WorldWideScience

Sample records for bandgap engineeringofsolar hydrogen

  1. Electronic structure characterization and bandgap engineeringofsolar hydrogen materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jinghua

    2007-11-01

    Bandgap, band edge positions as well as the overall band structure of semiconductors are of crucial importance in photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic applications. The energy position of the band edge level can be controlled by the electronegativity of the dopants, the pH of the solution (flatband potential variation of 60 mV per pH unit), as well as by quantum confinement effects. Accordingly, band edges and bandgap can be tailored to achieve specific electronic, optical or photocatalytic properties. Synchrotron radiation with photon energy at or below 1 keV is giving new insight into such areas as condensed matter physics and extreme ultraviolet optics technology. In the soft x-ray region, the question tends to be, what are the electrons doing as they migrated between the atoms. In this paper, I will present a number of soft x-ray spectroscopic study of nanostructured 3d metal compounds Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO.

  2. Bandgap Opening in Graphene Induced by Patterned Hydrogen Adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Jørgensen, Bjarke; Nilsson, Louis

    2010-01-01

    fermions, and graphene shows ballistic charge transport, turning it into an ideal material for circuit fabrication. However, graphene lacks a bandgap around the Fermi level, which is the defining concept for semiconductor materials and essential for controlling the conductivity by electronic means. Theory...

  3. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a Cu(100) projected band-gap surface

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbard, J A; Kohlhoff, M; Rennick, C J; So, E; Ford, M; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01

    The charge transfer (ionization) of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number $n=25-34$) incident at a Cu(100) surface is investigated. Unlike fully metallic surfaces, where the Rydberg electron energy is degenerate with the conduction band of the metal, the Cu(100) surface has a projected bandgap at these energies, and only discrete image states are available through which charge transfer can take place. Resonant enhancement of charge transfer is observed at hydrogen principal quantum numbers for which the Rydberg energy matches the energy of one of the image states. The integrated surface ionization signals show clear periodicity as the energies of states with increasing $n$ come in and out of resonance with the image states. The velocity dependence of the surface ionization dynamics is also investigated. Decreased velocity of the incident H atom leads to a greater mean distance of ionization and a lower field required to extract the ion. The surface-ionization profiles (signal versus applied field) ...

  4. Photo-electrochemical hydrogen generation using band-gap modified nanotubular titanium oxide in solar light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, K. S.; Misra, M.; Mahajan, V. K.; Gandhi, T.; Pillai, P.; Mohapatra, S. K.

    Anodization of Ti in acidified fluoride solution results in an ordered nanotubular titanium oxide surface. In this study, vertically oriented arrays of TiO 2 nanotubes were prepared by incorporating nitrate and phosphate species during the anodization process. These nanotubes were annealed at 650 °C in a carbonaceous atmosphere using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace for a brief period. The carbon-modified nanotubular TiO 2 produced a photo-current density of more than 2.75 mA cm -2 at 0.2 V Ag/AgCl under solar light illumination. This photo-current density corresponds to a hydrogen evolution rate of about 11 l h -1 using a photo-anode of 1 m 2 area. The enhanced hydrogen evolution behavior of carbon-modified nanotubular TiO 2 is highly reproducible and sustainable for long duration. Annealed (at 350 °C in nitrogen atmosphere) TiO 2 nanotubes showed improved photo-activity as compared to the as-anodized or thermally oxidized TiO 2 photo-anodes.

  5. Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility.......Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility....

  6. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinthavali, M.S.

    2005-11-22

    With the increase in demand for more efficient, higher-power, and higher-temperature operation of power converters, design engineers face the challenge of increasing the efficiency and power density of converters [1, 2]. Development in power semiconductors is vital for achieving the design goals set by the industry. Silicon (Si) power devices have reached their theoretical limits in terms of higher-temperature and higher-power operation by virtue of the physical properties of the material. To overcome these limitations, research has focused on wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond because of their superior material advantages such as large bandgap, high thermal conductivity, and high critical breakdown field strength. Diamond is the ultimate material for power devices because of its greater than tenfold improvement in electrical properties compared with silicon; however, it is more suited for higher-voltage (grid level) higher-power applications based on the intrinsic properties of the material [3]. GaN and SiC power devices have similar performance improvements over Si power devices. GaN performs only slightly better than SiC. Both SiC and GaN have processing issues that need to be resolved before they can seriously challenge Si power devices; however, SiC is at a more technically advanced stage than GaN. SiC is considered to be the best transition material for future power devices before high-power diamond device technology matures. Since SiC power devices have lower losses than Si devices, SiC-based power converters are more efficient. With the high-temperature operation capability of SiC, thermal management requirements are reduced; therefore, a smaller heat sink would be sufficient. In addition, since SiC power devices can be switched at higher frequencies, smaller passive components are required in power converters. Smaller heat sinks and passive components result in higher-power-density power converters

  7. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-08

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  8. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-05

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  9. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-08

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  10. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2016-03-22

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  11. Fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of 2D boron nitride nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report studies of the surface fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of atomic-thin boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs. BNNSs are synthesized by using digitally controlled pulse deposition techniques. The nanoscale morphologies of BNNSs are characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In general, the BNNSs appear microscopically flat in the case of low temperature synthesis, whereas at high temperature conditions, it yields various curved structures. Experimental data reveal the evolutions of fringe structures. Functionalization of the BNNSs is completed with hydrogen plasma beam source in order to efficiently control bandgap width. The characterizations are based on Raman scattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and FTIR transmittance spectra. Red shifts of spectral lines are clearly visible after the functionalization, indicating the bandgap width of the BNNSs has been changed. However, simple treatments with hydrogen gas do not affect the bandgap width of the BNNSs.

  12. Polarization properties of photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Libori, Stig E. Barkou; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2000-01-01

    We present the first analysis of polarization properties of photonic bandgap fibers. Strong birefringence may be obtained for modest non-uniformities in and around the core region, suggesting the use of photonic bandgap fibers as polarization maintaining components.......We present the first analysis of polarization properties of photonic bandgap fibers. Strong birefringence may be obtained for modest non-uniformities in and around the core region, suggesting the use of photonic bandgap fibers as polarization maintaining components....

  13. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, James S. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) have been investigated since the late 1970s. Some devices have been developed that withstand tens of kilovolts and others that switch hundreds of amperes. However, no single device has been developed that can reliably withstand both high voltage and switch high current. Yet, photoconductive switches still hold the promise of reliable high voltage and high current operation with subnanosecond risetimes. Particularly since good quality, bulk, single crystal, wide bandgap semiconductor materials have recently become available. In this chapter we will review the basic operation of PCSS devices, status of PCSS devices and properties of the wide bandgap semiconductors 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and 2H-GaN.

  15. Graded bandgap perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergen, Onur; Gilbert, S. Matt; Pham, Thang; Turner, Sally J.; Tan, Mark Tian Zhi; Worsley, Marcus A.; Zettl, Alex

    2017-05-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite materials have emerged as attractive alternatives to conventional solar cell building blocks. Their high light absorption coefficients and long diffusion lengths suggest high power conversion efficiencies, and indeed perovskite-based single bandgap and tandem solar cell designs have yielded impressive performances. One approach to further enhance solar spectrum utilization is the graded bandgap, but this has not been previously achieved for perovskites. In this study, we demonstrate graded bandgap perovskite solar cells with steady-state conversion efficiencies averaging 18.4%, with a best of 21.7%, all without reflective coatings. An analysis of the experimental data yields high fill factors of ~75% and high short-circuit current densities up to 42.1 mA cm-2. The cells are based on an architecture of two perovskite layers (CH3NH3SnI3 and CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx), incorporating GaN, monolayer hexagonal boron nitride, and graphene aerogel.

  16. Photonic bandgap fiber bundle spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Hang, Qu; Syed, Imran; Guo, Ning; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an all-fiber spectrometer consisting of a photonic bandgap fiber bundle and a black and white CCD camera. Photonic crystal fibers used in this work are the large solid core all-plastic Bragg fibers designed for operation in the visible spectral range and featuring bandgaps of 60nm - 180nm-wide. 100 Bragg fibers were chosen to have complimentary and partially overlapping bandgaps covering a 400nm-840nm spectral range. The fiber bundle used in our work is equivalent in its function to a set of 100 optical filters densely packed in the area of ~1cm2. Black and white CCD camera is then used to capture spectrally "binned" image of the incoming light at the output facet of a fiber bundle. To reconstruct the test spectrum from a single CCD image we developed an algorithm based on pseudo-inversion of the spectrometer transmission matrix. We then study resolution limit of this spectroscopic system by testing its performance using spectrally narrow test peaks (FWHM 5nm-25nm) centered at va...

  17. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-07-03

    Semi-insulating Gallium Nitride, 4H and 6H Silicon Carbide are attractive materials for compact, high voltage, extrinsic, photoconductive switches due to their wide bandgap, high dark resistance, high critical electric field strength and high electron saturation velocity. These wide bandgap semiconductors are made semi-insulating by the addition of vanadium (4H and 6HSiC) and iron (2H-GaN) impurities that form deep acceptors. These deep acceptors trap electrons donated from shallow donor impurities. The electrons can be optically excited from these deep acceptor levels into the conduction band to transition the wide bandgap semiconductor materials from a semi-insulating to a conducting state. Extrinsic photoconductive switches with opposing electrodes have been constructed using vanadium compensated 6H-SiC and iron compensated 2H-GaN. These extrinsic photoconductive switches were tested at high voltage and high power to determine if they could be successfully used as the closing switch in compact medical accelerators.

  18. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  19. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pilania, G; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A; Uberuaga, B P; Ramprasad, R; Gubernatis, J E; Lookman, T

    2016-01-01

    .... While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning...

  1. Actively doped solid core Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian;

    2010-01-01

    Solid photonic bandgap fibers offer distributed spectral filtering with extraordinary high suppression. This opens new possibilities of artificially tailoring the gain spectrum of fibers. We present record-performance of such fibers and outline their future applications....

  2. Wide Bandgap Nanostructured Space Photovoltaics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Firefly, in collaboration with Rochester Institute of Technology, proposes an STTR program for the development of a wide-bandgap GaP-based space solar cell capable...

  3. Porous-core honeycomb bandgap THz fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter we propose a novel (to our knowledge) porous-core honeycomb bandgap design. The holes of the porous core are the same size as the holes in the surrounding cladding, thereby giving the proposed fiber important manufacturing benefits. The fiber is shown to have a 0:35-THz......-wide fundamental bandgap centered at 1:05 THz. The calculated minimum loss of the fiber is 0:25 dB=cm....

  4. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  5. Modeling of realistic cladding structures for photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Nielsen, Martin Dybendal

    2004-01-01

    . For the fundamental bandgap we find that the bandgap edges (the intersections with the air line) shift toward shorter wavelengths when the air-filling fraction f is increased. The bandgap also broadens, and the relative bandwidth increases exponentially with f2. Compared with recent experiments [Nature 424, 657 (2003...

  6. Advances in photonic bandgap fiber functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian

    In order to take advantage of the many intriguing optical properties of photonic bandgap fibers, there are some technological challenges that have to be addressed. Among other things this includes transmission loss and the fibers ability to maintain field polarization. The work presented...... in this thesis addresses these two fundamental properties in both hollow core photonic crystal fibers and solid photonic bandgap fibers. Transmission loss in hollow core photonic crystal fibers is dominated by light scattering at the silica surfaces inside the fiber. In the current work it has been...... experimentally demonstrated that the minimum loss wavelength is located in the spectral region around 2000 nm, where the transmission loss in these fibers is significantly lower than in conventional solid silica fibers. Additionally it has been shown that transmission loss can be lowered roughly 40...

  7. Liquid Crystal photonic Bandgap Fiber Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei

    In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure....... The presence of liquid crystals (LCs) in the air-holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a total internal reflection (TIR) guiding type into a photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding type. The light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-filled air-holes and the transmission spectrum...... of each LCPBG fiber. Finally, the applications for LCPBG fiber devices based on the on-chip platform design have been demonstrated in realizing microwave true-time delay and creating an electrically tunable fiber laser. Referatet mailes...

  8. Liquid Crystal photonic Bandgap Fiber Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei

    In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure....... The presence of liquid crystals (LCs) in the air-holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a total internal reflection (TIR) guiding type into a photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding type. The light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-filled air-holes and the transmission spectrum...... of each LCPBG fiber. Finally, the applications for LCPBG fiber devices based on the on-chip platform design have been demonstrated in realizing microwave true-time delay and creating an electrically tunable fiber laser. Referatet mailes...

  9. Two-dimensional Kagome photonic bandgap waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Søndergaard, Thomas; Libori, Stig E. Barkou;

    2000-01-01

    The transverse-magnetic photonic-bandgap-guidance properties are investigated for a planar two-dimensional (2-D) Kagome waveguide configuration using a full-vectorial plane-wave-expansion method. Single-moded well-localized low-index guided modes are found. The localization of the optical modes...... is investigated with respect to the width of the 2-D Kagome waveguide, and the number of modes existing for specific frequencies and waveguide widths is mapped out....

  10. Wide bandgap matrix switcher, amplifier and oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2016-08-16

    An electronic device comprising an optical gate, an electrical input an electrical output and a wide bandgap material positioned between the electrical input and the electrical output to control an amount of current flowing between the electrical input and the electrical output in response to a stimulus received at the optical gate can be used in wideband telecommunication applications in transmission of multi-channel signals.

  11. A new photonic bandgap cover for a patch antenna with a photonic bandgap substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林青春; 朱方明; 何赛灵

    2004-01-01

    A new photonic bandgap (PBG) cover for a patch antenna with a photonic bandgap substrate is introduced. The plane wave expansion method and the FDTD method were used to calculate such an antenna system. Numerical results for the input return loss, radiation pattern, surface wave, and the directivity of the antennas are presented. A comparison between the conventional patch antenna and the new PBG antenna is given. It is shown that the new PBG cover is very efficient for improving the radiation directivity. The physical reasons for the improvement are also given.

  12. INVESTIGATION ON EMI EFFECTS IN BANDGAP VOLTAGE REFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Fiori, Franco; Crovetti S., Paolo

    2002-01-01

    International audience; In this paper the susceptibility of integrated bandgap voltage references to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) is investigated by on-chip measurements carried out on Kuijk and Tsividis bandgap circuits. These measurements highlight the offset in the reference voltage induced by continuous wave (CW) EMI and the complete failures which may be experienced by bandgap circuits. The role of the susceptibility of the startup circuit and of the operational amplifier which are...

  13. Polarizing 50micrometers Core Yb-Doped Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-08

    properly. Recent reports demonstrate that the birefringence in photonic bandgap fibers (PBFs) can provide single-polarization operation by shifting the...add ref]. Here, we demonstrate a 50µm core Yb-doped polarizing photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) for single-polarization operation 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM...19-08-2015 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Polarizing 50µm core Yb-doped photonic bandgap fiber The views, opinions and/or

  14. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  15. Air-guiding Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Theis Peter

    2005-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fibers that guide light in an air core have attracted much interest since their first demonstration in 1999. The prospect of low-loss guiding of light in air has importance for a multitude of applications, such as data transmission, gas sensors, dispersion compensation and guiding...... of high-power pulses. The low overlap between light and glass affects both the loss and nonlinear properties of the fiber. At the same time, the strong overlap between light and air provides a mean for creating convenient gas-filled devices with extremely long interaction lengths. In this project...

  16. Large Bandgap Semiconductors for Solar Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malizia, Mauro

    water splitting devices having tandem design. The increase of the photovoltage produced by GaP under illumination was the main goal of this work. GaP has a bandgap of 2.25 eV and could in theory produce a photovoltage of approximately 1.7 V. Instead, the photovoltage produced by the semiconductor...... density generated by GaP was increased by more than 60% by electrochemical etching of the surface. The etching process produces a rough microstructured surface that increases the optical path length of the incident photons and the collection of photogenerated electrons.Furthermore, the synthesis of BiVO4...

  17. Contact and Bandgap Engineering in Two Dimensional Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tao

    At the heart of semiconductor research, bandgap is one of the key parameters for materials and determine their applications in modern technologies. For traditional bulk semiconductors, the bandgap is determined by the chemical composition and specific arrangement of the crystal lattices, and usually invariant during the device operation. Nevertheless, it is highly desirable for many optoelectronic and electronic applications to have materials with continuously tunable bandgap available. In the past decade, 2D layered materials including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have sparked interest in the scientific community, owing to their unique material properties and tremendous potential in various applications. Among many newly discovered properties that are non-existent in bulk materials, the strong in-plane bonding and weak van der Waals inter-planar interaction in these 2D layered structures leads to a widely tunable bandgap by electric field. This provides an extra knob to engineer the fundamental material properties and open a new design space for novel device operation. This thesis focuses on this field controlled dynamic bandgap and can be divided into three parts: (1) bilayer graphene is the first known 2D crystal with a bandgap can be continuously tuned by electric field. However, the electrical transport bandgaps is much smaller than both theoretical predictions and extracted bandgaps from optical measurements. In the first part of the thesis, the limiting factors of preventing achieving a large transport bandgap in bilayer graphene are investigated and different strategies to achieve a large transport bandgap are discussed, including the vertically scaling of gate oxide and patterning channel into ribbon structure. With a record large transport bandgap of ~200meV, a dual-gated semiconducting bilayer graphene P/N junction with extremely scaled gap of 20nm in-between is fabricated. A tunable local maxima feature, associated with 1D v

  18. Stability and bandgaps of layered perovskites for one- and two-photon water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Ivano E.; María García-Lastra, Juan; Hüser, Falco; Thygesen, Kristian S.; Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2013-10-01

    Direct production of hydrogen from water and sunlight requires stable and abundantly available semiconductors with well positioned band edges relative to the water red-ox potentials. We have used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate 300 oxides and oxynitrides in the Ruddlesden-Popper phase of the layered perovskite structure. Based on screening criteria for the stability, bandgaps and band edge positions, we suggest 20 new materials for the light harvesting photo-electrode of a one-photon water splitting device and 5 anode materials for a two-photon device with silicon as photo-cathode. In addition, we explore a simple rule relating the bandgap of the perovskite to the number of octahedra in the layered structure and the B-metal ion. Finally, the quality of the GLLB-SC potential used to obtain the bandgaps, including the derivative discontinuity, is validated against G0W0@LDA gaps for 20 previously identified oxides and oxynitrides in the cubic perovskite structure.

  19. Stability and bandgaps of layered perovskites for one- and two-photon water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Hüser, Falco

    2013-01-01

    Direct production of hydrogen from water and sunlight requires stable and abundantly available semiconductors with well positioned band edges relative to the water red-ox potentials. We have used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate 300 oxides and oxynitrides...... in the Ruddlesden–Popper phase of the layered perovskite structure. Based on screening criteria for the stability, bandgaps and band edge positions, we suggest 20 new materials for the light harvesting photo-electrode of a one-photon water splitting device and 5 anode materials for a two-photon device with silicon...

  20. Gas sensing using air-guiding photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritar, Tuomo; Tuominen, J.; Ludvigsen, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the high sensitivity of gas sensing using a novel air-guiding photonic bandgap fiber. The bandgap fiber is spliced to a standard single-mode fiber at the input end for easy coupling and filled with gas through the other end placed in a vacuum chamber. The technique is applied...

  1. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser by using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an al...

  2. Review of wide band-gap semiconductors technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC and gallium nitride (GaN are typical representative of the wide band-gap semiconductor material, which is also known as third-generation semiconductor materials. Compared with the conventional semiconductor silicon (Si or gallium arsenide (GaAs, wide band-gap semiconductor has the wide band gap, high saturated drift velocity, high critical breakdown field and other advantages; it is a highly desirable semiconductor material applied under the case of high-power, high-temperature, high-frequency, anti-radiation environment. These advantages of wide band-gap devices make them a hot spot of semiconductor technology research in various countries. This article describes the research agenda of United States and European in this area, focusing on the recent developments of the wide band-gap technology in the US and Europe, summed up the facing challenge of the wide band-gap technology.

  3. Liquid Crystals and Photonic Bandgap Fiber Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Wei, Lei; Scolari, Lara

    Liquid Crystal(LC)filled Photonic Crystal Fibers(PCFs) represent a promising platform for the design and the fabrication of tunable all-in fiber devices. Tunability is achieved by varying the refractive index of the LC thermally, optically or electrically. In this contribution we present important...... parts of the LC theory as well as an application of a LC infiltrated PCF subject to an external electrostatic field. The fiber is placed between two electrodes and the voltage is increased step by step leading to the reorientation of the LC in the fiber capillaries. This mechanism can be used to produce...... a swichable polarizer, and an on chip LC photonic bandgap fiber polarimeter is presented, which admits strong attenuation of one polarization direction while the other one is nearly unaffected....

  4. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic bandgap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew A.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic crystals are a powerful tool for the manipulation of optical dispersion and density of states, and have thus been used in applications from photon generation to quantum sensing with nitrogen vacancy centres and atoms. The unique control provided by these media makes them a beautiful, if unexplored, playground for strong-coupling quantum electrodynamics, where a single, highly nonlinear emitter hybridizes with the band structure of the crystal. Here we demonstrate that such a hybridization can create localized cavity modes that live within the photonic bandgap, whose localization and spectral properties we explore in detail. We then demonstrate that the coloured vacuum of the photonic crystal can be employed for efficient dissipative state preparation. This work opens exciting prospects for engineering long-range spin models in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, as well as new opportunities for dissipative quantum state engineering.

  5. Novel 1-D Sandwich Photonic Bandgap Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞云波; 高葆新

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich photonic bandgap (PBG) structure is a novel PBG structure whose periodic lattice is buried in the middle of a substrate. Neither drilling nor suspending the substrate is required, and the integrity of the ground plane is maintained. This paper presents several modification techniques for sandwich PBG structure fabrication. The forbidden gap can be improved by adopting the chirping technique, applying the tapering technique, enlarging the periodic elements, adjusting the location of the periodic lattice in the substrate, and using different dielectric media H-shape elements. A finite difference time domain method is applied to analyze the structures. Deep and wide stopbands can be obtained using the modified sandwich structures. Experimental measurement results agree well with the theoretical analysis.

  6. Bandgap engineering of GaN nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Bang-Ming; Yan, Hui [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wang, Ru-Zhi, E-mail: wrz@bjut.edu.cn, E-mail: yamcy@csrc.ac.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, 100094 (China); Yam, Chi-Yung, E-mail: wrz@bjut.edu.cn, E-mail: yamcy@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, 100094 (China); Xu, Li-Chun [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Lau, Woon-Ming [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, 100094 (China); Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R& D Center, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610207 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Bandgap engineering has been a powerful technique for manipulating the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors. In this work, a systematic investigation of the electronic properties of [0001] GaN nanowires was carried out using the density functional based tight-binding method (DFTB). We studied the effects of geometric structure and uniaxial strain on the electronic properties of GaN nanowires with diameters ranging from 0.8 to 10 nm. Our results show that the band gap of GaN nanowires depends linearly on both the surface to volume ratio (S/V) and tensile strain. The band gap of GaN nanowires increases linearly with S/V, while it decreases linearly with increasing tensile strain. These linear relationships provide an effect way in designing GaN nanowires for their applications in novel nano-devices.

  7. Jacquard-woven photonic bandgap fiber displays

    CERN Document Server

    Sayed, Imran; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of photonic textile displays woven on a Jacquard loom, using newly discovered polymer photonic bandgap fibers that have the ability to change color and appearance when illuminated with ambient or transmitted light. The photonic fiber can be thin (smaller than 300 microns in diameter) and highly flexible, which makes it possible to weave in the weft on a computerized Jacquard loom and develop intricate double weave structures together with a secondary weft yarn. We demonstrate how photonic crystal fibers enable a variety of color and structural patterns on the textile, and how dynamic imagery can be created by balancing the ambient and emitted radiation. Finally, a possible application in security ware for low visibility conditions is described as an example.

  8. Photovoltaic efficiency of an indirect bandgap material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Michelle; Mangan, Niall; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Photovoltaic materials with direct band gap transitions absorb light more readily than those with indirect gaps, allowing for thinner devices. However, direct bands also suffer faster rates of radiative recombination than indirect bandgap materials. Some novel photovoltaic absorber materials, such as tin sulfide, have both direct and indirect gaps. Such materials raise the question of whether the multiple energy states benefit or harm device efficiency. We develop a model for current in a device with direct and indirect band gaps using detailed balance, similar to the Shockley-Quiesser model for direct band photovoltaics. We explore the effects of the following on device performance: transition probability of carriers between the direct and indirect state, and relative transport rate in each band.

  9. Ab initio quasi-particle approximation bandgaps of silicon nanowires calculated at density functional theory/local density approximation computational effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M., E-mail: ribeiro.jr@oorbit.com.br [Office of Operational Research for Business Intelligence and Technology, Principal Office, Buffalo, Wyoming 82834 (United States)

    2015-06-21

    Ab initio calculations of hydrogen-passivated Si nanowires were performed using density functional theory within LDA-1/2, to account for the excited states properties. A range of diameters was calculated to draw conclusions about the ability of the method to correctly describe the main trends of bandgap, quantum confinement, and self-energy corrections versus the diameter of the nanowire. Bandgaps are predicted with excellent accuracy if compared with other theoretical results like GW, and with the experiment as well, but with a low computational cost.

  10. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser by using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an all......-spliced laser cavity based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040-1065nm by applying...

  11. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    -sectional area. To study the band-gap for travelling waves, a repeated inner segment of the optimized beams is analyzed using Floquet theory and the waveguide finite element (WFE) method. Finally, the frequency response is computed for the optimized beams when these are subjected to an external time......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...

  12. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.; Misra, A.; Miller, E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A significant component of the US DOE Hydrogen Program is the development of a practical technology for the direct production of hydrogen using a renewable source of energy. High efficiency photoelectrochemical systems to produce hydrogen directly from water using sunlight as the energy source represent one of the technologies identified by DOE to meet this mission. Reactor modeling and experiments conducted at UH provide strong evidence that direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency greater than 10% can be expected using photoelectrodes fabricated from low-cost, multijunction (MJ) amorphous silicon solar cells. Solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8% have been achieved using a 10.3% efficient MJ amorphous silicon solar cell. Higher efficiency can be expected with the use of higher efficiency solar cells, further improvement of the thin film oxidation and reduction catalysts, and optimization of the solar cell for hydrogen production rather than electricity production. Hydrogen and oxygen catalysts developed under this project are very stable, exhibiting no measurable degradation in KOH after over 13,000 hours of operation. Additional research is needed to fully optimize the transparent, conducting coatings which will be needed for large area integrated arrays. To date, the best protection has been afforded by wide bandgap amorphous silicon carbide films.

  13. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    -sectional area. To study the band-gap for travelling waves, a repeated inner segment of the optimized beams is analyzed using Floquet theory and the waveguide finite element (WFE) method. Finally, the frequency response is computed for the optimized beams when these are subjected to an external time......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...

  14. High Power Wide Bandgap Engineered MMW MMIC Transceiver Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this phase I SBIR effort unique proven lattice and bandgap engineering techniques will be utilized to epitaxially grow InAlAs / InGaAs on GaN substrate for...

  15. Design of Bandgap Reference in Switching Power Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li; NIU Ping-juan; FU Xian-song; DING Ke; PENG Xiao-lei

    2009-01-01

    A bandgap voltage reference is designed to meet the requirements of low power loss,low temperature coefficient and high power source rejection ratio(PSRR) in the intergrated circuit.Based on the analysis of conventional bandgap reference circuit,and combined with the integral performance of IC,the specific design index of the bandgap reference is put forward.In the meantime,the circuit and the layout are designed with Chartered 0.35 μm dual gate CMOS process.The simulation result shows that the coefficient is less than 30ppm/℃ with the temperature from -50℃ to 150℃. The bandgap reference has the characteristics of low power and high PSRR.

  16. Wide-bandgap III-Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Jun-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation The views...Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation Report Title It was demonstrated that GaN, AlGaN and AlN lateral polar structures can...research have been socialized to the III - Nitride Optoelectronics Center of Excellence (ARL SEDD) and to the 2013 ARO Staff Research Symposium and at

  17. Bandgap Restructuring of the Layered Semiconductor Gallium Telluride in Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jose J; Tongay, Sefaattin; Topsakal, Mehmet; Chew, Annabel R; Lin, Alan J; Ko, Changhyun; Luce, Alexander V; Salleo, Alberto; Wu, Junqiao; Dubon, Oscar D

    2016-08-01

    A giant bandgap reduction in layered GaTe is demonstrated. Chemisorption of oxygen to the Te-terminated surfaces produces significant restructuring of the conduction band resulting in a bandgap below 0.8 eV, compared to 1.65 eV for pristine GaTe. Localized partial recovery of the pristine gap is achieved by thermal annealing, demonstrating that reversible band engineering in layered semiconductors is accessible through their surfaces.

  18. Large-area single-mode photonic bandgap vcsels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Gregersen, N.; Bischoff, S.;

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that the photonic bandgap effect can be used to control the modes of large area vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. We obtain more than 20 dB side mode suppression ratios in a 10-micron area device.......We demonstrate that the photonic bandgap effect can be used to control the modes of large area vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. We obtain more than 20 dB side mode suppression ratios in a 10-micron area device....

  19. Degenerate four wave mixing in solid core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Per Dalgaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Degenerate four wave mixing in solid core photonic bandgap fibers is studied theoretically. We demonstrate the possibility of generating parametric gain across bandgaps, and propose a specific design suited for degenerate four wave mixing when pumping at 532nmm. the possibility of tuning the effi...... the efficency of the parametric gain by varying the temperature is also considered. The sults are verified by numerical simultations of pulse propagation....

  20. Transmission properties of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Hald, Jan; Petersen, Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers.......Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers....

  1. Bandgap calculations and trends of organometal halide perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    of Cs, CH3NH3, and HC(NH2)2 as A-cation, Sn and Pb as B-ion, and a combination of Cl, Br, and I as anions. The calculated gaps span over a region from 0.5 to 5.0 eV. In addition, the trends over bandgaps have been investigated: the bandgap increases with an increase of the electronegativities...

  2. On the Suppression Band and Bandgap of Planar Electromagnetic Bandgap Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharak Mohajer-Iravani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic bandgap structures are considered a viable solution for the problem of switching noise in printed circuit boards and packages. Less attention, however, has been given to whether or not the introduction of EBGs affects the EMI potential of the circuit to couple unwanted energy to neighboring layers or interconnects. In this paper, we show that the bandgap of EBG structures, as generated using the Brillouin diagram, does not necessarily correspond to the suppression bandwidth typically generated using S-parameters. We show that the reactive near fields radiating from openings within the EBG layers can be substantial and are present in the entire frequency band including propagating and nonpropagating mode regions. These fields decay fast with distance; however, they can couple significant energy to adjacent layers and to signal lines. The findings are validated using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation. Based on this work, design guidelines for EBG structures can be drawn to insure not only suppression of switching noise but also minimization of EMI and insuring signal integrity.

  3. Tunable nonlinear absorption of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y J; Oh, J I; Zheng, D Q; Su, W A; Shen, W Z

    2011-09-01

    Nonlinear absorption (NLA) of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) has been investigated through the open aperture Z-scan method for the photon energy of the incident irradiance slightly less than the bandgap of the sample. NLA responses have been observed to be highly sensitive to the wavelength and intensity of the incident irradiance as well as to the bandgap of the sample, indicating greatly tunable NLA of nc-Si:H. The band tail of nc-Si:H appears to play a crucial role in such NLA responses.

  4. Low bandgap semiconducting polymers for polymeric photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Kai; Gong, Xiong; Heeger, Alan J

    2016-08-22

    In order to develop high performance polymer solar cells (PSCs), full exploitation of the sun-irradiation from ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) is one of the key factors to ensure high photocurrents and thus high efficiency. In this review, five of the effective design rules for approaching LBG semiconducting polymers with high molar absorptivity, suitable energy levels, high charge carrier mobility and high solubility in organic solvents are overviewed. These design stratagems include fused heterocycles for facilitating π-electron flowing along the polymer backbone, groups/atoms bridging adjacent rings for maintaining a high planarity, introduction of electron-withdrawing units for lowering the bandgap (Eg), donor-acceptor (D-A) copolymerization for narrowing Eg and 2-dimensional conjugation for broadened absorption and enhanced hole mobility. It has been demonstrated that LBG semiconducting polymers based on electron-donor units combined with strong electron-withdrawing units possess excellent electronic and optic properties, emerging as excellent candidates for efficient PSCs. While for ultrasensitive photodetectors (PDs), which have intensive applications in both scientific and industrial sectors, sensing from the UV to the NIR region is of critical importance. For polymer PDs, Eg as low as 0.8 eV has been obtained through a rational design stratagem, covering a broad wavelength range from the UV to the NIR region (1450 nm). However, the response time of the polymer PDs are severely limited by the hole mobility of LBG semiconducting polymers, which is significantly lower than those of the inorganic materials. Thus, further advancing the hole mobility of LBG semiconducting polymers is of equal importance as broadening the spectral response for approaching uncooled ultrasensitive broadband polymer PDs in the future study.

  5. Densely Aligned Graphene Nanoribbon Arrays and Bandgap Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Justin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Chen, Changxin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gong, Ming [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kenney, Michael [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Graphene has attracted great interest for future electronics due to its high mobility and high thermal conductivity. However, a two-dimensional graphene sheet behaves like a metal, lacking a bandgap needed for the key devices components such as field effect transistors (FETs) in digital electronics. It has been shown that, partly due to quantum confinement, graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with ~2 nm width can open up sufficient bandgaps and evolve into semiconductors to exhibit high on/off ratios useful for FETs. However, a challenging problem has been that, such ultra-narrow GNRs (~2 nm) are difficult to fabricate, especially for GNRs with smooth edges throughout the ribbon length. Despite high on/off ratios, these GNRs show very low mobility and low on-state conductance due to dominant scattering effects by imperfections and disorders at the edges. Wider GNRs (>5 nm) show higher mobility, higher conductance but smaller bandgaps and low on/off ratios undesirable for FET applications. It is highly desirable to open up bandgaps in graphene or increase the bandgaps in wide GNRs to afford graphene based semiconductors for high performance (high on-state current and high on/off ratio) electronics. Large scale ordering and dense packing of such GNRs in parallel are also needed for device integration but have also been challenging thus far. It has been shown theoretically that uniaxial strains can be applied to a GNR to engineer its bandgap. The underlying physics is that under uniaxial strain, the Dirac point moves due to stretched C-C bonds, leading to an increase in the bandgap of armchair GNRs by up to 50% of its original bandgap (i.e. bandgap at zero strain). For zigzag GNRs, due to the existence of the edge states, changes of bandgap are smaller under uniaxial strain and can be increased by ~30%. This work proposes a novel approach to the fabrication of densely aligned graphene nanoribbons with highly smooth edges afforded by anisotropic etching and uniaxial strain for

  6. High-Efficiency Solar Cells Using Photonic-Bandgap Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Jonathan; Lee, Hwang

    2005-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic cells would be designed to exploit photonic-bandgap (PBG) materials to enhance their energy-conversion efficiencies, according to a proposal. Whereas the energy-conversion efficiencies of currently available solar cells are typically less than 30 percent, it has been estimated that the energy-conversion efficiencies of the proposed cells could be about 50 percent or possibly even greater. The primary source of inefficiency of a currently available solar cell is the mismatch between the narrow wavelength band associated with the semiconductor energy gap (the bandgap) and the broad wavelength band of solar radiation. This mismatch results in loss of power from both (1) long-wavelength photons, defined here as photons that do not have enough energy to excite electron-hole pairs across the bandgap, and (2) short-wavelength photons, defined here as photons that excite electron- hole pairs with energies much above the bandgap. It follows that a large increase in efficiency could be obtained if a large portion of the incident solar energy could be funneled into a narrow wavelength band corresponding to the bandgap. In the proposed approach, such funneling would be effected by use of PBG materials as intermediaries between the Sun and photovoltaic cells.

  7. Synthesis of Metal-Oxide/Organic Hybrids: Structures, Bandgap Sizes, and Photocatalytic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan

    Photocatalysis research has attracted intense current attention for the development of new sources of renewable energy from sunlight. Mixed-metal oxides that comprise an early transition metal (e.g., d0 electronic configuration) with a late transition metal(e.g., d10 electronic configuration) demonstrate significant promise in the red-shifting of the bandgap sizes of simpler metal oxides into the visible-light energy range, and for thus enabling visible-light driven photocatalysis. However, the lack of a significant molecular-level control over their structures and bonding limits the current synthetic abilities to prepare potentially more efficient photocatalysts. Metal-oxide/organic hybrids are materials containing both extended metaloxide connectivity and coordinating organic ligands. These materials have also been the focus of intense research owing to the molecular-level manipulation of their solid-state structures which can be used to control their physical properties, as has been previously applied in many other research areas. Research efforts herein are focused on the investigation of metal-oxide/organic hybrids and their structures, optical bandgap sizes, and photocatalytic properties. The approach to the photocatalysis research begins with the hydrothermal syntheses of specific hybrid materials that can fulfill the band-energy requirements for visible-light absorption through the use of mixed-metal systemswithd5 and d0or d10 and d0 electron configurations, specifically in the Mn(II)/V(V) and Cu(I)/Mo(VI) systems. Optical bandgap sizes were measured by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and surfaces areas were characterized by BET measurements. The first measured photocatalytic activities for total water splitting and/or hydrogen production for hybrid oxide/organic materials were measured under both visible-light or ultraviolet irradiation in aqueous solutions. Optical bandgap size sand photocatalytic activities were strongly influenced by the

  8. Chemical and Bandgap Engineering in Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Kun; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Jingxin; Bao, Jingxian; Xuan, Ningning; Sun, Yangye; Liu, Bing; Xie, Aozhen; Wu, Shiwei; Sun, Zhengzong

    2017-04-01

    Monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses a wide bandgap of ~6 eV. Trimming down the bandgap is technically attractive, yet poses remarkable challenges in chemistry. One strategy is to topological reform the h-BN’s hexagonal structure, which involves defects or grain boundaries (GBs) engineering in the basal plane. The other way is to invite foreign atoms, such as carbon, to forge bizarre hybrid structures like hetero-junctions or semiconducting h-BNC materials. Here we successfully developed a general chemical method to synthesize these different h-BN derivatives, showcasing how the chemical structure can be manipulated with or without a graphene precursor, and the bandgap be tuned to ~2 eV, only one third of the pristine one’s.

  9. Bandgap renormalization in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhui; Liu, Yujie; Xu, Jieying; Nie, Zhonghui; Li, Yao; Xu, Yongbing; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Fengqiu

    2017-09-11

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been extensively explored as an ultrafast nonlinear optical material. However, due to the numerous electronic and morphological arrangements, a simple and self-contained physical model that can unambiguously account for the rich photocarrier dynamics in SWNTs is still absent. Here, by performing broadband degenerate and non-degenerate pump-probe experiments on SWNTs of different chiralities and morphologies, we reveal strong evidences for the existence of bandgap renormalization in SWNTs. In particularly, it is found that the broadband transient response of SWNTs can be well explained by the combined effects of Pauli blocking and bandgap renormalization, and the distinct dynamics is further influenced by the different sensitivity of degenerate and non-degenerate measurements to these two concurrent effects. Furthermore, we attribute optical-phonon bath thermalization as an underlying mechanism for the observed bandgap renormalization. Our findings provide new guidelines for interpreting the broadband optical response of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Modification of structure and optical band-gap of nc-Si:H films with ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yabin; Wang, Zhiguang; Sun, Jianrong; Yao, Cunfeng; Shen, Tielong; Li, Bingsheng; Wei, Kongfang; Pang, Lilong; Sheng, Yanbin; Cui, Minghuan; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Ji; Zhu, Huiping

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogenated nano-crystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films fabricated by using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition are irradiated at room temperature with 6.0 MeV Xe-ions. The irradiation fluences are 1.0 × 1013, 5.0 × 1013 and 1.0 × 1014 Xe-ions/cm2. The structure and optical band-gap of the irradiated films varying with ion fluence are investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopes, as well as transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the crystallite size, the crystalline fraction and the optical band-gap decrease continuously with increasing the ion fluence. The crystalline fraction of the films irradiated to the fluences from 0 to 1.0 × 1014 Xe-ions/cm2 decreases from about 65.7% to 2.9% and the optical band-gap decreases from about 2.1 to 1.6 eV. Possible origins of the modification of the nc-Si:H films under 6.0 MeV Xe-ions irradiation are briefly discussed.

  11. Sub-bandgap absorption in polymer-fullerene solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presselt, Martin; Herrmann, Felix; Seeland, Marco; Baerenklau, Maik; Roesch, Roland; Shokhovets, Sviatoslav; Hopp, Harald; Gobsch, Gerhard [Experimental Physics I, Institute of Physics and Institute of Micro- und Nanotechnologies, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau (Germany); Beenken, Wichard J.D.; Runge, Erich [Theoretical Physics I, Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present external quantum efficiency (EQE) studies of P3HT:PCBM based bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells with improved intensity resolution in the sub-bandgap (SBG) region, i.e. the energy range below the optical bandgaps of the pristine materials. Varying the P3HT:PCBM blending ratio, we find that in addition to a Gaussian profile an exponential tail is needed for a quantitative description of the SBG EQE spectra. To gain insights into the origin of the single contributions, absorption and emission spectra covering several decades of intensity and SBG EQE signals are discussed in detail.

  12. Ultrasensitive twin-core photonic bandgap fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Town, Graham; Bang, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We propose a microfluidic refractive index sensor based on new polymer twin-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF). The sensor can achieve ultrahigh detection limit, i.e. >1.4times10-7RIU refractive index unit (RIU), by measuring the coupling wavelength shift.......We propose a microfluidic refractive index sensor based on new polymer twin-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF). The sensor can achieve ultrahigh detection limit, i.e. >1.4times10-7RIU refractive index unit (RIU), by measuring the coupling wavelength shift....

  13. Recent ROB developments on wide bandgap based UV sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, B.; Ben Moussa, A.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Soltani, A.; de Moor, P.; Minoglou, K.; Malinowski, P.; Duboz, J.-Y.; Chong, Y. M.; Zou, Y. S.; Zhang, W. J.; Lee, S. T.; Dahal, R.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    The next ESA spatial mission planned to study the Sun, Solar Orbiter (SO), necessitates very innovative EUV detectors. The commonly used silicon detectors suffer important limitations mainly in terms of UV robustness and dark current level. An alternative comes from diamond or III-nitride materials. In these materials, the radiation hardness, solar blindness and dark current are improved due to their wide bandgap. This paper presents the new developments on wide bandgap materials at the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB). We present also the LYRA instrument, the BOLD project, and the EUI instrument suite.

  14. The density matrix method in photonic bandgap and antiferromagnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Scott B.

    In this thesis, a theory for dispersive polaritonic bandgap (DPBG) and photonic bandgap (PBG) materials is developed. An ensemble of multi-level nanoparticles, such as non-interacting two-, three- and four-level atoms doped in DPBG and PBG materials is considered. The optical properties of these materials such as spontaneous emission, line broadening, fluorescence and narrowing of the natural linewidth have been studied using the density matrix method. Numerical simulations for these properties have been performed for the DPBG materials SiC and InAs, and for a PBG material with a 20 percent gap-to-midgap ratio. When a three-level nanoparticle is doped into a DPBG material, it is predicted that one or two bound states exist when one or both resonance energies, respectively, lie in the bandgap. It is shown when a resonance energy lies below the bandgap, its spectral density peak weakens and broadens as the resonance energy increases to the lower band edge. For the first time it is predicted that when a nanoparticle's resonance energy lies above the bandgap, its spectral density peak weakens and broadens as the resonance energy increases. A relation is also found between spectral structure and gap-to-midgap ratios. The dressed states of a two-level atom doped into a DPBG material under the influence of an intense monochromatic laser field are examined. The splitting of the dressed state energies is calculated, and it is predicted that the splitting depends on the polariton density of states and the Rabi frequency of laser field. The fluoresence is also examined, and for the first time two distinct control processes are found for the transition from one peak to three peaks. It was previously known that the Rabi frequency controlled the Stark effect, but this thesis predicts that the local of the peak with respect to the optical bandgap can cause a transition from one to three peaks even with a weak Rabi frequency. The transient linewidth narrowing of PBG crystal

  15. Compact electrically controlled broadband liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber polarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm.......An electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic-bandgap fiber polarizer is experimentally demonstrated. A maximum 21.3dB electrically tunable polarization extinction ratio is achieved with 45° rotatable transmission axis as well as switched on and off in 1300nm–1600nm....

  16. Effect of Dielectric Constant Contrast and Filling Factor to Photonic Bandgap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The effect of dielectric constant contrast and the filling factor to the photonic bandgap in a 2-D square lattice photonic crystal is discussed. The location, width and number of photonic bandgap can be modulated.

  17. In Situ Measurement of Local Hydrogen Production Rate by Bubble-Evolved Recording

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowei Hu; Liejin Guo; Yechun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen visibly bubbles during photocatalytic water splitting under illumination with above-bandgap radiation, which provides a direct measurement of local gas-evolving reaction rate. In this paper, optical microscopy of superfield depth was used for recording the hydrogen bubble growth on Cd0.5Zn0.5S photocatalyst in reaction liquid and illuminated with purple light. By analyzing change of hydrogen bubble size as a function of time, we understood that hydrogen bubble growth experienced two ...

  18. High-power Yb-doped photonic bandgap fiber amplifier at 1150-1200 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A; Maruyama, H; Ueda, K

    2009-01-01

    Ytterbium-doped solid-core photonic bandgap fiber amplifiers operating at the long-wavelength edge of the ytterbium gain band are reported. The low-loss bandgap transmission window is formed in the very low gain region, whilst outside the bandgap, large attenuation inhibits the exponential growth...... knowledge, these are the highest output powers generating from active photonic bandgap fibers, as well as from ytterbium-doped fiber lasers at these wavelengths. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America...

  19. Optically controlled photonic bandgap structures for microstrip circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Cadman, D A

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the optical control of microwave photonic bandgap circuits using high resistivity silicon. Photoconducting processes that occur within silicon are investigated. The influence of excess carrier density on carrier mobility and lifetime is examined. In addition, electron-hole pair recombination mechanisms (Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, radiative and surface) are investigated. The microwave properties of silicon are examined, in particular the variation of silicon reflectivity with excess carrier density. Filtering properties of microstrip photonic bandgap structures and how they may be controlled optically are studied. A proof-of-concept microstrip photonic bandgap structure with optical control is designed, simulated and measured. With no optical illumination incident upon the silicon, the microstrip photonic bandgap structure's filtering properties are well-defined; a 3dB stopband width of 2.6GHz, a 6dB bandwidth of 2GHz and stopband depth of -11.6dB at the centre frequency of 9.9GHz...

  20. AlN Bandgap Temperature Dependence from its Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-07

    AlN bandgap temperature dependence from its optical properties E. Silveira a,, J.A. Freitas b, S.B. Schujman c, L.J. Schowalter c a Depto. de Fisica ...range. The energy gap in semiconductors in general changes due to contributions from the electron–phonon interaction and due to the lattice thermal

  1. Photonic bandgap narrowing in conical hollow core Bragg fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Yildirim, Adem; Kanik, Mehmet [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Bayindir, Mehmet, E-mail: bayindir@nano.org.tr [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Physics, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-08-18

    We report the photonic bandgap engineering of Bragg fibers by controlling the thickness profile of the fiber during the thermal drawing. Conical hollow core Bragg fibers were produced by thermal drawing under a rapidly alternating load, which was applied by introducing steep changes to the fiber drawing speed. In conventional cylindrical Bragg fibers, light is guided by omnidirectional reflections from interior dielectric mirrors with a single quarter wave stack period. In conical fibers, the diameter reduction introduced a gradient of the quarter wave stack period along the length of the fiber. Therefore, the light guided within the fiber encountered slightly smaller dielectric layer thicknesses at each reflection, resulting in a progressive blueshift of the reflectance spectrum. As the reflectance spectrum shifts, longer wavelengths of the initial bandgap cease to be omnidirectionally reflected and exit through the cladding, which narrows the photonic bandgap. A narrow transmission bandwidth is particularly desirable in hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensing schemes, where broadband light is coupled to the fiber and the analyte vapor is introduced into the hollow core to measure infrared absorption. We carried out sensing simulations using the absorption spectrum of isopropyl alcohol vapor to demonstrate the importance of narrow bandgap fibers in chemical sensing applications.

  2. Spontaneous emission and nonlinear effects in photonic bandgap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ishella S.; Bendickson, Jon M.; Tocci, Michael D.; Bloemer, Mark J.; Scalora, Michael; Bowden, Charles M.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1998-03-01

    We summarize and review our theoretical and experimental work on spontaneous emission and nonlinear effects in one-dimensional, photonic bandgap (PBG) structures. We present a new result: a method for calculating the normal-mode solutions - and hence the spontaneous emission of embedded emitters - in an arbitrary, linear, lossless, one-dimensional, PBG structure.

  3. Mode Division Multiplexing Exploring Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jing; Lyngso, Jens Kristian; Leick, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent exploratory investigations on mode division multiplexing using hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs). Compared with traditional multimode fibers, HC-PBGFs have several attractive features such as ultra-low nonlinearities, low-loss transmission window around 2 µm etc....

  4. Liquid Crystal Photonic bandgap Fibers: Modeling and Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes

    In this PhD thesis an experimental and numerical investigation of liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fibers (LCPBGs) is presented. A simulation scheme for modeling LCPBG devices including electrical tunability is presented. New experimental techniques, boundary coating and the applicatio...

  5. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong;

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate the flexibility and advantages of a non-uniform pseudo-spectral time domain (nu-PSTD) method through studies of the wave propagation characteristics on photonic band-gap (PBG) structures in stratified medium Design/methodology/approach - A nu-PSTD method is proposed...

  6. Design for maximum band-gaps in beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to extend earlier optimum design results for transversely vibrating Bernoulli-Euler beams by determining new optimum band-gap beam structures for (i) different combinations of classical boundary conditions, (ii) much larger values of the orders n and n-1 of adjacent upper and lowe...

  7. Advances in wide bandgap SiC for optoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has played a key role in power electronics thanks to its unique physical properties like wide bandgap, high breakdown field, etc. During the past decade, SiC is also becoming more and more active in optoelectronics thanks to the progress in materials growth and nanofabrication...

  8. Photonic bandgap structures for long-range surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    -size thickness variations result in the pronounced band gap effect, and obtain very good agreement between measured and simulated (transmission and reflection) spectra. This effect is exploited to realize a compact wavelength add-drop filter with the bandwidth of -20 nm centered at 1550 nm. The possibilities...... of achieving a full bandgap (in the surface plane) for LR-SPPs are also discussed....

  9. Automating Energy Bandgap Measurements in Semiconductors Using LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Sharma, Reena; Dhingra, Vishal

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report the development of an automated system for energy bandgap and resistivity measurement of a semiconductor sample using Four-Probe method for use in the undergraduate laboratory of Physics and Electronics students. The automated data acquisition and analysis system has been developed using National Instruments USB-6008 DAQ…

  10. Design of photonic bandgap fibers by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Feurer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A method based on topology optimization is presented to design the cross section of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers for minimizing energy loss by material absorption. The optical problem is modeled by the timeharmonic wave equation and solved with the finite element program Comsol Multiphysics...

  11. Electrically controllable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber with dual-frequency control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Riishede, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We present an electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based on a dual frequency liquid crystal with pre-tilted molecules that allows the bandgaps to be continuously tuned. The frequency dependent behavior of the liquid crystal enables active shifting of the bandgaps toward...

  12. Very Small Bandgap π-Conjugated Polymers with Extended Thienoquinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Kohsuke; Saito, Masahiko; Osaka, Itaru; Takimiya, Kazuo

    2016-06-22

    The introduction of quinoidal character to π-conjugated polymers is one of the effective approaches to reducing the bandgap. Here we synthesized new π-conjugated polymers (PBTD4T and PBDTD4T) incorporating thienoquinoids 2,2'-bithiophene-5,5'-dione (BTD) and benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-dione (BDTD) as strong electron-deficient (acceptor) units. PBTD4T showed a deep LUMO energy level of -3.77 eV and a small bandgap of 1.28 eV, which are similar to those of the analog using thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-dione (TTD) (PTTD4T). PBDTD4T had a much deeper LUMO energy level of -4.04 eV and a significantly smaller bandgap of 0.88 eV compared to those of the other two polymers. Interestingly, PBDTD4T showed high transparency in the visible region. The very small bandgap of PBDTD4T can be rationalized by the enhanced contribution of the resonance backbone structure in which the p-benzoquinodimethane skeleton in the BDTD unit plays a crucial role. PBTD4T and PBDTD4T exhibited ambipolar charge transport with more balanced mobilities between the hole and the electron than PTTD4T. We believe that the very small bandgap, i.e., the high near-infrared activity, as well as the well-balanced ambipolar property of the π-conjugated polymers based on these units would be of particular interest in the fabrication of next-generation organic devices.

  13. Optimal design of tunable phononic bandgap plates under equibiaxial stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, M. S.; Guest, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Design and application of phononic crystal (PhCr) acoustic metamaterials has been a topic with tremendous growth of interest in the last decade due to their promising capabilities to manipulate acoustic and elastodynamic waves. Phononic controllability of waves through a particular PhCr is limited only to the spectrums located within its fixed bandgap frequency. Hence the ability to tune a PhCr is desired to add functionality over its variable bandgap frequency or for switchability. Deformation induced bandgap tunability of elastomeric PhCr solids and plates with prescribed topology have been studied by other researchers. Principally the internal stress state and distorted geometry of a deformed phononic crystal plate (PhP) changes its effective stiffness and leads to deformation induced tunability of resultant modal band structure. Thus the microstructural topology of a PhP can be altered so that specific tunability features are met through prescribed deformation. In the present study novel tunable PhPs of this kind with optimized bandgap efficiency-tunability of guided waves are computationally explored and evaluated. Low loss transmission of guided waves throughout thin walled structures makes them ideal for fabrication of low loss ultrasound devices and structural health monitoring purposes. Various tunability targets are defined to enhance or degrade complete bandgaps of plate waves through macroscopic tensile deformation. Elastomeric hyperelastic material is considered which enables recoverable micromechanical deformation under tuning finite stretch. Phononic tunability through stable deformation of phononic lattice is specifically required and so any topology showing buckling instability under assumed deformation is disregarded. Nondominated sorting genetic algorithm (GA) NSGA-II is adopted for evolutionary multiobjective topology optimization of hypothesized tunable PhP with square symmetric unit-cell and relevant topologies are analyzed through finite

  14. Metallic-like bonding in plasma-born silicon nanocrystals for nanoscale bandgap engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vach, Holger; Ivanova, Lena V; Timerghazin, Qadir K; Jardali, Fatme; Le, Ha-Linh Thi

    2016-10-27

    Based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we show that small nanoclusters of about 1 nm size spontaneously generated in a low-temperature silane plasma do not possess tetrahedral structures, but are ultrastable. Apparently small differences in the cluster structure result in substantial modifications in their electric, magnetic, and optical properties, without the need for any dopants. Their non-tetrahedral geometries notably lead to electron deficient bonds that introduce efficient electron delocalization that strongly resembles the one of a homogeneous electron gas leading to metallic-like bonding within a semiconductor nanocrystal. As a result, pure hydrogenated silicon clusters that form by self-assembly in a plasma reactor possess optical gaps covering most of the solar spectrum from 1.0 eV to 5.2 eV depending simply on their structure and, in turn, on their degree of electron delocalization. This feature makes them ideal candidates for future bandgap engineering not only for photovoltaics, but also for many nano-electronic devices employing nothing else but silicon and hydrogen atoms.

  15. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Abdulraheem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause

  16. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulraheem, Yaser, E-mail: yaser.abdulraheem@kuniv.edu.kw [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University. P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  17. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  18. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Dishman, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.1 in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.2, wherein Eg.sub.2 >Eg.sub.1, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method, comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg.sub.1 but less than Eg.sub.2, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  19. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1987-03-10

    A method is described of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap E/sub g1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap E/sub g2/, wherein E/sub g2/>E/sub g1/. The second semiconductor material is not substantially etched during the method, comprising subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where the etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material where the photons are not present, the photons being of an energy greater than E/sub g1/ but less than E/sub g2/, whereby the first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and the second material is substantially not etched.

  20. High extinction ratio bandgap of photonic crystals in LNOI wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Mei; Cai, Lu-Tong; Jiang, Yun-Peng; Jiao, Yang

    2017-02-01

    A high-extinction-ratio bandgap of air-bridge photonic crystal slab, in the near infrared, is reported. These structures were patterned in single-crystalline LiNbO3 film bonded to SiO2/LiNbO3 substrate by focused ion beam. To improve the vertical confinement of light, the SiO2 layer was removed by 3.6% HF acid. Compared with photonic crystals sandwiched between SiO2 and air, the structures suspending in air own a robust photonic bandgap and high transmission efficiency at valence band region. The measured results are in good agreement with numerically computed transmission spectra by finite-difference time-domain method. The air-bridge photonic crystal waveguides were formed by removing one line holes. We reveal experimentally the guiding characteristics and calculate the theoretical results for photonic crystal waveguides in LiNbO3 film.

  1. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic band-gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts the localization of light around an atom in photonic band-gap (PBG) medium or photonic crystal. Here we report the first experimental realization of the strong coupling between a single artificial atom and an one dimensional PBG medium using superconducting circuits. In the photonic transport measurement, we observe an anomalous Lamb shift and a large band-edge avoided crossing when the artificial atom frequency is tuned across the band-edge. The persistent peak within the band-gap indicates the single photon bound state. Furthermore, we study the resonance fluorescence of this bound state, again demonstrating the breakdown of the Born-Markov approximation near the band-edge. This novel architecture can be directly generalized to study many-body quantum electrodynamics and to construct more complicated spin chain models.

  2. Low Loss Plastic Terahertz Photonic Band-Gap Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG You-Fu; TAN Xiao-Ling; ZHONG Kai; WANG Peng; YAO Jian-Quan

    2008-01-01

    We report a numerical investigation on terahertz wave propagation in plastic photonic band-gap fibres which are characterized by a 19-unit-cell air core and hexagonal air holes with rounded corners in cladding. Using the finite element method, the leakage loss and absorption loss are calculated and the transmission properties are analysed.The lowest loss of 0.268 dB/m is obtained. Numerical results show that the fibres could liberate the constraints of background materials beyond the transparency region in terahertz wave band, and efficiently minimize the effect of absorption by background materials, which present great advantage of plastic photonic band-gap fibres in long distance terahertz delivery.

  3. Experimental Methods for Implementing Graphene Contacts to Finite Bandgap Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob

    for molecular electronics with parallel CVD graphene bottom electrodes with SiO2 passivation was successfully fabricated and electronically characterized. A functioning Carbon Burger was not achieved. Along the work on the Carbon Burger, the scope was broadened and focus was put on implementing graphene......Present Ph.D. thesis describes my work on implanting graphene as electrical contact to finite bandgap semiconductors. Different transistor architectures, types of graphene and finite bandgap semiconductors have been employed. The device planned from the beginning of my Ph.D. fellowship...... was a graphene-C60 monolayergraphene vertical transistor named the Carbon Burger. The fabrication of such device proved increasingly difficult to achieve and many experimental methods to handle graphene were implemented and improved in attempt to fabricate the Carbon Burger. In the end, a device platform...

  4. Omnidirectional bandgaps in Fibonacci quasicrystals containing single-negative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao; Huang, Jie-Hui; Zou, Liner; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2010-02-10

    The band structure and bandgaps of one-dimensional Fibonacci quasicrystals composed of epsilon-negative materials and mu-negative materials are studied. We show that an omnidirectional bandgap (OBG) exists in the Fibonacci structure. In contrast to the Bragg gaps, such an OBG is insensitive to the incident angle and the polarization of light, and the width and location of the OBG cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order, but vary with the thickness ratio of both components, and the OBG closes when the thickness ratio is equal to the golden ratio. Moreover, the general formulations of the higher and lower band edges of the OBG are obtained by the effective medium theory. These results could lead to further applications of Fibonacci structures.

  5. Comparison of Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors for Power Electronics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozpineci, B.

    2004-01-02

    Recent developmental advances have allowed silicon (Si) semiconductor technology to approach the theoretical limits of the Si material; however, power device requirements for many applications are at a point that the present Si-based power devices cannot handle. The requirements include higher blocking voltages, switching frequencies, efficiency, and reliability. To overcome these limitations, new semiconductor materials for power device applications are needed. For high power requirements, wide-bandgap semiconductors like silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond, with their superior electrical properties, are likely candidates to replace Si in the near future. This report compares wide-bandgap semiconductors with respect to their promise and applicability for power applications and predicts the future of power device semiconductor materials.

  6. Bandgap narrowing in moderately to heavily doped silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, H. P. D.; Tuft, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model of bandgap narrowing in silicon at high doping levels has been developed. The model takes into account the electrostatic energy of interaction between a minority carrier and the majority carriers surrounding it, which reduces the thermal energy necessary for creation of an electron-hole pair. A pair energy similar to the excitonic binding energy of bound electron-hole pairs in insulators is obtained. Theoretical results are in excellent agreement with experimental results in the doping range from 3 times 10 to the 17th to 1.5 times 10 to the 20th/cu cm at room temperature. These results indicate that at high injection levels such as a transistor biased into the conductivity-modulation regime or a solar cell whose surface is established by ion implantation into an oxide layer, the bandgap narrowing is determined by the injected carrier concentration rather than by the doping level.

  7. Composition and bandgap-graded semiconductor alloy nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiujuan; Ning, C Z; Pan, Anlian

    2012-01-03

    Semiconductor alloy nanowires with spatially graded compositions (and bandgaps) provide a new material platform for many new multifunctional optoelectronic devices, such as broadly tunable lasers, multispectral photodetectors, broad-band light emitting diodes (LEDs) and high-efficiency solar cells. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress on composition graded semiconductor alloy nanowires with bandgaps graded in a wide range. Depending on different growth methods and material systems, two typical nanowire composition grading approaches will be presented in detail, including composition graded alloy nanowires along a single substrate and those along single nanowires. Furthermore, selected examples of applications of these composition graded semiconductor nanowires will be presented and discussed, including tunable nanolasers, multi-terminal on-nanowire photodetectors, full-spectrum solar cells, and white-light LEDs. Finally, we will make some concluding remarks with future perspectives including opportunities and challenges in this research area.

  8. Design techniques for superposition of acoustic bandgaps using fractal geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Castiñeira-Ibáñez, S; Sánchez-Pérez, J V; Garcia-Raffi, L M

    2010-01-01

    Research into properties of heterogeneous artificial materials, consisting of arrangements of rigid scatterers embedded in a medium with different elastic properties, has been intense throughout last two decades. The capability to prevent the transmission of waves in predetermined bands of frequencies -called bandgaps- becomes one of the most interesting properties of these systems, and leads to the possibility of designing devices to control wave propagation. The underlying physical mechanism is destructive Bragg interference. Here we show a technique that enables the creation of a wide bandgap in these materials, based on fractal geometries. We have focused our work in the acoustic case where these materials are called Phononic/Sonic Crystals (SC) but, the technique could be applied any types of crystals and wave types in ranges of frequencies where the physics of the process is linear.

  9. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, C. A.; O'Brien, W. A.; Penninger, M. W.; Schneider, W. F.; Gillett-Kunnath, M.; Zajicek, J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge1-xCx (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge0.998C0.002 shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge0.998C0.002 using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III-V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  10. Treating temperature effect on bandgap in polymer opal photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The optical reflective spectra and microstruc- tures of polystyrene opal photonic crystals treated with dif- ferent temperatures have been investigated. With tempera- ture increasing, the polystyrene spheres in opal structure transform to dodecahedrons, and the peak of reflective spec- trum moves to shorter wavelength. The experiment result testifies the effect of the effective refractive index and the filling ratio to the bandgap position, and it corresponds to the theoretical simulative result.

  11. Feasibility of detecting single atoms using photonic bandgap cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Lev, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Kartik; Barclay, Paul; Painter, Oskar; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    We propose an atom-cavity chip that combines laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms with magnetic microtraps and waveguides to deliver a cold atom to the mode of a fiber taper coupled photonic bandgap (PBG) cavity. The feasibility of this device for detecting single atoms is analyzed using both a semi-classical treatment and an unconditional master equation approach. Single-atom detection seems achievable in an initial experiment involving the non-deterministic delivery of weakly trapped...

  12. Stabilized Wide Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells by Tin Substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibin; Rajagopal, Adharsh; Jo, Sae Byeok; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Williams, Spencer; Huang, Chun-Chih; Katahara, John K; Hillhouse, Hugh W; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2016-12-14

    Wide bandgap MAPb(I1-yBry)3 perovskites show promising potential for application in tandem solar cells. However, unstable photovoltaic performance caused by phase segregation has been observed under illumination when y is above 0.2. Herein, we successfully demonstrate stabilization of the I/Br phase by partially replacing Pb(2+) with Sn(2+) and verify this stabilization with X-ray diffractometry and transient absorption spectroscopy. The resulting MAPb0.75Sn0.25(I1-yBry)3 perovskite solar cells show stable photovoltaic performance under continuous illumination. Among these cells, the one based on MAPb0.75Sn0.25(I0.4Br0.6)3 perovskite shows the highest efficiency of 12.59% with a bandgap of 1.73 eV, which make it a promising wide bandgap candidate for application in tandem solar cells. The engineering of internal bonding environment by partial Sn substitution is believed to be the main reason for making MAPb0.75Sn0.25(I1-yBry)3 perovskite less vulnerable to phase segregation during the photostriction under illumination. Therefore, this study establishes composition engineering of the metal site as a promising strategy to impart phase stability in hybrid perovskites under illumination.

  13. Defect-induced bandgap narrowing in low-k dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, X.; Zheng, H.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing & Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, S. W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Afanas' ev, V. V. [Department of Physics, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Baklanov, M. R.; Marneffe, J.-F. de [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nishi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-08-24

    In this work, core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to determine the surface bandgap for various porous and non-porous low-k a-SiCOH dielectrics before and after ion sputtering. By examining the onset of inelastic energy loss in O 1s core-level spectra, the gap narrowing was universally found in Ar{sup +} ion sputtered low-k dielectrics. The reduction of the bandgap ranges from 1.3 to 2.2 eV depending on the film composition. We show that the bandgap narrowing in these low-k dielectrics is caused by development of the valence-band tail as evidenced by the presence of additional electronic states above the valence-band maximum. Electron-spin-resonance measurements were made on a-SiCOH films to gain atomic insight into the nature of the sputtering-induced defects and reveal formation of carbon-related defects as the most probable origin of the gap states.

  14. Hollow multilayer photonic bandgap fibers for NIR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Ken; Shapira, Ofer; Hart, Shandon D.; Benoit, Gilles; Kuriki, Yuka; Viens, Jean F.; Bayindir, Mehmet; Joannopoulos, John D.; Fink, Yoel

    2004-04-01

    Here we report the fabrication of hollow-core cylindrical photonic bandgap fibers with fundamental photonic bandgaps at near-infrared wavelengths, from 0.85 to 2.28 μm. In these fibers the photonic bandgaps are created by an all-solid multilayer composite meso-structure having a photonic crystal lattice period as small as 260 nm, individual layers below 75 nm and as many as 35 periods. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, the smallest period lengths and highest period counts reported to date for hollow PBG fibers. The fibers are drawn from a multilayer preform into extended lengths of fiber. Light is guided in the fibers through a large hollow core that is lined with an interior omnidirectional dielectric mirror. We extend the range of materials that can be used in these fibers to include poly(ether imide) (PEI) in addition to the arsenic triselenide (As2Se3) glass and poly(ether sulfone) (PES) that have been used previously. Further, we characterize the refractive indices of these materials over a broad wavelength range (0.25 - 15 μm) and incorporated the measured optical properties into calculations of the fiber photonic band structure and a preliminary loss analysis.

  15. Bandgap tunability at single-layer molybdenum disulphide grain boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yu Li

    2015-02-17

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a new class of semiconductor materials with novel electronic and optical properties of interest to future nanoelectronics technology. Single-layer molybdenum disulphide, which represents a prototype two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide, has an electronic bandgap that increases with decreasing layer thickness. Using high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we measure the apparent quasiparticle energy gap to be 2.40±0.05 eV for single-layer, 2.10±0.05 eV for bilayer and 1.75±0.05 eV for trilayer molybdenum disulphide, which were directly grown on a graphite substrate by chemical vapour deposition method. More interestingly, we report an unexpected bandgap tunability (as large as 0.85±0.05 eV) with distance from the grain boundary in single-layer molybdenum disulphide, which also depends on the grain misorientation angle. This work opens up new possibilities for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices with tunable bandgaps that utilize both the control of two-dimensional layer thickness and the grain boundary engineering.

  16. Bandgap modulation of carbon nanotubes by encapsulated metallofullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jhinhwan; Kim, H.; Kahng, S.-J.; Kim, G.; Son, Y.-W.; Ihm, J.; Kato, H.; Wang, Z. W.; Okazaki, T.; Shinohara, H.; Kuk, Young

    2002-02-01

    Motivated by the technical and economic difficulties in further miniaturizing silicon-based transistors with the present fabrication technologies, there is a strong effort to develop alternative electronic devices, based, for example, on single molecules. Recently, carbon nanotubes have been successfully used for nanometre-sized devices such as diodes, transistors, and random access memory cells. Such nanotube devices are usually very long compared to silicon-based transistors. Here we report a method for dividing a semiconductor nanotube into multiple quantum dots with lengths of about 10nm by inserting Gd@C82 endohedral fullerenes. The spatial modulation of the nanotube electronic bandgap is observed with a low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscope. We find that a bandgap of ~0.5eV is narrowed down to ~0.1eV at sites where endohedral metallofullerenes are inserted. This change in bandgap can be explained by local elastic strain and charge transfer at metallofullerene sites. This technique for fabricating an array of quantum dots could be used for nano-electronics and nano-optoelectronics.

  17. Structure and optical bandgap relationship of π-conjugated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, André Leitão; Shin, Yongwoo; Liu, Jiakai; Lin, Xi

    2014-01-01

    In bulk heterojunction photovoltaic systems both the open-circuit voltage as well as the short-circuit current, and hence the power conversion efficiency, are dependent on the optical bandgap of the electron-donor material. While first-principles methods are computationally intensive, simpler model Hamiltonian approaches typically suffer from one or more flaws: inability to optimize the geometries for their own input; absence of general, transferable parameters; and poor performance for non-planar systems. We introduce a set of new and revised parameters for the adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (aSSH) Hamiltonian, which is capable of optimizing geometries, along with rules for applying them to any [Formula: see text]-conjugated system containing C, N, O, or S, including non-planar systems. The predicted optical bandgaps show excellent agreement to UV-vis spectroscopy data points from literature, with a coefficient of determination [Formula: see text], a mean error of -0.05 eV, and a mean absolute deviation of 0.16 eV. We use the model to gain insights from PEDOT, fused thiophene polymers, poly-isothianaphthene, copolymers, and pentacene as sources of design rules in the search for low bandgap materials. Using the model as an in-silico design tool, a copolymer of benzodithiophenes along with a small-molecule derivative of pentacene are proposed as optimal donor materials for organic photovoltaics.

  18. Structure and optical bandgap relationship of π-conjugated systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leitão Botelho

    Full Text Available In bulk heterojunction photovoltaic systems both the open-circuit voltage as well as the short-circuit current, and hence the power conversion efficiency, are dependent on the optical bandgap of the electron-donor material. While first-principles methods are computationally intensive, simpler model Hamiltonian approaches typically suffer from one or more flaws: inability to optimize the geometries for their own input; absence of general, transferable parameters; and poor performance for non-planar systems. We introduce a set of new and revised parameters for the adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (aSSH Hamiltonian, which is capable of optimizing geometries, along with rules for applying them to any [Formula: see text]-conjugated system containing C, N, O, or S, including non-planar systems. The predicted optical bandgaps show excellent agreement to UV-vis spectroscopy data points from literature, with a coefficient of determination [Formula: see text], a mean error of -0.05 eV, and a mean absolute deviation of 0.16 eV. We use the model to gain insights from PEDOT, fused thiophene polymers, poly-isothianaphthene, copolymers, and pentacene as sources of design rules in the search for low bandgap materials. Using the model as an in-silico design tool, a copolymer of benzodithiophenes along with a small-molecule derivative of pentacene are proposed as optimal donor materials for organic photovoltaics.

  19. High PSRR bandgap reference used in boost circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Duan, Baoxing; Wang, Yong; Yang, Yintang

    2017-03-01

    Based on pre-regulated voltage structure, a voltage bandgap reference with high power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) is presented in this paper. A pre-regulated voltage structure is used in the circuit to achieve isolating the supply voltage of the bandgap core circuit from VDD to reach a high PSRR. The circuit was designed and simulated in 0.35um BCD technology. The results show the output voltage variation versus temperature (-50°C -100°C) is 8.8 ppm/°C, bandgap reference voltage is 1.236V, current consumption is 30.3 µA. Noise is 53.54 µV/Hz-1/2 at 1Hz. PSRR is -91dB at low frequency, -90.3dB at 1 kHz and -30.3dB at 1MHz. thus, the circuit maintains a good performance in PSRR through a broad frequency.

  20. Facile Synthesis of Defective TiO2-x Nanocrystals with High Surface Area and Tailoring Bandgap for Visible-light Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajid Shah, Muhammad; Zhu, Yunqing; Fan, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yingxuan; Asim, Sumreen; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-10-30

    A facile hydrothermal approach has been developed to prepare defective TiO2-x nanocrystals using Ti(III)-salt as a precursor and L-ascorbic acid as reductant and structure direction agent. The prepared TiO2-x nanocrystals are composed of a highly crystallized TiO2 core and a disordered TiO2-x outer layer, possessing high surface area, controlled oxygen vacancy concentration and tunable bandgap via simply adjusting the amount of added L-ascorbic acid. The defective TiO2-x shows high photocatalytic efficiency in methylene blue and phenol degradation as well as in hydrogen evolution under visible light, underlining the significance of the present strategy for structural and bandgap manipulation in TiO2-based photocatalysis.

  1. Luminescence in Conjugated Molecular Materials under Sub-bandgap Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Franky [University of Florida

    2014-05-08

    Light emission in semiconductors occurs when they are under optical and electrical excitation with energy larger than the bandgap energy. In some low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructure systems, this thermodynamic limit can be violated due to radiative Auger recombination (AR), a process in which the sub-bandgap energy released from a recombined electron-hole pair is transferred to a third particle leading to radiative band-to-band recombination.1 Thus far, photoluminescence up-conversion phenomenon has been observed in some low dimensional semiconductor systems, and the effect is very weak and it can only be observed at low temperatures. Recently, we discovered that efficient electroluminescence in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethylhexyloxy)-1, phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) polymer light-emitting devices (PLEDs) at drive voltages below its bandgap voltage could be observed when a ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) electron injection layer was inserted between the polymer and the aluminum electrode. Specifically, emitted photons with energy of 2.13 eV can be detected at operating voltages as low as 1.2 V at room temperature. Based on these data, we propose that the sub-bandgap turn-on in the MEH-PPV device is due to an Auger-assisted energy up-conversion process. The significance of this discovery is three-fold. First, radiative recombination occurs at operating voltages below the thermodynamic bandgap voltage. This process can significantly reduce the device operating voltage. For example, the current density of the device with the ZnO NC layer is almost two orders of magnitude higher than that of the device without the NC layer. Second, a reactive metal is no longer needed for the cathode. Third, this electroluminescence up-conversion process can be applied to inorganic semiconductors systems as well and their operation voltages of inorganic LEDs can be reduced to about half of the bandgap energy. Based on our initial data, we propose that the sub-bandgap turn-on in MEH

  2. Photoelectrochemistry, Electronic Structure, and Bandgap Sizes of Semiconducting Cu(I)-Niobates and Cu(I)-Tantalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggard, Paul A.

    2013-11-14

    Semiconducting metal-oxides have remained of intense research interest owing to their potential for achieving efficient solar-driven photocatalytic reactions in aqueous solutions that occur as a result of their bandgap excitation. The photocatalytic reduction of water or carbon dioxide to generate hydrogen or hydrocarbon fuels, respectively, can be driven on p-type (photocathodic) electrodes with suitable band energies. However, metal-oxide semiconductors are typically difficult to dope as p-type with a high mobility of carriers. The supported research led to the discovery of new p-type Cu(I)-niobate and Cu(I)-tantalate film electrodes that can be prepared on FTO glass. New high-purity flux syntheses and the full structural determination of several Cu(I)-containing niobates and tantalates have been completed, as well as new investigations of their optical and photoelectrochemical properties and electronic structures via density-functional theory calculations. For example, CuNbO3, Cu5Ta11O30 and CuNb3O8 were prepared in high purity and their structures were characterized by both single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. These two classes of Cu(I)-containing compounds exhibit optical bandgap sizes ranging from ~1.3 eV to ~2.6 eV. Photoelectrochemical measurements of these compounds show strong photon-driven cathodic currents that confirm the p-type semiconductor behavior of CuNbO3, CuNb3O8, and Cu5Ta11O30. Incident-photon-to-current efficiencies are measured that approach greater than ~1%. Electronic-structure calculations based on density functional theory reveal the visible-light absorption stems from a nearly-direct bandgap transition involving a copper-to-niobium or tantalum (d10 to d0) charge-transfer excitations.

  3. Local resonance and Bragg bandgaps in sandwich beams containing periodically inserted resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Bhisham

    2015-01-01

    We study the low frequency wave propagation behavior of sandwich beams containing periodically embedded internal resonators. A closed form expression for the propagation constant is obtained using a phased array approach and verified using finite element simulations. We show that local resonance and Bragg bandgaps coexist in such a system and that the width of both bandgaps is a function of resonator parameters as well as their periodicity. The interaction between the two bandgaps is studied by varying the local resonance frequency. We find that a single combined bandgap does not exist for this system and that the Bragg bandgaps transition into sub-wavelength bandgaps when the local resonance frequency is above their associated classical Bragg frequency.

  4. Energy Bandgap and Edge States in an Epitaxially Grown Graphene/h-BN Heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Beomyong; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Yoon, Jong Keon; Lim, Sungjun; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeong Hoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Sung, Dongchul; Kim, Gunn; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Stroscio, Joseph A; Kuk, Young

    2016-08-09

    Securing a semiconducting bandgap is essential for applying graphene layers in switching devices. Theoretical studies have suggested a created bulk bandgap in a graphene layer by introducing an asymmetry between the A and B sub-lattice sites. A recent transport measurement demonstrated the presence of a bandgap in a graphene layer where the asymmetry was introduced by placing a graphene layer on a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Similar bandgap has been observed in graphene layers on metal substrates by local probe measurements; however, this phenomenon has not been observed in graphene layers on a near-insulating substrate. Here, we present bulk bandgap-like features in a graphene layer epitaxially grown on an h-BN substrate using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We observed edge states at zigzag edges, edge resonances at armchair edges, and bandgap-like features in the bulk.

  5. Energy Bandgap and Edge States in an Epitaxially Grown Graphene/h-BN Heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Beomyong; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Yoon, Jong Keon; Lim, Sungjun; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeong Hoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Sung, Dongchul; Kim, Gunn; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Stroscio, Joseph A.; Kuk, Young

    2016-08-01

    Securing a semiconducting bandgap is essential for applying graphene layers in switching devices. Theoretical studies have suggested a created bulk bandgap in a graphene layer by introducing an asymmetry between the A and B sub-lattice sites. A recent transport measurement demonstrated the presence of a bandgap in a graphene layer where the asymmetry was introduced by placing a graphene layer on a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Similar bandgap has been observed in graphene layers on metal substrates by local probe measurements; however, this phenomenon has not been observed in graphene layers on a near-insulating substrate. Here, we present bulk bandgap-like features in a graphene layer epitaxially grown on an h-BN substrate using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We observed edge states at zigzag edges, edge resonances at armchair edges, and bandgap-like features in the bulk.

  6. Maximizing bandgaps in two-dimensional photonic crystals a variational algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, P; Paul, Prabasaj; Ndi, Francis C.

    2002-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the maximization of photonic bandgaps in two-dimensional crystals. Once the translational symmetries of the underlying structure have been imposed, our algorithm finds a global maximal (and complete, if one exists) bandgap. Additionally, we prove two remarkable results related to maximal bandgaps: the so-called `maximum contrast' rule, and about the location in the Brillouin zone of band edges.

  7. Application of pressure to shift the bandgap in polystyrene-based photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nigel P.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; McLachlan, Martyn A.; McComb, David W.; De La Rue, Richard M.

    2004-09-01

    We describe a simple technique for the selective area modification of the bandgap in planar 3-D photonic crystals (PhC). The PhCs are grown by controlled drying of monosized polystyrene spheres. Uniaxial pressure of 41 MPa can produce a shift in the bandgap of ~90 nm from 230 nm spheres. An unexpected broadening of the bandgap is attributed to the change in topology associated with large necks formed between spheres at pressures greater than 10 MPa.

  8. High-efficiency, monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem photovoltaic energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    2011-11-29

    A monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem solar photovoltaic converter has at least one, and preferably at least two, subcells grown lattice-matched on a substrate with a bandgap in medium to high energy portions of the solar spectrum and at least one subcell grown lattice-mismatched to the substrate with a bandgap in the low energy portion of the solar spectrum, for example, about 1 eV.

  9. Exploring Direct to Indirect Bandgap Transition in Silicon Nanowires: Size Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lihong; Zhang, Gang

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the electronic band structure of [110] silicon nanowires (SiNWs) using first-principles calculations. We find that, in the ultrathin diameter regime, SiNWs have a direct bandgap, but the energy difference between the indirect and direct fundamental bandgaps decreases as the nanowire diameter increases. This indicates that larger [110] SiNWs could have an indirect bandgap. Fundamentally, a series of quantitative direct-indirect bandgap transitional diameters are obtained for different cross-sectional geometries, with the largest values for SiNWs with triangular cross section.

  10. Urbach's rule derived from thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1978-01-01

    The exponential absorption edge (known as Urbach's rule) observed in most materials is interpreted in terms of thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy. The main contribution to the temperature shift of the band-gap energy is due to the temperature-dependent self-energies of the electrons...... and holes interacting with the phonons. Since the phonon number is fluctuating in thermal equilibrium, the band-gap energy is also fluctuating resulting in an exponential absorption tail below the average band-gap energy. These simple considerations are applied to derive Urbach's rule at high temperatures...

  11. Enhanced chemiluminescent detection scheme for trace vapor sensing in pneumatically-tuned hollow core photonic bandgap fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarov, Alexander M; Gumennik, Alexander; McDaniel, William; Shapira, Ofer; Schell, Brent; Sorin, Fabien; Kuriki, Ken; Benoit, Gilles; Rose, Aimee; Joannopoulos, John D; Fink, Yoel

    2012-05-21

    We demonstrate an in-fiber gas phase chemical detection architecture in which a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction is spatially and spectrally matched to the core modes of hollow photonic bandgap (PBG) fibers in order to enhance detection efficiency. A peroxide-sensitive CL material is annularly shaped and centered within the fiber's hollow core, thereby increasing the overlap between the emission intensity and the intensity distribution of the low-loss fiber modes. This configuration improves the sensitivity by 0.9 dB/cm compared to coating the material directly on the inner fiber surface, where coupling to both higher loss core modes and cladding modes is enhanced. By integrating the former configuration with a custom-built optofluidic system designed for concomitant controlled vapor delivery and emission measurement, we achieve a limit-of-detection of 100 parts per billion (ppb) for hydrogen peroxide vapor. The PBG fibers are produced by a new fabrication method whereby external gas pressure is used as a control knob to actively tune the transmission bandgaps through the entire visible range during the thermal drawing process.

  12. High bandgap III-V alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Wanlass, Mark

    2017-01-10

    High bandgap alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics are disclosed. An exemplary optoelectronic device may include a substrate, at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer, and a step-grade buffer between the substrate and at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer. The buffer may begin with a layer that is substantially lattice matched to GaAs, and may then incrementally increase the lattice constant in each sequential layer until a predetermined lattice constant of Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP is reached.

  13. Soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    of an approximate scaling relation is tested. It is concluded that compression of input pulses of several ps duration and sub-MW peak power can lead to a formation of solitons with ∼100 fs duration and multi-megawatt peak powers. The dispersion slope of realistic hollow-core fibers appears to be the main obstacle......The formation of solitons upon compression of linearly chirped pulses in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers is investigated numerically. The dependence of soliton duration on the chirp and power of the input pulse and on the dispersion slope of the fiber is investigated, and the validity...

  14. Surface band-gap narrowing in quantized electron accumulation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P D C; Veal, T D; McConville, C F; Zúñiga-Pérez, J; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V; Hopkinson, M; Rienks, E D L; Jensen, M Fuglsang; Hofmann, Ph

    2010-06-25

    An energy gap between the valence and the conduction band is the defining property of a semiconductor, and the gap size plays a crucial role in the design of semiconductor devices. We show that the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas near to the surface of a semiconductor can significantly alter the size of its band gap through many-body effects caused by its high electron density, resulting in a surface band gap that is much smaller than that in the bulk. Apart from reconciling a number of disparate previous experimental findings, the results suggest an entirely new route to spatially inhomogeneous band-gap engineering.

  15. Accurate modelling of fabricated hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua, Eric Numkam; Sandoghchi, Seyed Reza; Chen, Yong; Jasion, Gregory T; Wheeler, Natalie V; Baddela, Naveen K; Hayes, John R; Petrovich, Marco N; Richardson, David J; Poletti, Francesco

    2015-09-07

    We report a novel approach to reconstruct the cross-sectional profile of fabricated hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers from scanning electron microscope images. Finite element simulations on the reconstructed geometries achieve a remarkable match with the measured transmission window, surface mode position and attenuation. The agreement between estimated scattering loss from surface roughness and measured loss values indicates that structural distortions, in particular the uneven distribution of glass across the thin silica struts on the core boundary, have a strong impact on the loss. This provides insight into the differences between idealized models and fabricated fibers, which could be key to further fiber loss reduction.

  16. Liquid-impermeable inverse opals with invariant photonic bandgap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyelim; Lee, Joon-Seok; Chang, Won Seok; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2015-02-18

    Omniphobic inverse opals are created by structurally and chemically modifying the surface of inverse opals through reactive ion etching. During the etching, void arrays of the inverse opal surface evolves to a triangular post array with re-entrant geometry. The elaborate structure can efficiently pin the air-liquid interface and retain air cavities against water and oil, thereby providing liquid-impermeable inverse opals with invariant photonic bandgap. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Optoelectronic devices based on graded bandgap structures utilising electroplated semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the work presented in this thesis is to develop low-cost multi-junction graded bandgap solar cells using electroplated semiconductors. The semiconductor materials explored in this research are CdSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdMnTe and CdTe thin films. These layers were characterised for their structural, compositional, morphological, optical, and electrical features using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, EDX, SEM, UV-Vis spectroscopy, PEC cell, C-V, I-V and UPS measurement techniques respectively. ...

  18. High bandgap III-V alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Wanlass, Mark

    2017-01-10

    High bandgap alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics are disclosed. An exemplary optoelectronic device may include a substrate, at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer, and a step-grade buffer between the substrate and at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer. The buffer may begin with a layer that is substantially lattice matched to GaAs, and may then incrementally increase the lattice constant in each sequential layer until a predetermined lattice constant of Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP is reached.

  19. Waveguidance by the photonic bandgap effect in optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Søndergaard, Thomas; Barkou, Stig Eigil;

    1999-01-01

    Photonic crystals form a new class of intriguing building blocks to be utilized in future optoelectronics and electromagnetics. One of the most exciting possiblilties offered by phtonic crystals is the realization of new types of electromagnetic waveguides. In the optical domain, the most mature...... technology for such photonic bandgap (PBG) waveguides is in optical fibre configurations. These new fibres can be classified in a fundamentally different way to all optical waveguides and possess radically different guiding properties due to PBG guidance, as opposed to guidance by total internal refelction...

  20. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  1. Bandgap and Carrier Transport Engineering of Quantum Confined Mixed Phase Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Tianyuan; Klafehn, Grant; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Airuoyo, Idemudia; Lusk, Mark T.; Stradins, Paul; Taylor, Craig; Collins, Reuben T.

    2016-11-21

    Mixed phase nanocrystalline/amorphous-silicon (nc/a-Si:H) thin films with band-gap higher than bulk silicon are prepared by depositing silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs), prepared in a separate deposition zone, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), simultaneously. Since the two deposition phases are well decoupled, optimized parameters for each component can apply to the growth process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) shows that the embedded SiNPs are small enough to exhibit quantum confinement effects. The low temperature PL measurements on the mixed phase reveal a dominant emission feature, which is associated with SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H. In addition, we compare time dependent low temperature PL measurements for both a-Si:H and mixed phase material under intensive laser exposure for various times up to two hours. The PL intensity of a-Si:H with embedded SiNPs degrades much less than that of pure a-Si:H. We propose this improvement of photostability occurs because carriers generated in the a-Si:H matrix quickly transfer into SiNPs and recombine there instead of recombining in a-Si:H and creating defect states (Staebler-Wronski Effect).

  2. Improved double-gate armchair silicene nanoribbon field-effect-transistor at large transport bandgap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Mahmoudi; Zahra, Ahangari; Morteza, Fathipour

    2016-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of a double-gate armchair silicene nanoribbon field-effect-transistor (DG ASiNR FET) are thoroughly investigated by using a ballistic quantum transport model based on non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) approach self-consistently coupled with a three-dimensional (3D) Poisson equation. We evaluate the influence of variation in uniaxial tensile strain, ribbon temperature and oxide thickness on the on-off current ratio, subthreshold swing, transconductance and the delay time of a 12-nm-length ultranarrow ASiNR FET. A novel two-parameter strain magnitude and temperature-dependent model is presented for designing an optimized device possessing balanced amelioration of all the electrical parameters. We demonstrate that employing HfO2 as the gate insulator can be a favorable choice and simultaneous use of it with proper combination of temperature and strain magnitude can achieve better device performance. Furthermore, a general model power (GMP) is derived which explicitly provides the electron effective mass as a function of the bandgap of a hydrogen passivated ASiNR under strain.

  3. Graded bandgap semiconduc-tor thin film photoelectrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A graded bandgap oxide semiconductor thin film electrode was designed in order to obtain a photoelectrochemically stable photoelectrode, with wide absorption range. The graded bandgap Ti1-xVxO2 film electrode was prepared by heating the stacked layers of V/Ti in varying ratios, which were coated on the substrate by the sol-gel method using the starting solution with various V/Ti ratios. XPS result showed that the composition gradient was achieved for the film. The Ti1-xVxO2 film electrode was found to be photoelectrochemically stable. Its photovoltage was about 360 mV. Obvious visible light photoresponse was observed for the Ti1-xVxO2 film electrode. Compared with the pure TiO2 electrode, the photocurrent onset potential of the Ti1-xVxO2 film electrode was shifted positively, probably because the accumulation of vanadium at the electrode sur-face causes the recombination of the electrons and holes, and the lowest level of the conduction band of Ti1-xVxO2 is lower than that of TiO2. Impedance analysis showed that the donor density of the Ti1-xVxO2 film electrode was higher than that of TiO2 film electrode.

  4. Lyapunov exponents for one-dimensional aperiodic photonic bandgap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Glen J.

    2011-10-01

    Existing in the "gray area" between perfectly periodic and purely randomized photonic bandgap structures are the socalled aperoidic structures whose layers are chosen according to some deterministic rule. We consider here a onedimensional photonic bandgap structure, a quarter-wave stack, with the layer thickness of one of the bilayers subject to being either thin or thick according to five deterministic sequence rules and binary random selection. To produce these aperiodic structures we examine the following sequences: Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, Period doubling, Rudin-Shapiro, as well as the triadic Cantor sequence. We model these structures numerically with a long chain (approximately 5,000,000) of transfer matrices, and then use the reliable algorithm of Wolf to calculate the (upper) Lyapunov exponent for the long product of matrices. The Lyapunov exponent is the statistically well-behaved variable used to characterize the Anderson localization effect (exponential confinement) when the layers are randomized, so its calculation allows us to more precisely compare the purely randomized structure with its aperiodic counterparts. It is found that the aperiodic photonic systems show much fine structure in their Lyapunov exponents as a function of frequency, and, in a number of cases, the exponents are quite obviously fractal.

  5. Optical bandgap of semiconductor nanostructures: Methods for experimental data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti, R.; Bahariqushchi, R.; Summonte, C.; Aydinli, A.; Terrasi, A.; Mirabella, S.

    2017-06-01

    Determination of the optical bandgap (Eg) in semiconductor nanostructures is a key issue in understanding the extent of quantum confinement effects (QCE) on electronic properties and it usually involves some analytical approximation in experimental data reduction and modeling of the light absorption processes. Here, we compare some of the analytical procedures frequently used to evaluate the optical bandgap from reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) spectra. Ge quantum wells and quantum dots embedded in SiO2 were produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and light absorption was characterized by UV-Vis/NIR spectrophotometry. R&T elaboration to extract the absorption spectra was conducted by two approximated methods (single or double pass approximation, single pass analysis, and double pass analysis, respectively) followed by Eg evaluation through linear fit of Tauc or Cody plots. Direct fitting of R&T spectra through a Tauc-Lorentz oscillator model is used as comparison. Methods and data are discussed also in terms of the light absorption process in the presence of QCE. The reported data show that, despite the approximation, the DPA approach joined with Tauc plot gives reliable results, with clear advantages in terms of computational efforts and understanding of QCE.

  6. Petahertz optical drive with wide-bandgap semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Hiroki; Oguri, Katsuya; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Suda, Akira; Gotoh, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    High-speed photonic and electronic devices at present rely on radiofrequency electric fields to control the physical properties of a semiconductor, which limits their operating speed to terahertz frequencies (1012 Hz ref. ). Using the electric field from intense light pulses, however, could extend the operating frequency into the petahertz regime (1015 Hz ref. ). Here we demonstrate optical driving at a petahertz frequency in the wide-bandgap semiconductor gallium nitride. Few-cycle near-infrared pulses are shown to induce electric interband polarization though a multiphoton process. Dipole oscillations with a periodicity of 860 as are revealed in the gallium nitride electron and hole system by using the quantum interference between the two transitions from the valence and conduction band states, which are probed by an extremely short isolated attosecond pulse with a coherent broadband spectrum. In principle, this shows that the conductivity of the semiconductor can be manipulated on attosecond timescales, which corresponds to instantaneous light-induced switching from insulator to conductor. The resultant dipole frequency reaches 1.16 PHz, showing the potential for future high-speed signal processing technologies based on wide-bandgap semiconductors.

  7. Characterization of Doped Amorphous Silicon Thin Films through the Investigation of Dopant Elements by Glow Discharge Spectrometry: A Correlation of Conductivity and Bandgap Energy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Pereiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of optical parameters, such as absorption and extinction coefficients, refractive index and the bandgap energy, is crucial to understand the behavior and final efficiency of thin film solar cells based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H. The influence of small variations of the gas flow rates used for the preparation of the p-a-SiC:H layer on the bandgap energy, as well as on the dopant elements concentration, thickness and conductivity of the p-layer, is investigated in this work using several complementary techniques. UV-NIR spectrophotometry and ellipsometry were used for the determination of bandgap energies of four p-a-SiC:H thin films, prepared by using different B2H6 and SiH4 fluxes (B2H6 from 12 sccm to 20 sccm and SiH4 from 6 sccm to 10 sccm. Moreover, radiofrequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry technique was used for depth profiling characterization of p-a-SiC:H thin films and valuable information about dopant elements concentration and distribution throughout the coating was found. Finally, a direct relationship between the conductivity of p-a-SiC:H thin films and the dopant elements concentration, particularly boron and carbon, was observed for the four selected samples.

  8. A simple model for approximate bandgap structure calculation of all-solid photonic bandgap fibre based on an array of rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hong; Lou Shu-Qin; Guo Tie-Ying; Yao Lei; Li nong-Lei; Jian ShuiSheng

    2008-01-01

    A simple model for approximate bandgap structure caculation of all-solid photonic bandgap fibre based on an array of rings is proposed.In this model calculated are only the potential modes of a unit cell,which is a high-index ring in the low-index background for this fibre,rather than the whole cladding periodic structure based on Bloch's theorem to find the bandgap.Its accuracy is proved by comparing its results with the results obtained by using the accurate full-vector plane-wave method.High speed in computation is its great advantage over the other exact methods,because it only needs to find the roots of one-dimensional analytical expressions.And the results of this model,mode plots,offer an ideal environment to explore the basic properties of photonic bandgap clearly.

  9. Power-scalable long-wavelength Yb-doped photonic bandgap fiber sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Shirakawa, Akira; Maurayama, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Ytterbium-doped photonic-bandgap fiber sources operationg at the long-wavelength edge of the ytterbium gain band are being investigated for high power amplification. Artificial shaping of the gain spectrum by the characteristic distributed filtering effect of the photonic bandgap enables...

  10. High Thermal and Electrical Tunability of Negative Dielectric Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Scolari, Lara; Weirich, Johannes;

    2008-01-01

    We infiltrate photonic crystal fibers with negative dielectric liquid crystals. 400nm bandgap shift is obtained in the range 22ºC-80ºC and 119nm shift of the long-wavelength bandgap edge is achieved by applying a voltage of 200V....

  11. True photonic band-gap mode-control in VCSEL structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, F.; Madsen, M.; Birkedal, Dan;

    2003-01-01

    Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect....

  12. Semi-transparent polymer solar cells with excellent sub-bandgap transmission for third generation photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiley, Zach M; Christoforo, M Greyson; Gratia, Paul; Bowring, Andrea R; Eberspacher, Petra; Margulis, George Y; Cabanetos, Clément; Beaujuge, Pierre M; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D

    2013-12-23

    Semi-transparent organic photovoltaics are of interest for a variety of photovoltaic applications, including solar windows and hybrid tandem photovoltaics. The figure shows a photograph of our semi-transparent solar cell, which has a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%, with an above bandgap transmission of 34% and a sub-bandgap transmission of 81%.

  13. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  14. High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, GaInP solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2014-07-08

    High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, photovoltaic cells (10), both transparent and non-transparent to sub-bandgap light, are provided as devices for use alone or in combination with other cells in split spectrum apparatus or other applications.

  15. High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, GaInP solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W; Carapella, Jeffrey J; Steiner, Myles A

    2016-11-01

    High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, photovoltaic cells (10), both transparent and non-transparent to sub-bandgap light, are provided as devices for use alone or in combination with other cells in split spectrum apparatus or other applications.

  16. Tunable bandgap in few-layer black phosphorus by electrical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Xu, Jin-Rong; Ba, Kun; Xuan, Ningning; Chen, Mingyuan; Sun, Zhengzong; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Zhang, Zengxing

    2017-09-01

    Dynamically engineering bandgap in semiconductors may enable a flexible design and optimization of electronics and optoelectronics. Layered black phosphorus is a 2D semiconductor with a direct bandgap and promising device characteristics. Theoretical studies indicate that the bandgap in black phosphorus can be tuned by electrical field. Here, through designing a double-gated field-effect transistor device configuration, we experimentally demonstrate that the bandgap in few-layer black phosphorus can be dynamically continually tuned by perpendicular electrical field. With an electrical displacement field of 1 V nm-1, the detailed study indicates that the bandgap can reduce around 100 meV. The finding here should be helpful on the flexible design and optimization of black phosphorus electronics and optoelectronics, and may open up some other new possible applications.

  17. Compressed lead-based perovskites reaching optimal Shockley-Queisser bandgap with prolonged carrier lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Gang; Gong, Jue; Yang, Wenge; Mao, Ho-kwang; Liu, Zhenxian; Schaller, Richard D; Zhang, Dongzhou; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Atomic structure of materials plays a decisive role in the light-matter interaction. Yet, despite its unprecedented progress, further efficiency boost of Lead-based organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells is hampered by its greater bandgap than the optimum value according to Shockley-Queisser limit. Here, we report the experimental achievement of bandgap narrowing in formamidinium lead triiodide from 1.489 to 1.337 eV by modulating the lattice constants under hydraulic compression, reaching the optimized bandgap for single-junction solar cells. Strikingly, such bandgap narrowing is accomplished with improved, instead of sacrificed carrier lifetime. More attractively, the narrowed bandgap is partially retainable after the release of pressure. This work opens a new dimension in basic science understanding of structural photonics and paves an alternative pathway towards more efficient photovoltaic materials.

  18. Bandgap Engineering of Double Perovskites for One- and Two-photon Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2013-01-01

    Computational screening is becoming increasingly useful in the search for new materials. We are interested in the design of new semiconductors to be used for light harvesting in a photoelectrochemical cell. In the present paper, we study the double perovskite structures obtained by combining 46...... stable cubic perovskites which was found to have a finite bandgap in a previous screening-study. The four-metal double perovskite space is too large to be investigated completely. For this reason we propose a method for combining different metals to obtain a desired bandgap. We derive some bandgap design...... rules on how to combine two cubic perovskites to generate a new combination with a larger or smaller bandgap compared with the constituent structures. Those rules are based on the type of orbitals involved in the conduction bands and on the size of the two cubic bandgaps. We also see that a change...

  19. On topology optimization of acoustic metamaterial lattices for locally resonant bandgaps of flexural waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Uddin, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Optimized topology of bi-material acoustic metamaterial lattice plates is studied for maximized locally resonant bandgap of flexural guided waves. Optimized layout of the two relatively stiff and compliant material phases in the design domain is explored, free from any restrictions on the topology and shape of the relevant domains. Multiobjective optimization is performed through which maximized effective stiffness or minimized overall mass of the bandgap topology is additionally ensured. Extreme and selected intermediate optimized topologies of Pareto fronts are presented and their bandgap efficiencies and effective stiffness are compared. The bi-material constitution of selected topologies are further altered and modal band structure of resultant multilateral and porous designs are evaluated. Novel, core-shell like, locally resonant bandgaps are introduced. It is shown that how the bandgap efficiency and structural mass and/or stiffness can be optimized through optimized microstructural design of the matrix...

  20. Wide bandgap GaN-based semiconductors for spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearton, S J [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Abernathy, C R [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Thaler, G T [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Frazier, R M [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Norton, D P [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ren, F [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Park, Y D [CSCMR and School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Zavada, J M [US Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Buyanova, I A [Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Linkoeping University, S-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Chen, W M [Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Linkoeping University, S-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Hebard, A F [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2004-02-25

    Recent results on achieving ferromagnetism in transition-metal-doped GaN, AlN and related materials are discussed. The field of semiconductor spintronics seeks to exploit the spin of charge carriers in new generations of transistors, lasers and integrated magnetic sensors. There is strong potential for new classes of ultra-low-power, high speed memory, logic and photonic devices based on spintronics. The utility of such devices depends on the availability of materials with practical magnetic ordering temperatures and most theories predict that the Curie temperature will be a strong function of bandgap. We discuss the current state-of-the-art in producing room temperature ferromagnetism in GaN-based materials, the origins of the magnetism and its potential applications. (topical review)

  1. Semiconductor Metal-Organic Frameworks: Future Low-Bandgap Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Muhammad; Mendiratta, Shruti; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2017-02-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with low density, high porosity, and easy tunability of functionality and structural properties, represent potential candidates for use as semiconductor materials. The rapid development of the semiconductor industry and the continuous miniaturization of feature sizes of integrated circuits toward the nanometer (nm) scale require novel semiconductor materials instead of traditional materials like silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide etc. MOFs with advantageous properties of both the inorganic and the organic components promise to serve as the next generation of semiconductor materials for the microelectronics industry with the potential to be extremely stable, cheap, and mechanically flexible. Here, a perspective of recent research is provided, regarding the semiconducting properties of MOFs, bandgap studies, and their potential in microelectronic devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Low voltage bandgap reference with closed loop curvature compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fan; Bo, Du; Zheng, Zhang; Guoshun, Yuan

    2009-03-01

    A new low-voltage CMOS bandgap reference (BGR) that achieves high temperature stability is proposed. It feeds back the output voltage to the curvature compensation circuit that constitutes a closed loop circuit to cancel the logarithmic term of voltage VBE. Meanwhile a low voltage amplifier with the 0.5 μm low threshold technology is designed for the BGR. A high temperature stability BGR circuit is fabricated in the CSMC 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The measured result shows that the BGR can operate down to 1 V, while the temperature coefficient and line regulation are only 9 ppm/°C and 1.2 mV/V, respectively.

  3. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with three-dimensional photonic bandgap crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, W L

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of recent work on three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals with a "full and complete" 3D photonic band gap. We review five main aspects: 1) spontaneous emission inhibition, 2) spatial localization of light within a tiny nanoscale volume (aka "a nanobox for light"), 3) the introduction of a gain medium leading to thresholdless lasers, 4) breaking of the weak-coupling approximation of cavity QED, both in the frequency and in the time-domain, 5) decoherence, in particular the shielding of vacuum fluctuations by a 3D photonic bandgap. In addition, we list and evaluate all known photonic crystal structures with a demonstrated 3D band gap.

  4. Optical devices based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2005-01-01

    In this ph.d. work, an experimental and theoretical study on Liquid Crystal (LC) infiltrated Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) has been carried out. PCFs usually, consists of an air/silica microstructure of air holes arranged in a triangular lattice surrounding a core defect defined by a missing air...... hole. The presence of a LC in the holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) guiding type into a Photonic BandGap (PBG) guiding type, where light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-billed holes. The high dielectric and optical anisotropy...... of LCs combined with the unique waveguiding features of PBG fibers gives the LC filled PCFs unique tunable properties. PBG guidance has been demonstrated for different mesophases of LCs and various functional compact fibers has been demonstrated, which utilitzes the high thermo-optical and electro...

  5. One-dimensional photonic bandgap structure in abalone shell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; ZHOU Ji; LI Longtu; LI Qi; HAN Shuo; HAO Zhibiao

    2005-01-01

    @@ Photonic bandgap (PBG) materials are periodic com- posites of dielectric materials in which electromagnetic waves of certain frequency range cannot propagate in any or a special direction. Recently, there has been great inter- est in synthetic PBG materials due to their ability in ma- nipulation of photons. Since 500 million years ago, the natural world has been exploiting photonic structures for specific biological purposes[1]. Different types of biologi- cal PBG materials have been discovered in recent years, such as the one-dimension PBG structure in the sea mouse Aphrodita[2], and the fruits Elaeocarpus[3,4]; two-dimension PBG structure in the male peacock Pavo muticus feathers[5], Indonesian male Papilio palinurus butterfly[6], Thaumantis diores butterfly[7] and the male Ancyluris meliboeus Fabricius butterflies[8]; and three-dimension PBG structure in the weevil Pachyrhynchus argus[9].

  6. Main Factors for Affecting Photonic Bandgap of Photonic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; XUE Wei; JIANG Yu-rong; YU Zhi-nong; WANG Hua-qing

    2007-01-01

    The factors affecting one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PhCs) are systemically analyzed in this paper by numerical simulation.Transfer matrix method (TMM) is employed for 1D PCs, both finite difference time domain method (FDTD) and plane wave expansion method (PWE) are employed for 2D PCs.The result shows that the photonic bandgaps (PBG) are directly affected by crystal type, crystal lattice constant, modulation of refractive index and periodicity, and it is should be useful for design of different type photonic crystals with the required PBG and functional devices.Finally, as an example, a near-IR 1D PCs narrow filter was designed.

  7. MUTUAL COUPLING REDUCTION BETWEEN MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS USING ELECTROMAGNETIC BANDGAP STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.N. Gaikwad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available When the number of antenna elements is placed in forming the arrays, mutual coupling between the antenna elements is a critical issue. This is particularly concern in phase array antennas. Mutual coupling is a potential source of performance degradation in the form of deviation of the radiation pattern from the desired one, gain reduction due to excitation of surface wave, increased side lobe levels etc. EBG (Electromagnetic Band Gap structure (also called as Photonic Bandgap Structure PBG not only enhances the performance of the patch antennas but also provides greater amount of isolation when placed between the microstrip arrays. This greatly reduces the mutual coupling between the antenna elements. The radiation efficiency, gain, antenna efficiency, VSWR, frequency, directivity etc greatly improves over the conventional patch antennas using EBG. The EBG structure and normal patch antenna is simulated using IE3D antenna simulation software.

  8. A Novel 2D Z-Shaped Electromagnetic Bandgap Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Iliev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper researches a novel 2D Z-shaped Electromagnetic Band-Gap (EBG structure, its dispersion diagram and application field. Based on a transmission line model, the dispersion equation is derived and theoretically investigated. In order to validate theoretical results, a full wave analysis is performed and the electromagnetic properties of the structure are revealed. The theoretical results show good agreement with the full wave simulation results. The frequency response of the structure is compared to the well know structures of Jerusalem cross and patch EBG. The results show the applicability of the proposed 2D Z-shaped EBG in microstrip patch antennas, microstrip filters and high speed switching circuits, where the suppression of parasitic surface wave is required.

  9. Novel Photonic Bandgap Structure and Its Application in Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANGYunbo; GAOBaoxin

    2003-01-01

    A novel compact photonic bandgap (PBG)structural element, which is etched in the ground plane of the microstrip line, is proposed in this paper. A forbid-den gap, which is about 200MHz wide, is measured at the center frequency of 8.6GHz. The measured results agree with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. A harmonic-suppression amplifier is fabricated by utilizing this novel structural element. The suppression of the sec-ond order harmonic has been enhanced about 17dB when compared with a reference amplifier. Since no filters are needed and the structural element is etched in the ground plane, the whole circuit is compact.

  10. Low voltage bandgap reference with closed loop curvature compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Tao; Du Bo; Zhang Zheng; Yuan Guoshun

    2009-01-01

    A new low-voltage CMOS bandgap reference (BGR) that achieves high temperature stability is proposed. It feeds back the output voltage to the curvature compensation circuit that constitutes a closed loop circuit to cancel the logarithmic term of voltage VBE. Meanwhile a low voltage amplifier with the 0.5μm low threshold technology is designed for the BGR. A high temperature stability BGR circuit is fabricated in the CSMC 0.5μm CMOS tech-nology. The measured result shows that the BGR can operate down to 1 V, while the temperature coefficient and line regulation are only 9 ppm/℃ and 1.2 mV/V, respectively.

  11. Bandgap Engineering in High-Efficiency Multijunction Concentrator Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R. R.; Sherif, R. A.; Kinsey, G. S.; Kurtz, S.; Fetzer, C. M.; Edmondson, K. M.; Law, D. C.; Cotal, H. L.; Krut, D. D.; Ermer, J. H.; Karam, N. H.

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses semiconductor device research paths under investigation with the aim of reaching the milestone efficiency of 40%. A cost analysis shows that achieving very high cell efficiencies is crucial for the realization of cost-effective photovoltaics, because of the strongly leveraging effect of efficiency on module packaging and balance-of systems costs. Lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/ GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cells have achieved the highest independently confirmed efficiency at 175 suns, 25?C, of 37.3% under the standard AM1.5D, low-AOD terrestrial spectrum. Lattice-mismatched, or metamorphic (MM), materials offer still higher potential efficiencies, if the crystal quality can be maintained. Theoretical efficiencies well over 50% are possible for a MM GaInP/ 1.17-eV GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cell limited by radiative recombination at 500 suns. The bandgap - open circuit voltage offset, (Eg/q) - Voc, is used as a valuable theoretical and experimental tool to characterize multijunction cells with subcell bandgaps ranging from 0.7 to 2.1 eV. Experimental results are presented for prototype 6-junction cells employing an active {approx}1.1-eV dilute nitride GaInNAs subcell, with active-area efficiency greater than 23% and over 5.3 V open-circuit voltage under the 1-sun AM0 space spectrum. Such cell designs have theoretical efficiencies under the terrestrial spectrum at 500 suns concentration exceeding 55% efficiency, even for lattice-matched designs.

  12. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  13. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  14. Electrically tunable Yb-doped fiber laser based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate...... an all-spliced laser cavity based on the liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040-1065 nm...

  15. 167 W, power scalable ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap fiber amplifier at 1178nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.

    2010-01-01

    An ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap fiber amplifier operating at the long wavelength edge of the ytterbium gain band is investigated for high power amplification. The spectral filtering effect of the photonic bandgap efficiently suppresses amplified spontaneous emission at the conventional...... ytterbium gain wavelengths and thus enables high power amplification at 1178 nm. A record output power of 167 W, a slope efficiency of 61% and 15 dB saturated gain at 1178 nm have been demonstrated using the ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap fiber....

  16. Band-gap narrowing in heavily doped silicon at 20 and 300 K studied by photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joachim

    1985-07-01

    The band-gap shrinkage in heavily doped n- and p-type silicon is studied by photoluminescence both at low temperatures (20 K) and at room temperature (300 K). A line-shape analysis was performed to determine the indirect band-gap energy from the emission spectra. Within the experimental accuracy the same band-gap shift is observed at room temperature as at low temperature. The present results are compared with experimental data from other optical studies and with theoretical calculations.

  17. Highly tunable large core single-mode liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard;

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate a highly tunable photonic bandgap fiber, which has a large-core diameter of 25 mu m and an effective mode area of 440 mu m(2). The tunability is achieved by infiltrating the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber with an optimized liquid-crystal mixture having a large temperature...... gradient of the refractive indices at room temperature. A bandgap tuning sensitivity of 27 nm/degrees C is achieved at room temperature. The insertion loss is estimated to be less than 0.5 dB and caused mainly by coupling loss between the index-guided mode and the bandgap-guided mode. (c) 2006 Optical...

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Small Band-gap Conjugated Polymers - Poly(pyrrolyl methines)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A kind of small band-gap conjugated polymers-poly (pyrrolyl methines) and their precursors-(poly pyrrolyl methanes) have been synthesized by a simple method and characterized by 1HNMR, FT-IR, TGA and UV-Vis. These polymers can be dissolved in high polar solvents such as DMSO, DMF or NMP. The results reveals that the band-gap of the synthesized conjugated polymers are in the range of 0.96~1.14 eV and they all belong to the small band-gap polymers. The conductivity of doped products with iodine is in the range of semiconductor.

  19. In Situ Measurement of Local Hydrogen Production Rate by Bubble-Evolved Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen visibly bubbles during photocatalytic water splitting under illumination with above-bandgap radiation, which provides a direct measurement of local gas-evolving reaction rate. In this paper, optical microscopy of superfield depth was used for recording the hydrogen bubble growth on Cd0.5Zn0.5S photocatalyst in reaction liquid and illuminated with purple light. By analyzing change of hydrogen bubble size as a function of time, we understood that hydrogen bubble growth experienced two periods, which were inertia effect dominated period and diffusion effect dominated period, respectively. The tendency of hydrogen bubble growth was similar to that of the gas bubble in boiling, while the difference in bubble diameter and growth time magnitude was great. Meanwhile, we obtained the local hydrogen production rate on photocatalyst active site by measuring hydrogen bubble growth variation characteristics. This method makes it possible to confirm local actual hydrogen evolution rate quantitatively during photocatalytic water splitting.

  20. SSPA's Using Reduced Conduction Angle Techniques on Wide-Bandgap Devices for Ultra High Efficiency Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel approach is proposed for very efficient, very reliable, low weight, wide-bandgap medium power SSPAs for Space applications operating at 400 MHz and 8GHz.

  1. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdulraheem, Yaser; Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    ...) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap...

  2. MoS2/MX2 heterobilayers: bandgap engineering via tensile strain or external electrical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ning; Guo, Hongyan; Li, Lei; Dai, Jun; Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; Wu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-02-01

    We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se, all heterobilayers show semiconducting characteristics with an indirect bandgap with the exception of the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer which retains the direct-bandgap character of the constituent monolayer. For M = Fe, V; X = S, Se, the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers exhibit metallic characters. Particular attention of this study has been focused on engineering the bandgap of the TMD heterobilayer materials via application of either a tensile strain or an external electric field. We find that with increasing either the biaxial or uniaxial tensile strain, the MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can undergo a semiconductor-to-metal transition. For the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer, a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition may occur beyond a critical biaxial or uniaxial strain. For M (=Fe, V) and X (=S, Se), the magnetic moments of both metal and chalcogen atoms are enhanced when the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers are under a biaxial tensile strain. Moreover, the bandgap of MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can be reduced by the vertical electric field. For two heterobilayers MSe2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr), PBE calculations suggest that the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition may occur under an external electric field. The transition is attributed to the enhanced spontaneous polarization. The tunable bandgaps in general and possible indirect-direct bandgap transitions due to tensile strain or external electric field make the TMD heterobilayer materials a viable candidate for optoelectronic applications.We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For

  3. Bandgaps of the Chalcogenide Glass Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Guang; Zhou, Hong-Song; Yin, Guo-Bing

    2011-11-01

    Bandgaps of chalcogenide glass hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (GLS HC-PCFs) are analyzed by using the plane-wave expansion method. A mid-infrared laser can propagate in these low confinement loss fibers when the wavelength falls into the bandgaps. For enlarging the bandgap width, an improved GLS HC-PCF is put forward, the normalized frequency kΛ of the improved fiber is from 7.2 to 8.5 in its first bandgap. The improved GLS HC-PCF with pitch of 4.2 μm can transmit the lights with wavelengths ranging from 3.1 μm to 3.7 μm.

  4. Vibration band-gap properties of three-dimensional Kagome lattices using the spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Jing; Li, Feng-Ming; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-04-01

    The spectral element method (SEM) is extended to investigate the vibration band-gap properties of three-dimensional (3D) Kagome lattices. The dynamic stiffness matrix of the 3D element which contains bending, tensional and torsional components is derived. The spectral equations of motion of the whole 3D Kagome lattice are then established. Comparing with frequency-domain solutions calculated by the finite element method (FEM), the accuracy and the feasibility of the SEM solutions are verified. It can be shown that the SEM is suitable for analyzing the vibration band-gap properties. Due to the band-gap characteristics, the periodic 3D Kagome lattice has the performance of vibration isolation. The influences of the structural and material parameters on the vibration band-gaps are discussed and a new type of 3D Kagome lattice is designed to obtain the improved vibration isolation capability.

  5. Microresonator and associated method for producing and controlling photonic signals with a photonic bandgap delay apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, Richard Lynn (Inventor); Jones, Darryl Keith (Inventor); Keys, Andrew Scott (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    By applying a photonic signal to a microresonator that includes a photonic bandgap delay apparatus having a photonic band edge transmission resonance at the frequency of the photonic signal, the microresonator imparts a predetermined delay to the photonic signal. The photonic bandgap delay apparatus also preferably has a photonic band edge transmission resonance bandwidth which is at least as wide as the bandwidth of the photonic signal such that a uniform delay is imparted over the entire bandwidth of the photonic signal. The microresonator also includes a microresonator cavity, typically defined by a pair of switchable mirrors, within which the photonic bandgap delay apparatus is disposed. By requiring the photonic signal to oscillate within the microresonator cavity so as to pass through the photonic bandgap delay apparatus several times, the microresonator can controllably impart an adjustable delay to the photonic signal.

  6. Bandgap engineering of graphene decorated with randomly distributed ZnO nano-seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Chowdhury; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Sinha, Raju; Pala, Nezih

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally demonstrated the engineering of semi-metal single layer CVD Graphene's bandgap by decorating with randomly distributed ZnO nano-seed grown by sonication of Zinc acetate dehydrate. The proximity of nanoparticles and Graphene breaks Graphene's sublattice symmetry and opens-up a bandgap. The 2-D/G ratio of Raman spectroscopy of decorated Graphene along with a peak at 432.39 cm-1 confirmed presence of ZnO on single layer Graphene. The introduced bandgap was measured from the slope of Arrhenius plot. Graphene with significant bandgap introduced by the proposed methods could be used for devices intended for digital and logic applications.

  7. Gap formation and guided modes in photonic bandgap fibres with high-index rods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fibres fabricated by infiltrating the holes of a microstructured optical fibre with high-index material are investigated numerically in the low- and intermediate-frequency regime. Bandgaps, transmission windows and the distribution of field energy between high- and low-index regi......Photonic bandgap fibres fabricated by infiltrating the holes of a microstructured optical fibre with high-index material are investigated numerically in the low- and intermediate-frequency regime. Bandgaps, transmission windows and the distribution of field energy between high- and low......-index regions are investigated. It is shown that the numerical results found can be rationalized in a simple way by considering the properties of guided modes in a conventional step-index fibre....

  8. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23

    The objectives of this project, covering two phases and an additional extension phase, were the development of thin film-based hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices for solar-powered water splitting. The hybrid device, comprising a low-cost photoactive material integrated with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H or a-Si in short)-based solar cells as a driver, should be able to produce hydrogen with a 5% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH) and be durable for at least 500 hours. Three thin film material classes were studied and developed under this program: silicon-based compounds, copper chalcopyrite-based compounds, and metal oxides. With the silicon-based compounds, more specifically the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), we achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% when the photoelectrode was coupled to an a-Si tandem solar cell, and a STH efficiency of 6.1% when using a crystalline Si PV driver. The hybrid PV/a-SiC device tested under a current bias of -3~4 mA/cm{sup 2}, exhibited a durability of up to ~800 hours in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. Other than the PV driver, the most critical element affecting the photocurrent (and hence the STH efficiency) of the hybrid PV/a-SiC device was the surface energetics at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. Without surface modification, the photocurrent of the hybrid PEC device was ~1 mA/cm{sup 2} or lower due to a surface barrier that limits the extraction of photogenerated carriers. We conducted an extensive search for suitable surface modification techniques/materials, of which the deposition of low work function metal nanoparticles was the most successful. Metal nanoparticles of ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W) or titanium (Ti) led to an anodic shift in the onset potential. We have also been able to develop hybrid devices of various configurations in a monolithic fashion and optimized the current matching via altering the energy bandgap and thickness of each constituent cell. As a result, the short

  9. Properties Of Gallium-doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Germanium

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The effects of adding small quantities of gallium atoms to hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) on its dark-conductivity, band-gap, electronic density of states and the hydrogen bonding, were studied in detail by dark-conductivity, optical and infrared-transmission, and photothermal- deflection-spectroscopy measurements. Films of a-Ge:H having relative Ga atomic concentrations ranging between 3×10-5 and 1×10-2 were deposited by the cosputtering of solid Ge and Ga targets in a rf-plasma s...

  10. Thermal modeling of wide bandgap materials for power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Mahesh B.; Matin, Mohammad A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the thermal performance of different wide bandgap (WBG) materials for their applicability as semiconductor material in power electronic devices. In particular, Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) are modeled for this purpose. These WBG materials have been known to show superior intrinsic material properties as compared to Silicon (Si), such as higher carrier mobility, lower electrical and thermal resistance. These unique properties have allowed for them to be used in power devices that can operate at higher voltages, temperatures and switching speeds with higher efficiencies. Digital prototyping of power devices have facilitated inexpensive and flexible methods for faster device development. The commercial simulation software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate a 2-D model of MOSFETs of these WBG materials to observe their thermal performance under different voltage and current operating conditions. COMSOL is a simulation software that can be used to simulate temperature changes due to Joule heating in the case of power MOSFETs. COMSOL uses Finite Element/Volume Analysis methods to solve for variables in complex geometries where multiple material properties and physics are involved. The Semiconductor and Heat Transfer with Solids modules of COMSOL were used to study the thermal performance of the MOSFETs in steady state conditions. The results of the simulations for each of the two WBG materials were compared with that of Silicon to determine relative stability and merit of each material.

  11. Research on micro-sized acoustic bandgap structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, James Grant; McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Su, Mehmet F.; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2010-01-01

    Phononic crystals (or acoustic crystals) are the acoustic wave analogue of photonic crystals. Here a periodic array of scattering inclusions located in a homogeneous host material forbids certain ranges of acoustic frequencies from existence within the crystal, thus creating what are known as acoustic (or phononic) bandgaps. The vast majority of phononic crystal devices reported prior to this LDRD were constructed by hand assembling scattering inclusions in a lossy viscoelastic medium, predominantly air, water or epoxy, resulting in large structures limited to frequencies below 1 MHz. Under this LDRD, phononic crystals and devices were scaled to very (VHF: 30-300 MHz) and ultra (UHF: 300-3000 MHz) high frequencies utilizing finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling, microfabrication and micromachining technologies. This LDRD developed key breakthroughs in the areas of micro-phononic crystals including physical origins of phononic crystals, advanced FDTD modeling and design techniques, material considerations, microfabrication processes, characterization methods and device structures. Micro-phononic crystal devices realized in low-loss solid materials were emphasized in this work due to their potential applications in radio frequency communications and acoustic imaging for medical ultrasound and nondestructive testing. The results of the advanced modeling, fabrication and integrated transducer designs were that this LDRD produced the 1st measured phononic crystals and phononic crystal devices (waveguides) operating in the VHF (67 MHz) and UHF (937 MHz) frequency bands and established Sandia as a world leader in the area of micro-phononic crystals.

  12. Angle-dependent bandgap engineering in gated graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Cervantes, H.; Sotolongo-Costa, O. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Gaggero-Sager, L. M. [CIICAp, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Naumis, G. G. [Instituto Física, Depto. de Física-Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000, México D.F., México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Vargas, I., E-mail: isaac@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac., México (Mexico)

    2016-03-15

    Graphene Superlattices (GSs) have attracted a lot of attention due to its peculiar properties as well as its possible technological implications. Among these characteristics we can mention: the extra Dirac points in the dispersion relation and the highly anisotropic propagation of the charge carriers. However, despite the intense research that is carried out in GSs, so far there is no report about the angular dependence of the Transmission Gap (TG) in GSs. Here, we report the dependence of TG as a function of the angle of the incident Dirac electrons in a rather simple Electrostatic GS (EGS). Our results show that the angular dependence of the TG is intricate, since for moderated angles the dependence is parabolic, while for large angles an exponential dependence is registered. We also find that the TG can be modulated from meV to eV, by changing the structural parameters of the GS. These characteristics open the possibility for an angle-dependent bandgap engineering in graphene.

  13. High-Temperature, Wirebondless, Ultracompact Wide Bandgap Power Semiconductor Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, John

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and other wide bandgap semiconductors offer great promise of high power rating, high operating temperature, simple thermal management, and ultrahigh power density for both space and commercial power electronic systems. However, this great potential is seriously limited by the lack of reliable high-temperature device packaging technology. This Phase II project developed an ultracompact hybrid power module packaging technology based on the use of double lead frames and direct lead frame-to-chip transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding that allows device operation up to 450 degC. The new power module will have a very small form factor with 3-5X reduction in size and weight from the prior art, and it will be capable of operating from 450 degC to -125 degC. This technology will have a profound impact on power electronics and energy conversion technologies and help to conserve energy and the environment as well as reduce the nation's dependence on fossil fuels.

  14. Negative voltage bandgap reference with multilevel curvature compensation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Liu; Qian, Liu; Xiaoshi, Jin; Yongrui, Zhao; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-05-01

    A novel high-order curvature compensation negative voltage bandgap reference (NBGR) based on a novel multilevel compensation technique is introduced. Employing an exponential curvature compensation (ECC) term with many high order terms in itself, in a lower temperature range (TR) and a multilevel curvature compensation (MLCC) term in a higher TR, a flattened and better effect of curvature compensation over the TR of 165 °C (-40 to 125 °C) is realised. The MLCC circuit adds two convex curves by using two sub-threshold operated NMOS. The proposed NBGR implemented in the Central Semiconductor Manufacturing Corporation (CSMC) 0.5 μm BCD technology demonstrates an accurate voltage of -1.183 V with a temperature coefficient (TC) as low as 2.45 ppm/°C over the TR of 165 °C at a -5.0 V power supply; the line regulation is 3 mV/V from a -5 to -2 V supply voltage. The active area of the presented NBGR is 370 × 180 μm2. Project supported by the Fund of Liaoning Province Education Department (No. L2013045).

  15. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA.......Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  16. 167 W, 1178 nm Ytterbium-Doped Photonic Bandgap Fiber Amplifier with Power Scalability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Shirakawa, Akira; Chen, Meishin

    2010-01-01

    We have generated 167 W of output power at 1178 nm using an ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap fiber. Distributed spectral filtering efficiently suppresses amplified spontaneous emission at shorter wavelengths and enables power scalable amplification at 1178nm.......We have generated 167 W of output power at 1178 nm using an ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap fiber. Distributed spectral filtering efficiently suppresses amplified spontaneous emission at shorter wavelengths and enables power scalable amplification at 1178nm....

  17. Properties of photonic bandgap in one-dimensional multicomponent photonic crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    Properties of photonic band gap and light propagation in one-dimensional multicomponent photonic crystal have been studied with the optical transfer matrix method.We mainly analyze the relation of photonic band-gap property with the arrangement of components,the refractive index and the geometrical thickness.In this study,the methods to change the width and the location of the existing photonic band-gaps in multicomponent photonic crystal are proposed.

  18. Variable band-gap semiconductors as the basis of new solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Acevedo, Arturo [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Electrical Engineering Department, Avenida IPN No. 2508, 07360 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    Some basic concepts related to variable band-gap absorbing semiconductors in solar cell structures, such as the associated quasi-electric field, will be discussed. The effects of this quasi-electric field upon the minority carrier drift-diffusion length and the back surface recombination velocity may induce a larger generated carrier collection at the junction with the corresponding increase of the illumination current density. It will also be shown that an additional improvement of the open-circuit voltage is possible when the band-gap is reduced within the space charge region so that the dark saturation current density is reduced there. Our estimation is that in the case of a solar cell where the band-gap is changed about 0.5 eV within the space charge region, an increase of the open-circuit voltage around 115 mV will be observed with respect to the single minimum band-gap absorbing material case. A similar band-gap variation in the bulk of the material will cause an increase of the minority carrier drift-diffusion length by a factor of 10 with respect to the single band-gap material. Therefore, based on these physical concepts, two possible structures with variable band-gap layers are proposed in order to have higher efficiencies than for cells without any band-gap grading. It will be shown that these concepts can be applied to II-VI, III-V chalcopyrite and even amorphous semiconductor solar cells. (author)

  19. Power-scalable long-wavelength Yb-doped photonic bandgap fiber sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Shirakawa, Akira; Maurayama, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Ytterbium-doped photonic-bandgap fiber sources operationg at the long-wavelength edge of the ytterbium gain band are being investigated for high power amplification. Artificial shaping of the gain spectrum by the characteristic distributed filtering effect of the photonic bandgap enables...... spontaneous-emission-free power svaling. As high as 167 W power and 16 dB saturated gain at 1178 nm have been demonstrated...

  20. Modeling of Z-scan characteristics for one-dimensional nonlinear photonic bandgap materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuqi; Zang, Weiping; Schülzgen, Axel; Liu, Xin; Tian, Jianguo; Moloney, Jerome V; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2009-12-01

    We propose a Z-scan theory for one-dimensional nonlinear photonic bandgap materials. The Z-scan characteristics for this material are analyzed. Results show that the Z-scan curves for photonic bandgap materials with nonlinear refraction are similar to those of uniform materials exhibiting both nonlinear refraction and nonlinear absorption simultaneously. Effects of nonlinear absorption on reflected and transmitted Z-scan results are also discussed.

  1. Band-gap narrowing in heavily doped silicon: A comparison of optical and electrical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joachim; del Alamo, Jesús A.

    1988-01-01

    The band-gap narrowing in heavily doped silicon has been studied by optical techniques—namely, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy—and by electrical measurements on bipolar transistors. The optical experiments give a consistent set of data for the band-gap narrowing in n- and p-type material at low temperatures as well as at room temperature. A good agreement is found between the optical and electrical data removing the discrepancies existing so far in the literature.

  2. Semi-transparent polymer solar cells with excellent sub-bandgap transmission for third generation photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Beiley, Zach M.

    2013-10-07

    Semi-transparent organic photovoltaics are of interest for a variety of photovoltaic applications, including solar windows and hybrid tandem photovoltaics. The figure shows a photograph of our semi-transparent solar cell, which has a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%, with an above bandgap transmission of 34% and a sub-bandgap transmission of 81%. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electrially tunable photonic bandgap guidance in a liquid crystal filled photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakestad, Magnus W.; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Nielsen, Martin Dybendal;

    2005-01-01

    Tunable bandgap guidance is obtained by filling the holes of a solid core photonic crystal fiber with a nematic liquid crystal and applying an electric field. The response times are measured and found to be in the millisecond range.......Tunable bandgap guidance is obtained by filling the holes of a solid core photonic crystal fiber with a nematic liquid crystal and applying an electric field. The response times are measured and found to be in the millisecond range....

  4. Elucidating interactions and conductivity of newly synthesised low bandgap polymer with protic and aprotic ionic liquids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Attri

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have examined the conductivity and interaction studies of ammonium and imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs with the newly synthesised low bandgap polymer (Poly(2-heptadecyl-4-vinylthieno[3,4-d]thiazole (PHVTT. Use of low bandgap polymers is the most suitable way to harvest a broader spectrum of solar radiations for solar cells. But, still there is lack of most efficient low bandgap polymer. In order to solve this problem, we have synthesised a new low bandgap polymer and investigated its interaction with the ILs to enhance its conductivity. ILs may undergo almost unlimited structural variations; these structural variations have attracted extensive attention in polymer studies. The aim of present work is to illustrate the state of art progress of implementing the interaction of ILs (protic and aprotic ILs with newly synthesised low bandgap polymer. In addition to this, our UV-Vis spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy results have revealed that all studied ILs (tributylmethylammonium methyl sulfate ([N1444][MeSO4] from ammonium family and 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([Mim]Cl, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl from imidazolium family have potential to interact with polymer. Our semi empirical calculation with help of Hyperchem 7 shows that protic IL ([Mim]Cl interacts strongly with the low bandgap polymer through the H-bonding. Further, protic ILs shows enhanced conductivity than aprotic ILs in association with low bandgap polymer. This study provides the combined effect of low bandgap polymer and ILs that may generate many theoretical and experimental opportunities.

  5. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  6. Optical bandgap of single- and multi-layered amorphous germanium ultra-thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pei; Zaslavsky, Alexander [Department of Physics and School of Engineering, Brown University, 182-184 Hope St., Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Longo, Paolo [Gatan, Inc., 5794 W Las Positas Blvd., Pleasanton, California 94588 (United States); Pacifici, Domenico, E-mail: Domenico-Pacifici@brown.edu [School of Engineering, Brown University, 184 Hope St., Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Accurate optical methods are required to determine the energy bandgap of amorphous semiconductors and elucidate the role of quantum confinement in nanometer-scale, ultra-thin absorbing layers. Here, we provide a critical comparison between well-established methods that are generally employed to determine the optical bandgap of thin-film amorphous semiconductors, starting from normal-incidence reflectance and transmittance measurements. First, we demonstrate that a more accurate estimate of the optical bandgap can be achieved by using a multiple-reflection interference model. We show that this model generates more reliable results compared to the widely accepted single-pass absorption method. Second, we compare two most representative methods (Tauc and Cody plots) that are extensively used to determine the optical bandgap of thin-film amorphous semiconductors starting from the extracted absorption coefficient. Analysis of the experimental absorption data acquired for ultra-thin amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers demonstrates that the Cody model is able to provide a less ambiguous energy bandgap value. Finally, we apply our proposed method to experimentally determine the optical bandgap of a-Ge/SiO{sub 2} superlattices with single and multiple a-Ge layers down to 2 nm thickness.

  7. Optical bandgap of single- and multi-layered amorphous germanium ultra-thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Longo, Paolo; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Accurate optical methods are required to determine the energy bandgap of amorphous semiconductors and elucidate the role of quantum confinement in nanometer-scale, ultra-thin absorbing layers. Here, we provide a critical comparison between well-established methods that are generally employed to determine the optical bandgap of thin-film amorphous semiconductors, starting from normal-incidence reflectance and transmittance measurements. First, we demonstrate that a more accurate estimate of the optical bandgap can be achieved by using a multiple-reflection interference model. We show that this model generates more reliable results compared to the widely accepted single-pass absorption method. Second, we compare two most representative methods (Tauc and Cody plots) that are extensively used to determine the optical bandgap of thin-film amorphous semiconductors starting from the extracted absorption coefficient. Analysis of the experimental absorption data acquired for ultra-thin amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers demonstrates that the Cody model is able to provide a less ambiguous energy bandgap value. Finally, we apply our proposed method to experimentally determine the optical bandgap of a-Ge/SiO2 superlattices with single and multiple a-Ge layers down to 2 nm thickness.

  8. The Search for Sub-Bandgap Optoelectronic Response in Silicon Hyperdoped with Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailoa, Jonathan; Akey, Austin; Mathews, Jay; Hutchinson, David; Simmons, Christie; Sullivan, Joseph; Winkler, Mark; Recht, Dan; Persans, Peter; Warrender, Jeffrey; Aziz, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-03-01

    Deep-level dopants have been long known as the lifetime-killer in microelectronic devices. Nevertheless, it has been shown that deep-level donor can facilitate strong absorption of light with energy below the semiconductor bandgap. Due to this strong sub-bandgap absorption, it is possible to engineer silicon devices exhibiting sub-bandgap optoelectronic response, such as silicon-based infrared photodetectors and intermediate-band solar cells. In this work, we show the optoelectronic response of silicon doped with a gold concentration surpassing the equilibrium solubility limit (gold-hyperdoped silicon, Au:Si). We fabricated Au:Si by ion implantation followed by nanosecond pulse laser melting, achieving a gold dopant concentration of over 1019 cm-3. UV-VIS spectrophotometry was performed to measure sub-bandgap light absorption in the Au:Si layer. Our samples with the highest gold concentration have 10-15% absorption of sub-bandgap light. We will present and discuss the sub-bandgap optoelectronic response of this gold-doped silicon.

  9. Modulation of bandgap in bilayer armchair graphene ribbons by tuning vertical and transverse electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thanh-Tra; Nguyen, Thi-Kim-Quyen; Huynh, Anh-Huy; Phan, Thi-Kim-Loan; Tran, Van-Truong

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effects of external electric fields on the electronic properties of bilayer armchair graphene nano-ribbons. Using atomistic simulations with Tight Binding calculations and the Non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we demonstrate that (i) in semi-metallic structures, vertical fields impact more effectively than transverse fields in terms of opening larger bandgap, showing a contrary phenomenon compared to that demonstrated in previous studies in bilayer zigzag graphene nano-ribbons; (ii) in some semiconducting structures, if transverse fields just show usual effects as in single layer armchair graphene nano-ribbons where the bandgap is suppressed when varying the applied potential, vertical fields exhibit an anomalous phenomenon that the bandgap can be enlarged, i.e., for a structure of width of 16 dimer lines, the bandgap increases from 0.255 eV to the maximum value of 0.40 eV when a vertical bias equates 0.96 V applied. Although the combined effect of two fields does not enlarge the bandgap as found in bilayer zigzag graphene nano-ribbons, it shows that the mutual effect can be useful to reduce faster the bandgap in semiconducting bilayer armchair graphene nano-ribbons. These results are important to fully understand the effects of electric fields on bilayer graphene nano-ribbons (AB stacking) and also suggest appropriate uses of electric gates with different edge orientations.

  10. Bandgaps and directional properties of two-dimensional square beam-like zigzag lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Yue-Sheng, E-mail: yswang@bjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, Siegen 57068 (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper we propose four kinds of two-dimensional square beam-like zigzag lattice structures and study their bandgaps and directional propagation of elastic waves. The band structures are calculated by using the finite element method. Both the in-plane and out-of-plane waves are investigated simultaneously via the three-dimensional Euler beam elements. The mechanism of the bandgap generation is analyzed by studying the vibration modes at the bandgap edges. The effects of the geometry parameters of the xy- and z-zigzag lattices on the bandgaps are investigated and discussed. Multiple complete bandgaps are found owing to the separation of the degeneracy by introducing bending arms. The bandgaps are sensitive to the geometry parameters of the periodic systems. The deformed displacement fields of the harmonic responses of a finite lattice structure subjected to harmonic loads at different positions are illustrated to show the directional wave propagation. An extension of the proposed concept to the hexagonal lattices is also presented. The research work in this paper is relevant to the practical design of cellular structures with enhanced vibro-acoustics performance.

  11. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  12. Effects of corrugation shape on frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic elastic layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns determining frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic waveguide. The waveguide may be considered either as an elastic layer with variable thickness or as a rod with variable cross section. As a result, widths and locations of all frequency band-gaps are det......The paper concerns determining frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic waveguide. The waveguide may be considered either as an elastic layer with variable thickness or as a rod with variable cross section. As a result, widths and locations of all frequency band......-gaps are determined by means of the method of varying amplitudes. For the general symmetric corrugation shape, the width of each odd band-gap is controlled only by one harmonic in the corrugation series with its number being equal to the number of the band-gap. Widths of even band-gaps, however, are influenced by all...... the harmonics involved in the corrugation series, so that the lower frequency band-gaps can emerge. These are band-gaps located below the frequency corresponding to the lowest harmonic in the corrugation series. For the general non-symmetric corrugation shape, the mth band-gap is controlled only by one, the mth...

  13. Pressure-induced phase transition and bandgap collapse in the wide-bandgap semiconductor InTaO4

    CERN Document Server

    Errandonea, D; Garg, A B; Botella, P; Martinez-Garcia, D; Pellicer-Porres, J; Rodriguez-Hernandez, P; Munoz, A; Cuenca-Gotor, V; Sans, J A

    2016-01-01

    A pressure-induced phase transition, associated with an increase of the coordination number of In and Ta, is detected beyond 13 GPa in InTaO4 by combining synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman measurements in a diamond anvil cell with ab-initio calculations. High-pressure optical-absorption measurements were also carried out. The high-pressure phase has a monoclinic structure which shares the same space group with the low-pressure phase (P2/c). The structure of the high-pressure phase can be considered as a slight distortion of an orthorhombic structure described by space group Pcna. The phase transition occurs together with a unit-cell volume collapse and an electronic bandgap collapse observed by experiments and calculations. Additionally, a band crossing is found to occur in the low-pressure phase near 7 GPa. The pressure dependence of all the Raman-active modes is reported for both phases as well as the pressure dependence of unit-cell parameters and the equations of state. Calculations also provide inf...

  14. Bandgaps of the Chalcogenide Glass Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-Guang; ZHOU Hong-Song; YIN Guo-Bing

    2011-01-01

    Bandgaps of chalcogenide glass hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (GLS HC-PCFs) are analyzed by using the plane-wave expansion method. A mid-infrared laser can propagate in these low confinement loss fibers when the wavelength falls into the bandgaps. For enlarging the bandgap width, an improved GLS HC-PCF is put forward, the normalized frequency kA of the improved fiber is from 7.2 to 8.5 in its first bandgap. The improved GLS HC-PCF with pitch of 4.2μm can transmit the lights with wavelengths ranging from 3.1μm to 3.7μm.%Bandgaps of chalcogenide glass hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (GLS HC-PCFs) are analyzed by using the plane-wave expansion method.A mid-infrared laser can propagate in these low confinement loss fibers when the wavelength falls into the bandgaps.For enlarging the bandgap width,an improved GLS HC-PCF is put forward,the normalized frequency κA of the improved fiber is from 7.2 to 8.5 in its first bandgap.The improved GLS HC-PCF with pitch of 4.2μm can transmit the lights with wavelengths ranging from 3.1 μm to 3.7 μm.Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) can be classified into total internal reflection PCFs and photonic bandgap (PBG) PCFs[1] Solid core PCFs are one kind of the total internal reflection PCFs;hollow-core PCFs (HC-PCFs) are a kind of typical PBG fibers.The conception of HC-PCFs was first proposed by Russel in 1991.[2] Later,it was theoretically demonstrated by Birks et al.[3] in 1995.A bandgap photonic crystal fiber was mde by Knight et al.[4] for the first time in 1998.On the basis of these works,the first HC-PCF was designed and made by Cregan et al.[5] in 1999.

  15. Hydrogen molecules in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, E.V.; Weber, J

    2003-12-31

    GaAs samples treated in a hydrogen plasma have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. In addition to the known Raman line at 3912 cm{sup -1} of H{sub 2} trapped at the interstitial T{sub Ga} site surrounded by Ga neighbors, two new Raman signals at 4043 and 4112 cm{sup -1} have been observed at room temperature. The 4043 cm{sup -1} line is assigned to H{sub 2} trapped at the interstitial T{sub As} site with As closest neighbors and the 4112 cm{sup -1} line is associated with H{sub 2} trapped in voids formed by the hydrogen plasma. Para-H{sub 2} trapped at the interstitial T{sub Ga} site is shown to be unstable against irradiation with the band-gap light at room temperature and can be observed only at temperatures below 120 K.

  16. Hydrogen Sensing with Ni-Doped TiO2 Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congqin Ning

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Doping with other elements is one of the efficient ways to modify the physical and chemical properties of TiO2 nanomaterials. In the present work, Ni-doped TiO2 nanotubes were fabricated through anodic oxidation of NiTi alloy and further annealing treatment. The hydrogen sensing properties of the nanotube sensor were investigated. It was found that the Ni-doped TiO2 nanotubes were sensitive to an atmosphere of 1,000 ppm hydrogen, showing a good response at both room temperature and elevated temperatures. A First-Principle simulation revealed that, in comparison with pure anatase TiO2 oxide, Ni doping in the TiO2 oxide could result in a decreased bandgap. When the oxide sensor adsorbed a certain amount of hydrogen the bandgap increased and the acceptor impurity levels was generated, which resulted in a change of the sensor resistance.

  17. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  18. Charge states of a hydrogen defect (3326 cm{sup -1} line) in ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herklotz, Frank; Lavrov, Eduard; Weber, Joerg [Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen in ZnO is a common impurity that strongly influences its electrical and optical properties, in particular, via formation of shallow donor states. An IR absorption study of a H-related defect resulting in a local vibrational mode (LVM) at 3326 cm{sup -1} is presented. We observed that a sub band-gap illumination results in the appearance of an IR absorption line at 3358 cm{sup -1} at the expense of the 3326 cm{sup -1} signal. The results of isotope substitution experiments strongly reveal that the two signals are LVMs of the same defect in different charge states. From the energy of the sub band-gap light it is concluded that this defect has a deep level in the band-gap. Data on thermal stability as well as the transition between the different charge states at different temperatures are also presented. The microscopic nature of the defect is discussed.

  19. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  20. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  1. The impact of sodium on the sub-bandgap states in CZTSe and CZTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, By Talia; Lee, Yun Seog; Mankad, Ravin; Gunawan, Oki; Gokmen, Tayfun; Bishop, Doug; McCandless, Brian; Guha, Supratik

    2015-03-01

    We compare the optically active sub-bandgap states in polycrystalline Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) and Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films as a function of sodium content. In all samples studied, we find that CZTSe has a lower concentration of radiative defect-derived states compared to CZTS and that the states are also shallower in CZTSe compared to CZTS. Further, we find that sodium impacts the relative ratios of two sub-bandgap peaks in the 4 K photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CZTSe (one at ˜0.85 eV and another at ˜0.92 eV). We propose that both of these sub-bandgap peaks stem from intrinsic point defects in CZTSe rather than from electronic states introduced by sodium; this is supported by a measurement on a sodium-free single-crystal of CZTSe. We also show that films with stronger emission through the shallower sub-bandgap states at 4 K display room-temperature PL closer to the bandgap energy. For all sodium quantities studied, one broad PL peak is observed in the 4 K PL spectrum of CZTS which also shifts towards the band edge with increasing sodium. A reduced overall defect density and the fact that the states that are present are shallower together may help account for the lower VOC deficits in CZTSe and the empirical observations that sodium improves device performance.

  2. Fast-light Assisted Four-Wave-Mixing in Photonic Bandgap

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Cheng; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Jinmei; Zhan, Li

    2014-01-01

    Since the forward and backward waves are coupled with each other and a standing wave with no net propagation of energy is formed in the photonic bandgap, it is a commonsense of basic physics that, any kinds of effects associated with wave propagation including four-wave-mixing (FWM) are thought to be impossible. However, we lay great emphasis here on explaining that this commonsense could be broken under specific circumstances. In this article, we report with the first experimental observation of the energy conversion in the photonic bandgap into other channel via FWM. Owing to the phase manipulation by fast light effect in the photonic bandgap, we manage to achieve the phase-match condition and thus occurred FWM transfer energy into other channels outside the photonic bandgap efficiently. As one-dimensional photonic crystal, simulations on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with and without fast light were conducted respectively, and an enhanced FWM in photonic bandgap of FBG was observed. The experimental result sho...

  3. TiO2 anatase with a bandgap in the visible region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dette, Christian; Pérez-Osorio, Miguel A; Kley, Christopher S; Punke, Paul; Patrick, Christopher E; Jacobson, Peter; Giustino, Feliciano; Jung, Soon Jung; Kern, Klaus

    2014-11-12

    TiO2 anatase plays a central role in energy and environmental research. A major bottleneck toward developing artificial photosynthesis with TiO2 is that it only absorbs ultraviolet light, owing to its large bandgap of 3.2 eV. If one could reduce the bandgap of anatase to the visible region, TiO2-based photocatalysis could become a competitive clean energy source. Here, using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a highly reactive titanium-terminated anatase surface with a reduced bandgap of less than 2 eV, stretching into the red portion of the solar spectrum. By tuning the surface preparation conditions, we can reversibly switch between the standard anatase surface and the newly discovered low bandgap surface phase. The identification of a TiO2 anatase surface phase with a bandgap in the visible and high chemical reactivity has important implications for solar energy conversion, photocatalysis, and artificial photosynthesis.

  4. Universal rule on chirality-dependent bandgaps in graphene antidot lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Zhuhua; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-04-22

    Graphene with periodically patterned antidots has attracted intense research attention as it represents a facile route to open a bandgap for graphene electronics. However, not all graphene antidot lattices (GALs) can open a bandgap and a guiding rule is missing. Here, through systematic first-principles calculations, it is found that bandgaps in triangular GALs are surprisingly well defined by a chirality vector R = n a1 + ma2 connecting two neighboring antidots, where a1 and a2 are the basis vectors of graphene. The bandgap opens in the GALs with (n-m)mod3 = 0 but remains closed in those with (n-m)mod3 = ±1, reminiscent of the gap-chirality rule in carbon nanotubes. Remarkably, the gap value in GALs allows ample modulation by adjusting the length of chirality vectors, shape and size of the antidots. The gap-chirality relation in GALs stems from the chirality-dependent atomic structures of GALs as revealed by a super-atom model as well as Clar sextet analyses. This chirality-dependent bandgap is further shown to be a generic behavior in any parallelogram GAL and thus serves as an essential stepping stone for experimenters to realize graphene devices by antidot engineering.

  5. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23

    The objectives of this project, covering two phases and an additional extension phase, were the development of thin film-based hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices for solar-powered water splitting. The hybrid device, comprising a low-cost photoactive material integrated with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H or a-Si in short)-based solar cells as a driver, should be able to produce hydrogen with a 5% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH) and be durable for at least 500 hours. Three thin film material classes were studied and developed under this program: silicon-based compounds, copper chalcopyrite-based compounds, and metal oxides. With the silicon-based compounds, more specifically the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), we achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% when the photoelectrode was coupled to an a-Si tandem solar cell, and a STH efficiency of 6.1% when using a crystalline Si PV driver. The hybrid PV/a-SiC device tested under a current bias of -3~4 mA/cm{sup 2}, exhibited a durability of up to ~800 hours in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. Other than the PV driver, the most critical element affecting the photocurrent (and hence the STH efficiency) of the hybrid PV/a-SiC device was the surface energetics at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. Without surface modification, the photocurrent of the hybrid PEC device was ~1 mA/cm{sup 2} or lower due to a surface barrier that limits the extraction of photogenerated carriers. We conducted an extensive search for suitable surface modification techniques/materials, of which the deposition of low work function metal nanoparticles was the most successful. Metal nanoparticles of ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W) or titanium (Ti) led to an anodic shift in the onset potential. We have also been able to develop hybrid devices of various configurations in a monolithic fashion and optimized the current matching via altering the energy bandgap and thickness of each constituent cell. As a result, the short

  6. Electric gating induced bandgaps and enhanced Seebeck effect in zigzag bilayer graphene ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thanh-Tra; Tran, Van-Truong

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of a transverse electric field generated by side gates and a vertical electric field generated by top/back gates on energy bands and transport properties of zigzag bilayer graphene ribbons (Bernal stacking). Using atomistic tight binding calculations and Green’s function formalism we demonstrate that a bandgap is opened when either field is applied and even enlarged under simultaneous influence of the two fields. Interestingly, although vertical electric fields are widely used to control the bandgap in bilayer graphene, here we show that transverse fields exhibit a more positive effect in terms of modulating a larger range of bandgap and retaining good electrical conductance. The Seebeck effect is also demonstrated to be enhanced strongly—by about 13 times for a zigzag bilayer graphene ribbon with 16 chain lines. These results may motivate new designs of devices made of bilayer graphene ribbons using electric gates.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of porous-core honeycomb bandgap THz fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    We have fabricated a porous-core honeycomb fiber in the cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) Topas® by drill-draw technology [1]. A cross-sectional image of the fabricated fiber is shown in the left Panel of Fig. 1. Simulation of the electromagnetic properties of the fiber shows two wide bandgaps within...... the cladding modes from the fiber. The propagation loss is measured in a cut-back experiment. The fundamental bandgap at 0.75-1.05 THz is found to have losses lower than 1.5 dB/cm, whereas the loss is below 1.0 dB/cm in the reduced bandgap 0.78-1.02 THz, as shown in Fig. 1(g)....

  8. Tailoring the optical bandgap and magnetization of cobalt ferrite thin films through controlled zinc doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanshu Sharma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the tuning of the optical bandgap and saturation magnetization of cobalt ferrite (CFO thin films through low doping of zinc (Zn has been demonstrated. The Zn doped CFO thin films with doping concentrations (0 to 10% have been synthesized by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapour deposition technique. The optical bandgap varies from 1.48 to 1.88 eV and saturation magnetization varies from 142 to 221 emu/cc with the increase in the doping concentration and this change in the optical and magnetic properties is attributed to the change in the relative population of the Co2+ at the tetrahedral and octahedral sites. Raman study confirms the decrease in the population of Co2+ at tetrahedral sites with controlled Zn doping in CFO thin films. A quantitative analysis has been presented to explain the observed variation in the optical bandgap and saturation magnetization.

  9. Self-collimated waveguide bends and partial bandgap reflection of photonic crystals with parallelogram lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dingshan; Zhou, Zhiping; Citrin, David S

    2008-03-01

    The photonic crystal structure with parallelogram lattice, capable of bending a self-collimated wave with free angles and partial bandgap reflection, is presented. The equifrequency contours show that the direction of the collimation wave can be turned by tuning the angle between the two basic vectors of the lattice. Acute, right, and obtuse angles of collimating waveguide bends have been realized by arc lattices of parallelogram photonic crystals. Moreover, partial bandgap reflection of the parallelogram lattice photonic crystals is validated from the equifrequency contours and the projected band structures. A waveguide taper based on this partial bandgap reflection is also designed and proved to have above 85% transmittance over a very wide operating bandwidth of 180 nm.

  10. Wide bandgap n-type and p-type semiconductor porous junction devices as photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuan-Pai; Horng, Sheng-Fu [Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chao, Yu-Chiang; Meng, Hsin-Fei [Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Zan, Hsiao-Wen, E-mail: yuchiangchao@gmail.com, E-mail: meng@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-12

    In junction absorber photovoltaics doped wide bandgap n-type and p-type semiconductors form a porous interpenetrating junction structure with a layer of low bandgap absorber at the interface. The doping concentration is high enough such that the junction depletion width is smaller than the pore size. The highly conductive neutral region then has a dentrite shape with fingers reaching the absorber to effectively collect the photo-carriers swept out by the junction electric field. With doping of 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} corresponding to a depletion width of 25 nm, pore size of 32 nm, absorber thickness close to exciton diffusion length of 17 nm, absorber bandgap of 1.4 eV and carrier mobility over 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, numerical calculation shows the power conversion efficiency is as high as 19.4%. It rises to 23% for a triplet exciton absorber.

  11. Tuning the hybridization bandgap by meta-molecules with in-unit interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yongqiang; Li, Yunhui, E-mail: liyunhui@tongji.edu.cn; Wu, Qian; Jiang, Haitao; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Hong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Structured Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-09-07

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the hybridization bandgap (HBG) can be tuned conveniently by deep subwavelength meta-molecules with in-unit interaction. Spontaneous-emission-cancellation-like (SEC-like) effect is realized in a meta-molecule by introducing the destructive interference of two detuned meta-atoms. The meta-atoms consisting of subwavelength zero-index-metamaterial-based resonators are side-coupled to a microstrip. Compared to conventional HBG configurations, the presence of in-unit interaction between meta-atoms provides more flexibility in tuning the bandgap properties, keeping the device volume almost unchanged. Both numerical simulations and microwave experiments confirm that the width, depth, and spectrum shape of HBG can be tuned by simply introducing SEC-like interaction into the meta-molecule. Due to these features, our design may be promising to be applied in microwave or optics communications systems with strict limitation of device volume and flexible bandgap properties.

  12. Reversed dispersion slope photonic bandgap fibers for broadband dispersion control in femtosecond fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várallyay, Z; Saitoh, K; Fekete, J; Kakihara, K; Koshiba, M; Szipocs, R

    2008-09-29

    Higher-order-mode solid and hollow core photonic bandgap fibers exhibiting reversed or zero dispersion slope over tens or hundreds of nanometer bandwidths within the bandgap are presented. This attractive feature makes them well suited for broadband dispersion control in femtosecond pulse fiber lasers, amplifiers and optical parametric oscillators. The canonical form of the dispersion profile in photonic bandgap fibers is modified by a partial reflector layer/interface placed around the core forming a 2D cylindrical Gires-Tournois type interferometer. This small perturbation in the index profile induces a frequency dependent electric field distribution of the preferred propagating higher-order-mode resulting in a zero or reversed dispersion slope.

  13. Energy bandgap variation in oblique angle-deposited indium tin oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyurin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Cho, Jaehee, E-mail: jcho@chonbuk.ac.kr [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Semiconductor Physics Research Center, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Jong Kyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Fred Schubert, E. [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films deposited using the oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique exhibit a strong correlation between structural and optical properties, especially the optical bandgap energy. The microstructural properties of ITO thin films are strongly influenced by the tilt angle used during the OAD process. When changing the tilt angle, the refractive index, porosity, and optical bandgap energy of ITO films also change due to the existence of a preferential growth direction at the interface between ITO and the substrate. Experiments reveal that the ITO film's optical bandgap varies from 3.98 eV (at normal incident deposition) to 3.87 eV (at a 60° tilt angle)

  14. Hybrid bandgap engineering for super-hetero-epitaxial semiconductor materials, and products thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    "Super-hetero-epitaxial" combinations comprise epitaxial growth of one material on a different material with different crystal structure. Compatible crystal structures may be identified using a "Tri-Unity" system. New bandgap engineering diagrams are provided for each class of combination, based on determination of hybrid lattice constants for the constituent materials in accordance with lattice-matching equations. Using known bandgap figures for previously tested materials, new materials with lattice constants that match desired substrates and have the desired bandgap properties may be formulated by reference to the diagrams and lattice matching equations. In one embodiment, this analysis makes it possible to formulate new super-hetero-epitaxial semiconductor systems, such as systems based on group IV alloys on c-plane LaF.sub.3; group IV alloys on c-plane langasite; Group III-V alloys on c-plane langasite; and group II-VI alloys on c-plane sapphire.

  15. A Unified Understanding of the Thickness-Dependent Bandgap Transition in Hexagonal Two-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joongoo; Zhang, Lijun; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-02-18

    Many important layered semiconductors, such as hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), are derived from a hexagonal lattice. A single layer of such hexagonal semiconductors generally has a direct bandgap at the high-symmetry point K, whereas it becomes an indirect, optically inactive semiconductor as the number of layers increases to two or more. Here, taking hBN and MoS2 as examples, we reveal the microscopic origin of the direct-to-indirect bandgap transition of hexagonal layered materials. Our symmetry analysis and first-principles calculations show that the bandgap transition arises from the lack of the interlayer orbital couplings for the band-edge states at K, which are inherently weak because of the crystal symmetries of hexagonal layered materials. Therefore, it is necessary to judiciously break the underlying crystal symmetries to design more optically active, multilayered semiconductors from hBN or TMDs.

  16. Growth of Wide-Bandgap Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Films by HWCVD: Influence of Filament Temperature on Structural and Optoelectronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Himanshu S.; Yadav, Asha; Singh, Mukesh; Kumar, Shailendra; Agarwal, Pratima

    2015-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) thin films have been deposited using a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique on quartz substrates with a mixture of silane, methane, and hydrogen gases as precursors at a reasonably high deposition rate of approximately 15 nm/min to 50 nm/min. The influence of the filament temperature ( T F) on the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the SiC film has been investigated using x-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible-near infrared transmission spectroscopy, and dark conductivity ( σ d) studies. Films deposited at low T F (1800°C to 1900°C) are amorphous in nature with high density of Si-Si bonds, whereas high- T F (≥2000°C) films are nanocrystalline embedded in an amorphous SiC matrix with higher concentration of Si-C bonds and negligible concentration of Si-Si bonds. The bandgap ( E g) varies from 2.5 eV to 3.1 eV and σ d (50°C) from ˜10-9 Ω-1 cm-1 to 10-1 Ω-1 cm-1 as T F is increased from 1900°C to 2200°C. This increase in E g and σ d is due to microstructural changes and unintentional oxygen doping of the films.

  17. An efficient method of DFT/LDA band-gap correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharoch, Pawel; Winiarski, Maciej

    2013-12-01

    It has been shown that the underestimated by DFT/LDA(GGA) band-gap can be efficiently corrected by an averaging procedure of transition energies over a region close to the direct band-gap transition, which we call the Δ(EIG) method (the differences in the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues). For small excitations the averaging appears to be equivalent to the Δ(SCF) approach (differences in the self-consistent energies), which is a consequence of Janak’s theorem and has been confirmed numerically. The Gaussian distribution in k-space for electronic excitation has been used (occupation numbers in the Δ(SCF) or eigenenergy sampling in the Δ(EIG)). A systematic behavior of the k-space localization parameter σk correcting the band-gap has been observed in numerical experiments. On that basis some sampling schemes for band-gap correction have been proposed and tested in the prediction of the band-gap behavior in InxGa(1-x)N semiconducting alloy, and a very good agreement with independent calculations has been obtained. In the context of the work the issue of electron localization in the r-space has been discussed which, as it has been predicted by Mori-Sánchez et al. [P. Mori-Sánchez, A.J. Cohen, W. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 146401], should reduce the effect of the convex behavior of the LDA/GGA functionals and improve the band-gap prediction within DFT/LDA(GGA). A scheme for electron localization in r-space has been suggested.

  18. Stable Low-Bandgap Pb-Sn Binary Perovskites for Tandem Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibin; Rajagopal, Adharsh; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Jo, Sae Byeok; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Ting; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2016-10-01

    A low-bandgap (1.33 eV) Sn-based MA0.5 FA0.5 Pb0.75 Sn0.25 I3 perovskite is developed via combined compositional, process, and interfacial engineering. It can deliver a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.19%. Finally, a four-terminal all-perovskite tandem solar cell is demonstrated by combining this low-bandgap cell with a semitransparent MAPbI3 cell to achieve a high efficiency of 19.08%. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ultrasensitive refractive index sensor based on twin-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Town, Graham E.; Bang, Ole

    We have theoretically investigated twin-core all-solid photonic bandgap fibers (PBGFs) for evanescent wave sensing of refractive index within one single microfluidic analyte channel centered between the two cores. The sensor can achieve ultrahigh sensitivity by detecting the change in transmission....... We find novel features in the sensing characteristics: the sensitivity is higher at the short wavelength edge of a bandgap than at the long wavelength edge, the effective index of the odd supermode (nodd) is more sensitive to ambient refractive index change compared with that of the even supermode...

  20. Refractive index sensing in an all-solid twin-core photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Town, Graham E.; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    We describe a highly sensitive refractive index sensor based on a twin-core coupler in an all-solid photonic bandgap guiding optical fiber. A single hole acts as a microfluidic channel for the analyte, which modifies the coupling between the cores, and avoids the need for selective filling....... By operating in the bandgap guiding regime the proposed sensor is capable of measuring refractive indices around that of water, and because the analyte varies the coupling coefficient (i.e., instead of phase matching condition) the device is capable of both high sensitivity and a relatively large dynamic range....

  1. Study on the photonic bandgaps of hollow-core microstructured fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaolun Liu; Guiyao Zhou; Lantian Hou

    2006-01-01

    A simple method is presented to measure the transmission spectrum of hollow-core microstructured fibers in the visible, near-infrared, and mid-infrared regions. The plane wave expansion method is applied to analyze the photonic bandgaps of hollow-core microstructured fibers. The experimental results indicate that there are several strong transmission bands in the near-infrared and mid-infrared region, but hardly any transmission phenomena in the visible region, which shows that there are some bandgaps in nearinfrared wavelength. The experimental results are consistent with the numerically simulative results using a plane wave expansion method.

  2. Enhanced third-harmonic generation in photonic crystals at band-gap pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Gorbunov, Evgeny A.; Yakovlev, Egor V.; Zotov, Arsen K.; Masalov, Vladimir M.; Emelchenko, Gennadi A.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.

    2017-02-01

    More than one order enhancement of third-harmonic generation is observed experimentally at band-gap pumping of globular photonic crystals. Due to a lateral modulation of the dielectric permittivity in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals, sharp peaks of light intensity (light localization) arise in the media at the band-gap pumping. The light localization enhances significantly the nonlinear light conversion, in particular, third-harmonic generation, in the near-surface volume of photonic crystal. The observed way to enhance the nonlinear conversion can be useful for creation of novel compact elements of nonlinear and laser optics.

  3. Strain dependence of the direct energy bandgap in thin silicon on insulator layers

    OpenAIRE

    Munguía, J; Bluet, J-M; Chouaib, H.; Bremond, G.; Mermoux, Michel; Bru-Chevallier, C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Photoreflectance spectroscopy is applied on tensilely-strained silicon on insulator (sSOI) thin layers in order to evaluate the biaxial strain effect on the Si direct bandgap. The measured redshift of the transition (i.e. direct bandgap) with strain (~ -100 meV/%), corresponds to theoretical predictions. The hydrostatic and valence band deformation potential parameters for E 1 (i.e. transition close to L-point along the ?-direction) are also measured: and ' 0 E eV D 5. 0 5 . 7 1 1...

  4. Compact optically-fed microwave true-time delay using liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui

    2009-01-01

    Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz.......Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz....

  5. Compact optically-fed microwave true-time delay using liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui;

    2009-01-01

    Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz.......Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz....

  6. Bandgap engineering of rippled MoS2 monolayer under external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jingshan; Li, Xiao; Qian, Xiaofeng; Feng, Ji

    2013-04-01

    In this letter we propose a universal strategy combining external electric field with the ripple of membrane to tune the bandgap of semiconducting atomic monolayer. By first-principles calculations we show that the bandgap of rippled MoS2 monolayer can be tuned in a large range by vertical external electric field, which is expected to have little effect on MoS2 monolayer. This phenomenon can be explained from charge redistribution under external electric field by a simple model. This may open an avenue of optimizing monolayer MoS2 for electronic and optoelectronic applications by surface patterning.

  7. Solution-processable donor-acceptor polymers with modular electronic properties and very narrow bandgaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Michael E; Zhang, Benjamin A; Murtagh, Dustin; Liu, Yi; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Wong, Bryan M; Azoulay, Jason D

    2014-09-01

    Bridgehead imine-substituted cyclopentadithiophene structural units, in combination with highly electronegative acceptors that exhibit progressively delocalized π-systems, afford donor-acceptor (DA) conjugated polymers with broad absorption profiles that span technologically relevant wavelength (λ) ranges from 0.7 electronic properties so as to achieve very narrow optical bandgaps (Eg (opt) < 0.5 eV). This strategy affords modular DA copolymers with broad- and long-wavelength light absorption in the infrared and materials with some of the narrowest bandgaps reported to date.

  8. Silica-air photonic crystal fiber design that permits waveguiding by a true photonic bandgap effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of a novel type of optical fiber is presented. The operation of the fiber relies entirely on wave guidance through the photonic bandgap effect and not on total internal reflection, thereby distinguishing that fiber from all other known fibers, including recently studied...... photonic crystal fibers. The novel fiber has a central low-index core region and a cladding consisting of a silica background material with air holes situated within a honeycomb lattice structure. We show the existence of photonic bandgaps for the silica–air cladding structure and demonstrate how light can...

  9. Compact Electrically tunable Waveplate Based on Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Keller, Stephan Urs

    2009-01-01

    A compact tunable waveplate based on negative dielectric liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers is presented. The birefringence can be tuned electrically to work as a quarter-wave or a half-wave plate in the wavelength range 1520nm-1600nm.......A compact tunable waveplate based on negative dielectric liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers is presented. The birefringence can be tuned electrically to work as a quarter-wave or a half-wave plate in the wavelength range 1520nm-1600nm....

  10. A Super Performance Bandgap Voltage Reference with Adjustable Output for DC-DC Converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a super performance bandgap voltage reference for DC-DC converter with adjustable output. It generates a wide range of voltage reference ranging from sub- 1V to 1.221 7 V and has a low temperature coefficient of 2.3 × 10 - 5/K over the temperature variation using the current feedback and resistive subdivision. In addition, the power supply rejection ration of the proposed bandgap voltage reference is 78 dB. When supply voltage varies from 2.5 V to 6 V, output VREF is 1.221 685 ± 0.055 mV.

  11. A novel two-layer compact electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure and its applications in microwave circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ning(杨宁); CHEN; Zhining; (陈志宁); WANG; Yunyi; (王蕴仪); Chia; M.; Y.; W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel two-layer electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure. The studies on the characteristics of the cell are carried out numerically and experimentally. A lumped-LC equivalent circuit extracted from the numerical simulation is used to model the bandgap characteristics of the proposed EBG structure. The influences of geometric parameters on the operation frequency and equivalent LC parameters are discussed. A meander line high performance bandstop filter and a notch type duplexer are designed and measured. These EBG structures are shown to have potential applications in microwave and RF systems.

  12. Quasi-two-dimensional optomechanical crystals with a complete phononic bandgap

    CERN Document Server

    Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Winger, Martin; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    A fully planar two-dimensional optomechanical crystal formed in a silicon microchip is used to create a structure devoid of phonons in the GHz frequency range. A nanoscale photonic crystal cavity is placed inside the phononic bandgap crystal in order to probe the properties of the localized acoustic modes. By studying the trends in mechanical damping, mode density, and optomechanical coupling strength of the acoustic resonances over an array of structures with varying geometric properties, clear evidence of a complete phononic bandgap is shown.

  13. Apparent bandgap shift in the internal quantum efficiency for solar cells with back reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M. A.; Perl, E. E.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Jain, N.; Levi, D.; Horner, G.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate that in solar cells with highly reflective back mirrors, the measured internal quantum efficiency exhibits a shift in bandgap relative to the measured external quantum efficiency. The shift arises from the fact that the measured reflectance at the front surface includes a superposition of waves reflecting from the front and back surfaces. We quantify the magnitude of the apparent shift and discuss the errors that can result in determination of quantities such as the photocurrent. Because of this apparent shift, it is important the bandgap be determined from the external quantum efficiency.

  14. Enhanced bandgap in annular photonic-crystal silicon-on-insulator asymmetric slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Citrin, D S; Wu, Huaming; Gao, Dingshan; Zhou, Zhiping

    2011-06-15

    Photonic band structures of annular photonic-crystal (APC) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) asymmetric slabs with finite thickness were investigated by the three-dimensional plane-wave expansion method. The results show that for a broad range of air-volume filling factors, APC slabs can exhibit a significantly larger bandgap than conventional circular-hole photonic-crystal (PC) slabs. Bandgap enhancements over conventional air hole PC SOI slabs as large as twofold are predicted for low air-volume filling factors below 15%. This desirable behavior suggests a potential for APC SOI slabs to serve as the basis of various optical cavities, waveguides, and mirrors.

  15. The Second Order Guided Modes Based on Photonic Bandgap Effects in Air/Glass Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Lei; LOU Shu-Qin; JIAN Shui-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a defect site in the periodic structure of a photonic bandgap fiber,to confine and guide the second order mode by photonic bandgap effects.Based on a high air-filling fraction photonic crystal cladding structure,a simplified model with an equivalent air cladding was proposed to explore and analyze the properties of this second order guided mode.

  16. Analysis of bandgap characteristics of two-dimensional periodic structures by using the source-model technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Alon; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2003-08-01

    We introduce a solution based on the source-model technique for periodic structures for the problem of electromagnetic scattering by a two-dimensional photonic bandgap crystal slab illuminated by a transverse-magnetic plane wave. The proposed technique takes advantage of the periodicity of the slab by solving the problem within the unit cell of the periodic structure. The results imply the existence of a frequency bandgap and provide a valuable insight into the relationship between the dimensions of a finite periodic structure and its frequency bandgap characteristics. A comparison shows a discrepancy between the frequency bandgap obtained for a very thick slab and the bandgap obtained by solving the corresponding two-dimensionally infinite periodic structure. The final part of the paper is devoted to explaining in detail this apparent discrepancy.

  17. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  18. Bandgap Control via Structural and Chemical Tuning of Transition Metal Perovskite Chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shanyuan; Huyan, Huaixun; Liu, Yang; Yeung, Matthew; Ye, Kevin; Blankemeier, Louis; Orvis, Thomas; Sarkar, Debarghya; Singh, David J; Kapadia, Rehan; Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2017-03-01

    Transition metal perovskite chalcogenides are a new class of versatile semiconductors with high absorption coefficient and luminescence efficiency. Polycrystalline materials synthesized by an iodine-catalyzed solid-state reaction show distinctive optical colors and tunable bandgaps across the visible range in photoluminescence, with one of the materials' external efficiency approaching the level of single-crystal InP and CdSe.

  19. A Fresh Look at the Semiconductor Bandgap Using Constant Current Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaya, R. O.; Luhanga, P. V. C.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the well-known linear variation of p-n diode terminal voltage with temperature at different fixed forward currents allows easy and accurate determination of the semiconductor ideality factor and bandgap from only two data points. This is possible if the temperature difference required to maintain the same diode voltage drop can be…

  20. Electrical and Optical Measurements of the Bandgap Energy of a Light-Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Matthieu; Michez, Lisa; Raimundo, Jean-Manuel; Dumas, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor materials are at the core of electronics. Most electronic devices are made of semiconductors. The operation of these components is well described by quantum physics which is often a difficult concept for students to understand. One of the intrinsic parameters of semiconductors is their bandgap energy E[subscript g]. In the case of…

  1. Tunable polarisation-maintaining filter based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Weirich, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A tunable and polarisation-maintaining all-in-fibre filter based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre is demonstrated. Its polarisation extinction ratio reaches 14 dB at 1550 nm wavelength. Its spectral tunability range spans over 250 nm in the temperature range 30–70°C. The measured...

  2. Single-mode ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic bandgap rod fiber amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Scolari, Lara; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    bandgap structure. The structure allows resonant coupling of higher-order modes from the core and acts as a spatially Distributed Mode Filter (DMF). With this approach, we demonstrate passive SM performance in an only ~50cm long and straight ytterbium-doped rod fiber. The amplifier has a mode field...

  3. Amplification and ASE suppression in a polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped allsolid photonic bandgap fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Falk, C. I.; Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate suppression of amplified spontaneous emission at the conventional ytterbium gain wavelengths around 1030 nm in a cladding-pumped polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped all-solid photonic crystal fibre. The fibre works through combined index and bandgap guiding. Furthermore, we show...

  4. 30W, 1178nm Yb-doped photonic bandgap fiber amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, Akira; Maruyama, Hiroki; Ueda, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    High-power, high-efficiency ytterbium-doped solid-core photonic-bandgap fiber amplification at the long-wavelength edge of the Yb gain band is reported. Amplified-spontaneous-emission-free, 30W nonpolarized and 25W linearly-polarized 1178nm outputs have been achieved with

  5. Tunable All-in-Fiber Waveplates Based on Negative Dielectric Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Eskildsen, Lars; Weirich, Johannes;

    2008-01-01

    Tunable all-in-fiber waveplates based on negative dielectric liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers are presented. The birefringence can be tuned electrically and thermally to work as a quarter-wave or a half-wave plate in the range 1520 nm-1580 nm....

  6. On-chip tunable long-period grating devices based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard;

    2009-01-01

    We design and fabricate an on-chip tunable long-period grating device by integrating a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber on silicon structures. The transmission axis of the device can be electrically rotated in steps of 45° as well as switched on and off with the response time in the millisec...

  7. Experimental investigation of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers with five photonic band-gaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jin-hui; HOU Lan-tian; WEI Dong-bin; WANG Hai-yun; ZHOU Gui-yao

    2008-01-01

    The hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) with integrity structure have been fabricated with an improved twice stack-and-draw technique. The transmission spectrum shows that five photonic band-gaps within 450-1100 nm have been obtained.And the green light transmission in the HC-PCFs'has been observed remarkably.

  8. Millijoule Pulse Energy Second Harmonic Generation With Single-Stage Photonic Bandgap Rod Fiber Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Saby, Julien; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate, for the first time, a single-stage Q-switched single-mode (SM) ytterbium-doped rod fiber laser delivering record breaking pulse energies at visible and UV light. We use a photonic bandgap rod fiber with a mode field diameter of 59μm based on a new distributed...

  9. A low-bandgap semiconducting polymer for photovoltaic devices and infrared emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabec, C.J.; Winder, C.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dhanabalan, A.; van Hal, P.A.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    A novel low-bandgap conjugated polymer (PTPTB, E-g = similar to1.6 eV), consisting of alternating electron-rich N-dodecyl-2,5-bis(2'-thienyl)pyrrole (TPT) and electron-deficient 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (B) units, is introduced for thin-film optoelectronic devices working in the near infrared (NIR).

  10. Polymer solar cells and infrared light emitting diodes : Dual function low bandgap polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winder, C.; Mühlbacher, D.; Neugebauer, H.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Brabec, C.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hummelen, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Conjugated Polymers with a HOMO-LUMO transition <2eV, i.e. a low bandgap, respectively, have interesting and desired properties for some thin film optoelectronic devices like light emitting diodes and solar cells. In this contribution we present the implementation of the novel copolymer PTPTB,

  11. A low-bandgap semiconducting polymer for photovoltaic devices and infrared emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabec, C.J.; Winder, C.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dhanabalan, A.; van Hal, P.A.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    A novel low-bandgap conjugated polymer (PTPTB, E-g = similar to1.6 eV), consisting of alternating electron-rich N-dodecyl-2,5-bis(2'-thienyl)pyrrole (TPT) and electron-deficient 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (B) units, is introduced for thin-film optoelectronic devices working in the near infrared (NIR). B

  12. Polymer solar cells and infrared light emitting diodes : Dual function low bandgap polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winder, C.; Mühlbacher, D.; Neugebauer, H.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Brabec, C.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hummelen, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Conjugated Polymers with a HOMO-LUMO transition <2eV, i.e. a low bandgap, respectively, have interesting and desired properties for some thin film optoelectronic devices like light emitting diodes and solar cells. In this contribution we present the implementation of the novel copolymer PTPTB, consi

  13. Bandgap determination of P(VDF–TrFE) copolymer film by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Mandal; K Henkel; K Müller; D Schmeißer

    2010-08-01

    The ferroelectric of poly(vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene), P(VDF–TrFE) is confirmed for 100 nm thickness spin coated copolymer film. The homogeneous coverage of the copolymer film is investigated by the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Most importantly, the existing bandgap in the crystalline phase of the copolymer is determined directly from the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

  14. A low-bandgap semiconducting polymer for photovoltaic devices and infrared emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabec, C.J.; Winder, C.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dhanabalan, A.; van Hal, P.A.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    A novel low-bandgap conjugated polymer (PTPTB, E-g = similar to1.6 eV), consisting of alternating electron-rich N-dodecyl-2,5-bis(2'-thienyl)pyrrole (TPT) and electron-deficient 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (B) units, is introduced for thin-film optoelectronic devices working in the near infrared (NIR). B

  15. Narrow Bandgap in beta-BaZn2As2 and Its Chemical Origins

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Zewen; Ueda, Shigenori; Toda, Yoshitake; Ran, Fan-Yong; Guo, Jiangang; Lei, Hechang; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Beta-BaZn2As2 is known to be a p-type semiconductor with the layered crystal structure similar to that of LaZnAsO, leading to the expectation that beta-BaZn2As2 and LaZnAsO have similar bandgaps; however, the bandgap of beta-BaZn2As2 (previously-reported value ~0.2 eV) is one order of magnitude smaller than that of LaZnAsO (1.5 eV). In this paper, the reliable bandgap value of beta-BaZn2As2 is determined to be 0.23 eV from the intrinsic region of the tem-perature dependence of electrical conductivity. The origins of this narrow bandgap are discussed based on the chemi-cal bonding nature probed by 6 keV hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, hybrid density functional calculations, and the ligand theory. One origin is the direct As-As hybridization between adjacent [ZnAs] layers, which leads to a secondary splitting of As 4p levels and raises the valence band maximum. The other is that the non-bonding Ba 5dx2-y2 orbitals form unexpectedly deep conduction band minimum (CBM) in beta-BaZn2As2 although the CBM of L...

  16. Temperature influence on electrically controlled liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the temperature influence on electrically controlled liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fiber device. The phase shift in the wavelength range 1520nm-1600nm for realizing quarter and half wave plates at different temperatures by applying a certain voltage...

  17. Compression of realistic laser pulses in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, John

    2009-01-01

    Dispersive compression of chirped few-picosecond pulses at the microjoule level in a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber is studied numerically. The performance of ideal parabolic input pulses is compared to pulses from a narrowband picosecond oscillator broadened by self-phase modulation during...

  18. Transmission properties of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers in relation to molecular spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Hald, Jan; Petersen, Jan C.;

    2010-01-01

    The transmission properties of five types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBFs) are characterized in the telecom wavelength range around 1:5 μm. The variations in optical transmission are measured as a function of laser frequency over a 2GHz scan range as well as a function of time over...

  19. High-Performance Photothermal Conversion of Narrow-Bandgap Ti2 O3 Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Li, Yangyang; Deng, Lin; Wei, Nini; Weng, Yakui; Dong, Shuai; Qi, Dianpeng; Qiu, Jun; Chen, Xiaodong; Wu, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Ti2 O3 nanoparticles with high performance of photothermal conversion are demonstrated for the first time. Benefiting from the nanosize and narrow-bandgap features, the Ti2 O3 nanoparticles possess strong light absorption and nearly 100% internal solar-thermal conversion efficiency. Furthermore, Ti2 O3 -nanoparticle-based thin film shows potential use in seawater desalination and purification.

  20. Physical ageing in the above-bandgap photoexposured glassy arsenic selenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozdras, A [Faculty of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Golovchak, R [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, O [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)

    2007-08-15

    Physical ageing induced by above-bandgap light illumination is studied in glassy As-Se using differential scanning calorimetry. It is shown that measurable effect like to known short-term physical ageing is observed only in Se-rich glasses. The kinetics of this effect is compared with that caused by natural storage in a dark.

  1. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...

  2. Electrical and Optical Measurements of the Bandgap Energy of a Light-Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Matthieu; Michez, Lisa; Raimundo, Jean-Manuel; Dumas, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor materials are at the core of electronics. Most electronic devices are made of semiconductors. The operation of these components is well described by quantum physics which is often a difficult concept for students to understand. One of the intrinsic parameters of semiconductors is their bandgap energy E[subscript g]. In the case of…

  3. Size dependence of the bandgap of plasma synthesized silicon nanoparticles through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theingi, S.; Guan, T. Y.; Klafehn, G.; Taylor, P. C.; Lusk, M. T.; Collins, R. T., E-mail: rtcollin@mines.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Renewable Energy Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kendrick, C. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Renewable Energy Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Gorman, B. P. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Stradins, P. [Renewable Energy Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Developing silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) synthesis techniques that allow for straightforward control of nanoparticle size and associated optical properties is critical to potential applications of these materials. In addition, it is, in general, hard to probe the absorption threshold in these materials due to silicon's low absorption coefficient. In this study, size is controlled through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) into the dilute silane precursor of plasma synthesized SiNPs. Size reduction by nearly a factor of two with high crystallinity independent of size is demonstrated. The optical absorption spectra of the SiNPs in the vicinity of the bandgap are measured using photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Bandgap as a function of size is extracted taking into account the polydispersity of the samples. A systematic blue shift in absorption edge due to quantum confinement in the SiNPs is observed with increasing flow of SF{sub 6}. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra show a similar blue shift with size. However, a ∼300 meV difference in energy between emission and absorption for all sizes suggests that PL emission involves a defect related process. This shows that, while PL may allow size-induced shifts in the bandgap of SiNPs to be monitored, it cannot be relied on to give an accurate value for the bandgap as a function of size.

  4. Size Dependence of the Bandgap of Plasma Synthesized Silicon Nanoparticles Through Direct Introduction of Sulfur Hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theingi, S.; Guan, T. Y.; Kendrick, C.; Klafehn, G.; Gorman, B. P.; Taylor, P. C.; Lusk, M. T.; Stradins, Pauls; Collins, R. T.

    2015-10-19

    Developing silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) synthesis techniques that allow for straightforward control of nanoparticle size and associated optical properties is critical to potential applications of these materials. In addition, it is, in general, hard to probe the absorption threshold in these materials due to silicon's low absorption coefficient. In this study, size is controlled through direct introduction of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) into the dilute silane precursor of plasma synthesized SiNPs. Size reduction by nearly a factor of two with high crystallinity independent of size is demonstrated. Optical absorption spectra of the SiNPs in the vicinity of the bandgap are measured using photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Bandgap as a function of size is extracted taking into account the polydispersity of the samples. A systematic blue shift inabsorption edge due to quantum confinement in the SiNPs is observed with increasing flow of SF6. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra show a similar blue shift with size. However, a ~300 meV difference in energy between emission and absorption for all sizes suggests that PL emission involves a defect related process. While PL may allow size-induced shifts in the bandgap of SiNPs to be monitored, it cannot be relied on to give an accurate value for the bandgap as a function of size.

  5. Effective mass density based topology optimization of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials for bandgap maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiong Wei; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-11-01

    Because effective material properties are essential concepts in the analyses of wave phenomena in metamaterials, they may also be utilized in the optimal design of metamaterials. In this work, we propose a topology optimization method directly using the Effective Mass Density (EMD) concept to maximize the first bandgaps of two-dimensional solid Locally Resonant Acoustic Metamaterials (LRAMs). When the first bandgap is characterized by the negative EMD, the bandgap maximization can be formulated efficiently as a topology optimization problem to broaden the frequency zone of the negative EMD values. In this work, EMD is calculated by considering the macroscopic isotropy of LRAMs in the long wavelength limit. To facilitate the analytical sensitivity analysis, we propose an elaborate calculation scheme of EMD. A sensitivity averaging technique is also suggested to guarantee the macroscopically isotropic behavior of the LRAMs. In the present study, the coating layer interfacing the core and the matrix of a ternary LRAM is chosen as the design region because it significantly influences the bandgap. By considering several numerical examples, the validity of this method is verified, and the effects of the mass constraint ratios on the optimized results are also investigated.

  6. Low index-contrast photonic bandgap fiber for transmission of short pulsed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riishede, Jesper; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Broeng, Jes

    2004-01-01

    The use of low-index-contrast photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber for transmission of short pulsed light is discussed. PBG fibers have positive waveguide dispersion at long wavelengths at which conventional index-guiding fibers have negative waveguide dispersion. PBG fibers with low-index contrast can...

  7. Origin of unusual bandgap shift and dual emission in organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Ibrahim; Jacopin, Gwénolé; Meloni, Simone; Mattoni, Alessandro; Arora, Neha; Boziki, Ariadni; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Emission characteristics of metal halide perovskites play a key role in the current widespread investigations into their potential uses in optoelectronics and photonics. However, a fundamental understanding of the molecular origin of the unusual blueshift of the bandgap and dual emission in perovskites is still lacking. In this direction, we investigated the extraordinary photoluminescence behavior of three representatives of this important class of photonic materials, that is, CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3PbBr3, and CH(NH2)2PbBr3, which emerged from our thorough studies of the effects of temperature on their bandgap and emission decay dynamics using time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The low-temperature (perovskite composition, the bandgap exhibits an unusual blueshift by raising the temperature from 15 to 300 K. Density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics simulations allow for assigning the additional photoluminescence peak to the presence of molecularly disordered orthorhombic domains and also rationalize that the unusual blueshift of the bandgap with increasing temperature is due to the stabilization of the valence band maximum. Our findings provide new insights into the salient emission properties of perovskite materials, which define their performance in solar cells and light-emitting devices.

  8. Theory study on the bandgap of antimonide-based multi-element alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ning; Liu, Cheng-Zhi; Fan, Cun-Bo; Dong, Xue; Song, Qing-Li

    2017-05-01

    In order to meet the design requirements of the high-performance antimonide-based optoelectronic devices, the spin-orbit splitting correction method for bandgaps of Sb-based multi-element alloys is proposed. Based on the analysis of band structure, a correction factor is introduced in the InxGa1-xAsySb1-y bandgaps calculation with taking into account the spin-orbit coupling sufficiently. In addition, the InxGa1-xAsySb1-y films with different compositions are grown on GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the corresponding bandgaps are obtained by photoluminescence (PL) to test the accuracy and reliability of this new method. The results show that the calculated values agree fairly well with the experimental results. To further verify this new method, the bandgaps of a series of experimental samples reported before are calculated. The error rate analysis reveals that the α of spin-orbit splitting correction method is decreased to 2%, almost one order of magnitude smaller than the common method. It means this new method can calculate the antimonide multi-element more accurately and has the merit of wide applicability. This work can give a reasonable interpretation for the reported results and beneficial to tailor the antimonides properties and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Selecting Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Narrow Bandgap Naphthalene Diimide-Based Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salazar-Rios, Jorge Mario; Gomulya, Widianta; Derenskyi, Vladimir; Yang, Jie; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by wrapping them using pi-conjugated polymers is one of the most promising techniques to sort, separate, and purify semiconducting nanotube species for applications in optoelectronic devices. However, wide energy bandgap polymers commonly used in thi

  10. Photonic bandgap properties of void-based body-centered-cubic photonic crystals in polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangyong; Ventura, Michael; Gu, Min; Matthews, Aaron; Kivshar, Yuri

    2005-06-13

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of void-based body-centered-cubic (bcc) photonic crystals in a solidified transparent polymer by the use of a femtosecond laser-driven microexplosion method. The change in the refractive index in the region surrounding the void dots that form the bcc structures is verified by presenting confocal microscope images, and the bandgap properties are characterized by using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The effect of the angle of incidence on the photonic bandgaps is also studied. We observe multiple stop gaps with a suppression rate of the main gap of 47% for a bcc structure with a lattice constant of 2.77 microm, where the first and second stop gaps are located at 3.7 microm and 2.2 microm, respectively. We also present a theoretical approach to characterize the refractive index of the material for calculating the bandgap spectra, and confirm that the wavelengths of the observed bandgaps are in good correlation with the analytical predictions.

  11. Reflection-induced bias error in an air-core photonic bandgap fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuchen; Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhihao; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Chunxi

    2016-01-15

    Analysis of the bias error induced by reflections in an air-core photonic bandgap fiber gyroscope is performed by both simulation and experiment. The bias error is sinusoidally periodic under modulation, and its intensity is related to the relative positions of the reflection points. A simple and effective method for the suppression of the error is proposed, and it has been verified experimentally.

  12. A note on anomalous band-gap variations in semiconductors with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P. K.; Mondal, B. N.

    2017-09-01

    An attempt is made to theoretically study the band-gap variations (ΔEg) in semiconductors with temperature following the works, did by Fan and O'Donnell et al. based on thermodynamic functions. The semiconductor band-gap reflects the bonding energy. An increase in temperature changes the chemical bondings, and electrons are promoted from valence band to conduction band. In their analyses, they made several approximations with respect to temperature and other fitting parameters leading to real values of band-gap variations with linear temperature dependences. In the present communication, we have tried to re-analyse the works, specially did by Fan, and derived an analytical model for ΔEg(T). Because, it was based on the second-order perturbation technique of thermodynamic functions. Our analyses are made without any approximations with respect to temperatures and other fitting parameters mentioned in the text, leading to a complex functions followed by an oscillating nature of the variations of ΔEg. In support of the existence of the oscillating energy band-gap variations with temperature in a semiconductor, possible physical explanations are provided to justify the experimental observation for various materials.

  13. Optical tuning of photonic bandgaps in dye-doped nematic liquid crystal photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Hermann, David Sparre;

    2005-01-01

    An all-optical modulator is demonstrated, which utilizes a pulsed 532 nm laser to modulate the spectral position of the bandgaps in a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal. In order to investigate the time response of the LCPBG fiber device, a low-power CW probe...

  14. Small bandgap polymers for organic solar cells (polymer material development in the last 5 years)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Renee; Lenes, Martijn; Hummelen, Jan C.; Blom, Paul W.M.; Boer, Bert de

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade the field of polymer photovoltaics has seen a tremendous improvement in both device efficiency and understanding of the underlying physical processes. One has come to a point in which the prototypical large bandgap material system P3HT:PCBM is nearing optimal device performanc

  15. A metal sulfide photocatalyst composed of ubiquitous elements for solar hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Y; Umezawa, N; Srinivasan, N; Koyasu, S; Sakai, E; Miyauchi, M

    2016-06-14

    A visible-light-sensitive tin sulfide photocatalyst was designed based on a ubiquitous element strategy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Computational analysis suggested that tin monosulfide (SnS) would be more efficient than SnS2 as a photocathode for hydrogen production because of the low ionization potential and weak ionic character of SnS. To test this experimentally, nanoparticles of SnS were loaded onto a mesoporous electrode using a wet chemical method, and the bandgap of the synthesized SnS quantum dots was found to be tunable by adjusting the number of successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) cycles, which controls the magnitude of the quantum confinement effect. Efficient hydrogen production was achieved when the bandgap of SnS was wider than that of the bulk form.

  16. Novel Approaches to Wide Bandgap CuInSe2 Based Absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William N. Shafarman

    2011-04-28

    This project targeted the development of high performance wide bandgap solar cells based on thin film alloys of CuInSe2 to relax constraints on module design and enable tandem solar cell structures. This addressed goals of the Solar Energy Technologies Program for Next Generation PV to develop technology needed for higher thin film module efficiency as a means to reduce costs. Specific objectives of the research project were: 1) to develop the processes and materials required to improve the performance of wide bandgap thin film solar cells based on alloys of CuInSe2, and 2) to provide the fundamental science and engineering basis for the material, electronic, and device properties required to effectively apply these processes and materials to commercial manufacture. CuInSe2-based photovoltaics have established the highest efficiencies of the thin film materials at both the cell and module scales and are actively being scaled up to commercialization. In the highest efficiency cells and modules, the optical bandgap, a function of the CuInSe2-based alloy composition, is relatively low compared to the optimum match to the solar spectrum. Wider bandgap alloys of CuInSe2 produce higher cell voltages which can improve module performance and enable the development of tandem solar cells to boost the overall efficiency. A focus for the project was alloying with silver to form (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 pentenary thin films deposited by elemental co-evaporation which gives the broadest range of control of composition and material properties. This alloy has a lower melting temperature than Ag-free, Cu-based chalcopyrite compounds, which may enable films to be formed with lower defect densities and the (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 films give improved material properties and better device performance with increasing bandgap. A comprehensive characterization of optical, structural, and electronic properties of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 was completed over the complete compositional range 0 ≤ Ga/(In+Ga) ≤ 1 and

  17. The impact of sodium on the sub-bandgap states in CZTSe and CZTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershon, By Talia, E-mail: tsgersho@us.ibm.com; Lee, Yun Seog; Mankad, Ravin; Gunawan, Oki; Gokmen, Tayfun; Guha, Supratik [Physical Sciences Department, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Rd, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Bishop, Doug; McCandless, Brian [Institute of Energy Conversion, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2015-03-23

    We compare the optically active sub-bandgap states in polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films as a function of sodium content. In all samples studied, we find that CZTSe has a lower concentration of radiative defect-derived states compared to CZTS and that the states are also shallower in CZTSe compared to CZTS. Further, we find that sodium impacts the relative ratios of two sub-bandgap peaks in the 4 K photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CZTSe (one at ∼0.85 eV and another at ∼0.92 eV). We propose that both of these sub-bandgap peaks stem from intrinsic point defects in CZTSe rather than from electronic states introduced by sodium; this is supported by a measurement on a sodium-free single-crystal of CZTSe. We also show that films with stronger emission through the shallower sub-bandgap states at 4 K display room-temperature PL closer to the bandgap energy. For all sodium quantities studied, one broad PL peak is observed in the 4 K PL spectrum of CZTS which also shifts towards the band edge with increasing sodium. A reduced overall defect density and the fact that the states that are present are shallower together may help account for the lower V{sub OC} deficits in CZTSe and the empirical observations that sodium improves device performance.

  18. First principle analyses of direct bandgap solar cells with absorbing substrates versus mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Alexander P.; Kirk, Wiley P.

    2013-11-01

    Direct bandgap InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga0.5In0.5P solar cells containing backside mirrors as well as parasitically absorbing substrates are analyzed for their limiting open circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency with comparison to record solar cells. From the principle of detailed balance, it is shown quantitatively that mirror solar cells have greater voltage and power conversion efficiency than their substrate counterparts. Next, the radiative recombination coefficient and maximum radiative lifetime of GaAs mirror and substrate solar cells are calculated and compared to the nonradiative Auger and Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes. Mirror solar cells have greater radiative lifetime than their substrate variants. Auger lifetime exceeds radiative lifetime for both substrate and mirror cells while SRH lifetime may be less or greater than radiative lifetime depending on trap concentration and capture cross section. Finally, the change in free energy of the photogenerated carriers is analyzed in a comparison between InP, GaAs, CdTe, and Ga0.5In0.5P mirror and substrate solar cells in order to characterize the relationship between solar photon quality and free energy management in solar cells with differing bandgaps. Wider bandgap visible threshold Ga0.5In0.5P solar cells make better use of the available change in free energy of the photogenerated charge carriers, even when normalized to the bandgap energy, than narrower bandgap near-IR threshold InP, GaAs, and CdTe solar cells.

  19. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  20. Structural and optical properties of silicon nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation in hydrogen background gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, T.; Inada, M.; Yoshida, K.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.

    We studied the structural and optical properties of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (np-Si) prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in hydrogen (H2) background gas. The mean diameter of the np-Si was estimated to be approximately 5 nm. The infrared absorption corresponding to Si-Hn (n=1,2,3) bonds was observed at around 2100 cm-1, and a Raman scattering peak corresponding to crystalline Si was observed at around 520 cm-1. These results indicate that nanoparticles are not an alloy of Si and hydrogen but Si nanocrystal covered by hydrogen or hydrogenated silicon. This means that surface passivated Si nanoparticles can be prepared by PLA in H2 gas. The band-gap energy of np-Si prepared in H2 gas (1.9 eV) was larger than that of np-Si prepared in He gas (1.6 eV) even though they are almost the same diameter. After decreasing the hydrogen content in np-Si by thermal annealing, the band-gap energy decreased, and reached the same energy level as np-Si prepared in He gas. Thus, the optical properties of np-Si were affected by the hydrogenation of the surface of np-Si.

  1. Effective absorption coefficient for graded band-gap semiconductors and the expected photocurrent density in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Acevedo, Arturo [CINVESTAV del IPN, Electrical Engineering Department, Avenida IPN No. 2508, 07360 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    A simple model for the generation of carriers by photons incident on a (linearly) decreasing band-gap material, such as has been described in recent CIGS solar cells, is developed. The model can be generalized for different cases such as increasing band-gap grading or for having a more complex band-gap profile. The model developed for direct band semiconductors such as CIGS or AlGaAs allows us to define an effective absorption coefficient, so that the ideal photocurrent density can be calculated in a similar manner as for solar cells with non-graded band-gap materials. We show that this model gives completely different results as those expected from intuitive approaches for calculating this ideal photocurrent density. We also show that grading of the band-gap of the absorbing material in solar cells makes the photocurrent less sensitive to the total band-gap change, in such a way that the design of the band-gap variation can be more flexible in order to have other advantages such as higher built-in voltage or higher back surface field in the device structure. (author)

  2. Enhanced photoresponse in monolayer hydrogenated graphene photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Prarthana; Mohapatra, Dipti R; Misra, Abha

    2014-10-01

    We report the photoresponse of a hydrogenated graphene (H-graphene)-based infrared (IR) photodetector that is 4 times higher than that of pristine graphene. An enhanced photoresponse in H-graphene is attributed to the longer photoinduced carrier lifetime and hence a higher internal quantum efficiency of the device. Moreover, a variation in the angle of incidence of IR radiation demonstrated a nonlinear photoresponse of the detector, which can be attributed to the photon drag effect. However, a linear dependence of the photoresponse is revealed with different incident powers for a given angle of IR incidence. This study presents H-graphene as a tunable photodetector for advanced photoelectronic devices with higher responsivity. In addition, in situ tunability of the graphene bandgap enables achieving a cost-effective technique for developing photodetectors without involving any external treatments.

  3. Performance enhancement of the P3HT/PCBM solar cells through NIR sensitization using a small-bandgap polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameri, Tayebeh; Min, Jie; Li, Ning; Machui, Florian; Baran, Derya [Institute Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology (I-MEET), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Forster, Michael; Schottler, Kristina J.; Dolfen, Daniel; Scherf, Ullrich [FB C - Mathematik and Naturwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Makromolekulare Chemie and Institut fuer Polymertechnologie, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Institute Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology (I-MEET), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    A smart strategy to significantly improve the energy conversion efficiency of the wide-bandgap polymer P3HT blended in PCBM is demonstrated through NIR sensitization with a low-bandgap polymer. An efficiency of over 4% is achieved by adding 30-40% of the low bandgap polymer Si-PCPDTBT to the binary P3HT:PCBM blend, corresponding to an efficiency improvement of 25% compared to the P3HT:PCBM reference binary blend. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. An Azulene-Containing Low Bandgap Small Molecule for Organic Photovoltaics with High Open-Circuit Voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Zhu, Youqin; Yang, Daobin; Zhao, Suling; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Lin; Wu, Jianglin; Huang, Yan; Xu, Zheng; Lu, Zhiyun

    2016-10-01

    A simple azulene-containing squaraine dye (AzUSQ) showing bandgap of 1.38 eV and hole mobility up to 1.25×10(-4)  cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) was synthesized. With its low bandgap, an organic photovoltaic (OPV) device based on it has been made that exhibits an impressive open-circuit voltages (Voc ) of 0.80 V. Hence, azulene might be a promising structural unit to construct OPV materials with simultaneous low bandgap, high hole mobility and high Voc .

  5. Cation-induced band-gap tuning in organohalide perovskites: interplay of spin-orbit coupling and octahedra tilting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, Anna; Mosconi, Edoardo; Ronca, Enrico; Quarti, Claudio; Umari, Paolo; Nazeeruddin, Md K; Grätzel, Michael; De Angelis, Filippo

    2014-06-11

    Organohalide lead perovskites have revolutionized the scenario of emerging photovoltaic technologies. The prototype MAPbI3 perovskite (MA = CH3NH3(+)) has dominated the field, despite only harvesting photons above 750 nm (∼1.6 eV). Intensive research efforts are being devoted to find new perovskites with red-shifted absorption onset, along with good charge transport properties. Recently, a new perovskite based on the formamidinium cation ((NH2)2CH(+) = FA) has shown potentially superior properties in terms of band gap and charge transport compared to MAPbI3. The results have been interpreted in terms of the cation size, with the larger FA cation expectedly delivering reduced band-gaps in Pb-based perovskites. To provide a full understanding of the interplay among size, structure, and organic/inorganic interactions in determining the properties of APbI3 perovskites, in view of designing new materials and fully exploiting them for solar cells applications, we report a fully first-principles investigation on APbI3 perovskites with A = Cs(+), MA, and FA. Our results evidence that the tetragonal-to-quasi cubic structural evolution observed when moving from MA to FA is due to the interplay of size effects and enhanced hydrogen bonding between the FA cations and the inorganic matrix altering the covalent/ionic character of Pb-I bonds. Most notably, the observed cation-induced structural variability promotes markedly different electronic and optical properties in the MAPbI3 and FAPbI3 perovskites, mediated by the different spin-orbit coupling, leading to improved charge transport and red-shifted absorption in FAPbI3 and in general in pseudocubic structures. Our theoretical model constitutes the basis for the rationale design of new and more efficient organohalide perovskites for solar cells applications.

  6. Hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

  7. Prediction of the Bandgap of a Core-Shell Microsphere via Light Intensity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Kyu Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been experimentally observed that in the case of microspheres irradiated by light, the absorption wavelength shift occurs, known as the blueshift, with changing shell materials (i.e., by decreasing the refractive index of the shell. In the present investigation, we want to demonstrate it numerically by using the boundary element method. The material used for the simulation is a core-shell (SiO2 and another material of a larger refractive index microsphere and it is irradiated by unpolarized monochromatic light wave. This paper intends to demonstrate that it is possible to predict the bandgap of a core-shell microsphere resulting from two different bandgap materials and that the numerical simulation employed produces the blueshift.

  8. Modeling and experimental verification of an ultra-wide bandgap in 3D phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, L.; Belloni, E.; Ardito, R.; Corigliano, A.; Braghin, F.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive modeling and experimental characterization of a three-dimensional phononic crystal composed of a single material, endowed with an ultra-wide complete bandgap. The phononic band structure shows a gap-mid gap ratio of 132% that is by far the greatest full 3D bandgap in literature for any kind of phononic crystals. A prototype of the finite crystal structure has been manufactured in polyamide by means of additive manufacturing technology and tested to assess the transmission spectrum of the crystal. The transmission spectrum has been numerically calculated taking into account a frequency-dependent elastic modulus and a Rayleigh model for damping. The measured and numerical transmission spectra are in good agreement and present up to 75 dB of attenuation for a three-layer crystal.

  9. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  10. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin

    2011-09-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  11. Experimental evidence of high-frequency complete elastic bandgap in pillar-based phononic slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Adibi, Ali [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Khelif, Abdelkrim [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25044 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2014-12-08

    We present strong experimental evidence for the existence of a complete phononic bandgap, for Lamb waves, in the high frequency regime (i.e., 800 MHz) for a pillar-based phononic crystal (PnC) membrane with a triangular lattice of gold pillars on top. The membrane is composed of an aluminum nitride film stacked on thin molybdenum and silicon layers. Experimental characterization shows a large attenuation of at least 20 dB in the three major crystallographic directions of the PnC lattice in the frequency range of 760 MHz–820 MHz, which is in agreement with our finite element simulations of the PnC bandgap. The results of experiments are analyzed and the physics behind the attenuation in different spectral windows is explained methodically by assessing the type of Bloch modes and the in-plane symmetry of the displacement profile.

  12. Bandgap energy tuning of electrochemically grown ZnO thin films by thickness and electrodeposition potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marotti, R.E.; Guerra, D.N.; Machado, G.; Dalchiele, E.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de la Republica, Julio Herrera y Reissig 565, C.C. 30, Montevideo 11000 (Uruguay); Bello, C. [Unidad Central de Instrumentacion Cientifica UCIC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Igua 4225, C.C. 10773, Montevideo 11400 (Uruguay)

    2004-05-01

    ZnO thin films were electrochemically deposited onto opaque and transparent substrates (copper and ITO). The electrolyte consisted of a 0.1M Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution with the initial pH adjusted to 6.0, different electrodeposition potentials from E=-700 to -1200mV (saturated calomel electrode, SCE). The resulting samples have the structural, chemical and morphological properties of hexagonal ZnO, with thickness varying from less than 1{mu}m to almost 30{mu}m. The bandgap energy varies inversely with film thickness, ranging from less than 3.1 to 3.4eV. The bandgap also depends on the electrodeposition potential. This result allows to adjust the desired absorption edge within a 30nm wide region in the UV.

  13. Three-dimensional single gyroid photonic crystals with a mid-infrared bandgap

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Siying; Chen, Valerian H; Khabiboulline, Emil T; Braun, Paul; Atwater, Harry A

    2016-01-01

    A gyroid structure is a distinct morphology that is triply periodic and consists of minimal isosurfaces containing no straight lines. We have designed and synthesized amorphous silicon (a-Si) mid-infrared gyroid photonic crystals that exhibit a complete bandgap in infrared spectroscopy measurements. Photonic crystals were synthesized by deposition of a-Si/Al2O3 coatings onto a sacrificial polymer scaffold defined by two-photon lithography. We observed a 100% reflectance at 7.5 \\mum for single gyroids with a unit cell size of 4.5 \\mum, in agreement with the photonic bandgap position predicted from full-wave electromagnetic simulations, whereas the observed reflection peak shifted to 8 um for a 5.5 \\mum unit cell size. This approach represents a simulation-fabrication-characterization platform to realize three-dimensional gyroid photonic crystals with well-defined dimensions in real space and tailored properties in momentum space.

  14. Photosensitive, all-glass AgPO3/silicaphotonic bandgap fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konidakis, Ioannis; Zito, Gianluigi; Pissadakis, Stavros

    2012-07-01

    Photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance is observed in a solid core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) consisting of silver metaphosphate (AgPO(3)) glass embedded into a silica cladding, realized by vacuum-assisted infiltration of the molten glass into the hollow channels of a commercial silica PCF. Morphologic analysis of the cladding microstructure by optical and scanning electron microscopy reveals the formation of highly homogeneous glass strands along the PCF length. The characteristic transmission spectrum of the fiber shows PBG guidance in the range between 350 and 1650 nm. The exposure of the cladding glass matrix, using 355 nm, 150 ps laser irradiation, allows photo-induced enhancement of the transmission-to-stop-band extinction ratio by ∼60 dB/cm and bandwidth tuning. Numerical calculations of the transmission pattern of the fabricated AgPO(3)/silica bandgap fiber are in good agreement with experiments.

  15. Simultaneous band-gap narrowing and carrier-lifetime prolongation of organic–inorganic trihalide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingping; Liu, Gang; Gong, Jue; Hu, Qingyang; Schaller, Richard D.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Zhang, Dongzhou; Liu, Zhenxian; Yang, Wenge; Zhu, Kai; Tang, Yuzhao; Wang, Chuanyi; Wei, Su-Huai; Xu, Tao; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2016-07-21

    The organic-inorganic hybrid lead trihalide perovskites have been emerging as the most attractive photovoltaic materials. As regulated by Shockley-Queisser theory, a formidable materials science challenge for improvement to the next level requires further band-gap narrowing for broader absorption in solar spectrum, while retaining or even synergistically prolonging the carrier lifetime, a critical factor responsible for attaining the near-band-gap photovoltage. Herein, by applying controllable hydrostatic pressure, we have achieved unprecedented simultaneous enhancement in both band-gap narrowing and carrier-lifetime prolongation (up to 70% to -100% increase) under mild pressures at -0.3 GPa. The pressure-induced modulation on pure hybrid perovskites without introducing any adverse chemical or thermal effect clearly demonstrates the importance of band edges on the photon-electron interaction and maps a pioneering route toward a further increase in their photovoltaic performance.

  16. Oxygen-Activated Growth and Bandgap Tunability of Large Single-Crystal Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yufeng; Hone, James; Ruoff, Rodney; Colombo, Luigi; the Hone Group Team

    Distinct from zero-bandgap single-layer graphene, Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose bandgap can be tuned by a transverse electric field, making it a unique material for a number of electronic and photonic devices. In this presentation, we will focus on the most recent progress in the identification of new growth mechanisms towards large-area single-layer BLG on Copper: multiple control experiments and first-principles calculations are used to support the proposed mechanisms. We emphasize that trace amount of impurities on metal surface are critical to initiate graphene growth and affect the growth kinetics. Furthermore, contrary to the traditional viewpoint that graphene growth is always surface-limited process, our new observations strongly suggest that metal bulk plays a role to feed carbon species for graphene growth. State-of-the-art structural characterizations and electrical transport measurements of the CVD graphene layers will be presented as well.

  17. Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers for orbital angular momentum applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Ren, G.; Gao, Y.; Zhu, B.; Wang, J.; Yin, B.; Jian, S.

    2017-04-01

    We present a study on the potential and challenges of guiding orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs). Two 19-cell HC-PBGFs with different structural parameters are comparably investigated. The OAM mode properties in a 37-cell HC-PBGF are also discussed to explore the scalability of OAM states. Characteristics of vector modes and OAM modes are comprehensively analyzed with numerical simulations. The results show HC-PBGF with a larger core could effectively support more OAM modes with lower confinement loss and a larger effective area. In addition, HC-PBGF with a deeper and wider photonic bandgap is advantageous for achieving low crosstalk OAM transmission over a broader band-width. 19-cell HC-PBGFs could support OAM modes with purity beyond 0.9, and the value can be further improved by exploiting the 37-cell HC-PBGF.

  18. Nanosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on wide band-gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Mikel; Rebollar, Esther; Ganeev, Rashid A.; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-08-01

    In this work we report on fabrication of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on different semiconductors with bandgap energies in the range of 1.3-3.3 eV and melting temperatures from 1100 to 2700 °C. In particular, InP, GaAs, GaP and SiC were irradiated in air with nanosecond pulses using a linearly polarized laser beam at 266 nm (6 ns pulse width). The nanostructures, inspected by atomic force microscopy, are produced upon multiple pulse irradiation at fluences near the ablation threshold. LIPSS are perpendicular to the laser polarization direction and their period is of the order of the irradiation wavelength. It was observed that the accumulative effect of both fluence and number of pulses needed for LIPSS formation increased with the material bandgap energy. These results, together with estimations of surface temperature increase, are discussed with reference to the semiconductor electrical, optical and thermal properties.

  19. Nanosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on wide band-gap semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Mikel, E-mail: mikel.sanz@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rebollar, Esther [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ganeev, Rashid A. [Voronezh State University, Voronezh 394006 (Russian Federation); Castillejo, Marta [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    In this work we report on fabrication of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on different semiconductors with bandgap energies in the range of 1.3–3.3 eV and melting temperatures from 1100 to 2700 °C. In particular, InP, GaAs, GaP and SiC were irradiated in air with nanosecond pulses using a linearly polarized laser beam at 266 nm (6 ns pulse width). The nanostructures, inspected by atomic force microscopy, are produced upon multiple pulse irradiation at fluences near the ablation threshold. LIPSS are perpendicular to the laser polarization direction and their period is of the order of the irradiation wavelength. It was observed that the accumulative effect of both fluence and number of pulses needed for LIPSS formation increased with the material bandgap energy. These results, together with estimations of surface temperature increase, are discussed with reference to the semiconductor electrical, optical and thermal properties.

  20. Investigation of residual core ellipticity induced nonreciprocity in air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zuchen; Zhang, Zhihao; Jin, Jing; Song, Ningfang

    2014-11-01

    Air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) is an excellent choice for fiber optic gyroscope owing to its incomparable adaptability of environment. Strong and continuous polarization mode coupling is found in PBFs with an average intensity of ~-30 dB, but the coupling arrives at the limit when the maximum optical path difference between the primary waves and the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves reaches ~10mm, which is corresponding to the PBF length of ~110 m according to the birefringence in the PBF. Incident light with the low extinction ratio (ER) can suppress the birth of the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves, but the low-ER light obtained by the conventional Lyot depolarizers does not work here. Consequently, a large nonreciprocity and a bias error of ~13°/h are caused in the air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope (PBFOG) with a PBF coil of ~268 m.

  1. Simultaneous band-gap narrowing and carrier-lifetime prolongation of organic-inorganic trihalide perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingping; Liu, Gang; Gong, Jue; Hu, Qingyang; Schaller, Richard D; Dera, Przemyslaw; Zhang, Dongzhou; Liu, Zhenxian; Yang, Wenge; Zhu, Kai; Tang, Yuzhao; Wang, Chuanyi; Wei, Su-Huai; Xu, Tao; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-08-09

    The organic-inorganic hybrid lead trihalide perovskites have been emerging as the most attractive photovoltaic materials. As regulated by Shockley-Queisser theory, a formidable materials science challenge for improvement to the next level requires further band-gap narrowing for broader absorption in solar spectrum, while retaining or even synergistically prolonging the carrier lifetime, a critical factor responsible for attaining the near-band-gap photovoltage. Herein, by applying controllable hydrostatic pressure, we have achieved unprecedented simultaneous enhancement in both band-gap narrowing and carrier-lifetime prolongation (up to 70% to ∼100% increase) under mild pressures at ∼0.3 GPa. The pressure-induced modulation on pure hybrid perovskites without introducing any adverse chemical or thermal effect clearly demonstrates the importance of band edges on the photon-electron interaction and maps a pioneering route toward a further increase in their photovoltaic performance.

  2. Simultaneous band-gap narrowing and carrier-lifetime prolongation of organic–inorganic trihalide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingping; Liu, Gang; Gong, Jue; Hu, Qingyang; Schaller, Richard D.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Zhang, Dongzhou; Liu, Zhenxian; Yang, Wenge; Zhu, Kai; Tang, Yuzhao; Wang, Chuanyi; Wei, Su-Huai; Xu, Tao; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2016-01-01

    The organic–inorganic hybrid lead trihalide perovskites have been emerging as the most attractive photovoltaic materials. As regulated by Shockley–Queisser theory, a formidable materials science challenge for improvement to the next level requires further band-gap narrowing for broader absorption in solar spectrum, while retaining or even synergistically prolonging the carrier lifetime, a critical factor responsible for attaining the near-band-gap photovoltage. Herein, by applying controllable hydrostatic pressure, we have achieved unprecedented simultaneous enhancement in both band-gap narrowing and carrier-lifetime prolongation (up to 70% to ∼100% increase) under mild pressures at ∼0.3 GPa. The pressure-induced modulation on pure hybrid perovskites without introducing any adverse chemical or thermal effect clearly demonstrates the importance of band edges on the photon–electron interaction and maps a pioneering route toward a further increase in their photovoltaic performance. PMID:27444014

  3. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  4. High-Temperature, Wirebondless, Ultra-Compact Wide Bandgap Power Semiconductor Modules for Space Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon carbide (SiC) and other wide band-gap semiconductors offer great promise of high power rating, high operating temperature, simple thermal management, and...

  5. Correction: Coordination-directed self-assembly of a simple benzothiadiazole-fused tetrathiafulvalene to low-bandgap metallogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, Anneliese M; Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Geng, Yan; Lebedev, Victor; Laukhin, Vladimir; Krämer, Karl; Hauser, Jürg; Amabilino, David B; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-11-25

    Correction for 'Coordination-directed self-assembly of a simple benzothiadiazole-fused tetrathiafulvalene to low-bandgap metallogels' by Anneliese M. Amacher et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 15063-15066.

  6. How to design low bandgap polymers for highly efficient organic solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Xu; Luping Yu

    2014-01-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells are promising in terms of their light weight, mechanically flexibility, ease of processing and low cost. Establishing a predictive understanding between the chemical structures and physical properties of polymers is still challenging, and continuous effort is needed to progress toward full commercialization. In this review, recent progress in polymer/fullerene systems is highlighted and four synthetic principles are summarized to engineer the bandgap and tune the en...

  7. How to design low bandgap polymers for highly efficient organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic photovoltaic cells are promising in terms of their light weight, mechanically flexibility, ease of processing and low cost. Establishing a predictive understanding between the chemical structures and physical properties of polymers is still challenging, and continuous effort is needed to progress toward full commercialization. In this review, recent progress in polymer/fullerene systems is highlighted and four synthetic principles are summarized to engineer the bandgap and tune the energy levels and the solubility of the targeted polymers.

  8. Influence of air pressure on soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, Peter John

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Soliton formation during dispersive compression of chirped few-picosecond pulses at the microjoule level in a hollow-core photonic bandgap (HC-PBG) fiber is studied by numerical simulations. Long-pass filtering of the emerging frequency-shifted solitons is investigated with the objective...... at high powers. This allows a scaling of the output pulse energy toward the microjoule level. © 2009 Optical Society of America...

  9. Band-gaps electromagnéticos con celdas unidad de tres dieléctricos

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Gómez, Álvaro; Herrán Planchuelo, Jaime; Cordobés Gallo, David; Vegas García, Ángel; Saiz Ipiña, Juan Antonio; Solano Vérez, Miguel Ángel; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2004-01-01

    Electromagnetic band-gap structures (EBG) with Kronig-Penney morphology implemented inside rectangular waveguides are theoretically and experimentally examined using a unit cell with three dielectrics. Filtering properties of these structures are analysed, invoking the Floquet theorem for ideal structures (infinite in the propagation direction), and by means of the scattering matrix technique for real structures (i.e., of finite length). Measurements of the transmis...

  10. Quantum information processing in localized modes of light within a photonic band-gap material

    CERN Document Server

    Vats, N; John, S; Vats, Nipun; Rudolph, Terry; John, Sajeev

    1999-01-01

    The single photon occupation of a localized field mode within an engineered network of defects in a photonic band-gap (PBG) material is proposed as a unit of quantum information (qubit). Qubit operations are mediated by optically-excited atoms interacting with these localized states of light as the atoms traverse the connected void network of the PBG structure. We describe conditions under which this system can have independent qubits with controllable interactions and very low decoherence, as required for quantum computation.

  11. Correlation of Bandgap Reduction with Inversion Response in (Si)GeSn/High-k/Metal Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Braucks, C; Narimani, K; Glass, S; von den Driesch, N; Hartmann, J M; Ikonic, Z; Afanas'ev, V V; Zhao, Q T; Mantl, S; Buca, D

    2017-03-15

    The bandgap tunability of (Si)GeSn group IV semiconductors opens a new era in Si-technology. Depending on the Si/Sn contents, direct and indirect bandgaps in the range of 0.4-0.8 eV can be obtained, offering a broad spectrum of both photonic and low power electronic applications. In this work, we systematically studied capacitance-voltage characteristics of high-k/metal gate stacks formed on GeSn and SiGeSn alloys with Sn-contents ranging from 0 to 14 at. % and Si-contents from 0 to 10 at. % particularly focusing on the minority carrier inversion response. A clear correlation between the Sn-induced shrinkage of the bandgap energy and enhanced minority carrier response was confirmed using temperature and frequency dependent capacitance voltage-measurements, in good agreement with k.p theory predictions and photoluminescence measurements of the analyzed epilayers as reported earlier. The enhanced minority generation rate for higher Sn-contents can be firmly linked to the bandgap reduction in the GeSn epilayer without significant influence of substrate/interface effects. It thus offers a unique possibility to analyze intrinsic defects in (Si)GeSn epilayers. The extracted dominant defect level for minority carrier inversion lies approximately 0.4 eV above the valence band edge in the studied Sn-content range (0-12.5 at. %). This finding is of critical importance since it shows that the presence of Sn by itself does not impair the minority carrier lifetime. Therefore, the continuous improvement of (Si)GeSn material quality should yield longer nonradiative recombination times which are required for the fabrication of efficient light detectors and to obtain room temperature lasing action.

  12. Identifying and Eliminating Emissive Sub-bandgap States in Thin Films of PbS Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyu Weon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA; Kim, Donghun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA; Cordero, Jose M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA; Wilson, Mark W. B. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA; Chuang, Chia-Hao M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA; Grossman, Jeffrey C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA; Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA

    2015-07-01

    Chemical oxidation of under-charged Pb atoms reduces the density of trap states by a factor of 40 in films of colloidal PbS quantum dots for devices. These emissive sub-bandgap states are a byproduct of several standard ligand-exchange procedures. X-ray photoelectron spectro­scopy measurements and density function theory simulations demonstrate that they are associated with under-charged Pb.

  13. Impact of structural distortions on the performance of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We present a generic model for studying numerically the performance of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs) with arbitrary cross-sectional distortions. Fully vectorial finite element simulations reveal that distortions beyond the second ring of air holes have an impact on the leakage loss and bandwidth of the fiber, but do not significantly alter its surface scattering loss which remains the dominant contribution to the overall fiber loss (providing that a sufficient number of rings...

  14. Transmission Bandwidth Tunability of a Liquid-Filled Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Bing; LIU Yan-Ge; DU Jiang-Sing; WANG Zhi; HAN Ting-Ting; XU Jian-Bo; LI Yuan; LIU Bo

    2009-01-01

    @@ A temperature tunable photonic bandgap tiber (PBGF) is demonstrated by an index-guiding photonic crystal fiber filled with high-index liquid. The temperature tunable characteristics of the fiber axe experimentally and numerically investigated. Compression of transmission bandwidth of the PBGF is demonstrated by changing the temperature of part of the fiber. The tunable transmission bandwidth with a range of 250 nm is achieved by changing the temperature from 30℃ to 90℃.

  15. SU-8 process optimization for high fiber coupling efficiency of liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fiber components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    SU-8 structures are built up to increase the fiber coupling efficiency of liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber components. The resolution reduction of UV exposure is minimized to 4%, and insertion loss is reduced to 2.7dB.......SU-8 structures are built up to increase the fiber coupling efficiency of liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber components. The resolution reduction of UV exposure is minimized to 4%, and insertion loss is reduced to 2.7dB....

  16. Relation between bandgap and resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütten, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Albert, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Memory based on phase change materials is currently the most promising candidate for bridging the gap in access time between memory and storage in traditional memory hierarchy. However, multilevel storage is still hindered by the so-called resistance drift commonly related to structural relaxation of the amorphous phase. Here, we present the temporal evolution of infrared spectra measured on amorphous thin films of the three phase change materials Ag4In3Sb67Te26, GeTe and the most popular Ge2Sb2Te5. A widening of the bandgap upon annealing accompanied by a decrease of the optical dielectric constant ε∞ is observed for all three materials. Quantitative comparison with experimental data for the apparent activation energy of conduction reveals that the temporal evolution of bandgap and activation energy can be decoupled. The case of Ag4In3Sb67Te26, where the increase of activation energy is significantly smaller than the bandgap widening, demonstrates the possibility to identify new phase change materials with reduced resistance drift.

  17. Relaxation of femtosecond photoexcited electrons in a polar indirect band-gap semiconductor nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navinder Singh

    2005-01-01

    A model calculation is given for the energy relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution of hot electrons (holes) prepared in the conduction (valence) band of a polar indirect band-gap semiconductor, which has been subjected to homogeneous photoexcitation by a femtosecond laser pulse. The model assumes that the pulsed photoexcitation creates two distinct but spatially interpenetrating electron and hole non-equilibrium subsystems that initially relax non-radiatively through the electron (hole)–phonon processes towards the conduction (valence) band minimum (maximum), and finally radiatively through the phonon-assisted electron–hole recombination across the band-gap, which is a relatively slow process. This leads to an accumulation of electrons (holes) at the conduction (valence) band minimum (maximum). The resulting peaking of the carrier density and the entire evolution of the hot electron (hole) distribution has been calculated. The latter may be time resolved by a pump-probe study. The model is particularly applicable to a divided (nanometric) polar indirect band-gap semiconductor with a low carrier concentration and strong electron–phonon coupling, where the usual two-temperature model [1–4] may not be appropriate.

  18. ZnO nanorod arrays for various low-bandgap polymers in inverted organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ping-Yi; Thiyagu, Subramani; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Kao, Chia-Yu; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2014-01-07

    Due to the limited diffusion length of carriers in polymer solar cells (PSCs), the path of carriers is a crucial factor that determines the device performance. Zinc oxide nanorods (NRs) as the electron transport channel can reduce electron-hole recombination and transport the electron to the electrode efficiently for poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), but have been seldom demonstrated for low-bandgap polymers. Here we successfully applied ZnO NRs, which were grown via the hydrothermal method, as a platform to enhance PSC efficiency for various low-bandgap polymers. In order to assure that the nanorod morphology functioned properly for PSCs, the growth time, the concentration, and the resulting morphology were systematically investigated in depths. Such ZnO NRs were applied to different organic systems, resulting in the increase of the PCE for PBDTTT-C/PC71BM from 4.76% to 6.07% and PBDTTT-C-T/PC71BM from 5.40% to 7.34%. Through those experiments, we established a potentially universal and efficient ZnO NRs platform for various low-bandgap polymers to achieve high efficiency of inverted PSCs.

  19. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  20. Band-gap manipulations of monolayer graphene by phenyl radical adsorptions: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Sk, Mahasin Alam; Chen, Peng; Lim, Kok Hwa

    2014-08-25

    Phenyl radical (Ph˙) adsorption on monolayer graphene sheets is used to investigate the band-gap manipulation of graphene through density functional theory. Adsorption of a single Ph˙ on graphene breaks the aromatic π-bond and generates an unpaired electron, which is delocalized to the ortho or para position. Adsorption of a second radical at the ortho or para position saturates the radical by electron pairing and results in semiconducting graphene. Adsorption of a second radical at the ortho position (ortho-ortho pairing) is found to be more favorable than adsorption at the para position (ortho-para pairing), and the ortho-ortho pairing has stronger effects on band-gap opening compared with ortho-para pairing. Adsorption of even numbers of Ph˙ on graphene by ortho-ortho and ortho-para pairings, in general, increases the band gap. Our study shows promise of band-gap manipulation in monolayer graphene by Ph˙ adsorption, leading to potential wider applications of graphene. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Design of optomechanical cavities and waveguides on a simultaneous bandgap phononic-photonic crystal slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Painter, Oskar

    2010-07-05

    In this paper we study and design quasi-2D optomechanical crystals, waveguides, and resonant cavities formed from patterned slabs. Two-dimensional periodicity allows for in-plane pseudo-bandgaps in frequency where resonant optical and mechanical excitations localized to the slab are forbidden. By tailoring the unit cell geometry, we show that it is possible to have a slab crystal with simultaneous optical and mechanical pseudo-bandgaps, and for which optical waveguiding is not compromised. We then use these crystals to design optomechanical cavities in which strongly interacting, co-localized photonic-phononic resonances occur. A resonant cavity structure formed by perturbing a ;;linear defect' waveguide of optical and acoustic waves in a silicon optomechanical crystal slab is shown to support an optical resonance at wavelength lambda(0) approximately 1.5 mum and a mechanical resonance of frequency omega(m)/2pi approximately 9.5 GHz. These resonances, due to the simultaneous pseudo-bandgap of the waveguide structure, are simulated to have optical and mechanical radiation-limited Q-factors greater than 10(7). The optomechanical coupling of the optical and acousticresonances in this cavity due to radiation pressure is also studied, with a quantum conversion rate, corresponding to the scattering rate of a single cavity photon via a single cavity phonon, calculated to be g/2pi = 292 kHz.

  2. Hollow core photonic bandgap fiber with microfluid-infiltrated air holes for slow-light propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liyong; Liang, Jian; Yun, Maojin

    2012-10-01

    Slow light plays an important role in the fields of all-optical signal processing and integration photonics. It has shown many potential applications, such as realizing optical delay lines or buffers, enhancing linear and nonlinear light-matter interactions, as well as increasing the sensitivity of the interferometers and transducers. In this paper, hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers made from high index glasses are designed by infiltrating microfluid into the air-holes to tailor the fiber dispersion for slow-light propagation under low pulse distortion. In such a fiber made from Si material, group index ng~8 is obtained with a bandwidth up to 30 nm, where the group index fluctuation is restricted in ±10 % of the ng, while ng~6 is obtained with a bandwidth over 100 nm when the chalcogenide material is selected instead. Such a ±10 % criterion determines a regarded flatland region accordingly, and in this region the group velocity dispersion can be negligible. It is found that for the same fiber length the slow-light time delay in the photonic bandgap fiber is much larger as compared with that in the single mode fiber. This kind of photonic bandgap fiber may have many potential applications in short-distance fiber communications and delay lines.

  3. A high precision high PSRR bandgap reference with thermal hysteresis protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yintang; Li Yani; Zhu Zhangming, E-mail: yanili@mail.xidian.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2010-09-15

    To meet the accuracy requirement for the bandgap voltage reference by the increasing data conversion precision of integrated circuits, a high-order curvature-compensated bandgap voltage reference is presented employing the characteristic of bipolar transistor current gain exponentially changing with temperature variations. In addition, an over-temperature protection circuit with a thermal hysteresis function to prevent thermal oscillation is proposed. Based on the CSMC 0.5 {mu}m 20 V BCD process, the designed circuit is implemented; the active die area is 0.17 x 0.20 mm{sup 2}. Simulation and testing results show that the temperature coefficient is 13.7ppm/K with temperature ranging from -40 to 150 {sup 0}C, the power supply rejection ratio is -98.2 dB, the line regulation is 0.3 mV/V, and the power consumption is only 0.38 mW. The proposed bandgap voltage reference has good characteristics such as small area, low power consumption, good temperature stability, high power supply rejection ratio, as well as low line regulation. This circuit can effectively prevent thermal oscillation and is suitable for on-chip voltage reference in high precision analog, digital and mixed systems. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  4. Structure-property relationships of small bandgap conjugated polymers for solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Stefan; Zhang, Fengling; Inganäs, Olle; Andersson, Mats R

    2009-12-01

    Conjugated polymers as electron donors in solar cells based on donor/acceptor combinations are of great interest, partly due to the possibility of converting solar light with a low materials budget. Six small bandgap polymers with optical bandgap ranging from 1.0-1.9 eV are presented in this paper. All polymers utilize an electron donor-acceptor-donor (DAD) segment in the polymer backbone, creating a partial charge-transfer, to decrease the bandgap. The design, synthesis and the optical characteristics as well as the solar cell characteristics of the polymers are discussed. The positions of the energy levels of the conjugated polymer relative to the electron acceptor are of significant importance and determine not only the driving force for exciton dissociation but also the maximum open-circuit voltage. This work also focuses on investigating the redox behavior of the described conjugated polymers and electron acceptors using square wave voltammetry. Comparing the electrochemical data gives important information of the structure-property relationships of the polymers.

  5. Optical bandgap modeling of thermal annealed ZnO:Ga thin films using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Eun; Moon, Pyung; Yun, Ilgu [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Kim, Sungyeon; Myoung, Jae-Min [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Jang, Hyeon Woo; Bang, Jungsik [LG Chem, Ltd., Research Park, 104-1 Moonji-Dong, Yuseng-Gu, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea)

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, the thermal annealing process modeling for the optical bandgap of ZnO:Ga thin films for transparent conductive oxide was presented using neural network (NNets) based on error backpropagation (BPNN) algorithm and multilayer perceptron (MLP). The thermal annealing process of ZnO:Ga thin films were analyzed by general factorial experimental design. The annealing temperature and film thickness were considered as input factors. To model the nonlinear annealing process, 6 experiments were trained by BPNN which has 2-4-1 structures and 2 additional samples were experimented to verify the predicted models. The output response model on optical bandgap and carrier concentration of ZnO:Ga thin films trained by BPNN was represented by surface plot of response surface model. Based on the modeling results, NNets can provide sufficient correspondence between the predicted output values and the measured. The optical bandgap variation of ZnO:Ga thin films by annealing is due to increased carrier concentration and explained by Burstein-Moss effect. The thermal annealing process is nonlinear and complex but the output response can be predicted by the NNets model. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Giant bandgap renormalization and excitonic effects in a monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugeda, Miguel M; Bradley, Aaron J; Shi, Su-Fei; da Jornada, Felipe H; Zhang, Yi; Qiu, Diana Y; Ruan, Wei; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Wang, Feng; Louie, Steven G; Crommie, Michael F

    2014-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are emerging as a new platform for exploring 2D semiconductor physics. Reduced screening in two dimensions results in markedly enhanced electron-electron interactions, which have been predicted to generate giant bandgap renormalization and excitonic effects. Here we present a rigorous experimental observation of extraordinarily large exciton binding energy in a 2D semiconducting TMD. We determine the single-particle electronic bandgap of single-layer MoSe2 by means of scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS), as well as the two-particle exciton transition energy using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. These yield an exciton binding energy of 0.55 eV for monolayer MoSe2 on graphene—orders of magnitude larger than what is seen in conventional 3D semiconductors and significantly higher than what we see for MoSe2 monolayers in more highly screening environments. This finding is corroborated by our ab initio GW and Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations which include electron correlation effects. The renormalized bandgap and large exciton binding observed here will have a profound impact on electronic and optoelectronic device technologies based on single-layer semiconducting TMDs.

  7. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnohr, C. S., E-mail: c.schnohr@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As, GaAs{sub x}P{sub 1−x}, or CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  8. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A high precision high PSRR bandgap reference with thermal hysteresis protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yintang, Yang; Yani, Li; Zhangming, Zhu

    2010-09-01

    To meet the accuracy requirement for the bandgap voltage reference by the increasing data conversion precision of integrated circuits, a high-order curvature-compensated bandgap voltage reference is presented employing the characteristic of bipolar transistor current gain exponentially changing with temperature variations. In addition, an over-temperature protection circuit with a thermal hysteresis function to prevent thermal oscillation is proposed. Based on the CSMC 0.5 μm 20 V BCD process, the designed circuit is implemented; the active die area is 0.17 × 0.20 mm2. Simulation and testing results show that the temperature coefficient is 13.7ppm/K with temperature ranging from -40 to 150 °C, the power supply rejection ratio is -98.2 dB, the line regulation is 0.3 mV/V, and the power consumption is only 0.38 mW. The proposed bandgap voltage reference has good characteristics such as small area, low power consumption, good temperature stability, high power supply rejection ratio, as well as low line regulation. This circuit can effectively prevent thermal oscillation and is suitable for on-chip voltage reference in high precision analog, digital and mixed systems.

  9. On the mechanism of bandgap formation in locally resonant finite elastic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Christopher; Leadenham, Stephen; Ruzzene, Massimo; Erturk, Alper

    2016-10-01

    Elastic/acoustic metamaterials made from locally resonant arrays can exhibit bandgaps at wavelengths much longer than the lattice size for various applications spanning from low-frequency vibration/sound attenuation to wave guiding and filtering in mechanical and electromechanical devices. For an effective use of such locally resonant metamaterial concepts in finite structures, it is required to bridge the gap between the lattice dispersion characteristics and modal behavior of the host structure with its resonators. To this end, we develop a novel argument for bandgap formation in finite-length elastic metamaterial beams, relying on the modal analysis and the assumption of infinitely many resonators. We show that the dual problem to wave propagation through an infinite periodic beam is the modal analysis of a finite beam with an infinite number of resonators. A simple formula that depends only on the resonator natural frequency and total mass ratio is derived for placing the bandgap in a desired frequency range, yielding an analytical insight and a rule of thumb for design purposes. A method for understanding the importance of a resonator location and mass is discussed in the context of a Riemann sum approximation of an integral, and a method for determining the optimal number of resonators for a given set of boundary conditions and target frequency is introduced. The simulations of the theoretical framework are validated by experiments for bending vibrations of a locally resonant cantilever beam.

  10. Direct-indirect character of the bandgap in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Eline M.; Gélvez-Rueda, María C.; Osherov, Anna; Bulović, Vladimir; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Savenije, Tom J.

    2017-01-01

    Metal halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) are generating great excitement due to their outstanding optoelectronic properties, which lend them to application in high-efficiency solar cells and light-emission devices. However, there is currently debate over what drives the second-order electron-hole recombination in these materials. Here, we propose that the bandgap in CH3NH3PbI3 has a direct-indirect character. Time-resolved photo-conductance measurements show that generation of free mobile charges is maximized for excitation energies just above the indirect bandgap. Furthermore, we find that second-order electron-hole recombination of photo-excited charges is retarded at lower temperature. These observations are consistent with a slow phonon-assisted recombination pathway via the indirect bandgap. Interestingly, in the low-temperature orthorhombic phase, fast quenching of mobile charges occurs independent of the temperature and photon excitation energy. Our work provides a new framework to understand the optoelectronic properties of metal halide perovskites and analyse spectroscopic data.

  11. Nanochemistry at the atomic scale revealed in hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derycke, Vincent; Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Amy, Fabrice; Chabal, Yves J.; D'Angelo, Marie D.; Enriquez, Hanna B.; Silly, Mathieu G.

    2003-04-01

    Passivation of semiconductor surfaces against chemical attack can be achieved by terminating the surface-dangling bonds with a monovalent atom such as hydrogen. Such passivation invariably leads to the removal of all surface states in the bandgap, and thus to the termination of non-metallic surfaces. Here we report the first observation of semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen. This result, established by using photo-electron and photo-absorption spectroscopies and scanning tunnelling techniques, is achieved on a Si-terminated cubic silicon carbide (SiC) surface. It results from competition between hydrogen termination of surface-dangling bonds and hydrogen-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for hydrogen-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides a means to develop electrical contacts on high-bandgap chemically passive materials, particularly for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, for example of nanomechanical devices.

  12. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franta, Benjamin, E-mail: bafranta@gmail.com; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  13. Clean Hydrogen Production. Carbon Dioxide Free Alternatives. Project Phisico2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fierro, J. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Serrano, D.; Penelas, G.; Romero, M.; Marcos, M. J.; Rodriguez, C.

    2006-07-01

    The main goal of the PHISICO2 project, funded and promoted by Comunidad de Madrid, is the evaluation and optimisation of three different processes for the clean hydrogen production without carbon dioxide emission. Solar energy and associated Technologies are proposed to be jointly employed with the aim of improving the process efficiency and reducing the production costs. As a transition to the non-fossil fuel hydrogen economy, the thermocatalytic CO2-free production of hydrogen from natural gas will be considered. One of the most promising alternatives of this process is to develop a cheap and stable carbon-based catalyst able to efficiently decompose methane into a CO2-free hydrogen stream and solid carbon. Thus, not only pure hydrogen can be obtained through but also carbon with specific properties and commercial value can be produced. Another option to be explored is the splitting of water by means of solar light by means of two different approaches: (i) photodissociation promoted by semiconductor catalysts and (ii) thermochemical cycles in which a specific mixed oxide is first thermally reduced by sunlight and then reoxidized by steam in a second step with the parallel production of hydrogen. Indeed, option (i) implies necessarily the development of semiconductors with appropriate band-gap able to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen in an efficient manner. Another critical issue will be the development of a strategy/concept that allows efficient separation of hydrogen and oxygen within the cell. In option (ii), the development of stable ferrites which act as the redox element of the cycle is also an important challenge. Finally, a 5 kW prototype solar engine water splitting, based on the mentioned thermochemical cycle, will developed and tested using concentrated solar light as an energy source. Moreover, thermodynamic and kinetic studies, reactor design, process optimisation, economical studies and comparison with conventional hydrogen production systems

  14. Electronic transitions in the bandgap of copper indium gallium diselenide polycrystalline thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Jennifer Theresa

    The electronic properties of polycrystalline copper indium gallium diselenide thin films have been investigated, with emphasis on understanding the distribution and origin of electronic states in the bandgap. The samples studied were working photovoltaic devices with the structure ZnO/CdS/CuIn1-xGa xSe2/Mo, and photovoltaic efficiencies ranging from 8 to 16%. The CdS layer and the p-type CuIn1-xGa xSe2 film create the n+- p junction at the heart of these devices. The samples were investigated using four techniques based on the electrical response of the junction: admittance spectroscopy, drive level capacitance profiling, transient photocapacitance spectroscopy, and transient photocurrent spectroscopy. From these measurements the free carrier densities, defect densities within the bandgap, spatial uniformity, and minority carrier mobilities have been deduced. The sub-bandgap response from the CuIn1-xGaxSe2 film was dominated by two defects. One exhibited a thermal transition to the valence band with an activation energy ranging between 0.1 and 0.3 eV and thermal emission prefactors obeying the Meyer-Neldel rule. The second was detected as an optical transition 0.8 eV from the valence band edge. Neither of these defects exhibited densities that varied systematically with gallium content, implying that they are not directly connected with the group III elements in these alloys. The defect densities also do not clearly correlate with the photovoltaic device performance; however, the position of the 0.8 eV defect lies nearer to mid-gap in the higher gallium, and hence higher band gap, material. This implies that it may be a more important recombination center in these devices and may be partially responsible for the reduced photovoltaic efficiencies observed when Ga/(In + Ga) > 0.4. An additional defect response was observed near mid-gap in films grown by processes known to produce lower quality devices. The influence of defects located at grain boundaries was also

  15. Critical behavior in the hydrogen insulator-metal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The vibrational Raman spectrum of solid hydrogen has been measured from 77 to 295 K in the vicinity of the recently observed insulator-metal transition and low-temperature phase transition at 150 gigapascals. The measurements provide evidence for a critical point in the pressure-temperature phase boundary of the low-temperature transition. The result suggests that below the critical temperature the insulator-metal transition changes from continuous to discontinuous, consistent with the general criteria originally proposed by Mott (1949) for metallization by band-gap closure. The effect of temperature on hydrogen metallization closely resembles that of the lower-pressure insulator-metal transitions in doped V2O3 alloys.

  16. Black TiO2 for solar hydrogen conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been widely investigated for photocatalytic H2 evolution and photoelectrochemical (PEC water splitting since 1972. However, its wide bandgap (3.0–3.2 eV limits the optical absorption of TiO2 for sufficient utilization of solar energy. Blackening TiO2 has been proposed as an effective strategy to enhance its solar absorption and thus the photocatalytic and PEC activities, and aroused widespread research interest. In this article, we reviewed the recent progress of black TiO2 for photocatalytic H2 evolution and PEC water splitting, along with detailed introduction to its unique structural features, optical property, charge carrier transfer property and related theoretical calculations. As summarized in this review article, black TiO2 could be a promising candidate for photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen generation via water splitting, and continuous efforts are deserved for improving its solar hydrogen efficiency.

  17. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of hydrogen in metals processing and treatment identified, and mechanisms for hydrogen entry into a ferritic surface are discussed. The differences between hydrogen attack of ferritic steels and copper alloys are contrasted, and an unusual case study...

  18. Hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choong-Nyeon

    2000-12-01

    This study introduces the hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials and its applicability for practical use. This treatment is somewhat different from normal heat treatment because of the interaction between metal atoms and hydrogen. Since hydrogen can be removed very fast by pumping it out the hydrogen-induced new lattice phase which can not be obtained without hydrogen can be preserved in a meta-stable state. A thermodynamic interpretation of the hydrogen heat treatment established previously was reformulated for graphical and analytical methods and applied to Pd-Pt-H and Pd-Ag-H alloy systems and a fair correlation between the calculation and experimental results was shown. The feasibility of applying the thermodynamic interpretation to intermetallic compounds-hydrogen systems was also discussed.

  19. Tribology in Gaseous Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawae, Yoshinori; Sugimura, Joich

    Hydrogen is expected as a clean and renewable energy carrier for future environment-friendly society. Many machine elements in hydrogen energy systems should be operating within hydrogen gas and tribological behavior, such as friction and wear, of bearings and seals are affected by the hydrogen environment through some interactions between material surfaces and gaseous hydrogen, i.e., physisorption of hydrogen molecules and following chemisorptions of dissociated atoms on metal surfaces, formation of metal hydride and reduction of metal oxide layer by hydrogen atoms diffused into bulk. Therefore, friction and wear characteristics of tribomaterials in the hydrogen environment should be appropriately understood to establish a design guideline for reliable hydrogen utilizing systems. This paper reviews the current knowledge about the effect of hydrogen on friction and wear of materials, and then describes our recent progress of hydrogen research in the tribology field.

  20. Pressure dependence of the band-gap energy in BiTeI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler-Kılıç, Sümeyra; Kılıç, ćetin

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of the electronic structure of BiTeI, a layered semiconductor with a van der Waals gap, under compression is studied by employing semilocal and dispersion-corrected density-functional calculations. Comparative analysis of the results of these calculations shows that the band-gap energy of BiTeI decreases till it attains a minimum value of zero at a critical pressure, after which it increases again. The critical pressure corresponding to the closure of the band gap is calculated, at which BiTeI becomes a topological insulator. Comparison of the critical pressure to the pressure at which BiTeI undergoes a structural phase transition indicates that the closure of the band gap would not be hindered by a structural transformation. Moreover, the band-gap pressure coefficients of BiTeI are computed, and an expression of the critical pressure is devised in terms of these coefficients. Our findings indicate that the semilocal and dispersion-corrected approaches are in conflict about the compressibility of BiTeI, which result in overestimation and underestimation, respectively. Nevertheless, the effect of pressure on the atomic structure of BiTeI is found to be manifested primarily as the reduction of the width of the van der Waals gap according to both approaches, which also yield consistent predictions concerning the interlayer metallic bonding in BiTeI under compression. It is consequently shown that the calculated band-gap energies follow qualitatively and quantitatively the same trend within the two approximations employed here, and the transition to the zero-gap state occurs at the same critical width of the van der Waals gap.

  1. Point defect reduction in wide bandgap semiconductors by defect quasi Fermi level control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P.; Hoffmann, M. P.; Kaess, F.; Bryan, Z.; Bryan, I.; Bobea, M.; Klump, A.; Tweedie, J.; Kirste, R.; Mita, S.; Gerhold, M.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical framework for a general approach to reduce point defect density in materials via control of defect quasi Fermi level (dQFL) is presented. The control of dQFL is achieved via excess minority carrier generation. General guidelines for controlling dQFL that lead to a significant reduction in compensating point defects in any doped material is proposed. The framework introduces and incorporates the effects of various factors that control the efficacy of the defect reduction process such as defect level, defect formation energy, bandgap, and excess minority carrier density. Modified formation energy diagrams are proposed, which illustrate the effect of the quasi Fermi level control on the defect formation energies. These formation energy diagrams provide powerful tools to determine the feasibility and requirements to produce the desired reduction in specified point defects. An experimental study of the effect of excess minority carriers on point defect incorporation in GaN and AlGaN shows an excellent quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions. Illumination at energies larger than the bandgap is employed as a means to generate excess minority carriers. The case studies with CN in Si doped GaN, H and VN in Mg doped GaN and VM-2ON in Si doped Al0.65Ga0.35N revealed a significant reduction in impurities in agreement with the proposed theory. Since compensating point defects control the material performance (this is particularly challenging in wide and ultra wide bandgap materials), dQFL control is a highly promising technique with wide scope and may be utilized to improve the properties of various materials systems and performance of devices based upon them.

  2. Microstructured and Photonic Bandgap Fibers for Applications in the Resonant Bio- and Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Skorobogatiy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review application of microstructured and photonic bandgap fibers for designing resonant optical sensors of changes in the value of analyte refractive index. This research subject has recently invoked much attention due to development of novel fiber types, as well as due to development of techniques for the activation of fiber microstructure with functional materials. Particularly, we consider two sensors types. The first sensor type employs hollow core photonic bandgap fibers where core guided mode is confined in the analyte filled core through resonant effect in the surrounding periodic reflector. The second sensor type employs metalized microstructured or photonic bandgap waveguides and fibers, where core guided mode is phase matched with a plasmon propagating at the fiber/analyte interface. In resonant sensors one typically employs fibers with strongly nonuniform spectral transmission characteristics that are sensitive to changes in the real part of the analyte refractive index. Moreover, if narrow absorption lines are present in the analyte transmission spectrum, due to Kramers-Kronig relation this will also result in strong variation in the real part of the refractive index in the vicinity of an absorption line. Therefore, resonant sensors allow detection of minute changes both in the real part of the analyte refractive index (10−6–10−4 RIU, as well as in the imaginary part of the analyte refractive index in the vicinity of absorption lines. In the following we detail various resonant sensor implementations, modes of operation, as well as analysis of sensitivities for some of the common transduction mechanisms for bio- and chemical sensing applications. Sensor designs considered in this review span spectral operation regions from the visible to terahertz.

  3. Wide bandgap mesoporous hematite nanowire bundles as a sensitive and rapid response ethanol sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danping; Zhang, Beibei; Xu, Jingcai; Han, Yanbing; Jin, Hongxiao; Jin, Dingfeng; Peng, Xiaoling; Ge, Hongliang; Wang, Xinqing

    2016-05-01

    In this study, α-Fe2O3 nanowires were synthesized using mesoporous SBA-15 silica as the hard templates with the nanocasting method, and then mesoporous α-Fe2O3 nanowire bundles (NWBs) were separated from the well-dispersed α-Fe2O3 nanowires (NWs) by the centrifugation technique. Both samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm and UV-vis spectra. All results indicated that the α-Fe2O3 NWBs with mesoporous structure presented a higher BET surface area (95 m2 g-1) and wider bandgap (2.08 eV) than those of α-Fe2O3 NWs (32 m2 g-1 and 1.91 eV). The bandgap of α-Fe2O3 NWBs was in accordance with the bulk α-Fe2O3, while the BET surface area was much higher. The results from the gas-sensing measurement revealed that the α-Fe2O3 NWBs based gas sensor exhibited a high sensitivity of 21.7, fast response-recovery of 7.5 s and 1 s, and good selectivity to ethanol at 340 °C. The sensitivity (21.7) for ethanol of α-Fe2O3 NWBs was much better than that of the α-Fe2O3 NWs (12.2), which should be attributed to the higher BET surface area and wider bandgap of α-Fe2O3 NWBs.

  4. Hydrogen sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, T L

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in 'sour' gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands, pelt processing, certain types of pulp and paper production, and any situation in which organic material decays or inorganic sulphides exist under reducing conditions. H2S dissociates into free sulphide in the circulation. Sulphide binds to many macromolecules, among them cytochrome oxidase. Although this is undoubtedly an important mechanism of toxicity due to H2S, there may be others H2S provides little opportunity for escape at high concentrations because of the olfactory paralysis it causes, the steep exposure-response relationships, and the characteristically sudden loss of consciousness it can cause which is colloquially termed 'knockdown.' Other effects may include mucosal irritation, which is associated at lower concentrations with a keratoconjunctivitis called 'gas eye' and at higher concentrations with risk of pulmonary oedema. Chronic central nervous system sequelae may possibly follow repeated knockdowns: this is controversial and the primary effects of H2S may be confounded by anoxia or head trauma. Treatment is currently empirical, with a combination of nitrite and hyperbaric oxygen preferred. The treatment regimen is not ideal and carries some risk.

  5. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different dielectric materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E D V Nagesh; G Santosh Babu; V Subramanian; V Sivasubramanian; V R K Murthy

    2005-12-01

    We report the use of low dielectric constant materials to form two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures for achieving high gap-to-midgap ratio. The variable parameters chosen are the lattice spacing and the geometric structure. The selected geometries are square and triangular and the materials chosen are PTFE ( = 2.1), PVC ( = 2.38) and glass ( = 5.5). Using the plane-wave expansion method, proper lattice spacing is selected for each structure and material. The observed experimental results are analyzed with the help of the theoretical prediction.

  6. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  7. Quaternary alloy semiconductor nanobelts with bandgap spanning the entire visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Anlian; Liu, Ruibin; Sun, Minghua; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2009-07-15

    We used an improved cothermal evaporation route for the first time to achieve quaternary semiconductor nanostructured alloys, using an example of Zn(x)Cd(1-x)S(y)Se(1-y) nanobelts. The PL (bandgap) of these as-grown nanostructured alloys can be continuously tunable across the entire visible spectrum through experimentally controlling their compositions. Such widely controlled alloy nanostructures via composition/light emission provide a new material platform for applications in wavelength-tunable lasers, multicolor detectors, full-spectrum solar cells, LEDs, and color displays.

  8. Numerical simulation and analysis of losses in air-core plastic photonic bandgap fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tieshan Guan; Mingyang Chen; Zhilong Zhang; Rongjin Yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ The loss properties of air-core plastic photonic bandgap fibers are analyzed by multipole method. Despite the relatively large absorption loss of plastics (PMMA), the contribution of material absorption loss can be reduced significantly through appropriate selection of operating wavelength, number of cladding air-hole rings, radius of air-core, and position of photonic band gap. The transmission loss in this type of fiber can be decreased by an order of magnitude in comparison with that of conventional plastic optical fiber.

  9. Continuous generation of Rubidium vapor in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Donvalkar, Prathamesh S; Clemmen, Stephane; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate high optical depths (50+/-5), lasting for hours in Rubidium-filled hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers, which represents a 1000X improvement over operation times previously reported. We investigate the vapor generation mechanism using both a continuous-wave and a pulsed light source and find that the mechanism for generating the Rubidium atoms is primarily due to thermal vaporization. Continuous generation of large vapor densities should enable measurements at the single-photon level by averaging over longer time scales.

  10. Pressure dependence of the band-gap energy in BiTeI

    OpenAIRE

    Güler-Kılıç, Sümeyra; Kılıç, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the electronic structure of BiTeI, a layered semiconductor with a van der Waals gap, under compression is studied by employing semilocal and dispersion-corrected density-functional calculations. Comparative analysis of the results of these calculations shows that the band-gap energy of BiTeI decreases till it attains a minimum value of zero at a critical pressure, after which it increases again. The critical pressure corresponding to the closure of the band gap is calculated,...

  11. A low-bandgap semiconducting polymer for photovoltaic devices and infrared emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Brabec, C.J.; Winder, C.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J. C.; Dhanabalan, A; van Hal, P. A.; Janssen, R. A. J.

    2002-01-01

    A novel low-bandgap conjugated polymer (PTPTB, E-g = similar to1.6 eV), consisting of alternating electron-rich N-dodecyl-2,5-bis(2'-thienyl)pyrrole (TPT) and electron-deficient 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (B) units, is introduced for thin-film optoelectronic devices working in the near infrared (NIR). Bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells from solid-state composite films of PTPTB with the soluble fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl C-61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as an active layer shows pro...

  12. First Evidence of Near-Infrared Photonic Bandgap in Polymeric Rod-Connected Diamond Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Lifeng; Zheng, Xu; Lin, Jia-De; Oulton, Ruth; Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Ho, Ying-Lung D; Rarity, John G

    2015-01-01

    We present the simulation, fabrication, and optical characterization of low-index polymeric rod-connected diamond (RCD) structures. Such complex three-dimensional photonic crystal structures are created via direct laser writing by two-photon polymerization. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement at near-infrared wavelengths, showing partial photonic bandgaps. We characterize structures in transmission and reflection using angular resolved Fourier image spectroscopy to visualize the band structure. Comparison of the numerical simulations of such structures with the experimentally measured data show good agreement for both P- and S-polarizations.

  13. Frequency translation via four-wave mixing Bragg scattering in Rb filled photonic bandgap fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donvalkar, Prathamesh S; Venkataraman, Vivek; Clemmen, Stéphane; Saha, Kasturi; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate frequency translation at microwatt pump power levels in Rubidium vapor confined to a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber using four-wave mixing Bragg scattering. The 5S(1/2)→5D(3/2) two-photon transition in 85Rb is employed for the four-wave mixing process. Using continuous-wave pump beams at 780 and 795 nm, a weak signal beam at 776 nm is translated to a wavelength of 762 nm with a 21% conversion efficiency at pump powers of 300 μW.

  14. Near-bandgap optical properties of pseudomorphic GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Wang, Wei; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the compositional dependence of the near-bandgap dielectric function and the E0 critical point in pseudomorphic Ge1-xSnx alloys grown on Ge (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The complex dielectric functions were obtained using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.5 to 4.5 eV at room temperature. Analogous to the E1 and E1+Δ1 transitions, a model consisting of the compositional dependence of relaxed alloys along with the strain contribution predicted by the deformation potential theory fully accounts for the observed compositional dependence in pseudomorphic alloys.

  15. Photolithography of thick photoresist coating for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Khomtchenko, Elena; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    Thick photoresist coating for electrode patterning in an anisotropically etched V-groove is investigated for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices. The photoresist step coverage at the convex corners is compared with and without soft baking after photoresist spin...... coating. Two-step UV exposure is applied to achieve a complete exposure for the thick photoresist layer at the bottom of the V-groove, and minimise the reduction in resolution and image distortion. The resolution reduction of the different open window width for electrode pattern transfer is also...

  16. Image-potential band-gap narrowing at a metal/semiconductor interface

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    GW approximation is used to systematically revisit the image-potential band-gap narrowing at metal/semiconductor interfaces proposed by Inkson in the 1970's. Here we have questioned how the narrowing as calculated from quasi-particle energy spectra for the jellium/Si interface depends on $r_s$ of the jellium. The gap narrowing is found to only weakly depend on $r_s$ (i.e., narrowing $\\simeq 0.3$ eV even for a large $r_s = 6)$. Hence we can turn to smaller polarizability in the semiconductor s...

  17. Band-gap narrowing in the space-charge region of heavily doped silicon diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowney, Jeremiah R.

    1985-02-01

    The densities of states of the valence and conduction bands have been calculated in the space-charge region of a heavily doped linearly graded p- n junction silicon diode. Both the donor and acceptor densities were chosen to be equal to 6.2 × 10 18 cm -3. The results showed the emergence of band tails which penetrated deeply into the energy gap and accounted for the band-gap narrowing observed in such a diode by analysis of capacitance vs voltage measurements of the built-in voltage.

  18. Novel start-up circuit with enhanced power-up characteristic for bandgap references

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, Cao; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre

    This paper presents a new start-up circuit for low-power bandgap reference (BGR) voltage generators. The BGR is designed for providing a stable 0.3 V power supply for application in low power wireless sensor nodes. The BGR has an enhanced power-up characteristic and demonstrates a reduction...... of the total stand-by current. Simulated results confirm that the proposed start-up circuit does not affect the performance of the BGR even though the supply voltage (VDD) is higher and has more stable power-up characteristic than the conventional start-up circuits. The new start-up circuit is designed with 65...

  19. Structural, optical, and electronic studies of wide-bandgap lead halide perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    Comin, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. We investigate the family of mixed Br/Cl organolead halide perovskites which enable light emission in the blue-violet region of the visible spectrum. We report the structural, optical and electronic properties of this air-stable family of perovskites, demonstrating full bandgap tunability in the 400-550 nm range and enhanced exciton strength upon Cl substitution. We complement this study by tracking the evolution of the band levels across the gap, thereby providing a foundational framework for future optoelectronic applications of these materials.

  20. Novel start-up circuit with enhanced power-up characteristic for bandgap references

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, Cao; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre;

    This paper presents a new start-up circuit for low-power bandgap reference (BGR) voltage generators. The BGR is designed for providing a stable 0.3 V power supply for application in low power wireless sensor nodes. The BGR has an enhanced power-up characteristic and demonstrates a reduction...... of the total stand-by current. Simulated results confirm that the proposed start-up circuit does not affect the performance of the BGR even though the supply voltage (VDD) is higher and has more stable power-up characteristic than the conventional start-up circuits. The new start-up circuit is designed with 65...

  1. DESIGN OF A CMOS BANDGAP REFERENCE WITH LOWTEMPERATURE COEFFICIENT AND HIGH POWER SUPPLY REJECTION PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Abhisek Dey; Tarun Kanti Bhattacharyya

    2011-01-01

    A high precision temperature compensated CMOS bandgap reference is presented. The proposed circuit employs current-mode architecture that improves the temperature stability of the output reference voltage as well as the power supply rejection when compared to the conventional voltage-mode band gap reference.Using only first order compensation the new architecture can generate an output reference voltage of 550 mV with a peak-to-peak variation of 400μV over a wide temperature range from -25oC ...

  2. Incorporation of Furan into Low Band-Gap Polymers for Efficient Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Woo, Claire H.

    2010-11-10

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of the first examples of furan-containing low band-gap polymers, PDPP2FT and PDPP3F, with substantial power conversion efficiencies in organic solar cells are reported. Inserting furan moieties in the backbone of the conjugated polymers enables the use of relatively small solubilizing side chains because of the significant contribution of the furan rings to overall polymer solubility in common organic solvents. Bulk heterojunction solar cells fabricated from furan-containing polymers and PC71BM as the acceptor showed power conversion efficiencies reaching 5.0%. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. High temperature performance of Wide Bandgap Semiconductors Devices for High Power Applications

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Wide bandgap III-Nitride semiconductor materials possess superior properties as compared to silicon and other IIIV compound materials. GaN has recently attracted a lot of interest for applications in high power electronics capable of operation at elevated temperatures. Modeling of the drift region properties of GaN Schottky rectifiers and power MOSFET to achieve breakdown voltages ranging from 200 to 5kV is presented. 1kV and 3kV Schottky rectifiers are simulated and the characteristics of th...

  4. Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

    2008-03-18

    The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

  5. Lattice reconfiguration and phononic band-gap adaptation via origami folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, M.; Li, S.; Wang, K. W.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a framework of utilizing origami folding to redistribute the inclusions of a phononic structure to achieve significant phononic band-gap adaptation. Cylindrical inclusions are attached to the vertices of a Miura-Ori sheet, whose 1 degree-of-freedom rigid folding can enable fundamental reconfigurations in the underlying periodic architecture via switching between different Bravais lattice types. Such a reconfiguration can drastically change the wave propagation behavior in terms of band gap and provide a scalable and practical means for broadband wave tailoring.

  6. Metallic Photonic Bandgap Resonant Antennas with High Directivity and High Radiation Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林青春; 符建; 何赛灵; 章坚武

    2002-01-01

    A metallic photonic bandgap (MPBG) resonant antenna is introduced, which has novel characteristics (such as high directivity and high radiation resistance for a certain range of frequencies) as compared to conventional MPBG antennas. The linear MPBG resonant antenna is formed by infinitely long metallic rods in vacuum. The numerical results for the radiation pattern and the radiation resistance are presented. By adjusting the struct ure of the MPBG resonant antenna and its working frequency, an optimal structure is achieved. The physical reasons for the novel characteristics of the MPBG resonant antenna are also explained.

  7. Above bandgap luminescence of p-type GaAs epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapriel, J.; Chavignon, J.; Alexandre, F.; Azoulay, R.; Sermage, B.; Rao, K.; Voos, M.

    1991-08-01

    New photoluminescence bands are observed in p-type GaAs epitaxial layers at 300 and 80 K, above the bandgap. These bands are independent of the nature of the dopant (Zn, Be, C) and of the growth technique (MBE or MOCVD). Their intensities increase as a function of the p doping (1 × 10 17 < p < 2 × 10 20cm-3) and peak at energies which correspond to transitions between the Γ 6, L 6 and X 6 minima of the conduction band and the Γ 8 and Γ 7 maxima of the valence band.

  8. Hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber gas sensor with high sensitivity and fast response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Jin, Wei; Cao, Yingchun; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2014-05-01

    The effects of modal interference (MI) on the performance of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) gas sensors are investigated. By optimizing mode launch, applying wavelength modulation with proper modulation parameters as well as appropriate digital signal processing, an estimated lower detection limit of drilling side-hole on the MI and response time are also studied. With a 62-cm long sensing HC-PBF drilled with multiple side-holes, an acetylene sensor with a lower detection limit of 11 ppmv and a recovery time of 2 minute is demonstrated.

  9. Significant band-gap opening in graphene and Pd-doped graphene via the adsorption of ionized methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-Fang; Chen, Li-Yong; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2017-04-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to study the adsorptions of ionized methane (i.e., CHn+ (n = 3,4) fragments) on pristine graphene (G-CHn+) and Pd-doped graphene (G/Pd-CHn+). Remarkably, CH3+ adsorption induces significant band-gap for both systems, while it is absent in the cases of both CH4+ and CH3 adsorptions. The charge-induced gaps are found to be about 665 meV and 401 meV for G-CH3+ and G/Pd-CH3+ systems, respectively. Promisingly, the Pd-doped graphene with CH3+ adsorption not only achieves a significant band-gap at Dirac point, but also retains nearly linear dispersion near the Fermi level. Both hole effect and localized electron hybridization mediate the band-gap opening. Within DFT + U scheme, coulomb-correction dependences of band-gap, Fermi velocity and effective mass of carriers are handled for the Pd-doped graphene with CH3+ adsorption. These results may be interesting for exploring the applications of graphene in band-gap engineering and gaseous ionization detectors.

  10. Optical reflectance and omnidirectional bandgaps in Fibonacci quasicrystals type 1-D multilayer structures containing exponentially graded material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bipin K.; Thapa, Khem B.; Pandey, Praveen C.

    2013-06-01

    A theoretical study of optical reflectance and reflection bands of 1-D photonic quasi-crystals (Fibonacci type arrangement) composed of exponentially graded material is presented. The proposed structures consist of two different layers, one of them is of constant refractive index (L) and the other one is of exponentially graded refractive index (S) dielectric materials. Four different generations (2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th) of the Fibonacci sequence for 10 periods in one dimension (1-D) are considered and compared in view of their optical reflectance and bandgaps for both TE and TM polarisations. Also, we proposed some heterostructures made by the combination of different Fibonacci generations and their periods to obtain suitable omnidirectional reflection band. We used the transfer matrix method (TMM) to obtain the reflectance, bandgaps and omnidirectional reflectional bandgaps (ODR) of such structures in near infrared spectrum (800-2200 nm) at different angles of incidence. We show that ODR exists in these types of structures. The number of ODRs and total bandgap depend on the Fibonacci generations. Extraordinary ODR bandgaps are obtained in the case of heterostructures formed by the combination of different generations of the Fibonacci sequence. The ODR for these structures is similar to the ODR of photonic crystals containing left-handed materials. This work would be useful to study the Fibonacci type photonic crystals having graded index materials and also it will open new window to design several photonic crystal devices like sensors, reflectors, etc. in the infrared region.

  11. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  12. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept b

  13. Dopant-induced bandgap shift in Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung-Chun Lai, Henry; Basheer, Tahseen; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L.; Egdell, Russell G.; Jacobs, Robert M. J.; Pepper, Michael; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-10-01

    A series of 1 at. % Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films were deposited onto glass substrates by a spray pyrolysis technique. We find that the observed blue shift in the optical bandgap of 1% AZO films is dominated by the Burstein Moss effect. The Fermi level for an 807 nm thick AZO film rose by some 0.16 eV with respect to the edge of the conduction band. By controlling the film thickness, all AZO films exhibit the same lattice strain values. The influence of strain-induced bandgap shift was excluded by selecting films with nearly the same level of bandgap volume-deformation potentials, and the differences in out-plain strain and in-plain stress remained effectively constant.

  14. Wild Band Edges: The Role of Bandgap Grading and Band-Edge Fluctuations in High-Efficiency Chalcogenide Devices: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repins, Ingrid; Mansfield, Lorelle; Kanevce, Ana; Jensen, Soren A.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Glynn, Stephen; Barnes, Teresa; Metzger, Wyatt; Burst, James; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Dippo, Patricia; Harvey, Steve; Teeter, Glenn; Perkins, Craig; Egaas, Brian; Zakutayev, Andriy; Alsmeier, J.-H.; Lussky, T.; Korte, L.; Wilks, R. G.; Bar, M.; Yan, Y.; Lany, Stephan; Zawadzki, Pawel; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Suhuai

    2016-06-16

    Band-edge effects -- including grading, electrostatic fluctuations, bandgap fluctuations, and band tails -- affect chalcogenide device efficiency. These effects now require more careful consideration as efficiencies increase beyond 20%. Several aspects of the relationships between band-edge phenomena and device performance for NREL absorbers are examined. For Cu(In,Ga)Se2 devices, recent increases in diffusion length imply changes to optimum bandgap profile. The origin, impact, and modification of electrostatic and bandgap fluctuations are also discussed. The application of the same principles to devices based on CdTe, kesterites, and emerging absorbers (Cu2SnS3, CuSbS2), considering differences in materials properties and defect formation energies, is examined.

  15. Double-graded bandgap in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells by low toxicity selenization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Chih; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2014-08-01

    A low-toxic selenization with post gallium diffusion (PGD) treatment has been demonstrated to increase the bandgap in the surface Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) absorbers and to form double-graded bandgap profiles to improve the cell efficiency. The CIGSe absorber with PGD for 5 min increased open-circuit voltage from 0.49 to 0.66 V and efficiency from 9.2% to 13.2%, contributed by the enhancement of carrier recombination in the space-charge region. The reduction in short-circuit current from 30.8 to 29.9 mA/cm2, attributed to the absorption loss in long-wavelength regions, can be potentially improved by further optimization of the minimum bandgap value in gradient valley.

  16. Statistical comparisons of data on band-gap narrowing in heavily doped silicon - Electrical and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, H. S.; Wilson, C. L.

    1984-05-01

    A system of subroutines for iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) computations has been applied to the published measured and theoretical data on band-gap narrowing in heavily doped silicon. The data include electrical and optical measurements at room temperature, photoluminescence and optical measurements for temperatures below 35 K, and theoretical calculations at 300 and 0 K. The IRLS procedure allows a clear graphical comparison of the various experimental and theoretical data in band-gap narrowing to be made. The results are (1) band-gap changes determined by the optical absorption are consistent at both 300 K and at temperatures below 35 K with recent theoretical calculations, (2) the electrical and optical measurements are not consistent with each other, and (3) the low temperature optical absorption data and the photoluminescence data are not consistent with each other.

  17. Ultra-sensitive pressure dependence of bandgap of rutile-GeO{sub 2} revealed by many body perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Atanu; Singh, Abhishek K. [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Jain, Manish [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-08-14

    The reported values of bandgap of rutile GeO{sub 2} calculated by the standard density functional theory within local-density approximation (LDA)/generalized gradient approximation (GGA) show a wide variation (∼2 eV), whose origin remains unresolved. Here, we investigate the reasons for this variation by studying the electronic structure of rutile-GeO{sub 2} using many-body perturbation theory within the GW framework. The bandgap as well as valence bandwidth at Γ-point of rutile phase shows a strong dependence on volume change, which is independent of bandgap underestimation problem of LDA/GGA. This strong dependence originates from a change in hybridization among O-p and Ge-(s and p) orbitals. Furthermore, the parabolic nature of first conduction band along X-Γ-M direction changes towards a linear dispersion with volume expansion.

  18. Wild Band Edges: The Role of Bandgap Grading and Band-Edge Fluctuations in High-Efficiency Chalcogenide Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repins, Ingrid; Mansfield, Lorelle; Kanevce, Ana; Jensen, Soren A.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Glynn, Stephen; Barnes, Teresa; Metzger, Wyatt; Burst, James; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Dippo, Patricia; Harvey, Steve; Teeter, Glenn; Perkins, Craig; Egaas, Brian; Zakutayev, Andriy; Alsmeier, J.-H.; Lussky, T.; Korte, L.; Wilks, R. G.; Bar, M.; Yan, Y.; Lany, Stephan; Zawadzki, Pawel; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Suhuai

    2016-11-21

    Band-edge effects - including grading, electrostatic fluctuations, bandgap fluctuations, and band tails - affect chalcogenide device efficiency. These effects now require more careful consideration as efficiencies increase beyond 20%. Several aspects of the relationships between band-edge phenomena and device performance for NREL absorbers are examined. For Cu(In, Ga)Se2 devices, recent increases in diffusion length imply changes to the optimum bandgap profile. The origin, impact, and modification of electrostatic and bandgap fluctuations are also discussed. The application of the same principles to devices based on CdTe, kesterites, and emerging absorbers (Cu2SnS3, CuSbS2), considering differences in materials properties, is examined.

  19. Ultraviolet laser quantum well intermixing based prototyping of bandgap tuned heterostructures for the fabrication of superluminescent diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Romain; Moumanis, Khalid; Aimez, Vincent; Dubowski, Jan J.

    2016-04-01

    The ultraviolet laser induced quantum well intermixing process has been investigated for prototyping of multiple bandgap quantum well (QW) wafers designed for the fabrication of superluminescent diodes (SLDs). The process takes advantage of a krypton fluoride excimer laser (λ=248 nm) that by irradiating an InP layer capping GaInAs/GaInAsP QW heterostructure leads to the modification of its surface chemical composition and formation of point defects. A subsequent rapid thermal annealing step results in the selective area intermixing of the investigated heterostructures achieving a high quality bandgap tuned material for the fabrication of broad spectrum SLDs. The devices made from a 3-bandgap material are characterized by ~100 nm wide emission spectra with relatively flat profiles and emission exceeding 1 mW.

  20. Bandgap widening in thermochromic Mg-doped VO{sub 2} thin films: Quantitative data based on optical absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shu-Yi; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Mlyuka, Nuru R. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 35063, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Primetzhofer, Daniel; Possnert, Göran [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Hallén, Anders [KTH-ICT, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-10-14

    Thermochromic Mg-doped VO{sub 2} films were deposited by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering onto heated glass and carbon substrates. Elemental compositions were inferred from Rutherford backscattering. Optical bandgaps were obtained from spectral transmittance and reflectance measurements—from both the film side and the back side of the samples—and ensuing determination of absorption coefficients. The bandgap of Mg-doped films was found to increase by 3.9 ± 0.5 eV per unit of atom ratio Mg/(Mg + V) for 0 < Mg/(Mg + V) < 0.21. The presence of ∼0.45 at. % Si enhanced the bandgap even more.

  1. Optimum design of phononic crystal perforated plate structures for widest bandgap of fundamental guided wave modes and maximized in-plane stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, Mohammad; Ng, Ching-Tai

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a topology optimization of single material phononic crystal plate (PhP) to be produced by perforation of a uniform background plate. The primary objective of this optimization study is to explore widest exclusive bandgaps of fundamental (first order) symmetric or asymmetric guided wave modes as well as widest complete bandgap of mixed wave modes (symmetric and asymmetric). However, in the case of single material porous phononic crystals the bandgap width essentially depends on the resultant structural integration introduced by achieved unitcell topology. Thinner connections of scattering segments (i.e. lower effective stiffness) generally lead to (i) wider bandgap due to enhanced interfacial reflections, and (ii) lower bandgap frequency range due to lower wave speed. In other words higher relative bandgap width (RBW) is produced by topology with lower effective stiffness. Hence in order to study the bandgap efficiency of PhP unitcell with respect to its structural worthiness, the in-plane stiffness is incorporated in optimization algorithm as an opposing objective to be maximized. Thick and relatively thin Polysilicon PhP unitcells with square symmetry are studied. Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm NSGA-II is employed for this multi-objective optimization problem and modal band analysis of individual topologies is performed through finite element method. Specialized topology initiation, evaluation and filtering are applied to achieve refined feasible topologies without penalizing the randomness of genetic algorithm (GA) and diversity of search space. Selected Pareto topologies are presented and gradient of RBW and elastic properties in between the two Pareto front extremes are investigated. Chosen intermediate Pareto topology, even not extreme topology with widest bandgap, show superior bandgap efficiency compared with the results reported in other works on widest bandgap topology of asymmetric guided waves, available in the literature

  2. Temperature dependent direct-bandgap light emission and optical gain of Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Liu; Chao, He; Dongliang, Zhang; Chuanbo, Li; Chunlai, Xue; Yuhua, Zuo; Buwen, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Band structure, electron distribution, direct-bandgap light emission, and optical gain of tensile strained, n-doped Ge at different temperatures were calculated. We found that the heating effects not only increase the electron occupancy rate in the Γ valley of Ge by thermal excitation, but also reduce the energy difference between its Γ valley and L valley. However, the light emission enhancement of Ge induced by the heating effects is weakened with increasing tensile strain and n-doping concentration. This phenomenon could be explained by that Ge is more similar to a direct bandgap material under tensile strain and n-doping. The heating effects also increase the optical gain of tensile strained, n-doped Ge at low temperature, but decrease it at high temperature. At high temperature, the hole and electron distributions become more flat, which prevent obtaining higher optical gain. Meanwhile, the heating effects also increase the free-carrier absorption. Therefore, to obtain a higher net maximum gain, the tensile strained, n-doped Ge films on Si should balance the gain increased by the heating effects and the optical loss induced by the free-carrier absorption. Project supported by the National Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632103) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61377045, 61435013, and 61176013).

  3. Dipole-induced band-gap reduction in an inorganic cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yaokang; Cheng, Jun; Steiner, Alexander; Gan, Lihua; Wright, Dominic S

    2014-02-10

    Metal-doped polyoxotitanium cages are a developing class of inorganic compounds which can be regarded as nano- and sub-nano sized molecular relatives of metal-doped titania nanoparticles. These species can serve as models for the ways in which dopant metal ions can be incorporated into metal-doped titania (TiO2 ), a technologically important class of photocatalytic materials with broad applications in devices and pollution control. In this study a series of cobalt(II)-containing cages in the size range ca. 0.7-1.3 nm have been synthesized and structurally characterized, allowing a coherent study of the factors affecting the band gaps in well-defined metal-doped model systems. Band structure calculations are consistent with experimental UV/Vis measurements of the Tix Oy absorption edges in these species and reveal that molecular dipole moment can have a profound effect on the band gap. The observation of a dipole-induced band-gap decrease mechanism provides a potentially general design strategy for the formation of low band-gap inorganic cages.

  4. Development of Radiation-hard Bandgap Reference and Temperature Sensor in CMOS 130 nm Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczynska, Marika; Bugiel, Szymon; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Idzik, Marek; Michelis, Stefano; Moron, Jakub; Przyborowski, Dominik; Swientek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    A stable reference voltage (or current) source is a standard component of today's microelectronics systems. In particle physics experiments such reference is needed in spite of harsh ionizing radiation conditions, i.e. doses exceeding 100 Mrads and fluences above 1e15 n/cm2. After such radiation load a bandgap reference using standard p-n junction of bipolar transistor does not work properly. Instead of using standard p-n junctions, two enclosed layout transistor (ELTMOS) structures are used to create radiation-hard diodes: the ELT bulk diode and the diode obtained using the ELTMOS as dynamic threshold transistor (DTMOS). In this paper we have described several sub-1V references based on ELTMOS bulk diode and DTMOS based diode, using CMOS 130 nm process. Voltage references the structures with additional PTAT (Proportional To Absolute Temperature) output for temperature measurements were also designed. We present and compare post-layout simulations of the developed bandgap references and temperature sensors, w...

  5. A generation/recombination model assisted with two trap centers in wide band-gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Kuwabara, Takuhito; Uda, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    A generation/recombination (GR) model assisted with two trap centers has been proposed for studying reverse current on pn junctions in wide band-gap semiconductors. A level (Et1) has been assumed to be located near the bottom of the conduction band and the other (Et2) to be near the top of the valence band. The GR model has been developed by assuming (1) a high-electric field; F, (2) a short distance; d, between trap centers, (3) reduction in an energy-difference; Δeff = |Et1 - Et2| - eFd, and (4) hopping or tunneling conductions between trap centers with the same energy-level (Δeff ≈ 0). The GR rate has been modeled by trap levels, capture cross-sections, trap densities, and transition rate between trap centers. The GR rate, about 1010 greater than that estimated from the single-level model, has been predicted on pn junctions in a material with band-gap of 3.1 eV. Device simulations using the proposed GR model have been demonstrated for SiC diodes with and without a guard ring. A reasonable range for reverse current at room temperature has been simulated and stable convergence has been obtained in a numerical scheme for analyzing diodes with an electrically floating region.

  6. Ultrafast electron and hole transfer in bulk heterojunctions of low-bandgap polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Oleg V.; Pavelyev, Vlad G.; de Gier, Hilde D.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2016-12-01

    In modern bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells, blends of low-bandgap polymer and [70]PCBM acceptor are used in the active layer. In this combination, the polymer absorbs photons from the red and near-IR parts of the solar spectrum, while the blue and near-UV photons are harvested by [70]PCBM. As a result, both electron transfer from polymer to [70]PCBM and hole transfer from [70]PCBM to polymer are of utmost importance in free charge generation and have to be optimized simultaneously. Here we study electron and hole transfer processes in BHJ blends of two low-bandgap polymers, BTT-DPP and PCPDTBT, by ultrafast photoinduced spectroscopy (PIA). By tracking the PIA dynamics, we observed substantially different charge separation pathways in BHJs of the two polymers with [70]PCBM. From the photoinduced anisotropy dynamics, we demonstrated that in the PCPDTBT:[70]PCBM system both electron and hole transfer processes are highly efficient, while in the BTTBPP:[ 70]PCBM electron transfer is blocked due to the unfortunate energy level alignment leaving hole transfer the only pathway to free charge generation. Calculations at the density functional theory level are used to gain more insight into our findings. The presented results highlight the importance of the energy level alignment on the charge separation process.

  7. Photonic Bandgap Propagation in All-Solid Chalcogenide Microstructured Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Caillaud

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An original way to obtain fibers with special chromatic dispersion and single-mode behavior is to consider microstructured optical fibers (MOFs. These fibers present unique optical properties thanks to the high degree of freedom in the design of their geometrical structure. In this study, the first all-solid all-chalcogenide MOFs exhibiting photonic bandgap transmission have been achieved and optically characterized. The fibers are made of an As38Se62 matrix, with inclusions of Te20As30Se50 glass that shows a higher refractive index (n = 2.9. In those fibers, several transmission bands have been observed in mid infrared depending on the geometry. In addition, for the first time, propagation by photonic bandgap effect in an all-chalcogenide MOF has been observed at 3.39 µm, 9.3 µm, and 10.6 µm. The numerical simulations based on the optogeometric properties of the fibers agree well with the experimental characterizations.

  8. Direct-Indirect Nature of the Bandgap in Lead-Free Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhai; Yin, Jun; Parida, Manas R; Ahmed, Ghada H; Pan, Jun; Bakr, Osman M; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Mohammed, Omar F

    2017-07-20

    With record efficiencies achieved in lead halide perovskite-based photovoltaics, urgency has shifted toward finding alternative materials that are stable and less toxic. Bismuth-based perovskite materials are currently one of the most promising candidates among those alternatives. However, the band structures of these materials, including the nature of the bandgaps, remain elusive due to extremely low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) and scattering issues in their thin-film form. Here, we reveal the specific nature of the material's electronic transitions by realizing monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) of hexagonal-phase Cs3Bi2X9 perovskites, which afford well-resolved PL features. Interestingly, the PL profile exhibits a dual-spectral feature at room temperature with comparable intensities, based on which we propose an exciton recombination process involving both indirect and direct transitions simultaneously-an observation further supported by temperature-dependent and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings provide experimental and theoretical insights into the nature of the bandgaps in bismuth halide materials-essential information for assessing their viability in solar cells and optoelectronics.

  9. Matching Charge Extraction Contact for Wide-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Chen, Bo; Zhao, Fuwen; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Deng, Yehao; Shao, Yuchuan; Fang, Yanjun; Bai, Yang; Wang, Chunru; Huang, Jinsong

    2017-07-01

    Efficient wide-bandgap (WBG) perovskite solar cells are needed to boost the efficiency of silicon solar cells to beyond Schottky-Queisser limit, but they suffer from a larger open circuit voltage (VOC ) deficit than narrower bandgap ones. Here, it is shown that one major limitation of VOC in WBG perovskite solar cells comes from the nonmatched energy levels of charge transport layers. Indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA) with higher-lying lowest-unoccupied-molecular-orbital is needed for WBG perovskite solar cells, while its energy-disorder needs to be minimized before a larger VOC can be observed. A simple method is applied to reduce the energy disorder by isolating isomer ICBA-tran3 from the as-synthesized ICBA-mixture. WBG perovskite solar cells with ICBA-tran3 show enhanced VOC by 60 mV, reduced VOC deficit of 0.5 V, and then a record stabilized power conversion efficiency of 18.5%. This work points out the importance of matching the charge transport layers in perovskite solar cells when the perovskites have a different composition and energy levels. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Low bandgap polymers synthesized by FeCl{sub 3} oxidative polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Tianqi [Materials and Surface Chemistry/Polymer Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong Road 130, 200237 Shanghai (China); Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Fengling; Inganaes, Olle [Biomolecular and Organic Electronics, IFM, and Centre of Organic Electronics, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Wang, Ergang; Hellstroem, Stefan [Materials and Surface Chemistry/Polymer Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Xu, Shiai [School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong Road 130, 200237 Shanghai (China); Andersson, Mats R. [Materials and Surface Chemistry/Polymer Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Biomolecular and Organic Electronics, IFM, and Centre of Organic Electronics, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-07-15

    Four low bandgap polymers, combining an alkyl thiophene donor with benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole, 2,3-diphenylquinoxaline, 2,3-diphenylthieno[3,4-b]pyrazine and 6,7-diphenyl-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-g]quinoxaline acceptors in a donor-acceptor-donor architecture, were synthesized via FeCl{sub 3} oxidative polymerization. The molecular weights of the polymers were improved by introducing o-dichlorobenzene (ODCB) as the reaction solvent instead of the commonly used solvent, chloroform. The photophysical, electrochemical and photovoltaic properties of the resulting polymers were investigated and compared. The optical bandgaps of the polymers vary between 1.0 and 1.9 eV, which is promising for solar cells. The devices spin-coated from an ODCB solution of P1DB:[70]PCBM showed a power conversion efficiency of 1.08% with an open-circuit voltage of 0.91 V and a short-circuit current density of 3.36 mA cm{sup -2} under irradiation from an AM1.5G solar simulator (100 mW cm{sup -2}). (author)

  11. Bandgap modulation in photoexcited topological insulator Bi2Te3 via atomic displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Masaki; Norimatsu, Katsura; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Keskin, Sercan; Tsuruta, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Kyushiro; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Kayanuma, Yosuke; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Onda, Ken; Sasagawa, Takao; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.

    2016-07-01

    The atomic and electronic dynamics in the topological insulator (TI) Bi2Te3 under strong photoexcitation were characterized with time-resolved electron diffraction and time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy. Three-dimensional TIs characterized as bulk insulators with an electronic conduction surface band have shown a variety of exotic responses in terms of electronic transport when observed under conditions of applied pressure, magnetic field, or circularly polarized light. However, the atomic motions and their correlation between electronic systems in TIs under strong photoexcitation have not been explored. The artificial and transient modification of the electronic structures in TIs via photoinduced atomic motions represents a novel mechanism for providing a comparable level of bandgap control. The results of time-domain crystallography indicate that photoexcitation induces two-step atomic motions: first bismuth and then tellurium center-symmetric displacements. These atomic motions in Bi2Te3 trigger 10% bulk bandgap narrowing, which is consistent with the time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy results.

  12. The ultraviolet radiation detectors based on wide-bandgap Schottky barrier structures

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, T V; Konstantinov, O V

    2002-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to measure and control ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the Sun and artificial sources. We present photodetectors based on different wide-bandgap surface-barrier structures, which exhibit linear photocurrent-radiant flux characteristics in the range 10 sup - sup 2 -10 sup 3 W/m sup 2 and can register different types of UVR. The use of light filter UFS-6 with GaP photodetector results in a spectral photosensitivity range corresponding to the Sun UV radiation if observed on Earth. The spectral sensitivity range of the photodetectors based on 4H-SiC is near the spectrum of relative effectiveness of various wavelengths in bactericidal UVR. The photosensitivity of the surface-barrier photodetectors based on wide-bandgap semiconductors exhibits the essential decline in the short-wavelength UVR region (5-6 eV), which is the region of intrinsic absorption of the semiconductor. We propose a hot exciton model, according to which the hot excitons can form in the process of the pho...

  13. Study on ceramic photonic bandgap structure with three-dimensional diamond lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiqing Yin; Wenbin Cao; Y. Miyamoto

    2006-01-01

    A novel process, which was based on powder injection molding, was investigated for the fabrication of ceramic photonic bandgap structure with three-dimensional diamond lattice. The SiO2-TiO2 ceramic powder was mixed with a water-soluble agent to produce slurry. The slurry was then injected into an epoxy mold with inverse diamond lattice, fabricated by the stereolitographic rapid prototyping process. To increase the density of the green compact, cold isostatic pressing was applied on the unit. Using thermal debinding, the water-soluble agent and the epoxy were extracted at 360 and 650 K, respectively. Sintering was immediately done at 950 K for 5 h and the desired three-dimensional ceramic structure was obtained. The calculated band diagram for this structure indicated the existence of an absolute photonic bandgap for all wave vectors. At 14.7-18.5 GHz, a complete band gap was located with a maximum attenuation of 30 dB at 17 GHz, when transmission was measured in the 〈100〉 direction between 10 and 20 GHz.

  14. Structural correlations in the generation of polaron pairs in low-bandgap polymers for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautz, Raphael; da Como, Enrico; Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Egelhaaf, Hans-Joachim; von Hauff, Elizabeth; Lemaur, Vincent; Beljonne, David; Yilmaz, Seyfullah; Dumsch, Ines; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich

    2012-07-01

    Polymeric semiconductors are materials where unique optical and electronic properties often originate from a tailored chemical structure. This allows for synthesizing conjugated macromolecules with ad hoc functionalities for organic electronics. In photovoltaics, donor-acceptor co-polymers, with moieties of different electron affinity alternating on the chain, have attracted considerable interest. The low bandgap offers optimal light-harvesting characteristics and has inspired work towards record power conversion efficiencies. Here we show for the first time how the chemical structure of donor and acceptor moieties controls the photogeneration of polaron pairs. We show that co-polymers with strong acceptors show large yields of polaron pair formation up to 24% of the initial photoexcitations as compared with a homopolymer (η=8%). π-conjugated spacers, separating the donor and acceptor centre of masses, have the beneficial role of increasing the recombination time. The results provide useful input into the understanding of polaron pair photogeneration in low-bandgap co-polymers for photovoltaics.

  15. Direct-Indirect Nature of the Bandgap in Lead-Free Perovskite Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuhai

    2017-06-23

    With record efficiencies achieved in lead halide perovskite-based photovoltaics, urgency has shifted toward finding alternative materials that are stable and less toxic. Bismuth-based perovskite materials are currently one of the most promising candidates among those alternatives. However, the band structures of these materials, including the nature of the bandgaps, remain elusive due to extremely low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) and scattering issues in their thin-film form. Here, we reveal the specific nature of the material\\'s electronic transitions by realizing monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) of hexagonal-phase Cs3Bi2X9 perovskites, which afford well-resolved PL features. Interestingly, the PL profile exhibits a dual-spectral feature at room temperature with comparable intensities, based on which we propose an exciton recombination process involving both indirect and direct transitions simultaneously-an observation further supported by temperature-dependent and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings provide experimental and theoretical insights into the nature of the bandgaps in bismuth halide materials-essential information for assessing their viability in solar cells and optoelectronics.

  16. The Miscibility of PCBM in Low Band-Gap Conjugated Polymers in Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huipeng; You, Wei; Peet, Jeff; Azoulay, Jason; Bazan, Guillermo; Dadmun, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the morphology of the photoactive layer in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is essential to optimizing conjugated polymer-based solar cells to meet the targeted efficiency of 10%. The miscibility and interdiffusion of components are among the key elements that impact the development of morphology and structure in OPV active layers. This study uses neutron reflectivity to correlate the structure of low band gap polymers to their miscibility with PCBM. Several low band gap polymers that exhibit power conversion efficiencies exceeding 7%, including PBnDT-DTffBT were examined. The intermixing of low band-gap polymer and PCBM bilayers was monitored by neutron reflectivity before and after thermal annealing, providing quantification of the miscibility and interdiffusion of PCBM within the low band gap polymer layer. These results indicate that the miscibility of PCBM ranges from 3% to 26% with the low band-gap polymers studied. The correlation between low band gap polymer structure and miscibility of PCBM will also be discussed.

  17. Oxygen vacancy origin of the surface band-gap state of TiO2(110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, C M; Pang, C L; Thornton, G

    2010-01-22

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and photoemission spectroscopy have been used to determine the origin of the band-gap state in rutile TiO2(110). This state has long been attributed to oxygen vacancies (O{b} vac). However, recently an alternative origin has been suggested, namely, subsurface interstitial Ti species. Here, we use electron bombardment to vary the O{b} vac density while monitoring the band-gap state with photoemission spectroscopy. Our results show that O{b} vac make the dominant contribution to the photoemission peak and that its magnitude is directly proportional to the O{b} vac density.

  18. High-Power Yb-Doped Solid-Core Photonic Bandgap Fiber Amplifier at 1150-1200nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maruyama, H.; Shirakawa, A.; Ueda, K.

    2008-01-01

    Solid-core photonic-bandgap fiber amplification at the long-wavelength edge of ytterbium band is reported. A 32W output at 1156nm with a 66% slope efficiency and 9.1W output at 1178nm were succesfully obtained.......Solid-core photonic-bandgap fiber amplification at the long-wavelength edge of ytterbium band is reported. A 32W output at 1156nm with a 66% slope efficiency and 9.1W output at 1178nm were succesfully obtained....

  19. Efficient continuous-wave four-wave mixing in bandgap-engineered AlGaAs waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Jeremiah J; Apiratikul, Paveen; Richardson, Christopher J K; Porkolab, Gyorgy A; Carter, Gary M; Murphy, Thomas E

    2014-06-01

    We present a side-by-side comparison of the nonlinear behavior of four passive AlGaAs ridge waveguides where the bandgap energy of the core layers ranges from 1.60 to 1.79 eV. By engineering the bandgap to suppress two-photon absorption, minimizing the linear loss, and minimizing the mode area, we achieve efficient wavelength conversion in the C-band via partially degenerate four-wave mixing with a continuous-wave pump. The observed conversion efficiency [Idler(OUT)/Signal(IN)=-6.8  dB] is among the highest reported in passive semiconductor or glass waveguides.

  20. Modulating Bandgap and HOCO/LUCO Energy of Semiconducting Polymer by Copolymerization or Incorporation of Electron Withdrawing/Releasing Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Liu-ming; LU Wen-cong

    2007-01-01

    The modulation of bandgap and HOCO/LUCO energies of conjugated polymers by copolymerization or by incorporation of electron withdrawing/releasing groups is studied. The study was conducted by band structure calculation applying density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation. The polymers and copolymers were modeled as 1D infinite system with periodical boundary condition along the molecular direction. It is concluded that the bandgap and HOCO/LUCO energies of conjugated polymers depend on both electron withdrawing/releasing effects and non-bonding interaction between a side group and the conjugated systems.

  1. Effect of band-gap narrowing on the built-in electric field in n-type silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, J.; Lowney, J. R.

    1981-02-01

    A relation is derived to describe the change in the built-in electric field in an n-type semiconductor due to band tailing and carrier freeze-out, as well as band-gap narrowing. Recent numerical models of these various phenomena were used to illustrate the effect on heavily doped n-type silicon. While neither band-gap narrowing, band tailing, nor deionization alone is sufficient to explain the large decrease in the built-in electric field that has been inferred from experimental measurements, the combination of all three effects may be sufficient.

  2. Thermally controlled mid-IR band-gap engineering in all-glass chalcogenide microstructured fibers: a numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, Ravi K.; Pal, Bishnu P.

    2017-01-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-glass low refractive index (RI) contrast chalcogenide (Ch) microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) is investigated numerically. The effect of external temperature on the position of band-gap is explored to realize potential fiber-based wavelength filters....../sensors at functional mid-IR spectral range. The cross-sectional geometry of the MOF is formed by considering a Ch glass to form the overall background cross-section as well as the central fiber core. The core region is surrounded by periodically arranged (hexagonal pattern) smaller holes, which are assumed...

  3. Direct experimental observation of giant Goos-Hänchen shifts from bandgap-enhanced total internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuhang; Zheng, Zheng; Kong, Weijing; Liu, Ya; Lu, Zhiting; Bian, Yusheng

    2011-09-15

    Giant Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts are experimentally demonstrated from a prism-coupled multilayer structure incorporating a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) through a bandgap-enhanced total internal reflection scheme. By combining the large phase changes near the bandgap of the PC and the low reflection loss of the total internal reflection, 2 orders of magnitude enhancement of the GH shift is realized with rather low extra optical loss, which might help to open the door toward many interesting applications for GH effects.

  4. A model for the direct-to-indirect band-gap transition in monolayer MoSe2 under strain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruma Das; Priya Mahadevan

    2015-06-01

    A monolayer of MoSe2 is found to be a direct band-gap semiconductor. We show, within ab-initio electronic structure calculations, that a modest biaxial tensile strain of 3% can drive it into an indirect band-gap semiconductor with the valence band maximum (VBM) shifting from point to point. An analysis of the charge density reveals that while Mo–Mo interactions contribute to the VBM at 0% strain, Mo–Se interactions contribute to the highest occupied band at point. A scaling of the hopping interaction strengths within an appropriate tight binding model can capture the transition.

  5. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  6. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  7. Continuously tunable all-in-fiber devices based on thermal and electrical control of negative dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Eskildsen, Lars; Weirich, Johannes;

    2009-01-01

    We infiltrate photonic crystal fibers with a negative dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal. 396nm bandgap shift is obtained in the temperature range 22°C-80°C, and 67 nm shift of long-wavelength bandgap edge is achieved by applying a voltage of 200Vrms. The polarization sensitivity and correspond...

  8. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  9. Solar-Driven Hydrogen Peroxide Production Using Polymer-Supported Carbon Dots as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-10-01

    Safe, sustainable, and green production of hydrogen peroxide is an exciting proposition due to the role of hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant and energy carrier for fuel cells. The current work reports the development of carbon dot-impregnated waterborne hyperbranched polyurethane as a heterogeneous photo-catalyst for solar-driven production of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the carbon dots possess a suitable band-gap of 2.98 eV, which facilitates effective splitting of both water and ethanol under solar irradiation. Inclusion of the carbon dots within the eco-friendly polymeric material ensures their catalytic activity and also provides a facile route for easy catalyst separation, especially from a solubilizing medium. The overall process was performed in accordance with the principles of green chemistry using bio-based precursors and aqueous medium. This work highlights the potential of carbon dots as an effective photo-catalyst.

  10. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  11. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  12. Bandgap tuning in SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3} by anionic-lattice variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Songhak; Maegli, Alexandra E.; Karvonen, Lassi; Matam, Santhosh K.; Shkabko, Andrey [Laboratory for Solid State Chemistry and Catalysis, Empa-Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Riegg, Stefan [Lehrstuhl für Experimentalphysik 5, EKM, Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 1, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Großmann, Thomas; Ebbinghaus, Stefan G. [Institut für Chemie, Martin-Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Kurt-Mothes-Straße 2, 06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Pokrant, Simone [Laboratory for Solid State Chemistry and Catalysis, Empa-Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Weidenkaff, Anke, E-mail: anke.weidenkaff@empa.ch [Laboratory for Solid State Chemistry and Catalysis, Empa-Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Polycrystalline SrTiO{sub 3} and SrTi(O,F){sub 3} powders were synthesized by a solid-state reaction. A partial substitution of oxygen by nitrogen was subsequently carried out using thermal ammonolysis resulting in SrTi(N,O){sub 3} and SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3}. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed a cubic perovskite structure with space group Pm-3m for all samples. The thermal ammonolysis slightly increased the lattice parameters, crystallite sizes and strain. As a result from the co-substitution of oxygen with nitrogen and fluorine for SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3}, highly distorted TiO{sub 6} octahedra were detected using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The weakening of all active modes of the Raman spectra after thermal ammonolysis also indicated enhanced distortions in the local crystal structure. SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3} has the largest amount of nitrogen as well as fluorine among all four samples as determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In the UV–vis spectra a distinctive shift of the absorption-edge energy was observed exclusively for the SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3} sample from 390 to 510 nm corresponding to a bandgap narrowing from 3.18 to 2.43 eV. - Graphical abstract: Figure shows the shift of the absorption-edge energy for the SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3} sample from 390 to 510 nm corresponding to a bandgap narrowing from 3.18 to 2.43 eV. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Synthesis of phase-pure SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3} via solid-state reaction. • The incorporated nitrogen contents increase by the presence of fluorine in SrTi(N,O,F){sub 3}. • Co-substitution with nitrogen and fluorine is beneficial for the bandgap narrowing compared to by only nitrogen or fluorine substitution.

  13. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  14. Direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion via inverted metamorphic multi-junction semiconductor architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James L.; Steiner, Myles A.; Döscher, Henning; France, Ryan M.; Turner, John A.; Deutsch, Todd G.

    2017-03-01

    Solar water splitting via multi-junction semiconductor photoelectrochemical cells provides direct conversion of solar energy to stored chemical energy as hydrogen bonds. Economical hydrogen production demands high conversion efficiency to reduce balance-of-systems costs. For sufficient photovoltage, water-splitting efficiency is proportional to the device photocurrent, which can be tuned by judicious selection and integration of optimal semiconductor bandgaps. Here, we demonstrate highly efficient, immersed water-splitting electrodes enabled by inverted metamorphic epitaxy and a transparent graded buffer that allows the bandgap of each junction to be independently varied. Voltage losses at the electrolyte interface are reduced by 0.55 V over traditional, uniformly p-doped photocathodes by using a buried p-n junction. Advanced on-sun benchmarking, spectrally corrected and validated with incident photon-to-current efficiency, yields over 16% solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with GaInP/GaInAs tandem absorbers, representing a 60% improvement over the classical, high-efficiency tandem III-V device.

  15. Direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion via inverted metamorphic multi-junction semiconductor architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, James L.; Steiner, Myles A.; Döscher, Henning; France, Ryan M.; Turner, John A.; Deutsch, Todd G.

    2017-03-13

    Solar water splitting via multi-junction semiconductor photoelectrochemical cells provides direct conversion of solar energy to stored chemical energy as hydrogen bonds. Economical hydrogen production demands high conversion efficiency to reduce balance-of-systems costs. For sufficient photovoltage, water-splitting efficiency is proportional to the device photocurrent, which can be tuned by judicious selection and integration of optimal semiconductor bandgaps. Here, we demonstrate highly efficient, immersed water-splitting electrodes enabled by inverted metamorphic epitaxy and a transparent graded buffer that allows the bandgap of each junction to be independently varied. Voltage losses at the electrolyte interface are reduced by 0.55 V over traditional, uniformly p-doped photocathodes by using a buried p-n junction. Advanced on-sun benchmarking, spectrally corrected and validated with incident photon-to-current efficiency, yields over 16% solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with GaInP/GaInAs tandem absorbers, representing a 60% improvement over the classical, high-efficiency tandem III-V device.

  16. Open-circuit voltage deficit, radiative sub-bandgap states, and prospects in quantum dot solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hao Marcus; Maurano, Andrea; Brandt, Riley E; Hwang, Gyu Weon; Jean, Joel; Buonassisi, Tonio; Bulović, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2015-05-13

    Quantum dot photovoltaics (QDPV) offer the potential for low-cost solar cells. To develop strategies for continued improvement in QDPVs, a better understanding of the factors that limit their performance is essential. Here, we study carrier recombination processes that limit the power conversion efficiency of PbS QDPVs. We demonstrate the presence of radiative sub-bandgap states and sub-bandgap state filling in operating devices by using photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) spectroscopy. These sub-bandgap states are most likely the origin of the high open-circuit-voltage (VOC) deficit and relatively limited carrier collection that have thus far been observed in QDPVs. Combining these results with our perspectives on recent progress in QDPV, we conclude that eliminating sub-bandgap states in PbS QD films has the potential to show a greater gain than may be attainable by optimization of interfaces between QDs and other materials. We suggest possible future directions that could guide the design of high-performance QDPVs.

  17. Effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli–Euler beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with analytically predicting the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli– Euler beam performing bending oscillations. Two cases are considered: (i) large transverse deflections, where nonlinear (true) curvature...

  18. Amplification and ASE suppression in a polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped solid-core photonic bandgap fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate suppression of amplified spontaneous emission at the conventional ytterbium gain wavelengths around 1030 nm in a cladding-pumped polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped solid core photonic crystal fibre. The fibre works through combined index and bandgap guiding. Furthermore, we...

  19. A Dual-Function All-in-Fiber Device Based on Negative Dielectric Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Eskildsen, Lars; Weirich, Johannes;

    2008-01-01

    A dual-function all-in-fiber device based on negative dielectric liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers is presented. This device can work both as an electrically tunable waveplate in the range 1520nm-1580nm, and as a polarimeter at 1310nm....

  20. Design of a Polymer-Based Hollow-Core Bandgap Fiber for Low-Loss Terahertz Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, Ravi K.; Pal, Bishnu P.;

    2016-01-01

    wavelength-scale circular air holes in a hexagonal pattern, embedded in a uniform Teflon matrix. The THz guidance in this fiber is achieved by exploiting the photonic bandgap (PBG) effect. In our low index contrast Teflon-air (1.44:1) hexagonal periodic lattice, the PBG appears only for a certain range...

  1. Optically fed microwave true-time delay based on a compact liquid-crystal hotonic-bandgap-fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui

    2009-01-01

    An electrically tunable liquid-crystal, photonic-bandgap-fiber-device-based, optically fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated with the response time in the millisecond range. A maximum electrically controlled phase shift of around 70° at 15GHz and an averaged 12.9ps true time delay over...

  2. Optically fed microwave true-time delay based on a compact liquid-crystal hotonic-bandgap-fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui;

    2009-01-01

    An electrically tunable liquid-crystal, photonic-bandgap-fiber-device-based, optically fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated with the response time in the millisecond range. A maximum electrically controlled phase shift of around 70° at 15GHz and an averaged 12.9ps true time delay over...

  3. Electrical band-gap narrowing in n- and p-type heavily doped silicon at 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cong, H.; Brunet, S.

    1986-09-01

    Based on previous results band-gap narrowing in heavily doped silicon at 300 K is investigated and expressed in terms of impurity size-and-doping effects. The results obtained for n- and p-type heavily doped silicon are compared with other theories and experiments.

  4. Ab initio study of the bandgap engineering of Al1−xGaxN for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, B.

    2011-01-19

    A theoretical study of Al1−xGaxN, based on the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method, is used to investigate the variations in the bandgap,optical properties, and nonlinear behavior of the compound with the change in the Ga concentration. It is found that the bandgap decreases with the increase in Ga. A maximum value of 5.50 eV is determined for the bandgap of pure AlN, which reaches a minimum value of 3.0 eV when Al is completely replaced by Ga. The static index of refraction and dielectric constant decreases with the increase in the bandgap of the material, assigning a high index of refraction to pure GaN when compared to pure AlN. The refractive index drops below 1 for higher energy photons, larger than 14 eV. The group velocity of these photons is larger than the vacuum velocity of light. This astonishing result shows that at higher energies the optical properties of the material shifts from linear to nonlinear. Furthermore, frequency dependent reflectivity and absorption coefficients show that peak values of the absorption coefficient and reflectivity shift toward lower energy in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum with the increase in Ga concentration. This comprehensive theoretical study of the optoelectronic properties predicts that the material can be effectively used in the optical devices working in the visible and UV spectrum.

  5. Defects induced luminescence and tuning of bandgap energy narrowing in ZnO nanoparticles doped with Li ions

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Saif Ullah

    2014-08-28

    Microstructural and optical properties of Zn1-yLiyO (0.00 ≤y ≤0.10) nanoparticles are investigated. Li incorporation leads to substantial changes in the structural characterization. From micro-structural analysis, no secondary phases or clustering of Li was detected. Elemental maps confirmed homogeneous distribution of Li in ZnO. Sharp UV peak due to the recombination of free exciton and defects based luminescence broad visible band was observed. The transition from the conduction band to Zinc vacancy defect level in photoluminescence spectra is found at 518±2.5nm. The yellow luminescence was observed and attributed to Li related defects in doped samples. With increasing Li doping, a decrease in energy bandgap was observed in the range 3.26±0.014 to 3.17±0.018eV. The bandgap narrowing behavior is explained in terms of the band tailing effect due to structural disorder, carrier-impurities, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interactions. Tuning of the bandgap energy in this class of wide bandgap semiconductor is very important for room temperature spintronics applications and optical devices. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  6. Coordination-directed self-assembly of a simple benzothiadiazole-fused tetrathiafulvalene to low-bandgap metallogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, Anneliese M; Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Geng, Yan; Lebedev, Victor; Laukhin, Vladimir; Krämer, Karl; Hauser, Jürg; Amabilino, David B; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-10-18

    Coordination-driven gelation of a benzothiadiazole-fused tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) is demonstrated. This is the first work reporting highly stable metallogels based on a donor-acceptor conjugate with such a simple structure for the construction of new low-bandgap materials with various functional properties and novel nanostructures.

  7. A strain or electric field induced direct bandgap in ultrathin silicon film and its application in photovoltaics or photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tengfei; Wang, Da; Geng, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Li-Min; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-03-14

    The indirect bandgap character of silicon greatly limits its applications in electronic or optoelectronic devices, and direct bandgaps are highly desirable in all silicon allotropes. The successful synthesis of ultrathin or even monolayer silicon films experimentally has opened new opportunities to further modulate the electronic structure of silicon through external modulation. In this work, strain or electric field effects on the electronic structure of ultrathin silicon film (USF) are systematically explored. The results demonstrate that all USFs are indirect band-gap semiconductors; interestingly, tensile strain or electric field efficiently tunes the USFs into direct band gap semiconductors. The indirect to direct band gap transition in the USFs not only extends their light adsorption spectra into the visible light region but also greatly enhances the adsorption intensity. Because of this, strained USFs have great potential to be used as a high-performance photovoltaic material. Furthermore, the high stability, moderate band-gap and proper band edge positions demonstrate that monolayer and bilayer USFs can also be used as photocatalysts for water splitting.

  8. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  9. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  10. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  11. III-N Wide Bandgap Deep-Ultraviolet Lasers and Photodetectors

    KAUST Repository

    Detchprohm, T.

    2016-11-05

    The III-N wide-bandgap alloys in the AlInGaN system have many important and unique electrical and optical properties which have been exploited to develop deep-ultraviolet (DUV) optical devices operating at wavelengths < 300 nm, including light-emitting diodes, optically pumped lasers, and photodetectors. In this chapter, we review some aspects of the development and current state of the art of these DUV materials and devices. We describe the growth of III-N materials in the UV region by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition as well as the properties of epitaxial layers and heterostructure devices. In addition, we discuss the simulation and design of DUV laser diodes, the processing of III-N optical devices, and the description of the current state of the art of DUV lasers and photodetectors.

  12. Room temperature direct-bandgap electroluminescence from a horizontal Ge ridge waveguide on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Liu, Zhi; Cheng, Bu-Wen

    2016-12-01

    We report a lateral Ge-on-Si ridge waveguide light emitting diode (LED) grown by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV-CVD). Direct-bandgap electroluminescence (EL) of Ge waveguide under continuous current is observed at room temperature. The heat-enhancing luminescence and thermal radiation-induced superlinear increase of edge output optical power are found. The spontaneous emission and thermal radiation based on the generalized Planck radiation law are calculated and fit very well to the experimental results. The Ge waveguides with different lengths are studied and the shorter one shows stronger EL intensity. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632103), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176013 and 61036003), and the Science Fund from Beijing Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. Z151100003315019).

  13. Near-Infrared Sub-Bandgap All-Silicon Photodetectors: State of the Art and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Sirleto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent breakthroughs, silicon photonics is now the most active discipline within the field of integrated optics and, at the same time, a present reality with commercial products available on the market. Silicon photodiodes are excellent detectors at visible wavelengths, but the development of high-performance photodetectors on silicon CMOS platforms at wavelengths of interest for telecommunications has remained an imperative but unaccomplished task so far. In recent years, however, a number of near-infrared all-silicon photodetectors have been proposed and demonstrated for optical interconnect and power-monitoring applications. In this paper, a review of the state of the art is presented. Devices based on mid-bandgap absorption, surface-state absorption, internal photoemission absorption and two-photon absorption are reported, their working principles elucidated and their performance discussed and compared.

  14. Study of sub-bandgap states in polymer-fullerene solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presselt, Martin; Herrmann, Felix; Seeland, Marco; Baerenklau, Maik; Engmann, Sebastian; Roesch, Roland; Shokhovets, Sviatoslav; Hoppe, Harald; Gobsch, Gerhard [Experimental Physics I, Institute of Physics and Institute of Micro- und Nanotechnologies, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Beenken, Wichard J.D. [Theoretical Physics I, Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    At present polymer-fullerene blends are widely used to build organic solar cells. The main contribution to their photocurrent originates from optical transitions between occupied states below the HOMO level and unoccupied states above the LUMO level of the polymer. In this work, we investigated the origin of states contributing to the optical absorption in the sub-bandgap spectral range and the resulting photocurrent in P3HT-PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy, temperature dependent external quantum efficiency, photoluminescence and electroluminescence as well as spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements have been carried out. Effects due to different P3HT-PCBM blending ratios and annealing temperatures have been studied. Two models are discussed to explain the experimental observations: optical transitions involving (a) disorder and/or defect related states, and (b) charge transfer complexes.

  15. Characterizing Surfaces of the Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Ilmenite with Scanning Probe Microcopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, R.; Powell, Kirk St. A.

    1997-01-01

    Ilmenite (FeTiO3) is a wide bandgap semiconductor with an energy gap of about 2.5eV. Initial radiation studies indicate that ilmenite has properties suited for radiation tolerant applications, as well as a variety of other electronic applications. Two scanning probe microscopy methods have been used to characterize the surface of samples taken from Czochralski grown single crystals. The two methods, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), are based on different physical principles and therefore provide different information about the samples. AFM provides a direct, three-dimensional image of the surface of the samples, while STM give a convolution of topographic and electronic properties of the surface. We will discuss the differences between the methods and present preliminary data of each method for ilmenite samples.

  16. Electrical and optical measurements of the bandgap energy of a light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Matthieu; Michez, Lisa; Raimundo, Jean-Manuel; Dumas, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor materials are at the core of electronics. Most electronic devices are made of semiconductors. The operation of these components is well described by quantum physics which is often a difficult concept for students to understand. One of the intrinsic parameters of semiconductors is their bandgap energy {{E}\\text{g}} . In the case of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) {{E}\\text{g}} fixes the colour of the light emitted by the diodes. In this article we propose an experiment to compare {{E}\\text{g}} of a green LED obtained by both electrical and optical measurements. The two slightly different results can be explained by the theoretical knowledge of students on solid physics and the internal structure of electronic devices.

  17. On the Bandgap quantum coupler and the harmonic oscillator interacting with a reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Quijas, P C G

    2007-01-01

    In order to be able to study dissipation, the interaction between a single system and their environment was introduced in quantum mechanics. Master and quantum Langeving equations was derived and, also, decoherence was studied using this approach. One of the most used model in this field of research is a single harmonic oscillator interacting with an infinite number of harmonic oscillators. In this work we analytically solve, with the evolution operator method, the Schrodinger equation for this model in the case of resonance. Also we address a different aspect of the quantum computing with linear optics. That is, we propose the linear bandgap quantum coupler, in the cases N=2 and N=3, to generate a new phase operator $U_{dp}^{\\pi} $ working on the two and three qubits basis like an alternative realization of a quantum phase gate.

  18. Optical function spectra and bandgap energy of Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S. G., E-mail: sukgeun.choi@nrel.gov; Kang, J.; Beall, C.; Wei, S.-H.; Christensen, S. T.; Repins, I. L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Li, J.; Haneef, H.; Podraza, N. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    We present the optical function spectra of Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} determined from 0.30 to 6.45 eV by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) at room temperature. We analyze the SE data using the Tauc-Lorentz model and obtain the direct-bandgap energy of 0.49 ± 0.02 eV, which is much smaller than the previously known value of 0.84 eV for the monoclinic-phase Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3}. We also perform density-functional theory calculations to obtain the complex dielectric function data, and the results show good agreement with the experimental spectrum. Finally, we discuss the electronic origin of the main optical structures.

  19. Size-controllable synthesis and bandgap modulation of single-layered RF-sputtered bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin-Kun; Chern, Ming-Yau; Lee, Hsin-Yen

    2014-05-01

    We here report a simple and efficient method to grow single-layer bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) with various sizes on glass substrates. Optimal conditions were found to be 200°C and 0.12 W/cm2 at a growth rate of 6 Å/s, with the deposition time around 40 s. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were used to calculate the particle size distribution statistics, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were used to examine the chemical interactions between BiNPs and the substrates. By measuring the transmission spectra within the range of 300 to 1,000 nm, we found that the optical bandgap can be modulated from 0.45 to 2.63 eV by controlling the size of these BiNPs. These interesting discoveries offer an insight to explore the dynamic nature of nanoparticles.

  20. Photonic band-gap engineering in UV fiber gratings by the arc discharge technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Andrea; Iadicicco, Agostino; Paladino, Domenico; Campopiano, Stefania; Cutolo, Antonello

    2008-09-29

    Localized heat treatments combined with local non-adiabatic tapering is proposed as suitable tool for the engineering of photonic band-gaps in UV-written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). In particular, here, we propose the use of the electric arc discharge to achieve localized defects along the FBG structure, however differently from previously reported works, we demonstrate how this post processing tool properly modified can be exploited to achieve the full control of the spectral characteristics of the final device. Also, we show how the suitable choice of the grating features and the correct selection of the defect geometry can be efficiently used to achieve interesting features for both communication and sensing applications.

  1. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Han; Freund, Robert M; Peraire, Jaime; Johnson, Steven G

    2014-01-01

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniq...

  2. The ideal chip is not enough: Issues retarding the success of wide band-gap devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Nando

    2017-04-01

    Semiconductor chips made from the wide band-gap (WBG) materials silicon carbide (SiC) or gallium nitride (GaN) are already approaching the theoretical limits given by the respective materials. Unfortunately, their advantages over silicon devices cannot be fully exploited due to limitations imposed by the device packaging or the circuitry around the semiconductors. Stray inductances slow down the switching speed and increase losses, packaging materials limit the maximum temperature and the maximum useful temperature swing, and passives limit the maximum switching frequency. All these issues have to be solved or at least minimised to make WBG attractive for a wider range of applications and, consequently, to profit from the economy of scale.

  3. Tunable fluorescence enhancement based on bandgap-adjustable 3D Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fei; Gao, Suning; Zhu, Lili; Liao, Fan; Yang, Lulu; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-06-01

    Great progress has been made in fluorescence-based detection utilizing solid state enhanced substrates in recent years. However, it is still difficult to achieve reliable substrates with tunable enhancement factors. The present work shows liquid fluorescence enhanced substrates consisting of suspensions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), which can assemble 3D photonic crystal under the external magnetic field. The photonic bandgap induced by the equilibrium of attractive magnetic force and repulsive electrostatic force between adjacent Fe3O4 NPs is utilized to enhance fluorescence intensity of dye molecules (including R6G, RB, Cy5, DMTPS-DCV) in a reversible and controllable manner. The results show that a maximum of 12.3-fold fluorescence enhancement is realized in the 3D Fe3O4 NP substrates without the utilization of metal particles for PCs/DMTPS-DCV (1.0 × 10-7 M, water fraction (f w) = 90%).

  4. A Novel Miniaturized Electromagnetic Bandgap Structure and Its Effects on Signal Integrity and Electromagnetic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowen Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A miniaturized planar electromagnetic bandgap (EBG structure with embedded meander line as bridge is proposed in this paper. The dimensions of the unit cell of the proposed EBG structure are 15 mm × 15 mm × 0.36 mm. Simulation and measurement of the noise transmission coefficient (S21 have been performed for the structure, and good agreement can be seen. According to the measured results, the −30 dB noise suppression bandwidth ranges from 0.97 to 21.54 GHz, which cover almost the whole noise band in ultrawideband applications. Moreover, its effects on signal integrity and electromagnetic emission are also analyzed.

  5. Negative differential resistance in direct bandgap GeSn p-i-n structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Braucks, C.; Stange, D.; von den Driesch, N.; Blaeser, S.; Ikonic, Z.; Hartmann, J. M.; Mantl, S.; Buca, D.

    2015-07-01

    Certain GeSn alloys are group IV direct bandgap semiconductors with prospects for electrical and optoelectronical applications. In this letter, we report on the temperature dependence of the electrical characteristics of high Sn-content Ge 0.89 Sn 0.11 p-i-n diodes. NiGeSn contacts were used to minimize the access resistance and ensure compatibility with silicon technology. The major emphasis is placed on the negative differential resistance in which peak to valley current ratios up to 2.3 were obtained. TCAD simulations were performed to identify the origin of the various current contributions, providing evidence for direct band to band tunneling and trap assisted tunneling.

  6. Phonon-assisted coherent control of injected carriers in indirect bandgap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Julien; Nastos, Fred; Sipe, John E.

    2007-03-01

    Charge and spin currents can be generated in direct semiconductors by quantum interference between one- and two-photon absorption. For semiconductors such as Si and Ge, optical injection of carriers over the indirect bandgap must be assisted by momentum transfer from phonon scattering. We consider the optical properties for such 1+2 photon processes in the presence of the electron-phonon interaction. The latter is modelled by acoustic deformation potential. Indirect transitions involve double Brillouin zone integrations, which are computed by a linearized tetrahedron method. We compare our results to those for bulk GaAs. M.J. Stevens, R.D.R. Bhat, A. Najmaie, H.M. van Driel, J.E. Sipe and A.L. Smirl, in Optics of Semiconductors and Their Nanostructures, edited by H. Kalt and M. Hetterich (Springer, Berlin, 2004), vol. 146 of Springer Series in Solid-State Sciences, p. 209.

  7. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively.

  8. Room-temperature direct band-gap electroluminescence from germanium (111)-fin light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kazuki; Saito, Shin-ichi; Oda, Katsuya; Miura, Makoto; Wakayama, Yuki; Okumura, Tadashi; Mine, Toshiyuki; Ido, Tatemi

    2017-03-01

    Germanium (Ge) (111) fins of 320 nm in height were successfully fabricated using a combination of flattening sidewalls of a silicon (Si) fin structure by anisotropic wet etching with tetramethylammonium hydroxide, formation of thin Ge fins by selective Si oxidation in SiGe layers, and enlargement of Ge fins by Ge homogeneous epitaxial growth. The excellent electrical characteristics of Ge(111) fin light-emitting diodes, such as an ideality factor of 1.1 and low dark current density of 7.1 × 10‑5 A cm‑2 at reverse bias of ‑2 V, indicate their good crystalline quality. A tensile strain of 0.2% in the Ge fins, which originated from the mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficients between Ge and the covering SiO2 layers, was expected from the room-temperature photoluminescence spectra, and room-temperature electroluminescence corresponding to the direct band-gap transition was observed from the Ge fins.

  9. Impact of structural distortions on the performance of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua, Eric Numkam; Richardson, David J; Poletti, Francesco

    2014-02-10

    We present a generic model for studying numerically the performance of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs) with arbitrary cross-sectional distortions. Fully vectorial finite element simulations reveal that distortions beyond the second ring of air holes have an impact on the leakage loss and bandwidth of the fiber, but do not significantly alter its surface scattering loss which remains the dominant contribution to the overall fiber loss (providing that a sufficient number of rings of air holes (≥ 5) are used). We have found that while most types of distortions in the first two rings are generally detrimental, enlarging the core defect while keeping equidistant and on a circular boundary the glass nodes surrounding the core may produce losses half those compared to "idealized" fiber designs and with no penalty in terms of the transmission bandwidth.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Quinoxaline-Based Low-Bandgap Copolymers for Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonkyoo; Jo, Won Ho

    2011-03-01

    A series of low-bandgap alternating copolymers consisting of quinoxaline derivatives and electron-donating carbazole or fluorene were synthesized via the Suzuki coupling reaction. For the purpose to improve the molecular packing of polymer chains and to enhance the charge carrier mobility in the packing direction, a new quinoxaline derivative, 5,8-dithien-2-yl-dibenzophenazine which has perfectly planar polycyclic structure, was synthesized and introduced as a new building block for alternating copolymers instead of frequently-used 5,8-dithien-2-yl-2,3-diphenylquinoxaline. The use of planar quinoxaline derivative exhibited better optical, electrochemical, and structural properties of the resulting copolymers as compared to those of polymers with less planar quinoxaline derivatives. Charge transport and photovoltaic properties of these two classes of copolymers are compared and discussed.

  11. Stable Band-Gaps in Phononic Crystals by Harnessing Hyperelastic Transformation Media

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yan; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The band structure in phononic crystals (PCs) is usually affected by the deformations of their soft components. In this work, hyperelastic transformation media is proposed to be integrated in the PCs'design, to achieve stable elastic band-gaps which is independent with finite mechanical deformations. For a one-dimensional (1D) PC, we demonstrate the semi-linear soft component can keep all elastic wave bands unchanged with the external deformation field. While for neo-Hookean soft component, only S-wave bands can be precisely retained. The change of the P-wave bands can be predicted by using a lumped mass method. Numerical simulations are performed to validate our theory predictions and the robustness of the proposed PCs.

  12. Gamma irradiation of minimal latency Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Olanterae, L; Richardson, D J; Vasey, F; Wooler, J P; Petrovich, M N; Wheeler, N V; Poletti, F; Troska, J

    2013-01-01

    Hollow-Core Photonic-Bandgap Fibres (HC-PBGFs) offer several distinct advantages over conventional fibres, such as low latency and radiation hardness; properties that make HC-PBGFs interesting for the high energy physics community. This contribution presents the results from a gamma irradiation test carried out using a new type of HC-PBGF that combines sufficiently low attenuation over distances that are compatible with high energy physics applications together with a transmission bandwidth that covers the 1550 nm region. The radiation induced attenuation of the HC-PBGF was two orders of magnitude lower than that of a conventional fibre during a 67.5 h exposure to gamma-rays, resulting in a radiation-induced attenuation of only 2.1 dB/km at an accumulated dose of 940 kGy.

  13. Band-gaps in long Josephson junctions with periodic phase-shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saeed; Susanto, Hadi; Wattis, Jonathan A. D.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate analytically and numerically a long Josephson junction on an infinite domain, having arbitrary periodic phase shift of κ, that is, the so-called 0-κ long Josephson junction. The system is described by a one-dimensional sine-Gordon equation and has relatively recently been proposed as artificial atom lattices. We discuss the existence of periodic solutions of the system and investigate their stability both in the absence and presence of an applied bias current. We find critical values of the phase-discontinuity and the applied bias current beyond which static periodic solutions cease to exist. Due to the periodic discontinuity in the phase, the system admits regions of allowed and forbidden bands. We perturbatively investigate the Arnold tongues that separate the region of allowed and forbidden bands, and discuss the effect of an applied bias current on the band-gap structure. We present numerical simulations to support our analytical results.

  14. Variability of bandgap and carrier mobility caused by edge defects in ultra-narrow graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, M.; Wang, K. L.; Suligoj, T.

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of multi-scale modeling of ultra-narrow graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) that combines atomistic non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach with semiclassical mobility modeling. The variability of the transport gap and carrier mobility caused by random edge defects is analyzed. We find that the variability increases as the GNR width is downscaled and that even the minimum variation of the total mobility reaches more than 100% compared to average mobility in edge-defected nanoribbons. It is shown that scattering by optical phonons exhibits significantly more variability than the acoustic, line-edge roughness and Coulomb scattering mechanisms. The simulation results demonstrate that sub-5 nm-wide nanoribbons offer no improvement over conventional bulk semiconductors, however, GNRs are comparable with sub-7 nm-thick silicon-on-insulator devices in terms of mobility-bandgap trade-off characteristics.

  15. System and method of modulating electrical signals using photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductors as variable resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John Richardson; Caporaso, George J; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2013-10-22

    A system and method for producing modulated electrical signals. The system uses a variable resistor having a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material construction whose conduction response to changes in amplitude of incident radiation is substantially linear throughout a non-saturation region to enable operation in non-avalanche mode. The system also includes a modulated radiation source, such as a modulated laser, for producing amplitude-modulated radiation with which to direct upon the variable resistor and modulate its conduction response. A voltage source and an output port, are both operably connected to the variable resistor so that an electrical signal may be produced at the output port by way of the variable resistor, either generated by activation of the variable resistor or propagating through the variable resistor. In this manner, the electrical signal is modulated by the variable resistor so as to have a waveform substantially similar to the amplitude-modulated radiation.

  16. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride for resonant tunnelling diode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PENCHALAIAH PALLA; GOPI RAJA UPPU; ANITA S ETHIRAJ; J P RAINA

    2016-10-01

    In this article a double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode (DBRTD) has been modelled by taking advantage of single-layer hexagonal lattice of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The DBRTD performance and operation are explored by means of a self-consistent solution inside the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism on an effective mass-Hamiltonian. Both p- and n-type DBRTDs exhibit a negative differential resistance effect, which entails the resonant tunnelling through the hole and electron bound states in the graphene quantum well, respectively. The peak-to-valley ratio of approximately 8 (3) for p-type (n-type) DBRTD with quantum well of 5.1 nm (4.3 nm) at a barrier width of 1.3 nm was achieved for zero bandgap graphene at room temperature.

  17. Considerations of dopant-dependent bandgap narrowing for accurate device simulation in abrupt HBTs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Shouli; Xiong Deping; Qin Yali

    2009-01-01

    Heavy doping of the base in HBTs brings about a bandgap narrowing(BGN)effect,which modifies the intrinsic carrier density and disturbs the band offset,and thus leads to the change of the currents.Based on a thermionic-field-diffusion model that is used to the analyze the performance of all abrupt HBT with a heavydoped base,the conclusion is made that,although the BGN effect makes the currents obviously change due to the modification of the intrinsic carrier density,the band offsets disturbed by the BGN effect should also be taken into account in the analysis of the electrical characteristics of abrupt HBTs.In addition,the BGN effect changes the bias voltage for the onset of Kirk effects.

  18. Low Bandgap InAs-Based Thermophotovoltaic Cells for Heat-Electricity Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krier, A.; Yin, M.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Krier, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    The practical realization of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells, which can directly convert heat into electric power, is of considerable technological interest. However, most existing TPV cells require heat sources at temperatures of ˜1800°C. Here we report a low bandgap mid-infrared cell based on InAs and demonstrate TPV operation with heat sources at temperatures in the range 500-950°C. The maximum open circuit voltage ( V oc) and short circuit current density ( J sc) were measured as 0.06 V and 0.89 A cm-2 for a blackbody temperature of 950°C and an incident power density of 720 mW cm-2 without antireflection coating or electrode optimisation. TPV operation was obtained with heat sources at temperatures as low as 500°C, which represents progress towards energy scavenging and waste heat recovery applications.

  19. Growth of Bulk Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Crystals and Their Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Tong; Shi, Detang; Morgan, S. H.; Collins, W. Eugene; Burger, Arnold

    1997-01-01

    Developments in bulk crystal growth research for electro-optical devices in the Center for Photonic Materials and Devices since its establishment have been reviewed. Purification processes and single crystal growth systems employing physical vapor transport and Bridgman methods were assembled and used to produce high purity and superior quality wide bandgap materials such as heavy metal halides and II-VI compound semiconductors. Comprehensive material characterization techniques have been employed to reveal the optical, electrical and thermodynamic properties of crystals, and the results were used to establish improved material processing procedures. Postgrowth treatments such as passivation, oxidation, chemical etching and metal contacting during the X-ray and gamma-ray device fabrication process have also been investigated and low noise threshold with improved energy resolution has been achieved.

  20. Design of Photonic Bandgap Fibre with Novel Air-Hole Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; ZHANG Wei-Gang; DU Jiang-Bing; WANG Zhi; LIU Yan-Ge; DONG Xiao-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We introduce PBGFs with the cladding made of our newly designed quasi-hexagonal air holes and demonstrate how it actually operates. This cladding structure is introduced for the first time to the best of our knowledge, and is realized by making use of the hydrofluoric acid's corrosive properties. The fibre corrosion can be accurately controlled, thus opening us the gate for the design and fabrication of new PBGFs with more complex and more efficient cladding structures. Numerical results and actual simulations indicate that PBGFs built with this cladding structure have improved bandgap properties and guiding bands as wide as 500nm have been theoretically reached. Using the same method, we have also been able to design two other types of PBGFs with improved cladding structure.

  1. Optimization of molecular organization and nanoscale morphology for high performance low bandgap polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Wang, Mengye; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-04-21

    Rational design and synthesis of low bandgap (LBG) polymers with judiciously tailored HOMO and LUMO levels have emerged as a viable route to high performance polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) exceeding 10%. In addition to engineering the energy-level of LBG polymers, the photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells also relies on the device architecture, in particular the fine morphology of the photoactive layer. The nanoscale interpenetrating networks composed of nanostructured donor and acceptor phases are the key to providing a large donor-acceptor interfacial area for maximizing the exciton dissociation and offering a continuous pathway for charge transport. In this Review Article, we summarize recent strategies for tuning the molecular organization and nanoscale morphology toward an enhanced photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells.

  2. Time-resolved measurements of charge carrier dynamics and optical nonlinearities in narrow-bandgap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Benjamin Varberg

    All-optical time-resolved measurement techniques provide a powerful tool for investigating critical parameters that determine the performance of infrared photodetector and emitter semiconductor materials. Narrow-bandgap InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) have shown great promise as a next generation source of these materials, due to superior intrinsic properties and versatility. Unfortunately, InAs/GaSb T2SLs are plagued by parasitic Shockley-Read-Hall recombination centers that shorten the carrier lifetime and limit device performance. Ultrafast pump-probe techniques and time-resolved differential transmission measurements are used here to demonstrate that Ga-free InAs/InAsSb T2SLs and InAsSb alloys do not have this same limitation and thus have significantly longer carrier lifetimes. Measurements at 77 K provided minority carrier lifetimes of 9 mus and 3 mus for an unintentionally doped mid-wave infrared (MWIR) InAs/InAsSb T2SL and InAsSb alloy, respectively; a two order of magnitude increase compared to the 90 ns minority carrier lifetime measured in a comparable MWIR InAs/GaSb T2SL. Through temperature-dependent lifetime measurements, the various carrier recombination processes are differentiated and the dominant mechanisms identified for each material. These results demonstrate that these Ga-free materials are viable options over InAs/GaSb T2SLs for potentially improved infrared photodetectors. In addition to carrier lifetimes, the drift and diffusion of excited charge carriers through the superlattice growth layers (i.e. vertical transport) directly affects the performance of photodetectors and emitters. Unfortunately, there is a lack of information pertaining to vertical transport, primarily due to difficulties in making measurements on thin growth layers and the need for non-standard measurement techniques. However, all-optical ultrafast techniques are successfully used here to directly measure vertical diffusion in MWIR InAs/GaSb T2SLs. By optically

  3. Backward Secondary-Wave Coherence Errors in Photonic Bandgap Fiber Optic Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Zuchen; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber optic gyroscope (PBFOG) is a novel fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) with excellent environment adaptability performance compared to a conventional FOG. In this work we find and investigate the backward secondary-wave coherence (BSC) error, which is a bias error unique to the PBFOG and caused by the interference between back-reflection-induced and backscatter-induced secondary waves. Our theoretical and experimental results show a maximum BSC error of ~4.7°/h for a 300-m PBF coil with a diameter of 10 cm. The BSC error is an important error source contributing to bias instability in the PBFOG and has to be addressed before practical applications of the PBFOG can be implemented. PMID:27338388

  4. On the Integration of Wide Band-gap Semiconductors in Single Phase Boost PFC Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos

    of high frequency operation in optoelectronics applications. On the other hand, Schottky SiC power diodes were introduced in 2001 as an alternative to eliminate reverse recovery issues in Si rectifiers. Wide band-gap semiconductors offer an increased electrical field strength and electron mobility...... diodes, or the introduction of silicon carbide (SiC) diodes, provided large steps in miniaturization and efficiency improvement of switched mode power converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) and SiC semiconductor devices have already been around for some years. The first one proliferated due to the necessity...... compared to Si semiconductors. Moreover, both semiconductor materials are particularly interesting for high temperature operation. These characteristics makes integration of SiC and GaN devices as the next logical step to further increase efficiency and power density in SMPS. This work is part of the Ph...

  5. Excitation dynamics of a low bandgap silicon-bridged dithiophene copolymer and its composites with fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othonos, Andreas; Itskos, Grigorios; Neophytou, Marios; Choulis, Stelios A.

    2012-04-01

    We report on excitation dynamics in pristine and bulk heterojunction films of the low bandgap silicon-bridged dithiophene copolymer poly[(4,4'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)dithieno[3,2-b:2', 3'-d]silole)-2,6-diyl-alt-(4,7-bis(2-thienyl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)-5,5'-diyl] with methanofullerene derivatives. The combination of ultrafast transient transmission and photoluminescence allows us to probe the relaxation of both exciton and polaron states in a relatively wide spectral and temporal range. Measurements reveal that the majority of excitations undergo ultrashort non-radiative relaxation while a small fraction of the photoexcited species decays slowly within hundreds of ps. In the blend films, significantly longer decays are observed suggesting the presence of long lived holes and/or charged-transfer type of excitons.

  6. Polarization bandgaps and fluid-like elasticity in fully solid elastic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guancong; Fu, Caixing; Wang, Guanghao; Del Hougne, Philipp; Christensen, Johan; Lai, Yun; Sheng, Ping

    2016-11-01

    Elastic waves exhibit rich polarization characteristics absent in acoustic and electromagnetic waves. By designing a solid elastic metamaterial based on three-dimensional anisotropic locally resonant units, here we experimentally demonstrate polarization bandgaps together with exotic properties such as `fluid-like' elasticity. We construct elastic rods with unusual vibrational properties, which we denote as `meta-rods'. By measuring the vibrational responses under flexural, longitudinal and torsional excitations, we find that each vibration mode can be selectively suppressed. In particular, we observe in a finite frequency regime that all flexural vibrations are forbidden, whereas longitudinal vibration is allowed--a unique property of fluids. In another case, the torsional vibration can be suppressed significantly. The experimental results are well interpreted by band structure analysis, as well as effective media with indefinite mass density and negative moment of inertia. Our work opens an approach to efficiently separate and control elastic waves of different polarizations in fully solid structures.

  7. A sub-1 V high-precision CMOS bandgap voltage reference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖峻; 赵毅强; 耿俊峰

    2012-01-01

    A third-order,sub-1 V bandgap voltage reference design for low-power supply,high-precision applications is presented.This design uses a current-mode compensation technique and temperature-dependent resistor ratio to obtain high-order curvature compensation.The circuit was designed and fabricated by SMIC 0.18μm CMOS technology.It produces an output reference of 713.6 mV.The temperature coefficient is 3.235 pprn/℃ in the temperature range of-40 to 120 ℃,with a line regulation of 0.199 mV/V when the supply voltage varies from 0.95 to 3 V.The average current consumption of the whole circuit is 49 μA at the supply voltage of 1 V.

  8. The Tunable Bandgap of AB-Stacked Bilayer Graphene on SiO2 with H2O Molecule Adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tao; GUO Qing; AO Zhi-Min; LIU Yan; WANG Wen-Bo; SHENG Kuang; YU Bin

    2011-01-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of AB-stacking bilayer graphene (BLG) in the presence of H2O molecules are investigated by density functional theory calculations.For free-standing BLG,the bandgap is opened to 0.101 eV with a single H2O molecule adsorbed on its surface.The perfectly suspended BLG is sensitive to H2O adsorbates,which break the BLG lattice symmetry and open an energy gap.While a single H2O molecule is adsorbed on the BLG surface with a SiO2 substrate,the bandgap widens to 0.363eV.Both the H2O molecule adsorption and the oxide substrate contribute to the BLG bandgap opening.The phenomenon is interpreted with the charge transfer process in 2D carbon nanostructures.With its demonstrated unique electron transport properties,graphene has becomes one of the research hot spots with great potential in replacing silicon for future-generation nanoscale electronic devices.[1-3]Among graphene derivatives,AB-stacking bilayer graphene (BLG) exhibits fantastic properties.For example,the IBM research group successfully demonstrated a BLG-based transistor with a working frequency from 24.7 to 100GHz and highlighted suppressed electronic noise in devices.[4-6] With one additional layer added on single-layer graphene,BLG has a completely different band structure.However,pristine BLG still suffers from the same zero-bandgap (Eg) issue as single-layer graphene,hampering the implementation of logic switch devices with sufficient onto-off current ratios.%The atomic and electronic structures of AB-stacking bilayer graphene (BLG) in the presence of H2O molecules are investigated by density functional theory calculations. For free-standing BLG, the bandgap is opened to 0.101 eV with a single H2O molecule adsorbed on its surface. The perfectly suspended BLG is sensitive to H2O adsorbates, which break the BLG lattice symmetry and open an energy gap. While a single H2O molecule is adsorbed on the BLG surface with a S1O2 substrate, the bandgap widens to 0.363eV. Both the H2O

  9. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  10. Advanced Materials for High Temperature, High Performance, Wide Bandgap Power Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Chad B.; McGee, Brad; McPherson, Brice; Stabach, Jennifer; Lollar, Richard; Liederbach, Ross; Passmore, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    Advanced packaging materials must be utilized to take full advantage of the benefits of the superior electrical and thermal properties of wide bandgap power devices in the development of next generation power electronics systems. In this manuscript, the use of advanced materials for key packaging processes and components in multi-chip power modules will be discussed. For example, to date, there has been significant development in silver sintering paste as a high temperature die attach material replacement for conventional solder-based attach due to the improved thermal and mechanical characteristics as well as lower processing temperatures. In order to evaluate the bond quality and performance of this material, shear strength, thermal characteristics, and void quality for a number of silver sintering paste materials were analyzed as a die attach alternative to solder. In addition, as high voltage wide bandgap devices shift from engineering samples to commercial components, passivation materials become key in preventing premature breakdown in power modules. High temperature, high dielectric strength potting materials were investigated to be used to encapsulate and passivate components internal to a power module. The breakdown voltage up to 30 kV and corresponding leakage current for these materials as a function of temperature is also presented. Lastly, high temperature plastic housing materials are important for not only discrete devices but also for power modules. As the operational temperature of the device and/or ambient temperature increases, the mechanical strength and dielectric properties are dramatically reduced. Therefore, the electrical characteristics such as breakdown voltage and leakage current as a function of temperature for housing materials are presented.

  11. Efficient Semitransparent Solar Cells with High NIR Responsiveness Enabled by a Small-Bandgap Electron Acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Zhou, Zichun; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Jianyun; Hu, Qin; Vergote, Thomas; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Zhu, Xiaozhang

    2017-06-01

    Inspired by the remarkable promotion of power conversion efficiency (PCE), commercial applications of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) can be foreseen in near future. One of the most promising applications is semitransparent (ST) solar cells that can be utilized in value-added applications such as energy-harvesting windows. However, the single-junction STOPVs utilizing fullerene acceptors show relatively low PCEs of 4%-6% due to the limited sunlight absorption because it is a dilemma that more photons need to be harvested in UV-vis-near-infrared (NIR) region to generate high photocurrent, which leads to the significant reduction of device transparency. This study describes the development of a new small-bandgap electron-acceptor material ATT-2, which shows a strong NIR absorption between 600 and 940 nm with an Eg(opt) of 1.32 eV. By combining with PTB7-Th, the as-cast OPVs yield PCEs of up to 9.58% with a fill factor of 0.63, an open-circuit voltage of 0.73 V, and a very high short-circuit current of 20.75 mA cm(-2) . Owing to the favorable complementary absorption of low-bangap PTB7-Th and small-bandgap ATT-2 in NIR region, the proof-of-concept STOPVs show the highest PCE of 7.7% so far reported for single-junction STOPVs with a high transparency of 37%. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Efficient Sub-Bandgap Light Absorption and Signal Amplification in Silicon Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Hsin

    This thesis focuses on two areas in silicon photodetectors, the first being enhancing the sub-bandgap light absorption of IR wavelenghts in silicon, and the second being intrinsic signal amplification in silicon photodetectors. Both of these are achieved using heavily doped p-n junction devices which create localized states that relax the k-selection rule of indirect bandgap material. The probability of transitions between impurity band and the conduction/valence band would be much more efficient than the one between band-to-band transition. The waveguide-coupled epitaxial p-n photodetector was demonstrated for 1310 nm wavelength detection. Incorporated with the Franz-Keldysh effect and the quasi-confined epitaxial layer design, an absorption coefficient around 10 cm-1 has been measured and internal quantum efficiency nearly 100% at -2.5V. The absorption coefficient is calculated from the wave function of the electron and hole in p-n diode. The heavily doped impurity wave function can be formulated as a delta function, and the quasi-confined conduction band energy states, and the wave function on each level can be obtained from the Silvaco software. The calculated theoretical absorption coefficient increases with the increasing applied bias and the doping concentration, which matches the experimental results. To solve the issues of large excess noise and high operation bias for avalanche photodiodes based on impact ionization, I presented a detector using the Cycling Excitation Process (CEP) for signal amplification. This can be realized in a heavily doped and highly compensated Si p-n junction, showing ultra high gain about 3000 at very low bias (Geiger-mode avalanche detectors. The CEP can be formulated with the rate equations in conduction bands and impurity states. The gain expression, which is a function of the primary photocurrent and related to the phonon absorption time, predicts the same trend of the gain increasing with temperature and decreasing with

  13. High-Performance Nonfullerene Polymer Solar Cells based on Imide-Functionalized Wide-Bandgap Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Baobing; Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Xiao-Fang; Ying, Lei; Huang, Fei; Cao, Yong

    2017-06-01

    High-performance nonfullerene polymer solar cells (PSCs) are developed by integrating the nonfullerene electron-accepting material 3,9-bis(2-methylene-(3-(1,1-dicyanomethylene)-indanone))-5,5,11,11-tetrakis(4-hexylphenyl)-dithieno[2,3-d:2',3'-d']-s-indaceno[1,2-b:5,6-b']dithiophne) (ITIC) with a wide-bandgap electron-donating polymer PTzBI or PTzBI-DT, which consists of an imide functionalized benzotriazole (TzBI) building block. Detailed investigations reveal that the extension of conjugation can affect the optical and electronic properties, molecular aggregation properties, charge separation in the bulk-heterojunction films, and thus the overall photovoltaic performances. Single-junction PSCs based on PTzBI:ITIC and PTzBI-DT:ITIC exhibit remarkable power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 10.24% and 9.43%, respectively. To our knowledge, these PCEs are the highest efficiency values obtained based on electron-donating conjugated polymers consisting of imide-functionalized electron-withdrawing building blocks. Of particular interest is that the resulting device based on PTzBI exhibits remarkable PCE of 7% with the thickness of active layer of 300 nm, which is among the highest values of nonfullerene PSCs utilizing thick photoactive layer. Additionally, the device based on PTzBI:ITIC exhibits prominent stability, for which the PCE remains as 9.34% after thermal annealing at 130 °C for 120 min. These findings demonstrate the great promise of using this series of wide-bandgap conjugated polymers as electron-donating materials for high-performance nonfullerene solar cells toward high-throughput roll-to-roll processing technology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  15. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  16. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  17. Computer simulation and modeling of graded bandgap CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhingra, A.; Rothwarf, A. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-04-01

    This paper proposes the use of graded bandgap absorber material, to improve the low open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) seen in CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS solar cells, without sacrificing the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}). It also proposes a p-i-n model for the CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS solar cell, where the intrinsic region is the graded bandgap CIS. Reflecting surfaces are provided at the p-i and n-i interfaces to trap the light in the narrow intrinsic region for maximum generation of electron and hole pairs (EHP`s). This optical confinement results in a 25--40% increase in the number of photons absorbed. An extensive numerical simulator was developed, which provides a 1-D self-consistent solution for Poisson`s equation and the two continuity equations for electrons and holes. This simulator was used to generate J-V curves to delineate the effect of different grading profiles on cell performance. The effects of a uniform bandgap, normal grading, reverse grading, and a low bandgap notch have been considered. Having established the inherent advantages to these grading profiles an optimal doubly graded structure is proposed. Replacing the thick CdS (2.42ev) layer assumed in the simulations with a wide gap semiconductor such as ZnO (3.35ev) increases all current densities by about 5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and increases the optimal calculated efficiency from 17.9% to roughly 21% for a doubly graded structure with a thickness of 1 {micro}m and bandgaps ranging from 1.3 eV to 1.5 eV.

  18. Hydrogen Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-09-08

    In the past few years, the efficiency of solar cells based on hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites has exceeded the level needed for commercialization. However, existing perovskites solar cells (PSCs) suffer from several intrinsic instabilities, which prevent them from reaching industrial maturity, and stabilizing PSCs has become a critically important problem. Here we propose to stabilize PSCs chemically by strengthening the interactions between the organic cation and inorganic anion of the perovskite framework. In particular, we show that replacing the methylammonium cation with alternative protonated cations allows an increase in the stability of the perovskite by forming strong hydrogen bonds with the halide anions. This interaction also provides opportunities for tuning the electronic states near the bandgap. These mechanisms should have a universal character in different hybrid organic–inorganic framework materials that are widely used.

  19. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  20. Materials for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Züttel

    2003-09-01

    The goal is to pack hydrogen as close as possible, i.e. to reach the highest volumetric density by using as little additional material as possible. Hydrogen storage implies the reduction of an enormous volume of hydrogen gas. At ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, 1 kg of the gas has a volume of 11 m3. To increase hydrogen density, work must either be applied to compress the gas, the temperature decreased below the critical temperature, or the repulsion reduced by the interaction of hydrogen with another material.