system for the Fontan circulation pulsation device using shape memory alloy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akihiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hidekazu; Hashem, Hashem Mohamed Omran; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2015-09-01

    The Fontan procedure is one of the common surgical treatments for circulatory reconstruction in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. In Fontan circulation, low pulsatility may induce localized lung ischemia and may impair the development of pulmonary peripheral endothelial cells. To promote pulmonary circulation in Fontan circulation, we have been developing a pediatric pulmonary circulatory pulsation device using shape memory alloy fibers attached from the outside of total cavopulmonary connection. In this study, we developed a new thermal control system for the device and examined its functions. We mounted on the device 16 fibers connected in parallel around an ePTFE graft circumferentially. To provide optimized contraction, we designed the new thermal control system. The system consisted of a thermistor, a pressure sensor, and a regulator that was controlled by the adaptive thermodynamic transfer functions. We monitored the parameters and calculated heat transfer function as well as pressure distribution on the graft surface. Then we examined and compared the dynamic contractile pressure and changes in surface temperature. As a result, by the application of the control based on the new feedback system analysis, the circumferential contractile pressure increased by 35%. The adaptive thermodynamic regulation was useful for the selection of alternative thresholds of the surface temperature of the graft. The system could achieve effective contraction for the pulsatile flow generation by the device.

  5. Design and Fabrication of Calibration Device for Scintillating Fibers of Tagger Microscope: For use in GlueX's QCD Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Emily

    2012-10-01

    For decades, scientists have struggled to understand the chromo-electromagnetic field which confines quarks and gluons within the hadron. GlueX is a QCD experiment centered at Jefferson Lab, Virginia, seeking to better understand this gluonic field by exciting it and mapping the spectrum of exotic hybrid mesons that it generates. The experiment uses coherent bremsstrahlung radiation to produce a beam of photons, which due to their polarity act as virtual vector mesons. When incident on a liquid hydrogen target, these mesons are expected to form exotic hybrid mesons. Such particles quickly decay into new particles which are captured in a solenoid detector. The decays can then be reconstructed to examine the properties of the original exotic hybrid meson, although the initial energy of the photon is required to draw meaningful conclusions. The post-bremsstrahlung degraded electrons are bent from the main beam into the tagger microscope where they strike an array of scintillating optical fibers. Given the correlation between momentum and radial bend, the Silicon Photmultiplier sensors attached to the optical fibers are able to ``tag'' the electrons', and thus the photons', initial energies based on which fibers were hit. Providing central data for GlueX, the tagger microscope must be accurate. This paper details the design and fabrication of a scintillating fiber calibration device that moves horizontally above fiber bundles, using a green laser diode to direct light pulses into the fibers. This calibration method has been tested mechanically and via a Monte Carlo Matlab simulation, and has proven to be effective.

  6. Recent Advances in Wide-Bandgap Photovoltaic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yunhao; Huo, Lijun; Sun, Yanming

    2017-06-01

    The past decade has witnessed significant advances in the field of organic solar cells (OSCs). Ongoing improvements in the power conversion efficiency of OSCs have been achieved, which were mainly attributed to the design and synthesis of novel conjugated polymers with different architectures and functional moieties. Among various conjugated polymers, the development of wide-bandgap (WBG) polymers has received less attention than that of low-bandgap and medium-bandgap polymers. Here, we briefly summarize recent advances in WBG polymers and their applications in organic photovoltaic (PV) devices, such as tandem, ternary, and non-fullerene solar cells. Addtionally, we also dissuss the application of high open-circuit voltage tandem solar cells in PV-driven electrochemical water dissociation. We mainly focus on the molecular design strategies, the structure-property correlations, and the photovoltaic performance of these WBG polymers. Finally, we extract empirical regularities and provide invigorating perspectives on the future development of WBG photovoltaic materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Bandgap tunability at single-layer molybdenum disulphide grain boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yu Li

    2015-02-17

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a new class of semiconductor materials with novel electronic and optical properties of interest to future nanoelectronics technology. Single-layer molybdenum disulphide, which represents a prototype two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide, has an electronic bandgap that increases with decreasing layer thickness. Using high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we measure the apparent quasiparticle energy gap to be 2.40±0.05 eV for single-layer, 2.10±0.05 eV for bilayer and 1.75±0.05 eV for trilayer molybdenum disulphide, which were directly grown on a graphite substrate by chemical vapour deposition method. More interestingly, we report an unexpected bandgap tunability (as large as 0.85±0.05 eV) with distance from the grain boundary in single-layer molybdenum disulphide, which also depends on the grain misorientation angle. This work opens up new possibilities for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices with tunable bandgaps that utilize both the control of two-dimensional layer thickness and the grain boundary engineering.

  8. Performance evaluation of one-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor for measuring high energy electron beam using a charge-coupled device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Dong Hyun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Yoo, Wook Jae; Chung, Soon Cheol; Tack, Gye Rae; Eom, Gwang Moon; Lee, Bongsoo; Cho, Hyosung; Kim, Sin

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have fabricated one-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor array for high energy electron beam therapy dosimetry. Fiber-optic radiation sensor comprises an organic scintillator as a sensing volume, optical fiber as a light guider and photo-detector as a light measuring device. Usually, photomultiplier tube or photodiode is used as a photo-detector however we have tried to use a charge-coupled device as a scintillating light measuring system for one-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor array. This system can take an image of the proximal ends of one-dimensional fiber-optic sensor array and can measure light intensities of individual image of optical fibers simultaneously using simple imaging software. Charge-coupled device as a light measuring detector has many advantages which are easy in multi-dimensional measurements, high spatial resolution and relatively low cost. We have measured one-dimensional electron beam distributions in a PMMA phantom with different energies and field sizes of electron beam using a fiber-optic sensor and a charge-coupled device. Also, the percentage depth dose curves for high energy electron beams are obtained. (author)

  9. Monolithically Integrated Fiber Optic Coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    single fused fiber 52 and drawn into ferrule 54 in order to provide an output as a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) or photonic bandgap ( PBG ) fiber 56...the reduced diameter air-silica photonic crystal fiber 56 (PCF) or photonic band gap ( PBG ), which is connected by a continuous transition of the... PBG 56 with a negative index of refraction includes metamaterials of superlattices formed by metal nanoparticles. The binary superlattices are

  10. Effects of sterilization methods on key properties of specialty optical fibers used in medical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolov, Andrei A.; Slyman, Brian E.; Burgess, David T.; Hokansson, Adam S.; Li, Jie; Allen, R. Steve

    2013-03-01

    Optical fibers with different types of polymer coatings were exposed to three sterilization conditions: multiple autoclaving, treatment with ethylene oxide and treatment with gamma rays. Effects of different sterilization techniques on key optical and mechanical properties of the fibers are reported. The primary attention is given to behavior of the coatings in harsh sterilization environments. The following four coating/buffer types were investigated: (i) dual acrylate, (ii) polyimide, (iii) silicone/PEEK and (iv) fluoroacrylate hard cladding/ETFE.

  11. Ultrawide bandgap pentamode metamaterials with an asymmetric double-cone outside profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yangyang; Li, Yucheng; Cai, Chengxin; Liu, Guangshuan; Wang, Zhaohong; Xu, Zhuo

    2018-03-01

    The band-gap characteristic is an important feature of acoustic metamaterials, which has important theoretical and practical significance in acoustic devices. Pentamode metamaterials (PMs) with phonon band-gap characteristics based on an asymmetric double-cone outside profile are presented and studied in this paper. The phonon band structures of these PMs are calculated by using the finite element method. In addition to the single-mode band-gaps, the complete 3D band-gaps are also obtained by changing the outside profile of the double-cone. Moreover, by adjusting the outside profile and the diameter of the double-cone to reduce the symmetry of the structure, the complete 3D band-gap can be widened. Further parametric analysis is presented to investigate the effect of geometrical parameters on the phonon band-gap property, the numerical simulations show that the maximum relative bandwidth is expanded by 15.14 times through reducing the symmetry of the structure. This study provides a possible way for PMs to control elastic wave propagation in the field of depressing vibration and noise, acoustic filtering and acoustic cloaking.

  12. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Opportunities in Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marlino, Laura D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Kristina O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The report objective is to explore the Wide Bandgap (WBG) Power Electronics (PE) market, applications, and potential energy savings in order to identify key areas where further resources and investments of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE) would have the most impact on U.S. competiveness. After considering the current market, several potential near-term application areas were identified as having significant market and energy savings potential with respect to clean energy applications: (1) data centers (uninterruptible power supplies and server power supplies); (2) renewable energy generation (photovoltaic-solar and wind); (3) motor drives (industrial, commercial and residential); (4) rail traction; and, (5) hybrid and electric vehicles (traction and charging). After the initial explorative analyses, it became clear that, SiC, not GaN, would be the principal WBG power device material for the chosen markets in the near future. Therefore, while GaN is discussed when appropriate, this report focuses on SiC devices, other WBG applications (e.g., solid-state transformers, combined heat and power, medical, and wireless power), the GaN market, and GaN specific applications (e.g., LiDAR, 5G) will be explored at a later date. In addition to the market, supply and value chain analyses addressed in Section 1 of this report, a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat) analysis and potential energy savings analysis was conducted for each application area to identify the major potential WBG application area(s) with a U.S. competitiveness opportunity in the future.

  13. Wide Bandgap Nanostructured Space Photovoltaics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Firefly, in collaboration with Rochester Institute of Technology, proposes an STTR program for the development of a wide-bandgap GaP-based space solar cell capable...

  14. High bandgap III-V alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Wanlass, Mark

    2017-01-10

    High bandgap alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics are disclosed. An exemplary optoelectronic device may include a substrate, at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer, and a step-grade buffer between the substrate and at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer. The buffer may begin with a layer that is substantially lattice matched to GaAs, and may then incrementally increase the lattice constant in each sequential layer until a predetermined lattice constant of Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP is reached.

  15. Regioregular narrow-bandgap-conjugated polymers for plastic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Fei; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2017-03-01

    Progress in the molecular design and processing protocols of semiconducting polymers has opened significant opportunities for the fabrication of low-cost plastic electronic devices. Recent studies indicate that field-effect transistors and organic solar cells fabricated using narrow-bandgap regioregular polymers with translational symmetries in the direction of the backbone vector often outperform those containing analogous regiorandom polymers. This review addresses the cutting edge of regioregularity chemistry, in particular how to control the spatial distribution in the molecular structures and how this order translates to more ordered bulk morphologies. The effect of regioregularity on charge transport and photovoltaic properties is also outlined.

  16. Coupled-resonator-induced plasmonic bandgaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujia; Sun, Chengwei; Gong, Qihuang; Chen, Jianjun

    2017-10-15

    By drawing an analogy with the conventional photonic crystals, the plasmonic bandgaps have mainly employed the periodic metallic structures, named as plasmonic crystals. However, the sizes of the plasmonic crystals are much larger than the wavelengths, and the large sizes considerably decrease the density of the photonic integration circuits. Here, based on the coupled-resonator effect, the plasmonic bandgaps are experimentally realized in the subwavelength waveguide-resonator structure, which considerably decreases the structure size to subwavelength scales. An analytic model and the phase analysis are established to explain this phenomenon. Both the experiment and simulation show that the plasmonic bandgap structure has large fabrication tolerances (>20%). Instead of the periodic metallic structures in the bulky plasmonic crystals, the utilization of the subwavelength plasmonic waveguide-resonator structure not only significantly shrinks the bandgap structure to be about λ 2 /13, but also expands the physics of the plasmonic bandgaps. The subwavelength dimension, together with the waveguide configuration and robust realization, makes the bandgap structure easy to be highly integrated on chips.

  17. THz waveguides, devices and hybrid polymer-chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Markos, Christos; Nielsen, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we review our recent activities in the design, fabrication and characterization of polymer THz waveguides. Besides the THz waveguides, we finally will also briefly show some of our initial results on a novel hybrid polymer photonic crystal fiber with integrated chalcogenide...

  18. Fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for remote label-free sensing of medical device surface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Moinuddin; Tan, Xin; Welle, Elissa; Ilev, Ilko

    2013-05-01

    As a potential major source of biochemical contamination, medical device surfaces are of critical safety concerns in the clinical practice and public health. The development of innovative sensing methods for accurate and real-time detection of medical device surface contamination is essential to protect patients from high risk infection. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative fiber-optic Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy based sensing approach for remote, non-contact, and label-free detection of biochemical contaminants in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region. The sensing probe is designed using mid-IR hollow fibers and FTIR measurements are carried out in reflection mode. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and bacterial endotoxin of different concentrations under thoroughly dry condition are used to evaluate the detection sensitivity. The devised system can identify ≤0.0025% (≤4 × 1011 molecules) BSA and 0.5% (0.5 EU/ml) endotoxin concentration. The developed sensing approach may be applied to detect various pathogens that pose public health threats.

  19. Electrical and Optical Measurements of the Bandgap Energy of a Light-Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Matthieu; Michez, Lisa; Raimundo, Jean-Manuel; Dumas, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor materials are at the core of electronics. Most electronic devices are made of semiconductors. The operation of these components is well described by quantum physics which is often a difficult concept for students to understand. One of the intrinsic parameters of semiconductors is their bandgap energy E[subscript g]. In the case of…

  20. On/off-current Ratio and Ambipolar Behavior of Narrow Bandgap III-V Nanowire FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanjie; Candebat, Drew; Delker, Collin; Zi, Yunlong; Janes, David; Appenzeller, Joerg; Yang, Chen

    2013-03-01

    III-V nanowires (NW) are promising candidates for future device applications due to the high bulk mobility. Yet the small bandgap may result in undesirable high off-current. Here we establish a simple but reliable model that quantitatively explains how channel bandgap and Schottky barriers at metal contacts affect the ambipolar characteristics and the achievable on/off-current ratios of NW-FETs. Thus one can gain insights of the expected transfer characteristics of a given channel material with certain device structure, and the optimal choice of materials for different device applications in ultimately scaled cases. The physics of electron transport in both ideal case (no Schottky barrier) and practical case (with Schottky barrier) is studied. The impact of Schottky barriers is evaluated by numerical calculation of the tunneling current, and is found to play a critical role for the different characteristics observed. A universal plot of on/off ratio vs. bandgap is presented. The excellent agreement between our simulation predictions and experiment results from InAs, InSb, Ge NWs and CNTs highlights the potential of our approach for understanding narrow bandgap NW-FETs, bridging material development and device applications, and guiding future transistor design.

  1. Etching of wide-bandgap chemically resistant semiconductors : An electrochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    The wide-bandgap semiconductors, SiC and GaN, are important for a whole range of (opto)electronic and other applications. Etching of these chemically very resistant materials poses problems in device technology. This thesis describes an electrochemical approach to etching. In addition, the use of

  2. Variation of interface trap level charge density within the bandgap of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process had direct relevance in the fabrication of MOS-based device structures. Keywords. ... ductor materials, SiC offered unique properties like wide band-gap energy, a high value of critical electric field, .... the oxide, most capacitors do not seem to have reached their maximum value in a strong accumulation region.

  3. Wide bandgap collector III-V double heterojunction bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flitcroft, R.M.

    2000-10-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study and development of Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBTs) designed for high voltage operation. The work concentrates on the use of wide bandgap III-V semiconductor materials as the collector material and their associated properties influencing breakdown, such as impact ionisation coefficients. The work deals with issues related to incorporating a wide bandgap collector into double heterojunction structures such as conduction band discontinuities at the base-collector junction and results are presented which detail, a number of methods designed to eliminate the effects of such discontinuities. In particular the use of AlGaAs as the base material has been successful in eliminating the conduction band spike at this interface. A method of electrically injecting electrons into the collector has been employed to investigate impact ionisation in GaAs, GaInP and AlInP which has used the intrinsic gain of the devices to extract impact ionisation coefficients over a range of electric fields beyond the scope of conventional optical injection techniques. This data has enabled the study of ''dead space'' effects in HBT collectors and have been used to develop an analytical model of impact ionisation which has been incorporated into an existing Ebers-Moll HBT simulator. This simulator has been shown to accurately reproduce current-voltage characteristics in both the devices used in this work and for external clients. (author)

  4. Method and device for detecting impact events on a security barrier which includes a hollow rebar allowing insertion and removal of an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pies, Ross E.

    2016-03-29

    A method and device for the detection of impact events on a security barrier. A hollow rebar is farmed within a security barrier, whereby the hollow rebar is completely surrounded by the security barrier. An optical fiber passes through the interior of the hollow rebar. An optical transmitter and an optical receiver are both optically connected to the optical fiber and connected to optical electronics. The optical electronics are configured to provide notification upon the detection of an impact event at the security barrier based on the detection of disturbances within the optical fiber.

  5. Electrical determination of the bandgap energies of the emitter and base regions of bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimila-Arroyo, J.

    2016-10-01

    A pure electrical method is presented to extract emitter and base bandgaps of a bipolar junction transistor (BJT) at the locations where the minority carrier injection takes place. It is based on the simultaneous measurement of the collector and base currents as a function of the emitter-base forward bias (Gummer plot) and the corresponding current gain. From the obtained saturation currents as a function of temperature, we extract the bandgap energies. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated for InGaP-GaAs, Si, and Ge commercial devices. For InGaP-GaAs transistors, the results can be understood if the emitter-base heterojunction is not an abrupt but a gradual one. The presented method is a reliable tool that can aid in the development of new compound semiconductor based BJTs whose bandgap energies are highly sensitive to their composition.

  6. Molecular studies and plastic optical fiber device structures for nonlinear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Carl W.; Nagarur, Aruna R.; Lu, Jin J.; Zhang, Lixia; Kalamegham, Priya; Fonseca, Joe; Gopalan, Saytha; Townsend, Scott; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Craig, Patrick; Rosales, Monica; Green, Leslie; Chan, Karen; Twieg, Robert J.; Ermer, Susan P.; Leung, Doris S.; Lovejoy, Steven M.; Lacroix, Suzanne; Godbout, Nicolas; Monette, Etienne

    1995-10-01

    Summarized are two project areas: First, the development of a quantitative structure property relationship for analyzing thermal decomposition differential scanning calorimetry data of electro-optic dyes is presented. The QSPR relationship suggest that thermal decomposition can be effectively correlated with structure by considering the kinds of atoms, their hybridization, and their nearest neighbor bonded atoms. Second, the simple preparation of clad plastic optical fibers (POF) is discussed with the intention of use for nonlinear optical applications. We discuss preparation techniques for single core and multiple core POF, and present some recent data on index profiles and the optimization of thermal stability in acrylate-based POF structures.

  7. Frequency conversion through spontaneous degenerate four wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2014-01-01

    Frequency conversion through spontaneous degenerate four wave mixing (FWM) is investigated in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers. Different FWM processes are observed, phasematching between fiber modes of orthogonal polarization, intermodal phasematching across bandgaps, and intramoda...

  8. WDM-Coherent OCDMA over one single device based on short chip Super Structured Fiber Bragg Gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Waldimar; Pastor, Daniel; Baños, Rocio; Garcia-Munoz, Victor

    2011-11-21

    We theoretically propose and demonstrate experimentally a Coherent Direct Sequence OCDMA en/decoder for multi-channel WDM operation based on a single device. It presents a broadband spectral envelope and a periodic spectral pattern that can be employed for en/decoding multiple sub-bands simultaneously. Multi-channel operation is verified experimentally by means of Multi-Band Super Structured Fiber Bragg Gratings with binary phase encoded chips fabricated with 1mm inter-chip separation that provides 4x100 GHz ITU sub-band separation at 1.25 Gbps. The WDM-OCDMA system verification was carried out employing simultaneous encoding of four adjacent sub-bands and two different OCDMA codes. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. Integrated SDS removal and protein digestion by hollow fiber membrane based device for SDS-assisted proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Simin; Yuan, Huiming; Chen, Yuanbo; Liang, Zheng; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a novel integrated sample preparation device for SDS-assisted proteome analysis was developed, by which proteins dissolved in 4% (w/v) SDS were first diluted by 50% methanol, and then SDS was online removed by a hollow fiber membrane interface (HFMI) with 50mM ammonium bicarbonate (pH 8.0) as an exchange buffer, finally digested by an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). To evaluate the performance of such an integrated device, bovine serum albumin dissolved in 4% (w/v) SDS as a model sample was analyzed; it could be found that similar to that obtained by direct analysis of BSA digests without SDS (the sequence coverage of 60.3±1.0%, n=3), with HFMI as an interface for SDS removal, BSA was identified with the sequence coverage of 61.0±1.0% (n=3). However, without SDS removal by HFMI, BSA could not be digested by the IMER and none peptides could be detected. In addition, such an integrated sample preparation device was also applied for the analysis of SDS extracted proteins from rat brain, compared to those obtained by filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), not only the identified protein group and unique peptide number were increased by 12% and 39% respectively, but also the sample pretreatment time was shortened from 24h to 4h. All these results demonstrated that such an integrated sample preparation device would provide an alternative tool for SDS assisted proteome analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fabrication of optical fiber micro(and nano)-optical and photonic devices and components, using computer controlled spark thermo-pulling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatemi, H.; Mosleh, A.; Pashmkar, M.; Khaksar Kalati, A.

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication of optical fiber Micro (and Nano)-Optical component and devices, as well as, those applicable for photonic purposes are described. It is to demonstrate the practical capabilities and characterization of the previously reported Computer controlled spark thermo-pulling fabrication system.

  11. Tunable Bandgap and Optical Properties of Black Phosphorene Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Black phosphorus (BP, a new two-dimensional material, has been the focus of scientists’ attention. BP nanotubes have potential in the field of optoelectronics due to their low-dimensional effects. In this work, the bending strain energy, electronic structure, and optical properties of BP nanotubes were investigated by using the first-principles method based on density functional theory. The results show that these properties are closely related to the rolling direction and radius of the BP nanotube. All the calculated BP nanotube properties show direct bandgaps, and the BP nanotubes with the same rolling direction express a monotone increasing trend in the value of bandgap with a decrease in radius, which is a stacking effect of the compression strain on the inner atoms and the tension strain on the outer atoms. The bending strain energy of the zigzag phosphorene nanotubes (zPNTs is higher than that of armchair phosphorene nanotubes (aPNT with the same radius of curvature due to the anisotropy of the BP’s structure. The imaginary part of the dielectric function, the absorption range, reflectivity, and the imaginary part of the refractive index of aPNTs have a wider range than those of zPNTs, with higher values overall. As a result, tunable BP nanotubes are suitable for optoelectronic devices, such as lasers and diodes, which function in the infrared and ultra-violet regions, and for solar cells and photocatalysis.

  12. PLZT Electrooptic Ceramic Photonic Devices for Surface-Normal Operation in Trenches Cut Across Arrays of Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Katsuhiko

    2005-03-01

    Simple Pb_1-x La_x(Zr_y Ti_z)_1-x/4 O3 (PLZT) electrooptic ceramic photonic device arrays for surface-normal operation have been developed for application to polarization-controller arrays and Fabry-Pérot tunable filter arrays. These arrays are inserted in trenches cut across fiber arrays. Each element of the arrayed structure corresponds to one optical beam and takes the form of a cell. Each sidewall of the cell (width: 50-80 μm) is coated to form an electrode. The arrays have 16 elements at a pitch of 250 μm. The phase modulator has about 1 dB of loss and a half-wavelength voltage of 120 V. A cascade of two PLZT phase modulators (thickness: 300 μm), with each attached to a polyimide lambda/2 plate (thickness:15 μm), is capable of converting an arbitrary polarization to the transverse-electric (TE) or transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization. The response time is 1 μs. The Fabry-Pérot tunable filters have a thickness of 50 μm . The front and back surfaces of each cell are coated by 99%-reflective mirror. The free spectral range (FSR) of the filters is about 10 nm, tunable range is about 10 nm, loss is 2.2 dB, and finesse is 150. The tuning speed of these devices is high, taking only 1 μs.

  13. Research on micro-sized acoustic bandgap structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, James Grant; McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Su, Mehmet F.; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2010-01-01

    Phononic crystals (or acoustic crystals) are the acoustic wave analogue of photonic crystals. Here a periodic array of scattering inclusions located in a homogeneous host material forbids certain ranges of acoustic frequencies from existence within the crystal, thus creating what are known as acoustic (or phononic) bandgaps. The vast majority of phononic crystal devices reported prior to this LDRD were constructed by hand assembling scattering inclusions in a lossy viscoelastic medium, predominantly air, water or epoxy, resulting in large structures limited to frequencies below 1 MHz. Under this LDRD, phononic crystals and devices were scaled to very (VHF: 30-300 MHz) and ultra (UHF: 300-3000 MHz) high frequencies utilizing finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling, microfabrication and micromachining technologies. This LDRD developed key breakthroughs in the areas of micro-phononic crystals including physical origins of phononic crystals, advanced FDTD modeling and design techniques, material considerations, microfabrication processes, characterization methods and device structures. Micro-phononic crystal devices realized in low-loss solid materials were emphasized in this work due to their potential applications in radio frequency communications and acoustic imaging for medical ultrasound and nondestructive testing. The results of the advanced modeling, fabrication and integrated transducer designs were that this LDRD produced the 1st measured phononic crystals and phononic crystal devices (waveguides) operating in the VHF (67 MHz) and UHF (937 MHz) frequency bands and established Sandia as a world leader in the area of micro-phononic crystals.

  14. Single-nanowire, low-bandgap hot carrier solar cells with tunable open-circuit voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpert, Steven; Burke, Adam; Chen, I.-Ju; Anttu, Nicklas; Lehmann, Sebastian; Fahlvik, Sofia; Bremner, Stephen; Conibeer, Gavin; Thelander, Claes; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Linke, Heiner

    2017-10-01

    Compared to traditional pn-junction photovoltaics, hot carrier solar cells offer potentially higher efficiency by extracting work from the kinetic energy of photogenerated ‘hot carriers’ before they cool to the lattice temperature. Hot carrier solar cells have been demonstrated in high-bandgap ferroelectric insulators and GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, but so far not in low-bandgap materials, where the potential efficiency gain is highest. Recently, a high open-circuit voltage was demonstrated in an illuminated wurtzite InAs nanowire with a low bandgap of 0.39 eV, and was interpreted in terms of a photothermoelectric effect. Here, we point out that this device is a hot carrier solar cell and discuss its performance in those terms. In the demonstrated devices, InP heterostructures are used as energy filters in order to thermoelectrically harvest the energy of hot electrons photogenerated in InAs absorber segments. The obtained photovoltage depends on the heterostructure design of the energy filter and is therefore tunable. By using a high-resistance, thermionic barrier, an open-circuit voltage is obtained that is in excess of the Shockley-Queisser limit. These results provide generalizable insight into how to realize high voltage hot carrier solar cells in low-bandgap materials, and therefore are a step towards the demonstration of higher efficiency hot carrier solar cells.

  15. Endocultivation: metabolism during heterotopic osteoinduction in vivo--monitoring with fiber optic detection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta Elisabeth; Christofzik, David W; Daschner, Frank; Knöchel, Reinhard; Smeets, Ralf; Warnke, Patrick; Wiltfang, Jörg; Becker, Stephan T

    2012-10-01

    Reconstructions of facial bone defects are one of the most challenging aspects in surgical treatment of malignant diseases, large facial traumata, or congenital anomalies. High-level reconstruction techniques are often associated with an elevated morbidity by the harvest of autologous bone grafts from the patient. Tissue engineering techniques may help to solve this problem. The aim of this study was to monitor metabolic processes during cellular colonization of matrices in vivo in an established rat model for endocultivation. After implantation of computer-designed hydroxyapatite scaffolds into the latissimus dorsi muscle of six rats, 100 μg bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) was injected twice, in week 1 and 2, directly into the center of the matrices. The development of pH value and oxygen (O₂) saturation inside the matrix was followed by fiber optic detection technique over 8 weeks and analyzed by variance analyses. Bone density measurements were performed by computed tomography as well as histological evaluations. Two weeks after implantation, oxygen supply and pH value measurements had decreased significantly. In the following weeks both parameters increased and stabilized on higher levels. This is the first study reporting a reproducible method to follow metabolic processes during heterotopic osteoinduction in vivo. It was shown that in the beginning of the study pH value and O₂ saturation decreased and it took several weeks to regain physiological levels. This is an important step to further understand the physiological process of bone induction.

  16. Mode Division Multiplexing Exploring Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jing; Lyngso, Jens Kristian; Leick, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    -return to zero (NRZ) data signals over a 30 m 7-cell HC-PBGF using the offset mode launching method. In another experiment, a short piece of 19-cell HC-PBGF was used to transmit two 20 Gbit/s NRZ channels using a spatial light modulator for precise mode excitation. Bit-error-ratio (BER) performances below...

  17. Novel Approaches to Wide Bandgap CuInSe2 Based Absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William N. Shafarman

    2011-04-28

    This project targeted the development of high performance wide bandgap solar cells based on thin film alloys of CuInSe2 to relax constraints on module design and enable tandem solar cell structures. This addressed goals of the Solar Energy Technologies Program for Next Generation PV to develop technology needed for higher thin film module efficiency as a means to reduce costs. Specific objectives of the research project were: 1) to develop the processes and materials required to improve the performance of wide bandgap thin film solar cells based on alloys of CuInSe2, and 2) to provide the fundamental science and engineering basis for the material, electronic, and device properties required to effectively apply these processes and materials to commercial manufacture. CuInSe2-based photovoltaics have established the highest efficiencies of the thin film materials at both the cell and module scales and are actively being scaled up to commercialization. In the highest efficiency cells and modules, the optical bandgap, a function of the CuInSe2-based alloy composition, is relatively low compared to the optimum match to the solar spectrum. Wider bandgap alloys of CuInSe2 produce higher cell voltages which can improve module performance and enable the development of tandem solar cells to boost the overall efficiency. A focus for the project was alloying with silver to form (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 pentenary thin films deposited by elemental co-evaporation which gives the broadest range of control of composition and material properties. This alloy has a lower melting temperature than Ag-free, Cu-based chalcopyrite compounds, which may enable films to be formed with lower defect densities and the (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 films give improved material properties and better device performance with increasing bandgap. A comprehensive characterization of optical, structural, and electronic properties of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 was completed over the complete compositional range 0 ≤ Ga/(In+Ga) ≤ 1 and

  18. Optimization and experimental validation of stiff porous phononic plates for widest complete bandgap of mixed fundamental guided wave modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Kersemans, Mathias; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, Mohammad; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Phononic crystal plates (PhPs) have promising application in manipulation of guided waves for design of low-loss acoustic devices and built-in acoustic metamaterial lenses in plate structures. The prominent feature of phononic crystals is the existence of frequency bandgaps over which the waves are stopped, or are resonated and guided within appropriate defects. Therefore, maximized bandgaps of PhPs are desirable to enhance their phononic controllability. Porous PhPs produced through perforation of a uniform background plate, in which the porous interfaces act as strong reflectors of wave energy, are relatively easy to produce. However, the research in optimization of porous PhPs and experimental validation of achieved topologies has been very limited and particularly focused on bandgaps of flexural (asymmetric) wave modes. In this paper, porous PhPs are optimized through an efficient multiobjective genetic algorithm for widest complete bandgap of mixed fundamental guided wave modes (symmetric and asymmetric) and maximized stiffness. The Pareto front of optimization is analyzed and variation of bandgap efficiency with respect to stiffness is presented for various optimized topologies. Selected optimized topologies from the stiff and compliant regimes of Pareto front are manufactured by water-jetting an aluminum plate and their promising bandgap efficiency is experimentally observed. An optimized Pareto topology is also chosen and manufactured by laser cutting a Plexiglas (PMMA) plate, and its performance in self-collimation and focusing of guided waves is verified as compared to calculated dispersion properties.

  19. High frequency modulation circuits based on photoconductive wide bandgap switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2018-02-13

    Methods, systems, and devices for high voltage and/or high frequency modulation. In one aspect, an optoelectronic modulation system includes an array of two or more photoconductive switch units each including a wide bandgap photoconductive material coupled between a first electrode and a second electrode, a light source optically coupled to the WBGP material of each photoconductive switch unit via a light path, in which the light path splits into multiple light paths to optically interface with each WBGP material, such that a time delay of emitted light exists along each subsequent split light path, and in which the WBGP material conducts an electrical signal when a light signal is transmitted to the WBGP material, and an output to transmit the electrical signal conducted by each photoconductive switch unit. The time delay of the photons emitted through the light path is substantially equivalent to the time delay of the electrical signal.

  20. Two-dimensional Kagome photonic bandgap waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Søndergaard, Thomas; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2000-01-01

    The transverse-magnetic photonic-bandgap-guidance properties are investigated for a planar two-dimensional (2-D) Kagome waveguide configuration using a full-vectorial plane-wave-expansion method. Single-moded well-localized low-index guided modes are found. The localization of the optical modes...... is investigated with respect to the width of the 2-D Kagome waveguide, and the number of modes existing for specific frequencies and waveguide widths is mapped out....

  1. Monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem, ultra-thin, strain-counterbalanced, photovoltaic energy converters with optimal subcell bandgaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanlass, Mark W [Golden, CO; Mascarenhas, Angelo [Lakewood, CO

    2012-05-08

    Modeling a monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem, solar photovoltaic converter or thermophotovoltaic converter by constraining the bandgap value for the bottom subcell to no less than a particular value produces an optimum combination of subcell bandgaps that provide theoretical energy conversion efficiencies nearly as good as unconstrained maximum theoretical conversion efficiency models, but which are more conducive to actual fabrication to achieve such conversion efficiencies than unconstrained model optimum bandgap combinations. Achieving such constrained or unconstrained optimum bandgap combinations includes growth of a graded layer transition from larger lattice constant on the parent substrate to a smaller lattice constant to accommodate higher bandgap upper subcells and at least one graded layer that transitions back to a larger lattice constant to accommodate lower bandgap lower subcells and to counter-strain the epistructure to mitigate epistructure bowing.

  2. Selective mode excitation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, A. D.; Couny, F.; Coupland, S.; Roberts, P. J.; Sabert, H.; Knight, J. C.; Birks, T. A.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2005-04-01

    Modes are selectively excited by launching light through the cladding from the side into a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Measuring the total output power at the end of the fiber as a function of the angle of incidence of the exciting laser beam provides a powerful diagnostic for characterizing the cladding bandgap. Furthermore, various types of modes on either side of the bandgap are excited individually, and their near-field images are obtained.

  3. Controlling spin-dependent tunneling by bandgap tuning in epitaxial rocksalt MgZnO films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D L; Ma, Q L; Wang, S G; Ward, R C C; Hesjedal, T; Zhang, X-G; Kohn, A; Amsellem, E; Yang, G; Liu, J L; Jiang, J; Wei, H X; Han, X F

    2014-12-02

    Widespread application of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for information storage has so far been limited by the complicated interplay between tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio and the product of resistance and junction area (RA). An intricate connection exists between TMR ratio, RA value and the bandgap and crystal structure of the barrier, a connection that must be unravelled to optimise device performance and enable further applications to be developed. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to tailor the bandgap of an ultrathin, epitaxial Zn-doped MgO tunnel barrier with rocksalt structure. This structure is attractive due to its good Δ1 spin filtering effect, and we show that MTJs based on tunable MgZnO barriers allow effective balancing of TMR ratio and RA value. In this way spin-dependent transport properties can be controlled, a key challenge for the development of spintronic devices.

  4. Comments on determination of bandgap narrowing from activation plots. [for bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.-S.; Neugroschel, A.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A determination is made of the temperature-dependence of emitter saturation current in bipolar devices which allows the derivation of a value for bandgap narrowing that is in better agreement with other determinations than previous results based on ohmic contact measurements of temperature dependence. The new values were obtained by varying the surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. This improves accuracy by varying the minority carrier surface recombination velocity at the emitter contacts of otherwise indistinguishable emitters.

  5. Robust, low-noise, polarization-maintaining mode-locked Er-fiber laser with a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) device as a multi-functional element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chur; Kwon, Dohyeon; Kim, Dohyun; Choi, Sun Young; Cha, Sang Jun; Choi, Ki Sun; Yeom, Dong-Il; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-04-15

    We demonstrate a new planar lightwave circuit (PLC)-based device, integrated with a 980/1550 wavelength division multiplexer, an evanescent-field-interaction-based saturable absorber, and an output tap coupler, which can be employed as a multi-functional element in mode-locked fiber lasers. Using this multi-functional PLC device, we demonstrate a simple, robust, low-noise, and polarization-maintaining mode-locked Er-fiber laser. The measured full-width at half-maximum bandwidth is 6 nm centered at 1555 nm, corresponding to 217 fs transform-limited pulse duration. The measured RIN and timing jitter are 0.22% [10 Hz-10 MHz] and 6.6 fs [10 kHz-1 MHz], respectively. Our results show that the non-gain section of mode-locked fiber lasers can be easily implemented as a single PLC chip that can be manufactured by a wafer-scale fabrication process. The use of PLC processes in mode-locked lasers has the potential for higher manufacturability of low-cost and robust fiber and waveguide lasers.

  6. Characterizations of Proton-irradiated wide bandgap semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. R.; Ahn, J. H.

    2008-04-01

    Current-voltages were compared before and after proton irradiation. As expected from simulation results, 5keV protons severely damaged the transistors' performance compared to 25MeV protons. Also, the effects of both lower and higher fluencies were compared. Source-Drain currents were dramatically decreased under higher fluency. At the highest dose of 2x10 16 protons/cm 2 there was a decrease of 43% in IDS and a 29% decrease in gm. The data is consistent with the introduction of defect centers in the HEMT structure by the high energy protons leading to a reduction in carrier concentration and mobility in the 2- dimensional electron gas channel due to the extremely thin 2DEG and the high displacement threshold energy, AlGaN/GaN HEMT has great potential for applications in earth orbit

  7. Bandgap Optimization of Perovskite Semiconductors for Photovoltaic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zewen; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio; Padture, Nitin P

    2018-02-16

    The bandgap is the most important physical property that determines the potential of semiconductors for photovoltaic (PV) applications. This Minireview discusses the parameters affecting the bandgap of perovskite semiconductors that are being widely studied for PV applications, and the recent progress in the optimization of the bandgaps of these materials. Perspectives are also provided for guiding future research in this area. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Superconducting switch and amplifier device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    An amplifying or switching superconductive device is described whose current-voltage characteristic is drastically altered by heavy injection of excess energetic quasi-particles. In this device, the superconducting bandgap of a superconducting layer is greatly altered by overinjection of energetic quasi-particles so that the bandgap changes greatly with respect to its thermal equilibrium value, and in most cases is made to vanish. In a preferred embodiment, a three electrode device is fabricated where at least one of the electrodes is a superconductor. Tunnel barriers are located between the electrodes. A first tunnel junction is used to heavily inject energetic quasi-particles into the superconducting electrode to change its superconducting bandgap drastically. In turn, this greatly modifies the currentvoltage characteristics of the second tunnel junction. This device can be used to provide logic circuits, or as an amplifier, and has an output sufficiently large that it can drive other similar devices

  9. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  10. A general theory for bandgap estimation in locally resonant metastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, C.; Xia, Y.; Leadenham, S.; Ruzzene, M.; Erturk, A.

    2017-10-01

    Locally resonant metamaterials are characterized by bandgaps at wavelengths that are much larger than the lattice size, enabling low-frequency vibration attenuation. Typically, bandgap analyses and predictions rely on the assumption of traveling waves in an infinite medium, and do not take advantage of modal representations typically used for the analysis of the dynamic behavior of finite structures. Recently, we developed a method for understanding the locally resonant bandgap in uniform finite metamaterial beams using modal analysis. Here we extend that framework to general locally resonant 1D and 2D metastructures (i.e. locally resonant metamaterial-based finite structures) with specified boundary conditions using a general operator formulation. Using this approach, along with the assumption of an infinite number of resonators tuned to the same frequency, the frequency range of the locally resonant bandgap is easily derived in closed form. Furthermore, the bandgap expression is shown to be the same regardless of the type of vibration problem under consideration, depending only on the added mass ratio and target frequency. For practical designs with a finite number of resonators, it is shown that the number of resonators required for the bandgap to appear increases with increased target frequency, i.e. more resonators are required for higher vibration modes. Additionally, it is observed that there is an optimal, finite number of resonators which gives a bandgap that is wider than the infinite-resonator bandgap, and that the optimal number of resonators increases with target frequency and added mass ratio. As the number of resonators becomes sufficiently large, the bandgap converges to the derived infinite-resonator bandgap. Furthermore, the derived bandgap edge frequencies are shown to agree with results from dispersion analysis using the plane wave expansion method. The model is validated experimentally for a locally resonant cantilever beam under base

  11. High-Temperature, Wirebondless, Ultracompact Wide Bandgap Power Semiconductor Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, John

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and other wide bandgap semiconductors offer great promise of high power rating, high operating temperature, simple thermal management, and ultrahigh power density for both space and commercial power electronic systems. However, this great potential is seriously limited by the lack of reliable high-temperature device packaging technology. This Phase II project developed an ultracompact hybrid power module packaging technology based on the use of double lead frames and direct lead frame-to-chip transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding that allows device operation up to 450 degC. The new power module will have a very small form factor with 3-5X reduction in size and weight from the prior art, and it will be capable of operating from 450 degC to -125 degC. This technology will have a profound impact on power electronics and energy conversion technologies and help to conserve energy and the environment as well as reduce the nation's dependence on fossil fuels.

  12. Oxygen-activated growth and bandgap tunability of large single-crystal bilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yufeng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yuanyue; Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaohan; Tan, Cheng; Nie, Shu; Suk, Ji Won; Jiang, Tengfei; Liang, Tengfei; Xiao, Junfeng; Ye, Wenjing; Dean, Cory R.; Yakobson, Boris I.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2016-02-01

    Bernal (AB)-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose bandgap can be tuned by a transverse electric field, making it a unique material for a number of electronic and photonic devices. A scalable approach to synthesize high-quality BLG is therefore critical, which requires minimal crystalline defects in both graphene layers and maximal area of Bernal stacking, which is necessary for bandgap tunability. Here we demonstrate that in an oxygen-activated chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process, half-millimetre size, Bernal-stacked BLG single crystals can be synthesized on Cu. Besides the traditional 'surface-limited' growth mechanism for SLG (1st layer), we discovered new microscopic steps governing the growth of the 2nd graphene layer below the 1st layer as the diffusion of carbon atoms through the Cu bulk after complete dehydrogenation of hydrocarbon molecules on the Cu surface, which does not occur in the absence of oxygen. Moreover, we found that the efficient diffusion of the carbon atoms present at the interface between Cu and the 1st graphene layer further facilitates growth of large domains of the 2nd layer. The CVD BLG has superior electrical quality, with a device on/off ratio greater than 104, and a tunable bandgap up to -100 meV at a displacement field of 0.9 V nm-1.

  13. Electrically dependent bandgaps in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.; Swaminathan, V.; Recine, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations on the bandgap of graphene on a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in three different stacking configurations. Relative stability of the configurations is identified and bandgap tunability is demonstrated through the application of an external, perpendicularly applied electric field. We carefully examine the bandgap's sensitivity to both magnitude of the applied field as well as separation between the graphene and hexagonal boron nitride layers. Features of the band structure are examined and configuration-dependent relationships between the field and bandgap are revealed and elucidated through the atom-projected density of states. These findings suggest the potential for opening and modulating a bandgap in graphene as high as several hundred meV

  14. Electrically dependent bandgaps in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D., E-mail: daniel.b.kaplan.civ@mail.mil; Swaminathan, V. [U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC, Fuze Precision Armaments and Technology Directorate, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey 07806 (United States); Recine, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Fordham University, Bronx, New York 10458 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    We present first-principles calculations on the bandgap of graphene on a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in three different stacking configurations. Relative stability of the configurations is identified and bandgap tunability is demonstrated through the application of an external, perpendicularly applied electric field. We carefully examine the bandgap's sensitivity to both magnitude of the applied field as well as separation between the graphene and hexagonal boron nitride layers. Features of the band structure are examined and configuration-dependent relationships between the field and bandgap are revealed and elucidated through the atom-projected density of states. These findings suggest the potential for opening and modulating a bandgap in graphene as high as several hundred meV.

  15. OBIC technique applied to wide bandgap semiconductors from 100 K up to 450 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, H.; Planson, D.; Raynaud, C.; Bevilacqua, P.

    2017-05-01

    Wide bandgap semiconductors have recently become more frequently used in the power electronics domain. They are predicted to replace traditional silicon, especially for high voltage and/or high frequency devices. Device design has made a lot of progress in the last two decades. Substrates up to six inches in diameter have now been commercialized with very low defect densities. Such a development is due to continuous studies. Of these studies, those that allow an excess of charge carriers in the space charge region (like OBIC - optical beam induced current, and EBIC - electron beam induced current) are useful to analyze the variation of electric field as a function of the voltage and the beam position. This paper shows the OBIC technique applied to wide bandgap semiconductor-based devices. OBIC cartography gives an image of the electric field in the device, and the analysis of the OBIC signal helps one to determine some characteristics of the semiconductors, like minority carrier lifetime and ionization rates. These are key parameters to predict device switching behavior and breakdown voltage.

  16. Photonic Bandgap Structures as Meta-Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonovitch, Eli

    2000-03-01

    Engineering design is sometimes inspired by Nature. The natural world is filled with crystals, periodic structures which interact with Schrodinger Waves. Drawing on this analogy, we are designing artificial crystal structures which are intended for Electromagnetic Waves instead. This has now unleashed the collective scientific imagination, engendering a profusion of synthetic electromagnetic crystal structures. In correspondence to semiconductor crystals these usually have an electromagnetic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden. We will present here a portfolio of various 2 and 3 dimensional crystal structures which have been conceived, and indicate the applications, such as opto-electronic light emitters, radio antennas, and color pigments, for which they are intended.

  17. Terahertz Fibres and Functional FibreI-Based Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong

    The area of Terahertz (THz) radiation has been proved to be a very promising utility for a wide range of applications. However, since current THz systems predominantly utilize freespace propagation, the large size and requirement of careful alignment thus increasing the complexity are the drawbacks...... fiber. The fabrication and experimental characterization of such a PBG THz fiber are also performed. The fiber is made of polymer TOPAS and confirm that it allows to fabricate long lengths of fiber with a near-perfect periodic structure and thus very clear bandgap guidance. The fundamental bandgap at 0...

  18. Model Hamiltonian for predicting the bandgap of conjugated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitao Botelho, Andre; Shin, Yongwoo; Lin, Xi

    2012-02-01

    We calculate the bandgaps for conjugated systems using the adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian and find good agreement with 130 independent experimental points. The 2D version of the model correctly demonstrates the decrease in bandgap from the addition of vinylene bridges to both poly(p-phenylene) and polythiophene indicating that planarization is not a significant effect. Expanding the model to 3D shows that interchain interactions systematically reduces the bandgap. In fused rings sharing dissimilar bonds, such as in isothianaphthene, the bond length dimerization along the carbon backbone decreases leading to a decrease in the bandgap. In contrast, when fusing two of the same rings along equivalent bonds, for example thienoacene, the bandgap change is less than 10% at best when normalized by the number of carbon atoms in the conjugation path. From porphyrin and pyrrole-benzothiadiazole we learn that tautomerization significantly affects the bandgap, as the ɛ value for NH had to be used for both NH and N, indicating that H is being shared by both. In modeling donor-acceptor co-polymers we accurately calculate the reduction in the bandgaps when compared to their parent homopolymers.

  19. Operations manual for DOE/METC's second generation fiber optic alkali monitor and calibration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, R.G.; Hensel, J.P.; Wachter, J.K.; Signor, R.B.; Crane, R.W.

    1988-05-01

    The DOE/METC fiber optic alkali monitor is an integrated hardware and software system developed to monitor alkali concentrations in process gas streams. For additional information on the background, design and application of this fiber optic alkali monitor (and its predecessor version) the reader should consult the suggested reading list at the end of this report. A slipstream of the process gas is introduced into a controlled flame and the concentrations of sodium and potassium are monitored using flame emission spectroscopy. The system consists of three basic sections: the light gathering and distribution section, the light filtering and detection section, and the computer-controlled signal processing section. The light gathering and distribution section consists of four components: a lens arrangement, an optical shutter, a bifurcated fiber optic, and two beam splitters. The purpose of the lens arrangement is to reduce flame noise by spreading the image of the center of the flame and focusing it through the optical shutter onto the fiber optic. This technique serves to eliminate the adverse effects of flame movements. The optical shutter is a means to block out all light from the fiber optic bundle while performing dark calibrations. When the shutter is open, the gathered light travels through a bifurcated fiber optic to the sodium and potassium channels, where it is divided by the beam splitters. This beam-splitting technique distributes equal amounts of light between each of the two channels' foreground and background subchannels. The divided light beam then enters the filtering and detection section. 24 figs.

  20. On the mechanism of bandgap formation in locally resonant finite elastic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Christopher; Leadenham, Stephen; Ruzzene, Massimo; Erturk, Alper

    2016-10-01

    Elastic/acoustic metamaterials made from locally resonant arrays can exhibit bandgaps at wavelengths much longer than the lattice size for various applications spanning from low-frequency vibration/sound attenuation to wave guiding and filtering in mechanical and electromechanical devices. For an effective use of such locally resonant metamaterial concepts in finite structures, it is required to bridge the gap between the lattice dispersion characteristics and modal behavior of the host structure with its resonators. To this end, we develop a novel argument for bandgap formation in finite-length elastic metamaterial beams, relying on the modal analysis and the assumption of infinitely many resonators. We show that the dual problem to wave propagation through an infinite periodic beam is the modal analysis of a finite beam with an infinite number of resonators. A simple formula that depends only on the resonator natural frequency and total mass ratio is derived for placing the bandgap in a desired frequency range, yielding an analytical insight and a rule of thumb for design purposes. A method for understanding the importance of a resonator location and mass is discussed in the context of a Riemann sum approximation of an integral, and a method for determining the optimal number of resonators for a given set of boundary conditions and target frequency is introduced. The simulations of the theoretical framework are validated by experiments for bending vibrations of a locally resonant cantilever beam.

  1. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as InxGa1-xAs, GaAsxP1-x, or CuInxGa1-xSe2 are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  2. III-N Wide Bandgap Deep-Ultraviolet Lasers and Photodetectors

    KAUST Repository

    Detchprohm, T.

    2016-11-05

    The III-N wide-bandgap alloys in the AlInGaN system have many important and unique electrical and optical properties which have been exploited to develop deep-ultraviolet (DUV) optical devices operating at wavelengths < 300 nm, including light-emitting diodes, optically pumped lasers, and photodetectors. In this chapter, we review some aspects of the development and current state of the art of these DUV materials and devices. We describe the growth of III-N materials in the UV region by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition as well as the properties of epitaxial layers and heterostructure devices. In addition, we discuss the simulation and design of DUV laser diodes, the processing of III-N optical devices, and the description of the current state of the art of DUV lasers and photodetectors.

  3. Optical fiber stripper positioning apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Richard W.; Sanchez, Jr., Amadeo

    1990-01-01

    An optical fiber positioning apparatus for an optical fiber stripping device is disclosed which is capable of providing precise axial alignment between an optical fiber to be stripped of its outer jacket and the cutting blades of a stripping device. The apparatus includes a first bore having a width approximately equal to the diameter of an unstripped optical fiber and a counter bore axially aligned with the first bore and dimensioned to precisely receive a portion of the stripping device in axial alignment with notched cutting blades within the stripping device to thereby axially align the notched cutting blades of the stripping device with the axis of the optical fiber to permit the notched cutting blades to sever the jacket on the optical fiber without damaging the cladding on the optical fiber. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further includes a fiber stop which permits determination of the length of jacket to be removed from the optical fiber.

  4. Metallic photonic band-gap materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigalas, M.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.; Soukoulis, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the transmission and absorption of electromagnetic waves propagating in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D periodic metallic photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. For 2D systems, there is substantial difference between the s- and p-polarized waves. The p-polarized waves exhibit behavior similar to the dielectric PBG's. But, the s-polarized waves have a cutoff frequency below which there are no propagating modes. For 3D systems, the results are qualitatively the same for both polarizations but there are important differences related to the topology of the structure. For 3D structures with isolated metallic scatterers (cermet topology), the behavior is similar to that of the dielectric PBG's, while for 3D structures with the metal forming a continuous network (network topology), there is a cutoff frequency below which there are no propagating modes. The systems with the network topology may have some interesting applications for frequencies less than about 1 THz where the absorption can be neglected. We also study the role of the defects in the metallic structures

  5. Bandgap calculations and trends of organometal halide perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    of Cs, CH3NH3, and HC(NH2)2 as A-cation, Sn and Pb as B-ion, and a combination of Cl, Br, and I as anions. The calculated gaps span over a region from 0.5 to 5.0 eV. In addition, the trends over bandgaps have been investigated: the bandgap increases with an increase of the electronegativities...

  6. Etching of wide-bandgap chemically resistant semiconductors : An electrochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    van Dorp, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    The wide-bandgap semiconductors, SiC and GaN, are important for a whole range of (opto)electronic and other applications. Etching of these chemically very resistant materials poses problems in device technology. This thesis describes an electrochemical approach to etching. In addition, the use of p-type SiC as a photocathode for water splitting is described. For the (photo)electrochemical dissolution of SiC two etching systems are considered: acidic fluoride and alkaline solutions. The anodic...

  7. Medium Bandgap Conjugated Polymer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells Exceeding 9% Power Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Woong; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Jo, Won Ho

    2015-12-02

    Two medium-bandgap polymers composed of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiohpene and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole with 6-octyl-thieno[3,2-b]thiophene as a π-bridge unit are synthesized and their photovoltaic properties are analyzed. The two polymers have deep highest occupied molecular orbital energy levels, high crystallinity, optimal bulk-heterojunction morphology, and efficient charge transport, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of as high as 9.44% for a single-junction polymer solar-cell device. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. SU-F-T-515: Increased Skin Dose in Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Due to Carbon Fiber Couch and Vacuum Bag Immobilization Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, D; Zhao, Z; Wang, X; Yang, J [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the surface dose for supine craniospinal irradiation employing posterior beams, treating through an imaging couch and BlueBag immobilization device. Methods: The percentage depth dose (PDD) in the buildup region of a clinical 6 MV photon beam was measured using an Advanced Markus parallel plate ionization chamber in a solid water phantom. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} anterior beam was measured at 100 cm SSD, simulating a traditional prone craniospinal technique. The measurements were compared to commissioning and treatment planning system data. The PDD was also measured in a posterior setup with the phantom surface laying directly on the Brainlab carbon fiber imaging couch, with the phantom surface 100 cm from the source, simulating a supine craniospinal setup. The posterior measurements were repeated with a BlueBag vacuum immobilization device between the couch and phantom, with thicknesses of 1.7 cm and 5 cm. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field and a typical 6×30 cm{sup 2} craniospinal field were also compared. The PDDs were normalized at 5 cm to reflect typical craniospinal prescription dose normalization. Results: The measured PDD curve from the anterior setup agreed well with commissioning and treatment planning data, with surface doses of 19.9%, 28.8% and 27.7%, respectively. The surface doses of the 10×10 cm{sup 2} and 6×30 cm{sup 2} fields delivered through the imaging couch were both 122.4%. The supine setup yielded surface doses of 122.4%, 121.6%, and 119.6% for the couch only, 1.7 cm bag, and 5 cm bag setups, respectively. Conclusion: Delivering craniospinal irradiation through a carbon fiber couch removes the majority of skin sparing. The addition of a vacuum bag immobilization device restores some skin sparing, but the magnitude of this effect is negligible.

  9. Local resonance bandgaps in periodic media: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, L; Phani, A Srikantha

    2013-09-01

    Periodic composites such as acoustic metamaterials use local resonance phenomenon in designing low frequency sub-Bragg bandgaps. These bandgaps emerge from a resonant scattering interaction between a propagating wave and periodically arranged resonators. This paper develops a receptance coupling technique to combine the dynamics of the resonator with the unit cell dynamics of the background medium to analyze flexural wave transmission in a periodic structure, involving a single degree of freedom coupling between the medium and the resonator. Receptance techniques allow for a straightforward extension to higher dimensional systems with multiple degrees of freedom coupling and for easier experimental measurements. Closed-form expressions for the location and width of sub-Bragg bandgaps are obtained. Rigid body modes of the unit cell of the background medium are shown to set the bounding frequencies for local resonance bandgaps. Results from the receptance analysis compare well with Bloch wave analysis and experiments performed on a finite structural beam with periodic masses and resonators. Stronger coupling and inertia of the resonator increase the local resonance bandgap width. Two-fold periodicity widens the Bragg bandgap, narrowed by local resonators, thus expanding the design space and highlighting the advantages of hierarchical periodicity.

  10. Highly Efficient Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Employing a Host Material with Small Bandgap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ye-Xin; Hu, Yun; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Zuo-Quan; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-06-29

    Blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PhOLED) with a high maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 26.6% was achieved using a new material, 2,8-bis(9,9-dimethylacridin-10(9H)-yl)dibenzo[b,d]furan (DBF-DMS) with a small bandgap, as the host. The device with DBF-DMS showed improved performance compared with that with 1,3-di-9-carbazolylbenzene, which is ascribed to the enhancement in carrier injection and transporting abilities and material stability of DBF-DMS. A lifetime of more than 100 h (time to 50% of the initial luminance, 1000 cd/m(2) with an EQE of 19.6%) in the other DBF-DMS-based device is obtained by further utilizing better device structure. This is a report indicating that host material with a small bandgap like DBF-DMS can be successfully utilized toward blue PhOLEDs with high performance.

  11. Birefringent all-solid hybrid microstructured fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Ryuichiro; Jackson, Stuart D; Fleming, Simon; Kuhlmey, Boris T; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Himeno, Kuniharu

    2008-11-10

    We report the characterization of a birefringent all-solid hybrid microstructured fiber, in which the core-modes are guided by both the photonic bandgap (PBG) effect and total internal reflection (TIR). Due to the twofold symmetry, modal birefringence of 1.5 x 10(-4) and group birefringence of 2.1 x 10(-4) were measured at 1.31 microm, which is in the middle of the second bandgap. The band structure was calculated to be different from conventional 2-D PBG fibers due to the 1-D arrangement of high-index regions. The bend loss has a strong directional dependence due to the coexistence of the two guiding mechanisms. The fiber has two important properties pertinent to PBG fibers; spectral filtering, and chromatic dispersion specific to PBG fibers. The number of high-index regions, which trap pump power (by index guiding) when the fiber is used in cladding-pumped fiber lasers, is greatly reduced so that this fiber should enable efficient cladding pumping. This structure is suitable for linearly-polarized, cladding-pumped fiber lasers utilizing the properties of PBG fibers.

  12. Ab initio study of the bandgap engineering of Al1−xGaxN for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, B.

    2011-01-19

    A theoretical study of Al1−xGaxN, based on the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method, is used to investigate the variations in the bandgap,optical properties, and nonlinear behavior of the compound with the change in the Ga concentration. It is found that the bandgap decreases with the increase in Ga. A maximum value of 5.50 eV is determined for the bandgap of pure AlN, which reaches a minimum value of 3.0 eV when Al is completely replaced by Ga. The static index of refraction and dielectric constant decreases with the increase in the bandgap of the material, assigning a high index of refraction to pure GaN when compared to pure AlN. The refractive index drops below 1 for higher energy photons, larger than 14 eV. The group velocity of these photons is larger than the vacuum velocity of light. This astonishing result shows that at higher energies the optical properties of the material shifts from linear to nonlinear. Furthermore, frequency dependent reflectivity and absorption coefficients show that peak values of the absorption coefficient and reflectivity shift toward lower energy in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum with the increase in Ga concentration. This comprehensive theoretical study of the optoelectronic properties predicts that the material can be effectively used in the optical devices working in the visible and UV spectrum.

  13. Ab initio study of the bandgap engineering of Al1-xGaxN for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, B.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Maqbool, M.; Goumri-Said, S.; Ahmad, R.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of Al1-xGaxN, based on the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method, is used to investigate the variations in the bandgap, optical properties, and nonlinear behavior of the compound with the change in the Ga concentration. It is found that the bandgap decreases with the increase in Ga. A maximum value of 5.50 eV is determined for the bandgap of pure AlN, which reaches a minimum value of 3.0 eV when Al is completely replaced by Ga. The static index of refraction and dielectric constant decreases with the increase in the bandgap of the material, assigning a high index of refraction to pure GaN when compared to pure AlN. The refractive index drops below 1 for higher energy photons, larger than 14 eV. The group velocity of these photons is larger than the vacuum velocity of light. This astonishing result shows that at higher energies the optical properties of the material shifts from linear to nonlinear. Furthermore, frequency dependent reflectivity and absorption coefficients show that peak values of the absorption coefficient and reflectivity shift toward lower energy in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum with the increase in Ga concentration. This comprehensive theoretical study of the optoelectronic properties predicts that the material can be effectively used in the optical devices working in the visible and UV spectrum.

  14. Optical spectroscopy and imaging of the higher energy excitons and bandgap of monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borys, Nicholas; Bao, Wei; Barnard, Edward; Ko, Changhyun; Tongay, Sefaatin; Wu, Junqiao; Yang, Li; Schuck, P. James

    Monolayer MoS2 (ML-MoS2) exhibits a rich manifold of excitons that dictate optoelectronic performance and functionality. Disentangling these states, which include the quasi-particle bandgap, is critical for developing 2D optoelectronic devices that operate beyond the optical bandgap. Whereas photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy only probes the lowest-energy radiative state and absorption spectroscopy fails to discriminate energetically degenerate states, photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy selectively probes only the excited states that thermalize to the emissive ground state exciton. Using PLE spectroscopy of ML-MoS2, we identify the Rydberg series of the exciton A and exciton B states as well as signatures of the quasi-particle bandgap and coupling between the indirect C exciton and the lowest-energy A exciton, which have eluded previous PLE studies. The assignment of these states is confirmed with density functional theory. Mapping the PLE spectrum reveals spatial variations of the higher-energy exciton manifold and quasi-particle bandgap which mirror the heterogeneity in the PL but also indicate variations in local exciton thermalization processes and chemical potentials.

  15. Defects induced luminescence and tuning of bandgap energy narrowing in ZnO nanoparticles doped with Li ions

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Saif Ullah

    2014-08-28

    Microstructural and optical properties of Zn1-yLiyO (0.00 ≤y ≤0.10) nanoparticles are investigated. Li incorporation leads to substantial changes in the structural characterization. From micro-structural analysis, no secondary phases or clustering of Li was detected. Elemental maps confirmed homogeneous distribution of Li in ZnO. Sharp UV peak due to the recombination of free exciton and defects based luminescence broad visible band was observed. The transition from the conduction band to Zinc vacancy defect level in photoluminescence spectra is found at 518±2.5nm. The yellow luminescence was observed and attributed to Li related defects in doped samples. With increasing Li doping, a decrease in energy bandgap was observed in the range 3.26±0.014 to 3.17±0.018eV. The bandgap narrowing behavior is explained in terms of the band tailing effect due to structural disorder, carrier-impurities, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interactions. Tuning of the bandgap energy in this class of wide bandgap semiconductor is very important for room temperature spintronics applications and optical devices. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  16. Growth of Bulk Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Crystals and Their Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Tong; Shi, Detang; Morgan, S. H.; Collins, W. Eugene; Burger, Arnold

    1997-01-01

    Developments in bulk crystal growth research for electro-optical devices in the Center for Photonic Materials and Devices since its establishment have been reviewed. Purification processes and single crystal growth systems employing physical vapor transport and Bridgman methods were assembled and used to produce high purity and superior quality wide bandgap materials such as heavy metal halides and II-VI compound semiconductors. Comprehensive material characterization techniques have been employed to reveal the optical, electrical and thermodynamic properties of crystals, and the results were used to establish improved material processing procedures. Postgrowth treatments such as passivation, oxidation, chemical etching and metal contacting during the X-ray and gamma-ray device fabrication process have also been investigated and low noise threshold with improved energy resolution has been achieved.

  17. On the Suppression Band and Bandgap of Planar Electromagnetic Bandgap Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharak Mohajer-Iravani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic bandgap structures are considered a viable solution for the problem of switching noise in printed circuit boards and packages. Less attention, however, has been given to whether or not the introduction of EBGs affects the EMI potential of the circuit to couple unwanted energy to neighboring layers or interconnects. In this paper, we show that the bandgap of EBG structures, as generated using the Brillouin diagram, does not necessarily correspond to the suppression bandwidth typically generated using S-parameters. We show that the reactive near fields radiating from openings within the EBG layers can be substantial and are present in the entire frequency band including propagating and nonpropagating mode regions. These fields decay fast with distance; however, they can couple significant energy to adjacent layers and to signal lines. The findings are validated using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation. Based on this work, design guidelines for EBG structures can be drawn to insure not only suppression of switching noise but also minimization of EMI and insuring signal integrity.

  18. Bandgap opening in graphene templates on Ru(0001) from subsurface hydrogen effects studied by STM, LEED, and DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Maxwell; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Valovcin, Darren; Hagelberg, Frank; Pohl, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has aroused tremendous interest due to its remarkable electronic and mechanical properties. Graphene's optical properties, conductance, and the fact that it can be transferred to many substrates make it an ideal candidate for use in nanoelectronic devices and organic photoelectric devices. The lack of a bandgap, however, causes a serious challenge for implementing graphene as a material for electrical switches and therefore creative ways of inducing this bandgap are needed. We will present a STM/LEED/DFT study of the single layer graphene on Ru(0001) system in the presence of hydrogen. Structural studies show arrays of moiré superlattices with sizes ranging from 0.9 to 3.0 nm in the presence of hydrogen on the compact surface of ruthenium. First principle calculations help explain the appearance of these arrays of graphene reconstructions driven by the H presence at the Ru(0001) interface, and furthermore, predict the appearance of a bandgap with values correlated with the moiré superstructure sizes in the presence of hydrogen. Control over moiré superstructure size can aid in future work using graphene as a nanotemplate for self assembled growth of nanoelectronic devices an organic photovoltaics. This work was supported by the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (NSF NSEC-425826) and NSF DMR-1006863

  19. Optically-powered Voltage-supply-device for Effective Utilization of Optical Energy in the Fiber-To-The-Home Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, Hideki; Shinagawa, Takeshi; Tsuruta, Kenji

    An optically powered device with using InGaAs-Photodiode has been developed. This study aims to harvest light energy (2.8∼500μW) from the FTTH (Fiber To The Home) network and to utilize it for operating remote sensors without external energy sources. First, we designed and evaluated the characteristics of the booster circuit and confirmed that it could boost an input voltage of 0.3 V to 3.0 V. Next, we also evaluated the characteristics of InGaAs photodiode and confirmed that it can output a voltage over 0.3 V at 10-μW input light. We demonstrate that a ready-made sensor can be operated with an input optical power as low as 10 μW.

  20. Advances in Fiber Optic Sensors Technology Development for temperature and strain measurements in Superconducting magnets and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Bajko, M.; Bottura, L.; Consales, M.; Cusano, A.; Giordano, M.; Perez, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) requires the development of a new generation of superconducting magnets based on Nb3Sn technology. In order to monitor the magnet thermo-mechanical behaviour during its service life, from the coil fabrication to the magnet operation, reliable sensing systems need to be implemented. In the framework of the FP7 European project EUCARD, Nb3Sn racetrack coils are developed as test beds for the fabrication validation, the cable characterization and the instrumentation development. Fiber optic sensors (FOS) based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) technology have been embedded in the coils of the Short Model Coil (SMC) magnet. The FBG sensitivity to both temperature and strain required the development of a solution able to separate the mechanical and temperature effects. This work presents the feasibility study of the implementation of embedded FBG sensors for the temperature and strain monitoring of the 11 T type conductor. We aim to monitor and register these...

  1. Bandgap engineering of coal-derived graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ruquan; Peng, Zhiwei; Metzger, Andrew; Lin, Jian; Mann, Jason A; Huang, Kewei; Xiang, Changsheng; Fan, Xiujun; Samuel, Errol L G; Alemany, Lawrence B; Martí, Angel A; Tour, James M

    2015-04-01

    Bandgaps of photoluminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs) synthesized from anthracite have been engineered by controlling the size of GQDs in two ways: either chemical oxidative treatment and separation by cross-flow ultrafiltration, or by a facile one-step chemical synthesis using successively higher temperatures to render smaller GQDs. Using these methods, GQDs were synthesized with tailored sizes and bandgaps. The GQDs emit light from blue-green (2.9 eV) to orange-red (2.05 eV), depending on size, functionalities and defects. These findings provide a deeper insight into the nature of coal-derived GQDs and demonstrate a scalable method for production of GQDs with the desired bandgaps.

  2. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    in the present paper that such an a priori assumption is not necessary since, in general, just the maximization of the gap between two consecutive natural frequencies leads to significant design periodicity. The aim of this paper is to maximize frequency gaps by shape optimization of transversely vibrating......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...

  3. Sustained hole inversion layer in a wide-bandgap metal-oxide semiconductor with enhanced tunnel current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoute, Gem; Afshar, Amir; Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Kenneth; Barlage, Douglas

    2016-02-04

    Wide-bandgap, metal-oxide thin-film transistors have been limited to low-power, n-type electronic applications because of the unipolar nature of these devices. Variations from the n-type field-effect transistor architecture have not been widely investigated as a result of the lack of available p-type wide-bandgap inorganic semiconductors. Here, we present a wide-bandgap metal-oxide n-type semiconductor that is able to sustain a strong p-type inversion layer using a high-dielectric-constant barrier dielectric when sourced with a heterogeneous p-type material. A demonstration of the utility of the inversion layer was also investigated and utilized as the controlling element in a unique tunnelling junction transistor. The resulting electrical performance of this prototype device exhibited among the highest reported current, power and transconductance densities. Further utilization of the p-type inversion layer is critical to unlocking the previously unexplored capability of metal-oxide thin-film transistors, such applications with next-generation display switches, sensors, radio frequency circuits and power converters.

  4. Frequency selective bistable switching in metamaterial based photonic bandgap medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jolly

    2014-10-01

    We present frequency selective bistable response at the defect mode of the zero-nbar bandgap of a photonic bandgap (PBG) material made of negative and positive index media. The nonlinear (Kerr) layer acts as the defect layer in the periodic PBG material. Incorporating metamaterial based electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) like resonance in the positive layer leads to unprecedented line narrowing of the defect mode which in turn facilitates narrow frequency selective bistable operation, wherein all the bistable characteristics can be effectively engineered. Thresholding the output intensity selects the narrow band of frequencies that exhibit bistability.

  5. Photonic Bandgaps in Mie Scattering by Concentrically Stratified Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands are present for periodic concentric spheres, though not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, whereas modification of the interference structure is evident in extinction spectra in accordance with the optical theorem

  6. In-line Fiber Polarizer

    OpenAIRE

    Perumalsamy, Priya

    1998-01-01

    Polarizers and polarization devices are important components in fiber optic communication and sensor systems. There is a growing need for efficient low loss components that are compatible with optical fibers. An all fiber in-line polarizer is a more desirable alternative that could be placed at appropriate intervals along communication links. An in-line fiber polarizer was fabricated and tested. The in-line fiber polarizer operates by coupling optical energy propagatin...

  7. Sub-bandgap response of graphene/SiC Schottky emitter bipolar phototransistor examined by scanning photocurrent microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Bobby G., Jr.; Chava, Venkata Surya N.; Daniels, Kevin M.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.; Greytak, Andrew B.

    2018-01-01

    Graphene layers grown epitaxially on SiC substrates are attractive for a variety of sensing and optoelectronic applications because the graphene acts as a transparent, conductive, and chemically responsive layer that is mated to a wide-bandgap semiconductor with large breakdown voltage. Recent advances in control of epitaxial growth and doping of SiC epilayers have increased the range of electronic device architectures that are accessible with this system. In particular, a recently-introduced Schottky-emitter bipolar phototransistor (SEPT) based on an epitaxial graphene (EG) emitter grown on a p-SiC base epilayer has been found to exhibit a maximum common emitter current gain of 113 and a UV responsivity of 7.1 A W‑1. The behavior of this device, formed on an n +-SiC substrate that serves as the collector, was attributed to a very large minority carrier injection efficiency at the EG/p-SiC Schottky contact. This large minority carrier injection efficiency is in turn related to the large built-in potential found at a EG/p-SiC Schottky junction. The high performance of this device makes it critically important to analyze the sub bandgap visible response of the device, which provides information on impurity states and polytype inclusions in the crystal. Here, we employ scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) with sub-bandgap light as well as a variety of other techniques to clearly demonstrate a localized response based on the graphene transparent electrode and an approximately 1000-fold difference in responsivity between 365 nm and 444 nm excitation. A stacking fault propagating from the substrate/epilayer interface, assigned as a single layer of the 8H-SiC polytype within the 4H-SiC matrix, is found to locally increase the photocurrent substantially. The discovery of this polytype heterojunction opens the potential for further development of heteropolytype devices based on the SEPT architecture.

  8. Processing of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for thermal management of wide-bandgap semiconductor power electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindaraju, N.; Singh, R.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Studied effect of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) deposition on device metallization. → Deposited NCD on to top of High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) and Si devices. → Temperatures below 290 deg. C for Si devices and 320 deg. C for HEMTs prevent metal damage. → Development of novel NCD-based thermal management for power electronics feasible. - Abstract: High current densities in wide-bandgap semiconductor electronics operating at high power levels results in significant self-heating of devices, which necessitates the development thermal management technologies to effectively dissipate the generated heat. This paper lays the foundation for the development of such technology by ascertaining process conditions for depositing nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) on AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) with no visible damage to device metallization. NCD deposition is carried out on Si and GaN HEMTs with Au/Ni metallization. Raman spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy are used to evaluate the quality of the deposited NCD films. Si device metallization is used as a test bed for developing process conditions for NCD deposition on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Results indicate that no visible damage occurs to the device metallization for deposition conditions below 290 deg. C for Si devices and below 320 deg. C for the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Possible mechanisms for metallization damage above the deposition temperature are enumerated. Electrical testing of the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs indicates that it is indeed possible to deposit NCD on GaN-based devices with no significant degradation in device performance.

  9. Paper-based energy-storage devices comprising carbon fiber-reinforced polypyrrole-cladophora nanocellulose composite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razaq, Aamir; Sjoedin, Martin; Stroemme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert [Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Nyholm, Leif [Department of Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    Composites of polypyrrole (PPy) and Cladophora nanocellulose, reinforced with 8 {mu}m-thick chopped carbon filaments, can be used as electrode materials to obtain paper-based energy-storage devices with unprecedented performance at high charge and discharge rates. Charge capacities of more than 200 C g{sup -1} (PPy) are obtained for paper-based electrodes at potential scan rates as high as 500 mV s{sup -1}, whereas cell capacitances of {proportional_to}60-70 F g{sup -1} (PPy) are reached for symmetric supercapacitor cells with capacitances up to 3.0 F (i.e.,0.48 F cm{sup -2}) when charged to 0.6 V using current densities as high as 31 A g{sup -1} based on the PPy weight (i.e., 99 mA cm{sup -2}). Energy and power densities of 1.75 Wh kg{sup -1} and 2.7 kW kg{sup -1}, respectively, are obtained when normalized with respect to twice the PPy weight of the smaller electrode. No loss in cell capacitance is seen during charging/discharging at 7.7 A g{sup -1} (PPy) over 1500 cycles. It is proposed that the nonelectroactive carbon filaments decrease the contact resistances and the resistance of the reduced PPy composite. The present straightforward approach represents significant progress in the development of low-cost and environmentally friendly paper-based energy-storage devices for high-power applications. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. The Wide Band-Gap Semiconductors: A Brief Survey | Ottaviani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wide band-gap semiconductors are promising materials in the fields of power electronics, high-energy radiation detection and optoelectronics. They have attracted much attention thanks to their physical properties, allowing them to get better performances than silicon for some specific uses (high temperature, high ...

  11. Advances in wide bandgap SiC for optoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has played a key role in power electronics thanks to its unique physical properties like wide bandgap, high breakdown field, etc. During the past decade, SiC is also becoming more and more active in optoelectronics thanks to the progress in materials growth and nanofabrication...

  12. Tailoring the bandgap and magnetic properties by bismuth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-11-30

    Nov 30, 2017 ... the structural distortions through Cr–O polyhedral, which are evident from Raman scattering studies. The observed structural and magnetic ... Raman spectroscopy; magnetic properties; optical bandgap. 1. Introduction. Orthochromites, RCrO3 ... and their complex magnetic interactions. These compounds.

  13. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report the use of low dielectric constant materials to form two- dimensional microwave band-gap structures for achieving high gap-to-midgap ratio. The variable parameters chosen are the lattice spacing and the geometric structure. The se- lected geometries are square and triangular and the materials chosen ...

  14. Automating Energy Bandgap Measurements in Semiconductors Using LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Sharma, Reena; Dhingra, Vishal

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report the development of an automated system for energy bandgap and resistivity measurement of a semiconductor sample using Four-Probe method for use in the undergraduate laboratory of Physics and Electronics students. The automated data acquisition and analysis system has been developed using National Instruments USB-6008 DAQ…

  15. Design for maximum band-gaps in beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to extend earlier optimum design results for transversely vibrating Bernoulli-Euler beams by determining new optimum band-gap beam structures for (i) different combinations of classical boundary conditions, (ii) much larger values of the orders n and n-1 of adjacent upper and lowe...

  16. Photon recycling in the graded bandgap solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafat, N.H. [Cairo Univ., Dept. of Mathematics and Engineering Physics, Giza (Egypt); Haleem, A.M. Abdel [Cairo Univ., Dept. of Mathematics and Engineering Physics, EIFayoum (Egypt); Habib, S.E.D. [Cairo Univ., Electronics and Communication Dept., Giza (Egypt)

    2006-07-01

    We derived a general integral expression for the carrier radiative recombination rate in solar cells. The photon Boltzmann equation is solved taking into account the photon recycling effect inside the cell and assuming arbitrary spatial variation of the absorption coefficient. This expression can thus be used for graded bandgap solar cells. (Author)

  17. Medium-Bandgap Small-Molecule Donors Compatible with Both Fullerene and Nonfullerene Acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yong; Yan, Cenqi; Kan, Bin; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Li-Chuan; Hu, Chen-Xia; Lau, Tsz-Ki; Lu, Xinhui; Sun, Chun-Lin; Shao, Xiangfeng; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2018-03-21

    Much effort has been devoted to the development of new donor materials for small-molecule organic solar cells due to their inherent advantages of well-defined molecular weight, easy purification, and good reproducibility in photovoltaic performance. Herein, we report two small-molecule donors that are compatible with both fullerene and nonfullerene acceptors. Both molecules consist of an (E)-1,2-di(thiophen-2-yl)ethane-substituted (TVT-substituted) benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) as the central unit, and two rhodanine units as the terminal electron-withdrawing groups. The central units are modified with either alkyl side chains (DRBDT-TVT) or alkylthio side chains (DRBDT-STVT). Both molecules exhibit a medium bandgap with complementary absorption and proper energy level offset with typical acceptors like PC 71 BM and IDIC. The optimized devices show a decent power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.87% for small-molecule organic solar cells and 6.63% for nonfullerene all small-molecule organic solar cells. Our results reveal that rationally designed medium-bandgap small-molecule donors can be applied in high-performance small-molecule organic solar cells with different types of acceptors.

  18. Freedom from band-gap slavery: from diode lasers to quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Federico

    2010-02-01

    Semiconductor heterostructure lasers, for which Alferov and Kromer received part of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2000, are the workhorse of technologies such as optical communications, optical recording, supermarket scanners, laser printers and fax machines. They exhibit high performance in the visible and near infrared and rely for their operation on electrons and holes emitting photons across the semiconductor bandgap. This mechanism turns into a curse at longer wavelengths (mid-infrared) because as the bandgap, shrinks laser operation becomes much more sensitive to temperature, material defects and processing. Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL), invented in 1994, rely on a radically different process for light emission. QCLs are unipolar devices in which electrons undergo transitions between quantum well energy levels and are recycled through many stages emitting a cascade of photons. Thus by suitable tailoring of the layers' thickness, using the same heterostructure material, they can lase across the molecular fingerprint region from 3 to 25 microns and beyond into the far-infrared and submillimiter wave spectrum. High power cw room temperature QCLs and QCLs with large continuous single mode tuning range have found many applications (infrared countermeasures, spectroscopy, trace gas analysis and atmospheric chemistry) and are commercially available. )

  19. Optimization of Beam Properties with Respect to Maximum Band-Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole

    2004-01-01

    We study numerically the frequency band-gap phenomenon for bending waves in an infinite periodic beam. The outcome of the analysis is then subjected to an optimization problem in order to maximize these band-gaps. The band-gap maximization may be performed with respect to material parameters and ...

  20. Electromagnetic interference reduction using electromagnetic bandgap structures in packages, enclosures, cavities, and antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajer Iravani, Baharak

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is a source of noise problems in electronic devices. The EMI is attributed to coupling between sources of radiation and components placed in the same media such as package or chassis. This coupling can be either through conducting currents or through radiation. The radiation of electromagnetic (EM) fields is supported by surface currents. Thus, minimizing these surface currents is considered a major and critical step to suppress EMI. In this work, we present novel strategies to confine surface currents in different applications including packages, enclosures, cavities, and antennas. The efficiency of present methods of EM noise suppression is limited due to different drawbacks. For example, the traditional use of lossy materials and absorbers suffers from considerable disadvantages including mechanical and thermal reliability leading to limited life time, cost, volume, and weight. In this work, we consider the use of Electromagnetic Band Gap (EBG) structures. These structures are suitable for suppressing surface currents within a frequency band denoted as the bandgap. Their design is straight forward, they are inexpensive to implement, and they do not suffer from the limitations of the previous methods. A new method of EM noise suppression in enclosures and cavity-backed antennas using mushroom-type EBG structures is introduced. The effectiveness of the EBG as an EMI suppresser is demonstrated using numerical simulations and experimental measurements. To allow integration of EBGs in printed circuit boards and packages, novel miniaturized simple planar EBG structures based on use of high-k dielectric material (epsilonr > 100) are proposed. The design consists of meander lines and patches. The inductive meander lines serve to provide current continuity bridges between the capacitive patches. The high-k dielectric material increases the effective capacitive load substantially in comparison to commonly used material with much lower

  1. High energy nanosecond laser pulses delivered single-mode through hollow-core PBG fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Jonathan; Jones, J; Hand, D; Bouwmans, G; Knight, J; Russell, P; Mangan, B

    2004-02-23

    We report on the development of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers for the delivery of high energy pulses for precision micromachining applications. Short pulses of (65ns pulse width) and energies of the order of 0.37mJ have been delivered in a single spatial mode through hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers at 1064nm using a high repetition rate (15kHz) Nd:YAG laser. The ultimate laser-induced damage threshold and practical limitations of current hollow-core fibers for the delivery of short optical pulses are discussed.

  2. Graded-Bandgap Solar Cells Using All-Electrodeposited ZnS, CdS and CdTe Thin-Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obi K. Echendu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 3-layer graded-bandgap solar cell with glass/FTO/ZnS/CdS/CdTe/Au structure has been fabricated using all-electrodeposited ZnS, CdS and CdTe thin layers. The three semiconductor layers were electrodeposited using a two-electrode system for process simplification. The incorporation of a wide bandgap amorphous ZnS as a buffer/window layer to form glass/FTO/ZnS/CdS/CdTe/Au solar cell resulted in the formation of this 3-layer graded-bandgap device structure. This has yielded corresponding improvement in all the solar cell parameters resulting in a conversion efficiency >10% under AM1.5 illumination conditions at room temperature, compared to the 8.0% efficiency of a 2-layer glass/FTO/CdS/CdTe/Au reference solar cell structure. These results demonstrate the advantages of the multi-layer graded-bandgap device architecture over the conventional 2-layer structure. In addition, they demonstrate the effective application of the two-electrode system as a simplification to the conventional three-electrode system in the electrodeposition of semiconductors with the elimination of the reference electrode as a possible impurity source.

  3. Distributed mode filtering rod fiber amplifier delivering 292W with improved mode stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Jørgensen, Mette Marie; Hansen, Kristian Rymann

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a high power fiber (85μm core) amplifier delivering up to 292Watts of average output power using a mode-locked 30ps source at 1032nm. Utilizing a single mode distributed mode filter bandgap rod fiber, we demonstrate 44% power improvement before the threshold-like onset of mode inst...

  4. Spectrally-engineered solar thermal photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenert, Andrej; Bierman, David; Chan, Walker; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N.; Nam, Young Suk; McEnaney, Kenneth; Kraemer, Daniel; Chen, Gang

    2018-03-27

    A solar thermal photovoltaic device, and method of forming same, includes a solar absorber and a spectrally selective emitter formed on either side of a thermally conductive substrate. The solar absorber is configured to absorb incident solar radiation. The solar absorber and the spectrally selective emitter are configured with an optimized emitter-to-absorber area ratio. The solar thermal photovoltaic device also includes a photovoltaic cell in thermal communication with the spectrally selective emitter. The spectrally selective emitter is configured to permit high emittance for energies above a bandgap of the photovoltaic cell and configured to permit low emittance for energies below the bandgap.

  5. The bandgap controlling by geometrical symmetry design in hybrid phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Han, X. K.; Ji, G. M.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of symmetries on the bandgap in a newly designed hybrid phononic crystal plate composed of rubber slab and epoxy resin stub are studied for better controlling of bandgaps. The point group symmetry is changed by changing the orientation of the stub. The translation group symmetry is changed by changing the side length and the height of adjacent stubs. Results show that the point group symmetry and translation group symmetry can be important factors for controlling of the bandgaps of phononic crystal. Wider bandgap is obtained by suitable orientation of the stub. Lower bandgap appears when the differences between the adjacent stubs become bigger in supercell.

  6. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  7. Novel photonic bandgap based architectures for quantum computers and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Durdu

    All of the approaches for quantum information processing have their own advantages, but unfortunately also their own drawbacks. Ideally, one would merge the most attractive features of those different approaches in a single technology. We envision that large-scale photonic crystal (PC) integrated circuits and fibers could be the basis for robust and compact quantum circuits and processors of the next generation quantum computers and networking devices. Cavity QED, solid-state, and (non)linear optical models for computing, and optical fiber approach for communications are the most promising candidates to be improved through this novel technology. In our work, we consider both digital and analog quantum computing. In the digital domain, we first perform gate-level analysis. To achieve this task, we solve the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian with time-dependent coupling parameters under the dipole and rotating-wave approximations for a 3D PC single-mode cavity with a sufficiently high Q-factor. We then exploit the results to show how to create a maximally entangled state of two atoms and how to implement several quantum logic gates: a dual-rail Hadamard gate, a dual-rail NOT gate, and a SWAP gate. In all of these operations, we synchronize atoms, as opposed to previous studies with PCs. The method has the potential for extension to N-atom entanglement, universal quantum logic operations, and the implementation of other useful, cavity QED-based quantum information processing tasks. In the next part of the digital domain, we study circuit-level implementations. We design and simulate an integrated teleportation and readout circuit on a single PC chip. The readout part of our device can not only be used on its own but can also be integrated with other compatible optical circuits to achieve atomic state detection. Further improvement of the device in terms of compactness and robustness is possible by integrating with sources and detectors in the optical regime. In the analog

  8. Optimization of molecular organization and nanoscale morphology for high performance low bandgap polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Wang, Mengye; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-04-21

    Rational design and synthesis of low bandgap (LBG) polymers with judiciously tailored HOMO and LUMO levels have emerged as a viable route to high performance polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) exceeding 10%. In addition to engineering the energy-level of LBG polymers, the photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells also relies on the device architecture, in particular the fine morphology of the photoactive layer. The nanoscale interpenetrating networks composed of nanostructured donor and acceptor phases are the key to providing a large donor-acceptor interfacial area for maximizing the exciton dissociation and offering a continuous pathway for charge transport. In this Review Article, we summarize recent strategies for tuning the molecular organization and nanoscale morphology toward an enhanced photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells.

  9. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic band-gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts the localization of light around an atom in photonic band-gap (PBG) medium or photonic crystal. Here we report the first experimental realization of the strong coupling between a single artificial atom and an one dimensional PBG medium using superconducting circuits. In the photonic transport measurement, we observe an anomalous Lamb shift and a large band-edge avoided crossing when the artificial atom frequency is tuned across the band-edge. The persistent peak within the band-gap indicates the single photon bound state. Furthermore, we study the resonance fluorescence of this bound state, again demonstrating the breakdown of the Born-Markov approximation near the band-edge. This novel architecture can be directly generalized to study many-body quantum electrodynamics and to construct more complicated spin chain models.

  10. Waveguidance by the photonic bandgap effect in optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Søndergaard, Thomas; Barkou, Stig Eigil

    1999-01-01

    technology for such photonic bandgap (PBG) waveguides is in optical fibre configurations. These new fibres can be classified in a fundamentally different way to all optical waveguides and possess radically different guiding properties due to PBG guidance, as opposed to guidance by total internal refelction....... In this paper we summarize and review our theoretical work demonstrating the underlying physical principles of PBG guiding optical fibres and discuss some of their unique waveguiding properties....

  11. Ultrasonic bandgaps in 3D-printed periodic ceramic microlattices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruisová, Alena; Ševčík, Martin; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Román-Manso, B.; Miranzo, P.; Belmonte, M.; Landa, Michal

    January (2018), s. 91-100 ISSN 0041-624X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01618S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : phononic crystals * ceramics * additive manufacturing * bandgaps * wave propagation * finite elements method Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics OBOR OECD: Applied mechanics Impact factor: 2.327, year: 2016 http://dx. doi . org /10.1016/j.ultras.2017.07.017

  12. Direct bandgap silicon: tensile-strained silicon nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Hapala, Prokop; Valenta, J.; Jelínek, Pavel; Cibulka, Ondřej; Ondič, Lukáš; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2014), "1300042-1"-"1300042-9" ISSN 2196-7350 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235; GA ČR GAP204/10/0952 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * badstructure * light emission * direct bandgap * surface capping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  13. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass or...

  14. Bandgap control with local and interconnected LC piezoelectric shunts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Bergamini, Andrea; Lossouarn, Boris; Van Damme, Bart; Cenedese, Mattia; Ermanni, Paolo

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports on the control of longitudinal wave propagation, in the kHz frequency range, using local and interconnected LC (inductance-capacitance) shunts distributed periodically along a rod. The LC shunts are connected to piezoelectric inserts and tuned to engender narrow or broad-band pass-bands in the forbidden band frequency range. The Bragg-scattering bandgaps are the result of the periodic mechanical mismatch between PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate) of the rod and PZT (lead-zirconate-titanate). The narrow pass-bands correspond to the local configuration, where an equivalence between the mechanical impedance of the PMMA and PZT occurs around the shunt resonance frequency. Conversely, the interconnected shunts give a way to an electrical medium through which energy can propagate parallel to its mechanical counterpart, leading to broad pass-bands. This paper presents analytical models for calculating the dispersion and displacements of the 1D medium with interconnected LC shunts. An analytical formulation is also introduced to expediently identify the location of bandgaps and pass-bands in the medium comprised of local LC shunts. Moreover, analytical investigations are carried out to elucidate different physical phenomena giving rise to these pass-bands. The findings are experimentally validated using a finite periodic rod. The ability to tune the dispersion properties of the medium to control the width or depth of the bandgap, by utilizing local or interconnected shunts, offers a new and powerful application for piezoelectric shunts.

  15. Structure and optical bandgap relationship of π-conjugated systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leitão Botelho

    Full Text Available In bulk heterojunction photovoltaic systems both the open-circuit voltage as well as the short-circuit current, and hence the power conversion efficiency, are dependent on the optical bandgap of the electron-donor material. While first-principles methods are computationally intensive, simpler model Hamiltonian approaches typically suffer from one or more flaws: inability to optimize the geometries for their own input; absence of general, transferable parameters; and poor performance for non-planar systems. We introduce a set of new and revised parameters for the adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (aSSH Hamiltonian, which is capable of optimizing geometries, along with rules for applying them to any [Formula: see text]-conjugated system containing C, N, O, or S, including non-planar systems. The predicted optical bandgaps show excellent agreement to UV-vis spectroscopy data points from literature, with a coefficient of determination [Formula: see text], a mean error of -0.05 eV, and a mean absolute deviation of 0.16 eV. We use the model to gain insights from PEDOT, fused thiophene polymers, poly-isothianaphthene, copolymers, and pentacene as sources of design rules in the search for low bandgap materials. Using the model as an in-silico design tool, a copolymer of benzodithiophenes along with a small-molecule derivative of pentacene are proposed as optimal donor materials for organic photovoltaics.

  16. Effect of Non-Stoichiometric Solution Chemistry on Improving the Performance of Wide-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Kai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Mengjin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Donghoe [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Li, Zhen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Reid, Obadiah G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yue [University of Toledo; Song, Zhaoning [University of Toledo; Zhao, Dewei [University of Toledo; Wang, Changlei [University of Toledo; Li, Liwei [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Meng, Yuan [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Guo, Ted [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Yan, Yanfa [University of Toledo

    2017-10-18

    A high-efficiency wide-bandgap (WBG) perovskite solar cell is critical for developing perovskite-related (e.g., all-perovskite, perovskite/Si, or perovskite/Cu(In,Ga)Se2) tandem devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of non-stoichiometric precursor chemistry with excess methylammonium halides (MAX; X = I, Br, or Cl) for preparing high-quality ~1.75-eV FA0.83Cs0.17Pb(I0.6Br0.4)3 perovskite solar cells. Among various methylammonium halides, using excess MABr in the non-stoichiometric precursor exhibits the strongest effect on improving perovskite crystallographic properties and device characteristics without affecting the perovskite composition. In contrast, using excess MAI significantly reduces the bandgap of perovskite due to the replacement of Br with I. Using 40% excess MABr, we demonstrate a single-junction WBG perovskite solar cell with stabilized efficiency of 16.4%. We further demonstrate a 20.3%-efficient 4-terminal tandem device by using a 14.7%-efficient semi-transparent WBG perovskite top cell and an 18.6%-efficient unfiltered (5.6%-efficient filtered) Si bottom cell.

  17. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2016-01-01

    setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 cells hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and showed up to 59W average power output for a 5 meters fiber. The damage...... threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius...... spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract...

  18. Dietary Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label as soluble fiber or insoluble fiber. Both types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and vegetables Dietary fiber adds bulk to ...

  19. Large bandgap reduced graphene oxide (rGO) based n-p + heterojunction photodetector with improved NIR performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjri; Kumar, Gaurav; Prakash, Nisha; Khanna, Suraj P.; Pal, Prabir; Singh, Surinder P.

    2018-04-01

    Integration of two-dimensional reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with conventional Si semiconductor offers novel strategies for realizing broadband photodiode with enhanced device performance. In this quest, we have synthesized large bandgap rGO and fabricated metal-free broadband (300–1100 nm) back-to-back connected np-pn hybrid photodetector utilizing drop casted n-rGO/p +-Si heterojunctions with high performance in NIR region (830 nm). With controlled illumination, the device exhibited a peak responsivity of 16.7 A W‑1 and peak detectivity of 2.56 × 1012 Jones under 830 nm illumination (11 μW cm‑2) at 1 V applied bias with fast response (∼460 μs) and recovery time (∼446 μs). The fabricated device demonstrated excellent repeatability, durability and photoswitching behavior with high external quantum efficiency (∼2.5 × 103%), along with ultrasensitive behavior at low light conditions.

  20. Silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Kamchevska, Valerija; Dalgaard, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent work on silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication, including multicore fiber fan-in/fan-out, multicore fiber switches towards reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers. We also present multicore fiber based quantum communication using silicon devices....

  1. Robust Visible and Infrared Light Emitting Devices Using Rare-Earth-Doped GaN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steckl, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) dopants (such as Er, Eu, Tm) in the wide bandgap semiconductor (WBGS) GaN are investigated for the fabrication of robust visible and infrared light emitting devices at a variety of wavelengths...

  2. Fiber webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han; Von L. Byrd

    2005-01-01

    Wood fibers can be used to produce a wide variety of low-density three-dimensional webs, mats, and fiber-molded products. Short wood fibers blended with long fibers can be formed into flexible fiber mats, which can be made by physical entanglement, nonwoven needling, or thermoplastic fiber melt matrix technologies. The most common types of flexible mats are carded, air...

  3. Wide bandgap engineering of (AlGa)2O3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fabi; Saito, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Tooru; Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Guo, Qixin; Arita, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Bandgap tunable (AlGa) 2 O 3 films were deposited on sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The deposited films are of high transmittance as measured by spectrophotometer. The Al content in films is almost the same as that in targets. The measurement of bandgap energies by examining the onset of inelastic energy loss in core-level atomic spectra using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is proved to be valid for determining the bandgap of (AlGa) 2 O 3 films as it is in good agreement with the bandgap values from transmittance spectra. The measured bandgap of (AlGa) 2 O 3 films increases continuously with the Al content covering the whole Al content range from about 5 to 7 eV, indicating PLD is a promising growth technology for growing bandgap tunable (AlGa) 2 O 3 films.

  4. Repetitive Immunosensor with a Fiber-Optic Device and Antibody-Coated Magnetic Beads for Semi-Continuous Monitoring of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Midori; Saito, Hirokazu; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2017-09-19

    A rapid and reproducible fiber-optic immunosensor for Escherichia coli O157:H7 ( E. coli O157:H7) was described. The biosensor consisted of a flow cell, an optical fiber with a thin Ni layer, and a PC linked fluorometer. First, the samples with E. coli O157:H7 were incubated with magnetic beads coated with anti- E. coli O157:H7 antibodies and anti- E. coli O157:H7 antibodies labeled cyanine 5 (Cy5) to make sandwich complexes. Then the Cy5-( E. coli O157:H7)-beads were injected into a flow cell and pulled to the magnetized Ni layer on the optical fiber set in the flow cell. An excitation light (λ = 635 nm) was used to illuminate the optical fiber, and the Cy5 florescent molecules facing the optical fiber were exposed to an evanescent wave from the optical fiber. The 670 nm fluorescent light was measured using a photodiode. Finally, the magnetic intensity of the Ni layer was removed and the Cy5- E. coli O157:H7-beads were washed out for the next immunoassay. E. coli O157:H7, diluted with phosphate buffer (PB), was measured from 1 × 10⁵ to 1 × 10⁷ cells/mL. The total time required for an assay was less than 15 min (except for the pretreatment process) and repeating immunoassay on one optical fiber was made possible.

  5. High-efficiency, monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem photovoltaic energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanlass, Mark W [Golden, CO

    2011-11-29

    A monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem solar photovoltaic converter has at least one, and preferably at least two, subcells grown lattice-matched on a substrate with a bandgap in medium to high energy portions of the solar spectrum and at least one subcell grown lattice-mismatched to the substrate with a bandgap in the low energy portion of the solar spectrum, for example, about 1 eV.

  6. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  7. Urbach's rule derived from thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1978-01-01

    The exponential absorption edge (known as Urbach's rule) observed in most materials is interpreted in terms of thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy. The main contribution to the temperature shift of the band-gap energy is due to the temperature-dependent self-energies of the electrons...... and holes interacting with the phonons. Since the phonon number is fluctuating in thermal equilibrium, the band-gap energy is also fluctuating resulting in an exponential absorption tail below the average band-gap energy. These simple considerations are applied to derive Urbach's rule at high temperatures...

  8. True photonic band-gap mode-control in VCSEL structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, F.; Madsen, M.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect.......Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect....

  9. Tunable bandgap energy of fluorinated nanocrystals for flash memory applications produced by low-damage plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Hsien; Lin, Chih-Ting; Wang, Jer-Chyi; Chou, Chien; Ye, Yu-Ren; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2012-11-01

    A plasma system with a complementary filter to shield samples from damage during tetrafluoromethane (CF4) plasma treatment was proposed in order to incorporate fluorine atoms into gadolinium oxide nanocrystals (Gd2O3-NCs) for flash memory applications. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that fluorine atoms were successfully introduced into the Gd2O3-NCs despite the use of a filter in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition system to shield against several potentially damaging species. The number of incorporated fluorine atoms can be controlled by varying the treatment time. The optimized memory window of the resulting flash memory devices was twice that of devices treated by a filterless system because more fluorine atoms were incorporated into the Gd2O3-NCs film with very little damage. This enlarged the bandgap energy from 5.48 to 6.83 eV, as observed by ultraviolet absorption measurements. This bandgap expansion can provide a large built-in electric field that allows more charges to be stored in the Gd2O3-NCs. The maximum improvement in the retention characteristic was >60%. Because plasma damage during treatment is minimal, maximum fluorination can be achieved. The concept of simply adding a filter to a plasma system to prevent plasma damage exhibits great promise for functionalization or modification of nanomaterials for advanced nanoelectronics while introducing minimal defects.

  10. A superhard sp3 microporous carbon with direct bandgap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yilong; Xie, Chenlong; Xiong, Mei; Ma, Mengdong; Liu, Lingyu; Li, Zihe; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Gao, Guoying; Zhao, Zhisheng; Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; He, Julong

    2017-12-01

    Carbon allotropes with distinct sp, sp2, and sp3 hybridization possess various different properties. Here, a novel all-sp3 hybridized tetragonal carbon, namely the P carbon, was predicted by the evolutionary particle swarm structural search. It demonstrated a low density among all-sp3 carbons, due to the corresponding distinctive microporous structure. P carbon is thermodynamically stable than the known C60 and could be formed through the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) compression. P carbon is a direct bandgap semiconductor displaying a strong and superhard nature. The unique combination of electrical and mechanical properties constitutes P carbon a potential superhard material for semiconductor industrial fields.

  11. ZnO Piezoelectric Nanowires for Use in a Self-Powered Structural Health Monitoring Device for Fiber-Reinforced Composites Uploading Attachment Instructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new self-powered structural health monitoring (SHM) system for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites by using...

  12. Efficient Sub-Bandgap Light Absorption and Signal Amplification in Silicon Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Hsin

    This thesis focuses on two areas in silicon photodetectors, the first being enhancing the sub-bandgap light absorption of IR wavelenghts in silicon, and the second being intrinsic signal amplification in silicon photodetectors. Both of these are achieved using heavily doped p-n junction devices which create localized states that relax the k-selection rule of indirect bandgap material. The probability of transitions between impurity band and the conduction/valence band would be much more efficient than the one between band-to-band transition. The waveguide-coupled epitaxial p-n photodetector was demonstrated for 1310 nm wavelength detection. Incorporated with the Franz-Keldysh effect and the quasi-confined epitaxial layer design, an absorption coefficient around 10 cm-1 has been measured and internal quantum efficiency nearly 100% at -2.5V. The absorption coefficient is calculated from the wave function of the electron and hole in p-n diode. The heavily doped impurity wave function can be formulated as a delta function, and the quasi-confined conduction band energy states, and the wave function on each level can be obtained from the Silvaco software. The calculated theoretical absorption coefficient increases with the increasing applied bias and the doping concentration, which matches the experimental results. To solve the issues of large excess noise and high operation bias for avalanche photodiodes based on impact ionization, I presented a detector using the Cycling Excitation Process (CEP) for signal amplification. This can be realized in a heavily doped and highly compensated Si p-n junction, showing ultra high gain about 3000 at very low bias (<4 V), and possessing an intrinsic, phonon-mediated regulation process to keep the device stable without any quenching device required in today's Geiger-mode avalanche detectors. The CEP can be formulated with the rate equations in conduction bands and impurity states. The gain expression, which is a function of the

  13. Investigating the electronic properties of multi-junction ZnS/CdS/CdTe graded bandgap solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olusola, O.I., E-mail: olajideibk@yahoo.com [Electronic Materials and Sensors Group, Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, School of Science, The Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA), P.M.B. 704 (Nigeria); Madugu, M.L.; Dharmadasa, I.M. [Electronic Materials and Sensors Group, Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    The fabrication of multi-junction graded bandgap solar cells have been successfully implemented by electroplating three binary compound semiconductors from II-VI family. The three semiconductor materials grown by electroplating techniques are ZnS, CdS and CdTe thin films. The electrical conductivity type and energy bandgap of each of the three semiconductors were determined using photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell measurement and UV–Vis spectrophotometry techniques respectively. The PEC cell results show that all the three semiconductor materials have n-type electrical conductivity. These two material characterisation techniques were considered in this paper in order to establish the relevant energy band diagram for device results, analysis and interpretation. Solar cells with the device structure glass/FTO/n-ZnS/n-CdS/n-CdTe/Au were then fabricated and characterised using current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques. From the I-V characteristics measurement, the fabricated device structures yielded an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 670 mV, short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 41.5 mA cm{sup −2} and fill-factor (FF) of 0.46 resulting in ∼12.8% efficiency when measured at room temperature under AM1.5 illumination conditions. The device structure showed an excellent rectification factor (RF) of 10{sup 4.3} and ideality factor (n) of 1.88. The results obtained from the C-V measurement also showed that the device structures have a moderate doping level of 5.2 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3}. - Highlights: • Electroplating of n-ZnS, n-CdS and n-CdTe binary compound semiconductors. • Fabrication of Schottky barrier solar cells from glass/FTO/n-ZnS/n-CdS/n-CdTe/Au. • Development of multi-junction graded bandgap solar cells using n-n-n structures.

  14. The research on temperature sensing properties of photonic crystal fiber based on Liquid crystal filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zan Xiangzhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the photonic bandgap-photonic crystal fibers( PBG-PCF fiber core fills the namitic liquid crystal. By readjusting the temperature to change the refractive index, constitute new liquid fiber-optic temperature sensor. In this paper, we use finite element COMSOL software to simulate and analyze photonic crystal optical fiber sensitive properties. The research show that after the PBG – PCF filling the liquid crystal, its mode field distribution, effective refractive index, waveguide dispersion etc changing with temperature is so big. Therefore, the properties that the refractive index of PCF mode CF changing with temperature sensitive medium, provides the theoretical basis for designing optic fiber temperature sensors.

  15. Niphargus: a silicon band-gap sensor temperature logger for high-precision environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlet, Christian; Vanbrabant, Yves; Piessens, Kris; Welkenhuysen, Kris; Verheyden, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    A temperature logger, called 'Niphargus', was developed at the Geological Survey of Belgium to monitor temperature of local natural processes with sensitivity of the order of a few hundredths of degrees to monitor temperature variability in open air, caves, soils and rivers. The newly developed instrument uses a state-of-the-art band-gap silicon temperature sensor with digital output. This sensor reduces the risk of drift associated with thermistor-based sensing devices, especially in humid environments. The Niphargus is designed to be highly reliable, low-cost and powered by a single lithium cell with up to several years autonomy depending on the sampling rate and environmental conditions. The Niphargus was evaluated in an ice point bath experiment in terms of temperature accuracy and thermal inertia. The small size and low power consumption of the logger allow its use in difficult accessible environments, e.g. caves and space-constrained applications, inside a rock in a water stream. In both cases, the loggers have proven to be reliable and accurate devices. For example, spectral analysis of the temperature signal in the Han caves (Belgium) allowed detection and isolation of a 0.005° C amplitude day-night periodic signal in the temperature curve. PIC Figure 1: a Niphargus logger in its standard size. SMD components side. Photo credit: W. Miseur

  16. Narrow bandgap host material for high quantum efficiency yellow phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes doped with iridium(III) bis(4-phenylthieno[3,2-c]pyridine)acetylacetonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@skku.edu

    2015-05-15

    A narrow bandgap host material, 4,5-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phthalonitrile (2CzPN), was used as a bipolar host material to improve the device performances of yellow phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes(PHOLEDs). The device performances of the yellow PHOLEDs were optimized at a low doping concentration of 1%. A low turn-on voltage of 3.0 V and high quantum efficiency of 19.3% were achieved using the 2CzPN host material and no efficiency roll-off of the device was observed up to 1000 cd/m{sup 2} compared with 25% of reference device. - Highlights: • High quantum efficiency in yellow phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. • Narrow bandgap host material with donor–acceptor structure for low driving voltage. • Low optimum doping concentration of 1% for high quantum efficiency and power efficiency.

  17. Bandgap engineering in semiconductor alloy nanomaterials with widely tunable compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Dou, Letian; Yang, Peidong

    2017-12-01

    Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been achieved in the development of nanoscale semiconductor materials with a wide range of bandgaps by alloying different individual semiconductors. These materials include traditional II-VI and III-V semiconductors and their alloys, inorganic and hybrid perovskites, and the newly emerging 2D materials. One important common feature of these materials is that their nanoscale dimensions result in a large tolerance to lattice mismatches within a monolithic structure of varying composition or between the substrate and target material, which enables us to achieve almost arbitrary control of the variation of the alloy composition. As a result, the bandgaps of these alloys can be widely tuned without the detrimental defects that are often unavoidable in bulk materials, which have a much more limited tolerance to lattice mismatches. This class of nanomaterials could have a far-reaching impact on a wide range of photonic applications, including tunable lasers, solid-state lighting, artificial photosynthesis and new solar cells.

  18. Natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  19. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  20. Photorefractive Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuzyk, Mark G

    2003-01-01

    ... scope of the project. In addition to our work in optical limiting fibers, spillover results included making fiber-based light-sources, writing holograms in fibers, and developing the theory of the limits of the nonlinear...

  1. Non-leaky modes and bandgaps of surface acoustic waves in wrinkled stiff-film/compliant-substrate bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Yang; Xu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Yang; Cao, Yanping

    2018-03-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have found a wide variety of technical applications, including SAW filters, SAW resonators, microfluidic actuators, biosensors, flow measurement devices, and seismic wave shields. Stretchable/flexible electronic devices, such as sensory skins for robotics, structural health monitors, and wearable communication devices, have received considerable attention across different disciplines. Flexible SAW devices are essential building blocks for these applications, wherein piezoelectric films may need to be integrated with the compliant substrates. When piezoelectric films are much stiffer than soft substrates, SAWs are usually leaky and the devices incorporating them suffer from acoustic losses. In this study, the propagation of SAWs in a wrinkled bilayer system is investigated, and our analysis shows that non-leaky modes can be achieved by engineering stress patterns through surface wrinkles in the system. Our analysis also uncovers intriguing bandgaps (BGs) related to the SAWs in a wrinkled bilayer system; these are caused by periodic deformation patterns, which indicate that diverse wrinkling patterns could be used as metasurfaces for controlling the propagation of SAWs.

  2. Investigation of complete bandgaps in a piezoelectric slab covered with periodically structured coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Kui; Ma, Tian-Xue; Wang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The propagation of elastic waves in a piezoelectric slab covered with periodically structured coatings or the so-called stubbed phononic crystal slab is investigated. Four different models are selected and the effects of distribution forms and geometrical parameters of the structured coatings on complete bandgaps are discussed. The phononic crystal slab with symmetric coatings can generate wider complete bandgaps while that with asymmetric coatings is favorable for the generation of multi-bandgaps. The complete bandgaps, which are induced by locally resonant effects, change significantly as the geometry of the coatings changes. Moreover, the piezoelectric effects benefit the opening of the complete bandgaps. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical fiber rotation sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, William K; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Optical Fiber Rotation Sensing is the first book devoted to Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyros (IFOG). This book provides a complete overview of IFOGs, beginning with a historical review of IFOG development and including a fundamental exposition of basic principles, a discussion of devices and components, and concluding with industry reports on state-of-the-art activity. With several chapters contributed by principal developers of this solid-state device, the result is an authoritative work which will serve as the resource for researchers, students, and users of IFOGs.* * State-of-t

  4. Demonstration of orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes emission from a silicon photonic integrated device for 20 Gbit/s QPSK carrying data transmission in few-mode fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Shimao; Ding, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode emission from a high emission efficiency OAM emitter for 20 Gbit/s QPSK carrying data transmission in few-mode fiber (FMF). Two modes propagate through a 3.6km three-mode FMF with measured OSNR penalties less than 4 dB at a BER of ...

  5. MUTUAL COUPLING REDUCTION BETWEEN MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS USING ELECTROMAGNETIC BANDGAP STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.N. Gaikwad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available When the number of antenna elements is placed in forming the arrays, mutual coupling between the antenna elements is a critical issue. This is particularly concern in phase array antennas. Mutual coupling is a potential source of performance degradation in the form of deviation of the radiation pattern from the desired one, gain reduction due to excitation of surface wave, increased side lobe levels etc. EBG (Electromagnetic Band Gap structure (also called as Photonic Bandgap Structure PBG not only enhances the performance of the patch antennas but also provides greater amount of isolation when placed between the microstrip arrays. This greatly reduces the mutual coupling between the antenna elements. The radiation efficiency, gain, antenna efficiency, VSWR, frequency, directivity etc greatly improves over the conventional patch antennas using EBG. The EBG structure and normal patch antenna is simulated using IE3D antenna simulation software.

  6. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate the flexibility and advantages of a non-uniform pseudo-spectral time domain (nu-PSTD) method through studies of the wave propagation characteristics on photonic band-gap (PBG) structures in stratified medium Design/methodology/approach - A nu-PSTD method is proposed...... in solving the Maxwell's equations numerically. It expands the temporal derivatives using the finite differences, while it adopts the Fourier transform (FT) properties to expand the spatial derivatives in Maxwell's equations. In addition, the method makes use of the chain-rule property in calculus together...... with the transformed space technique in order to make the algorithm flexible in terms of non-uniform spatial sampling. Findings - Through the studies of the wave propagation characteristics on PBG structures in stratified medium, it has been found that the proposed method retains excellent accuracy in the occasions...

  7. Waveguidance by the photonic bandgap effect in optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Søndergaard, Thomas; Barkou, Stig Eigil

    1999-01-01

    technology for such photonic bandgap (PBG) waveguides is in optical fibre configurations. These new fibres can be classified in a fundamentally different way to all optical waveguides and possess radically different guiding properties due to PBG guidance, as opposed to guidance by total internal refelction....... In this paper we summarize and review our theoretical work demonstrating the underlying physical principles of PBG guiding optical fibres and discuss some of their unique waveguiding properties.......Photonic crystals form a new class of intriguing building blocks to be utilized in future optoelectronics and electromagnetics. One of the most exciting possiblilties offered by phtonic crystals is the realization of new types of electromagnetic waveguides. In the optical domain, the most mature...

  8. Copper-organic/octamolybdates: structures, bandgap sizes, and photocatalytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan; Lin, Haisheng; Li, Le; Smirnova, Tatyana I; Maggard, Paul A

    2014-04-07

    The structures, optical bandgap sizes, and photocatalytic activities are described for three copper-octamolybdate hybrid solids prepared using hydrothermal methods, [Cu(pda)]4[β-Mo8O26] (I; pda = pyridazine), [Cu(en)2]2[γ-Mo8O26] (II; en = ethylenediamine), and [Cu(o-phen)2]2[α-Mo8O26] (III; o-phen = o-phenanthroline). The structure of I consists of a [Cu(pda)]4(4+) tetramer that bridges to neighboring [β-Mo8O26](4-) octamolybdate clusters to form two-dimensional layers that stack along the a axis. The previously reported structures of II and III are constructed from [Cu2(en)4Mo8O26] and [Cu2(o-phen)4Mo8O26] clusters. The optical bandgap sizes were measured by UV-vis diffuse reflectance techniques to be ∼1.8 eV for I, ∼3.1 eV for II, and ∼3.0 eV for III. Electronic structure calculations show that the smaller bandgap size of I originates primarily from an electronic transition between the valence and conduction band edges comprised of filled 3d(10) orbitals on Cu(I) and empty 4d(0) orbitals on Mo(VI). Both II and III contain Cu(II) and exhibit larger bandgap sizes. Accordingly, aqueous suspensions of I exhibit visible-light photocatalytic activity for the production of oxygen at a rate of ∼90 μmol O2 g(-1) h(-1) (10 mg samples; radiant power density of ∼1 W/cm(2)) and a turnover frequency per calculated surface [Mo8O26](4-) cluster of ∼36 h(-1). Under combined ultraviolet and visible-light irradiation, I also exhibits photocatalytic activity for hydrogen production in 20% aqueous methanol of ∼316 μmol H2 g(-1) h(-1). By contrast, II decomposed during the photocatalysis measurements. The molecular [Cu2(o-phen)4(α-Mo8O26)] clusters of III dissolve into the aqueous methanol solution under ultraviolet irradiation and exhibit homogeneous photocatalytic rates for hydrogen production of up to ∼8670 μmol H2·g(-1) h(-1) and a turnover frequency of 17 h(-1). The clusters of III can be precipitated out by evaporation and redispersed into solution with

  9. Trifluoromethyl-Substituted Large Band-Gap Polytriphenylamines for Polymer Solar Cells with High Open-Circuit Voltages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuwang Yi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two large band-gap polymers (PTPACF and PTPA2CF based on polytriphenylamine derivatives with the introduction of electron-withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups were designed and prepared by Suzuki polycondensation reaction. The chemical structures, thermal, optical and electrochemical properties were characterized in detail. From the UV-visible absorption spectra, the PTPACF and PTPA2CF showed the optical band gaps of 2.01 and 2.07 eV, respectively. The cyclic voltammetry (CV measurement displayed the deep highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO energy levels of −5.33 and −5.38 eV for PTPACF and PTPA2CF, respectively. The hole mobilities, determined by field-effect transistor characterization, were 2.5 × 10−3 and 1.1 × 10−3 cm2 V−1 S−1 for PTPACF and PTPA2CF, respectively. The polymer solar cells (PSCs were tested under the conventional device structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer:PC71BM/PFN/Al. All of the PSCs showed the high open circuit voltages (Vocs with the values approaching 1 V. The PTPACF and PTPA2CF based PSCs gave the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs of 3.24% and 2.40%, respectively. Hence, it is a reliable methodology to develop high-performance large band-gap polymer donors with high Vocs through the feasible side-chain modification.

  10. Highly efficient exciton harvesting and charge transport in ternary blend solar cells based on wide- and low-bandgap polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbin; Ohkita, Hideo; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2015-10-28

    We have designed highly efficient ternary blend solar cells based on a wide-bandgap crystalline polymer, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), and a low-bandgap polymer, poly[(4,4'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)dithieno[3,2-b:2'3'-d]silole)-2,6-diyl-alt-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)-4,7-diyl] (PSBTBT), and a fullerene derivative (PCBM). By using highly crystalline P3HT, high fill factors were obtained even for ternary blend solar cells, suggesting efficient charge transport due to large P3HT crystalline domains. In such large crystalline domains, some P3HT excitons could not diffuse into the interface with PCBM but can be collected in PSBTBT domains by efficient energy transfer because of large spectral overlap between the P3HT fluorescence and the PSBTBT absorption. Consequently, all the P3HT excitons can contribute to the photocurrent generation at the P3HT/PCBM interface and/or PSBTBT domains mixed with PCBM in the ternary blends. As a result, P3HT/PSBTBT/PCBM ternary blend solar cells exhibit a power conversion efficiency of 5.6%, which is even higher than those of both individual binary devices of P3HT/PCBM and PSBTBT/PCBM.

  11. Alternative approaches of SiC & related wide bandgap materials in light emitting & solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmann, Peter; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-03-01

    silicon oxycarbide material can provide potential applications of the Eu luminescent materials to challenging conditions like high temperatures or aggressive environments where the silica has weaknesses. In some approaches, silicon rich silicon oxide that contain silicon nanoclusters emit red to near infrared luminescence due to quantum confinement effects while luminescence at shorter wavelength is difficult due to the interplay of defects and quantum confinement effects. In addition it is applicable as low-k dielectric, etch-stop and passivation layers. It also has an optical band-gap that is smaller than that of SiO2 which may facilitate carrier injection at lower voltages that is suitable for optoelectronics. From materials perspective of emerging materials, it seems distant to consider system related issues. The future demands on communication and lighting devices require higher information flows in modernized optical devices, for example by replacing electrical interconnects with their optical counterparts and tunable backgrounds filters for integrated optics or photonics applications. However, there are materials issues related to such device performance, for example by a non-linearity, that provide the possibility for selective removal or addition of wavelengths using hetero structures in which one side of the structure enhances the light-to-dark sensitivity of long and medium wavelength channels and diminish others, and an opposite behavior in other face of the structure. Certainly materials may be applied in various innovative ways to provide new performances in devices and systems. In any materials and device evaluation, reliability issues in passivation and packaging of semiconductor device structures provide a base knowledge that may be used to evaluate new concepts. Fundamental aspects of dielectric constant, bandgap and band offsets between the valence and conduction band edges between the passivation layer and the semiconductor create a foundation for

  12. Nonlinear Silicon Waveguides for Integrated Fiber Laser Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi Yan

    clocks for high speed applications and coherent optical comb source for high spectral efficiency modulation schemes such as orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). Besides the parametric processes, we study a graphene based saturable absorber which can be used to achieve ultrafast passive mode-locked laser for SOI sensing platform. Graphene based photonic devices have attracted considerable interest because of their unique zero bandgap and linear electronic dispersion. The graphene on silicon waveguide structure offers the advantage of greatly increasing the interaction length compared to the geometry with light incident normal to the graphene plane. We describe a mode-locked fiber laser using graphene on silicon saturable absorber. Finally, we study the possibility of expanding the working wavelengths to mid-infrared (mid-IR) for chemical sensing or free-space communications. MRRs were fabricated on silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) wafer and characterized at 2.75 microm. We developed a characterization technique to measure the Q of MRRs using a fixed wavelength source by only varying the temperature of the device. The proposed method provides an alternative method of Q measurement for MRRs in mid-IR where tunable lasers may not be easily available.

  13. 3D analysis of thermal and electrical performance of wide bandgap VDMOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Mahesh B.; Matin, Mohammad A.

    2017-08-01

    Power electronics is based on the conversion and conditioning of electric power in its different forms. The need for higher operating voltages, temperatures and switching speeds have necessitated for the use of semiconductor materials more superior to Silicon for power electronics purposes. Wide bandgap (WBG) materials like SiC, GaN and Diamond have been known to demonstrate better material properties as compared to Silicon, like higher operating temperatures, higher breakdown voltages and reduced thermal and electrical resistances which make them ideal for high power electronic devices. This paper analyzes the thermal and electrical performance of WBG power MOSFETs, in particular the Vertical Double-diffused MOSFET (VDMOSFET) structure, modeled in the commercial simulation software COMSOL Multiphysics. VDMOSFETs are ideal for high power electronic applications owing to their higher voltage blocking capabilities as compared to the conventional lateral MOSFET structure. COMSOL uses Finite Element/Volume Analysis methods to approximate solutions to differential equations involved with complex geometries and physics. The 3D model investigated in COMSOL for this paper solved for thermal and electrical variables for VDMOSFETs using SiC and GaN as their semiconductor material. Only a quarter of the 3D VDMOSFET structure was modeled for faster computational speed as the structure itself is symmetric about two vertical planes. The temperature profiles and current densities of each WBG material VDMOSFET were analyzed for different operating voltages. These profiles were compared with a Si VDMOSFET model to determine relative similarities and differences between each material.

  14. Highly efficient luminescent solar concentrators based on earth-abundant indirect-bandgap silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinardi, Francesco; Ehrenberg, Samantha; Dhamo, Lorena; Carulli, Francesco; Mauri, Michele; Bruni, Francesco; Simonutti, Roberto; Kortshagen, Uwe; Brovelli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Building-integrated photovoltaics is gaining consensus as a renewable energy technology for producing electricity at the point of use. Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) could extend architectural integration to the urban environment by realizing electrode-less photovoltaic windows. Crucial for large-area LSCs is the suppression of reabsorption losses, which requires emitters with negligible overlap between their absorption and emission spectra. Here, we demonstrate the use of indirect-bandgap semiconductor nanostructures such as highly emissive silicon quantum dots. Silicon is non-toxic, low-cost and ultra-earth-abundant, which avoids the limitations to the industrial scaling of quantum dots composed of low-abundance elements. Suppressed reabsorption and scattering losses lead to nearly ideal LSCs with an optical efficiency of η = 2.85%, matching state-of-the-art semi-transparent LSCs. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that optimized silicon quantum dot LSCs have a clear path to η > 5% for 1 m2 devices. We are finally able to realize flexible LSCs with performances comparable to those of flat concentrators, which opens the way to a new design freedom for building-integrated photovoltaics elements.

  15. Role of wide bandgap host in the degradation of blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R. Y.; Li, X. M.; Cao, X. A.

    2017-08-01

    Accelerated reliability tests of blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) comprising bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-N,C2](picolinato)-iridium(III) (FIrpic) doped in four different wide bandgap hosts were conducted. The half-life of the OLEDs stressed under a high current density of 100 mA/cm2 varied in a wide range, revealing an important role of the host. Pulsed current stressing with a 1% duty cycle was performed to suppress self-heating, but only extended the lifetime by 2-3.2×. For blue OLEDs with a host favoring hole transport, current stressing caused a shift of the recombination zone toward the anode, turning the emission color to greenish blue. These results suggest that device degradation was mainly caused by charge-trapping defects generated within a narrow zone close to the electron-transport layer. It is expected that the lifetime of blue phosphorescent OLEDs can be effectively extended by selecting an appropriate host which has good stability, enables efficient charge injection and balanced charge transport in the emissive layer.

  16. Heterovalent Dopant Incorporation for Bandgap and Type Engineering of Perovskite Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Ahmed L.

    2016-01-02

    Controllable doping of semiconductors is a fundamental technological requirement for electronic and optoelectronic devices. As intrinsic semiconductors, hybrid perovskites have so far been a phenomenal success in photovoltaics. The inability to dope these materials heterovalently (or aliovalently) has greatly limited their wider utilizations in electronics. Here we show an efficient in situ chemical route that achieves the controlled incorporation of trivalent cations (Bi3+, Au3+, or In3+) by exploiting the retrograde solubility behavior of perovskites. We term the new method dopant incorporation in the retrograde regime. We achieve Bi3+ incorporation that leads to bandgap tuning (∼300 meV), 104 fold enhancement in electrical conductivity, and a change in the sign of majority charge carriers from positive to negative. This work demonstrates the successful incorporation of dopants into perovskite crystals while preserving the host lattice structure, opening new avenues to tailor the electronic and optoelectronic properties of this rapidly emerging class of solution-processed semiconductors. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  17. Fiber Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The chapter provides a discussion of optical fiber amplifiers and through three sections provides a detailed treatment of three types of optical fiber amplifiers, erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), Raman amplifiers, and parametric amplifiers. Each section comprises the fundamentals including...... the basic physics and relevant in-depth theoretical modeling, amplifiers characteristics and performance data as a function of specific operation parameters. Typical applications in fiber optic communication systems and the improvement achievable through the use of fiber amplifiers are illustrated....

  18. Modal dynamics in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Amit; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2005-08-08

    Modal characteristics of hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins are studied by use of a recently proposed numerical method. The dynamic behavior of bandgap guided modes, as the wavelength and aspect ratio are varied, is shown to include zero-crossings of the birefringence, polarization dependent radiation losses, and deformation of the fundamental mode.

  19. Hybrid Fiber-Optic/CCD Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, W. C.; Janesick, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low noise and linearity of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) combined with optical waveguide components in hybrid, integrated chip package. Concept used to measure laser flux in fiber-gyro application using sensing fibers that range from several to several tens of kilometers in length. Potential applications include optical delay measurement and linear detector of light flux emanating from fiber-optic waveguides.

  20. Single-Crystal Germanium Core Optoelectronic Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Xiaoyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Page, Ryan L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Chaudhuri, Subhasis [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Liu, Wenjun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Mohney, Suzanne E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Badding, John V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Gopalan, Venkatraman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA

    2016-09-19

    Synthesis and fabrication of high-quality, small-core single-crystal germanium fibers that are photosensitive at the near-infrared and have low optical losses ≈1 dB cm-1 at 2 μm are reported. These fibers have potential applications in fiber-based spectroscopic imaging, nonlinear optical devices, and photodetection at the telecommunication wavelengths.

  1. Infiltration liquid crystal in microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Wei, Lei; Bang, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Here, we firstly demonstrate the photonic bandgap effect with PMMA mPOF by filling the air holes with liquid crystal, and subsequently change the light guidance mechanism from index guiding to bandgap guiding. The triangular structure PMMA mPOF used in the experiment is fabricated. A 60 cm length m......POF is butt-coupled to a conventional single mode fiber (SMF) with the broadband light from a supercontinuum source. It is clear to see the colour of the guided modes is red, since some wavelengths are attenuated by the material loss of PMMA in visible region. A positive dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal E......7 is then infiltrated into about 6 cm of the length of mPOF by using capillary forces with the duration of 45 minutes. The transmission spectrum is measured by an optical spectrum analyzer with 1 nm resolution, and normalized to that of the unfilled fiber as shown by the solid line. The difference...

  2. Bandgap Engineering of Double Perovskites for One- and Two-photon Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2013-01-01

    Computational screening is becoming increasingly useful in the search for new materials. We are interested in the design of new semiconductors to be used for light harvesting in a photoelectrochemical cell. In the present paper, we study the double perovskite structures obtained by combining 46...... stable cubic perovskites which was found to have a finite bandgap in a previous screening-study. The four-metal double perovskite space is too large to be investigated completely. For this reason we propose a method for combining different metals to obtain a desired bandgap. We derive some bandgap design...

  3. Complete photonic bandgaps in the visible range from spherical layer structures in dichromate gelatin emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jenny; Kok, Mang Hin; Tam, Wing Yim

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated spherical layer structures that exhibit complete photonic bandgaps in the visible range in dichromate gelatin emulsions by holographic interference. The complete bandgap was not a result of the high dielectric contrast but was due to the fact that the spherical layer structure was isotropic with equal spacing in all accessible directions. Angular dependence spectral measurements of the spherical layer structures were in good agreement with the expected results from an ideal structure of dielectric concentric spherical shells with equal spacing. Our fabrication technique and results could pave the way for new applications using complete bandgap photonic crystals.

  4. Fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  5. Cross-correlated imaging of single-mode photonic crystal rod fiber with distributed mode filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Barankov, Roman; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystal bandgap fibers employing distributed mode filtering design provide near diffraction-limited light outputs, a critical property of fiber-based high-power lasers. Microstructure of the fibers is tailored to achieve single-mode operation at specific wavelength by resonant mode...... identify regimes of resonant coupling between higher-order core modes and cladding band. We demonstrate a passive fiber design in which the higher-order modal content inside the single-mode guiding regime is suppressed by at least 20 dB even for significantly misaligned input-coupling configurations....

  6. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  7. Multi-fidelity machine learning models for accurate bandgap predictions of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Gubernatis, James E.; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a multi-fidelity co-kriging statistical learning framework that combines variable-fidelity quantum mechanical calculations of bandgaps to generate a machine-learned model that enables low-cost accurate predictions of the bandgaps at the highest fidelity level. Additionally, the adopted Gaussian process regression formulation allows us to predict the underlying uncertainties as a measure of our confidence in the predictions. In using a set of 600 elpasolite compounds as an example dataset and using semi-local and hybrid exchange correlation functionals within density functional theory as two levels of fidelities, we demonstrate the excellent learning performance of the method against actual high fidelity quantum mechanical calculations of the bandgaps. The presented statistical learning method is not restricted to bandgaps or electronic structure methods and extends the utility of high throughput property predictions in a significant way.

  8. A model for the direct-to-indirect band-gap transition in monolayer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-28

    , within ab-initio electronic structure calculations, that a modest biaxial tensile strain of 3% can drive it into an indirect band-gap semiconductor with the valence band maximum (VBM) shifting from point to point. An analysis ...

  9. Angle-dependent bandgap engineering in gated graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Cervantes, H.; Sotolongo-Costa, O. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Gaggero-Sager, L. M. [CIICAp, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Naumis, G. G. [Instituto Física, Depto. de Física-Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000, México D.F., México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Vargas, I., E-mail: isaac@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac., México (Mexico)

    2016-03-15

    Graphene Superlattices (GSs) have attracted a lot of attention due to its peculiar properties as well as its possible technological implications. Among these characteristics we can mention: the extra Dirac points in the dispersion relation and the highly anisotropic propagation of the charge carriers. However, despite the intense research that is carried out in GSs, so far there is no report about the angular dependence of the Transmission Gap (TG) in GSs. Here, we report the dependence of TG as a function of the angle of the incident Dirac electrons in a rather simple Electrostatic GS (EGS). Our results show that the angular dependence of the TG is intricate, since for moderated angles the dependence is parabolic, while for large angles an exponential dependence is registered. We also find that the TG can be modulated from meV to eV, by changing the structural parameters of the GS. These characteristics open the possibility for an angle-dependent bandgap engineering in graphene.

  10. 21 CFR 880.5300 - Medical absorbent fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical absorbent fiber. 880.5300 Section 880.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5300 Medical absorbent fiber. (a) Identification. A medical absorbent fiber is a device...

  11. Photonic bandgap structures for guiding of long-range surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, K.; Nikolajsen, T.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    We present the first observations of long-range plasmon polariton guiding in photonic bandgap structures. The transmission of waveguide structures is characterized at telecommunication wavelengths and a propagation loss below 4 dB/mm is determined.......We present the first observations of long-range plasmon polariton guiding in photonic bandgap structures. The transmission of waveguide structures is characterized at telecommunication wavelengths and a propagation loss below 4 dB/mm is determined....

  12. Semi-transparent polymer solar cells with excellent sub-bandgap transmission for third generation photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Beiley, Zach M.

    2013-10-07

    Semi-transparent organic photovoltaics are of interest for a variety of photovoltaic applications, including solar windows and hybrid tandem photovoltaics. The figure shows a photograph of our semi-transparent solar cell, which has a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%, with an above bandgap transmission of 34% and a sub-bandgap transmission of 81%. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Advances in wide-bandgap semiconductor based photocathode devices for low light level applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Melville P.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Han, Bing; Gregie, Joel; Tremsin, Anton; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.

    2003-12-01

    Our work with GaN based photocathodes shows a strong dependence on the photo-emission response versus the carrier concentration and conductivity of the films. Films with quantum efficiency (QE) as high as 56% in opaque mode and as high as 30% in transmission mode have been made. Although surface activation plays a key role, the characteristics of the films, e.g. the thickness, film structure, minority carrier diffusion length, and doping, all play a role in affecting the photo-emission QE and especially its spectral dependence. The QE of films with the various properties is discussed and the utility of using measurements of the film properties to predict the optimal performance of the resulting photocathode is demonstrated.

  14. Electrochromic devices based on wide band-gap nanocrystalline semiconductors functionalized with mononuclear charge transfer compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biancardo, M.; Argazzi, R.; Bignozzi, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    A series of ruthenium and iron mononuclear complexes were prepared and their spectroeletrochemical behavior characterized oil Optically Transparent Thin Layer Electrodes (OTTLE) and on Fluorine Doped SnO2 (FTO) conductive glasses coated with Sb-doped nanocrystalline SnO2. These systems display a ...

  15. Wavelength-modulated spectroscopy of the sub-bandgap response of solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandanirina, N.H., E-mail: s213514095@nmmu.ac.za; Botha, J.R.; Wagener, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    A wavelength-modulation setup for measuring the differential photo-response of a GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cell structure is reported. The pseudo-monochromatic wavelength is modulated at the output of a conventional monochromator by means of a vibrating slit mechanism. The vibrating slit was able to modulate the excitation wavelength up to 33 nm. The intensity of the light beam was kept constant through a unique flux correction module, designed and built in-house. The setup enabled measurements in the near-infrared range (from 1000 to 1300 nm), which is specifically used to probe the sub-band gap differential photo-response of GaAs solar cells.

  16. Highly efficient and thickness-tolerable bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells based on P3HT donor and a low-bandgap non-fullerene acceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Li, Yongxi; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Yi; Jiang, Zuo-Quan; Song, Bo; Li, Yongfang; Liao, Liang-Sheng; Zheng, Yonghao

    2017-10-01

    In order to fabricate highly efficient polymer solar cells (PSCs) in industrial scale, one of the key issues is to use thick active layer (>200 nm) in the device module without sacrificing the power conversion efficiency (PCE). In this article, we have studied the blend of the medium-bandgap polymeric donor P3HT and the low-bandgap acceptor IDTIDT-IC as the active layer in non-fullerene PSCs, and successfully maintained the device performance with the thickness of the active layer close to 250 nm. The P3HT:IDTIDT-IC based PSCs with simple thermal annealing exhibits a PCE of 3.49% at a thin active layer, 74 nm. More importantly, the PCE remains almost constant with increasing the thickness of the active layer, and reaches a peak value of 3.64% at 236 nm. This thickness-insensitive photovoltaic performance of the P3HT:IDTIDT-IC system makes them compatible with large-scale roll-to-roll processing. Furthermore, the P3HT:IDTIDT-IC devices show a very high tolerance to temperature, and the PCE keeps nearly unchanged after annealing the active layer at 150 °C for 75 min. All in all, our results show that thickness-tolerable and thermal-stable P3HT:IDTIDT-IC system is more suitable for large-scale industrial manufacturing than the classic P3HT:PCBM formula.

  17. Novel molecular host materials based on carbazole/PO hybrids with wide bandgap via unique linkages for solution-processed blue phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hua; Zhou, Kaifeng; Wu, Hongyu; Chen, Kai; Xie, Gaozhan; Hu, Jingang; Yan, Guobing; Ma, Songhua; Su, Shi-Jian; Cao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    A series of novel molecules with wide bandgap based on electron-withdrawing diphenyl phosphine oxide units and electron-donating carbazolyl moieties through insulated unique linkages of flexible chains terminated by oxygen or sulfur atoms as solution-processable host materials were successfully synthesized for the first time, and their thermal, photophysical, and electrochemical properties were studied thoroughly. These materials possess high triplet energy levels (ET, 2.76-2.77 eV) due to the introduction of alkyl chain to interrupt the conjugation between electron-donor and electron-acceptor. Such high ET could effectively curb the energy from phosphorescent emitter transfer to the host molecules and thus assuring the emission of devices was all from the blue phosphorescent emitter iridium (III) bis [(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinate-N,C2‧]picolinate (FIrpic). Among them, the solution-processed device based on CBCR6OPO without extra vacuum thermal-deposited hole-blocking layer and electron-transporting layer showed the highest maximum current efficiency (CEmax) of 4.16 cd/A. Moreover, the device presented small efficiency roll-off with current efficiency (CE) of 4.05 cd/A at high brightness up to 100 cd/m2. Our work suggests the potential applications of the solution-processable materials with wide bandgap in full-color flat-panel displays and organic lighting.

  18. Toward a compact fibered squeezing parametric source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieussel, Alexandre; Ott, Konstantin; Joos, Maxime; Treps, Nicolas; Fabre, Claude

    2018-03-15

    In this work, we investigate three different compact fibered systems generating vacuum squeezing that involve optical cavities limited by the end surface of a fiber and by a curved mirror and containing a thin parametric crystal. These systems have the advantage to couple squeezed states directly to a fiber, allowing the user to benefit from the flexibility of fibers in the use of squeezing. Three types of fibers are investigated: standard single-mode fibers, photonic-crystal large-mode-area single-mode fibers, and short multimode fibers taped to a single-mode fiber. The observed squeezing is modest (-0.56  dB, -0.9  dB, -1  dB), but these experiments open the way for miniaturized squeezing devices that could be a very interesting advantage in scaling up quantum systems for quantum processing, opening new perspectives in the domain of integrated quantum optics.

  19. Monolithic, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Switching Array for Lidar, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed optical device is a fiber-based multi-channel switch to quickly switch a fiber-coupled laser among many possible output channels to create a fiber-based...

  20. Wide Band-Gap 3,4-Difluorothiophene-Based Polymer with 7% Solar Cell Efficiency: an Alternative to P3HT

    KAUST Repository

    Wolf, Jannic Sebastian

    2015-05-27

    We report on a wide band-gap polymer donor composed of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b\\']dithiophene (BDT) and 3,4-difluorothiophene ([2F]T) units (Eopt ~2.1 eV), and show that the fluorinated analog PBDT[2F]T performs significantly better than its non-fluorinated counterpart PBDT[2H]T in BHJ solar cells with PC71BM. While control P3HT- and PBDT[2H]T-based devices yield PCEs of ca. 4% and 3% (Max.) respectively, PBDT[2F]T-based devices reach PCEs of ca. 7%, combining a large Voc of ca. 0.9 V and short-circuit current values (ca. 10.7 mA/cm2) comparable to those of the best P3HT-based control devices.

  1. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ATLAS device simulator of SILVACO TCAD [25] is used for numerical calculation. ..... port parameters. In our device the rough edges between h-BN and graphene are perpendicular to the transport direc- tion, which is not the case for disorder GNRs [32] where the direction of the rough edges is parallel. Owing to the exis-.

  2. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low-dimensional nanomaterials, such as monolayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), have the ... tures containing a mixture of carbon and h-BN nanodomains were of great interest for device engineers to ... nique. Another important progress towards graphene device fabrication is doping graphene using ...

  3. Development of a Rapid Thermoplastic Impregnation Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weustink, A.P.D.

    2007-01-01

    A melt impregnation device for rapid thermoplastic impregnation of fiber bundles has been developed through modeling and experiments. The basic principles behind the thermoplastic impregnation process are investigated and the properties needed for a successful thermoplastic impregnation device are

  4. Status of silicon carbide (SiC) as a wide-bandgap semiconductor for high-temperature applications: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, J. B.; Johnson, R. W.

    1996-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), a material long known with potential for high-temperature, high-power, high-frequency, and radiation hardened applications, has emerged as the most mature of the wide-bandgap (2.0 eV ≲ Eg ≲ 7.0 eV) semiconductors since the release of commercial 6HSiC bulk substrates in 1991 and 4HSiC substrates in 1994. Following a brief introduction to SiC material properties, the status of SiC in terms of bulk crystal growth, unit device fabrication processes, device performance, circuits and sensors is discussed. Emphasis is placed upon demonstrated high-temperature applications, such as power transistors and rectifiers, turbine engine combustion monitoring, temperature sensors, analog and digital circuitry, flame detectors, and accelerometers. While individual device performances have been impressive (e.g. 4HSiC MESFETs with fmax of 42 GHz and over 2.8 W mm -1 power density; 4HSiC static induction transistors with 225 W power output at 600 MHz, 47% power added efficiency (PAE), and 200 V forward blocking voltage), material defects in SiC, in particular micropipe defects, remain the primary impediment to wide-spread application in commercial markets. Micropipe defect densities have been reduced from near the 1000 cm -2 order of magnitude in 1992 to 3.5 cm -2 at the research level in 1995.

  5. Radiation resistance of wide-bandgap semiconductor power transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazdra, Pavel; Popelka, Stanislav [Department of Microelectronics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Radiation resistance of state-of-the-art commercial wide-bandgap power transistors, 1700 V 4H-SiC power MOSFETs and 200 V GaN HEMTs, to the total ionization dose was investigated. Transistors were irradiated with 4.5 MeV electrons with doses up to 2000 kGy. Electrical characteristics and introduced defects were characterized by current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Results show that already low doses of 4.5 MeV electrons (>1 kGy) cause a significant decrease in threshold voltage of SiC MOSFETs due to embedding of the positive charge into the gate oxide. On the other hand, other parameters like the ON-state resistance are nearly unchanged up to the dose of 20 kGy. At 200 kGy, the threshold voltage returns back close to its original value, however, the ON-state resistance increases and transconductance is lowered. This effect is caused by radiation defects introduced into the low-doped drift region which decrease electron concentration and mobility. GaN HEMTs exhibit significantly higher radiation resistance. They keep within the datasheet specification up to doses of 2000 kGy. Absence of dielectric layer beneath the gate and high concentration of carriers in the two dimensional electron gas channel are the reasons of higher radiation resistance of GaN HEMTs. Their degradation then occurs at much higher doses due to electron mobility degradation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Radiation resistance of wide-bandgap semiconductor power transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazdra, Pavel; Popelka, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Radiation resistance of state-of-the-art commercial wide-bandgap power transistors, 1700 V 4H-SiC power MOSFETs and 200 V GaN HEMTs, to the total ionization dose was investigated. Transistors were irradiated with 4.5 MeV electrons with doses up to 2000 kGy. Electrical characteristics and introduced defects were characterized by current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Results show that already low doses of 4.5 MeV electrons (>1 kGy) cause a significant decrease in threshold voltage of SiC MOSFETs due to embedding of the positive charge into the gate oxide. On the other hand, other parameters like the ON-state resistance are nearly unchanged up to the dose of 20 kGy. At 200 kGy, the threshold voltage returns back close to its original value, however, the ON-state resistance increases and transconductance is lowered. This effect is caused by radiation defects introduced into the low-doped drift region which decrease electron concentration and mobility. GaN HEMTs exhibit significantly higher radiation resistance. They keep within the datasheet specification up to doses of 2000 kGy. Absence of dielectric layer beneath the gate and high concentration of carriers in the two dimensional electron gas channel are the reasons of higher radiation resistance of GaN HEMTs. Their degradation then occurs at much higher doses due to electron mobility degradation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaoka, Takeshi, E-mail: inaoka@phys.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  8. Monitoring the Wobbe Index of Natural Gas Using Fiber-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenz Sandfort

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The fast and reliable analysis of the natural gas composition requires the simultaneous quantification of numerous gaseous components. To this end, fiber-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to detect most components in a single measurement using a single laser source. However, practical issues such as detection limit, gas exchange time and background Raman signals from the fiber material still pose obstacles to utilizing the scheme in real-world settings. This paper compares the performance of two types of hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF, namely photonic bandgap PCF and kagomé-style PCF, and assesses their potential for online determination of the Wobbe index. In contrast to bandgap PCF, kagomé-PCF allows for reliable detection of Raman-scattered photons even below 1200 cm−1, which in turn enables fast and comprehensive assessment of the natural gas quality of arbitrary mixtures.

  9. Degenerate four wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous degenerate four wave mixing (FWM) is investigated in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers, in which photonic bandgap guidance and index guidance is combined. Calculations show the parametric gain is maximum on the edge of a photonic bandgap, for a large range of pump...... wavelengths. The FWM products are observed on the edges of a transmission band experimentally, in good agreement with the numerical results. Thereby the bandedges can be used to control the spectral positions of FWM products through a proper fiber design. The parametric gain control combined with a large mode...... area fiber design potentially allows for power scaling of light at wavelengths not easily accessible with e.g. rare earth ions....

  10. Comparative Analysis of Bandgap-Engineered Pillar Type Flash Memory with HfO2 and S3N4 as Trapping Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Youl; Yang, Seung-Dong; Oh, Jae-Sub; Yun, Ho-Jin; Jeong, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Hi-Deok; Lee, Ga-Won

    In this paper, we fabricated a gate-all-around bandgap- engineered (BE) silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) and silicon-oxide-high-k-oxide-silicon (SOHOS) flash memory device with a vertical silicon pillar type structure for a potential solution to scaling down. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) were used as trapping layers in the SONOS and SOHOS devices, respectively. The BE-SOHOS device has better electrical characteristics such as a lower threshold voltage (VTH) of 0.16V, a higher gm.max of 0.593µA/V and on/off current ratio of 5.76×108, than the BE-SONOS device. The memory characteristics of the BE-SONOS device, such as program/erase speed (P/E speed), endurance, and data retention, were compared with those of the BE-SOHOS device. The measured data show that the BE-SONOS device has good memory characteristics, such as program speed and data retention. Compared with the BE-SONOS device, the erase speed is enhanced about five times in BE-SOHOS, while the program speed and data retention characteristic are slightly worse, which can be explained via the many interface traps between the trapping layer and the tunneling oxide.

  11. Ultra-large bandwidth hollow-core guiding in all-silica bragg fibers with nano-supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienne, Guillaume; Xu, Yong; Jakobsen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate a new class of hollow-core Bragg fibers that are composed of concentric cylindrical silica rings separated by nanoscale support bridges. We theoretically predict and experimentally observe hollow-core confinement over an octave frequency range. The bandwidth of bandgap guiding...

  12. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair...

  13. Graphene nano-devices and nano-composites for structural, thermal and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Fazel

    In this dissertation we have developed graphene-based nano-devices for applications in integrated circuits and gas sensors; as well as graphene-based nano-composites for applications in structures and thermal management. First, we have studied the bandgap of graphene for semiconductor applications. Graphene as a zero-bandgap material cannot be used in the semiconductor industry unless an effective method is developed to open the bandgap in this material. We have demonstrated that a bandgap of 0.206 eV can be opened in graphene by adsorption of water vapor molecules on its surface. Water molecules break the molecular symmetries of graphene resulting in a significant bandgap opening. We also illustrate that the lack of bandgap in graphene can be used to our advantage by making sensors that are able to detect low concentrations of gas molecules mixed in air. We have shown that 1-2 layers of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition enables detection of trace amounts of NO 2 and NH3 in air at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The gas species are detected by monitoring changes in electrical resistance of the graphene film due to gas adsorption. The sensor response time is inversely proportional to the gas concentration. Heating the film expels chemisorbed molecules from the graphene surface enabling reversible operation. The detection limits of ~100 parts-per-billion (ppb) for NO2 and ~500 ppb for NH3 obtained using this device are markedly superior to commercially available NO2 and NH3 detectors. This sensor is fabricated using individual graphene sheets that are exquisitely sensitive to the chemical environment. However, the fabrication and operation of devices that use individual nanostructures for sensing is complex, expensive and suffers from poor reliability due to contamination and large variability from sample-to-sample. To overcome these problems we have developed a gas sensor based on a porous 3D network of graphene sheets called graphene foam

  14. 7-cell core hollow-core photonic crystal fibers with low loss in the spectral region around 2 mu m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian; Mangan, B.J.; Jakobsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    Several 7 cell core hollow-core photonic crystal fibers with bandgaps in the spectral range of 1.4 μm to 2.3 μm have been fabricated. The transmission loss follows the ≈ λ−3 dependency previously reported, with a minimum measured loss of 9.5 dB/km at 1.99 μm. One fiber with a transmission loss...

  15. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  16. All-Fiber Laser Curvature Sensor Using an In-Fiber Modal Interferometer Based on a Double Clad Fiber and a Multimode Fiber Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Sánchez, Manuel; Prieto-Cortés, Patricia; Salceda-Delgado, Guillermo; Castillo-Guzmán, Arturo A.; Selvas-Aguilar, Romeo; Ibarra-Escamilla, Baldemar; Kuzin, Evgeny A.

    2017-01-01

    An all-fiber curvature laser sensor by using a novel modal interference in-fiber structure is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The in-fiber device, fabricated by fusion splicing of multimode fiber and double-clad fiber segments, is used as wavelength filter as well as the sensing element. By including a multimode fiber in an ordinary modal interference structure based on a double-clad fiber, the fringe visibility of the filter transmission spectrum is significantly increased. By using the modal interferometer as a curvature sensitive wavelength filter within a ring cavity erbium-doped fiber laser, the spectral quality factor Q is considerably increased. The results demonstrate the reliability of the proposed curvature laser sensor with advantages of robustness, ease of fabrication, low cost, repeatability on the fabrication process and simple operation. PMID:29182527

  17. Devices, systems, and methods for harvesting energy and methods for forming such devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Dale K.; Novack, Steven D.

    2012-12-25

    Energy harvesting devices include a substrate coupled with a photovoltaic material and a plurality of resonance elements associated with the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to collect energy in at least visible and infrared light spectra. Each resonance element is capacitively coupled with the photovoltaic material, and may be configured to resonate at a bandgap energy of the photovoltaic material. Systems include a photovoltaic material coupled with a feedpoint of a resonance element. Methods for harvesting energy include exposing a resonance element having a resonant electromagnetic radiation having a frequency between approximately 20 THz and approximately 1,000 THz, absorbing at least a portion of the electromagnetic radiation with the resonance element, and resonating the resonance element at a bandgap energy of an underlying photovoltaic material. Methods for forming an energy harvesting device include forming resonance elements on a substrate and capacitively coupling the resonance elements with a photovoltaic material.

  18. Effects of weak nonlinearity on dispersion relations and frequency band-gaps of periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the behaviour of linear periodic structures can be traced back over 300 years, to Sir Isaac Newton, and still attracts much attention. An essential feature of periodic struc-tures is the presence of frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate....... Determination of band-gaps and the corresponding attenuation levels is an im-portant practical problem. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants, and the method of space-harmonics. However, application....... The present work deals with analytically predicting dynamic responses for nonlinear continuous elastic periodic structures. Specifically, the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion re-lation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending os-cillations are analyzed...

  19. Numerical simulation of the limiting efficiency of the graded bandgap solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafat, N.H. [Department of Mathematics and Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Abdel Haleem, A.M. [Department of Mathematics and Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, El Fayoum University, El Fayoum (Egypt); Habib, S.E.-D. [Electronics and Communication Department, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2007-01-15

    The limiting efficiency of the compositionally graded bandgap solar cell is calculated using a 1-D numerical simulator. Our simulator calculates the limiting efficiency by solving the coupled semiconductor equations, namely, Poisson's equation, the current continuity equations, together with the Boltzmann photon equation, rather than the detailed balance equations that are usually used in such calculations. The non-avoidable radiative and Auger bulk losses are the only losses considered in the calculations. The effect of photon recycling on the cell's parameters is included in the calculations of radiative recombination rates. We verified numerically that bandgap grading, under optimum profile, increases the limiting efficiency of the solar cell, over the previously published values. The effect of the bandgap grading on desensitizing the surface of the cell is discussed. (author)

  20. Composite media mixing Bragg and local resonances for highly attenuating and broad bandgaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaina, Nadège; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2013-11-19

    In this article, we investigate composite media which present both a local resonance and a periodic structure. We numerically and experimentally consider the case of a very academic and simplified system that is a quasi-one dimensional split ring resonator medium. We modify its periodicity to shift the position of the Bragg bandgap relative to the local resonance one. We observe that for a well-chosen lattice constant, the local resonance frequency matches the Bragg frequency thus opening a single bandgap which is at the same time very wide and strongly attenuating. We explain this interesting phenomenon by the dispersive nature of the unit cell of the medium, using an analogy with the concept of white light cavities. Our results provide new ways to design wide and efficient bandgap materials.

  1. Obstacle recovery device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Fujio; Furuya, Masaaki; Ugai, Masaru.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a fiber scope for taking a recovery operation portion and an obstacle into a field of vision and photographing the state of the operation in the recovery operation portion and a display section for displaying the photographed image at a remote place. Concretely, the monitor of a remote operation section displays an image photographed by the fiber scope. A operation unit attached with a forceps and a fiber scope are brought closer, for example, to a fuel assembly in a reactor in the recovery operation portion. Then, the obstacle intruded into a minute space between fuels is recovered by the forceps while displaying state of the operation on the monitor of the remote operation section. Such a device certainly recover and remove a minute obstacle present in such a circumstance that a man's hand can not access, by the operation conducted under visual confirmation. (I.S.)

  2. Morphology control of rutile TiO2 with tunable bandgap by preformed β-FeOOH nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheming; Wang, Feng; Balachandran, Subramanian; Li, Gen; Liu, Peng; Ding, Yanfen; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Mingshu

    2018-03-01

    Rutile TiO2 are widely used for applications of coatings, cosmetics, photoelectric devices and so on. However, effective control of well-defined morphology, size and composition of rutile TiO2 nanoparticles from agglomeration has always been a challenge. A new synthesis strategy was proposed to prepare rutile TiO2 with controllable morphology varied from flower-like structures to single-separated nanorods. The β-FeOOH nanoparticles were generated by the hydrolysis of FeCl3 solution and could prevent the aggregation of TiO2 nanocrystals at early stages of the reaction; thus, could control the morphology of rutile nanoparticles. The morphology of rutile TiO2 nanoparticles could be controllably regulated from flower-like structures to individually separated nanorods. Meanwhile, the preformed β-FeOOH also played a role of dopant. Fe ions were substitutionally doped into the bulk lattice of TiO2 nanocrystals and reduced the bandgap, which extended the solar radiation absorption range of rutile TiO2. The prepared TiO2 may be suitable for novel UV-blue light shielding agents and many other applications in photoelectric devices, photocatalysis, and so on due to its small size, unprecedented discrete rod-like structure and unique UV–vis light permeability.

  3. The Role of Fullerene Mixing Behavior in the Performance of Organic Rhotovoltaics: PCBM in Low-Bandgap Polymers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huipeng [ORNL; Peet, Jeff [Konarka Technologies; Hu, Sheng [ORNL; Azoulay, Jason [University of California, Santa Barbara; Bazan, Guillermo [University of California, Santa Barbara; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript reports the mixing behavior, interdiffusion, and depth profile of 1-[3-(methoxycarbonyl)propyl]-1-phenyl-[6,6]C 61 (PCBM):low-bandgap (LBG) polymer thin fi lms that are formed by thermally annealing initial bilayers. The extent of mixing of PCBM is higher in polymers that include the 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) unit than in polymers that incorporate the 2,1,3-benzooxadiazole (BO) unit. This difference is ascribed to the enhanced mixing behavior of PCBM with the benzothiadiazole functionality than with benzooxadiazole functionality, which is attributed to preferred intermolecular interactions. The increased polymer/fullerene mixing is found to be crucial for optimal device performance. A decrease of polymer/fullerene mixing reduces the donor/acceptor interface, which lowers the probability of exciton dissociation and charge generation. Moreover, low PCBM mixing provides limited pathways for electron transport out of a miscible region, due to long distances between adjacent PCBM in such a miscible phase. This inhibits electron transport and increases the recombination of free charge carriers, resulting in a decrease in short circuit current and device performance. These results further exemplify the importance of the thermodynamic mixing behavior of the polymer:fullerene pair in designing next-generation conjugated polymers for organic photovoltaic (OPV) applications, as this controls the fi nal morphology of the OPV active layer.

  4. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon fiber (ACF) from cotton woven waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jieying; Zhao, Quanlin; Ye, Zhengfang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared using cotton woven waste as precursor. The cotton woven waste was first partly dissolved by 80% phosphoric acid and then was pre-soaked in 7.5% diammonium hydrogen phosphate solution. Finally, carbonization and activation were proceeded to get ACF. The optimum preparation conditions, including carbonization temperature, carbonization time, activation temperature and activation time, were chosen by orthogonal design. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption test was conducted to characterize the prepared ACF's pore structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) were employed to characterize its chemical properties and morphology. Adsorption of oilfield wastewater was used to evaluate its adsorption properties. The results show that the prepared ACF is in the form of fiber, with the sectional diameters of 11.7 × 2.6 μm and the surface area of 789 m2/g. XPS results show that carbon concentration of the prepared ACF is higher than that of the commercial ACF. When the prepared ACF dosage is 6 g/L, over 80% of COD and over 70% of chrominance can be removed after 24 h of adsorption at 18 °C. We demonstrated the catalytic growth of m-axial InxGa1-xN (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.17) nanocolumn arrays with high crystallinity on silicon substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition with trimethylindium (TMIn), triethylgallium (TEGa), and ammonia as precursors. The high quality of InGaN nanocolumns (NCs) were believed to be due to the utilization of TEGa that achieved less carbon impurities and offered more comparable vapor pressure with that of TMIn at low temperature. In addition, these NCs were grown in non-polar m-axis, which the internal electric field of the InGaN that often deteriorates the device performances might be able to be eliminated. Furthermore, the bandgap of this InGaN can be modulated from

  5. Influence of interface preparation on minority carrier lifetime for low bandgap tandem solar cell materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Nadine; Sagol, B. Erol; Seidel, Ulf; Schwarzburg, Klaus; Hannappel, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    III-V semiconductor compounds grown by MOVPE are implemented in todays state-of-the-art third generation multi-junction solar cells. The current record multi junction solar cell grown on germanium, having Ge, Ga(In)As and GaInP as subcells, reached a record efficiency of 41.6%. The efficiency of these multi junction solar cells could be significantly increased, if its low bandgap Ge subcell would be replaced by a more efficient tandem. For this purpose the low bandgap materials InGaAs and InGaAsP are suitable. The bandgap composition of these materials allows a better yield of the solar spectrum. Based on InGaAs/InGaAsP absorber materials we have developed a low bandgap tandem solar cell with optimized bandgaps. Results of time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) for the IR-bandgap compounds InGaAsP (1.03 eV)/InGaAs (0.73 eV) are presented. The lifetime of minority carriers is one of the most important properties of solar cell absorber materials. We show on the example of the low band gap tandem cell how the choice of the materials, the quality of the bulk, the optimization of the band gap energies and the preparation of the critical interfaces are essential to build a high efficiency solar cell. The quality of the bulk and the preparation of the critical interfaces are essential for the growth of the double heterostructure (DHS).

  6. Beyond Donor-Acceptor (D-A) Approach: Structure-Optoelectronic Properties-Organic Photovoltaic Performance Correlation in New D-A1-D-A2Low-Bandgap Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochos, Christos L; Drakopoulou, Sofia; Katsouras, Athanasios; Squeo, Benedetta M; Sprau, Christian; Colsmann, Alexander; Gregoriou, Vasilis G; Cando, Alex-Palma; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Gasparini, Nicola; Kazerouni, Negar; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos

    2017-04-01

    Low-bandgap near-infrared polymers are usually synthesized using the common donor-acceptor (D-A) approach. However, recently polymer chemists are introducing more complex chemical concepts for better fine tuning of their optoelectronic properties. Usually these studies are limited to one or two polymer examples in each case study so far, though. In this study, the dependence of optoelectronic and macroscopic (device performance) properties in a series of six new D-A 1 -D-A 2 low bandgap semiconducting polymers is reported for the first time. Correlation between the chemical structure of single-component polymer films and their optoelectronic properties has been achieved in terms of absorption maxima, optical bandgap, ionization potential, and electron affinity. Preliminary organic photovoltaic results based on blends of the D-A 1 -D-A 2 polymers as the electron donor mixed with the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C 71 -butyric acid methyl ester demonstrate power conversion efficiencies close to 4% with short-circuit current densities (J sc ) of around 11 mA cm -2 , high fill factors up to 0.70, and high open-circuit voltages (V oc s) of 0.70 V. All the devices are fabricated in an inverted architecture with the photoactive layer processed in air with doctor blade technique, showing the compatibility with roll-to-roll large-scale manufacturing processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Novel bandgap grading technique for enhancing the limiting efficiency of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, S.E.-D.; Rafat, N.H. [Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01

    The efficiency of solar cells is limited by radiative and/or Auger recombination losses. Radiative recombination can be reduced by limiting the escape angle of the re-emitted rays. Auger recombination can be reduced by limiting the cells` thickness. A novel technique for reducing the Auger recombination limit is proposed in this work. We show that bandgap grading can be effectively utilized to suppress the Auger recombination limit. The optimum bandgap grading profile that maximises the limiting efficiency for an idealized, one dimensional solar cell is hence calculated under AMO irradiation conditions. (author)

  8. Fabrication of a graphene quantum dot device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Il; Kim, Eunseong

    2014-03-01

    Graphene, which exhibits a massless Dirac-like spectrum for its electrons, has shown impressive properties for nano-electronics applications including a high mobility and a width dependent bandgap. We will report the preliminary report on the transport property of the suspended graphene nano-ribbon(GNR) quantum dot device down to dilution refrigerator temperature. This GNR QD device was fabricated to realize an ideal probe to investigate Kondo physics--a characteristic phenomenon in the physics of strongly correlated electrons. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the National Research Foundation of Korea through the Creative Research Initiatives.

  9. A Stretchable Alternating Current Electroluminescent Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible, stretchable electroluminescent fibers are of significance to meet the escalating requirements of increasing complexity and multifunctionality of smart electronics. We report a stretchable alternating current electroluminescent (ACEL fiber by a low-cost and all solution-processed scalable process. The ACEL fiber provides high stretchability, decent light-emitting performance, with excellent stability and nearly zero hysteresis. It can be stretched up to 80% strain. Our ACEL fiber device maintained a stable luminance for over 6000 stretch-release cycles at 50% strain. The mechanical stretchability and optical stability of our ACEL fiber device provides new possibilities towards next-generation stretchable displays, electronic textiles, advanced biomedical imaging and lighting, conformable visual readouts in arbitrary shapes, and novel health-monitoring devices.

  10. Design of a flat-top fiber Bragg filter via quasi-random modulation of the refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevyanko, Stanislav

    2008-10-15

    The statistics of the reflection spectrum of a short-correlated disordered fiber Bragg grating are studied. The averaged spectrum appears to be flat inside the bandgap and has significantly suppressed sidelobes compared to the uniform grating of the same bandwidth. This is due to the Anderson localization of the modes of a disordered grating. This observation prompts a new algorithm for designing passband reflection gratings. Using the stochastic invariant imbedding approach it is possible to obtain the probability distribution function for the random reflection coefficient inside the bandgap and obtain both the variance of the averaged reflectivity as well as the distribution of the time delay of the grating.

  11. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  12. Analysis of bandgap characteristics of two-dimensional periodic structures by using the source-model technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Alon; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2003-08-01

    We introduce a solution based on the source-model technique for periodic structures for the problem of electromagnetic scattering by a two-dimensional photonic bandgap crystal slab illuminated by a transverse-magnetic plane wave. The proposed technique takes advantage of the periodicity of the slab by solving the problem within the unit cell of the periodic structure. The results imply the existence of a frequency bandgap and provide a valuable insight into the relationship between the dimensions of a finite periodic structure and its frequency bandgap characteristics. A comparison shows a discrepancy between the frequency bandgap obtained for a very thick slab and the bandgap obtained by solving the corresponding two-dimensionally infinite periodic structure. The final part of the paper is devoted to explaining in detail this apparent discrepancy.

  13. Recombination Processes on Low Bandgap Antimonides for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saroop, Sudesh [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Recombination processes in antimonide-based (TPV) devices have been investigated using a technique, in which a Nd-YAG pulsed laser is materials for thermophotovoltaic radio-frequency (RF) photoreflectance used to excite excess carriers and the short-pulse response and photoconductivity decay are monitored with an inductively-coupled non-contacting RF probe. The system has been used to characterize surface and bulk recombination mechanisms in Sb-based materials.

  14. Quantum-engineered interband cascade photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razeghi, Manijeh; Tournié, Eric; Brown, Gail J.; Yang, Rui Q.; Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Hinkey, Robert T.; Ye, Hao; Klem, John F.; Lei, L.; Mishima, T. D.; Keay, J. C.; Santos, M. B.; Johnson, M. B.

    2013-12-18

    Quantum-engineered multiple stage photovoltaic (PV) devices are explored based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb interband cascade (IC) structures. These ICPV devices employ multiple discrete absorbers that are connected in series by widebandgap unipolar barriers using type-II heterostructure interfaces for facilitating carrier transport between cascade stages similar to IC lasers. The discrete architecture is beneficial for improving the collection efficiency and for spectral splitting by utilizing absorbers with different bandgaps. As such, the photo-voltages from each individual cascade stage in an ICPV device add together, creating a high overall open-circuit voltage, similar to conventional multi-junction tandem solar cells. Furthermore, photo-generated carriers can be collected with nearly 100% efficiency in each stage. This is because the carriers travel over only a single cascade stage, designed to be shorter than a typical diffusion length. The approach is of significant importance for operation at high temperatures where the diffusion length is reduced. Here, we will present our recent progress in the study of ICPV devices, which includes the demonstration of ICPV devices at room temperature and above with narrow bandgaps (e.g. 0.23 eV) and high open-circuit voltages. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  15. Spectroscopic properties of PEDOTEHIITN, a novel soluble low band-gap conjugated polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cravino, A; Loi, MA; Scharber, MC; Winder, C; Neugebauer, H; Denk, P; Meng, H; CHEN, Y; Wudl, F; Sariciftci, NS

    2003-01-01

    Polymers with narrow band gap are expected to posses appreciably high RT conductivities, luminescence in the NIR and improved solar energy harvesting properties. Here we report the spectroscopic properties of a soluble and environmentally stable copolymer (PEDOTEHIITN) with a band-gap of ca. 1.1 eV.

  16. A model study of surface state on optical bandgap of silicon nanowires

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is observed that visible PL in silicon nanowires is due to quantum confinement and surface passivation. But the energy recombination of electron and holes in the quantum confined nanostructures is responsible for the visible PL. In this work, models from quantum bandgap and photoluminescence intensity are adopted to ...

  17. Opto-electronics of PbS quantum dot and narrow bandgap polymer blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahmann, Simon; Mura, Andrea; Protesescu, Loredana; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Brabec, Christoph J.; Loi, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report on the interaction between the narrow bandgap polymer [2,6-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta-[2,1-b;3,4-b]dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT) and lead sulphide (PbS) colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) upon photoexcitation. We show that the presence of both materials

  18. Free-carrier-compensated charged domain walls produced with super-bandgap illumination in insulating ferroelectrics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednyakov, Petr; Sluka, T.; Tagantsev, A.; Damjanovic, D.; Setter, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 43 (2016), s. 9498-9503 ISSN 0935-9648 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-04121S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : super-bandgap illumination * charged domain walls * ferroelectric BaTiO 3 * free-carrier generation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 19.791, year: 2016

  19. Novel start-up circuit with enhanced power-up characteristic for bandgap references

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, Cao; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre

    This paper presents a new start-up circuit for low-power bandgap reference (BGR) voltage generators. The BGR is designed for providing a stable 0.3 V power supply for application in low power wireless sensor nodes. The BGR has an enhanced power-up characteristic and demonstrates a reduction...

  20. 10 Gbit/s transmission over air-guiding photonic bandgap fibre at 1550 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Zsigri, Beata; Hansen, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    The first data transmission over air-guiding photonic bandgap (PBG) fibre is demonstrated. A 10 Gbit/s signal was successfully transmitted at 1550 nm over 150 m of singlemode PBG fibre, thus demonstrating their applicability to optical communications. Furthermore, the impact of the polarisation...... properties of PBG fibres is highlighted experimentally....

  1. Tunable polarisation-maintaining filter based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Weirich, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A tunable and polarisation-maintaining all-in-fibre filter based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre is demonstrated. Its polarisation extinction ratio reaches 14 dB at 1550 nm wavelength. Its spectral tunability range spans over 250 nm in the temperature range 30–70°C. The measured...

  2. A note on anomalous band-gap variations in semiconductors with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P. K.; Mondal, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt is made to theoretically study the band-gap variations (ΔEg) in semiconductors with temperature following the works, did by Fan and O'Donnell et al. based on thermodynamic functions. The semiconductor band-gap reflects the bonding energy. An increase in temperature changes the chemical bondings, and electrons are promoted from valence band to conduction band. In their analyses, they made several approximations with respect to temperature and other fitting parameters leading to real values of band-gap variations with linear temperature dependences. In the present communication, we have tried to re-analyse the works, specially did by Fan, and derived an analytical model for ΔEg(T). Because, it was based on the second-order perturbation technique of thermodynamic functions. Our analyses are made without any approximations with respect to temperatures and other fitting parameters mentioned in the text, leading to a complex functions followed by an oscillating nature of the variations of ΔEg. In support of the existence of the oscillating energy band-gap variations with temperature in a semiconductor, possible physical explanations are provided to justify the experimental observation for various materials.

  3. Origin of the Large Bandgap Bowing in Highly Mismatched Semiconductor Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K. M.; Ager, J. W., III; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A. K.; Su, Ching-Hua; Sou, I. K.; Perera, R.; hide

    2002-01-01

    We use a combination of optical and soft x-ray fluorescence techniques to investigate the composition dependence of the band edge energies in ZnSe(1-x)Te(x) and ZnS(1-x)Te(x) alloys. The results reveal entirely different origins of the large bandgap bowing for alloys with small and large Te content. On the Te-rich side, the reduction of the bandgap is well explained by the band anticrossing interaction between the Se or S localized states and the ZnTe conduction band states. On the Se or S-rich side, an interaction between the localized Te states and the degenerate GAMMA valence bands of ZnSe or ZnS is responsible for the bandgap reduction and the rapid increase of the spin-orbit splitting with increasing Te concentration. Results of soft x-ray fluorescence experiments provide direct evidence for the valence band anticrossing interaction. The bandgap bowing over the entire composition range is accounted for by a linear interpolation between the conduction band anticrossing and valence band anticrossing models.

  4. a model study of surface state on optical bandgap of silicon nanowires

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    to quantum confinement and surface passivation. But the energy recombination of electron and holes in the quantum confined nanostructures is responsible for the visible PL. In this work, models from quantum bandgap and photoluminescence intensity are adopted to explain the size dependent surface luminescence.

  5. Rationally Controlled Synthesis of CdSexTe1-x Alloy Nanocrystals and Their Application in Efficient Graded Bandgap Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shiya; Li, Miaozi; Yang, Junyu; Mei, Xianglin; Wu, Bin; Liu, Xiaolin; Heng, Jingxuan; Qin, Donghuan; Hou, Lintao; Xu, Wei; Wang, Dan

    2017-11-08

    CdSe x Te 1-x semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), being rod-shaped/irregular dot-shaped in morphology, have been fabricated via a simple hot-injection method. The NCs composition is well controlled through varying molar ratios of Se to Te precursors. Through changing the composition of the CdSe x Te 1-x NCs, the spectral absorption of the NC thin film between 570-800 nm is proved to be tunable. It is shown that the bandgap of homogeneously alloyed CdSe x Te 1-x active thin film is nonlinearly correlated with the different compositions, which is perceived as optical bowing. The solar cell devices based on CdSe x Te 1-x NCs with the structure of ITO/ZnO/CdSe/CdSe x Te 1-x /MoO x /Au and the graded bandgap ITO/ZnO/CdSe( w / o )/CdSe x Te 1-x /CdTe/MoO x /Au are systematically evaluated. It was found that the performance of solar cells degrades almost linearly with the increase of alloy NC film thickness with respect to ITO/ZnO/CdSe/CdSe 0.2 Te 0.8 /MoO x /Au. From another perspective, in terms of the graded bandgap structure of ITO/ZnO/CdSe/CdSe x Te 1-x /CdTe/MoO x /Au, the performance is improved in contrast with its single-junction analogues. The graded bandgap structure is proved to be efficient when absorbing spectrum and the solar cells fabricated under the structure of ITO/ZnO/CdSe 0.8 Te 0.2 /CdSe 0.2 Te 0.8 /CdTe/MoO x /Au indicate power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.37%, a value among the highest for solution-processed inversely-structured CdSe x Te 1-x NC solar cells. As the NC solar cells are solution-processed under environmental conditions, they are promising for fabricating solar cells at low cost, roll by roll and in large area.

  6. Band-gap narrowing and magnetic behavior of Ni-doped Ba(Ti0.875Ce0.125)O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenliang; Deng, Hongmei; Yu, Lu; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Junhao

    2015-11-01

    Band-gap narrowing and magnetic effects have been observed in a Ni-doped Ba(Ti0.875Ce0.125)O3 (BTC) thin film. Structural characterizations and microstructural analysis show that the as-prepared Ba(Ti0.75Ce0.125Ni0.125)O3-δ (BTCN) thin film exhibits a cubic perovskite structure with an average grain size of 25 nm. The Ce doping at the Ti-site results in an increasing perovskite volume to favour an O-vacancy-stabilized Ni2+ substitution. Raman spectroscopy, however, shows the cubic symmetry of crystalline structures is locally lowered by the presence of dopants, significantly deviating from the ideal Pm3m space group. Moreover, BTCN presents a narrowed band-gap, much smaller than that of BaTiO3 and BTC, due to new states of both the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in an electronic structure with the presence of Ni. Also, magnetic enhancement driven by co-doping has been confirmed in the films, which mainly stems from the exchange interaction of Ni2+ ions via an electron trapped in a bridging oxygen vacancy. These findings may open an avenue to discover and design optimal perovskite compounds for solar-energy devices and information storage.

  7. Realization of 7-cell hollow-core photonic crystal fibers with low loss in the region between 1.4 μm and 2.3 μm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian; Mangan, Brian Joseph; Jakobsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    Five 7-cell core hollow-core fibers with photonic bandgap spectral positions between 1.4 μm and 2.3 μm were fabricated. The loss follows the ≈ λ-3 dependency previously reported [1] with a minimum measured loss of 9.5 dB/km at 1992 nm.......Five 7-cell core hollow-core fibers with photonic bandgap spectral positions between 1.4 μm and 2.3 μm were fabricated. The loss follows the ≈ λ-3 dependency previously reported [1] with a minimum measured loss of 9.5 dB/km at 1992 nm....

  8. Research progress of the resonant fiber optic gyroscope technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linglan; Yan, Yuchao; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2015-10-01

    The resonant fiber optic gyro (RFOG) is a high accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. The existence of various noises, including the nonreciprocal noises such as the polarization noise and the Kerr noise as well as the reciprocal circuit noise, limits the performance improvement of the RFOG. An improved scheme by inserting two in-line polarizers in the polarization maintaining fiber transmission-type resonator has been proposed to suppress the polarization-fluctuation induced drift. Furthermore, the adoption of the air-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBFs) offers a novel solution to reduce the optical Kerr effect. In addition, A digital signal processor is designed to reduce the reciprocal noises and detect the rotation information. A minimum actual rotation of 0.001°/s is achieved. The dynamic range is improved by a factor of 7 and the scale factor nonlinearity is decreased by a factor of 60.

  9. Temperature-modified photonic bandgap in colloidal photonic crystals fabricated by vinyl functionalized silica spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Tiansong; Zhang Junyan; Zhu Kongtao; Zhang Qifeng; Wu Jinlei

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A thermal annealing procedure was described for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals, which were self-assembled from vinyl-functionalized silica spheres by a gravity sedimentation process. Highlights: → We described a thermal annealing procedure for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals. → The position of its stop band had more than 25% blue shift by annealing the sample from 60 to 600 deg. C. → The annealing temperature and the Bragg peak values have a linear relationship in the 120-440 deg. C range. → The effects provide a simple and controllable method for modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals. - Abstract: A thermal annealing procedure for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals was described. The colloidal photonic crystals were assembled from monodisperse vinyl functionalized silica spheres by a gravity sedimentation process. The samples diffract light following Bragg's law combined with Snell's law. By annealing the sample at temperatures in the range of 60-600 deg. C, the position of its stop band shifted from 943 to 706 nm. It had more than 25% blue shift. In addition, the annealing temperature and the Bragg peak values have a linear relationship in the 120-440 deg. C range. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) curves of vinyl functionalized silica spheres confirmed the above results. The effects provide a simple and controllable method for modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals.

  10. Alternative approaches of SiC and related wide bandgap materials in light emitting and solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellman, P; Syväjärvi, M; Ou, H

    2014-01-01

    silicon oxycarbide material can provide potential applications of the Eu luminescent materials to challenging conditions like high temperatures or aggressive environments where the silica has weaknesses. In some approaches, silicon rich silicon oxide that contain silicon nanoclusters emit red to near infrared luminescence due to quantum confinement effects while luminescence at shorter wavelength is difficult due to the interplay of defects and quantum confinement effects. In addition it is applicable as low-k dielectric, etch-stop and passivation layers. It also has an optical band-gap that is smaller than that of SiO2 which may facilitate carrier injection at lower voltages that is suitable for optoelectronics. From materials perspective of emerging materials, it seems distant to consider system related issues. The future demands on communication and lighting devices require higher information flows in modernized optical devices, for example by replacing electrical interconnects with their optical counterparts and tunable backgrounds filters for integrated optics or photonics applications. However, there are materials issues related to such device performance, for example by a non-linearity, that provide the possibility for selective removal or addition of wavelengths using hetero structures in which one side of the structure enhances the light-to-dark sensitivity of long and medium wavelength channels and diminish others, and an opposite behavior in other face of the structure. Certainly materials may be applied in various innovative ways to provide new performances in devices and systems. In any materials and device evaluation, reliability issues in passivation and packaging of semiconductor device structures provide a base knowledge that may be used to evaluate new concepts. Fundamental aspects of dielectric constant, bandgap and band offsets between the valence and conduction band edges between the passivation layer and the semiconductor create a foundation for

  11. In-fiber integrated chemiluminiscence online optical fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jun; Dong, Biao; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Yao; Yuan, Libo

    2013-09-01

    We report an in-fiber integrated chemiluminiscence (CL) sensor based on a kind of hollow optical fiber with a suspended inner core. The path of microfluid is realized by etching microholes for inlets and outlets on the surface of the optical fiber without damaging the inner core and then constructing a melted point beside the microhole of the outlet. When samples are injected into the fiber, the liquids can be fully mixed and form steady microflows. Simultaneously, the photon emitted from the CL reaction is efficiently coupled into the core and can be detected at the end of the optical fiber. In this Letter, the concentration of H2O2 samples is analyzed through the emission intensity of the CL reaction among H2O2, luminol, K3Fe(CN)6, and NaOH in the optical fiber. The linear sensing range of 0.1-4.0 mmol/L of H2O2 concentration is obtained. The emission intensity can be determined within 400 ms at a total flow rate of 150 μL/min. Significantly, this work presents the information of developing in-fiber integrated online analyzing devices based on optical methods.

  12. Magnetically sensitive nanodiamond-doped tellurite glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yinlan; Simpson, David A; Jeske, Jan; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Lau, Desmond W M; Ji, Hong; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Afshar V, Shahraam; Hollenberg, Lloyd; Greentree, Andrew D; Monro, Tanya M; Gibson, Brant C

    2018-01-19

    Traditional optical fibers are insensitive to magnetic fields, however many applications would benefit from fiber-based magnetometry devices. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetically sensitive optical fiber by doping nanodiamonds containing nitrogen vacancy centers into tellurite glass fibers. The fabrication process provides a robust and isolated sensing platform as the magnetic sensors are fixed in the tellurite glass matrix. Using optically detected magnetic resonance from the doped nanodiamonds, we demonstrate detection of local magnetic fields via side excitation and longitudinal collection. This is a first step towards intrinsically magneto-sensitive fiber devices with future applications in medical magneto-endoscopy and remote mineral exploration sensing.

  13. Hybrid photonic-crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Travers, John C.; Abdolvand, Amir

    2017-01-01

    This article offers an extensive survey of results obtained using hybrid photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) which constitute one of the most active research fields in contemporary fiber optics. The ability to integrate novel and functional materials in solid- and hollow-core PCFs through various...... is reviewed from scientific and technological perspectives, focusing on how different fluids, solids, and gases can significantly extend the functionality of PCFs. The first part of this review discusses the efforts to develop tunable linear and nonlinear fiber-optic devices using PCFs infiltrated...... propagation, and compression dynamics in both atomic and molecular gases, and novel soliton-plasma interactions are reviewed. A discussion of future prospects and directions is also included.Optical fibers provide much more than a means to transport light between different locations. This article reviews how...

  14. Environmentally friendly method to grow wide-bandgap semiconductor aluminum nitride crystals: Elementary source vapor phase epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, PeiTsen; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-11-30

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has attracted increasing interest as an optoelectronic material in the deep ultraviolet spectral range due to its wide bandgap of 6.0 eV (207 nm wavelength) at room temperature. Because AlN bulk single crystals are ideal device substrates for such applications, the crystal growth of bulky AlN has been extensively studied. Two growth methods seem especially promising: hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and sublimation. However, the former requires hazardous gases such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, while the latter needs extremely high growth temperatures around 2000 °C. Herein we propose a novel vapor-phase-epitaxy-based growth method for AlN that does not use toxic materials; the source precursors are elementary aluminum and nitrogen gas. To prepare our AlN, we constructed a new growth apparatus, which realizes growth of AlN single crystals at a rate of ~18 μm/h at 1550 °C using argon as the source transfer via the simple reaction Al + 1/2N2 → AlN. This growth rate is comparable to that by HVPE, and the growth temperature is much lower than that in sublimation. Thus, this study opens up a novel route to achieve environmentally friendly growth of AlN.

  15. Environmentally friendly method to grow wide-bandgap semiconductor aluminum nitride crystals: Elementary source vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peitsen; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-11-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has attracted increasing interest as an optoelectronic material in the deep ultraviolet spectral range due to its wide bandgap of 6.0 eV (207 nm wavelength) at room temperature. Because AlN bulk single crystals are ideal device substrates for such applications, the crystal growth of bulky AlN has been extensively studied. Two growth methods seem especially promising: hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and sublimation. However, the former requires hazardous gases such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, while the latter needs extremely high growth temperatures around 2000 °C. Herein we propose a novel vapor-phase-epitaxy-based growth method for AlN that does not use toxic materials; the source precursors are elementary aluminum and nitrogen gas. To prepare our AlN, we constructed a new growth apparatus, which realizes growth of AlN single crystals at a rate of ~18 μm/h at 1550 °C using argon as the source transfer via the simple reaction Al + 1/2N2 → AlN. This growth rate is comparable to that by HVPE, and the growth temperature is much lower than that in sublimation. Thus, this study opens up a novel route to achieve environmentally friendly growth of AlN.

  16. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices. PMID:25758749

  17. Bandgap- and Radial-Position-Dependent Mn-Doped Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lucheng; Huang, Keke; Zhang, Zhuolei; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Zhan; Xie, Renguo; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-03-03

    This paper presents a mechanistic study on the doping of Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) with Mn by changing the Zn-Cu-In-S QD bandgap and dopant position inside the samples (Zn-Cu-In-S core and ZnS shell). Results show that for the Mn:Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS system, a Mn-doped emission can be obtained when the bandgap value of the QDs is larger than the energy of Mn-doped emission. Conversely, a bandgap emission is only observed for the doped system when the bandgap value of QDs is smaller than the energy gap of the Mn-doped emission. In the Zn-Cu-In-S/Mn:ZnS systems, doped QDs show dual emissions, consisting of bandgap and Mn dopant emissions, instead of one emission band when the value of the host bandgap is larger than the energy of the Mn-doped emission. These findings indicate that the emission from Mn-doped Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell QDs depends on the bandgap of the QDs and the dopant position inside the core/shell material. The critical bandgap of the host materials is estimated to have the same value as the energy of the Mn d-d transition. Subsequently, the mechanism of photoluminescence properties of the Mn:Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS and Zn-Cu-In-S/Mn:ZnS core/shell QD systems is proposed. Control experiments are then carried out by preparing Mn-doped Zn(Cu)-In-S QDs with various bandgaps, and the results confirm the reliability of the suggested mechanism. Therefore, the proposed mechanism can aid the design and synthesis of novel host materials in fabricating doped QDs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fiber-optic gyro for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaguro, W. S.; Udd, E.; Cahill, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    State-of-the-art fiber-optic gyro modules can be environmentalized to withstand a wide range of vibration, shock and temperature effects; this modular approach to fiber-optic gyro design has improved reliability to the point where rate control device applications in spacecraft can be confidently considered. In order to arrive at a benchmark for such applications, performance and technology readiness comparisons are presently undertaken of both digital and analog fiber-optic gyros with the ring laser gyro. As mass production of key subassemblies for the fiber-optic gyro proceeds, critical cost advantages relative to the ring laser gyro may be achieved.

  19. Thermal tuning On narrow linewidth fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peiqi; Liu, Tianshan; Gao, Xincun; Ren, Shiwei

    2010-10-01

    At present, people have been dedicated to high-speed and large-capacity optical fiber communication system. Studies have been shown that optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technology is an effective means of communication to increase the channel capacity. Tunable lasers have very important applications in high-speed, largecapacity optical communications, and distributed sensing, it can provide narrow linewidth and tunable laser for highspeed optical communication. As the erbium-doped fiber amplifier has a large gain bandwidth, the erbium-doped fiber laser can be achieved lasing wavelength tunable by adding a tunable filter components, so tunable filter device is the key components in tunable fiber laser.At present, fiber laser wavelength is tuned by PZT, if thermal wavelength tuning is combined with PZT, a broader range of wavelength tuning is appearance . Erbium-doped fiber laser is used in the experiments,the main research is the physical characteristics of fiber grating temperature-dependent relationship and the fiber grating laser wavelength effects. It is found that the fiber laser wavelength changes continuously with temperature, tracking several temperature points observed the self-heterodyne spectrum and found that the changes in spectra of the 3dB bandwidth of less than 1kHz, and therefore the fiber laser with election-mode fiber Bragg grating shows excellent spectral properties and wavelength stability.

  20. Perturbative approach to continuum generation in a fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, P S; Nicholson, J W

    2006-08-21

    We derive a perturbative solution to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation to include the effect of a fiber Bragg grating whose bandgap is much smaller than the pulse bandwidth. The grating generates a slow dispersive wave which may be computed from an integral over the unperturbed solution if nonlinear interaction between the grating and unperturbed waves is negligible. Our approach allows rapid estimation of large grating continuum enhancement peaks from a single nonlinear simulation of the waveguide without grating. We apply our method to uniform and sampled gratings, finding good agreement with full nonlinear simulations, and qualitatively reproducing experimental results.

  1. Intrauterine Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    S HARE W ITH W OMEN INTRAUTERINE DEVICES INTRAUTERINE DEVICES What is An Intrauterine Device? An intrauterine device (IUD) is anything that is placed inside the uterus (womb) to prevent pregnancy. ...

  2. Wave bandgap formation and its evolution in two-dimensional phononic crystals composed of rubber matrix with periodic steel quarter-cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Wang, Guan; Luo, Dong; Cao, Xiaoshan

    2018-02-01

    The band structure of a two-dimensional phononic crystal, which is composed of four homogenous steel quarter-cylinders immersed in rubber matrix, is investigated and compared with the traditional steel/rubber crystal by the finite element method (FEM). It is revealed that the frequency can then be tuned by changing the distance between adjacent quarter-cylinders. When the distance is relatively small, the integrality of scatterers makes the inner region inside them almost motionless, so that they can be viewed as a whole at high-frequencies. In the case of relatively larger distance, the interaction between each quarter-cylinder and rubber will introduce some new bandgaps at relatively low-frequencies. Lastly, the point defect states induced by the four quarter-cylinders are revealed. These results will be helpful in fabricating devices, such as vibration insulators and acoustic/elastic filters, whose band frequencies can be manipulated artificially.

  3. Using Protection Layers for a 2-Photon Water Splitting Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Mei, Bastian Timo; Frydendal, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The 2-photon tandem device for photocatalytic water splitting has been theoretically shown to provide a higher efficiency than a single photon device(1). This increased efficiency can be achieved by having one material optimized to absorb high energy photons (large bandgap) and another material...... optimized to absorb low energy photons (small bandgap). To a large degree this approach has been hindered by corrosion issues. In this talk I will first discuss how our computational screening of 2,400 materials showed that very few materials can efficiently absorb light without corroding in water splitting...... conditions.(2) I will follow this up by discussing how protection layers bypass the corrosion issue by creating a buffer layer.(3) Finally I will show how we integrated a photocatalyst/protection layer/(co-catalyst) scheme to produce highly efficient H2 evolution photocathodes and O2 evolution photoanodes.(3...

  4. MOCVD growth of wide-bandgap nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shiro; Wang, Tao; Wang, Hong Xing; Bai, Jie

    2002-08-01

    Following topics are reviewed in this paper. After an introduction in section 1, section 2 reviews growth conditions of the most widely used III-nitride semiconductors, GaN and InGaN, by mean of MOCVD, and their optical properties are examined in conjunction with the carrier localization and the quantum confined Stark effects. A-face sapphire is now collecting more attention as a substrate for electronic devices, since it is available in very large size. The growth on A-face sapphire substrate is reviewed in section 3. Several MOCVD reactors with large capacity available on market are introduced in section 4. Both negative and positive aspects of the dislocation in GaN and InGaN are summarized in section 5. Although a dislocation works as a non-recombination center, it produces indium composition fluctuation of an InGaN and enhances carrier localization making light emission efficiency less sensitive to the presence of non-radiative recombination centers. Section 6 summarizes new technique to reduce dislocation density in GaN grown on heterogeneous substrates. And the paper is summarized in section 7.

  5. Optofluidic in-fiber interferometer based on hollow optical fiber with two cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Xinghua; Liu, Zhihai; Yang, Jun; Li, Song; Kong, Depeng; Qi, Xiuxiu; Yu, Wenting; Long, Qunlong; Yuan, Libo

    2017-07-24

    We demonstrate a novel integrated optical fiber interferometer for in-fiber optofluidic detection. It is composed of a specially designed hollow optical fiber with a micro-channel and two cores. One core on the inner surface of the micro-channel is served as sensing arm and the other core in the annular cladding is served as reference arm. Fusion-and-tapering method is employed to couple light from a single mode fiber to the hollow optical fiber in this device. Sampling is realized by side opening a microhole on the surface of the hollow optical fiber. Under differential pressure between the end of the hollow fiber and the microhole, the liquids can form steady microflows in the micro-channel. Simultaneously, the interference spectrum of the interferometer device shifts with the variation of the concentration of the microfluid in the channel. The optofluidic in-fiber interferometer has a sensitivity of refractive index around 2508 nm/RIU for NaCl. For medicine concentration detection, its sensitivity is 0.076 nm/mmolL -1 for ascorbic acid. Significantly, this work presents a compact microfluidic in-fiber interferometer with a micro-channel which can be integrated with chip devices without spatial optical coupling and without complex manufacturing procedure of the waveguide on the chips.

  6. Photovoltaic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  7. Optical fiber head for providing lateral viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Billy W.; James, Dale L.; Brown, Steve; Da Silva, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    The head of an optical fiber comprising the sensing probe of an optical heterodyne sensing device includes a planar surface that intersects the perpendicular to axial centerline of the fiber at a polishing angle .theta.. The planar surface is coated with a reflective material so that light traveling axially through the fiber is reflected transverse to the fiber's axial centerline, and is emitted laterally through the side of the fiber. Alternatively, the planar surface can be left uncoated. The polishing angle .theta. must be no greater than 39.degree. or must be at least 51.degree.. The emitted light is reflected from adjacent biological tissue, collected by the head, and then processed to provide real-time images of the tissue. The method for forming the planar surface includes shearing the end of the optical fiber and applying the reflective material before removing the buffer that circumscribes the cladding and the core.

  8. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  9. Quasiperiodic one-dimensional photonic crystals with adjustable multiple photonic bandgaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyunishev, Andrey M; Pankin, Pavel S; Svyakhovskiy, Sergey E; Timofeev, Ivan V; Vetrov, Stepan Ya

    2017-09-15

    We propose an elegant approach to produce photonic bandgap (PBG) structures with multiple photonic bandgaps by constructing quasiperiodic photonic crystals (QPPCs) composed of a superposition of photonic lattices with different periods. Generally, QPPC structures exhibit both aperiodicity and multiple PBGs due to their long-range order. They are described by a simple analytical expression, instead of quasiperiodic tiling approaches based on substitution rules. Here we describe the optical properties of QPPCs exhibiting two PBGs that can be tuned independently. PBG interband spacing and its depth can be varied by choosing appropriate reciprocal lattice vectors and their amplitudes. These effects are confirmed by the proof-of-concept measurements made for the porous silicon-based QPPC of the appropriate design.

  10. Triple photonic band-gap structure dynamically induced in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jinwei; Bao Qianqian; Wan Rengang; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui

    2011-01-01

    We study a cold atomic sample coherently driven into the five-level triple-Λ configuration for attaining a dynamically controlled triple photonic band-gap structure. Our numerical calculations show that three photonic band gaps with homogeneous reflectivities up to 92% can be induced on demand around the probe resonance by a standing-wave driving field in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence. All these photonic band gaps are severely malformed with probe reflectivities declining rapidly to very low values when spontaneously generated coherence is gradually weakened. The triple photonic band-gap structure can also be attained in a five-level chain-Λ system of cold atoms in the absence of spontaneously generated coherence, which however requires two additional traveling-wave fields to couple relevant levels.

  11. Band-gap modulation of graphane-like SiC nanoribbons under uniaxial elastic strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ben-Ling, E-mail: jsblgao@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Qing-Qiang [Department of Physics, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221009 (China); Ke, San-Huang, E-mail: shke@tongji.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Structured Materials, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, 3 Heqing Road, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, Ning [Department of Physics, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051 (China); Hu, Guang; Wang, Yanzong; Liang, Feng; Tang, Yalu [Department of Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Xiong, Shi-Jie [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-01-24

    The band-gap modulation of zigzag and armchair graphane-like SiC nanoribbons (GSiCNs) under uniaxial elastic strain is investigated using the density functional theory. The results show that band gap of both structures all decreases when being compressed or tensed. In compression, both zigzag and armchair GSiCNs are semiconductors with a direct band gap. However, in tension, the armchair GSiCNs undergo a direct-to-indirect band-gap transition but the zigzag GSiCNs still have a direct band gap. These results are also proved by HSE06 method. This implies a potential application of the graphane-like SiC nanoribbons in the future pressure sensor and optical electronics nanodevices.

  12. Contributions of oxygen vacancies and titanium interstitials to band-gap states of reduced titania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfeng; Lazzari, Rémi; Chenot, Stéphane; Jupille, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    The spectroscopic fingerprints of the point defects of titanium dioxide remain highly controversial. Seemingly indisputable experiments lead to conflicting conclusions in which oxygen vacancies and titanium interstitials are alternately referred to as the primary origin of the Ti 3 d band-gap states. We report on experiments performed by electron energy loss spectroscopy whose key is the direct annealing of only the very surface of rutile TiO2(110 ) crystals and the simultaneous measurement of its temperature via the Bose-Einstein loss/gain ratio. By surface preparations involving reactions with oxygen and water vapor, in particular, under electron irradiation, vacancy- and interstitial-related band-gap states are singled out. Off-specular measurements reveal that both types of defects contribute to a unique charge distribution that peaks in subsurface layers with a common dispersive behavior.

  13. High-Temperature, Wirebondless, Ultra-Compact Wide Bandgap Power Semiconductor Modules for Space Power Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon carbide (SiC) and other wide band-gap semiconductors offer great promise of high power rating, high operating temperature, simple thermal management, and...

  14. Creation of tunable absolute bandgaps in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal modulated by a nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chenyang

    2008-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation. We have investigated the tunable absolute bandgap in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal structures modulated by a nematic liquid crystal. The PC structure composed of an anisotropic-dielectric cylinder in the liquid crystal medium is studied by solving Maxwell's equations using the plane wave expansion method. The photonic band structures are found to exhibit absolute bandgaps for the square and triangular lattices. Numerical simulations show that the absolute bandgaps can be continuously tuned in the square and triangular lattices consisting of anisotropic-dielectric cylinders by infiltrating nematic liquid crystals. Such a mechanism of bandgap adjustment should open up a new application for designing components in photonic integrated circuits

  15. High-Temperature, Wirebondless, Ultra-Compact Wide Bandgap Power Semiconductor Modules for Space Power Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon carbide (SiC) and other wide band-gap semiconductors offer great promise of high power rating, high operating temperature, simple thermal management, and...

  16. Visible light photoreactivity from hybridization states between carbon nitride bandgap states and valence states in Nb and Ti oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hosik, E-mail: hosiklee@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Unist-gil 100 Eonyang-eup, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Ohno, Takahisa, E-mail: OHNO.Takahisa@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Material Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba (Japan); Computational Materials Science Unit (CMSU), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Origin of bandgap reduction for visible photoreactivity is suggested. ► Carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space can induce the bandgap reduction. ► The electronic structures are studied by density functional theory calculations. - Abstract: For better efficiency as photocatalysts, N-doping for visible light reactivity has been intensively studied in Lamellar niobic and titanic solid acids (HNb{sub 3}O{sub 8}, H{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}), and its microscopic structures have been debated in this decade. We calculate the layered solid acids’ structures and bandgaps. Bandgap reduction by carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space is observed computationally. It originates from localized nitrogen states which form delocalized top-valence states by hybridizing with the host oxygen states and can contribute to photo-current.

  17. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  18. Breakdown of Kasha's Rule in a Ubiquitous, Naturally Occurring, Wide Bandgap Aluminosilicate (Feldspar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Jain, Mayank

    2018-01-01

    and the mechanism behind the EDE in a wide band gap aluminosilicate (feldspar), which comprises more than half of the Earth's crust, and is widely used in geophotonics (e.g., optical dating). We observe EDE up to 150 nm at room temperature in our samples, which is unprecedented in rigid macroscopic structures...... using feldspar, measurement of band tail width in wide bandgap materials, and understanding the EDE effect in other materials....

  19. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qianlang [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States); March, Katia [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bâtiment 510, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Crozier, Peter A., E-mail: CROZIER@asu.edu [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO{sub 2} anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO{sub 2} showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60 nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1 eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. - Highlights: • Bandgap states detected with aloof beam monochromated EELS on oxide nanoparticle surfaces. • Dielectric theory applied to simulate the spectra and interpret surface structure. • Density of states models also be employed to understand the surface electronic structure. • In MgO, one states associate with water species was found close to the valence band edge. • In anatase, two mid-gap states associated with point defects were found.

  20. Investigations on the variable large bandgap semiconductor compound HgBrI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanciu, G A; Stanciu, S G; Daviti, M; Paraskevopoulos, K M; Polychroniadis, E K

    2003-01-01

    A new ternary compound, HgBrI, having a variable, large bandgap was investigated using different nondestructive methods. The homogeneity of the crystal composition along the growth axis was given from absorption edge measurements performed on different parts of the crystals using classical optical measurements. The atomic composition was determined by x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Based on photoluminescence and reflection measurements using Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy, the exact position and dimensions of the inhomogeneity regions were established

  1. Synthesis of novel low-bandgap organic semiconductors: Azulene-1,3-diyl-vinylene oligomers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strachota, Adam; Cimrová, Věra; Thorn-Csányi, E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 268, č. 1 (2008), s. 66-71 ISSN 1022-1360. [Microsymposium on Advanced Polymer Materials for Photonics and Electronics /47./. Prague, 15.07.2007-19.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050409; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : azulene * low bandgap * organic semiconductors Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Band-gap control of GaInP using Sb as a surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurtleff, J.K.; Lee, R.T.; Fetzer, C.M.; Stringfellow, G.B.

    1999-01-01

    The use of surfactants to control specific aspects of the vapor-phase epitaxial growth process is beginning to be studied for both the elemental and III/V semiconductors. To date, most reported surfactant effects for semiconductors relate to the morphology of the growing films. However, semiconductor alloys with CuPt ordering exhibit much more dramatic effects. The change in the CuPt order parameter induced by the surfactant translates into a marked change in the band-gap energy. Previous work concentrated on the effects of the donor tellurium. Te is less than ideal as a surfactant, since the change in band-gap energy is coupled to a large change in the conductivity. This letter presents the results of a study of the effects of an isoelectronic surfactant on the ordering process in GaInP. Sb has been found to act as a surfactant during organometallic vapor-phase epitaxial growth. At an estimated Sb concentration in the solid of 1x10 -4 , order is eliminated, as indicated by the band-gap energy. Surface photoabsorption (SPA) data indicate that the effect is due to a change in the surface reconstruction. Adding Sb leads to attenuation of the peak at 400 nm in the SPA spectrum associated with [bar 110] P dimers. The addition of Sb during the growth cycle has been used to produce a heterostructure with a 135 meV band-gap difference between two layers with the same solid composition. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  3. A bandgap voltage reference generator for an analogue-to-digital converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liu; Feng, Liu

    2003-09-01

    We propose a bandgap voltage reference generator with low power supply design, implemented in complementary metal-oxide silicon integrated circuit technology. Its stability and immunity have an important effect on the performance of the analogue-to-digital converter. With HSPICE simulation, the temperature coefficient and power supply rejection ratio became several ppm °C-1 and 54 dB, respectively. Moreover, the power consumption was only 0.25 mw.

  4. Highly Conductive Graphene/Ag Hybrid Fibers for Flexible Fiber-Type Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sang Su; Lee, Kang Eun; Cha, Hwa-Jin; Seong, Dong Gi; Um, Moon-Kwang; Byun, Joon-Hyung; Oh, Youngseok; Oh, Joon Hak; Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk

    2015-11-01

    Mechanically robust, flexible, and electrically conductive textiles are highly suitable for use in wearable electronic applications. In this study, highly conductive and flexible graphene/Ag hybrid fibers were prepared and used as electrodes for planar and fiber-type transistors. The graphene/Ag hybrid fibers were fabricated by the wet-spinning/drawing of giant graphene oxide and subsequent functionalization with Ag nanoparticles. The graphene/Ag hybrid fibers exhibited record-high electrical conductivity of up to 15,800 S cm-1. As the graphene/Ag hybrid fibers can be easily cut and placed onto flexible substrates by simply gluing or stitching, ion gel-gated planar transistors were fabricated by using the hybrid fibers as source, drain, and gate electrodes. Finally, fiber-type transistors were constructed by embedding the graphene/Ag hybrid fiber electrodes onto conventional polyurethane monofilaments, which exhibited excellent flexibility (highly bendable and rollable properties), high electrical performance (μh = 15.6 cm2 V-1 s-1, Ion/Ioff > 104), and outstanding device performance stability (stable after 1,000 cycles of bending tests and being exposed for 30 days to ambient conditions). We believe that our simple methods for the fabrication of graphene/Ag hybrid fiber electrodes for use in fiber-type transistors can potentially be applied to the development all-organic wearable devices.

  5. Relation between bandgap and resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütten, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Albert, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Memory based on phase change materials is currently the most promising candidate for bridging the gap in access time between memory and storage in traditional memory hierarchy. However, multilevel storage is still hindered by the so-called resistance drift commonly related to structural relaxation of the amorphous phase. Here, we present the temporal evolution of infrared spectra measured on amorphous thin films of the three phase change materials Ag4In3Sb67Te26, GeTe and the most popular Ge2Sb2Te5. A widening of the bandgap upon annealing accompanied by a decrease of the optical dielectric constant ε∞ is observed for all three materials. Quantitative comparison with experimental data for the apparent activation energy of conduction reveals that the temporal evolution of bandgap and activation energy can be decoupled. The case of Ag4In3Sb67Te26, where the increase of activation energy is significantly smaller than the bandgap widening, demonstrates the possibility to identify new phase change materials with reduced resistance drift.

  6. Graded band-gap engineering for increased efficiency in CZTS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhati, H.; Djeffal, F.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a potential high efficiency Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4/CdS (CZTS) solar cell design based on graded band-gap engineering that can offer the benefits of improved absorption behavior and reduced recombination effects. Moreover, a new hybrid approach based on analytical modeling and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is proposed to determinate the optimal band-gap profile of the amended CZTS absorber layer to achieve further efficiency enhancement. It is found that the proposed design exhibits superior performance, where a high efficiency of 16.9% is recorded for the optimized solar cell with a relative improvement of 92%, compared with the reference cell efficiency of 8.8%. Likewise, the optimized CZTS solar cell with a graded band-gap enables achieving a higher open circuit voltage of 889 mV, a short-circuit current of 28.5 mA and a fill factor of 66%. Therefore, the optimized CZTS-based solar cell with graded-band gap paradigm pinpoints a new path toward recording high-efficiency thin-film solar cells through enhancing carrier collection and reducing the recombination rate.

  7. Bandgap tuning with thermal residual stresses induced in a quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eui-Hyun; Joo, Soo-Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jin; Song, Seungwoo; Chang, Yong-June; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2014-09-24

    Lattice distortion induced by residual stresses can alter electronic and mechanical properties of materials significantly. Herein, a novel way of the bandgap tuning in a quantum dot (QD) by lattice distortion is presented using 4-nm-sized CdS QDs grown on a TiO2 particle as an application example. The bandgap tuning (from 2.74 eV to 2.49 eV) of a CdS QD is achieved by suitably adjusting the degree of lattice distortion in a QD via the tensile residual stresses which arise from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between CdS and TiO2. The idea of bandgap tuning is then applied to QD-sensitized solar cells, achieving ≈60% increase in the power conversion efficiency by controlling the degree of thermal residual stress. Since the present methodology is not limited to a specific QD system, it will potentially pave a way to unexplored quantum effects in various QD-based applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. In- and Ga-based inorganic double perovskites with direct bandgaps for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Ma, Liang; Ju, Minggang; Huang, Jinsong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2017-08-16

    Double perovskites in the form of A 2 B'B''X 6 (A = Cs, B' = Ag, B'' = Bi) have been reported as potential alternatives to lead-containing organometal trihalide perovskites. However, all double perovskites synthesized to date exhibit indirect bandgaps >1.95 eV, which are undesirable for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Herein, we report a comprehensive computer-aided screening of In- and Ga-based double perovskites for potential photovoltaic applications. To this end, several preconditions are implemented for the screening of optimal candidates, which include structural stability, electronic bandgaps, and optical absorption. Importantly, four In- and Ga-based double perovskites are identified to possess direct bandgaps within the desirable range of 0.9-1.6 eV for photovoltaic applications. Dominant optical absorption of the four double perovskites is found to be in the UV range. The structural and thermal stability of the four double perovskites are examined using both the empirical Goldschmidt ratio and convex-hull calculations. Only Cs 2 AgInBr 6 is predicted to be thermodynamically stable.

  9. Fiber Bragg Grating Based Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Filla, James; Guthrie, William; Quintavalle, John

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in developing photonic temperature sensors such as the Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) as an alternative to resistance thermometry. In this study we examine the thermal response of FBGs over the temperature range of 233 K to 393 K. We demonstrate, in hermetically sealed dry Argon environment, FBG devices show a quadratic dependence on temperature with expanded uncertainties (k=2) of ≈500 mK. Our measurements indicate that the combined measurement uncertainty is dominated by uncertainty in determining peak center fitting and thermal ageing of polyimide coated fibers.

  10. Lab-on-fiber technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Andrea; Crescitelli, Alessio; Ricciardi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on a research field that is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising ones for the global optics and photonics community: the "lab-on-fiber" technology. Inspired by the well-established 'lab on-a-chip' concept, this new technology essentially envisages novel and highly functionalized devices completely integrated into a single optical fiber for both communication and sensing applications.Based on the R&D experience of some of the world's leading authorities in the fields of optics, photonics, nanotechnology, and material science, this book provides a broad and accurate de

  11. Fiber optics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Azzawi, Abdul

    2007-01-01

    Since the invention of the laser, our fascination with the photon has led to one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of technology. New advances in fiber optic devices, components, and materials make it more important than ever to stay current. Comprising chapters drawn from the author's highly anticipated book Photonics: Principles and Practices, Fiber Optics: Principles and Practices offers a detailed and focused treatment for anyone in need of authoritative information on this critical area underlying photonics.Using a consistent approach, the author leads you step-by-step throug

  12. Modeling and testing of static pressure within an optical fiber cable spool using distributed fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengju; Ren, Liyong; Qu, Enshi; Tang, Feng; Liang, Quan

    2012-11-01

    Based on the force analysis, we establish a theoretical model to study the static pressure distribution of the fiber cable spool for the fiber optic guided missile (FOG-M). Simulations indicate that for each fiber layer in the fiber cable spool, the applied static pressure on it asymptotically converges as the number of fiber layers increases. Using the distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing technique, the static pressure of fiber cable layers in the spool on the cable winding device was measured. Experiments show that the Bragg wavelength of FBG in every layer varies very quickly at the beginning and then becomes gently as the subsequent fiber cable was twisted onto the spool layer by layer. Theoretical simulations agree qualitatively with experimental results. This technology provides us a real-time method to monitor the pressure within the fiber cable layer during the cable winding process.

  13. Optical-fiber-interconnected MEMS sensors and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael B.; Meller, Scott A.; Wavering, Thomas A.; Greene, Jonathan A.; Murphy, Kent A.

    1998-07-01

    Microelectromechanical systems or MEMS are miniature devices that have several advantages over conventional sensing and actuating technology. MEMS devices benefit form well developed integrated circuit production methods which ensure high volume, high yield processes that create low-cost sensors and actuators. OPtical fiber interconnected MEMS will provide new functionality in MEMS devices such as multiplexed operation for distributed sensing applications. This paper presents approaches in optical fiber to MEMS interfacing and some preliminary results.

  14. Fiber fuse light-induced continuous breakdown of silica glass optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Todoroki, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the fiber fuse phenomenon that causes a serious problem for the present optical communication systems. High-power light often brings about catastrophic damage to optical devices. Silica glass optical fibers with ultralow transmission loss are not the exception. A fiber fuse appears in a heated region of the fiber cable delivering a few watts of light and runs toward the light source destroying its core region. Understanding this phenomenon is a necessary first step in the development of future optical communication systems. This book provides supplementary videos and photog

  15. Fabrication of wide-bandgap transparent electrodes by using conductive filaments: performance breakthrough in vertical-type GaN LED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Shin, Hee Woong; Han, Il Ki; Kim, Tae Geun

    2014-07-25

    For realizing next-generation solid-state lighting devices, performance breakthroughs must be accomplished for nitride-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Highly transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) may be key to achieving this goal, as they provide uniform current injection and distribution across a large device area, eventually increasing the light output power. However, the trade-off between electrical conductivity and optical transmittance of LEDs must be addressed. Herein, we introduce a novel strategy based on TCEs fabricated using wide-bandgap (WB) materials such as SiNx, incorporated beneath the n-type electrode of vertical-type LEDs, and show the feasibility of this strategy. We employ a novel electrical breakdown (EBD) technique to form conductive filaments (or current paths) between a TCE and n-GaN (GaN: gallium nitride). By employing the EBD process, we obtain both ohmic behavior for SiNx TCE/n-GaN and a current spreading effect across n-GaN. These results demonstrate the tremendous potential of WB-TCEs for use in high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  16. Oriented thin films of mixture of a low-bandgap polymer and a fullerene derivative prepared by friction-transfer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Nobutaka; Mizokuro, Toshiko; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Shibata, Yousei; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki

    2018-02-01

    We have been studying oriented thin films of polymers fabricated by the friction-transfer method, which allows the alignment of a variety of conjugated polymers into highly oriented films. In this study, we prepared oriented blend films of a mixture of a low-bandgap polymer, poly{4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-4,6-diyl} (PTB7), and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM), which is a promising combination for application in organic solar cells. We obtained oriented blend films of PTB7 and PC71BM by the friction-transfer method from a solid block. Polarized UV-visible spectra show that the PTB7 chains were aligned parallel to the friction direction in the blend films. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) studies with synchrotron radiation suggested that the preferred orientation of PTB7 crystallites was face-on in the blend films. The GIXD results also showed the high uniaxial orientation of PTB7 chains in blend films. Photovoltaic devices were fabricated using the friction-transferred blend films of the PTB7 and PC71BM. These bulk heterojunction devices showed better performance than planar heterojunction devices fabricated using pure friction-transferred PTB7 films.

  17. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given

  18. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  19. Fiber tests on a radiotelescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connes, P.; Reynaud, F.

    In order to demonstrate use of fibers in a future radio-dish-mounted interferometric array or optical telescopes, two 100-m SM fibers were installed on the Nançay radiotelescope, used in a serendipitous mode. They formed the two arms of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, illuminated by a 6328 Å laser. Thermal and interferometric servo-control were simultaneously applied. Even under severe conditions, path difference was maintained stable to within a few Å.This is considerably better than needed for any ground-based application, and still more than adequate for a roughly-similar proposed space-borne device. Some more fiber problems remain to be solved.

  20. Three-terminal graphene negative differential resistance devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Farmer, Damon B; Zhu, Wenjuan; Han, Shu-Jen; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos D; Bol, Ageeth A; Avouris, Phaedon; Lin, Yu-Ming

    2012-03-27

    A new mechanism for negative differential resistance (NDR) is discovered in three-terminal graphene devices based on a field-effect transistor configuration. This NDR effect is a universal phenomenon for graphene and is demonstrated in devices fabricated with different types of graphene materials and gate dielectrics. Operation of conventional NDR devices is usually based on quantum tunneling or intervalley carrier transfer, whereas the NDR behavior observed here is unique to the ambipolar behavior of zero-bandgap graphene and is associated with the competition between electron and hole conduction as the drain bias increases. These three terminal graphene NDR devices offer more operation flexibility than conventional two-terminal devices based on tunnel diodes, Gunn diodes, or molecular devices, and open up new opportunities for graphene in microwave to terahertz applications. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  1. Nanofilms on a hollow core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Ignacio R.; Bravo, Javier; Arregui, Francisco J.; Corres, Jesús M.

    2006-05-01

    We experimentally study the behavior of one multimode fiber-hollow core fiber-multimode fiber structure when nanofilms are deposited on it with the aim of developing practical evanescent field-based devices, such as sensors, filters, etc. The electrostatic self-assembly (ESA) method is used as the deposition technique and the chosen polymers are PDDA and Poly R-478 because of their well-known optical properties and their potential application as humidity sensors. Three different types of hollow core, fibers are used for the fabrication of the devices and at two different wavelengths. An oscillatory-decreasing transmitted optical power is obtained as the thickness of the nanofilms is increased.

  2. Optical device comprising a cantilever and method of fabrication and use thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Deladi, S.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The present invention provides an optical device, comprising an optical fiber and a cantilever that is arranged on an end of the optical fiber; The cantilever may be an integral part of the optical fiber, and may have a length that is substantially equal to a diameter of the optical fiber.

  3. Optical device comprising a cantilever and method of fabrication and use thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Deladi, S.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2011-01-01

    The present invention provides an optical device, comprising an optical fiber and a cantilever that is arranged on an end of the optical fiber; The cantilever may be an integral part of the optical fiber, and may have a length that is substantially equal to a diameter of the optical fiber.

  4. A Game Changer: A Multifunctional Perovskite Exhibiting Giant Ferroelectricity and Narrow Bandgap with Potential Application in a Truly Monolithic Multienergy Harvester or Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Tofel, Pavel; Palosaari, Jaakko; Jantunen, Heli; Juuti, Jari

    2017-08-01

    An ABO 3 -type perovskite solid-solution, (K 0.5 Na 0.5 )NbO 3 (KNN) doped with 2 mol% Ba(Ni 0.5 Nb 0.5 )O 3- δ (BNNO) is reported. Such a composition yields a much narrower bandgap (≈1.6 eV) compared to the parental composition-pure KNN-and other widely used piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials (e.g., Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 , BaTiO 3 ). Meanwhile, it exhibits the same large piezoelectric coefficient as that of KNN (≈100 pC N -1 ) and a much larger pyroelectric coefficient (≈130 µC m -2 K -1 ) compared to the previously reported narrow-bandgap material (KNbO 3 ) 1- x -BNNO x . The unique combination of these excellent ferroelectric and optical properties opens the door to the development of multisource energy harvesting or multifunctional sensing devices for the simultaneous and efficient conversion of solar, thermal, and kinetic energies into electricity in a single material. Individual and comprehensive characterizations of the optical, ferroelectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and photovoltaic properties are investigated with single and coexisting energy sources. No degrading interaction between ferroelectric and photovoltaic behaviors is observed. This composition may fundamentally change the working principles of state-of-the-art hybrid energy harvesters and sensors, and thus significantly increases the unit-volume energy conversion efficiency and reliability of energy harvesters in ambient environments. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Downhill simplex algorithm based approach to holey fiber design for tunable fiber parametric wavelength converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sheng; Liu, Deming; Yu, Shaohua; Huang, Benxiong; Ke, Changjian; Zhang, Minming; Liu, Chen

    2010-05-10

    We present a new approach to the design of the holey fibers that have ultra-high nonlinearity and dispersion properties optimized for tunable fiber parametric wavelength converters based on degenerated four wave mixing. This hybrid approach combines downhill simplex algorithms with four wave mixing modeling. Exploiting the relations between fiber properties and the converter's characteristics, this method is not only much faster than other methods proposed before but also enables an inverse design of the holey fibers according to the pre-set device characteristics, like conversion gain, tuning range, fiber length and pump power. We then investigate the sensitivity of these characteristics to the small variations in the fiber structural parameters and find adjusting the pump power can to some extent mitigate the impact of the fabrication errors. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  6. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  7. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 312 Holden Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  8. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  9. Complex layered materials and periodic electromagnetic band-gap structures: Concepts, characterizations, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosallaei, Hossein

    The main objective of this dissertation is to characterize and create insight into the electromagnetic performances of two classes of composite structures, namely, complex multi-layered media and periodic Electromagnetic Band-Gap (EBG) structures. The advanced and diversified computational techniques are applied to obtain their unique propagation characteristics and integrate the results into some novel applications. In the first part of this dissertation, the vector wave solution of Maxwell's equations is integrated with the Genetic Algorithm (GA) optimization method to provide a powerful technique for characterizing multi-layered materials, and obtaining their optimal designs. The developed method is successfully applied to determine the optimal composite coatings for Radar Cross Section (RCS) reduction of canonical structures. Both monostatic and bistatic scatterings are explored. A GA with hybrid planar/curved surface implementation is also introduced to efficiently obtain the optimal absorbing materials for curved structures. Furthermore, design optimization of the non-uniform Luneburg and 2-shell spherical lens antennas utilizing modal solution/GA-adaptive-cost function is presented. The lens antennas are effectively optimized for both high gain and suppressed grating lobes. The second part demonstrates the development of an advanced computational engine, which accurately computes the broadband characteristics of challenging periodic electromagnetic band-gap structures. This method utilizes the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique with Periodic Boundary Condition/Perfectly Matched Layer (PBC/PML), which is efficiently integrated with the Prony scheme. The computational technique is successfully applied to characterize and present the unique propagation performances of different classes of periodic structures such as Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS), Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) materials, and Left-Handed (LH) composite media. The results are

  10. Effects of indirect bandgap top cells in a monolithic cascade cell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, H. B.; Godlewski, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of having a slightly indirect top cell in a three junction cascade monolithic stack is calculated. The minority carrier continuity equations are utilized to calculate individual junction performance. Absorption coefficient curves for general III-V compounds are calculated for a variety of direct and indirect gap materials. The results indicate that for a small excursion into the indirect region, (about 0.1 eV), the loss of efficiency is acceptably small (less than 2.5 percent) and considerably less than attempting to make the top junction a smaller direct bandgap.

  11. Structural, optical, and electronic studies of wide-bandgap lead halide perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    Comin, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. We investigate the family of mixed Br/Cl organolead halide perovskites which enable light emission in the blue-violet region of the visible spectrum. We report the structural, optical and electronic properties of this air-stable family of perovskites, demonstrating full bandgap tunability in the 400-550 nm range and enhanced exciton strength upon Cl substitution. We complement this study by tracking the evolution of the band levels across the gap, thereby providing a foundational framework for future optoelectronic applications of these materials.

  12. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...... behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  13. Enhanced Near-Bandgap Response in InP Nanopillar Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Corsin; Xu, Jingsan; Zheng, Maxwell; Yin, Xingtian; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Kevin; Haegel, Nancy; Javey, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aenm.201400061 The effect of nanopillar texturing on the performance of InP solar cells is investigated. Maskless, lithography-free reactive ion etching of InP nanopillars improves the open-circuit voltage, reduces refl ectance over a broad spectral range, and enhances the near-bandgap response compared to a fl at, non-textured cell with comparable refl ectance in the infrared. Electron-beam induced...

  14. Near-bandgap optical properties of pseudomorphic GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Costa, Vijay Richard, E-mail: vdcosta@asu.edu; Wang, Wei; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: eleyeoyc@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore)

    2016-08-14

    We investigated the compositional dependence of the near-bandgap dielectric function and the E{sub 0} critical point in pseudomorphic Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} alloys grown on Ge (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The complex dielectric functions were obtained using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.5 to 4.5 eV at room temperature. Analogous to the E{sub 1} and E{sub 1}+Δ{sub 1} transitions, a model consisting of the compositional dependence of relaxed alloys along with the strain contribution predicted by the deformation potential theory fully accounts for the observed compositional dependence in pseudomorphic alloys.

  15. Lattice reconfiguration and phononic band-gap adaptation via origami folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, M.; Li, S.; Wang, K. W.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a framework of utilizing origami folding to redistribute the inclusions of a phononic structure to achieve significant phononic band-gap adaptation. Cylindrical inclusions are attached to the vertices of a Miura-Ori sheet, whose 1 degree-of-freedom rigid folding can enable fundamental reconfigurations in the underlying periodic architecture via switching between different Bravais lattice types. Such a reconfiguration can drastically change the wave propagation behavior in terms of band gap and provide a scalable and practical means for broadband wave tailoring.

  16. Incorporation of Furan into Low Band-Gap Polymers for Efficient Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Woo, Claire H.

    2010-11-10

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of the first examples of furan-containing low band-gap polymers, PDPP2FT and PDPP3F, with substantial power conversion efficiencies in organic solar cells are reported. Inserting furan moieties in the backbone of the conjugated polymers enables the use of relatively small solubilizing side chains because of the significant contribution of the furan rings to overall polymer solubility in common organic solvents. Bulk heterojunction solar cells fabricated from furan-containing polymers and PC71BM as the acceptor showed power conversion efficiencies reaching 5.0%. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. Theoretical prediction of sandwiched two-dimensional phosphide binary compound sheets with tunable bandgaps and anisotropic physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. Y.; Yu, M.

    2018-03-01

    Atomic layers of GaP and InP binary compounds with unique anisotropic structural, electronic and mechanical properties have been predicted from first-principle molecular dynamics simulations. These new members of the phosphide binary compound family stabilize to a sandwiched two-dimensional (2D) crystalline structure with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and high buckling of 2.14 Å–2.46 Å. Their vibration modes are similar to those of phosphorene with six Raman active modes ranging from ∼80 cm‑1 to 400 cm‑1. The speeds of sound in their phonon dispersions reflect anisotropy in their elastic constants, which was further confirmed by their strong directional dependence of Young’s moduli and effective nonlinear elastic moduli. They show wide bandgap semiconductor behavior with fundamental bandgaps of 2.89 eV for GaP and 2.59 eV for InP, respectively, even wider than their bulk counterparts. Such bandgaps were found to be tunable under strain. In particular, a direct–indirect bandgap transition was found under certain strains along zigzag or biaxial orientations, reflecting their promising applications in strain-induced bandgap engineering in nanoelectronics and photovoltaics. Feasible pathways to realize these novel 2D phosphide compounds are also proposed.

  18. Pressure-Induced Bandgap Optimization in Lead-Based Perovskites with Prolonged Carrier Lifetime and Ambient Retainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Kong, Lingping [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Gong, Jue [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb IL 60115 USA; Yang, Wenge [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Mao, Ho-kwang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Hu, Qingyang [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Liu, Zhenxian [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Schaller, Richard D. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Zhang, Dongzhou [Hawai' i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, Honolulu HI 96822 USA; Xu, Tao [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb IL 60115 USA

    2016-12-05

    Bond length and bond angle exhibited by valence electrons is essential to the core of chemistry. Using lead-based organic–inorganic perovskite compounds as an exploratory platform, it is demonstrated that the modulation of valence electrons by compression can lead to discovery of new properties of known compounds. Yet, despite its unprecedented progress, further efficiency boost of lead-based organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells is hampered by their wider bandgap than the optimum value according to the Shockley–Queisser limit. By modulating the valence electron wavefunction with modest hydraulic pressure up to 2.1 GPa, the optimized bandgap for single-junction solar cells in lead-based perovskites, for the first time, is achieved by narrowing the bandgap of formamidinium lead triiodide (HC(NH2)2PbI3) from 1.489 to 1.337 eV. Strikingly, such bandgap narrowing is partially retained after the release of pressure to ambient, and the bandgap narrowing is also accompanied with double-prolonged carrier lifetime. With First-principles simulation, this work opens a new dimension in basic chemical understanding of structural photonics and electronics and paves an alternative pathway toward better photovoltaic materials-by-design.

  19. Pressure-Induced Bandgap Optimization in Lead-Based Perovskites with Prolonged Carrier Lifetime and Ambient Retainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Kong, Lingping [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Gong, Jue [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb IL 60115 USA; Yang, Wenge [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Mao, Ho-kwang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 China; Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Hu, Qingyang [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Liu, Zhenxian [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Schaller, Richard D. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Zhang, Dongzhou [Hawai' i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, Honolulu HI 96822 USA; Xu, Tao [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb IL 60115 USA

    2016-12-05

    Bond length and bond angle exhibited by valence electrons is essential to the core of chemistry. Using lead-based organic–inorganic perovskite compounds as an exploratory platform, it is demonstrated that the modulation of valence electrons by compression can lead to discovery of new properties of known compounds. Yet, despite its unprecedented progress, further efficiency boost of lead-based organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells is hampered by their wider bandgap than the optimum value according to the Shockley–Queisser limit. By modulating the valence electron wavefunction with modest hydraulic pressure up to 2.1 GPa, the optimized bandgap for single-junction solar cells in lead-based perovskites, for the first time, is achieved by narrowing the bandgap of formamidinium lead triiodide (HC(NH2)2PbI3) from 1.489 to 1.337 eV. Strikingly, such bandgap narrowing is partially retained after the release of pressure to ambient, and the bandgap narrowing is also accompanied with double-prolonged carrier lifetime. With First-principles simulation, this work opens a new dimension in basic chemical understanding of structural photonics and electronics and paves an alternative pathway toward better photovoltaic materials-by-design.

  20. Effects of Ge- and Sb-doping and annealing on the tunable bandgaps of SnS films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsuan-Tai; Chiang, Ming-Hung; Huang, Chen-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wen-Tai, E-mail: wtlin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Fu, Yaw-Shyan [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700, Taiwan (China); Guo, Tzung-Fang [Department of Photonics, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    SnS, Ge- and Sb-doped SnS films with single orthorhombic SnS phase were fabricated via solvothermal routes and subsequent spin-coating, respectively. The substitution solubilities of Ge and Sb in SnS are about 6 and 5 at.%, respectively. The bandgaps of Ge- and Sb-doped SnS films can be tuned in the ranges of 1.25–1.35 and 1.30–1.39 eV, respectively. The possible mechanisms for the tunable bandgaps of Ge- and Sb-doped SnS films are discussed. For the Ge- and Sb-doped SnS films subjected to annealing at 200–350 °C in N{sub 2}, the bandgaps of 200 °C-annealed films remain unchanged, while those of 300 °C- and 350 °C-annealed films decrease with the annealing temperature because of the evaporation of Ge and Sb respectively. - Highlights: • Ge- and Sb-doped SnS films were fabricated via spin-coating. • The solubilities of Ge and Sb in SnS are about 6 and 5 at.%, respectively. • The bandgaps of SnS films can be tuned by Ge and Sb doping respectively. • Annealing above 300 °C reduces the bandgaps of Ge- and Sb-doped SnS films.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of special microstructured fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelke, J.; Schuster, K.; Schwuchow, A.; Litzkendorf, D.; Spittel, R.; Kirchhof, J.; Bartelt, H.

    2011-05-01

    Microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) as a novel type of light guiding media typically combine structural elements with very different chemical and optical behavior, e.g. silica - air, silica - high refractive index glasses. The applicative potential is very manifold: devices for telecommunication, nonlinear optics, sensing devices, fiber based gas lasers, etc. We report about preparation and characterization of selected total internal reflection (TIR) guiding MOFs: Air Clad Fiber, Suspended Core Fiber and heavy metal oxide (HMO) glass core MOFs. We fabricated Air Clad Fibers with extreme air fraction. The bridge width of about 0.13 μm corresponds to a numerical aperture (NA) of about 0.6. Suspended core fibers for evanescent sensing were prepared by pressurized drawing of arrangements of three and four capillaries. By inflating the cavities the NA was increased up to 0.68. Material combined MOFs were prepared for nonlinear application (e.g. supercontinuum generation) with lanthanum aluminum silicate glass core. Thermochemical and optical behaviors of high nonlinear core glass candidates were investigated for alumina concentration up to 20 mol% and lanthanum oxide concentration up to 24 mol% in silica matrix. The manufactured HMO glass core MOF with a La2O3 concentration of 10 mol% shows a similar background loss level like the unstructured HMO glass fiber about 1 dB/m.

  2. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoluble vs. soluble fiber; Fiber - soluble vs. insoluble ... There are 2 different types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. Both ... water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. ...

  3. Controlled chemical stabilization of polyvinyl precursor fiber, and high strength carbon fiber produced therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-12-27

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber, which comprises: (i) immersing functionalized polyvinyl precursor fiber into a liquid solution having a boiling point of at least 60.degree. C.; (ii) heating the liquid solution to a first temperature of at least 25.degree. C. at which the functionalized precursor fiber engages in an elimination-addition equilibrium while a tension of at least 0.1 MPa is applied to the fiber; (iii) gradually raising the first temperature to a final temperature that is at least 20.degree. C. above the first temperature and up to the boiling point of the liquid solution for sufficient time to convert the functionalized precursor fiber to a pre-carbonized fiber; and (iv) subjecting the pre-carbonized fiber produced according to step (iii) to high temperature carbonization conditions to produce the final carbon fiber. Articles and devices containing the fibers, including woven and non-woven mats or paper forms of the fibers, are also described.

  4. Photonic crystal fibers -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2002-01-01

    During this ph.d. work, attention has been focused on understanding and analyzing the modal behavior of micro-structured fibers. Micro-structured fibers are fibers with a complex dielectric toplogy, and offer a number of novel possibilities, compared to standard silica based optical fibers......, and nonlinear fibers with zero dispersion wavelength well below 1300 nm. This thesis dexcribes the functionalities of these fibers, and further point to novel application areas, such as new efficient fiber amplifiers and fibers with new possibilities within dispersion management. When pointing toward novel...

  5. Light monitoring by isotropic and by integrated fiber detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Beyer, Wolfgang; Ell, Christian; Gebhardt, G.; Heinze, Armin; Jocham, Dieter; Unsoeld, Eberhard

    1990-07-01

    In the medical field of laser light application detector systems are required for measuring the light power applied to the tissue and monitoring instabilities caused by the delivery system during the application of the laser light. An isotropic detector was developed consisting of a fiber tip molded to a sphere and covered with diffuse backscattering layers. The homogeneity of the isotropic detection is 85-90% in an angular field of Additionally a monitoring device has been developed which consists of a darkened chamber holding a part of the fiber bent to a curve. Integrated photodiodes detect the photons "stepping" out of the fiber. Defects of the fiber, the fiber tip, changes in the medium around the fiber tip, and variations of the laser output have influences on the detector signal. Both devices could be useful in evaluating an exact dosimetry for light.

  6. Bandgap widening in thermochromic Mg-doped VO{sub 2} thin films: Quantitative data based on optical absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shu-Yi; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Mlyuka, Nuru R. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 35063, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Primetzhofer, Daniel; Possnert, Göran [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Hallén, Anders [KTH-ICT, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-10-14

    Thermochromic Mg-doped VO{sub 2} films were deposited by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering onto heated glass and carbon substrates. Elemental compositions were inferred from Rutherford backscattering. Optical bandgaps were obtained from spectral transmittance and reflectance measurements—from both the film side and the back side of the samples—and ensuing determination of absorption coefficients. The bandgap of Mg-doped films was found to increase by 3.9 ± 0.5 eV per unit of atom ratio Mg/(Mg + V) for 0 < Mg/(Mg + V) < 0.21. The presence of ∼0.45 at. % Si enhanced the bandgap even more.

  7. Integrating a Triplet-triplet Annihilation Up-conversion System to Enhance Dye-sensitized Solar Cell Response to Sub-bandgap Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattestad, Andrew; Cheng, Yuen Yap; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2014-01-01

    The poor response of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) to red and infrared light is a significant impediment to the realization of higher photocurrents and hence higher efficiencies. Photon up-conversion by way of triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA-UC) is an attractive technique for using these otherwise wasted low energy photons to produce photocurrent, while not interfering with the photoanodic performance in a deleterious manner. Further to this, TTA-UC has a number of features, distinct from other reported photon up-conversion technologies, which renders it particularly suitable for coupling with DSC technology. In this work, a proven high performance TTA-UC system, comprising a palladium porphyrin sensitizer and rubrene emitter, is combined with a high performance DSC (utilizing the organic dye D149) in an integrated device. The device shows an enhanced response to sub-bandgap light over the absorption range of the TTA-UC sub-unit resulting in the highest figure of merit for up-conversion assisted DSC performance to date. PMID:25285452

  8. Matching Charge Extraction Contact for Wide-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Chen, Bo; Zhao, Fuwen; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Deng, Yehao; Shao, Yuchuan; Fang, Yanjun; Bai, Yang; Wang, Chunru; Huang, Jinsong

    2017-07-01

    Efficient wide-bandgap (WBG) perovskite solar cells are needed to boost the efficiency of silicon solar cells to beyond Schottky-Queisser limit, but they suffer from a larger open circuit voltage (V OC ) deficit than narrower bandgap ones. Here, it is shown that one major limitation of V OC in WBG perovskite solar cells comes from the nonmatched energy levels of charge transport layers. Indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA) with higher-lying lowest-unoccupied-molecular-orbital is needed for WBG perovskite solar cells, while its energy-disorder needs to be minimized before a larger V OC can be observed. A simple method is applied to reduce the energy disorder by isolating isomer ICBA-tran3 from the as-synthesized ICBA-mixture. WBG perovskite solar cells with ICBA-tran3 show enhanced V OC by 60 mV, reduced V OC deficit of 0.5 V, and then a record stabilized power conversion efficiency of 18.5%. This work points out the importance of matching the charge transport layers in perovskite solar cells when the perovskites have a different composition and energy levels. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Amide-Catalyzed Phase-Selective Crystallization Reduces Defect Density in Wide-Bandgap Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghwan; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Tan, Hairen; Zhao, Yicheng; Kim, Younghoon; Choi, Jongmin; Jo, Jea Woong; Fan, James; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Yang, Zhenyu; Quan, Li Na; Wei, Mingyang; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H

    2018-02-14

    Wide-bandgap (WBG) formamidinium-cesium (FA-Cs) lead iodide-bromide mixed perovskites are promising materials for front cells well-matched with crystalline silicon to form tandem solar cells. They offer avenues to augment the performance of widely deployed commercial solar cells. However, phase instability, high open-circuit voltage (V oc ) deficit, and large hysteresis limit this otherwise promising technology. Here, by controlling the crystallization of FA-Cs WBG perovskite with the aid of a formamide cosolvent, light-induced phase segregation and hysteresis in perovskite solar cells are suppressed. The highly polar solvent additive formamide induces direct formation of the black perovskite phase, bypassing the yellow phases, thereby reducing the density of defects in films. As a result, the optimized WBG perovskite solar cells (PSCs) (E g ≈ 1.75 eV) exhibit a high V oc of 1.23 V, reduced hysteresis, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 17.8%. A PCE of 15.2% on 1.1 cm 2 solar cells, the highest among the reported efficiencies for large-area PSCs having this bandgap is also demonstrated. These perovskites show excellent phase stability and thermal stability, as well as long-term air stability. They maintain ≈95% of their initial PCE after 1300 h of storage in dry air without encapsulation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Direct-Indirect Nature of the Bandgap in Lead-Free Perovskite Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuhai

    2017-06-23

    With record efficiencies achieved in lead halide perovskite-based photovoltaics, urgency has shifted toward finding alternative materials that are stable and less toxic. Bismuth-based perovskite materials are currently one of the most promising candidates among those alternatives. However, the band structures of these materials, including the nature of the bandgaps, remain elusive due to extremely low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) and scattering issues in their thin-film form. Here, we reveal the specific nature of the material\\'s electronic transitions by realizing monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) of hexagonal-phase Cs3Bi2X9 perovskites, which afford well-resolved PL features. Interestingly, the PL profile exhibits a dual-spectral feature at room temperature with comparable intensities, based on which we propose an exciton recombination process involving both indirect and direct transitions simultaneously-an observation further supported by temperature-dependent and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings provide experimental and theoretical insights into the nature of the bandgaps in bismuth halide materials-essential information for assessing their viability in solar cells and optoelectronics.

  11. Development of Radiation-hard Bandgap Reference and Temperature Sensor in CMOS 130 nm Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczynska, Marika; Bugiel, Szymon; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Idzik, Marek; Michelis, Stefano; Moron, Jakub; Przyborowski, Dominik; Swientek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    A stable reference voltage (or current) source is a standard component of today's microelectronics systems. In particle physics experiments such reference is needed in spite of harsh ionizing radiation conditions, i.e. doses exceeding 100 Mrads and fluences above 1e15 n/cm2. After such radiation load a bandgap reference using standard p-n junction of bipolar transistor does not work properly. Instead of using standard p-n junctions, two enclosed layout transistor (ELTMOS) structures are used to create radiation-hard diodes: the ELT bulk diode and the diode obtained using the ELTMOS as dynamic threshold transistor (DTMOS). In this paper we have described several sub-1V references based on ELTMOS bulk diode and DTMOS based diode, using CMOS 130 nm process. Voltage references the structures with additional PTAT (Proportional To Absolute Temperature) output for temperature measurements were also designed. We present and compare post-layout simulations of the developed bandgap references and temperature sensors, w...

  12. Band-gaps in long Josephson junctions with periodic phase-shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Saeed, E-mail: saeedahmad@uom.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, University of Malakand Chakdara, Dir(L), Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Susanto, Hadi, E-mail: hsusanto@essex.ac.uk [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Wattis, Jonathan A.D. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-04

    We investigate analytically and numerically a long Josephson junction on an infinite domain, having arbitrary periodic phase shift of κ, that is, the so-called 0–κ long Josephson junction. The system is described by a one-dimensional sine-Gordon equation and has relatively recently been proposed as artificial atom lattices. We discuss the existence of periodic solutions of the system and investigate their stability both in the absence and presence of an applied bias current. We find critical values of the phase-discontinuity and the applied bias current beyond which static periodic solutions cease to exist. Due to the periodic discontinuity in the phase, the system admits regions of allowed and forbidden bands. We perturbatively investigate the Arnold tongues that separate the region of allowed and forbidden bands, and discuss the effect of an applied bias current on the band-gap structure. We present numerical simulations to support our analytical results. - Highlights: • A long Josephson junction on an infinite domain having arbitrary periodic phase shift has been proposed as artificial atom lattices recently. • We compute the band-gaps of the system asymptotically. • We show that the phase-shift and applied bias current can be used to control the band structures.

  13. Electronic band-gap modified passive silicon optical modulator at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Qingming; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-11-13

    The silicon optical modulator is considered to be the workhorse of a revolution in communications. In recent years, the capabilities of externally driven active silicon optical modulators have dramatically improved. Self-driven passive modulators, especially passive silicon modulators, possess advantages in compactness, integration, low-cost, etc. Constrained by a large indirect band-gap and sensitivity-related loss, the passive silicon optical modulator is scarce and has been not advancing, especially at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, a passive silicon optical modulator is fabricated by introducing an impurity band in the electronic band-gap, and its nonlinear optics and applications in the telecommunications-wavelength lasers are investigated. The saturable absorption properties at the wavelength of 1.55 μm was measured and indicates that the sample is quite sensitive to light intensity and has negligible absorption loss. With a passive silicon modulator, pulsed lasers were constructed at wavelengths at 1.34 and 1.42 μm. It is concluded that the sensitive self-driven passive silicon optical modulator is a viable candidate for photonics applications out to 2.5 μm.

  14. Controllable Synthesis of Bandgap-Tunable CuSx Se(1-x) Nanoplate Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Yang, Xia; Yang, Qing-Dan; Huang, Xing; Tang, Yongbing; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-07-01

    Composition engineering is an important approach for modulating the physical properties of alloyed semiconductors. In this work, ternary CuS(x)Se(1-x) nanoplates over the entire composition range of 0≤x≤1 have been controllably synthesized by means of a simple aqueous solution method at low temperature (90 °C). Reaction of Cu(2+) cations with polysulfide/-selenide ((S(n)Se(m))(2-)) anions rather than independent S(n)(2-) and Se(m)(2-) anions is responsible for the low-temperature and rapid synthesis of CuS(x)Se(1-x) alloys, and leads to higher S/Se ratios in the alloys than that in reactants owing to different dissociation energies of the Se-Se and the S-S bonds. The lattice parameters 'a' and 'c' of the hexagonal CuS(x)Se(1-x) alloys decrease linearly, whereas the direct bandgaps increase quadratically along with the S content. Direct bandgaps of the alloys can be tuned over a wide range from 1.64 to 2.19 eV. Raman peaks of the S-Se stretching mode are observed, thus further confirming formation of the alloyed CuS(x)Se(1-x) phase. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Bandgap Engineering of Stable Lead-Free Oxide Double Perovskites for Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qingde; Wang, Jing; Yin, Wan-Jian; Yan, Yanfa

    2018-03-06

    Despite the rapid progress in solar power conversion efficiency of archetype organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 -based solar cells, the long-term stability and toxicity of Pb remain the main challenges for the industrial deployment, leading to more uncertainties for global commercialization. The poor stabilities of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 -based solar cells may not only be attributed to the organic molecules but also the halides themself, most of which exhibit intrinsic instability under moisture and light. As an alternative, the possibility of oxide perovskites for photovoltaic applications is explored here. The class of lead-free stable oxide double perovskites A 2 M(III)M(V)O 6 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba; M(III) = Sb 3+ or Bi 3+ ; M(V) = V 5+ , Nb 5+ , or Ta 5+ ) is comprehensively explored with regard to their stability and their electronic and optical properties. Apart from the strong stability, this class of double perovskites exhibits direct bandgaps ranging from 0.3 to 3.8 eV. With proper B site alloying, the bandgap can be tuned within the range of 1.0-1.6 eV with optical absorptions as strong as CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 , making them suitable for efficient single-junction thin-film solar cell application. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. "Embedded Emitters": Direct bandgap Ge nanodots within SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, M. H.; Chou, S. K.; Pan, Y. W.; Lin, S. D.; George, T.; Li, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Microdisk-arrays of vertically stacked 30-70 nm Ge nanodots embedded within SiO2 were fabricated using thermal oxidation of Si0.75Ge0.25 abacus-shaped pillars and followed by post-annealing in oxygen-deficient conditions. The Ge nanodots are subjected to increasing quantum-confinement and tensile-strain by reducing dot size. We show that considerable quantum-confinement and tensile-strain can be generated within 30 nm Ge nanodots embedded in SiO2, as evidenced by large Raman red shifts for the Ge-Ge phonon lines in comparison to that for bulk Ge. These large quantum-confinement and tensile-strain facilitate direct-bandgap photoluminescence experimentally observed for the Ge nanodots, and are consistent with the strain-split photoluminescence transitions to the light-hole (LH) and heavy-hole (HH) valence bands at 0.83 eV and 0.88 eV, respectively. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements conducted from 10-100 K show temperature-insensitive carrier lifetimes of 2.7 ns and 5 ns for the HH and LH valence-band transitions, respectively, providing additional strong evidence of direct bandgap photoluminescence for tensile-strained Ge nanodots.

  17. The ultraviolet radiation detectors based on wide-bandgap Schottky barrier structures

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, T V; Konstantinov, O V

    2002-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to measure and control ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the Sun and artificial sources. We present photodetectors based on different wide-bandgap surface-barrier structures, which exhibit linear photocurrent-radiant flux characteristics in the range 10 sup - sup 2 -10 sup 3 W/m sup 2 and can register different types of UVR. The use of light filter UFS-6 with GaP photodetector results in a spectral photosensitivity range corresponding to the Sun UV radiation if observed on Earth. The spectral sensitivity range of the photodetectors based on 4H-SiC is near the spectrum of relative effectiveness of various wavelengths in bactericidal UVR. The photosensitivity of the surface-barrier photodetectors based on wide-bandgap semiconductors exhibits the essential decline in the short-wavelength UVR region (5-6 eV), which is the region of intrinsic absorption of the semiconductor. We propose a hot exciton model, according to which the hot excitons can form in the process of the pho...

  18. Control of electric field in CdZnTe radiation detectors by above-bandgap light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franc, J.; Dědič, V.; Rejhon, M.; Zázvorka, J.; Praus, P. [Institute of Physics of Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Touš, J. [Crytur Ltd., Turnov (Czech Republic); Sellin, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-28

    We have studied the possibility of above bandgap light induced depolarization of CdZnTe planar radiation detector operating under high flux of X-rays by Pockels effect measurements. In this contribution, we show a similar influence of X-rays at 80 kVp and LED with a wavelength of 910 nm irradiating the cathode on polarization of the detector due to an accumulation of a positive space charge of trapped photo-generated holes. We have observed the depolarization of the detector under simultaneous cathode-site illumination with excitation LED at 910 nm and depolarization above bandgap LED at 640 nm caused by trapping of drifting photo-generated electrons. Although the detector current is quite high during this depolarization, we have observed that it decreases relatively fast to its initial value after switching off the depolarizing light. In order to get detailed information about physical processes present during polarization and depolarization and, moreover, about associated deep levels, we have performed the Pockels effect infrared spectral scanning measurements of the detector without illumination and under illumination in polarized and optically depolarized states.

  19. First-principle approach based bandgap engineering for cubic boron nitride doped with group IIA elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubo; Wang, Pengtao; Hua, Fei; Zhan, Shijie; Wang, Xiaozhi; Luo, Jikui; Yang, Hangsheng

    2018-03-01

    Electronic properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) doped with group IIA elements were systematically investigated using the first principle calculation based on density functional theory. The electronic bandgap of c-BN was found to be narrowed when the impurity atom substituted either the B (IIA→B) or the N (IIA→N) atom. For IIA→B, a shallow accept level degenerated into valence band (VB); while for IIA→N, a shallow donor level degenerated conduction band (CB). In the cases of IIBe→N and IIMg→N, deep donor levels were also induced. Moreover, a zigzag bandgap narrowing pattern was found, which is in consistent with the variation pattern of dopants' radius of electron occupied outer s-orbital. From the view of formation energy, the substitution of B atom under N-rich conditions and the substitution of N atom under B-rich conditions were energetically favored. Our simulation results suggested that Mg and Ca are good candidates for p-type dopants, and Ca is the best candidate for n-type dopant.

  20. First-principle approach based bandgap engineering for cubic boron nitride doped with group IIA elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electronic properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN doped with group IIA elements were systematically investigated using the first principle calculation based on density functional theory. The electronic bandgap of c-BN was found to be narrowed when the impurity atom substituted either the B (IIA→B or the N (IIA→N atom. For IIA→B, a shallow accept level degenerated into valence band (VB; while for IIA→N, a shallow donor level degenerated conduction band (CB. In the cases of IIBe→N and IIMg→N, deep donor levels were also induced. Moreover, a zigzag bandgap narrowing pattern was found, which is in consistent with the variation pattern of dopants’ radius of electron occupied outer s-orbital. From the view of formation energy, the substitution of B atom under N-rich conditions and the substitution of N atom under B-rich conditions were energetically favored. Our simulation results suggested that Mg and Ca are good candidates for p-type dopants, and Ca is the best candidate for n-type dopant.