WorldWideScience

Sample records for band structure comparison

  1. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  2. Photonic band structure computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, D; Frank, M; Busch, K; Wolfle, P

    2001-01-29

    We introduce a novel algorithm for band structure computations based on multigrid methods. In addition, we demonstrate how the results of these band structure calculations may be used to compute group velocities and effective photon masses. The results are of direct relevance to studies of pulse propagation in such materials.

  3. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are ...

  4. A Comparison of the Valence Band Structure of Bulk and Epitaxial GeTe-based Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzyk, M.A.; Kowalski, B.J.; Orlowski, B.A.; Knoff, W.; Story, T.; Dobrowolski, W.; Slynko, V.E.; Slynko, E.I.; Johnson, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a comparison of the experimental results, which have been obtained by the resonant photoelectron spectroscopy for a set of selected diluted magnetic semiconductors based on GeTe, doped with manganese. The photoemission spectra are acquired for the photon energy range of 40-60 eV, corresponding to the Mn 3p → 3d resonances. The spectral features related to Mn 3d states are revealed in the emission from the valence band. The Mn 3d states contribution manifests itself in the whole valence band with a maximum at the binding energy of 3.8 eV. (authors)

  5. Quasiparticle band structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manghi, F., E-mail: franca.manghi@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 213/A, I-41125 Modena (Italy); CNR – Institute of NanoSciences – S3 (Italy); Boni, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 213/A, I-41125 Modena (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We review many body techniques for quasiparticle calculations. • We focus on transition metals and transition metal oxides. • We discuss spin dependent energy renormalization and quasiparticle quenching. • We present a detailed comparison between two methods (DMFT and 3BS).

  6. Quasiparticle band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manghi, F.; Boni, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We review many body techniques for quasiparticle calculations. • We focus on transition metals and transition metal oxides. • We discuss spin dependent energy renormalization and quasiparticle quenching. • We present a detailed comparison between two methods (DMFT and 3BS).

  7. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  8. High-energy band structure of gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede

    1976-01-01

    The band structure of gold for energies far above the Fermi level has been calculated using the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The calculated f-band edge (Γ6-) lies 15.6 eV above the Fermi level is agreement with recent photoemission work. The band model is applied to interpret...

  9. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...

  10. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict...

  11. Phononic band gap structures as optimal designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use topology optimization to design phononic band gap structures. We consider 2D structures subjected to periodic loading and obtain the distribution of two materials with high contrast in material properties that gives the minimal vibrational response of the structure. Both in...

  12. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhizhong, E-mail: zzyan@bit.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57078 Siegen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  13. Transport in bilayer and trilayer graphene: band gap engineering and band structure tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Controlling the stacking order of atomically thin 2D materials offers a powerful tool to control their properties. Linearly dispersed bands become hyperbolic in Bernal (AB) stacked bilayer graphene (BLG). Both Bernal (ABA) and rhombohedral (ABC) stacking occur in trilayer graphene (TLG), producing distinct band structures and electronic properties. A symmetry-breaking electric field perpendicular to the sample plane can further modify the band structures of BLG and TLG. In this talk, I will describe our experimental effort in these directions using dual-gated devices. Using thin HfO2 film deposited by ALD as gate dielectric, we are able to apply large displacement fields D > 6 V/nm and observe the opening and saturation of the field-induced band gap Eg in bilayer and ABC-stacked trilayer graphene, where the conduction in the mid gap changes by more than six decades. Its field and temperature dependence highlights the crucial role played by Coulomb disorder in facilitating hopping conduction and suppressing the effect of Eg in the tens of meV regime. In contrast, mid-gap conduction decreases with increasing D much more rapidly in clean h-BN dual-gated devices. Our studies also show the evolution of the band structure in ABA-stacked TLG, in particular the splitting of the Dirac-like bands in large D field and the signatures of two-band transport at high carrier densities. Comparison to theory reveals the need for more sophisticated treatment of electronic screening beyond self-consistent Hartree calculations to accurately predict the band structures of trilayer graphene and graphenic materials in general.

  14. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... The deformed configurations and rotational band structures in =50 Ge and Se nuclei are studied by deformed Hartree–Fock with quadrupole constraint and angular momentum projection. Apart from the `almost' spherical HF solution, a well-deformed configuration occurs at low excitation. A deformed ...

  15. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... Here, we study theoretically the low-lying as well as the excited deformed bands and their electromagnetic properties to search for various structures, spherical and deformed, of the exotic nuclei 82Ge and 84Se by employing the deformed Hartree–Fock (HF) and angular momentum (J) projection method ...

  16. Wakefield Band Partitioning in LINAC Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Roger M

    2003-01-01

    In the NLC project multiple bunches of electrons and positrons will be accelerated initially to a centre of mass of 500 GeV and later to 1 TeV or more. In the process of accelerating 192 bunches within a pulse train, wakefields are excited which kick the trailing bunches off axis and can cause luminosity dilution and BBU (Beam Break Up). Several structures to damp the wakefield have been designed and tested at SLAC and KEK and these have been found to successfully damp the wakefield [1]. However, these 2π/3 structures suffered from electrical breakdown and this has prompted us to explore lower group velocity structures operating at higher fundamental mode phase advances. The wakefield partitioning amongst the bands has been found to change markedly with increased phase advance. Here we report on general trends in the kick factor and associated wakefield band partitioning in dipole bands as a function of phase advance of the synchronous mode in linacs. These results are applicable to both TW (travelling wave) and SW (standing wave) structures

  17. Surface band structures on Nb(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, B.; Lo, W.; Chien, T.; Leung, T.C.; Lue, C.Y.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    We report the joint studies of experimental and theoretical surface band structures of Nb(001). Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine surface-state dispersions along three high-symmetry axes bar Γ bar M, bar Γ bar X, and bar M bar X in the surface Brillouin zone. Ten surface bands have been identified. The experimental data are compared to self-consistent pseudopotential calculations for the 11-layer Nb(001) slabs that are either bulk terminated or fully relaxed (with a 12% contraction for the first interlayer spacing). The band calculations for a 12% surface-contracted slab are in better agreement with the experimental results than those for a bulk-terminated slab, except for a surface resonance near the Fermi level, which is related to the spin-orbit interaction. The charge profiles for all surface states or resonances have been calculated. Surface contraction effects on the charge-density distribution and the energy position of surface states and resonances will also be discussed

  18. Changing optical band structure with single photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-11-01

    Achieving strong interactions between individual photons enables a wide variety of exciting possibilities in quantum information science and many-body physics. Cold atoms interfaced with nanophotonic structures have emerged as a platform to realize novel forms of nonlinear interactions. In particular, when atoms are coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide, long-range atomic interactions can arise that are mediated by localized atom-photon bound states. We theoretically show that in such a system, the absorption of a single photon can change the band structure for a subsequent photon. This occurs because the first photon affects the atoms in the chain in an alternating fashion, thus leading to an effective period doubling of the system and a new optical band structure for the composite atom-nanophotonic system. We demonstrate how this mechanism can be engineered to realize a single-photon switch, where the first incoming photon switches the system from being highly transmissive to highly reflective, and analyze how signatures can be observed via non-classical correlations of the outgoing photon field.

  19. Band-Structure of Thallium by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtham, P. M.; Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The relativistic band structure of thallium has been calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method. The positions and extents of the bands were found to follow the Wigner-Seitz rule approximately, and the origin of the dispersion of the bands was established from the canonical s...... and p bands for the HCP structure. Energy bands have been evaluated both with and without spin-orbit coupling which is particularly large in thallium. Energy bands close to the Fermi level were found to be mainly 6p like in character. The 6s states lay below the 6p bands and were separated from them...

  20. Multiple band structures in 70Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Morrow, S. I.; Döring, J.; Tabor, S. L.; Le, K. Q.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Bender, P. C.; Elder, R. M.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Tripathi, Vandana

    2018-02-01

    High-spin states in 70Ge were studied using the 55Mn(18O,p 2 n ) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. Prompt γ -γ coincidences were measured using the Florida State University Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. An investigation of these coincidences resulted in the addition of 31 new transitions and the rearrangement of four others in the 70Ge level scheme, providing a more complete picture of the high-spin decay pattern involving both positive- and negative-parity states with multiple band structures. Spins were assigned based on directional correlation of oriented nuclei ratios, which many times also led to unambiguous parity determinations based on the firm assignments for low-lying states made in previous work. Total Routhian surface calculations, along with the observed trends in the experimental kinematic moment of inertia with rotational frequency, support the multiquasiparticle configurations of the various crossing bands proposed in recent studies. The high-spin excitation spectra predicted by previous shell-model calculations compare favorably with the experimental one determined from this study.

  1. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Banaras [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saifullah [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali-Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan (UI), 81744 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khan, Imad [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan)

    2015-10-25

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX{sub 3} (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures.

  2. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Banaras; Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye; Saifullah; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Khan, Imad; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX 3 (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures

  3. Band structures in fractal grading porous phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu; Wang, Bin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a new grading porous structure is introduced based on a Sierpinski triangle routine, and wave propagation in this fractal grading porous phononic crystal is investigated. The influences of fractal hierarchy and porosity on the band structures in fractal graidng porous phononic crystals are clarified. Vibration modes of unit cell at absolute band gap edges are given to manifest formation mechanism of absolute band gaps. The results show that absolute band gaps are easy to form in fractal structures comparatively to the normal ones with the same porosity. Structures with higher fractal hierarchies benefit multiple wider absolute band gaps. This work provides useful guidance in design of fractal porous phononic crystals.

  4. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... nuclei, e.g., in 16O (Z = N = 8) [12,13] and 56Ni (Z = N = 28) [14–16], coexisting with the spherical ground configuration. Recently, Hwang et al [2] have observed deformed rotational bands in 82Ge. To our knowledge, these deformed rotational bands have not been studied theoretically so far though there ...

  5. ARPES measurements of SnAs electronic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezotosnyi, P. I.; Dmitrieva, K. A.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu.; Pervakov, K. S.; Tsvetkov, A. Yu.; Martovitski, V. P.; Rybkin, A. G.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    We report experimental study of the electronic band structure of SnAs superconductor with the NaCl type lattice structure by angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The determined band structure, in general, is in a good agreement with the calculated one. However, at odd with the calculated band structure, the experimental data reveals splitting of one of the upper valence bands into three branches along the \\bar K - \\bar Γ - \\bar K and \\bar M - \\bar Γ - \\bar M' symmetry directions. We assume this splitting can be caused by the spin orbit coupling of electrons or a mixed valence of Sn atoms in the compound.

  6. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  7. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei; Huang, Xiaodong; Jia, Baohua

    2015-12-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  8. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Fei; Huang, Xiaodong; Jia, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  9. Band structure engineered layered metals for low-loss plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Morten Niklas; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    dichalcogenide TaS2, due to an extraordinarily small density of states for scattering in the near-IR originating from their special electronic band structure. On the basis of this observation, we propose a new class of band structure engineered van der Waals layered metals composed of hexagonal transition metal...

  10. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Electronic structures of rutile and anatase polymorph of TiO2 were determined by resonant inelas- tic X-ray scattering measurements and FEFF9.0 calculations. Difference between crystalline structures led to shifts in the rutile Ti d-band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., decrease in band gap. Anatase ...

  11. Band warping, band non-parabolicity, and Dirac points in electronic and lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resca, Lorenzo; Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-10-01

    We illustrate at a fundamental level the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. We point out a robust presence of pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a p-type tight-binding approximation. We analyze two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices with implications that are expected to generalize to more complex structures. Band warping is shown to arise at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, which allows the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions, hence band degeneracy, at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band warping is incompatible with a multi-dimensional Taylor series expansion, whereas band non-parabolicities are associated with multi-dimensional Taylor series expansions to all orders. Still band non-parabolicities may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Remarkably, while still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two p-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively to each other, until these conical intersections merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, even though our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more

  12. Band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying, E-mail: yliu5@bjtu.edu.cn; Liang, Tianshu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals (FPPCs) are studied with the aim to clarify the effect of fractal hierarchy on the band structures. Firstly, one kind of FPPCs based on Sierpinski triangle routine is proposed. Then the influence of the porosity on the elastic wave dispersion in Sierpinski triangle FPPCs is investigated. The sensitivity of the band structures to the fractal hierarchy is discussed in detail. The results show that the increase of the hierarchy increases the sensitivity of ABG (Absolute band gap) central frequency to the porosity. But further increase of the fractal hierarchy weakens this sensitivity. On the same hierarchy, wider ABGs could be opened in Sierpinski equilateral triangle FPPC; whilst, a lower ABG could be opened at lower porosity in Sierpinski right-angled isosceles FPPCs. These results will provide a meaningful guidance in tuning band structures in porous phononic crystals by fractal design.

  13. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  14. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor M.

    2007-01-01

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements

  15. Band connectivity for topological quantum chemistry: Band structures as a graph theory problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Elcoro, L.; Vergniory, M. G.; Cano, Jennifer; Wang, Zhijun; Felser, C.; Aroyo, M. I.; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2018-01-01

    The conventional theory of solids is well suited to describing band structures locally near isolated points in momentum space, but struggles to capture the full, global picture necessary for understanding topological phenomena. In part of a recent paper [B. Bradlyn et al., Nature (London) 547, 298 (2017), 10.1038/nature23268], we have introduced the way to overcome this difficulty by formulating the problem of sewing together many disconnected local k .p band structures across the Brillouin zone in terms of graph theory. In this paper, we give the details of our full theoretical construction. We show that crystal symmetries strongly constrain the allowed connectivities of energy bands, and we employ graph theoretic techniques such as graph connectivity to enumerate all the solutions to these constraints. The tools of graph theory allow us to identify disconnected groups of bands in these solutions, and so identify topologically distinct insulating phases.

  16. Band structure peculiarities of magnetic photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Golik, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we studied light diffraction in magneto-photonic crystals (MPC) having large magneto-optical activity and modulation large depth. The case of arbitrary angles between the direction of the external static magnetic field and the normal to the border of the MPC layer is considered. The problem is solved by Ambartsumian's modified layer addition method. It is found that there is a new type of non-reciprocity, namely, the relation R (α) ≠ R (- α) takes place, where R is the reflection coefficient, and α is the incidence angle. It is shown the formation of new photonic band gap (PBG) at oblique incidence of light, which is not selective for the polarization of the incident light, in the case when the external magnetic field is directed along the medium axis. Such a system can be used as: a tunable polarization filter, polarization mirror, circular (elliptical) polarizer, tunable optical diode, etc.

  17. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - stant and/or magnetic permeability (or in particular impedance) are periodic and the propagation of electromagnetic waves is forbidden at certain frequencies when allowed to pass through these structures. This is similar to the electronic band.

  18. Phonon band structures of the three dimensional latticed pentamode metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The artificially designed three-dimensional (3D pentamode metamaterials have such an extraordinary characteristic that the solid materials behave like liquids. Meanwhile, the ideal structure of the pentamode metamaterials arranges in the same way as that of the diamond crystals. In the present research, we regard three types of pentamode metamaterials derived from the 3D crystal lattices as research objects. The phonon band structures of the candidate pentamode structures are calculated by using the finite element method (FEM. We illustrate the relation between the ratio of the bulk modulus B and the shear modulus G of different combinations of D and d. Finally, we find out the relationship between the phonon band structure and the structure parameters. It is useful for generating the phonon band structure and controlling elastic wave propagation.

  19. Topological classification of crystalline insulators through band structure combinatorics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruthoff, J.; de Boer, J.; van Wezel, J.; Kane, C.L.; Slager, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a method for efficiently enumerating all allowed, topologically distinct, electronic band structures within a given crystal structure in all physically relevant dimensions. The algorithm applies to crystals without time-reversal, particle-hole, chiral, or any other anticommuting or

  20. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report the use of low dielectric constant materials to form two- dimensional microwave band-gap structures for achieving high gap-to-midgap ratio. The variable parameters chosen are the lattice spacing and the geometric structure. The se- lected geometries are square and triangular and the materials chosen ...

  1. Investigations of the Band Structure and Morphology of Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Kevin R.

    2011-12-01

    and temperature, which is manifested by variations in the diffraction lineshape. The effects of both intrinsic and extrinsic corrugation factors will be discussed. Through a carefully coordinated study I show how these surface morphology measurements can be combined with angle resolved photoemission measurements to understand the role of surface corrugation in the ARPES measurement process. The measurements described here rely on the development of an analytical formulation for relating the crystal corrugation to the photoemission linewidth. I present ARPES measurements that show that, despite significant deviation from planarity of the crystal, the electronic structure of exfoliated suspended graphene is nearly that of ideal, undoped graphene; the Dirac point is measured to be within 25 meV of EF. Further, I show that suspended graphene behaves as a marginal Fermi-liquid, with a quasiparticle lifetime which scales as (E -- EF)--1 ; comparison with other graphene and graphite data is discussed. In contrast to graphene, which must be treated as a flexible membrane with continuous height variation, roughness in clean single crystal surfaces arises from lattice dislocations, which introduce discrete height variations. Such height variations can be exploited to generate a self assembled nano-structured surface. In particular, by making a vicinal cut on a single crystal surface, a nanoscale step array can be formed. A model system for such nanoscale self assembly is Cu(111). Cu(775) is formed by making an 8.5° viscinal cut of Cu(111) along the [112¯] axis. The electronic states formed on the surface of this system, with a nanoscale step array of 14 A terraces, shows markedly different behavior those formed on Cu(111). In this dissertation, I show that the tunability of a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator, combined with its high-repetition rate and short pulse length, provides a powerful tool for resonant band mapping of the sp surface and image states on flat and

  2. Self-consistent, relativistic, ferromagnetic band structure of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, B.N.; Schirber, J.; Koelling, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    An initial self-consistent calculation of the ground state magnetic band structure of gadolinium is described. A linearized APW method was used which included all single particle relativistic effects except spin-orbit coupling. The spin polarized potential was obtained in the muffin-tin form using the local spin density approximation for exchange and correlation. The most striking and unorthodox aspect of the results is the position of the 4f spin-down ''bands'' which are required to float just on top of the Fermi level in order to obtain convergence. If the 4f states (l = 3 resonance) are removed from the occupied region of the conduction bands the magnetic moment is approximately .75 μ/sub B//atom; however, as the 4f spin-down states are allowed to find their own position they hybridize with the conduction bands at the Fermi level and the moment becomes smaller. Means of improving the calculation are discussed

  3. Bulk band structure of Bi2Te3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michiardi, Matteo; Aguilera, Irene; Bianchi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The bulk band structure of Bi2Te3 has been determined by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and compared to first-principles calculations. We have performed calculations using the local density approximation (LDA) of density functional theory and the one-shot GW approximation within the al...... distinct differences between the LDA and GW results are present. Overall a superior agreement with GW is found, highlighting the importance of many-body effects in the band structure of this family of topological insulators....

  4. An algebraic approach to scattering and band structure problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that both bound and scattering states of a class of potentials are related to the unitary representations of certain groups. For such systems the scattering matrix can be calculated in a completely algebraic way through the use of the Euclidean group to describe asymptotic behaviour. The band structures associated with a family of periodic potentials can also be obtained from the group theory. These results suggest that an algebraic approach to scattering and band structure problems similar to that applied to bound states is possible

  5. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    in the present paper that such an a priori assumption is not necessary since, in general, just the maximization of the gap between two consecutive natural frequencies leads to significant design periodicity. The aim of this paper is to maximize frequency gaps by shape optimization of transversely vibrating......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...

  6. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Michele; Palummo, Maurizia; Ossicini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  7. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Michele [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Palummo, Maurizia [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (Italy); CNR-INFM-SMC, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ossicini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.ossicini@unimore.it [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy) and Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy) and European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility - ETSF (Italy) and Centro Interdipartimentale ' En and Tech' , Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2012-06-05

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  8. First Principles Study of Band Structure and Band Gap Engineering in Graphene for Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-20

    vacancy and added impurities in them are investigated using 96 atom slab of graphene . The relaxed structures and charge distribution plots of graphene 24... graphene gets reconstructed. In order to further improve the band gap opening in the graphene we introduced impurity atoms in the vacancies and...distorted Dirac cones at the Fermi point can be a check mark for presence of equal concentration of p-type and n-type impurities in graphene . The

  9. Emission bands of phosphorus and calculation of band structure of rare earth phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'perovich, G.I.; Gusatinskij, A.N.; Geguzin, I.I.; Blokhin, M.A.; Torbov, V.I.; Chukalin, V.I.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Novykh Khimicheskikh Problem)

    1977-01-01

    The method of x-ray emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the electronic structure of monophosphides of rare-earth metals (REM). The fluorescence K bands of phosphorus have been obtained in LaP, PrP, SmP, GdP, TbP, DyP, HoP, ErP, TmP, YbP, and LuP and also the Lsub(2,3) bands of phosphorus in ErP, TmP, YbP, and LuP. Using the Green function technique involving the muffin-tin potential, the energy spectrum for ErP has been calculated in the single-electron approximation. The hystogram of electronic state distribution N(E) is compared with the experimental K and Lsub(2,3) bands of phosphorus in ErP. The agreement between the main details of N(E) and that of x-ray spectra allows to state that the model used provides a good description of the electron density distribution in crystals of REM monophosphides. In accordance with the character of the N(E) distribution the compounds under study are classified as semimetals or semiconductors with a very narrow forbidden band

  10. Design for maximum band-gaps in beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to extend earlier optimum design results for transversely vibrating Bernoulli-Euler beams by determining new optimum band-gap beam structures for (i) different combinations of classical boundary conditions, (ii) much larger values of the orders n and n-1 of adjacent upper and lowe...

  11. X-band photonic band-gap accelerator structure breakdown experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roark A. Marsh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz. The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65  MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110  MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100  MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890  kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14  MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  12. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BANDED STRUCTURES IN DUAL-PHASE STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Krebs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dual-Phase (DP steels are composed of martensite islands dispersed in a ductile ferrite matrix, which provides a good balance between strength and ductility. Current processing conditions (continuous casting followed by hot and cold rolling generate 'banded structures' i.e., irregular, parallel and alternating bands of ferrite and martensite, which are detrimental to mechanical properties and especially for in-use properties. We present an original and simple method to quantify the intensity and wavelength of these bands. This method, based on the analysis of covariance function of binary images, is firstly tested on model images. It is compared with ASTM E-1268 standard and appears to be more robust. Then it is applied on real DP steel microstructures and proves to be sufficiently sensitive to discriminate samples resulting from different thermo-mechanical routes.

  13. Three-dimensional photonic band gaps in woven structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai Ya Chih; Pendry, J B

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the photonic properties of dielectric fibres woven into three-dimensional (3D) structures. Such fibres can be fabricated on the micrometre scale, and hence the gaps are in the far-infrared to the infrared regime. The vector-wave transfer matrix method is applied to evaluate the photonic band structures. We have also employed the constant-frequency dispersion surface scheme to investigate the development of a full band gap. Such a 3D absolute gap is observed in a rectangular lattice, but at a fairly large dielectric constant for the fibres. Ways to improve on this have been suggested. Our study indicates that woven structures are promising materials for realizing the 3D photonic insulator in the infrared regime. (author)

  14. Band structure and orbital character of monolayer MoS2 with eleven-band tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Majid; Ghalambor Dezfuli, Abdolmohammad; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, based on a tight-binding (TB) model, first we present the calculations of eigenvalues as band structure and then present the eigenvectors as probability amplitude for finding electron in atomic orbitals for monolayer MoS2 in the first Brillouin zone. In these calculations we are considering hopping processes between the nearest-neighbor Mo-S, the next nearest-neighbor in-plan Mo-Mo, and the next nearest-neighbor in-plan and out-of-plan S-S atoms in a three-atom based unit cell of two-dimensional rhombic MoS2. The hopping integrals have been solved in terms of Slater-Koster and crystal field parameters. These parameters are calculated by comparing TB model with the density function theory (DFT) in the high-symmetry k-points (i.e. the K- and Γ-points). In our TB model all the 4d Mo orbitals and the 3p S orbitals are considered and detailed analysis of the orbital character of each energy level at the main high-symmetry points of the Brillouin zone is described. In comparison with DFT calculations, our results of TB model show a very good agreement for bands near the Fermi level. However for other bands which are far from the Fermi level, some discrepancies between our TB model and DFT calculations are observed. Upon the accuracy of Slater-Koster and crystal field parameters, on the contrary of DFT, our model provide enough accuracy to calculate all allowed transitions between energy bands that are very crucial for investigating the linear and nonlinear optical properties of monolayer MoS2.

  15. Hubbard-U band-structure methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, R.C.; Christensen, Niels Egede; Svane, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen a large increase in the number of electronic-structure calculations that involve adding a Hubbard term to the local-density approximation band-structure Hamiltonian. The Hubbard term is then determined either at the mean-field level or with sophisticated many......-body techniques such as using dynamical mean-field theory. We review the physics underlying these approaches and discuss their strengths and weaknesses in terms of the larger issues of electronic structure that they involve. In particular, we argue that the common assumptions made to justify such calculations...

  16. Band structure, band offsets, substitutional doping, and Schottky barriers of bulk and monolayer InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the electronic structure of the layered semiconductor InSe. We calculate the band structure of the monolayer and bulk material using density functional theory, hybrid functionals, and G W . The band gap of the monolayer InSe is calculated to be 2.4 eV in screened exchange hybrid functional, close to the experimental photoluminescence gap. The electron affinities and band offsets are calculated for vertical stacked-layer heterostructures, and are found to be suitable for tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) in combination with WS e2 or similar. The valence-band edge of InSe is calculated to lie 5.2 eV below the vacuum level, similar to that for the closed shell systems HfS e2 or SnS e2 . Hence InSe would be suitable to act as a p -type drain in the TFET. The intrinsic defects are calculated. For Se-rich layers, the Se adatom (interstitial) is found to be the most stable defect, whereas for In-rich layers, the Se vacancy is the most stable for the neutral state. Antisites tend to have energies just above those of vacancies. The Se antisite distorts towards a bond-breaking distortion as in the EL2 center of GaAs. Both substitutional donors and acceptors are calculated to be shallow, and effective dopants. They do not reconstruct to form nondoping configurations as occurs in black phosphorus. Finally, the Schottky barriers of metals on InSe are found to be strongly pinned by metal induced gap states (MIGS) at ˜0.5 eV above the valence-band edge. Any interfacial defects would lead to a stronger pinning at a similar energy. Overall, InSe is an effective semiconductor combining the good features of 2D (lack of dangling bonds, etc.) with the good features of 3D (effective doping), which few others achieve.

  17. Band structure engineered layered metals for low-loss plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerding, Morten N.; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmonics currently faces the problem of seemingly inevitable optical losses occurring in the metallic components that challenges the implementation of essentially any application. In this work, we show that Ohmic losses are reduced in certain layered metals, such as the transition metal dichalcogenide TaS2, due to an extraordinarily small density of states for scattering in the near-IR originating from their special electronic band structure. On the basis of this observation, we propose a new class of band structure engineered van der Waals layered metals composed of hexagonal transition metal chalcogenide-halide layers with greatly suppressed intrinsic losses. Using first-principles calculations, we show that the suppression of optical losses lead to improved performance for thin-film waveguiding and transformation optics.

  18. High-spin structure of yrast-band in Kr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 185–189. High-spin structure of yrast-band in. 78. Kr. P K JOSHI, R PALIT, H C JAIN, S NAGARAJ and J A SHEIKH. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005, India. Abstract. Lifetime of levels up to 22. ·. , have been measured in Kr and an oblate shape is assigned to the ground state using the CSM and ...

  19. Importance of complex band structure and resonant states for tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dederichs, P. H.; Mavropoulos, Ph.; Wunnicke, O.; Papanikolaou, N.; Bellini, V.; Zeller, R.; Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 240, - (2002), s. 108-113 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010829; GA ČR GA202/00/0122; GA MŠk OC P5.30 Grant - others:TSR(XX) 01398 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetoresistance * tunneling * band structure * interface effects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  20. Band structure and unconventional electronic topology of CoSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenay-Severin, D. A.; Ivanov, Y. V.; Burkov, A. A.; Burkov, A. T.

    2018-04-01

    Semimetals with certain crystal symmetries may possess unusual electronic structure topology, distinct from that of the conventional Weyl and Dirac semimetals. Characteristic property of these materials is the existence of band-touching points with multiple (higher than two-fold) degeneracy and nonzero Chern number. CoSi is a representative of this group of materials exhibiting the so-called ‘new fermions’. We report on an ab initio calculation of the electronic structure of CoSi using density functional methods, taking into account the spin–orbit interactions. The linearized \

  1. Band gaps in grid structure with periodic local resonator subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2017-09-01

    The grid structure is widely used in architectural and mechanical field for its high strength and saving material. This paper will present a study on an acoustic metamaterial beam (AMB) based on the normal square grid structure with local resonators owning both flexible band gaps and high static stiffness, which have high application potential in vibration control. Firstly, the AMB with variable cross-section frame is analytically modeled by the beam-spring-mass model that is provided by using the extended Hamilton’s principle and Bloch’s theorem. The above model is used for computing the dispersion relation of the designed AMB in terms of the design parameters, and the influences of relevant parameters on band gaps are discussed. Then a two-dimensional finite element model of the AMB is built and analyzed in COMSOL Multiphysics, both the dispersion properties of unit cell and the wave attenuation in a finite AMB have fine agreement with the derived model. The effects of design parameters of the two-dimensional model in band gaps are further examined, and the obtained results can well verify the analytical model. Finally, the wave attenuation performances in three-dimensional AMBs with equal and unequal thickness are presented and discussed.

  2. Crossing points in the electronic band structure of vanadium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav N. Shrivastava

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic band structures of several models of vanadium oxide are calculated. In the models 1-3, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 4 vanadium atoms. In model 1, a=b=c 2.3574 Å; in model 2, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 2.3574 Å; and in model 3, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 4.7148 Å. In the models 4-6, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 2 vanadium atoms. In model 4, a=b= 4.551 Å and c= 2.851 Å; in model 5, a=b=c= 3.468 Å; and in model 6, a=b=c= 3.171 Å. We have searched for a crossing point in the band structure of all the models. In model 1 there is a point at which five bands appear to meet but the gap is 7.3 meV. In model 2 there is a crossing point between G and F points and there is a point between F and Q with the gap ≈ 3.6608 meV. In model 3, the gap is very small, ~ 10-5 eV. In model 4, the gap is 5.25 meV. In model 5, the gap between Z and G points is 2.035 meV, and in model 6 the gap at Z point is 4.3175 meV. The crossing point in model 2 looks like one line is bent so that the supersymmetry is broken. When pseudopotentials are replaced by a full band calculation, the crossing point changes into a gap of 2.72 x 10-4 eV.

  3. Optical processes in different types of photonic band gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Mengqin; Ullah, Zakir; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-06-01

    For the first time, we investigate the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in the static and moving electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) through scanning the frequency detunings of the probe field, dressing field and coupling field. Especially, the suppression and enhancement of the four wave mixing band gap signal (FWM BGS) and the probe transmission signal (PTS) can be observed when we scan the dressing field frequency detuning in the FWM BGS system. It is worth noting that the PBG structure and FWM BGS appear at the right of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) position in the case of scanning the frequency detuning of the coupling field in the FWM BGS system, while the PBG structure and FWM BGS appears at the left of the EIT position on the condition of scanning the probe field frequency detuning. Moreover, in the moving PBG structure, we can obtain the nonreciprocity of FWM BGS. Furthermore, we can modulate the intensity, width, location of the FWM BGS and PTS through changing the frequency detunings and intensities of the probe field, dressing field and coupling field, sample length and the frequency difference of coupling fields in EIG. Such scheme could have potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers and quantum information processing.

  4. A Compact UWB Band-Pass Filter Using Embedded Circular Slot Structures for Improved Upper Stop-band Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Ren, Jian; Mikkelsen, Jan Hvolgaard

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultra-wideband band-pass filter designed using a slot-line ring resonator and two pairs of embedded circular slot structures. The slot-line ring resonator is used to form the desired UWB passband, and the upper stop-band response is suppressed by embedding the circular slot...

  5. Band structure engineering for ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The energy band structure fundamentally influences the physical properties of a periodic system. It may give rise to highly exotic phenomena in yet uncharted physical regimes. Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices provide an ideal playground for the investigation of a large variety of such intriguing effects. Experiments presented here address several issues that require the systematic manipulation of energy band structures in optical lattices with diverse geometries. These artificial crystals of light, generated by interfering laser beams, allow for an unprecedented degree of control over a wide range of parameters. A major part of this thesis employs time-periodic driving to engineer tunneling matrix elements and, thus, the dispersion relation for bosonic quantum gases in optical lattices. Resonances emerging in the excitation spectrum due to the particularly strong forcing can be attributed to multi-photon transitions that are investigated systematically. By changing the sign of the tunneling, antiferromagnetic spin-spin interactions can be emulated. In a triangular lattice this leads to geometrical frustration with a doubly degenerate ground state as the simultaneous minimization of competing interactions is inhibited. Moreover, complex-valued tunneling matrix elements can be generated with a suitable breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the driving scheme. The associated Peierls phases mimic the presence of an electromagnetic vector gauge potential acting on charged particles. First proof-of-principle experiments reveal an excellent agreement with theoretical calculations. In the weakly interacting superfluid regime, these artificial gauge fields give rise to an Ising-XY model with tunable staggered magnetic fluxes and a complex interplay between discrete and continuous symmetries. A thermal phase transition from an ordered ferromagnetic- to an unordered paramagnetic state could be observed. In the opposite hard-core boson limit of strong interactions

  6. Band structure in Platinum nuclei (A ∼ 182)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    In this thesis, the author studies the band structure in Platinum nuclei and has divided his work in 5 parts: in the first, the author makes a general presentation of nucleus physics with a high angular momentum and introduces to the deformed nucleus notion -axial, triaxial or mixing of different deformations. The notion of form co-existence will be used to interpret the experimental results. In the second part, the author describes the detection means which have been used to make measurements. An abstract of theoretical notions, usefull for the understanding of fusion-evaporation reaction is presented. The author explains the details, performances and different modes of using of 'Chateau de cristal' and others used spectrometers. In the third part, the author presents all experimental data. He has effected γ coincidence measurements for Pt, Au and Ir nuclei. In the fourth part, for a classical analysis or an interpretation in the frame of cranking model the author presents theoretical models which are adapted at the study of high spin states and band structures

  7. Comparison of CN-Band Strengths in Open Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, B.

    1996-12-01

    Spectra at ~ 5 Angstroms resolution in the 3600--4600 Angstroms wavelength range have been obtained for 27 stars in the field of the old open cluster (M67) (NGC 2682) and for 14 stars of the younger Pleiades. Based on synthetic spectra (Briley 1996, private communication) of 23 M67 G-dwarf members and 14 Pleiads, the violet CN-band index is found to be adequate to detect a star-to-star spread in [N/H] for these G-dwarf spectra. No such [N/H] inhomogeneity was indicated. This is consistent with findings for unevolved stars in other open clusters, but is unlike the bimodality in CN-band strengths seen in globular cluster unevolved stars [Suntzeff 1989, in The Abundance Spread within Globular Clusters, (Paris, Obs. de Paris), 71: NGC 6752) and (Briley et al. 1994, AJ 108, 2183): 47 Tuc]. This homogeneity is also different than the significant spread in CN-band strengths of evolved stars in three other as old or older open clusters, Melotte 66, NGC 188, and NGC 6791 (Anthony-Twarog et al., 1994, AJ, 106, 486; McClure 1974, ApJ, 194, 355; and Hufnagel et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 693, respectively). This result is consistent with an evolutionary process that creates a dispersion in the CN-band strength distribution of evolved stars, but is only effective for stars turning off the main-sequence with a mass lower than some threshold mass, as suggested by other workers (e.g., Gilroy 1989, ApJ, 347, 835). The Pleiads were successfully modeled using enhanced [O/H] values (King 1994, PASP, 106, 423) and depleted [C/H] values, contrary to previous high-resolution results (e.g., Boesgaard & Friel 1990, ApJ, 351, 467).

  8. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate the flexibility and advantages of a non-uniform pseudo-spectral time domain (nu-PSTD) method through studies of the wave propagation characteristics on photonic band-gap (PBG) structures in stratified medium Design/methodology/approach - A nu-PSTD method is proposed...... in solving the Maxwell's equations numerically. It expands the temporal derivatives using the finite differences, while it adopts the Fourier transform (FT) properties to expand the spatial derivatives in Maxwell's equations. In addition, the method makes use of the chain-rule property in calculus together...... with the transformed space technique in order to make the algorithm flexible in terms of non-uniform spatial sampling. Findings - Through the studies of the wave propagation characteristics on PBG structures in stratified medium, it has been found that the proposed method retains excellent accuracy in the occasions...

  9. Band structure of ABC-trilayer graphene superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, Salah; Chan, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of one-dimensional periodic potentials on the low energy band structure of ABC trilayer graphene first by assuming that all the three layers have the same potential. Extra Dirac points having the same electron hole crossing energy as that of the original Dirac point are generated by superlattice potentials with equal well and barrier widths. When the potential height is increased, the numbers of extra Dirac points are increased. The dispersions around the Dirac points are not isotropic. It is noted that the dispersion along the k y direction for k x  = 0 oscillates between a non-linear dispersion and a linear dispersion when the potential height is increased. When the well and barrier widths are not identical, the symmetry of the conduction and valence bands is broken. The extra Dirac points are shifted either upward or downward depending on the barrier and well widths from the zero energy, while the position of the central Dirac point oscillates with the superlattice potential height. By considering different potentials for different layers, extra Dirac points are generated not from the original Dirac points but from the valleys formed in the energy spectrum. Two extra Dirac points appear from each pair of touched valleys, so four Dirac points appeared in the spectrum at particular barrier height. By increasing the barrier height of superlattice potential two Dirac points merge into the original Dirac point. This emerging and merging of extra Dirac points is different from the equal potential case

  10. A multi-mesh finite element method for phase-field based photonic band structure optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengyang; Hu, Xianliang; Zhu, Shengfeng

    2018-03-01

    A novel finite element method with multiple meshes is proposed, which is applied to solve the phase-field models for photonic band structures optimization. In our approach, fine meshes are used for the phase field evolution, which allows fine resolution for shape representations. The coarse meshes are adopted for the finite element analysis of the state equation. Such a multi-mesh approach could save a considerable amount of computational costs. Numerical convergence is illustrated through comparisons between our computational results and benchmarks. The efficiency and robustness of the multi-mesh approach are also shown.

  11. Band structure and optical properties of diglycine nitrate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriyevsky, Bohdan; Ciepluch-Trojanek, Wioleta; Romanyuk, Mykola; Patryn, Aleksy; Jaskolski, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electron energy characteristics and optical spectra for diglycine nitrate crystal (DGN) (NH 2 CH 2 COOH) 2 .HNO 3 , in the paraelectric phase (T=295K) are presented. Spectral dispersion of light reflection R(E) have been measured in the range of 3-22eV and the optical functions n(E) and k(E) have been calculated using Kramers-Kronig relations. First principal calculations of the electron energy characteristic and optical spectra of DGN crystal have been performed in the frame of density functional theory using CASTEP code (CAmbridge Serial Total Energy Package). Optical transitions forming the low-energy edge of fundamental absorption are associated with the nitrate groups NO 3 . Peculiarities of the band structure and DOS projected onto glycine and NO 3 groups confirm the molecular character of DGN crystal

  12. Intrinsic properties of high-spin band structures in triaxial nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehangir, S.; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.; Palit, R.; Ganai, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    The band structures of 68,70Ge, 128,130,132,134Ce and 132,134,136,138Nd are investigated using the triaxial projected shell model (TPSM) approach. These nuclei depict forking of the ground-state band into several s-bands and in some cases, both the lowest two observed s-bands depict neutron or proton character. It was discussed in our earlier work that this anomalous behaviour can be explained by considering γ-bands based on two-quasiparticle configurations. As the parent band and the γ-band built on it have the same intrinsic structure, g-factors of the two bands are expected to be similar. In the present work, we have undertaken a detailed investigation of g-factors for the excited band structures of the studied nuclei and the available data for a few high-spin states are shown to be in fair agreement with the predicted values.

  13. Observation of high-spin oblate band structures in Pm141

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, L.; Zhu, S. J.; Wang, J. G.; Yeoh, E. Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.; Zhang, M.; Liu, Y.; Ding, H. B.; Xu, Q.; Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Li, G. S.; Wang, L. L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, B.

    2011-06-01

    The high-spin states of Pm141 have been investigated through the reaction Te126(F19,4n) at a beam energy of 90 MeV. A previous level scheme has been updated with spins up to 49/2ℏ. Six collective bands at high spins are newly observed. Based on the systematic comparison, one band is proposed as a decoupled band; two bands with strong ΔI=1 M1 transitions inside the bands are suggested as the oblate bands with γ ~-60°; three other bands with large signature splitting have been proposed with the oblate-triaxial deformation with γ~ -90°. The triaxial n-particle-n-hole particle rotor model calculations for one of the oblate bands in Pm141 are in good agreement with the experimental data. The other characteristics for these bands have been discussed.

  14. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125−131Ce ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nated by rotational bands, built on the ground and low-lying excited states. The behaviour of these rotational bands can provide useful information about the un- derlying nuclear structure. The 125Ce nucleus is the lightest even–odd isotope of which the band structures have been published by Paul et al [2]. Excited states.

  15. QUANTUM-MECHANICAL MODELING OF SPATIAL AND BAND STRUCTURE OF Y3AL5O12 SCINTILLATION CRYSTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vrubel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and electronic structures of a unit cell of yttrium-aluminum garnet have been studied. Quantum-mechanical model have been presented. Semi-empirical methods PM6 and PM7 have been used for geometry optimization of the crystal unit cell. Band structure has been calculated within density functional theory with the use of PBE exchange-correlation functional. Histograms of metal-oxygen distances for equilibrium geometry have been constructed. Comparison of the used methods has been carried out and recommendation about their applicability for such problems was given. The single-particle wave functions and energies have been calculated. The bandgap was estimated. The band structure was plotted. It was shown that the method gives reliable results for spatial and band structure of Y3Al5O12 scintillation crystal. The results of this work can be used for improvement of characteristics of garnet scintillation crystals.

  16. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandhya; Tuttle, Gary L.; Sigalas, Mihail; McCalmont, Jonathan S.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  17. True photonic band-gap mode-control in VCSEL structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, F.; Madsen, M.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect.......Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect....

  18. Structural mechanisms of formation of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sokovikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of plastic deformation instability and localization in materials subjected to dynamic loading and high-velocity perforation. We investigate the behavior of samples dynamically loaded during Hopkinson-Kolsky pressure bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions. Experiments were carried out using samples of a special shape and appropriate test rigging, which allowed us to realize a plane strain state. Also, the shear-compression specimens proposed in were investigated. The lateral surface of the samples was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. Use of a transmission electron microscope for studying the surface of samples showed that in the regions of strain localization there are parts taking the shape of bands and honeycomb structure in the deformed layer. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was investigated using a high-speed infra-red camera. A specially designed ballistic set-up for studying perforation was used to test samples in different impulse loading regimes followed by plastic flow instability and plug ejection. Changes in the velocity of the rear surface at different time of plug ejection were analyzed by Doppler interferometry techniques. The microstructure of tested samples was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The subsequent processing of 3D deformation relief data enabled estimation of the distribution of plastic strain gradients at different time of plug formation and ejection. It has been found that in strain localization areas the subgrains are elongated taking the shape of bands and undergo fragmentation leading to the formation of super-microcrystalline structure, in which the

  19. Cresting the wave: proper motions of the Eastern Banded Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deason, Alis J.; Belokurov, Vasily; Koposov, Sergey E.

    2018-01-01

    We study the kinematic properties of the Eastern Banded Structure (EBS) and Hydra I overdensity using exquisite proper motions derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Gaia source catalogue. Main sequence turn-off stars in the vicinity of the EBS are identified from SDSS photometry; we use the proper motions and, where applicable, spectroscopic measurements of these stars to probe the kinematics of this apparent stream. We find that the EBS and Hydra I share common kinematic and chemical properties with the nearby Monoceros Ring. In particular, the proper motions of the EBS, like Monoceros, are indicative of prograde rotation (Vϕ ∼ 180-220 km s-1), which is similar to the Galactic thick disc. The kinematic structure of stars in the vicinity of the EBS suggests that it is not a distinct stellar stream, but rather marks the 'edge' of the Monoceros Ring. The EBS and Hydra I are the latest substructures to be linked with Monoceros, leaving the Galactic anti-centre a mess of interlinked overdensities which likely share a unified, Galactic disc origin.

  20. A new perspective for analyzing complex band structures of phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingkai; Shi, Zhifei; Cheng, Zhibao

    2018-03-01

    Rewriting the formulation of the Bloch waves, this paper presents a new perspective for analyzing the complex band structures of the in-plane waves in 2D phononic crystals. Using the proposed formulation, a new finite element based method is developed for analyzing 2D periodic systems. The results of the validation example prove that the proposed method can provide exact solutions for both the real and complex band structures of 2D periodic systems. Furthermore, using the proposed method, the complex band structures of a 2D periodic structure are calculated. The physical meanings of the obtained complex band structures are discussed by performing the wave mode analysis.

  1. Electronic band structure in porous silicon studied by photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki-Won; Kim, Young-You

    2004-01-01

    In this research, we used photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) to visualize the electronic band structure in porous silicon (PS). From the combined results of the PLE measurements at various PL emission energies and the PL measurements under excitation at various PLE absorption energies, we infer that three different electronic band structures, originating from different luminescent origins, give rise to the PL spectrum. Through either thermal activation or diffusive transfer, excited carriers are moved to each of the electronic band structures.

  2. Energy band structure, fermi surfaces, magnetization densities, and properties of the rare-earths and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    Some aspects of the predictions of energy band theory for both the rare earths and actinides and their comparison with experiment are discussed. Recent developments in assessing eigenfunction behavior are emphasized. 5 figures

  3. Unoccupied electronic band structure effects in low-energy SEES and TCS of some d-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchenko, O.F.

    2002-01-01

    The fine structure of the experimental secondary electron emission spectra (SEES) along the normal to a Ir(111) surface and the target (total) current spectra (TCS) along the normal to a Cu(111) surface are interpreted theoretically. It is shown that the fine structure of SEES and TCS is mainly due to the electronic structure of unoccupied high-level electronic states (above the vacuum level E vac ) to which the electrons come or from which they emit. The predominant role of the effects of bulk energy-band structure in the formation of spectra is shown. Comparison to existing experimental data is given

  4. Optical model with multiple band couplings using soft rotator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Dmitry; Soukhovitskii, Efrem; Capote, Roberto; Quesada, Jose Manuel; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A new dispersive coupled-channel optical model (DCCOM) is derived that describes nucleon scattering on 238U and 232Th targets using a soft-rotator-model (SRM) description of the collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM Hamiltonian parameters are adjusted to the observed collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM nuclear wave functions (mixed in K quantum number) have been used to calculate coupling matrix elements of the generalized optical model. Five rotational bands are coupled: the ground-state band, β-, γ-, non-axial- bands, and a negative parity band. Such coupling scheme includes almost all levels below 1.2 MeV of excitation energy of targets. The "effective" deformations that define inter-band couplings are derived from SRM Hamiltonian parameters. Conservation of nuclear volume is enforced by introducing a monopolar deformed potential leading to additional couplings between rotational bands. The present DCCOM describes the total cross section differences between 238U and 232Th targets within experimental uncertainty from 50 keV up to 200 MeV of neutron incident energy. SRM couplings and volume conservation allow a precise calculation of the compound-nucleus (CN) formation cross sections, which is significantly different from the one calculated with rigid-rotor potentials with any number of coupled levels.

  5. The band gap variation of a two dimensional binary locally resonant structure in thermal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the numerical investigation of thermal effect on band gap dynamical characteristic for a two-dimensional binary structure composed of aluminum plate periodically filled with nitrile rubber cylinder is presented. Initially, the band gap of the binary structure variation trend with increasing temperature is studied by taking the softening effect of thermal stress into account. A breakthrough is made which found the band gap being narrower and shifting to lower frequency in thermal environment. The complete band gap which in higher frequency is more sensitive to temperature that it disappears with temperature increasing. Then some new transformed models are created by changing the height of nitrile rubber cylinder from 1mm to 7mm. Simulations show that transformed model can produce a wider band gap (either flexure or complete band gap. A proper forbidden gap of elastic wave can be utilized in thermal environment although both flexure and complete band gaps become narrower with temperature. Besides that, there is a zero-frequency flat band appearing in the first flexure band, and it becomes broader with temperature increasing. The band gap width decreases trend in thermal environment, as well as the wider band gap induced by the transformed model with higher nitrile rubber cylinder is useful for the design and application of phononic crystal structures in thermal environment.

  6. Valence-band structure of cubic CdS as determined by angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, A. P. J.; Hofmann, Ph.; Schaff, O.; Bradshaw, A. M.

    1997-04-01

    The valence-band structure of cubic CdS along the Γ-Σ-X direction and at all high-symmetry points has been experimentally determined using angle-resolved photoemission and compared to two local density approximation (LDA) calculations as well as to a recent quasiparticle calculation. The Cd 4d level was found to be semibandlike with an energy dispersion of up to 1 eV. The energy difference between the experimental and our calculated linear-muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) LDA energies falls, as expected, along a line of positive gradient. The quasiparticle calculation by Pollmann and co-workers fits the experimental values somewhat better than the LMTO calculation, although a difference of ~1.0 eV was still found to occur for the Cd 4d band. The self-interaction and relaxation-corrected pseudopotential LDA results by the same group give the best fit to within ~+/-0.5 eV for nearly all critical energies measured. Comparison with previously reported photoemission results on the wurtzite structure shows that energies at equivalent symmetry points agree within experimental error.

  7. Energy Band Structure Studies Of Zinc-Blende GaAs and InAs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Energy band structures, density of states and structural parameters of all the compounds are presented and discussed in context with available theoretical and experimental studies. Our results show that the energy band gaps of the semiconductors are underestimated. But overall our results show reasonable agreement ...

  8. New bismuth borophosphate Bi4BPO10: Synthesis, crystal structure, optical and band structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babitsky, Nicolay A.; Leshok, Darya Y.; Mikhaleva, Natalia S.; Kuzubov, Aleksandr A.; Zhereb, Vladimir P.; Kirik, Sergei D.

    2015-01-01

    New bismuth borophosphate Bi 4 BPO 10 was obtained by spontaneous crystallization from the melt of correspondent composition at 804 °C. Crystal structure with orthorhombic lattice parameters: a = 22.5731(3) Å, b = 14.0523(2) Å, c = 5.5149(1) Å, V = 1749.34(4), Z = 8, SG Pcab was determined by X-ray powder diffraction technique. The [Bi 2 O 2 ] 2+ -layers, which are typical for bismuth oxide compounds, transform into cationic endless strips of 4 bismuth atoms width directed along the c-axis in Bi 4 BPO 10 . The strips combining stacks are separated by flat triangle [BO 3 ] 3− -anions within stacks. Neighboring stacks are separated by tetrahedral [PO 4 ] 3− -anions and shifted relatively to each other. Bismuth atoms are placed in 5–7 vertex oxygen irregular polyhedra. Bi 4 BPO 10 is stable up to 812 °C, then melts according to the peritectic law. The absorption spectrum in the range 350–700 nm was obtained and the width of the forbidden band was estimated as 3.46 eV. The band electronic structure of Bi 4 BPO 10 was modeled using DFT approach. The calculated band gap (3.56 eV) is in good agreement with the experimentally obtained data. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • New bismuth borophosphate with composition Bi 4 BPO 10 was synthesized. • The crystal structure was determined by X-ray powder diffraction technique. • Bismuth-oxygen part [Bi 4 O 3 ] 6+ forms endless strips of 4 bismuth atoms width. • Electronic structure was modeled by DFT method. • The calculated band gap (3.56 eV) is very close to the experimental one (3.46 eV)

  9. Structure research of L-band travelling-wave buncher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wenzhen; Zhang Xiangyang; Ding Shuling

    1996-01-01

    The authors introduce design and tuning of two kinds of the buncher of the L-band high current injector of China Institute of Atomic Energy. Characteristics of the few cavities buncher is shown and the effects of the two modes of the buncher in high current injector are given

  10. The use of simultaneous confidence bands for comparison of single parameter fluorescent intensity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongha; Donnenberg, Vera S; Wilson, John W; Donnenberg, Albert D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the utility of multiparameter flow cytometry for a wide variety of biological applications, comparing single parameter histograms of fluorescence intensity remains a mainstay of flow cytometric analysis. Even comparisons requiring multiparameter gating strategies often end with single parameter histograms as the final readout. When histograms overlap, analysis relies on comparison of mean or median fluorescence intensities, or determination of percent positive based on an arbitrary cutoff. Earlier attempts to address this problem utilized either simple channel-by-channel subtraction without statistical evaluation, or the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) or Chi-square test statistics, both of which proved to be overly sensitive to small and biologically insignificant differences. Here we present a method for the comparison of two single-parameter histograms based on difference curves and their simultaneous confidence bands generated by bootstrapping raw channel data. Bootstrapping is a nonparametric statistical approach that can be used to generate confidence intervals without distributional assumptions about the data. We have constructed simultaneous confidence bands and show them to be superior to KS and Cox methods. The method constructs 95% confidence bands about the difference curves, provides a P value for the comparison and calculates the area under the difference curve (AUC) as an estimate of percent positive and the area under the confidence band (AUCSCB95), providing a lower estimate of the percent positive. To demonstrate the utility of this new approach we have examined single-color fluorescence intensity data taken from a cell surface proteomic survey of a lung cancer cell line (A549) and a published fluorescence intensity data from a rhodamine efflux assay of P-glycoprotein activity, comparing rhodamine 123 loading and efflux in CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations. SAS source code is provided as supplementary material. © 2015 International Society for

  11. Comparison of High Performance Network Options: EDR InfiniBand vs.100Gb RDMA Capable Ethernet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelmeier, Luke Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van Wig, Faith Virginia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Erickson, Kari Natania [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    These are the slides for a presentation at the HPC Mini Showcase. This is a comparison of two different high performance network options: EDR InfiniBand and 100Gb RDMA capable ethernet. The conclusion of this comparison is the following: there is good potential, as shown with the direct results; 100Gb technology is too new and not standardized, thus deployment effort is complex for both options; different companies are not necessarily compatible; if you want 100Gb/s, you must get it all from one place.

  12. Design and analysis of coplanar waveguide triple-band antenna based on defected ground structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hong; Chen, Wanli; Xia, Xinsheng; Qi, Peng; Sun, Quanling

    2017-11-01

    A kind of coplanar waveguide triple-band antenna based on defected ground structure is proposed, which has novel structure. Three batches with different frequency band are constructed by utilizing line combination, overlapping, and symmetry method. Stop band signals among three frequency bands are effectively suppressed by slots with different structures. More satisfactory impedance matching is realized by means of changing slot structure and improving return-loss. The presented antenna can operates simultaneously in various systems such as 3G / 4G wireless communication, Bluetooth, Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, Wireless LAN. Test results show that the antenna has good radiation and gain in its working frequency band, and that it has great application potentials.

  13. Effect of pressure on the structural properties and electronic band structure of GaSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, U.; Olguin, D.; Syassen, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cantarero, A. [Department of Materials Sciences, University of Valencia, 46000 Burjasot (Spain); Hanfland, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2007-01-15

    The structural properties of GaSe have been investigated up to 38 GPa by monochromatic X-ray diffraction. The onset of the phase transition from the {epsilon}-GaSe to a disordered NaCl-type structural motif is observed near 21 GPa. Using the experimentally determined lattice parameters of the layered {epsilon}-phase as input, constrained ab-initio total energy calculations were performed in order to optimize the internal structural parameters at different pressures. The results obtained for the nearest-neighbor Ga-Se distance agree with those derived from recent EXAFS measurements. In addition, information is obtained on the changes of Ga-Ga and Se-Se bond lengths which were not accessible to a direct experimental determination yet. Based on the optimized structural parameters, we report calculations of band gap changes of {epsilon}-GaSe under pressure. The optical response and electronic band structure of the metallic high-pressure phase of GaSe are discussed briefly. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Electronic band structure of epitaxial PbTe (111) thin films observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhenyu; Cui, Shengtao; Shu, Tianyu; Ma, Songsong; Liu, Yang; Sun, Zhe; Luo, Jun-Wei; Wu, Huizhen

    2017-04-01

    Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we studied bulk and surface electronic band structures of narrow-gap semiconductor lead telluride (PbTe) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy both perpendicular and parallel to the Γ -L direction. The comparison of ARPES data with the first-principles calculation reveals the details of band structures, orbital characters, spin-orbit splitting energies, and surface states. The photon-energy-dependent spectra show the bulk character. Both the L and Σ valence bands are observed and their energy difference is determined. The spin-orbit splitting energies at L and Γ points are 0.62 eV and 0.88 eV, respectively. The surface states below and close to the valence band maximum are identified. The valence bands are composed of a mixture of Pb 6 s and Te 5 pz orbitals with dominant in-plane even parity, which is attributed to the layered distortion in the vicinity of the PbTe (111) surface. These findings provide insights into PbTe fundamental properties and shall benefit relevant thermoelectric and optoelectronic applications.

  15. Energy band structure tailoring of vertically aligned InAs/GaAsSb quantum dot structure for intermediate-band solar cell application by thermal annealing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chu, Ting-Fu; Huang, Tien-Hao

    2014-12-15

    This study presents an band-alignment tailoring of a vertically aligned InAs/GaAs(Sb) quantum dot (QD) structure and the extension of the carrier lifetime therein by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Arrhenius analysis indicates a larger activation energy and thermal stability that results from the suppression of In-Ga intermixing and preservation of the QD heterostructure in an annealed vertically aligned InAs/GaAsSb QD structure. Power-dependent and time-resolved photoluminescence were utilized to demonstrate the extended carrier lifetime from 4.7 to 9.4 ns and elucidate the mechanisms of the antimony aggregation resulting in a band-alignment tailoring from straddling to staggered gap after the RTA process. The significant extension in the carrier lifetime of the columnar InAs/GaAsSb dot structure make the great potential in improving QD intermediate-band solar cell application.

  16. Design and Additive Manufacturing of 3D Phononic Band Gap Structures Based on Gradient Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Wormser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for gradient based maximization of phononic band gaps. The approach is a geometry projection method combining parametric shape optimization with density based topology optimization. By this approach, we obtain, in a two dimension setting, cellular structures exhibiting relative and normalized band gaps of more than 8 and 1.6, respectively. The controlling parameter is the minimal strut size, which also corresponds with the obtained stiffness of the structure. The resulting design principle is manually interpreted into a three dimensional structure from which cellular metal samples are fabricated by selective electron beam melting. Frequency response diagrams experimentally verify the numerically determined phononic band gaps of the structures. The resulting structures have band gaps down to the audible frequency range, qualifying the structures for an application in noise isolation.

  17. Design and Additive Manufacturing of 3D Phononic Band Gap Structures Based on Gradient Based Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Maximilian; Wein, Fabian; Stingl, Michael; Körner, Carolin

    2017-09-22

    We present a novel approach for gradient based maximization of phononic band gaps. The approach is a geometry projection method combining parametric shape optimization with density based topology optimization. By this approach, we obtain, in a two dimension setting, cellular structures exhibiting relative and normalized band gaps of more than 8 and 1.6, respectively. The controlling parameter is the minimal strut size, which also corresponds with the obtained stiffness of the structure. The resulting design principle is manually interpreted into a three dimensional structure from which cellular metal samples are fabricated by selective electron beam melting. Frequency response diagrams experimentally verify the numerically determined phononic band gaps of the structures. The resulting structures have band gaps down to the audible frequency range, qualifying the structures for an application in noise isolation.

  18. A comparison of L-band and C-band rf guns as sources for inline-injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Meyerer, T.

    1994-12-01

    We consider the beam dynamics associated with installing a BNL type 1 1/2 cell L-band or C-band rf gun before two TESLA L-band cryomodules. This system will deliver a 25 MeV electron beam with peak currents on the order of 100 A suitable for further magnetic compression. evaluate the injection systems utilizing the electron beam dynamic code PARMELA from the point of view of minimizing the transverse invariant emittance

  19. Three-dimensional band structure of LaSb and CeSb: Absence of band inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinuma, H.; Souma, S.; Takane, D.; Nakamura, T.; Nakayama, K.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Horiba, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Yoshida, M.; Ochiai, A.; Takahashi, T.; Sato, T.

    2017-07-01

    We have performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of LaSb and CeSb, a candidate of topological insulators. Using soft-x-ray photons, we have accurately determined the three-dimensional bulk band structure and revealed that the band inversion at the Brillouin-zone corner, a prerequisite for realizing the topological-insulator phase, is absent in both LaSb and CeSb. Moreover, unlike the ARPES data obtained with soft-x-ray photons, those with VUV photons were found to suffer significant kz broadening. These results suggest that LaSb and CeSb are topologically trivial semimetals, and unusual Dirac-cone-like states observed with VUV photons are not of the topological origin.

  20. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, G., E-mail: gsphysics@gmail.com [University of Kota, Department of Pure and Applied Physics (India); Munjal, N.; Vyas, V. [Banasthali University, Department of Physics (India); Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K. [University of Rajasthan, Department of Physics (India); Joshi, K. B. [MLS University, Department of Physics (India)

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  1. First direct observation of a nearly ideal graphene band structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprinkle, M.; Siegel, D.; Hu, Y.; Hicks, J.; Tejeda, A.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Vizzini, S.; Enriquez, H.; Chiang, S.; Soukiassian, P.; Berger, C.; de Heer, W.A.; Lanzara, A.; Conrad, E.H.; (CNRS-UMR); (UCB); (CEAS); (SOLEIL); (GIT)

    2009-12-10

    Angle-resolved photoemission and x-ray diffraction experiments show that multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC(000{bar 1}) surface is a new form of carbon that is composed of effectively isolated graphene sheets. The unique rotational stacking of these films causes adjacent graphene layers to electronically decouple leading to a set of nearly independent linearly dispersing bands (Dirac cones) at the graphene K point. Each cone corresponds to an individual macroscale graphene sheet in a multilayer stack where AB-stacked sheets can be considered as low density faults.

  2. First direct observation of a nearly ideal graphene band structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, M; Siegel, D; Hu, Y; Hicks, J; Tejeda, A; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Le Fèvre, P; Bertran, F; Vizzini, S; Enriquez, H; Chiang, S; Soukiassian, P; Berger, C; de Heer, W A; Lanzara, A; Conrad, E H

    2009-11-27

    Angle-resolved photoemission and x-ray diffraction experiments show that multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC(0001) surface is a new form of carbon that is composed of effectively isolated graphene sheets. The unique rotational stacking of these films causes adjacent graphene layers to electronically decouple leading to a set of nearly independent linearly dispersing bands (Dirac cones) at the graphene K point. Each cone corresponds to an individual macroscale graphene sheet in a multilayer stack where AB-stacked sheets can be considered as low density faults.

  3. Three band crossings in the yrast structure of 162Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Courtney, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The yrast sequence of 162 Hf has been observed up to a level tentatively assigned as 38 + and reveals a continuing rotational character up to that spin. Sharp backbends at rotational frequencies of 0.27 and 0.42 MeV/ℎ are attributed to isub(13/2) neutron and hsub(11/2) proton alignments, respectively. A gradual increase in the aligned angular momentum of the yrast levels between these two sharp backbends is attributed to the rotational alignment of a pair of negative parity quasineutrons (mostly hsub(9/2) in character). The interpretation of this effect is supported by the failure of the negative parity bands, which already contain this aligned hsub(9/2) neutron, to gain alignment in the same rotational frequency range. While the alignment of the hsub(9/2) quasineutrons has been predicted in the cranked shell model to occur in the rare-earth region with a large interaction strength, this represents the first clear observation of such a band crossing. (author)

  4. Stability of graphene band structures against an external periodic perturbation: Na on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C. G.; Shin, S. Y.; Choi, Seon-Myeong; Kim, N. D.; Uhm, S. H.; Kim, H. S.; Hwang, C. C.; Noh, D. Y.; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Chung, J. W.

    2009-03-01

    The electronic structure of Na-adsorbed graphenes formed on the 6H-SiC(0001) substrate was studied using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron photons and ab initio pseudopotential calculations. It was found that the band of the graphenes sensitively changes upon Na adsorption especially at low temperature. With increasing Na dose, the π band appears to be quickly diffused into the background at 85 K whereas it becomes significantly enhanced with its spectral intensity at room temperature (RT). A new parabolic band centered at ktilde 1.15Å-1 also forms near Fermi energy with Na at 85 K while no such band was observed at RT. Such changes in the band structure are found to be reversible with temperature. The changes in the π band of graphene are mainly driven by the Na-induced potential especially at low temperature where the potential becomes periodic due to the crystallized Na overlayer. The new parabolic band turns out to be the π band of the underlying buffer layer partially filled by the charge transfer from Na adatoms. The increase in the hopping rate of Na adatoms at RT by 5 orders of magnitude prevents such a charge transfer, explaining the absence of the new band at RT.

  5. Cytotoxicity Comparison of the Nanoparticles Deposited on Latex Rubber Bands between the Original and Stretched State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in dental materials is essential for their safe usage in the oral cavity. In this study, we investigated whether nanoparticles deposited on orthodontic latex rubber bands are involved in the induction of cytotoxicity. A method of stretching to three times (“3L” the length of the latex rubber bands was employed to detach the particles using the original length (“L” for comparison. The cytotoxicity tests were performed on extracts with mouse fibroblasts (L929 and human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ion chromatography, elemental analysis, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS were performed to detect the harmful components in the extracts from rubber bands. There was a significant decrease in the cell viability in the “L” samples compared with the “3L” samples (P<0.05 in the L929 and HGF cells. This was due to the Ni single crystal nanoparticles (~50nm from the inner surface of “L” samples that were detached in the “3L” samples as well as the Zn ion (~9 ppm detected in the extract. This study revealed that the Ni nanoparticles, as well as Zn ions, were involved in the induction of cytotoxicity from the latex rubber bands.

  6. Variational energy band theory for polarons: Mapping polaron structure with the global-local method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.W.; Lindenberg, K.; Zhao, Y.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we revisit from a contemporary perspective a classic problem of polaron theory in one dimension using a new variational approach generalizing that of Toyozawa, based on delocalized trial states including mixed gobal and local exciton-phonon correlations. Polaron structure is represented by variational surfaces giving the optimal values of the complete set of exciton and phonon amplitudes for every value of the joint exciton-phonon crystal momentum κ. Characteristic small polaron, large polaron, and nearly free phonon structures are identified, and the manner in which these compete and/or coexist is examined in detail. Through such examination, the parameter space of the problem is mapped, with particular attention given to problematic areas such as the highly quantum mechanical weak-coupling regime, the highly nonlinear intermediate-coupling regime, and to the self-trapping transition that may be said to mark the onset of the strong-coupling regime. Complete energy bands are presented in illustrative cases, and the principal trends in the ground-state energy, polaron bandwidth, and effective mass are identified. The internal structure of our variational Bloch states is examined for qualities that might reflect the typical characteristics of solitons, finding some intriguing qualitative comparisons, but little that bears close scrutiny. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Grain size dependent optical band gap of CdI2 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    direct band gap in conformity with band structure calcula- tions. However, a smaller indirect band gap can also be determined from part of absorption data near the band edge for the purpose of comparison with earlier analyses of absorption data as well as the band structure calcula- tions. The decreasing band gap with film ...

  8. Broad frequency band full field measurements for advanced applications: Point-wise comparisons between optical technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    The progress of optical systems gives nowadays at disposal on lightweight structures complex dynamic measurements and modal tests, each with its own advantages, drawbacks and preferred usage domains. It is thus more easy than before to obtain highly spatially defined vibration patterns for many applications in vibration engineering, testing and general product development. The potential of three completely different technologies is here benchmarked on a common test rig and advanced applications. SLDV, dynamic ESPI and hi-speed DIC are here first deployed in a complex and unique test on the estimation of FRFs with high spatial accuracy from a thin vibrating plate. The latter exhibits a broad band dynamics and high modal density in the common frequency domain where the techniques can find an operative intersection. A peculiar point-wise comparison is here addressed by means of discrete geometry transforms to put all the three technologies on trial at each physical point of the surface. Full field measurement technologies cannot estimate only displacement fields on a refined grid, but can exploit the spatial consistency of the results through neighbouring locations by means of numerical differentiation operators in the spatial domain to obtain rotational degrees of freedom and superficial dynamic strain distributions, with enhanced quality, compared to other technologies in literature. Approaching the task with the aid of superior quality receptance maps from the three different full field gears, this work calculates and compares rotational and dynamic strain FRFs. Dynamic stress FRFs can be modelled directly from the latter, by means of a constitutive model, avoiding the costly and time-consuming steps of building and tuning a numerical dynamic model of a flexible component or a structure in real life conditions. Once dynamic stress FRFs are obtained, spectral fatigue approaches can try to predict the life of a component in many excitation conditions. Different

  9. Disorder enabled band structure engineering of a topological insulator surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yishuai; Chiu, Janet; Miao, Lin; He, Haowei

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are bulk insulators with Z 2 topological electronic order that gives rise to conducting light-like surface states. These surface electrons are exceptionally resistant to localization by non-magnetic disorder, and have been adopted as the basis for a wide range of proposals to achieve new quasiparticle species and device functionality. Recent studies have yielded a surprise by showing that in spite of resisting localization, topological insulator surface electrons can be reshaped by defects into distinctive resonance states. Here we use numerical simulations and scanning tunnelling microscopy data to show that these resonance states have significance well beyond the localized regime usually associated with impurity bands. Lastly, at native densities in the model Bi 2 X 3 (X=Bi, Te) compounds, defect resonance states are predicted to generate a new quantum basis for an emergent electron gas that supports diffusive electrical transport.

  10. Band Jahn-Teller structural phase transition in Y2In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanidze, E.; Georgen, C.; Hallas, A. M.; Huang, Q.; Santiago, J. M.; Lynn, J. W.; Morosan, E.

    2018-02-01

    The number of paramagnetic materials that undergo a structural phase transition is rather small, which can perhaps explain the limited understanding of the band Jahn-Teller mechanism responsible for this effect. Here we present a structural phase transition observed in paramagnetic Y2In at temperature T0=250 ±5 K. Below T0, the high-temperature hexagonal P 63/m m c phase transforms into the low-temperature orthorhombic P n m a phase. This transition is accompanied by an unambiguous thermal hysteresis of about 10 K, observed in both magnetic susceptibility M /H (T ) and resistivity ρ (T ) , indicating a first-order transition. Band structure calculations suggest a band Jahn-Teller mechanism, during which the degeneracy of electron bands close to the Fermi energy is broken. We establish that this structural phase transition does not have a magnetic component; however, the possibility of a charge density wave formation has not been eliminated.

  11. Complete flexural vibration band gaps in membrane-like lattice structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Liu Yaozong; Qiu Jing; Wang Gang; Zhao Honggang

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of flexural vibration in the periodical membrane-like lattice structure is studied. The band structure calculated with the plane wave expansion method indicates the existence of complete gaps. The frequency response function of a finite periodic structure is simulated with finite element method. Frequency ranges with vibration attenuation are in good agreement with the gaps found in the band structure. Much larger attenuations are found in the complete gaps comparing to those directional ones. The existence of complete flexural vibration gaps in such a lattice structure provides a new idea for vibration control of thin plates

  12. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  13. Cell and band structures in cold rolled polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ananthan, V.S.; Leffers, Torben; Hansen, Niels

    1991-01-01

    dislocation walls (DDWs) and cells develop during the initial stages of cold rolling. Grains having a high density of DDWs are described as high wall density (HWD) structures, and grains having a low density of DDWs are described as low wall density (LWD) structures. These structures are characterised by cell...... size, misorientation across the cell walls, and the crystallographic orientation of the grains in which they appear. The DDWs in the HWD structures have special characteristics, extending along several cells and having a misorientation across them greater than that across ordinary cell boundaries...... operating slip systems. Two generations of microbands are found to develop with increasing deformation. The first generation microbands are related to a continuous development of the structure according to the principle of grain subdivision, whereas the second generation microbands relate to localised shear...

  14. Low-frequency photonic band structures in graphene-like triangular metallic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang

    2016-11-01

    We study the low frequency photonic band structures in triangular metallic lattice, displaying Dirac points in the frequency spectrum, and constructed upon the lowest order regular polygonal tiles. We show that, in spite of the unfavourable geometrical conditions intrinsic to the structure symmetry, the lowest frequency photonic bands are formed by resonance modes sustained by local structure patterns, with the corresponding electric fields following a triangular distribution at low structure filling rate and a honeycomb distribution at high filling rate. For both cases, the lowest photonic bands, and thus the plasma gap, can be described in the framework of a tight binding model, and analysed in terms of local resonance modes and their mutual correlations. At high filling rate, the Dirac points and their movement following the structure deformation are described in the same framework, in relation with local structure patterns and their variations, as well as the particularity of the metallic lattice that enhances the topological anisotropy.

  15. Cell and band structures in cold rolled polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ananthan, V.S.; Leffers, Torben; Hansen, Niels

    1991-01-01

    The effect of plastic strain on the deformation microstructure has been investigated in polycrystalline copper rolled at room temperature to 5, 10, 20, and 30% reduction in thickness equivalent strain 0.06-0.42). Results from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations show that dense...... dislocation walls (DDWs) and cells develop during the initial stages of cold rolling. Grains having a high density of DDWs are described as high wall density (HWD) structures, and grains having a low density of DDWs are described as low wall density (LWD) structures. These structures are characterised by cell...... size, misorientation across the cell walls, and the crystallographic orientation of the grains in which they appear. The DDWs in the HWD structures have special characteristics, extending along several cells and having a misorientation across them greater than that across ordinary cell boundaries...

  16. Band Structures Analysis Method of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Using Wavelet-Based Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A wavelet-based finite element method (WFEM is developed to calculate the elastic band structures of two-dimensional phononic crystals (2DPCs, which are composed of square lattices of solid cuboids in a solid matrix. In a unit cell, a new model of band-gap calculation of 2DPCs is constructed using plane elastomechanical elements based on a B-spline wavelet on the interval (BSWI. Substituting the periodic boundary conditions (BCs and interface conditions, a linear eigenvalue problem dependent on the Bloch wave vector is derived. Numerical examples show that the proposed method performs well for band structure problems when compared with those calculated by traditional FEM. This study also illustrates that filling fractions, material parameters, and incline angles of a 2DPC structure can cause band-gap width and location changes.

  17. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction evidence for two Z-band structural states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz-Edwards, Robert J; Reedy, Michael K

    2011-08-03

    In vertebrate muscles, Z-bands connect adjacent sarcomeres, incorporate several cell signaling proteins, and may act as strain sensors. Previous electron microscopy (EM) showed Z-bands reversibly switch between a relaxed, "small-square" structure, and an active, "basketweave" structure, but the mechanism of this transition is unknown. Here, we found the ratio of small-square to basketweave in relaxed rabbit psoas muscle varied with temperature, osmotic pressure, or ionic strength, independent of activation. By EM, the A-band and both Z-band lattice spacings varied with temperature and pressure, not ionic strength; however, the basketweave spacing was consistently 10% larger than small-square. We next sought evidence for the two Z-band structures in unfixed muscles using x-ray diffraction, which indicated two Z-reflections whose intensity ratios and spacings correspond closely to the EM measurements for small-square and basketweave if the EM spacings are adjusted for 20% shrinkage due to EM processing. We conclude that the two Z-reflections arise from the small-square and basketweave forms of the Z-band as seen by EM. Regarding the mechanism of transition during activation, the effects of Ca(2+) in the presence of force inhibitors suggested that the interconversion of Z-band forms was correlated with tropomyosin movement on actin. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of strain on band structure of semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raičević Nevena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the mechanical strain on the electronic structure of the asymmetric (In,GaAs/GaAs quantum well is considered. Both the direct influence of strain on the orbital part of the electronic structure and an indirect influence through the strain dependent Rashba and Dresselhaus Hamiltonians are taken into account. The analyzed quantum well is taken to have a triangular shape, and is oriented along the direction. For this direction, there exists both the intrinsic and strain-induced spin-orbit interaction. For all analyzed types of spin-orbit interaction, subband splittings depend linearly on the in-plane wave vector. On the other hand, the electronic structure for the Rashba type of the strain-induced spin-orbit interaction shows isotropic dependence in the k-space, while the electronic structure due to the Dresselhaus type shows anisotropy. Furthermore, the Rashba strain-induced spin-orbit interaction increases subband splitting, while the effect of the Dresselhaus Hamiltonian on the electronic structure is opposite to the intrinsic spin-orbit interaction for certain polar angles.

  19. Fine structure and energy spectrum of exciton in direct band gap cubic semiconductors with degenerate valence bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Toan Thang; Nguyen Ai Viet; Nguyen Que Huong

    1987-06-01

    The influence of the cubic structure on the energy spectrum of direct exciton is investigated, using the new method suggested by Nguyen Van Hieu and co-workers. Explicit expressions of the exciton energy levels 1S, 2S and 2P are derived. A comparison with the experiments and the other theory is done for ZnSe. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  1. Compact UWB Filtering-Antenna with Controllable WLAN Band Rejection Using Defected Microstrip Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alhegazi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An ultra-wideband (UWB filtering-antenna with controllable band notch is reported in this paper. The filtering-antenna consists of a modified monopole antenna and defected microstrip structure (DMS. The monopole antenna is modified using microstrip transition in the feedline and block with a triangular-shape slot on each side of the circular patch to produce wider impedance bandwidth with better return loss. The DMS is constructed using U-shaped slot etched on the feedline to provide band notch and remove WLAN band (5.1-5.8 GHz. A switch is employed in the DMS to control the created band notch. The measured results show that the proposed design exhibits a wide impedance bandwidth with controllable WLAN band rejection, realized peak gain of 4.85 dB and omnidirectional radiation pattern. Therefore, the proposed design is suitable for UWB applications.

  2. Electrical properties and band structures of Pb1-x Snx Te alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocio, Miguel

    1972-01-01

    Both p type alloys Pb 0.72 Sn 0.28 Te and Pb 0.53 Sn 0.47 Te have been studied in the present work. The main obtained results are the following: the materials have a two-valence band structure, the first band following non-parabolic Cohen's dispersion law; at low temperatures, carriers are scattered by ionized impurities; the Coulomb potentials being screened almost completely, impurities act like neutral centers. At room temperature, scattering by acoustic modes can explain lattice mobility behavior; reversing of the thermo-power, for samples with carrier densities of about 10 20 cm -3 , is possibly due to inter-band scattering between both valence bands; a very simple picture of the band parameters variations as a function of alloy fraction is suggested. (author) [fr

  3. Precise fabrication of X-band accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higo, T.; Sakai, H.; Higashi, Y.; Koike, S.; Takatomi, T.

    1994-01-01

    An accelerating structure with a/λ=0.16 is being fabricated to study a precise fabrication method. A frequency control of each cell better than 10 -4 level is required to realize a detuned structure. The present machining level is nearly 1 MHz/11.4 GHz in relative frequency error, which just satisfies the above requirement. To keep this machining precision, the diffusion bonding technique is found preferable to join the cells. Various diffusion conditions were tried. The frequency change can be less than 1 MHz/11.4 GHz and it can be controlled well better than that. (author)

  4. Band structures of graphene hexagonal lattice semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Juan; Li, Shu-Shen

    2010-12-01

    Electronic structures of coupled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) arranged as graphene hexagonal lattice are studied theoretically using the tight-binding method. In our calculations, the electrons can hop to the third-nearest-neighbors, and the overlap matrix as well as the multicenter integral are taken into account. The novel two-dimensional Dirac-like electronic excitations in graphene are found in these artificial planar QD structures. The results provide the theoretical basis for searching Dirac fermions in QD materials and have great significance for investigating and making semiconductor QD devices.

  5. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    insufficient to study in-depth unoccupied states of investigated materials because it overlooks the shallow traps. Keywords. Photo-catalysis; high-resolution RIXS; electronic structure. 1. Introduction. Photocatalysis is an emerging field that offers poten- tial to address some of the energy and waste manage- ment challenges.

  6. Band structure features of nonlinear optical yttrium aluminium borate crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reshak, Ali H; Auluck, S.; Majchrowski, A.; Kityk, I. V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 10 (2008), s. 1445-1448 ISSN 1293-2558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Electronic structure * DFF * FPLAPW * LDA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.742, year: 2008

  7. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  8. Electronic structure and band alignment at an epitaxial spinel/perovskite heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Wei; Xiao, Haiyan; Meyer, Harry M; Liang, Xuelei; Nguyen, N V; Weber, William J; Biegalski, Michael D

    2014-08-27

    The electronic properties of solid-solid interfaces play critical roles in a variety of technological applications. Recent advances of film epitaxy and characterization techniques have demonstrated a wealth of exotic phenomena at interfaces of oxide materials, which are critically dependent on the alignment of their energy bands across the interface. Here we report a combined photoemission and electrical investigation of the electronic structures across a prototypical spinel/perovskite heterojunction. Energy-level band alignment at an epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterointerface indicates a chemically abrupt, type I heterojunction without detectable band bending at both the film and substrate. The unexpected band alignment for this typical p-type semiconductor on SrTiO3 is attributed to its intrinsic d-d interband excitation, which significantly narrows the fundamental band gap between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band. The formation of the type I heterojunction with a flat-band state results in a simultaneous confinement of both electrons and holes inside the Co3O4 layer, thus rendering the epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterostructure to be a very promising material for high-efficiency luminescence and optoelectronic device applications.

  9. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiz, F., E-mail: fethimaiz@gmail.com [University of Cartage, Nabeul Engineering Preparatory Institute, Merazka, 8000 Nabeul (Tunisia); King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-10-01

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results.

  10. Band structure of a two-dimensional Dirac semimetal from cyclotron resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvaev, A. M.; Dziom, V.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Kvon, Z. D.; Shao, Y.; Basov, D. N.; Pimenov, A.

    2017-10-01

    Knowing the band structure of materials is one of the prerequisites to understanding their properties. Therefore, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has become a highly demanded experimental tool to investigate the band structure. However, especially in thin film materials with a layered structure and several capping layers, access to the electronic structure by ARPES is limited. Therefore, several alternative methods to obtain the required information have been suggested. Here we directly invert the results by cyclotron resonance experiments to obtain the band structure of a two-dimensional (2D) material. This procedure is applied to the mercury telluride quantum well with a critical thickness which is characterized by a 2D electron gas with linear dispersion relations. The Dirac-like band structure in this material could be mapped both on the electron and on the hole side of the band diagram. In this material, purely linear dispersion of the holelike carriers is in contrast to detectable quadratic corrections for the electrons.

  11. Triple photonic band-gap structure dynamically induced in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jinwei; Bao Qianqian; Wan Rengang; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui

    2011-01-01

    We study a cold atomic sample coherently driven into the five-level triple-Λ configuration for attaining a dynamically controlled triple photonic band-gap structure. Our numerical calculations show that three photonic band gaps with homogeneous reflectivities up to 92% can be induced on demand around the probe resonance by a standing-wave driving field in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence. All these photonic band gaps are severely malformed with probe reflectivities declining rapidly to very low values when spontaneously generated coherence is gradually weakened. The triple photonic band-gap structure can also be attained in a five-level chain-Λ system of cold atoms in the absence of spontaneously generated coherence, which however requires two additional traveling-wave fields to couple relevant levels.

  12. Band structure properties of (BGa)P semiconductors for lattice matched integration on (001) silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Nadir; Sweeney, Stephen [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Hosea, Jeff [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK and Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Liebich, Sven; Zimprich, Martin; Volz, Kerstin; Stolz, Wolfgang [Material Sciences Center and Faculty of Physics, Philipps-University, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Kunert, Bernerdette [NAsP III/V GmbH, Am Knechtacker 19, 35041 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    We report the band structure properties of (BGa)P layers grown on silicon substrate using metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy. Using surface photo-voltage spectroscopy we find that both the direct and indirect band gaps of (BGa)P alloys (strained and unstrained) decrease with Boron content. Our experimental results suggest that the band gap of (BGa)P layers up to 6% Boron is large and suitable to be used as cladding and contact layers in GaP-based quantum well heterostructures on silicon substrates.

  13. Pathway to oxide photovoltaics via band-structure engineering of SnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowei Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available All-oxide photovoltaics could open rapidly scalable manufacturing routes, if only oxide materials with suitable electronic and optical properties were developed. SnO has exceptional doping and transport properties among oxides, but suffers from a strongly indirect band gap. Here, we address this shortcoming by band-structure engineering through isovalent but heterostructural alloying with divalent cations (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Zn. Using first-principles calculations, we show that suitable band gaps and optical properties close to that of direct semiconductors are achievable, while the comparatively small effective masses are preserved in the alloys. Initial thin film synthesis and characterization support the feasibility of the approach.

  14. The LDA+U calculation of electronic band structure of GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahuguna, B. P., E-mail: pk.svnit@gmail.com; Sharma, R. O.; Saini, L. K. [Applied Physics Department, Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Surat-395007 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We present the electronic band structure of bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) using first principle approach. A series of calculations has been performed by applying norm-conserving pseudopotentials and ultrasoft non-norm-conserving pseudopotentials within the density functional theory. These calculations yield too small band gap as compare to experiment. Thus, we use semiemperical approach called local density approximation plus the multi-orbital mean-field Hubbard model (LDA+U), which is quite effective in order to describe the band gap of GaAs.

  15. Pathway to oxide photovoltaics via band-structure engineering of SnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haowei; Bikowski, Andre; Zakutayev, Andriy; Lany, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    All-oxide photovoltaics could open rapidly scalable manufacturing routes, if only oxide materials with suitable electronic and optical properties were developed. SnO has exceptional doping and transport properties among oxides, but suffers from a strongly indirect band gap. Here, we address this shortcoming by band-structure engineering through isovalent but heterostructural alloying with divalent cations (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Zn). Using first-principles calculations, we show that suitable band gaps and optical properties close to that of direct semiconductors are achievable, while the comparatively small effective masses are preserved in the alloys. Initial thin film synthesis and characterization support the feasibility of the approach.

  16. Band structure analysis of (1 × 2)-H/Pd(110)-pr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2013-09-01

    A novel method of band structure analysis based on the atomic orbital (AO) coefficients in LCAO-DFT has been applied to the (1 × 2)-H/Pd(110)-pr system. The analysis has revealed symmetry-dependent Pd 4d band splitting due to H ligand effects; ensemble effects due to the (1 × 2) Pd reconstruction are shown to be relatively minor.

  17. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong

    2005-01-01

    in solving the Maxwell's equations numerically. It expands the temporal derivatives using the finite differences, while it adopts the Fourier transform (FT) properties to expand the spatial derivatives in Maxwell's equations. In addition, the method makes use of the chain-rule property in calculus together...... in electromagnetic and microwave applications once the Maxwell's equations are appropriately modeled. Originality/value - The method validates its values and properties through extensive studies on regular and defective 1D PBG structures in stratified medium, and it can be further extended to solving more...

  18. Crystal structure, electrical properties and electronic band structure of tantalum ditelluride

    CERN Document Server

    Vernes, A; Bensch, W; Heid, W; Naether, C

    1998-01-01

    Motivated by the unexpectedly strong influence of the Te atoms on the structural and bonding properties of the transition metal tellurides, we have performed a detailed study of TaTe sub 2. Experimentally, this comprises a crystal structure determination as well as electrical resistivity measurements. The former analysis leads to an accurate update of the structural data reported in the 1960s, while the latter provides evidence for the mainly electronic character of scattering processes leading to the electrical conductivity. In addition, the electronic properties of TaTe sub 2 have been calculated using the TB-LMTO method. The partial density of states reflects the close connection of the Ta zigzag chains and the Te-Te network. This finding explains the charge transfer in the system in a rather simple way. The orthogonal-orbital character of the bands proved the existence of pi-bonds. The Fermi-surface study supports the interpretation of the experimental resistivity measurements. (author)

  19. Photonic band structure of isotropic and anisotropic Abrikosov lattices in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandi, Hesam [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: zandi@ee.sharif.edu; Kokabi, Alireza [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarpour, Aliakbar [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (United States); Khorasani, Sina [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fardmanesh, Mehdi [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: fardmanesh@sharif.edu; Adibi, Ali [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0250 (United States)

    2007-12-01

    We have performed a numerical solution for band structure of an Abrikosov vortex lattice in type-II superconductors forming a periodic array in two dimensions for applications of incorporating the photonic crystals concept into superconducting materials with possibilities for optical electronics. The implemented numerical method is based on the extensive numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equation for calculating the parameters of the two-fluid model and obtaining the band structure from the permittivity for both orthogonal polarizations, which depends on the above parameters and the frequency. This is while the characteristics of such crystals highly vary with an externally applied static normal magnetic field, leading to nonlinear behavior of the band structure, which also has nonlinear dependence on the temperature. The similar analysis for every arbitrary lattice structure is also possible to be developed by this approach as presented in this work. We also present some examples and discuss the results.

  20. Precision photonic band structure calculation of Abrikosov periodic lattice in type-II superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokabi, Alireza; Zandi, Hesam; Khorasani, Sina [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fardmanesh, Mehdi [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: fardmanesh@sharif.edu

    2007-09-01

    We have performed a numerical solution for band structure of an Abrikosov vortex lattice in type-II superconductors forming a periodic array in two dimensions for applications of incorporating the photonic crystals concept into superconducting materials with possibilities for optical electronics. The implemented numerical method is based on the extensive numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equation for calculating the parameters of the two-fluid model and obtaining the band structure from the permittivity, which depends on the above parameters and the frequency. This is while the characteristics of such crystals highly vary with an externally applied static normal magnetic field, leading to nonlinear behavior of the band structure, which also has nonlinear dependence on the temperature. The similar analysis for every arbitrary lattice structure is also possible to be developed by this approach as presented in this work. We also present some examples and discuss the results.

  1. Band structure and phonon properties of lithium fluoride at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, J. M., E-mail: amitjignesh@yahoo.co.in [Government Engineering College, Gandhinagar 382028, Gujarat (India); Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Mitesh [Government Polytechnic for Girls, Athwagate, Surat395001, Gujarat (India); Gajjar, P. N., E-mail: pngajjar@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380009, Gujarat (India)

    2016-05-23

    High pressure structural and electronic properties of Lithium Fluoride (LiF) have been studied by employing an ab-initio pseudopotential method and a linear response scheme within the density functional theory (DFT) in conjunction with quasi harmonic Debye model. The band structure and electronic density of states conforms that the LiF is stable and is having insulator behavior at ambient as well as at high pressure up to 1 Mbar. Conclusions based on Band structure, phonon dispersion and phonon density of states are outlined.

  2. Band structure and phonon properties of lithium fluoride at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchal, J. M.; Joshi, Mitesh; Gajjar, P. N.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure structural and electronic properties of Lithium Fluoride (LiF) have been studied by employing an ab-initio pseudopotential method and a linear response scheme within the density functional theory (DFT) in conjunction with quasi harmonic Debye model. The band structure and electronic density of states conforms that the LiF is stable and is having insulator behavior at ambient as well as at high pressure up to 1 Mbar. Conclusions based on Band structure, phonon dispersion and phonon density of states are outlined.

  3. Polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric, twisted-band structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Jagodnicka, Anna; Wasylczyk, Piotr, E-mail: pwasylcz@fuw.edu.pl [Photonic Nanostructure Facility, Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-23

    We propose a concept for light polarization management: polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric microstructures. Numerical simulations of light propagation show that with an appropriately configured array of twisted bands, such structures may exhibit zero birefringence and at the same time diffract two circular polarizations with different efficiencies. Non-birefringent structures as thin as 3 μm have a significant difference in diffraction efficiency for left- and right-hand circular polarizations. We identify the structural parameters of such twisted-band matrices for optimum performance as circular polarizers.

  4. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...... behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  5. Band structure of the solid state - interpretation of the nature of the chemical bond in some transition metal compounds in terms of energy band structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neckel, A.; Schwarz, K.; Eibler, R.; Weinberger, P.; Rastl, P.

    1975-01-01

    The nature of chemical binding for some transition metal compounds (ScN, ScO, TiC, TiN, Tio, VC, VN, VO) with NaCl structure is discussed in terms of energy band structure calculations. The discussion is based on the wave functions and energy eigenvalues, as calculated by the 'Quasi self sonsistent APW method' as well as on the energy eigen values and eigen vectors resulting from the Slater-Koster LCAO-Tight binding interpolation scheme. The LCAO-TB l-like partial density of states can be used to analyse the valence bands. This analysis shows, that the deepest valence band has predominantly s-character. The following bands, which can be derived in essence from the atomic 2p states of the of the non metal are characterized not only by the partial p-like density of states but also by a substantial contribution from the d-like partial density of states, which is decreasing going from a particular Carbide to the corresponding Oxide. For the valence bands, which can be associated with the atomic 3d states of the metal, the density of states exhibits besides the partial d-density of states small contributions from the partial p-like density of states. The decomposition of the d-like partial density of states into an esub(g)-like and a tsub(2g)-like contribution is discussed. By analyzing the APW crystal wave functions the partial l-like charges inside each atomic sphere can be obtained. If the APW total charges within the atomic spheres are compared with the charges of a hypothetical crystal, which correspond to a superposition of the charge densities of the neutral atoms, a transfer of electrons from the metal to the non-metal sphere is found for all compounds under investigation. (orig.) [de

  6. Structural analysis, electronic properties, and band gaps of a graphene nanoribbon: A new 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Devi

    2018-03-01

    Graphene nanoribbon (GNR), a new 2D carbon nanomaterial, has some unique features and special properties that offer a great potential for interconnect, nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronics, and nanophotonics. This paper reports the structural analysis, electronic properties, and band gaps of a GNR considering different chirality combinations obtained using the pz orbital tight binding model. In structural analysis, the analytical expressions for GNRs have been developed and verified using the simulation for the first time. It has been found that the total number of unit cells and carbon atoms within an overall unit cell and molecular structure of a GNR have been changed with the change in their chirality values which are similar to the values calculated using the developed analytical expressions thus validating both the simulation as well as analytical results. Further, the electronic band structures at different chirality values have been shown for the identification of metallic and semiconductor properties of a GNR. It has been concluded that all zigzag edge GNRs are metallic with very small band gaps range whereas all armchair GNRs show both the metallic and semiconductor nature with very small and high band gaps range. Again, the total number of subbands in each electronic band structure is equal to the total number of carbon atoms present in overall unit cell of the corresponding GNR. The semiconductors GNRs can be used as a channel material in field effect transistor suitable for advanced CMOS technology whereas the metallic GNRs could be used for interconnect.

  7. Band structure calculations for dilute nitride quantum wells under compressive or tensile strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrere, H; Marie, X; Barrau, J; Amand, T; Bouzid, S Ben; Sallet, V; Harmand, J-C

    2004-01-01

    We have calculated the band structure of InGaAsN/GaAs(N)/GaAs compressively strained quantum wells (QW) emitting at 1.3 μm using the band anticrossing model and an eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The calculated interband optical transition energies have been compared to the experimental ones deduced from photocurrent, photoluminescence and excitation of photoluminescence spectroscopy experiments and measured laser characteristics extracted from the recent literature. Because of the high compressive strain in the QW, strain-compensated structures may be required in order to grow stable multiple QWs; in view of this we have studied the band structure of InGaAsN/GaAsP/GaAs QWs emitting at 1.3 μm. Dilute nitride structures also offer the possibility of growing tensile strained QW lasers on InP substrate emitting in the 1.55 μm emission wavelength range. In order to evaluate the potentialities of such structures we have determined the band characteristics of InGaAsN/InGaAsP/InP heterostructures with a TM polarized fundamental transition

  8. Coupling between Fano and Bragg bands in the photonic band structure of two- dimensional metallic photonic structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markoš, P.; Kuzmiak, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 033845. ISSN 2469-9926 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14028 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Crystal structure * Photonic crystals * Two-dimensional arrays Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2016

  9. Phononic band gaps and vibrations in one- and two-dimensional mass-spring structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The vibrational response of finite periodic lattice structures subjected to periodic loading is investigated. Special attention is devoted to the response in frequency ranges with gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice. The effects of boundaries, viscous dampin...

  10. Near-infrared diffuse interstellar bands in APOGEE telluric standard star spectra . Weak bands and comparisons with optical counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyajouri, M.; Lallement, R.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Capitanio, L.; Cox, N. L. J.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: Information on the existence and properties of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) outside the optical domain is still limited. Additional infra-red (IR) measurements and IR-optical correlative studies are needed to constrain DIB carriers and locate various absorbers in 3D maps of the interstellar matter. Methods: We extended our study of H-band DIBs in Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) Telluric Standard Star (TSS) spectra. We used the strong λ15273 band to select the most and least absorbed targets. We used individual spectra of the former subsample to extract weaker DIBs, and we searched the two stacked series for differences that could indicate additional bands. High-resolution NARVAL and SOPHIE optical spectra for a subsample of 55 TSS targets were additionally recorded for NIR/optical correlative studies. Results: From the TSS spectra we extract a catalog of measurements of the poorly studied λλ15617, 15653, and 15673 DIBs in ≃300 sightlines, we obtain a first accurate determination of their rest wavelength and constrained their intrinsic width and shape. In addition, we studied the relationship between these weak bands and the strong λ15273 DIB. We provide a first or second confirmation of several other weak DIBs that have been proposed based on different instruments, and we add new constraints on their widths and locations. We finally propose two new DIB candidates. Conclusions: We compared the strength of the λ15273 absorptions with their optical counterparts λλ5780, 5797, 6196, 6283, and 6614. Using the 5797-5780 ratio as a tracer of shielding against the radiation field, we showed that the λ15273 DIB carrier is significantly more abundant in unshielded (σ-type) clouds, and it responds even more strongly than the λ5780 band carrier to the local ionizing field. Full Table 5 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  11. Electronic band structure of a type-II ‘W’ quantum well calculated by an eight-band k · p model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiu; Wang Qing; Wei Xin; Chen Liang-Hui; Gu Yong-Xian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation of type-II ‘W’ quantum wells for the InAs/Ga 1−x In x Sb/AlSb family, where ‘W’ denotes the conduction profile of the material. We focus our attention on using the eight-band k · p model to calculate the band structures within the framework of finite element method. For the sake of clarity, the simulation in this paper is simplified and based on only one period—AlSb/InAs/Ga 1−x In x Sb/InAs/AlSb. The obtained numerical results include the energy levels and wavefunctions of carriers. We discuss the variations of the electronic properties by changing several important parameters, such as the thickness of either InAs or Ga 1−x In x Sb layer and the alloy composition in Ga 1−x In x Sb separately. In the last part, in order to compare the eight-band k · p model, we recalculate the conduction bands of the ‘W’ structure using the one-band k · p model and then discuss the difference between the two results, showing that conduction bands are strongly coupled with valence bands in the narrow band gap structure. The in-plane energy dispersions, which illustrate the suppression of the Auger recombination process, are also obtained. (general)

  12. Research on the Band Gap Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Microcavity with Local Resonant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional locally resonant phononic crystal with microcavity structure is proposed. The acoustic wave band gap characteristics of this new structure are studied using finite element method. At the same time, the corresponding displacement eigenmodes of the band edges of the lowest band gap and the transmission spectrum are calculated. The results proved that phononic crystals with microcavity structure exhibited complete band gaps in low-frequency range. The eigenfrequency of the lower edge of the first gap is lower than no microcavity structure. However, for no microcavity structure type of quadrilateral phononic crystal plate, the second band gap disappeared and the frequency range of the first band gap is relatively narrow. The main reason for appearing low-frequency band gaps is that the proposed phononic crystal introduced the local resonant microcavity structure. This study provides a good support for engineering application such as low-frequency vibration attenuation and noise control.

  13. Effects of weak nonlinearity on dispersion relations and frequency band-gaps of periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the behaviour of linear periodic structures can be traced back over 300 years, to Sir Isaac Newton, and still attracts much attention. An essential feature of periodic struc-tures is the presence of frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate....... Determination of band-gaps and the corresponding attenuation levels is an im-portant practical problem. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants, and the method of space-harmonics. However, application....... The present work deals with analytically predicting dynamic responses for nonlinear continuous elastic periodic structures. Specifically, the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion re-lation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending os-cillations are analyzed...

  14. Band Structure and Quantum Confined Stark Effect in InN/GaN superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2012-01-01

    N/GaN(0001) superlattices are investigated, and the variation of the band gap with the thicknesses of the well and the barrier is discussed. Superlattices of the form mInN/nGaN with n ≥ m are simulated using band structure calculations in the Local Density Approximation with a semiempirical correction...... for the gap error. The calculated band gap shows a strong decrease with the thickness (m) of the InN well. In superlattices containing a single layer of InN (m = 1) the band gap increases weakly with the GaN barrier thickness n, reaching a saturation value around 2 eV. In superlattices with n = m and n > 5...

  15. Solar Irradiance Models and Measurements: A Comparison in the 220-240 nm wavelength band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Yvonne C.; Ball, Will T.; Krivova, Natalie A.

    2012-07-01

    Solar irradiance models that assume solar irradiance variations to be due to changes in the solar surface magnetic flux have been successfully used to reconstruct total solar irradiance on rotational as well as cyclical and secular time scales. Modelling spectral solar irradiance is not yet as advanced, and also suffers from a lack of comparison data, in particular on solar cycle time scales. Here, we compare solar irradiance in the 220-240 nm band as modelled with SATIRE-S and measured by different instruments on the UARS and SORCE satellites. We find good agreement between the model and measurements on rotational time scales. The long-term trends, however, show significant differences. Both SORCE instruments, in particular, show a much steeper gradient over the decaying part of cycle 23 than the modelled irradiance or that measured by UARS/SUSIM.

  16. Comparison of MODTRAN5 to measured data in the UV band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leon; Richardson, Mark; Walmsley, Roy

    2013-10-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) band of the electromagnetic spectrum has potential as a host medium for the operation of guided weapons. Unlike in the infrared (IR), a target which is propelled by an air breathing jet engine generates no detectable radiation in the UV band, and is opaque to the background UV produced by the Sun. In theory the blocking of UV radiation from the sun causes a detectable `negative contrast' between the target and the background. In order to determine the outcome of engagement scenarios between airborne platforms and guided weapon systems that utilise a guard channel operating in the UV, it is necessary to accurately model background UV levels. This paper presents a comparison between the atmospheric modelling code moderate resolution atmospheric transmission (MODTRAN®5) and measured data. The spectral irradiance levels generated by the MODTRAN®5 code are compared to those of the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Data Centre (WOUDC ) database, for various global positions and times of year. Radiance data collected at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom (Shrivenham, England) for various observer geometries is also compared to that generated by the MODTRAN®5 code.

  17. COMPARISON OF C-BAND AND X-BAND POLARIMETRIC SAR DATA FOR RIVER ICE CLASSIFICATION ON THE PEACE RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Łoś

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, synthetic aperture radar (SAR data from TerraSAR-X were compared with RADARSAT-2 data to evaluate their effectiveness for river ice monitoring on the Peace River. For several years RADARSAT-2 data have been successfully used for river ice observation. However, it is important to take into account data from other satellites as they may provide solutions when it is not possible to obtain images from the preferred system (e.g., in the case of acquisition priority conflicts. In this study we compared three TerraSAR-X (X-band and three RADARSAT-2 (C-band datasets acquired in December 2013 on a section of the Peace River, Canada. For selected classes (open water, skim ice, juxtaposed skim ice, agglomerated skim ice, frazil run and consolidated ice we compared backscattering values in HH and VV polarisation and performed Wishart supervised classification. Covariance matrices that were previously filtered using a refined Lee filter were used as input data for classification. For all data sets the overall accuracy was higher than 80%. Similar errors associated with classification output were observed for data from both satellite systems.

  18. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  19. Dielectric band structure of crystals: General properties, and calculations for silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Car, R.; Baroni, S.; Tosatti, E.; Leelaprute, S.

    1981-02-01

    We shift the dielectric band structure method, orginially proposed by Baldereschi and Tosatti for the description of microscopic electronic screening in crystals. Some general properties are examined first, including the requirements of causality and stability. The specific test case of silicon is then considered. Dielectric bands are calculated, according to several different prescriptions for the construction of the dielectric matrix. It is shown that the results allow a very direct appraisal of the screening properties of the system, as well as of the quality of the dielectric model adopted. The electronic charge displacement induced by γsub(25') and X 3 phonon-like displacements of the atoms is also calculated and compared with the results of existent full self-consistent calculations. Conclusions are drawn on the relative accuracies of the dielectric band structures. (author)

  20. A Compact Quad-Band Bandpass Filter Based on Defected Microstrip Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Xiao Yan; Wei, Feng

    2017-07-01

    A compact quad-band band-pass filter (BPF) based on stub loaded resonators (SLRs) with defected microstrip structure (DMS) is analyzed and designed in this paper. The proposed resonator is created by embedding DMS into the SLR and can achieve four narrow passbands. By employing the pseudointerdigital coupling structure between the two resonators, transmission zeros among each passband are generated to improve the passband selectivity and a high isolation is achieved. In order to validate its practicability, a prototype of a quad-band BPF centred at 1.57, 2.5, 4.3 and 5.2 GHz is designed and fabricated. The proposed filter is more compact due to the slow-wave characteristic of DMS. The simulated and measured results are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the DMS idea can be extended to the design of other microstrip passive devices.

  1. Metal-like Band Structures of Ultrathin Si {111} and {112} Surface Layers Revealed through Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Huang, Michael H

    2017-09-04

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on Si (100), (110), (111), and (112) planes with tunable number of planes for evaluation of their band structures and density of states profiles. The purpose is to see whether silicon can exhibit facet-dependent properties derived from the presence of a thin surface layer having different band structures. No changes have been observed for single to multiple layers of Si (100) and (110) planes with a consistent band gap between the valence band and the conduction band. However, for 1, 2, 4, and 5 Si (111) and (112) planes, metal-like band structures were obtained with continuous density of states going from the valence band to the conduction band. For 3, 6, and more Si (111) planes, as well as 3 and 6 Si (112) planes, the same band structure as that seen for Si (100) and (110) planes has been obtained. Thus, beyond a layer thickness of five Si (111) planes at ≈1.6 nm, normal semiconductor behavior can be expected. The emergence of metal-like band structures for the Si (111) and (112) planes are related to variation in Si-Si bond length and bond distortion plus 3s and 3p orbital electron contributions in the band structure. This work predicts possession of facet-dependent electrical properties of silicon with consequences in FinFET transistor design. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Estimation of photonic band gap in the hollow core cylindrical multilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Ritesh Kumar; Singh, Vivek

    2018-04-01

    The propagation characteristic of two hollow core cylindrical multilayer structures having high and low refractive index contrast of cladding regions have been studied and compared at two design wavelengths i.e. 1550 nm and 632.8 nm. With the help of transfer matrix method a relation between the incoming light wave and outgoing light wave has been developed using the boundary matching technique. In high refractive index contrast, small numbers of layers are sufficient to provide perfect band gap in both design wavelengths. The spectral position and width of band gap is highly depending on the optical path of incident light in all considered cases. For sensing application, the sensitivity of waveguide can be obtained either by monitoring the width of photonic band gap or by monitoring the spectral shift of photonic band gap. Change in the width of photonic band gap with the core refractive index is larger in high refractive index contrast of cladding materials. However, in the case of monitoring the spectral shift of band gap, the obtained sensitivity is large for low refractive index contrast of cladding materials and further it increases with increase of design wavelength.

  3. Surface effect on band structure of flexural wave propagating in magneto-elastic phononic crystal nanobeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shunzu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical model is established to study the size-dependent performance of flexural wave propagation in magneto-elastic phononic crystal (PC) nanobeam with surface effect based on Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and Gurtin–Murdoch theory. Considering the magneto-mechanical coupling constitutive relation of magnetostrictive material, the influence of surface effect on band structure is calculated by the plane wave expansion method for PC nanobeam subjected to pre-stress and magnetic field loadings. Through the example of an epoxy/Terfenol-D PC nanobeam, it can be observed that the characteristics of flexural wave band structures are size-dependent, and remarkably affected by surface effect when the dimension of the PC beam reduces to the nanoscale. The edges and width of the band gap with surface effect are higher than those without surface effect, especially for high frequency region. And surface effect gradually reduces with the increasing of bulk layer-to-surface layer thickness ratio until the band gap descends to a constant for the conventional one in the absence of surface effect. The effects of surface elasticity and piezomagneticity on band gap are more prominent than the residual surface stress. In addition, a distinctly nonlinear variation of band gap appears under the combined effects of pre-stress and magnetic field. Moreover, with the varying of filling fraction, multi-peaks of the width of the band gap are obtained and discussed. These results could be helpful for the intelligent regulation of magneto-elastic PC nanobeam and the design of nanobeam-based devices. (paper)

  4. Surface effect on band structure of flexural wave propagating in magneto-elastic phononic crystal nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shunzu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2017-11-01

    A theoretical model is established to study the size-dependent performance of flexural wave propagation in magneto-elastic phononic crystal (PC) nanobeam with surface effect based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Gurtin-Murdoch theory. Considering the magneto-mechanical coupling constitutive relation of magnetostrictive material, the influence of surface effect on band structure is calculated by the plane wave expansion method for PC nanobeam subjected to pre-stress and magnetic field loadings. Through the example of an epoxy/Terfenol-D PC nanobeam, it can be observed that the characteristics of flexural wave band structures are size-dependent, and remarkably affected by surface effect when the dimension of the PC beam reduces to the nanoscale. The edges and width of the band gap with surface effect are higher than those without surface effect, especially for high frequency region. And surface effect gradually reduces with the increasing of bulk layer-to-surface layer thickness ratio until the band gap descends to a constant for the conventional one in the absence of surface effect. The effects of surface elasticity and piezomagneticity on band gap are more prominent than the residual surface stress. In addition, a distinctly nonlinear variation of band gap appears under the combined effects of pre-stress and magnetic field. Moreover, with the varying of filling fraction, multi-peaks of the width of the band gap are obtained and discussed. These results could be helpful for the intelligent regulation of magneto-elastic PC nanobeam and the design of nanobeam-based devices.

  5. Design of UWB Monopole Antenna with Dual Notched Bands Using One Modified Electromagnetic-Bandgap Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1–10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX and the wireless local area network (WLAN at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively.

  6. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR UWB 3.1-10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively.

  7. Band structure analysis of an analytically solvable Hill equation with continuous potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, G. V.; Sprung, D. W. L.

    2015-03-01

    This paper concerns analytically solvable cases of Hill’s equation containing a continuously differentiable periodic potential. We outline a procedure for constructing the Floquet-Bloch fundamental system, and analyze the band structure of the system. The similarities to, and differences from, the cases of a piecewise constant periodic potential and the Mathieu potential, are illuminated.

  8. Band structure of thin films by the linear augmented-plane-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Madsen, J.; Andersen, Ole Krogh

    1978-01-01

    We present a linear augmented-plane-wave method for solving the band-structure problem in thin crystalline films. The potential is separated into a muffin-tin potential inside the film, a potential depending exclusively on the normal coordinate outside the film, and corrections in both regions...

  9. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125−131Ce ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4. — journal of. April 2010 physics pp. 525–539. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125−131Ce nuclei. ARUN BHARTI∗, SURAM SINGH and S K KHOSA. Department of ... in 125Ce have been extensively studied up to very high spins in recent years [3,4]. ... The detailed theory of PSM is given in [12].

  10. Carrier-carrier relaxation kinetics in quantum well semiconductor structures with nonparabolic energy bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dery, H.; Tromborg, Bjarne; Eisenstein, G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe carrier-carrier scattering dynamics in an inverted quantum well structure including the nonparabolic nature of the valance band. A solution of the semiconductor Bloch equations yields strong evidence to a large change in the temporal evolution of the carrier distributions compared...

  11. Direct Measurement of the Band Structure of a Buried Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miwa, Jill; Hofmann, Philip; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2013-01-01

    We directly measure the band structure of a buried two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The buried 2DEG forms 2 nm beneath the surface of p-type silicon, because of a dense delta-type layer of phosphorus n-type dopants which have been placed there...

  12. The Electronic Band Structure of Platinum Oxide (PtO) | Omehe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have performed the electronic band structure of the bulk and monolayer of PtO using the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital and the projector augmented wave method with the density functional theory. We applied the LDA and LDA+U scheme to both methods. It was found out that the LDA calculation of bulk PtO ...

  13. Photonic Band Structure of Dispersive Metamaterials Formulated as a Hermitian Eigenvalue Problem

    KAUST Repository

    Raman, Aaswath

    2010-02-26

    We formulate the photonic band structure calculation of any lossless dispersive photonic crystal and optical metamaterial as a Hermitian eigenvalue problem. We further show that the eigenmodes of such lossless systems provide an orthonormal basis, which can be used to rigorously describe the behavior of lossy dispersive systems in general. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  14. k.p Parameters with Accuracy Control from Preexistent First-Principles Band Structure Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Guilherme; Bastos, Carlos M. O.; Sabino, Fernando P.; Faria Junior, Paulo E.; de Campos, Tiago; da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    The k.p method is a successful approach to obtain band structure, optical and transport properties of semiconductors. It overtakes the ab initio methods in confined systems due to its low computational cost since it is a continuum method that does not require all the atoms' orbital information. From an effective one-electron Hamiltonian, the k.p matrix representation can be calculated using perturbation theory and the parameters identified by symmetry arguments. The parameters determination, however, needs a complementary approach. In this paper, we developed a general method to extract the k.p parameters from preexistent band structures of bulk materials that is not limited by the crystal symmetry or by the model. To demonstrate our approach, we applied it to zinc blende GaAs band structure calculated by hybrid density functional theory within the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional (DFT-HSE), for the usual 8 ×8 k.p Hamiltonian. Our parameters reproduced the DFT-HSE band structure with great accuracy up to 20% of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ). Furthermore, for fitting regions ranging from 7-20% of FBZ, the parameters lie inside the range of values reported by the most reliable studies in the literature. The authors acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian agencies CNPq (Grant #246549/2012-2) and FAPESP (Grants #2011/19333-4, #2012/05618-0 and #2013/23393-8).

  15. Band structure and optical properties of highly anisotropic LiBa2[B10O16(OH)3] decaborate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smok, P.; Kityk, I.V.; Berdowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    The band structure (BS), charge density distribution and linear-optical properties of the anisotropic crystal LiBa 2 [B 10 O 16 (OH) 3 ] (LBBOH) are calculated using a self-consistent norm-conserving pseudopotential method within the framework of the local-density approximation theory. A high anisotropy of the band energy gap (4.22 eV for the E parallel b, 4.46 eV for the E parallel c) and giant birefringence (up to 0.20) are found. Comparison of the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured polarised spectra of the imaginary part of the dielectric susceptibility ε 2 shows a good agreement. The anisotropy of the charge density distribution, BS dispersion and of the optical spectra originate from anisotropy between the 2p z B-2p z O and 2p y,x B-2p y,y O bonding orbitals. The observed anisotropy in the LBBOH is principally different from that of β-BaB 2 O 4 (BBO) single crystals. In the LBBOH single crystals the anisotropy of optical and charge density distribution is caused by different projection of the orbitals originating from particular borate clusters on the particular crystallographic axes, contrary to the BBO, where the anisotropy is caused prevailingly by a different local site symmetry of oxygen within the borate planes. The observed anisotropy is analysed in terms of the band energy dispersion and space charge density distribution

  16. Band Structure Engineering in 2D Photonic Crystal Waveguide with Rhombic Cross-Section Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrasoul Gharaati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PhC waveguides with square lattice composed of dielectric rhombic cross-section elements in air background, by using plane wave expansion (PWE method, are investigated. In order to study the change of photonic band gap (PBG by changing of elongation of elements, the band structure of the used structure is plotted. We observe that the size of the PBG changes by variation of elongation of elements, but there is no any change in the magnitude of defect modes. However, the used structure does not have any TE defect modes but it has TM defect mode for any angle of elongation. So, the used structure can be used as optical polarizer.

  17. Observation of dark-current signals from the S-band structures of the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.; Decker, F.J.; Seidel, M.; Siemann, R.H.; Whittum, D.

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that the electro-magnetic fields in high-gradient RF structures can cause electron emission from the metallic structure walls. If the emitted electrons are captured and accelerated by the accelerating fields so-called dark-current is induced. Dark-currents have been measured and studied for various RF-structures. In this paper the authors present measurements of RF induced signals for the SLC S-band structures. For nominal gradients of 17 MV/m it is shown that the dark-current can be strong enough to significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the SLC beam wire scanners. They also show results from RF measurements in the dipole band. The measurements are compared to more direct observations of dark-current and it is tried to connect the results to possible effects on the accelerated particle beam

  18. Wide-band underwater acoustic absorption based on locally resonant unit and interpenetrating network structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, Jiang; Mi-Lin, Zhang; Yu-Ren, Wang; Yan-Ping, Hu; Ding, Lan; Qun-Li, Wu; Huan-Tong, Lu

    2010-01-01

    The interpenetrating network structure provides an interesting avenue to novel materials. Locally resonant phononic crystal (LRPC) exhibits excellent sound attenuation performance based on the periodical arrangement of sound wave scatters. Combining the LRPC concept and interpenetrating network glassy structure, this paper has developed a new material which can achieve a wide band underwater strong acoustic absorption. Underwater absorption coefficients of different samples were measured by the pulse tube. Measurement results show that the new material possesses excellent underwater acoustic effects in a wide frequency range. Moreover, in order to investigate impacts of locally resonant units, some defects are introduced into the sample. The experimental result and the theoretical calculation both show that locally resonant units being connected to a network structure play an important role in achieving a wide band strong acoustic absorption. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  19. Spins, Parity, Excitation Energies, and Octupole Structure of an Excited Superdeformed Band in 194Hg and Implications for Identical Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, G.; Khoo, T. L.; Carpenter, M. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Calderin, I. J.; Janssens, R. V.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Agarwala, S.; Blumenthal, D. J.; Fischer, S. M.; Nisius, D.; Reiter, P.; Young, J.; Amro, H.; Moore, E. F.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Døssing, T.; Nakatsukasa, T.

    1997-11-01

    An excited superdeformed band in 194Hg, observed to decay directly to both normal-deformed and superdeformed yrast states, is proposed to be a Kπ = 2- octupole vibrational band, based on its excitation energies, spins, and likely parity. The transition energies are identical to those of the yrast superdeformed band in 192Hg, but originate from levels with different spins and parities. The evolution of transition energies with spin suggests that cancellations between pairing and particle alignment are partly responsible for the identical transition energies.

  20. Determining rotational temperatures from the OH(8-3 band, and a comparison with OH(6-2 rotational temperatures at Davis, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Phillips

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Rotational temperatures derived from the OH(8–3 band may vary by ~18K depending on the choice of transition probabilities. This is of concern when absolute temperatures or trends determined in combination with measurements of other hydroxyl bands are important. In this paper, measurements of the OH(8–3 temperature-insensitive Q/P and R/P line intensity ratios are used to select the most appropriate transition probabilities for use with this band. Aurora, airglow and solar and telluric absorption in the OH(8–3 band are also investigated. Water vapour absorption of P1(4, airglow or auroral contamination of P1(2 and solar absorption in the vicinity of P1(5 are concerns to be considered when deriving rotational temperatures from this band.

    A comparison is made of temperatures derived from OH(6–2 and OH(8–3 spectra collected alternately at Davis (69° S, 78° E in 1990. An average difference of ~4K is found, with OH(8–3 temperatures being warmer, but a difference of this magnitude is within the two sigma uncertainty limit of the measurements.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure airglow and aurora; pressure, density, and temperature

  1. Electronic structure and band alignment of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone passivated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Sushobhan; Qi, Yabing; Vertelov, Grigory K.; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Kahn, Antoine; Sturm, James C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the room-temperature deposition of the organic molecule 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) reduces the surface defect density of the silicon (100) surface by chemically bonding to the surface dangling bonds. Using various spectroscopic measurements we have investigated the electronic structure and band alignment properties of the PQ/Si interface. The band-bending at the PQ-passivated silicon surface is negligible for both n- and p-type substrates, demonstrating a low density of surface defects. Finally we show that PQ forms a semiconducting wide-bandgap type-I heterojunction with silicon.

  2. Crystal structure and energy band and optical properties of phosphate Sr3P4O13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Cheng, W.-D.; Wu, D.-S.; Zhang, H.; Chen, D.-G.; Gong, Y.-J.; Kan, Z.-G.

    2004-01-01

    A single crystal of the compound Sr 3 P 4 O 13 has been found and the crystal structure has been characterized by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound crystallizes in triclinic system and belongs to space group P1-bar. It builds up from SrO 7 polyhedra and P 4 O 13 -6 anions and has a layered structure, and the Sr atoms are located in the interlayer space. The absorption and luminescence spectrum of Sr 3 P 4 O 13 microcrystals have been measured. The calculated results of crystal energy band structure by the DFT show that the solid state of Sr 3 P 4 O 13 is an isolator with direct band gap. The calculated total and partial density of states indicate that the top valence bands are contributions from P 3p and O 2p states and low conduction bands mostly originate from Sr atomic states. The calculated optical response functions expect that the Sr 3 P 4 O 13 is a low refractive index, and it is possible that the Sr 3 P 4 O 13 is used to make transparent material between the UV and FR light zone

  3. Band-structure calculations for the 3d transition metal oxides in GW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    Many-body GW calculations have emerged as a standard for the prediction of band gaps, band structures, and optical properties for main-group semiconductors and insulators, but it is not well established how predictive the GW method is in general for transition metal (TM) compounds. Surveying the series of 3d oxides within a typical GW approach using the random-phase approximation reveals mixed results, including cases where the calculated band gap is either too small or too large, depending on the oxidation states of the TM (e.g., FeO/Fe2O3, Cu2O/CuO). The problem appears to originate mostly from a too high average d-orbital energy, whereas the splitting between occupied and unoccupied d symmetries seems to be reasonably accurate. It is shown that augmenting the GW self-energy by an attractive (negative) and occupation-independent on-site potential for the TM d orbitals with a single parameter per TM cation can reconcile the band gaps for different oxide stoichiometries and TM oxidation states. In Cu2O, which is considered here in more detail, standard GW based on wave functions from initial density or hybrid functional calculations yields an unphysical prediction with an incorrect ordering of the conduction bands, even when the magnitude of the band gap is in apparent agreement with experiment. The correct band ordering is restored either by applying the d-state potential or by iterating the wave functions to self-consistency, which both have the effect of lowering the Cu-d orbital energy. While it remains to be determined which improvements over standard GW implementations are needed to achieve an accurate ab initio description for a wide range of transition metal compounds, the application of the empirical on-site potential serves to mitigate the problems specifically related to d states in GW calculations.

  4. Ab initio electronic band structure study of III-VI layered semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín, Daniel; Rubio-Ponce, Alberto; Cantarero, Andrés

    2013-08-01

    We present a total energy study of the electronic properties of the rhombohedral γ-InSe, hexagonal ɛ-GaSe, and monoclinic GaTe layered compounds. The calculations have been done using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method, including spin-orbit interaction. The calculated valence bands of the three compounds compare well with angle resolved photoemission measurements and a discussion of the small discrepancies found has been given. The present calculations are also compared with recent and previous band structure calculations available in the literature for the three compounds. Finally, in order to improve the calculated band gap value we have used the recently proposed modified Becke-Johnson correction for the exchange-correlation potential.

  5. Dual Band Notched EBG Structure based UWB MIMO/Diversity Antenna with Reduced Wide Band Electromagnetic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglan, Naveen; Kanaujia, Binod Kumar; Gupta, Samir Dev; Srivastava, Shweta

    2017-10-01

    A dual band-notched MIMO/Diversity antenna is proposed in this paper. The proposed antenna ensures notches in WiMAX band (3.3-3.6 GHz) besides WLAN band (5-6 GHz). Mushroom Electromagnetic Band Gap (EBG) arrangements are employed for discarding interfering frequencies. The procedure followed to attain notches is antenna shape independent with established formulas. The electromagnetic coupling among two narrowly set apart Ultra-Wide Band (UWB) monopoles is reduced by means of decoupling bands and slotted ground plane. Monopoles are 90° angularly parted with steps on the radiator. This aids to diminish mutual coupling and also adds in the direction of impedance matching by long current route. S21 or else mutual coupling of fewer than 15 dB is established over antenna operating range. Two-port envelope correlation coefficient is lower than 0.02 in UWB range of 3.1 GHz-10.6 GHz. The shifting in notch frequencies by varying variables in formulas is also reported. The suggested antenna is designed on low budget FR-4 substrate with measurements as (58 × 45 × 1.6) mm3. Simulated and measured results of fabricated antenna are found to be in close agreement.

  6. Surface plasmon polariton band gap structures: implications to integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Volkov, V. S.; Østergaard, John Erland

    2001-01-01

    Conventional photonic band gap (PBG) structures are composed of regions with periodic modulation of refractive index that do not allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a certain interval of wavelengths, i.e., that exhibit the PBG effect. The PBG effect is essentially an interference...... phenomenon related to strong multiple scattering of light in periodic media. The interest to the PBG structures has dramatically risen since the possibility of efficient waveguiding around a sharp corner of a line defect in the PBG structure has been pointed out. Given the perspective of integrating various...... PBG-based components within a few hundred micrometers, we realized that other two-dimensional waves, e.g., surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), might be employed for the same purpose. The SPP band gap (SPPBG) has been observed for the textured silver surfaces by performing angular measurements...

  7. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin–orbit coupling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2 , where M   =  Mo, W; X   =  S, Se, Te) while including spin–orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed. (paper)

  8. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  9. Electronic structures and band gaps of chains and sheets based on phenylacetylene units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masakazu; Nozaki, Daijiro; Tachibana, Masamitsu; Yumura, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structures of polymers composed of π-conjugated phenylacetylene (PA) units, m-PA-based and p-PA-based wires, at the extended Hueckel level of theory. It is demonstrated that these conjugated systems should have a variety of electric conductance. All of the one-dimensional (1D) chains and the two-dimensional (2D) sheet based on the m-PA unit are insulators with large band gaps of 2.56 eV because there is no effective orbital interaction with neighboring chains. On the other hand, p-PA-based 1D chains have relatively small band gaps that decrease with an increase in chain width (1.17-1.74 eV) and are semiconductive. The p-PA-based sheet called 'graphyne', a 2D-limit of the p-PA-based 1D chains, shows a small band gap of 0.89 eV. The variety of band electronic structures is discussed in terms of frontier crystal orbitals

  10. A comparison between two permanent broad band ocean bottom seismometers in the western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, T.; Deschamps, A.; Ugalde, A.; Jara, J. A.; Hello, Y.; Goula, X.; Olivera, C.

    2009-04-01

    deployment of an opto-electrical cable to provide power and data transmission from the coast to a recording point at 2550 m in depth and 15km south to Porquerolles Island in the frame of the Antares neutrino telescope project. The program was founded in the 2002-2006 CPER (State-Region Research plan) by PACA region and CNRS/INSU and in the Antares collaboration which is responsible of all the marine operations on the site. The OBS and the DPG were set up by the ROV "Victor" from Ifremer (French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea) and partially buried; levelling and orientation were performed directly on the site. The instrument was running from April 2005 to April 2007. In April 2006 the sensor was completely buried. Data transmitted in quasi real time to Geoazur were integrated to the regional data center. In April 2007 the sensor was retrieved and reinstalled with data transmission protocol modification in October 2008. A water leak detected in December forced to cut the alimentation in January 2009. Because both sensors have not operated over the same time period, two different periods have been analysed: 2006 for the Antares OBS and 2008 for the Casablanca's one. In this way we are able to make a comparison of the noise behaviour by observing also the seasonal evolution. As observed on most of the ocean floor observatories, the noise is quite large on all components for both OBS. In general, the Antares OBS shows a better behaviour than the Casablanca OBS, due to the more favourable site conditions. Both OBS have been reinstalled to ameliorate some site condition deficiencies, which has basically affected the low frequency band, between 0.008 and 0.07 Hz. After the reinstallations, the noise conditions have improved at least 10 dB. A comparison of the power spectral density (PSD) curves for both stations concerning the periods after the reinstallations of the OBS show that, at low frequencies, the vertical component PSD curve for the Casablanca OBS is about

  11. Empirical optimization of DFT  +  U and HSE for the band structure of ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyal, Keshab; Pyles, Christopher K.; Afroosheh, Sajjad; Lamichhane, Aneer; Zayak, Alexey T.

    2018-02-01

    ZnO is a well-known wide band gap semiconductor with promising potential for applications in optoelectronics, transparent electronics, and spintronics. Computational simulations based on the density functional theory (DFT) play an important role in the research of ZnO, but the standard functionals, like Perdew–Burke–Erzenhof, result in largely underestimated values of the band gap and the binding energies of the Zn3d electrons. Methods like DFT  +  U and hybrid functionals are meant to remedy the weaknesses of plain DFT. However, both methods are not parameter-free. Direct comparison with experimental data is the best way to optimize the computational parameters. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) is commonly considered as a benchmark for the computed electronic densities of states. In this work, both DFT  +  U and HSE methods were parametrized to fit almost exactly the binding energies of electrons in ZnO obtained by XPS. The optimized parameterizations of DFT  +  U and HSE lead to significantly worse results in reproducing the ion-clamped static dielectric tensor, compared to standard high-level calculations, including GW, which in turn yield a perfect match for the dielectric tensor. The failure of our XPS-based optimization reveals the fact that XPS does not report the ground state electronic structure for ZnO and should not be used for benchmarking ground state electronic structure calculations.

  12. Band structure and device fabrication using thin-films of p-benzoquinonemonoimine zwitterion/P3HT blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Gerson; Wong, Freddy; Vega, Eduardo; Rosa, Luis; Lucie Routaboul, Pierre Braunstein Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Most organic materials are insulators or semiconductors and few explicitly exhibit a density of states at the Fermi level. Stable charge neutral organic molecules do not usually behave as metals because the interatomic hybridization causes the conduction and valence bands to be completely unfilled and filled, respectively. The electronic structure of the p-benzoquinonemonoimine zwitterion molecular film has a definite, although small, density of states evident at the Fermi level as well as a nonzero inner potential and thus is very different from a true insulator. Using this newly discover property of the zwitterion we are using blends of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) or P3HT/zwitterion for device fabrication and characterization. P3Ht is a semiconducting polymer with high electron mobility, a promising characteristic in organic semi-conductive devices. Photoelectron emission and inverse photoemission spectroscopy studies of polymer blends of p-benzoquinonemonoimine zwitterion and regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) thin-films provide evidence of changes in the molecular band structure. Electric measurements done with these polymer blends show evidence of higher transport currents in comparison to P3HT polymer thin-films alone. Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, Institut de Chimie (UMR 7177 CNRS), Université de Strasbourg, France.

  13. Empirical optimization of DFT  +  U and HSE for the band structure of ZnO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyal, Keshab; Pyles, Christopher K; Afroosheh, Sajjad; Lamichhane, Aneer; Zayak, Alexey T

    2018-02-14

    ZnO is a well-known wide band gap semiconductor with promising potential for applications in optoelectronics, transparent electronics, and spintronics. Computational simulations based on the density functional theory (DFT) play an important role in the research of ZnO, but the standard functionals, like Perdew-Burke-Erzenhof, result in largely underestimated values of the band gap and the binding energies of the Zn 3d electrons. Methods like DFT  +  U and hybrid functionals are meant to remedy the weaknesses of plain DFT. However, both methods are not parameter-free. Direct comparison with experimental data is the best way to optimize the computational parameters. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) is commonly considered as a benchmark for the computed electronic densities of states. In this work, both DFT  +  U and HSE methods were parametrized to fit almost exactly the binding energies of electrons in ZnO obtained by XPS. The optimized parameterizations of DFT  +  U and HSE lead to significantly worse results in reproducing the ion-clamped static dielectric tensor, compared to standard high-level calculations, including GW, which in turn yield a perfect match for the dielectric tensor. The failure of our XPS-based optimization reveals the fact that XPS does not report the ground state electronic structure for ZnO and should not be used for benchmarking ground state electronic structure calculations.

  14. Autopsy on an RF-Processed X-band Travelling Wave Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to locate the cause(s) of high electric-field breakdown in x-band accelerating structures, we have cleanly-autopsied (no debris added by post-operation structure disassembly) an RF-processed structure. Macroscopic localization provided operationally by RF reflected wave analysis and acoustic sensor pickup was used to connect breakdowns to autopsied crater damage areas. Surprisingly, the microscopic analyses showed breakdown craters in areas of low electric field. High currents induced by the magnetic field on sharp corners of the input coupler appears responsible for the extreme breakdown damage observed

  15. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-01

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  16. Experimental Studies of W-Band Accelerator Structures at High Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Marc E

    2001-02-09

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high-energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagnetic field solver. Manufacturing considerations of the small, delicate mm-wave components and the steps taken to reach a robust fabrication process are detailed. These devices were characterized under low power using a two-port vector network analyzer to verify tune and match, including measurements of the structures' fields using a bead-pull. The measurements are compared with theory throughout. Addition studies of the W-band structures were performed under high power utilizing a 11.424 GHz electron linac as a current source. Test results include W-band power levels of 200 kW, corresponding to fields in the PDA of over 20 MV/m, a higher gradient than any collider. Planar accelerator devices naturally have an rf quadrupole component of the accelerating field. Presented for the first time are the measurements of this effect.

  17. Band Gap Opening Induced by the Structural Periodicity in Epitaxial Graphene Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Nair, Maya; Palacio, Irene; Celis, Arlensiú; Zobelli, Alberto; Gloter, Alexandre; Kubsky, Stefan; Turmaud, Jean-Philippe; Conrad, Matthew; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Conrad, Edward H; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Tejeda, Antonio

    2017-04-12

    The epitaxial graphene buffer layer on the Si face of hexagonal SiC shows a promising band gap, of which the precise origin remains to be understood. In this work, we correlate the electronic to the atomic structure of the buffer layer by combining angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM). We show that the band structure in the buffer has an electronic periodicity related to the structural periodicity observed in STM images and published X-ray diffraction. Our HR-STEM measurements show the bonding of the buffer layer to the SiC at specific locations separated by 1.5 nm. This is consistent with the quasi 6 × 6 periodic corrugation observed in the STM images. The distance between buffer C and SiC is 1.9 Å in the bonded regions and up to 2.8 Å in the decoupled regions, corresponding to a 0.9 Å corrugation of the buffer layer. The decoupled regions are sp 2 hybridized. Density functional tight binding (DFTB) calculations demonstrate the presence of a gap at the Dirac point everywhere in the buffer layer, even in the decoupled regions where the buffer layer has an atomic structure close to that of graphene. The surface periodicity also promotes band in the superperiodic Brillouin zone edges as seen by photoemission and confirmed by our calculations.

  18. Thermal stability of the optical band gap and structural order in hot-wire-deposited amorphous silicon

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arendse, CJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available and that the structural disorder increases upon annealing. The increase in the structural disorder results in a broadening of the valence and conduction band tails, thereby pinning the valence and conduction band edges closer together, resulting in a decrease...

  19. Observation of wakefields in a beam-driven photonic band gap accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Wakefield excitation has been experimentally studied in a three-cell X-band standing wave photonic band gap (PBG accelerating structure. Major monopole (TM_{01}- and TM_{02}-like and dipole (TM_{11}- and TM_{12}-like modes were identified and characterized by precisely controlling the position of beam injection. The quality factor Q of the dipole modes was measured to be ∼10  times smaller than that of the accelerating mode. A charge sweep, up to 80 nC, has been performed, equivalent to ∼30  MV/m accelerating field on axis. A variable delay low charge witness bunch following a high charge drive bunch was used to calibrate the gradient in the PBG structure by measuring its maximum energy gain and loss. Experimental results agree well with numerical simulations.

  20. Harnessing the bistable composite shells to design a tunable phononic band gap structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanlong

    2018-02-01

    By proposing a system composed of an array of bistable composite shells immersed in air, we develop a new class of periodic structure to control the propagation of sound. Through numerical investigation, we find that the acoustic band gap of this system can be switched on and off by triggering the snap through deformation of the bistable composite shells. The shape of cross section and filling fraction of unit cell can be altered by different number of bistable composite shells, and they have strong impact on the position and width of the band gap. The proposed concept paves the way of using the bistable structures to design a new class of metamaterials that can be enable to manipulate sound.

  1. Structural Coloration of Colloidal Fiber by Photonic Band Gap and Resonant Mie Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Zhou, Ning; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-07-01

    Because structural color is fadeless and dye-free, structurally colored materials have attracted great attention in a wide variety of research fields. In this work, we report the use of a novel structural coloration strategy applied to the fabrication of colorful colloidal fibers. The nanostructured fibers with tunable structural colors were massively produced by colloidal electrospinning. Experimental results and theoretical modeling reveal that the homogeneous and noniridescent structural colors of the electrospun fibers are caused by two phenomena: reflection due to the band gap of photonic structure and Mie scattering of the colloidal spheres. Our unprecedented findings show promise in paving way for the development of revolutionary dye-free technology for the coloration of various fibers.

  2. Automated band annotation for RNA structure probing experiments with numerous capillary electrophoresis profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungmyung; Kim, Hanjoo; Tian, Siqi; Lee, Taehoon; Yoon, Sungroh; Das, Rhiju

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a powerful approach for structural analysis of nucleic acids, with recent high-throughput variants enabling three-dimensional RNA modeling and the discovery of new rules for RNA structure design. Among the steps composing CE analysis, the process of finding each band in an electrophoretic trace and mapping it to a position in the nucleic acid sequence has required significant manual inspection and remains the most time-consuming and error-prone step. The few available tools seeking to automate this band annotation have achieved limited accuracy and have not taken advantage of information across dozens of profiles routinely acquired in high-throughput measurements. We present a dynamic-programming-based approach to automate band annotation for high-throughput capillary electrophoresis. The approach is uniquely able to define and optimize a robust target function that takes into account multiple CE profiles (sequencing ladders, different chemical probes, different mutants) collected for the RNA. Over a large benchmark of multi-profile datasets for biological RNAs and designed RNAs from the EteRNA project, the method outperforms prior tools (QuSHAPE and FAST) significantly in terms of accuracy compared with gold-standard manual annotations. The amount of computation required is reasonable at a few seconds per dataset. We also introduce an 'E-score' metric to automatically assess the reliability of the band annotation and show it to be practically useful in flagging uncertainties in band annotation for further inspection. The implementation of the proposed algorithm is included in the HiTRACE software, freely available as an online server and for download at http://hitrace.stanford.edu. sryoon@snu.ac.kr or rhiju@stanford.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Band structures tunability of bulk 2D phononic crystals made of magneto-elastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Vasseur

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of contactless tunability of the band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals is demonstrated by employing magnetostrictive materials and applying an external magnetic field. The influence of the amplitude and of the orientation with respect to the inclusion axis of the applied magnetic field are studied in details. Applications to tunable selective frequency filters with switching functionnality and to reconfigurable wave-guides and demultiplexing devices are then discussed.

  4. Theoretical analysis of electronic band structure of 2- to 3-nm Si nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hapala, Prokop; Kůsová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 19 (2013), "195420-1"-"195420-13" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/09/H041; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Si nanoparticles * electronic band structure * nanoparticles * luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  5. Fabrication and cold test of photonic band gap resonators and accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenya I. Smirnova

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the detailed description of the successful design and cold test of photonic band gap (PBG resonators and traveling-wave accelerator structures. Those tests provided the essential basis for later hot test demonstration of the first PBG accelerator structure at 17.140 GHz [E. I. Smirnova, A. S. Kesar, I. Mastovsky, M. A. Shapiro, and R. J. Temkin, Phys. Rev. Lett., 95, 074801 (2005.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.074801]. The advantage of PBG resonators is that they were built to support only the main, TM_{01}-like, accelerator mode while not confining the higher-order modes (HOM or wakefields. The design of the PBG resonators was based on a triangular lattice of rods, with a missing rod at the center. Following theoretical analysis, the rod radius divided by the rod spacing was held to a value of about 0.15 to avoid supporting HOM. For a single-cell test the PBG structure was fabricated in X-band (11 GHz and brazed. The mode spectrum and Q factor (Q=5 000 agreed well with theory. Excellent HOM suppression was evident from the cold test. A six-cell copper PBG accelerator traveling-wave structure with reduced long-range wakefields was designed and was built by electroforming at Ku-band (17.140 GHz. The structure was tuned by etching the rods. Cold test of the structure yielded excellent agreement with the theoretical design. Successful results of the hot test of the structure demonstrating the acceleration of the electron beam were published in E. I. Smirnova, A. S. Kesar, I. Mastovsky, M. A. Shapiro, and R. J. Temkin, Phys. Rev. Lett., 95, 074801 (2005.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.074801

  6. A Ku-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with overmoded slow-wave-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; He, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Jian-De; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Ling, Jun-Pu

    2016-12-01

    In order to enhance the power capacity, an improved Ku-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with overmoded slow-wave-structure (SWS) is proposed and investigated numerically and experimentally. The analysis of the dispersion relationship and the resonant curve of the cold test indicate that the device can operate at the near π mode of the TM01 mode, which is useful for mode selection and control. In the particle simulation, the improved Ku-band MILO generates a microwave with a power of 1.5 GW and a frequency of 12.3 GHz under an input voltage of 480 kV and input current of 42 kA. Finally, experimental investigation of the improved Ku-band MILO is carried out. A high-power microwave (HPM) with an average power of 800 MW, a frequency of 12.35 GHz, and pulse width of 35 ns is generated under a diode voltage of 500 kV and beam current of 43 kA. The consistency between the experimental and simulated far-field radiation pattern confirms that the operating mode of the improved Ku-band MILO is well controlled in π mode of the TM01 mode. Project supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61171021).

  7. Extracting E versus k⃗ effective band structure from supercell calculations on alloys and impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2012-02-01

    The supercell approach to defects and alloys has circumvented the limitations of those methods that insist on using artificially high symmetry, yet this step usually comes at the cost of abandoning the language of E versus k⃗ band dispersion. Here we describe a computational method that maps the energy eigenvalues obtained from large supercell calculations into an effective band structure (EBS) and recovers an approximate E(k⃗) for alloys. Making use of supercells allows one to model a random alloy A1-xBxC by occupying the sites A and B via a coin-toss procedure, affording many different local environments (polymorphic description) to occur. We present the formalism and implementation details of the method and apply it to study the evolution of the impurity band appearing in the dilute GaN:P alloy. We go beyond the perfectly random case, realizing that many alloys may have nonrandom microstructures, and investigate how their formation is reflected in the EBS. It turns out that the EBS is extremely sensitive in determining the critical disorder level for which delocalized states start to appear in the intermediate band. In addition, the EBS allows us to identify the role played by atomic relaxation in the positioning of the impurity levels.

  8. A High-Power Test of an X-Band Molybdenum-Iris Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wuensch, Walter; Grudiev, A; Heikkinen, Samuli Tapio; Syratchev, I V; Taborelli, M; Wilson, Ian H; Adolphsen, C E

    2004-01-01

    In order to achieve accelerating gradients above 150 MV/m, alternative materials to copper are being investigated by the CLIC study. The potential of refractory metals has already been demonstrated in tests in which a tungsten-iris and a molybdenum-iris structure reached 150 and 193 MV/m respectively (30 GHz and a pulse length of 15 ns). In order to extend the investigation to the pulse lengths required for a linear collider, a molybdenum-iris structure scaled to X-band was tested at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA). The structure conditioned to only 65 MV/m (100 ns pulse length) in the available testing time and much more slowly than is typical of a copper structure. However the structure showed no sign of saturation and a microscopic inspection of the rf surfaces corroborated that the structure was still at an early stage of conditioning. The X-band and 30 GHz results are compared and what has been learned about material quality, surface preparation and conditioning strategy is discussed.

  9. Complex layered materials and periodic electromagnetic band-gap structures: Concepts, characterizations, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosallaei, Hossein

    The main objective of this dissertation is to characterize and create insight into the electromagnetic performances of two classes of composite structures, namely, complex multi-layered media and periodic Electromagnetic Band-Gap (EBG) structures. The advanced and diversified computational techniques are applied to obtain their unique propagation characteristics and integrate the results into some novel applications. In the first part of this dissertation, the vector wave solution of Maxwell's equations is integrated with the Genetic Algorithm (GA) optimization method to provide a powerful technique for characterizing multi-layered materials, and obtaining their optimal designs. The developed method is successfully applied to determine the optimal composite coatings for Radar Cross Section (RCS) reduction of canonical structures. Both monostatic and bistatic scatterings are explored. A GA with hybrid planar/curved surface implementation is also introduced to efficiently obtain the optimal absorbing materials for curved structures. Furthermore, design optimization of the non-uniform Luneburg and 2-shell spherical lens antennas utilizing modal solution/GA-adaptive-cost function is presented. The lens antennas are effectively optimized for both high gain and suppressed grating lobes. The second part demonstrates the development of an advanced computational engine, which accurately computes the broadband characteristics of challenging periodic electromagnetic band-gap structures. This method utilizes the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique with Periodic Boundary Condition/Perfectly Matched Layer (PBC/PML), which is efficiently integrated with the Prony scheme. The computational technique is successfully applied to characterize and present the unique propagation performances of different classes of periodic structures such as Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS), Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) materials, and Left-Handed (LH) composite media. The results are

  10. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  11. A wave-bending structure at Ka-band using 3D-printed metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junqiang; Liang, Min; Xin, Hao

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional printing technologies enable metamaterials of complex structures with arbitrary inhomogeneity. In this work, a 90° wave-bending structure at the Ka-band (26.5-40 GHz) based on 3D-printed metamaterials is designed, fabricated, and measured. The wave-bending effect is realized through a spatial distribution of varied effective dielectric constants. Based on the effective medium theory, different effective dielectric constants are accomplished by special, 3D-printable unit cells, which allow different ratios of dielectric to air at the unit cell level. In contrast to traditional, metallic-structure-included metamaterial designs, the reported wave-bending structure here is all dielectric and implemented by the polymer-jetting technique, which features rapid, low-cost, and convenient prototyping. Both simulation and experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the wave-bending structure.

  12. Band structure and thermoelectric properties of half-Heusler semiconductors from many-body perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedifar, Maedeh; Kratzer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Various ab initio approaches to the band structure of A NiSn and A CoSb half-Heusler compounds (A = Ti, Zr, Hf) are compared and their consequences for the prediction of thermoelectric properties are explored. Density functional theory with the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), as well as the hybrid density functional HSE06 and ab initio many-body perturbation theory in the form of the G W0 approach, are employed. The G W0 calculations confirm the trend of a smaller band gap (0.75 to 1.05 eV) in A NiSn compared to the A CoSb compounds (1.13 to 1.44 eV) already expected from the GGA calculations. While in A NiSn materials the G W0 band gap is 20% to 50% larger than in HSE06, the fundamental gap of A CoSb materials is smaller in G W0 compared to HSE06. This is because G W0 , similar to PBE, locates the valence band maximum at the L point of the Brillouin zone, whereas it is at the Γ point in the HSE06 calculations. The differences are attributed to the observation that the relative positions of the d levels of the transition metal atoms vary among the different methods. Using the calculated band structures and scattering rates taking into account the band effective masses at the extrema, the Seebeck coefficients, thermoelectric power factors, and figures of merit Z T are predicted for all six half-Heusler compounds. Comparable performance is predicted for the n -type A NiSn materials, whereas clear differences are found for the p -type A CoSb materials. Using the most reliable G W0 electronic structure, ZrCoSb is predicted to be the most efficient material with a power factor of up to 0.07 W/(K2 m) at a temperature of 600 K. We find strong variations among the different ab initio methods not only in the prediction of the maximum power factor and Z T value of a given material, but also in comparing different materials to each other, in particular in the p -type thermoelectric materials. Thus we conclude that the most elaborate, but also most costly G W0

  13. Band structure calculation of GaSe-based nanostructures using empirical pseudopotential method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osadchy, A V; Obraztsova, E D; Volotovskiy, S G; Golovashkin, D L; Savin, V V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of band structure computer simulation of GaSe- based nanostructures using the empirical pseudopotential method. Calculations were performed using a specially developed software that allows performing simulations using cluster computing. Application of this method significantly reduces the demands on computing resources compared to traditional approaches based on ab-initio techniques and provides receiving the adequate comparable results. The use of cluster computing allows to obtain information for structures that require an explicit account of a significant number of atoms, such as quantum dots and quantum pillars. (paper)

  14. Quasiparticle band structure for the Hubbard systems: Application to. alpha. -CeAl sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F. (Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain (ES)); Balle, S. (Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07071 Palma de Mallorca, Spain (ES)); Salvador, R. (Control Data Corporation, TALLAHASSEE, FL (USA) Supercomputer Computations Research Institute, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4052 (USA))

    1990-04-01

    A self-energy formalism for determining the quasiparticle band structure of the Hubbard systems is deduced. The self-energy is obtained from the dynamically screened Coulomb interaction whose bare value is the correlation energy {ital U}. A method for integrating the Schroedingerlike equation with the self-energy operator is given. The method is applied to the cubic Laves phase of {alpha}-CeAl{sub 2} because it is a clear Hubbard system with a very complex electronic structure and, moreover, this system provides us with sufficient experimental data for testing our method.

  15. Ab initio electronic band structure calculation of InP in the wurtzite phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacal, Luis C. O.; Cantarero, Andrés

    2011-05-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the InP band structure in the wurtzite phase and compare it with that of the zincblende phase. In both calculations, we use the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method as implemented in the WIEN2k code and the modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential, which provides an improved value of the bandgap. The structural optimization of the wurtizte InP gives a=0.4150 nm, c=0.6912 nm, and an internal parameter u=0.371, showing the existence of a spontaneous polarization along the growth axis. As compared to the ideal wurtzite structure (that with the lattice parameter derived from the zincblende structure calculations), the actual wurtzite structure is compressed (-1.3%) in plane and expanded (0.7%) along the c-direction. The value of the calculated band gaps agrees well with recent optical experiments. The calculations are also consistent with the optical transitions found using polarized light.

  16. Photonic band gap structure for a ferroelectric photonic crystal at microwave frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Chen, De-Xin; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-10-10

    In this work, the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in a one-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal (PC) is theoretically investigated. We consider a PC, air/(AB)N/air, in which layer A is a dielectric of MgO and layer B is taken to be a ferroelectric of Ba0.55Sr0.45TiO3 (BSTO). With an extremely high value in the dielectric constant in BSTO, the calculated photonic band structure at microwave frequencies exhibits some interesting features that are significantly different from those in a usual dielectric-dielectric PC. First, the photonic transmission band consists of multiple and nearly discrete transmission peaks. Second, the calculated bandwidth of the PBG is nearly unchanged as the angle of incidence varies in the TE wave. The bandwidth will slightly reduce for the TM mode. Thus, a wide omnidirectional PBG can be obtained. Additionally, the effect of the thickness of the ferroelectric layer on the PBG is much more pronounced compared to the dielectric layer thickness. That is, the increase of ferroelectric thickness can significantly decrease the PBG bandwidth.

  17. Reply to ``Comment on `Band structure engineering of graphene by strain: First-principles calculations' ''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Gui; Li, Jin; Zhong, Jianxin

    2009-10-01

    We reply to the Comment by Farjam and Rafii-Tabar [Phys. Rev. B 80, 167401 (2009)] on our paper [Phys. Rev. B 78, 075435 (2008)]. We show that the gap opening found in our paper is due to the use of a small number of k points in the calculation which prevents revealing the sharp contact of the two bands near K or R . Once a large number of k points is used, the density-functional theory (DFT) VASP codes give the same conclusion as obtained by Farjam and Rafii-Tabar by using the QUANTUM-ESPRESSO codes, namely, there is no gap opening in the band structure of graphene under small planar strain. We also point out that all other results in our paper remain correct, except for the conclusion of the gap opening. The results demonstrate the importance of using a large number of k points for determining the gap width of the band structure of graphene under strain as well as the validity of the DFT VASP codes for the system.

  18. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensors for large band low frequency monitoring and characterization of sites and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-10-01

    Among the different mechanical architectures present in literature, the Watts linkage is one of the most promising ones for the implementation of a new class of mechanical accelerometers (horizontal, vertical and angular). In this paper, we present monolithic implementations of uniaxial and triaxial mechanical seismometers and accelerometers based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum mechanical configuration, optimized for low frequency characterization of sites (including underground sites) and structures as inertial sensor (seismometer). This mechanical architecture allows the design and implementation of very large band monolithic sensors (10-7Hz 102 Hz), whose sensitivities for the most common applications are defined by the noise introduced by their readouts (e.g. ¡ 10-12 m/sqrt(Hz) with classical LVDT readouts). These unique features, coupled other relevant properties like scalability, compactness, lightness, high directivity, frequency tunability (typical resonance frequencies in the band 10-1 Hz 102 Hz), very high immunity to environmental noises and low cost make this class of sensors very effective for the implementation of uniaxial (horizontal and/or vertical) and triaxial seismometers and accelerometers for ground, space and underwater applications, including UHV and cryogenics ones. Typical applications of this class of monolithic sensors are in the field of earthquake engineering, seismology, geophysics, civil engineering, characterization of sites (including underground sites), structures (e.g. buildings, bridges, historical monuments), and, in general, in all applications requiring large band-low frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities and compactness.

  19. High power breakdown testing of a photonic band-gap accelerator structure with elliptical rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Munroe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved single-cell photonic band-gap (PBG structure with an inner row of elliptical rods (PBG-E was tested with high power at a 60 Hz repetition rate at X-band (11.424 GHz, achieving a gradient of 128  MV/m at a breakdown probability of 3.6×10^{-3} per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 150 ns. The tested standing-wave structure was a single high-gradient cell with an inner row of elliptical rods and an outer row of round rods; the elliptical rods reduce the peak surface magnetic field by 20% and reduce the temperature rise of the rods during the pulse by several tens of degrees, while maintaining good damping and suppression of high order modes. When compared with a single-cell standing-wave undamped disk-loaded waveguide structure with the same iris geometry under test at the same conditions, the PBG-E structure yielded the same breakdown rate within measurement error. The PBG-E structure showed a greatly reduced breakdown rate compared with earlier tests of a PBG structure with round rods, presumably due to the reduced magnetic fields at the elliptical rods vs the fields at the round rods, as well as use of an improved testing methodology. A post-testing autopsy of the PBG-E structure showed some damage on the surfaces exposed to the highest surface magnetic and electric fields. Despite these changes in surface appearance, no significant change in the breakdown rate was observed in testing. These results demonstrate that PBG structures, when designed with reduced surface magnetic fields and operated to avoid extremely high pulsed heating, can operate at breakdown probabilities comparable to undamped disk-loaded waveguide structures and are thus viable for high-gradient accelerator applications.

  20. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, Ekmel; Tuttle, Gary; Michel, Erick; Ho, Kai-Ming; Biswas, Rana; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap.

  1. The band structure of carbonmonoxide on 2-D Au islands on graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2014-06-01

    The dispersion of the occupied molecular orbitals of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Au 2D islands, vapor-deposited on graphene/Ru(0 0 0 1), is seen to be wave vector dependent, as revealed by angle-resolved photoemission. The band dispersion is similar to CO monolayers adsorbed on many single crystal metal surfaces. Thus not only are the adsorbed gold islands on graphene flat and crystalline, as evident in the dispersion of the Au d-states, but the CO molecular adlayer is both molecular and ordered as well. The experimental angle-resolved photoemission combined with model calculations of the occupied CO band structure, suggest that, in spite of being a very weakly bound adsorbate, the CO adlayer on Au 2D islands on graphene is strongly hybridized to the Au layer. . © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Tang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs) are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS) have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC.

  3. Development of small C-band standing-wave accelerator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, S.; Takahashi, A.; Hisanaga, N.; Sekido, H.; Yoshizumi, A.

    2000-01-01

    We have newly developed a compact C-band (5712 MHz) standing-wave accelerator for the medical product/waste sterilization applications. The accelerator consists of an electron gun operating at 25 kV DC followed by a single-cell pre-buncher and 3-cell buncher section, and 11-cell of the side-coupled standing-wave accelerating structure. The total length including the electron gun is about 600 mm. The first high-power test was performed in March 2000, where the accelerator successively generated the electron beam of 9 MeV energy and 160 mA peak-current at 3.8 MW RF input power. Mitsubishi Heavy Industry starts to serve the sterilization systems using C-band accelerator reported here, and also supplies the accelerator components for the medical oncology applications. (author)

  4. Band gap widening and quantum tunnelling effects of Ag/MgO/p-Si MOS structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, Norlida; Badar, Nurhanna; Fadilah Chayed, Nor; Firdaus Kasim, Muhd

    2016-10-01

    MgO films of various thicknesses were fabricated via the pulsed laser deposition method. The MgO thin films obtained have the advantage of high quality mirror finish, good densification and of uniform thickness. The MgO thin films have thicknesses of between 43 to 103 nm. They are polycrystalline in nature with oriented growth mainly in the direction of the [200] and [220] crystal planes. It is observed that the band gap of the thin films increases as the thickness decreases due to quantum effects, however, turn-on voltage has the opposite effect. The decrease of the turn-on as well as the tunnelling voltage of the thinner films, despite their larger band gap, is a direct experimental evidence of quantum tunnelling effects in the thin films. This proves that quantum tunnelling is more prominent in low dimensional structures.

  5. Impurity effects on the band structure of one-dimensional photonic crystals: experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Acosta, G A [Instituto de Fisica, BUAP Apartado Postal J-48, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); Schanze, H; Kuhl, U; Stoeckmann, H-J [Fachbereich Physik der Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Renthof 5, D-35032 (Germany)], E-mail: gluna@sirio.ifuap.buap.mx

    2008-04-15

    We study the effects of single impurities on the transmission in microwave realizations of the photonic Kronig-Penney model, consisting of arrays of Teflon pieces alternating with air spacings in a microwave guide. As only the first propagating mode is considered, the system is essentially one-dimensional (1D) obeying the Helmholtz equation. We derive analytical closed form expressions from which the band structure, frequency of defect modes and band profiles can be determined. These agree very well with experimental data for all types of single defects considered (e.g. interstitial and substitutional) and show that our experimental set-up serves to explore some of the phenomena occurring in more sophisticated experiments. Conversely, based on the understanding provided by our formulae, information about the unknown impurity can be determined by simply observing certain features in the experimental data for the transmission. Further, our results are directly applicable to the closely related quantum 1D Kronig-Penney model.

  6. Fermi surface and band structure of BiPd from ARPES studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohani, H.; Mishra, P.; Gupta, Anurag; Awana, V. P. S.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a detailed electronic structure study of the non-centrosymmetric superconductor BiPd based on our angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations. We observe a high intensity distribution on the Fermi surface (FS) of this compound resulting from various electron and hole like bands which are present in the vicinity of the Fermi energy (Ef). The near Ef states are primarily composed of Bi-6p with a little admixture of Pd-4dx2-y2/zy orbitals. There are various spin-orbit split bands involved in the crossing of Ef making a complex FS. The FS mainly consists of multi sheets of three dimensions which disfavor the nesting between different sheets of the FS. Our comprehensive study elucidates that BiPd could be a s-wave multiband superconductor.

  7. Strain-tunable band parameters of ZnO monolayer in graphene-like honeycomb structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-10-01

    We present ab initio calculations which show that the direct-band-gap, effective masses and Fermi velocities of charge carriers in ZnO monolayer (ML-ZnO) in graphene-like honeycomb structure are all tunable by application of in-plane homogeneous biaxial strain. Within our simulated strain limit of ± 10%, the band gap remains direct and shows a strong non-linear variation with strain. Moreover, the average Fermi velocity of electrons in unstrained ML-ZnO is of the same order of magnitude as that in graphene. The results promise potential applications of ML-ZnO in mechatronics/straintronics and other nano-devices such as the nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS).

  8. Lunar banding in the scleractinian coral Montastraea faveolata: Fine-scale structure and influence of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Amos; Sammarco, Paul W.

    2010-10-01

    Lunar cycles play an important role in controlling biological rhythms in many organisms, including hermatypic corals. Coral spawning is correlated with environmental factors, including surface seawater temperature (SST) and lunar phase. Calcium carbonate skeletons of corals possess minute structures that, when viewed via X-radiography, produce high-density (HD) annual banding patterns. Some corals possess dissepiments that serve as the microstructural base for upward corallite growth. Here we report the results of detailed structural analysis of the skeleton of Montastraea faveolata (Scleractinia) (Ellis and Solander, 1786) and quantify the number of dissepiments that occur between HD bands, including interannual and intercorallite variability. Using a 30 year database, spanning from 1961 to 1991, we confirm earlier speculation by several authors that the frequencies of these microbands within a year is tightly linked to the lunar cycle. We also demonstrate that the frequency distribution of the number of these dissepiments per year is skewed to lower numbers. Extensive statistical analyses of long-term daily SST records (University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez) revealed that precipitation of dissepiments is suppressed in years of cooler-than-average seawater temperature. We propose that dissepiment deposition is driven primarily by lunar cycle and seawater temperature, particularly at lower temperatures, and banding is generally unaffected by normal or high temperatures. These fine-scale banding patterns are also strongly correlated with the number of lunar months between reproductive spawning events in average or warmer-than-average seawater temperature years. This microbanding may represent another proxy for high-resolution estimates of variance in marine palaeo-temperatures, particularly during cooler SST years.

  9. Giant amplification in degenerate band edge slow-wave structures interacting with an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Veysi, Mehdi; Capolino, Filippo [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Figotin, Alexander [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We propose a new amplification regime based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate electromagnetic (EM) modes in a slow-wave structure and the electron beam, referred to as super synchronization. These four EM modes arise in a Fabry-Pérot cavity when degenerate band edge (DBE) condition is satisfied. The modes interact constructively with the electron beam resulting in superior amplification. In particular, much larger gains are achieved for smaller beam currents compared to conventional structures based on synchronization with only a single EM mode. We demonstrate giant gain scaling with respect to the length of the slow-wave structure compared to conventional Pierce type single mode traveling wave tube amplifiers. We construct a coupled transmission line model for a loaded waveguide slow-wave structure exhibiting a DBE, and investigate the phenomenon of giant gain via super synchronization using the Pierce model generalized to multimode interaction.

  10. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, K

    2003-01-01

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e sup + e sup - linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 (micro)m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  11. A Reconfigurable Triple-Notch-Band Antenna Integrated with Defected Microstrip Structure Band-Stop Filter for Ultra-Wideband Cognitive Radio Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingsong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A printed reconfigurable ultra-wideband (UWB monopole antenna with triple narrow band-notched characteristics is proposed for cognitive radio applications in this paper. The triple narrow band-notched frequencies are obtained using a defected microstrip structure (DMS band stop filter (BSF embedded in the microstrip feed line and an inverted π-shaped slot etched in the rectangular radiation patch, respectively. Reconfigurable characteristics of the proposed cognitive radio antenna (CRA are achieved by means of four ideal switches integrated on the DMS-BSF and the inverted π-shaped slot. The proposed UWB CRA can work at eight modes by controlling switches ON and OFF. Moreover, impedance bandwidth, design procedures, and radiation patterns are presented for analysis and explanation of this antenna. The designed antenna operates over the frequency band between 3.1 GHz and 14 GHz (bandwidth of 127.5%, with three notched bands from 4.2 GHz to 6.2 GHz (38.5%, 6.6 GHz to 7.0 GHz (6%, and 12.2 GHz to 14 GHz (13.7%. The antenna is successfully simulated, fabricated, and measured. The results show that it has wide impedance bandwidth, multimodes characteristics, stable gain, and omnidirectional radiation patterns.

  12. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  13. Design, fabrication and high-gradient tests of X-band choke-mode structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaowei; Shi, Jiaru; Chen, Huaibi; Zha, Hao; Abe, Tetsuo; Higo, Toshiyasu; Matsumoto, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    Two standing-wave single-cell choke-mode damped structures with different choke dimensions which worked at 11.424 GHz were designed, manufactured and tuned by accelerator group in Tsinghua University. High power test was carried out to study choke-mode structure's properties in high gradient and related breakdown phenomenon. A single-cell structure without choke which almost has the same inner dimension as choke-mode structure was also tested as a comparison to study how the choke affects hig...

  14. Computing the band structure and energy gap of penta-graphene by using DFT and G0W0 approximations

    OpenAIRE

    Einollahzadeh, H.; Dariani, R. S.; Fazeli, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the optimum coordinate of the penta-graphene. Penta-graphene is a new stable carbon allotrope which is stronger than graphene. Here, we compare the band gap of penta-graphene with various density functional theory (DFT) methods. We plot the band structure of penta-graphene which calculated with the generalized gradient approximation functional, about Fermi energy.

  15. Effect of superconductivity on the cubic to tetragonal structural transition due to a two-fold degenerate electronic band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, S.K.; Khanra, B.C.; Ray, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the BCS superconductivity on the cubic to tetragonal structural transition arising from a two-fold degenerate electronic band is investigated within the mean field approximation. The phase diagram of the two transitions is given for a half filled esub(g)-band. Modification of the two transitions when they are close together is also discussed. (author)

  16. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Stop-Bands in Finite and Infinite Periodic One-Dimensional Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Manconi, Elisabetta; Vanali, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    structure. Numerical examples are presented, and results are discussed and validated experimentally. Very good agreement between the numerical and experimental models in terms of stop-bands is shown. In particular, the results show that the stop-bands obtained using a wave approach (applied to a single cell...

  17. High power experimental studies of hybrid photonic band gap accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JieXi Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the first high power tests of hybrid photonic band gap (PBG accelerator structures. Three hybrid PBG (HPBG structures were designed, built and tested at 17.14 GHz. Each structure had a triangular lattice array with 60 inner sapphire rods and 24 outer copper rods sandwiched between copper disks. The dielectric PBG band gap map allows the unique feature of overmoded operation in a TM_{02} mode, with suppression of both lower order modes, such as the TM_{11} mode, as well as higher order modes. The use of sapphire rods, which have negligible dielectric loss, required inclusion of the dielectric birefringence in the design. The three structures were designed to sequentially reduce the peak surface electric field. Simulations showed relatively high surface fields at the triple point as well as in any gaps between components in the clamped assembly. The third structure used sapphire rods with small pin extensions at each end and obtained the highest gradient of 19  MV/m, corresponding to a surface electric field of 78  MV/m, with a breakdown probability of 5×10^{-1} per pulse per meter for a 100-ns input power pulse. Operation at a gradient above 20  MV/m led to runaway breakdowns with extensive light emission and eventual damage. For all three structures, multipactor light emission was observed at gradients well below the breakdown threshold. This research indicated that multipactor triggered at the triple point limited the operational gradient of the hybrid structure.

  18. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, A. K., E-mail: aktrip2001@yahoo.co.in; Singhal, R. P., E-mail: rpsiitbhu@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh (India); Khazanov, G. V., E-mail: George.V.Khazanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Avanov, L. A., E-mail: levon.a.avanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Electron pitch angle (D{sub αα}) and momentum (D{sub pp}) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in D{sub αα} and D{sub pp} coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The D{sub pp} diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients. For chorus waves, D{sub pp} coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of D{sub pp} coefficient are generally larger than the values of D{sub αα} coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3

  19. Study of the structure of yrast bands of neutron-rich 114-124Pd isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2018-02-01

    The projected shell model calculations have been carried out in the neutron-rich 114-124Pd isotopic mass chain. The results have been obtained for the deformation systematics of E(2+1) and E(4+1)/E({2}+1) values, BCS subshell occupation numbers, yrast spectra, backbending phenomena, B( E2) transition probabilities and g-factors in these nuclei. The observed systematics of E(2+1) values and R_{42} ratios in the 114-124Pd isotopic mass chain indicate that there is a decrease of collectivity as the neutron number increases from 68 to 78. The occurrence of backbending in these nuclei as well as the changes in the calculated B( E2) transition probabilities and g -factors predict that there are changes in the structure of yrast bands in these nuclei. These changes occur at the spin where there is crossing of g-band by 2-qp bands. The predicted backbendings and predicted values of B( E2)s and g-factors in some of the isotopes need to be confirmed experimentally.

  20. Lamé polynomials, hyperelliptic reductions and Lamé band structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Robert S

    2008-03-28

    The band structure of the Lamé equation, viewed as a one-dimensional Schrödinger equation with a periodic potential, is studied. At integer values of the degree parameter l, the dispersion relation is reduced to the l=1 dispersion relation, and a previously published l=2 dispersion relation is shown to be partly incorrect. The Hermite-Krichever Ansatz, which expresses Lamé equation solutions in terms of l=1 solutions, is the chief tool. It is based on a projection from a genus-l hyperelliptic curve, which parametrizes solutions, to an elliptic curve. A general formula for this covering is derived, and is used to reduce certain hyperelliptic integrals to elliptic ones. Degeneracies between band edges, which can occur if the Lamé equation parameters take complex values, are investigated. If the Lamé equation is viewed as a differential equation on an elliptic curve, a formula is conjectured for the number of points in elliptic moduli space (elliptic curve parameter space) at which degeneracies occur. Tables of spectral polynomials and Lamé polynomials, i.e. band-edge solutions, are given. A table in the earlier literature is corrected.

  1. Dual Band-Notched Microstrip-Fed Vivaldi Antenna Utilizing Compact EBG Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Alshamaileh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an ultra-wideband (UWB antipodal Vivaldi antenna (AVA with high-Q stopband characteristics based on compact electromagnetic bandgap (EBG structures. First, an AVA is designed and optimized to operate over an UWB spectrum. Then, two pairs of EBG cells are introduced along the antenna feed line to suppress the frequency components at 3.6–3.9 and 5.6–5.8 GHz (i.e., WiMAX and ISM bands, resp.. Simulated and measured results show a voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR below 2 for the entire 3.1–10.6 GHz band with high attenuation at the two selected subbands. This simple yet effective approach eliminates the need to deform the antenna radiators with slots/parasitic elements or comprise multilayer substrates. Furthermore, the flexibility it offers in terms of controlling both the number and locations of the band-reject frequencies is advantageous for antennas with nonuniform flares as in the AVA.

  2. Microscopic bosonization of band structures: x-ray processes beyond the Fermi edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Izak; Florens, Serge

    2017-11-01

    Bosonization provides a powerful analytical framework to deal with one-dimensional strongly interacting fermion systems, which makes it a cornerstone in quantum many-body theory. However, this success comes at the expense of using effective infrared parameters, and restricting the description to low energy states near the Fermi level. We propose a radical extension of the bosonization technique that overcomes both limitations, allowing computations with microscopic lattice Hamiltonians, from the Fermi level down to the bottom of the band. The formalism rests on the simple idea of representating the fermion kinetic term in the energy domain, after which it can be expressed in terms of free bosonic degrees of freedom. As a result, one- and two-body fermionic scattering processes generate anharmonic boson-boson interactions, even in the forward channel. We show that up to moderate interaction strengths, these non-linearities can be treated analytically at all energy scales, using the x-ray emission problem as a showcase. In the strong interaction regime, we employ a systematic variational solution of the bosonic theory, and obtain results that agree quantitatively with an exact diagonalization of the original one-particle fermionic model. This provides a proof of the fully microscopic character of bosonization, on all energy scales, for an arbitrary band structure. Besides recovering the known x-ray edge singularity at the emission threshold, we find strong signatures of correlations even at emission frequencies beyond the band bottom.

  3. Comparison of the chromosome banding patterns in Dryomys laniger and D. nitedula from Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arslan, A.; Kankilic, T.; Yorulmaz, T.; Kankilic, T.; Zima, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2016), s. 363-368 ISSN 1300-0179 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : dormice * karyotype * C-banding * AgNOR staining Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.785, year: 2016

  4. SRTM mission-cross comparison of X adn C band data properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P.; Eineder, M.; Rabus, B.; Gurrola, E.; Hensley, S.; Knopfle, W.; Breit, H.; Roth, A.; Werner, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the specific properties of the X and C band data sets with respect to global coverage, height accuracy, sensor specific errors, product definition, product format and availability.

  5. Electronic band structure and magnetism of Fe16N2 calculated by the FLAPW method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Harima, Hisatomo; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Yoshiyuki; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko

    2000-12-01

    Electronic band structure calculations based on the full-potential linear augmented plane-wave method have been performed for Fe16N2. The calculations are performed with the crystal parameters recently refined [H. Tanaka et al., Acta Mater. 45, 1401 (1997)] in addition to the previous reported structure [K. H. Jack, Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 208, 200 (1951)]. Jack's model (J model) led to the model of Tanaka et al. (T model), where Fe atoms at the 8h site shift to N atoms along the [110] direction. The calculated average moment per Fe atom for the T model is slightly smaller than that for the J model. We cannot theoretically expect a large magnetic moment based on any Fe16N2 structure. The presence of another material that has a large magnetic moment must be considered to explain the large magnetic moment of the Fe-N system.

  6. Specific heat, Electrical resistivity and Electronic band structure properties of noncentrosymmetric Th7Fe3superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, V H; Sahakyan, M

    2017-11-17

    Noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th 7 Fe 3 has been investigated by means of specific heat, electrical resisitivity measurements and electronic properties calculations. Sudden drop in the resistivity at 2.05 ± 0.15 K and specific heat jump at 1.98 ± 0.02 K are observed, rendering the superconducting transition. A model of two BCS-type gaps appears to describe the zero-magnetic-field specific heat better than those based on the isotropic BCS theory or anisotropic functions. A positive curvature of the upper critical field H c2 (T c ) and nonlinear field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K qualitatively support the two-gap scenario, which predicts H c2 (0) = 13 kOe. The theoretical densities of states and electronic band structures (EBS) around the Fermi energy show a mixture of Th 6d- and Fe 3d-electrons bands, being responsible for the superconductivity. Furthermore, the EBS and Fermi surfaces disclose significantly anisotropic splitting associated with asymmetric spin-orbit coupling (ASOC). The ASOC sets up also multiband structure, which presumably favours a multigap superconductivity. Electron Localization Function reveals the existence of both metallic and covalent bonds, the latter may have different strengths depending on the regions close to the Fe or Th atoms. The superconducting, electronic properties and implications of asymmetric spin-orbit coupling associated with noncentrosymmetric structure are discussed.

  7. Calculation of the band structure of 2d conducting polymers using the network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabra, M. K.; Suman, H.

    2007-01-01

    the network model has been used to calculate the band structure the gap energy and Fermi level of conducting polymers in two dimensions. For this purpose, a geometrical classification of possible polymer chains configurations in two dimensions has been introduced leading to a classification of the unit cells based on the number of bonds in them. The model has been applied to graphite in 2D, represented by a three bonds unit cell, and, as a new case, the anti-parallel Polyacetylene chains (PA) in two dimensions, represented by a unit cell with four bons. The results are in good agreement with the first principles calculations. (author)

  8. Silicon-based photocells of enhanced spectral sensitivity with nano-sized graded band gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhadyrkhanov, M.K.; Isamov, S.B.; Iliev, K.M. et al.

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of monocrystalline silicon with multiply charged nanoclusters are studied that generate 'silicon clusters', i.e., nano-sized graded band gap structures. Multiply charged nanoclusters of manganese atoms strongly influence the photoelectric properties of monocrystalline silicon and expand the range of spectral sensitivity up to 8 μm; the photoelectric sensitivity reaches ∼10 9 . Conditions occur for the emergence of photo-emf in such a material in the infrared region when hν< E g . The obtained experimental data expand the functional capabilities for the application of silicon with multiply charged impurity atoms. (authors)

  9. Effect of edge defects on band structure of zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Payal; Kumar, Shailesh; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.; Shukla, Alok; Kumar, Rakesh

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we report band structure studies of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) on introducing defects (sp3 hybridized carbon atoms) in different concentrations at edges by varying the ratio of sp3 to sp2 hybridized carbon atoms. On the basis of theoretical analyses, bandgap values of ZGNRs are found to be strongly dependent on the relative arrangement of sp3 to sp2 hybridized carbon atoms at the edges for a defect concentration; so the findings would greatly help in understanding the bandgap of nanoribbons for their electronic applications.

  10. Product fine-structure resolved photodissociation dynamics: The A band of H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Linsen; Xie, Daiqian; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of H 2 O in its first absorption band is investigated on an accurate potential energy surface based on a large number of high-level ab initio points. Several ro-vibrational states of the parent molecule are considered. Different from most previous theoretical studies, the spin-orbit and Λ-doublet populations of the open-shell OH fragment are reported from full-dimensional wave packet calculations. The populations of the two spin-orbit manifolds are in most cases close to the statistical limit, but the Λ-doublet is dominated by the A ″ component, thanks largely to the fast in-plane dissociation of H 2 O(A ~1 A ′′ ). Comparisons with experimental data and a Franck-Condon model are generally very good, although some discrepancies exist

  11. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  12. 16O + 16O molecular structures of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed bands in 34S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniguchi Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of excited states in 34S are investigated using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method(GCM. The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter β. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of two positive- and one negative-parity super de formed(SD bands are predicted, and low-lying states and other deformed bands are obtained. The SD bands have structures of 16O + 16O + two valence neutrons in molecular orbitals around the two 16O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the two valence neutrons are δ2 and π2 for the positive-parity SD bands and π1δ1 for the negative parity SD band.

  13. STATUS OF X-BAND STANDING WAVE STRUCTURE STUDIES AT SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2003-01-01

    The linacs proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and Japanese Linear Collider (JLC) would contain several thousand X-Band accelerator structures that would operate at a loaded gradient of 50 MV/m. An extensive experimental and theoretical program is underway at SLAC, FNAL and KEK to develop structures that reliably operate at this gradient. The development of standing wave structures is a part of this program. The properties of standing wave structures allow them to operate at the loaded gradient in contrast to traveling wave structures that need conditioning to the unloaded gradient (65 MV/m for NLC/JLC). The gradients in the standing structures tested thus far have been limited by input coupler breakdowns. The behavior of these breakdowns is consistent with a model of pulsed heating due to high magnetic fields. New input couplers have been designed to reduce maximum magnetic fields. This paper discusses design considerations related to high power performance, wakefield suppression and results of high power tests of prototype standing wave structures

  14. Relativistic Band Structure and Fermi Surface of PdTe2 by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The energy bands of the trigonal layer compound PdTe2 have been calculated, using the relativistic linear muffin-tin orbitals method. The bandstructure is separated into three distinct regions with low-lying Te 5s bands, conduction bands formed by Pd 4d and Te 5p states, and high-lying bands formed...

  15. Comparison of tension band wiring and precontoured locking compression plate fixation in Mayo type IIA olecranon fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Raschke, Michael J; Groene, Philipp; Weimann, André; Wähnert, Dirk; Lenschow, Simon; Kösters, Clemens

    2014-03-01

    Aim of the present study was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcome of tension band wiring and precontoured locking compression plate fixation in patients treated surgically for an isolated olecranon fractures type IIA according to the Mayo classification. Of 26 patients presenting with an isolated Mayo type IIA olecranon fracture, 13 underwent fixation with a precontoured locking compression plate (group A), 13 patients were treated with tension band wiring (group B). At a mean follow-up of 43 months, patients were clinically and radiographically re-examined using the DASH score, the Mayo Elbow Performance score (MEPS) and anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. The mean DASH score was 14 points in group A and 12.5 points in group B. Regarding the MEPS, 92% of the patients in group A achieved a good to excellent results in comparison to 77% in group B. No significant differences between the two groups could be detected regarding the clinical and radiographic outcome. Implant-related irritations requiring hardware removal occurred more frequently in group B (12 vs. 7). Procedure and implant related costs were significantly higher in group A. Tension band wiring is still a preferable surgical method to treat simple isolated olecranon fractures. The patient must be informed that in all likelihood implant removal will be required once the fracture has healed. Fixation with precontoured locking compression plates does not provide better functional and radiographic outcome but is more expensive than tension band wiring.

  16. Comparison of titanium cable tension band and nickel-titanium patella concentrator for patella fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Quan-Ming; Gu, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, Li; Feng, De-Hong

    2017-07-01

    Patellar fractures account for approximately 1% of all fractures. Due to the patella's importance as regards the extensor mechanism, effort should be made to preserve the patella. Several operative treatment methods have been introduced for patella fractures. This study aims to compare the clinical effect of a titanium cable tension band and nickeltitanium (NiTi) patella concentrator (NT-PC) in treating patella fractures. Thirty-nine patients with patella fractures were enrolled in this retrospective study. All the patients were treated via the open reduction internal fixation procedure using a titanium cable tension band or NT-PC. All the patients were followed up over an average period of 13 months. The main outcome measures were operation time, time of fracture union, postoperative complications, and Böstman knee scores. Statistical analyses were conducted between the 2 groups. All the patients were operated on successfully. The operation time of the NT-PC treatment group was less than that of the titanium cable tension band treatment group (p cable tension band and NT-PC groups, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the excellent and good results (p > 0.05). Both titanium cable tension band and NT-PC showed good efficacy for the treatment of patellar fractures. NT-PC fixation, a new option for the treatment of patella fractures, is a simple and effective fixation method.

  17. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro, E-mail: juanpedro.cascales@uam.es; Martínez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G., E-mail: farkhad.aliev@uam.es [Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada C3, Instituto Nicolas Cabrera (INC), Condensed Matter Physics Institute (IFIMAC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Chang, Cui-Zu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Guerrero, Rubén [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-21

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunneling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunneling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.

  18. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap plasma structure formed by atmospheric pressure plasma inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitski, V. S.; Callegari, Th.; Simonchik, L. V.; Sokoloff, J.; Usachonak, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The ability to use plasma columns of pulse discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure to form a one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure (or electromagnetic crystal) in the X-band waveguide is demonstrated. We show that a plasma electromagnetic crystal attenuates a microwave propagation in the stopband more than by 4 orders of magnitude. In order to obtain an effective control of the transmission spectrum comparable with a metallic regular structure, the electron concentration in plasma inhomogeneities should vary within the range from 1014 cm-3 to 1016 cm-3, while gas temperature and mean electron energy must be in the range of 2000 K and 0.5 eV, respectively, to lower electron collision frequency around 1010 s-1. We analyze in detail the time evolution response of the electromagnetic crystal according to the plasma parameters for the duration of the discharge. The interest of using atmospheric pressure discharges is to increase the microwave breakdown threshold in discharge volumes, whereby it becomes possible to perform dynamic control of high power microwaves.

  19. Consideration of relativistic effects in band structure calculations based on the empirical tight-binding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanke, M.; Hennig, D.; Kaschte, A.; Koeppen, M.

    1988-01-01

    The energy band structure of cadmium telluride and mercury telluride materials is investigated by means of the tight-binding (TB) method considering relativistic effects and the spin-orbit interaction. Taking into account relativistic effects in the method is rather simple though the size of the Hamilton matrix doubles. Such considerations are necessary for the interesting small-interstice semiconductors, and the experimental results are reflected correctly in the band structures. The transformation behaviour of the eigenvectors within the Brillouin zone gets more complicated, but is, nevertheless, theoretically controllable. If, however, the matrix elements of the Green operator are to be calculated, one has to use formula manipulation programmes in particular for non-diagonal elements. For defect calculations by the Koster-Slater theory of scattering it is necessary to know these matrix elements. Knowledge of the transformation behaviour of eigenfunctions saves frequent diagonalization of the Hamilton matrix and thus permits a numerical solution of the problem. Corresponding results for the sp 3 basis are available

  20. Handbook of the band structure of elemental solids from Z = 1 to Z = 112

    CERN Document Server

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitris A

    2015-01-01

    This handbook presents electronic structure data and tabulations of Slater-Koster parameters for the whole periodic table. This second edition presents data sets for all elements up to Z = 112, Copernicium, whereas the first edition contained only 53 elements. In this new edition, results are given for the equation of state of the elements together with the parameters of a Birch fit, so that the reader can regenerate the results and derive additional information, such as Pressure-Volume relations and variation of Bulk Modulus with Pressure. For each element, in addition to the equation of state, the energy bands, densities of states, and a set of tight-binding parameters is provided. For a majority of elements, the tight-binding parameters are presented for both a two- and three-center approximation. For the hcp structure, new three-center tight-binding results are given. Other new material in this edition include: energy bands and densities of states of all rare-earth metals, a discussion of the McMillan-Gas...

  1. Momentum-Space Imaging of the Dirac Band Structure in Molecular Graphene via Quasiparticle Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Anna; Gomes, Kenjiro K.; Ko, Wonhee; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari C.

    2014-03-01

    Molecular graphene is a nanoscale artificial lattice composed of carbon monoxide molecules arranged one by one, realizing a dream of exploring exotic quantum materials by design. This assembly is done by atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) on a Cu(111) surface. To directly probe the transformation of normal surface state electrons into massless Dirac fermions, we map the momentum space dispersion through the Fourier analysis of quasiparticle scattering maps acquired at different energies with the STM. The Fourier analysis not only bridges the real-space and momentum-space data but also reveals the chiral nature of those quasiparticles, through a set of selection rules of allowed scattering involving the pseudospin and valley degrees of freedom. The graphene-like band structure can be reshaped with simple alterations to the lattice, such as the addition of a strain. We analyze the effect on the momentum space band structure of multiple types of strain on our system. Supported by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  2. The valence band structure of AgxRh1–x alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Anli; Sakata, Osami; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yayama, Tomoe; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Koyama, Michihisa

    2014-01-01

    The valence band (VB) structures of face-centered-cubic Ag-Rh alloy nanoparticles (NPs), which are known to have excellent hydrogen-storage properties, were investigated using bulk-sensitive hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed VB spectra profiles of the Ag-Rh alloy NPs do not resemble simple linear combinations of the VB spectra of Ag and Rh NPs. The observed VB hybridization was qualitatively reproduced via a first-principles calculation. The electronic structure of the Ag 0.5 Rh 0.5 alloy NPs near the Fermi edge was strikingly similar to that of Pd NPs, whose superior hydrogen-storage properties are well known.

  3. Time-resolved ARPES at LACUS: Band Structure and Ultrafast Electron Dynamics of Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaldi, Alberto; Roth, Silvan; Gatti, Gianmarco; Arrell, Christopher A; Ojeda, José; van Mourik, Frank; Bugnon, Philippe; Magrez, Arnaud; Berger, Helmuth; Chergui, Majed; Grioni, Marco

    2017-05-31

    The manipulation of the electronic properties of solids by light is an exciting goal, which requires knowledge of the electronic structure with energy, momentum and temporal resolution. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) is the most direct probe of the effects of an optical excitation on the band structure of a material. In particular, tr-ARPES in the extreme ultraviolet (VUV) range gives access to the ultrafast dynamics over the entire Brillouin zone. VUV tr-ARPES experiments can now be performed at the ASTRA (ARPES Spectrometer for Time-Resolved Applications) end station of Harmonium, at LACUS. Its capabilities are illustrated by measurements of the ultrafast electronic response of ZrSiTe, a novel topological semimetal characterized by linearly dispersing states located at the Brillouin zone boundary.

  4. Metastable modular metastructures for on-demand reconfiguration of band structures and nonreciprocal wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Zheng, Y.; Wang, K. W.

    2018-02-01

    We present an approach to achieve adaptable band structures and nonreciprocal wave propagation by exploring and exploiting the concept of metastable modular metastructures. Through studying the dynamics of wave propagation in a chain composed of finite metastable modules, we provide experimental and analytical results on nonreciprocal wave propagation and unveil the underlying mechanisms that facilitate such unidirectional energy transmission. In addition, we demonstrate that via transitioning among the numerous metastable states, the proposed metastructure is endowed with a large number of bandgap reconfiguration possibilities. As a result, we illustrate that unprecedented adaptable nonreciprocal wave propagation can be realized using the metastable modular metastructure. Overall, this research elucidates the rich dynamics attainable through the combinations of periodicity, nonlinearity, spatial asymmetry, and metastability and creates a class of adaptive structural and material systems capable of realizing tunable bandgaps and nonreciprocal wave transmissions.

  5. Engineering design and fabrication of tapered damped X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Solodko, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G; Grudiev, A; Atieh, S; Taborelli, M

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating structures (AS) are one of the main components of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC), under study at CERN. Each accelerating structure contains about 30 copper discs, which form the accelerating cavity. The requirements of different technical systems, such as vacuum and cooling, have to be considered during the engineering design. A fully featured AS is very challenging and requires several technologies. Different damping methods, waveguides, vacuum manifolds, slots and chokes, result in various design configurations. In the CLIC AS each cell is damped by means of four waveguides coupled to the cell. The vacuum manifolds combine a number of functions such as damping, vacuum pumping and cooling. A silicon carbide absorber, fixed inside of each manifold, is required for effective damping of Higher Order Modes (HOMs). This paper describes the engineering design of the X-band AS with damping material, and focuses on few technical solutions.

  6. Analytical and Numerical Calculations of Two-Dimensional Dielectric Photonic Band Gap Structures and Cavities for Laser Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Samokhvalova, Ksenia R; Liang Qian, Bao

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric photonic band gap (PBG) structures have many promising applications in laser acceleration. For these applications, accurate determination of fundamental and high order band gaps is critical. We present the results of our recent work on analytical calculations of two-dimensional (2D) PBG structures in rectangular geometry. We compare the analytical results with computer simulation results from the MIT Photonic Band Gap Structure Simulator (PBGSS) code, and discuss the convergence of the computer simulation results to the analytical results. Using the accurate analytical results, we design a mode-selective 2D dielectric cylindrical PBG cavity with the first global band gap in the frequency range of 8.8812 THz to 9.2654 THz. In this frequency range, the TM01-like mode is shown to be well confined.

  7. Monitoring of Forest Structure Dynamics by Means of L-Band SAR Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Cazcarra-Bes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar Tomography (TomoSAR allows the reconstruction of the 3D reflectivity of natural volume scatterers such as forests, thus providing an opportunity to infer structure information in 3D. In this paper, the potential of TomoSAR data at L-band to monitor temporal variations of forest structure is addressed using simulated and experimental datasets. First, 3D reflectivity profiles were extracted by means of TomoSAR reconstruction based on a Compressive Sensing (CS approach. Next, two complementary indices for the description of horizontal and vertical forest structure were defined and estimated by means of the distribution of local maxima of the reconstructed reflectivity profiles. To assess the sensitivity and consistency of the proposed methodology, variations of these indices for different types of forest changes in simulated as well as in real scenarios were analyzed and assessed against different sources of reference data: airborne Lidar measurements, high resolution optical images, and forest inventory data. The forest structure maps obtained indicated the potential to distinguish between different forest stages and the identification of different types of forest structure changes induced by logging, natural disturbance, or forest management.

  8. Dispersive and resonant properties of finite one-dimensional photonic band gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, C. M.; Scalora, Michael; Bloemer, Mark J.; Sibilia, Concita; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Centini, Marco; Bertolotti, Mario

    2000-06-01

    The report is a review of work one-dimensional photonic band gap (PBG) materials, carried out by the Quantum Optics Group at the US Army Aviation and Missile Command during the past few years. This work has benefited from national and international collaborations between academic, industrial, and governmental research organizations. The research effort has benefited from a multifaceted approach that combined innovative, theoretical methods with fabrication techniques in order to address the physics of structures of finite length, i.e., the description of spatio-temporal linear and nonlinear dynamics and boundary conditions. In this work we will review what we consider three major breakthroughs: (a) the discovery of transparent metals; (b) discovery of critical phase matching conditions in PBG structures for second harmonic and nonlinear frequency conversion; (c) development of a PBG true time delay device. Our report addresses linear and nonlinear wave propagation in PBG materials, one-dimensional structures in particular. Most investigators generally address two and three-dimensional structures. We choose one-dimensional systems because in the past they have proven to be quite challenging and have pointed the way to the new physical phenomena that are the subject of this report. In addition, one-dimensional systems can be used as a blueprint for higher dimensional structures, where the work is necessarily much more computationally intensive, and the physics much less transparent as a result.

  9. Crystal growth, structure, and electronic band structure of tetracene-TCNQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, A. J. C.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Shokaryev, I.; Baas, J.; Meetsma, A.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    We have grown the charge-transfer salt of the electron acceptor 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and the electron donor tetracene using physical vapor transport. The crystal structure was solved by singlecrystal X-ray diffraction and the symmetry was found to be triclinic (space group PT).

  10. Birefringence and band structure of CdP{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beril, S.I.; Stamov, I.G. [Tiraspol State Corporative University, Yablocikin Street 5, 2069 Tiraspol, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Syrbu, N.N., E-mail: sirbunn@yahoo.com [Technical University of Moldova, 168 Stefan cel Mare Avenue, 2004 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Zalamai, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 5 Academy Street, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    The spatial dispersion in CdP{sub 2} crystals was investigated. The dispersion is positive (n{sup k||c}>n{sup k||y}) at λ>λ{sub 0} and negative (n{sup k||c}bands. Minimal direct energy intervals correspond to transitions Γ{sub 1}→Γ{sub 1} for E{sup ||}c and Γ{sub 2}→Γ{sub 1} for E⊥c. The temperature coefficient of energy gap sifting in the case of temperature changing between 2 and 4.2 K equals to 10.6 meV/K and 3.2 mev/K for Γ{sub 1}→Γ{sub 1} and Γ{sub 2}→Γ{sub 1} band gap correspondingly. Reflectivity spectra were measured for energy interval 1.5–10 eV and optical functions (n, k, ε{sub 1}, ε{sub 2,}d{sup 2}ε{sub 1}/dE{sup 2} and d{sup 2}ε{sub 2}/dE{sup 2}) were calculated by using Kramers–Kronig analyses. All features were interpreted as optical transitions on the basis of both theoretical calculations of band structure.

  11. Comparison of Model Prediction With Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Vine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Kerr, Yann H.

    2005-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.413 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of surface parameters such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity that are needed to understand the hydrological cycle and ocean circulation. Radiation from celestial sources (mostly galactic) is strong in this w...

  12. Band structure of Heusler compounds studied by photoemission and tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelo Jorge, Elena

    2011-07-01

    Heusler compounds are key materials for spintronic applications. They have attracted a lot of interest due to their half-metallic properties predicted by band structure calculations. The aim of this work is to evaluate experimentally the validity of the predictions of half metallicity by band structure calculations for two specific Heusler compounds, Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa. Two different spectroscopy methods for the analysis of the electronic properties were used: Angular Resolved Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARUPS) and Tunneling Spectroscopy. Heusler compounds are prepared as thin films by RF-sputtering in an ultra high vacuum system. For the characterization of the samples, bulk and surface crystallographic and magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa are studied. X-ray and electron diffraction reveal a bulk and surface crossover between two different types of sublattice order (from B2 to L2{sub 1}) with increasing annealing temperature. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism results show that the magnetic properties in the surface and bulk are identical, although the magnetic moments obtained are 5 % below from the theoretically predicted. By ARUPS evidence for the validity of the predicted total bulk density of states (DOS) was demonstrated for both Heusler compounds. Additional ARUPS intensity contributions close to the Fermi energy indicates the presence of a specific surface DOS. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the crystallographic order, controlled by annealing, plays an important role on broadening effects of DOS features. Improving order resulted in better defined ARUPS features. Tunneling magnetoresistance measurements of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa based MTJ's result in a Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} spin polarization of 44 %, which is the highest experimentally obtained value for this compound, although it is lower than the 100 % predicted. For Co

  13. Touching points in the energy band structure of bilayer graphene superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, C Huy; Nguyen, V Lien

    2014-01-01

    The energy band structure of the bilayer graphene superlattices with zero-averaged periodic δ-function potentials are studied within the four-band continuum model. Using the transfer matrix method, the study is mainly focused on examining the touching points between adjacent minibands. For the zero-energy touching points the dispersion relation derived shows a Dirac-like double-cone shape with the group velocity which is periodic in the potential strength P with the period of π and becomes anisotropic at relatively large P. From the finite-energy touching points we have identified those located at zero wave-number. It was shown that for these finite-energy touching points the dispersion is direction-dependent in the sense that it is linear or parabolic in the direction parallel or perpendicular to the superlattice direction, respectively. We have also calculated the density of states and the conductivity which demonstrates a manifestation of the touching points examined. (paper)

  14. GeAs and SiAs monolayers: Novel 2D semiconductors with suitable band structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liqin; Guo, Yu; Zhao, Jijun

    2018-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) materials provide a versatile platform for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy conversion. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose a novel kind of 2D materials - GeAs and SiAs monolayers and investigate their atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties. The calculations show that monolayer GeAs and SiAs sheets are energetically and dynamically stable. Their small interlayer cohesion energies (0.191 eV/atom for GeAs and 0.178 eV/atom for SiAs) suggest easy exfoliation from the bulk solids that exist in nature. As 2D semiconductors, GeAs and SiAs monolayers possess band gap of 2.06 eV and 2.50 eV from HSE06 calculations, respectively, while their band gap can be further engineered by the number of layers. The relatively small and anisotropic carrier effective masses imply fast electric transport in these 2D semiconductors. In particular, monolayer SiAs is a direct gap semiconductor and a potential photocatalyst for water splitting. These theoretical results shine light on utilization of monolayer or few-layer GeAs and SiAs materials for the next-generation 2D electronics and optoelectronics with high performance and satisfactory stability.

  15. Band edge electronic structure of transition metal/rare earth oxide dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucovsky, Gerald

    2006-10-01

    This article addresses band edge electronic structure of transition metal/rare earth (TM/RE) non-crystalline and nano-crystalline elemental and complex oxide high- k dielectrics for advanced semiconductor devices. Experimental approaches include X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from TM, RE and oxygen core states, photoconductivity (PC), and visible/vacuum ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) combined with ab initio theory is applied to small clusters. These measurements are complemented by Fourier transform infra-red absorption (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two issues are highlighted: Jahn-Teller term splittings that remove d-state degeneracies of states at the bottom of the conduction band, and chemical phase separation and crystallinity in Zr and Hf silicates and ternary (Zr(Hf)O 2) x(Si 3N 4) y(SiO 2) 1- x- y alloys. Engineering solutions for optimization of both classes of high- k dielectric films, including limits imposed on the continued and ultimate scaling of the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are addressed.

  16. First-principles energy band calculation for CaBi{sub 2}O{sub 4} with monoclinic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Shin' ichirou [Integrated Arts and Science, Kitakyushu National College of Technology, 5-20-1 Shii, Kokuraminami-ku, Kitakyushu 802-0985 (Japan); Yamada, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Kitakyushu National College of Technology, 5-20-1 Shii, Kokuraminami-ku, Kitakyushu 802-0985 (Japan); Matsushima, Shigenori, E-mail: smatsu@kct.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Kitakyushu National College of Technology, 5-20-1 Shii, Kokuraminami-ku, Kitakyushu 802-0985 (Japan); Arai, Masao [Computational Materials Science Center (CMSC), National Institute of Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kenkichiro [Department of Materials Science, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    The electronic structure of CaBi{sub 2}O{sub 4} is calculated by a GGA approach. The valence band maximum is approximately located at the {Gamma}-point or the Y-point and the conduction band minimum at the V-point. This means that CaBi{sub 2}O{sub 4} is an indirect energy gap material. The conduction band is composed of Bi 6p-O 2p interaction. On the other hand, the valence band can be divided into two energy regions ranging from -9.92 to -7.40 eV (lower valence band) and -4.69 to 0 eV (upper valence band). The former is mainly constructed from Bi 6s states interacting slightly with O 2s and 2p states, and the latter consists of O 2p states hybridizing with Bi 6s and 6p states. The states near the valence band maximum are strongly localized and the mobility of holes generated by band gap excitation is predicted to be fairly low.

  17. High-gradient experiment on X-band disk-loaded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higo, T.; Taniuchi, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Odagiri, J.; Tokumoto, S.; Mizuno, H.; Takata, K.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    1993-09-01

    The high-gradient performance of two travelling-wave X-band accelerating structures 20 cm long has been studied. One of the structures, KEK, was conditioned up to an average accelerating gradient (Eav) of 68 MV/m in 600 hours, while the other, CERN, reached 85 MV/m in 50 hours. In the latter case the maximum output power was fed from the SLED system and the maximum field inside the structure was 138 MV/m. This maximum level was limited by the available power from the klystron. Operation at the Eav=50 MV/m level was found to be stable for both structures. The associated dark current at this level was less than a few μA for CERN but 20 to 30 μA for KEK. Since the two electrical designs are almost the same the difference in dark current must be attributed to the difference in the two fabrication techniques. Modified Fowler-Northeim plots of downstream dark current showed a change of slope, a kink, around 50 to 60 MV/m above which the field enhancement factor was substantially increased. (author)

  18. High-gradient breakdown studies of an X-band Compact Linear Collider prototype structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A Compact Linear Collider prototype traveling-wave accelerator structure fabricated at Tsinghua University was recently high-gradient tested at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK. This X-band structure showed good high-gradient performance of up to 100  MV/m and obtained a breakdown rate of 1.27×10^{−8} per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 250 ns. This performance was similar to that of previous structures tested at KEK and the test facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN, thereby validating the assembly and bonding of the fabricated structure. Phenomena related to vacuum breakdown were investigated and are discussed in the present study. Evaluation of the breakdown timing revealed a special type of breakdown occurring in the immediately succeeding pulse after a usual breakdown. These breakdowns tended to occur at the beginning of the rf pulse, whereas usual breakdowns were uniformly distributed in the rf pulse. The high-gradient test was conducted under the international collaboration research program among Tsinghua University, CERN, and KEK.

  19. A PPM-focused klystron at X-band with a traveling-wave output structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed algorithms for designing disk-loaded traveling-wave output structures for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. We use either a four- or five-cell structure in a π/2 mode. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The matching calculation is not performed on the tapered structure, but rather on a coupler whose input and output cells are the same as the final cell of the tapered structure, and whose interior cells are the same as the penultimate cell in the tapered structure. 2-D calculations using CONDOR model the waveguide as a radial transmission line of adjustable impedance. 3-D calculations with MAFIA model the actual rectangular waveguide and coupling slot. A good match is obtained by adjusting the impedance of the final cell. In 3-D, this requires varying both the radius of the cell and the width of the aperture. When the output cell with the best match is inserted in the tapered structure, we obtain excellent cold-test agreement between the 2-D and 3-D models. We use hot-test simulations with CONDOR to design a structure with maximum efficiency and minimum surface fields. We have designed circuits at 11.424 Ghz for different perveances. At 440 kV, microperveance 1.2, we calculated 81 MW, 53 percent efficiency, with peak surface field 76 MV/m. A microperveance 0.6 design was done using a PPM stack for focusing. At 470 kV, 193 amps, we calculated 58.7 MW, 64.7 percent efficiency, peak surface field 62.3 MV/m. At 500 kV, 212 amps, we calculated 67.1 MW, 63.3 percent efficiency, peak surface field 66.0 MV/m. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. Band structure of semiconductor compounds of Mg sub 2 Si and Mg sub 2 Ge with strained crystal lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Krivosheeva, A V; Shaposhnikov, V L; Krivosheev, A E; Borisenko, V E

    2002-01-01

    The effect of isotopic and unaxial deformation of the crystal lattice on the electronic band structure of indirect band gap semiconductors Mg sub 2 Si and Mg sub 2 Ge has been simulated by means of the linear augmented plane wave method. The reduction of the lattice constant down to 95 % results in a linear increase of the direct transition in magnesium silicide by 48%. The stresses arising under unaxial deformation shift the bands as well as result in splitting of degenerated states. The dependence of the interband transitions on the lattice deformation is nonlinear in this case

  1. A Compact Narrow-Band Bandstop Filter Using Spiral-Shaped Defected Microstrip Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel compact narrow-band bandstop filter is implemented by using the proposed spiral-shaped defected microstrip structure (SDMS in this paper. Compared with other DMSs, the presented SDMS exhibits the advantage of compact size and narrow stopband. Meanwhile, an approximate design rule of the SDMS is achieved and the effects of the dimensions on the resonant frequency and 3 dB fractional bandwidth (FBW are analyzed in detail. Both the simulation and measurement results of the fabricated bandstop filter show that it has a 10 dB stopband from 3.4 GHz to 3.6 GHz with more than 45 dB rejection at the center frequency.

  2. From Metal Cluster to Metal Nanowire: A Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Band Structure Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:We investigate a theoretical model of molecular metalwire constructed from linear polynuclear metal complexes. In particular we study the linear Crn metal complex and Cr molecular metalwire. The electron density distributions of the model nanowire and the linear Crn metal complexes, with n = 3, 5, and 7, are calculated by employing CRYSTAL98 package with topological analysis. The preliminary results indicate that the bonding types between any two neighboring Cr are all the same, namely the polarized open-shell interaction. The pattern of electron density distribution in metal complexes resembles that of the model Cr nanowire as the number of metal ions increases. The conductivity of the model Cr nanowire is also tested by performing the band structure calculation.

  3. Laparoendoscopic single-site gastric bands versus standard multiport gastric bands: a comparison of technical learning curve measured by surgical time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawart, Matthew; Dupitron, Sabine; Lutfi, Rami

    2012-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate our learning curve comparing surgical time of laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) banding with multiport laparoscopy. We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data comparing our first 48 LESS bands with our first 50 multiport laparoscopic bands at our institution. We then compared the first 24 LESS bands with the last 24 bands. The average body mass index for the LESS group was significantly lower than for the laparoscopic group (43.19 vs 48.3; P < .0001). The surgical time was much faster toward the second half of our experience performing the LESS procedure (85.34 vs 68.8; P = .0055). LESS banding took significantly longer than our early traditional laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (76.85 vs 64.4; P = .0015). We conclude that in experienced hands, single-incision banding is feasible and safe to perform. Long-term data are needed to prove that LESS banding is as good a surgery as traditional laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  5. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Hund, Zachary M.; th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Nihill, Kevin J.; th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))" >Sibener, S. J.; Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M.; Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Benedek, G.

    2015-01-01

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD 3 -Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH 3 -Ge(111) and CH 3 -Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers

  6. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hund, Zachary M.; Nihill, Kevin J.; Sibener, S. J., E-mail: s-sibener@uchicago.edu [The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57" t" h Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beckman Institute and Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory, 127-72, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Benedek, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Universidad del País Vasco (EHU), 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2015-09-28

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD{sub 3}-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH{sub 3}-Ge(111) and CH{sub 3}-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers.

  7. Comparison of the Effect of Three Cements on Prevention of Enamel Demineralization Adjacent to Orthodontic Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Kashani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. This in vitro study was designed to compare enamel demineralization depths adjacent to bands cemented with zinc polycarboxylate, glass ionomer (GI and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI, in order to achieve minimal enamel demineralization during orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods. Sixty fully developed extracted third molars were randomly divided into three test groups each containing 20 samples, used to cement orthodontic bands with zinc polycarboxylate, GI and RMGI. All samples were demineralized using White method using hydroxyapatite, latic acid and Carbapol for in vitro caries simulation, and then, immersed in 10% solution of methylene blue. The mean depth of dye penetration was assessed up to 0.1 millimeter, reflecting the depth of enamel demineralization. One way ANOVA and LSD statistical tests were employed to evaluate significant differences among groups. Results. The highest dye penetration depth was seen in zinc polycarboxylate group, followed by GI, and RMGI groups, respectively, with significant differences among each two groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion. The use of RMGI cement seems to present significantly better prevention of enamel demineralization adjacent to orthodontics bands.

  8. Feature Extraction from MEMS Accelerometer and Motion Tracking Measurements in Comparison with Smart Bands during Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Stamm

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Athlete monitoring is a major field of interest for professional and recreational runners as well as for coaches to improve performance and reduce injury risk. The development of inertial sensors in recent years offers the opportunity to improve the number of monitored training sessions significantly. This research used a self-developed inertial sensor in conjunction with a motion tracking system and four smart bands to record the runner’s movement and extract parameters such as step numbers and frequencies. The data recorded were calibrated before it was high-pass filtered to remove gravity components from the signal. A peak detection algorithm was developed to find the number of steps, which have been further used to compare the different systems (IMU, motion capture, smart bands and find their agreement. The results showed a very strong correlation between the IMU and the motion tracking system of r2 = 0.998, and an r2 = 0.996 between the IMU and one smart band.

  9. Mining single-electron spectra of the interface states from a supercell band structure of silicene on an Ag (111 ) substrate with band-unfolding methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Jun-Ichi; Matsushita, Yu-ichiro; Nishi, Hirofumi; Guo, Zhi-Xin; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2017-12-01

    We develop a new position-resolved band-unfolding method based on the density functional theory to clarify the single-electron energy spectrum of (3 ×3 ) silicene on Ag (111 ) substrate. The position-resolved scheme enables us to clarify each contribution from each spatial region to the single-electron spectrum, which facilitates the chemical identification of each electron state. We find interface states which are distributed in the region of silicene and top two layers of the Ag substrate near the Fermi level and also below the Fermi level. The states are unique in silicene on a substrate in the sense that they are mixtures of Si and Ag orbitals. The obtained electronic structure near the Fermi level is interesting, featuring a hyperbolic-paraboloid-shaped energy band which leads to 12 Dirac-like cones at the boundary of the primitive Brillouin zone of Ag (111 ) . Characteristics of measured photoemission spectra are satisfactorily explained by the obtained unfolded bands.

  10. An unsupervised two-stage clustering approach for forest structure classification based on X-band InSAR data - A case study in complex temperate forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Sahra; Schardt, Mathias; Pretzsch, Hans

    2017-05-01

    Forest structure at stand level plays a key role for sustainable forest management, since the biodiversity, productivity, growth and stability of the forest can be positively influenced by managing its structural diversity. In contrast to field-based measurements, remote sensing techniques offer a cost-efficient opportunity to collect area-wide information about forest stand structure with high spatial and temporal resolution. Especially Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), which facilitates worldwide acquisition of 3d information independent from weather conditions and illumination, is convenient to capture forest stand structure. This study purposes an unsupervised two-stage clustering approach for forest structure classification based on height information derived from interferometric X-band SAR data which was performed in complex temperate forest stands of Traunstein forest (South Germany). In particular, a four dimensional input data set composed of first-order height statistics was non-linearly projected on a two-dimensional Self-Organizing Map, spatially ordered according to similarity (based on the Euclidean distance) in the first stage and classified using the k-means algorithm in the second stage. The study demonstrated that X-band InSAR data exhibits considerable capabilities for forest structure classification. Moreover, the unsupervised classification approach achieved meaningful and reasonable results by means of comparison to aerial imagery and LiDAR data.

  11. Low-noise X-band Oscillator and Amplifier Technologies: Comparison and Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howe, D. A; Hati, A

    2005-01-01

    .... Best-in-class results are presented based on recent measurements at NIST. In particular, comparisons are made between mature technologies of multiplied quartz, sapphire dielectric in whispering gallery mode (WGM...

  12. On the Suppression Band and Bandgap of Planar Electromagnetic Bandgap Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharak Mohajer-Iravani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic bandgap structures are considered a viable solution for the problem of switching noise in printed circuit boards and packages. Less attention, however, has been given to whether or not the introduction of EBGs affects the EMI potential of the circuit to couple unwanted energy to neighboring layers or interconnects. In this paper, we show that the bandgap of EBG structures, as generated using the Brillouin diagram, does not necessarily correspond to the suppression bandwidth typically generated using S-parameters. We show that the reactive near fields radiating from openings within the EBG layers can be substantial and are present in the entire frequency band including propagating and nonpropagating mode regions. These fields decay fast with distance; however, they can couple significant energy to adjacent layers and to signal lines. The findings are validated using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation. Based on this work, design guidelines for EBG structures can be drawn to insure not only suppression of switching noise but also minimization of EMI and insuring signal integrity.

  13. Analysis of eigenfrequencies of finite periodic structures in view of location of frequency pas- and stop-bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvatov, Alexander; Sorokin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of wave-guide properties of infinite periodic structures is a well establish research subject. The existence of frequency stop-bands, in which transmission of the vibro-acoustic energy is impossible, suggests that these structures may be used for vibro-isolation. In any technical applica...

  14. Band Structure Analysis of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 Perovskite Manganite Using a Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Sub Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxide semiconductors and their application in next-generation devices have received a great deal of attention due to their various optical, electric, and magnetic properties. For various applications, an understanding of these properties and their mechanisms is also very important. Various characteristics of these oxides originate from the band structure. In this study, we introduce a band structure analysis technique using a soft X-ray energy source to study a La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO oxide semiconductor. The band structure is formed by a valence band, conduction band, band gap, work function, and electron affinity. These can be determined from secondary electron cut-off, valence band spectrum, O 1s core electron, and O K-edge measurements using synchrotron radiation. A detailed analysis of the band structure of the LSMO perovskite manganite oxide semiconductor thin film was established using these techniques.

  15. Bi4TaO8Cl Nano-Photocatalyst: Influence of Local, Average, and Band Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Swetha S M; Swain, Diptikanta; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Mishra, Abhishek K; Hodala, Janardhan L; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Shanbhag, Ganapati V; Sundaram, Nalini G

    2017-05-15

    The average structure, local structure, and band structure of nanoparticles of photocatalyst Bi 4 TaO 8 Cl, an Aurivillius-Sillen layered material, has been studied by powder neutron Rietveld refinement, neutron pair distribution function technique, Raman scattering, and density functional theory calculations. A significant local structural deviation of nano-Bi 4 TaO 8 Cl was established in contrast to the local structure of bulk-Bi 4 TaO 8 Cl. Local structure was further supported by Raman scattering measurements. Through DFT calculations, we identify specific features in the electronic band structure that correlate lower secondary structural distortions in nano-Bi 4 TaO 8 Cl. Increased distortion of TaO 6 , decreased Ta-O-Ta bond angle, and increased octahedral tilt in the local structure of nano-Bi 4 TaO 8 Cl influence the band structure and the electron hole pair migration. Therefore, in addition to morphology and size, the local structure of a nanomaterial contributes to the photocatalytic performance. Trapping experiments confirm the role of superoxide radical in the photocatalysis mechanism of this material. Such studies help in developing new functional materials with better photocatalytic efficiency to address energy and environmental issues.

  16. Anisotropic electronic band structure of intrinsic Si(110) studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Stephane Yu; Takayama, Akari; Kawamoto, Erina; Hu, Chunping; Hagiwara, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Takashi; Suto, Shozo

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the electronic band structure of the hydrogen-terminated Si(110)-(1 ×1 ) [H:Si(110)-(1 ×1 )] surface using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations in the framework of density functional theory with local density approximation (LDA). The bulk-truncated H:Si(110)-(1 ×1 ) surface is a good template to investigate the electronic band structure of the intrinsic Si(110). In the ARPES spectra, seven bulk states and one surface state due to the H-H interaction are observed clearly. The four bulk states consisting of Si 3 px y orbitals exhibit anisotropic band dispersions along the high symmetric direction of Γ ¯-X ¯ and Γ ¯-X¯' directions, where one state shows one-dimensional character. The calculated band structures show a good agreement with the experimental results except the surface state. We discuss the exact nature of electronic band structures and the applicability of LDA. We have estimated the anisotropic effective masses of electrons and holes of Si(110) for device application.

  17. Absolute band structure determination on naturally occurring rutile with complex chemistry: Implications for mineral photocatalysis on both Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Yanzhang; Ding, Cong; Wu, Jing; Lu, Anhuai; Ding, Hongrui; Qin, Shan; Wang, Changqiu

    2018-05-01

    Rutile is the most common and stable form of TiO2 that ubiquitously existing on Earth and other terrestrial planets like Mars. Semiconducting mineral such as rutile-based photoredox reactions have been considered to play important roles in geological times. However, due to the inherent complexity in chemistry, the precision determination on band structure of natural rutile and the theoretical explanation on its solar-driven photochemistry have been hardly seen yet. Considering the multiple minor and trace elements in natural rutile, we firstly obtained the single-crystal crystallography, mineralogical composition and defects characteristic of the rutile sample by using both powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the band gap was accurately determined by synchrotron-based O K-edge X-ray absorption and emission spectra, which was firstly applied to natural rutile due to its robustness on compositions and defects. The absolute band edges of the rutile sample was calculated by considering the electronegativity of the atoms, band gap and point of zero charge. Besides, after detecting the defect energy levels by photoluminescence spectra, we drew the schematic band structure of natural rutile. The band gap (2.7 eV) of natural rutile was narrower than that of synthetic rutile (3.0 eV), and the conduction and valence band edges of natural rutile at pH = pHPZC were determined to be -0.04 V and 2.66 V (vs. NHE), respectively. The defect energy levels located at nearly the middle position of the forbidden band. Further, we used theoretical calculations to verify the isomorphous substitution of Fe and V for Ti gave rise to the distortion of TiO6 octahedron and created vacancy defects in natural rutile. Based on density functional theory, the narrowed band gap was interpreted to the contribution of Fe-3d and V-3d orbits, and the defect energy state was formed by hybridization of O-2p and Fe/V/Ti-3d

  18. Oversized 250 GHz Traveling Wave Tube with a Photonic Band-Gap Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Guy; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2017-10-01

    The challenge in manufacturing traveling wave tubes (TWTs) at high frequencies is that the sizes of the structures scale with, and are much smaller than, the wavelength. We have designed and are building a 250 GHz TWT that uses an oversized structure to overcome fabrication and power handling issues that result from the small dimensions. Using a photonic band-gap (PBG) structure, we succeeded to design the TWT with a beam tunnel diameter of 0.72 mm. The circuit consists of metal plates with the beam tunnel drilled down their center. Twelve posts are protruding on one side of each plate in a triangular array and corresponding sockets are drilled on the other side. The posts of each plate are inserted into the sockets of an adjacent plate, forming a PBG lattice. The vacuum spacing between adjacent plates forms the `PBG cavity''. The full structure is a series of PBG coupled cavities, with microwave power coupling through the beam tunnel. The PBG lattice provides confinement of microwave power in each of the cavities and can be tuned to give the right amount of diffraction per cavity so that no sever is needed to suppress oscillations in the operating mode. CST PIC simulations predict over 38 dB gain with 67 W peak power, using a 30 kV, 310 mA electron beam, 0.6 mm in diameter. Research supported by the AFOSR Program on Plasma and Electro-Energetic Physics and by the NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  19. Electronic states and band alignment in GalnNAs/GaAs quantum-well structures with low nitrogen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetterich, M.; Dawson, M. D.; Egorov, A. Yu.; Bernklau, D.; Riechert, H.

    2000-02-01

    We investigate the electronic states in strained Ga0.62In0.38N0.015As0.985/GaAs multiple- quantum-well structures using photoluminescence and (polarized) photoluminescence excitation measurements at low temperature. From a theoretical fit to the experimental data, a type-I band alignment for the heavy holes with a strained conduction-band offset ratio of about 80% is obtained, while the light holes show an approximately flat band alignment. Additionally, our results suggest an increased effective electron mass in GaInNAs, possibly due to the interaction of the conduction band with nitrogen-related resonant states, an observation prospectively of benefit for GaInNAs-based diode lasers.

  20. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  1. Optical properties and band structure of atomically thin MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jie; Mak, Kin Fai; Lee, Changgu; Hone, James; Heinz, Tony

    2010-03-01

    Atomically thin layers of materials can be expected to exhibit distinct electronic structure and novel properties compared to their bulk counterparts. Layered compounds, for which stable atomically thin samples can be produced, are ideal candidates for such studies. Graphene, a monolayer slice of the graphite crystal, is an illustrative example of both the stability and of the interest and importance of such materials. Here we report a study of thin layers of MoS2, a hexagonal layered bulk semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 1.3 eV. MoS2 samples with layer thickness N down to a monolayer were obtained by mechanical exfoliation. We observed an enhancement of the luminescence quantum yield by more than a factor of 100 in monolayer MoS2 compared to the bulk material. The combination of absorption, photoluminescence, and photoconductivity measurements indicates that a transition to a direct-gap material occurs in the limit of the single MoS2 layer. This result is supported by an earlier first-principles calculation [J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 16192]. Further, by varying the thickness of the samples, we were able to probe the evolution of the electronic structure for N = 1 -- 6 layers.

  2. Band structure of cavity-type hypersonic phononic crystals fabricated by femtosecond laser-induced two-photon polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Utegulov, Z. N., E-mail: zhutegulov@nu.edu.kz, E-mail: fytas@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Optics Laboratory, National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 10000 (Kazakhstan); Gueddida, A. [Institut d' Electronique, Microélectronique et Nanotechnologie, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); LPMR, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohamed I, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Alonso-Redondo, E. [Max Planck Institute of Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Perevoznik, D.; Kurselis, K. [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., 30419 Hannover (Germany); Chichkov, B. N. [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., 30419 Hannover (Germany); Institute of Laser and Information Technologies RAS, Moscow, 142092 Troitsk (Russian Federation); El Boudouti, E. H. [LPMR, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohamed I, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Djafari-Rouhani, B. [Institut d' Electronique, Microélectronique et Nanotechnologie, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Fytas, G., E-mail: zhutegulov@nu.edu.kz, E-mail: fytas@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Materials Science, University of Crete and FORTH, 71110 Heraklion (Greece)

    2016-05-16

    The phononic band diagram of a periodic square structure fabricated by femtosecond laser pulse-induced two photon polymerization is recorded by Brillouin light scattering (BLS) at hypersonic (GHz) frequencies and computed by finite element method. The theoretical calculations along the two main symmetry directions quantitatively capture the band diagrams of the air- and liquid-filled structure and moreover represent the BLS intensities. The theory helps identify the observed modes, reveals the origin of the observed bandgaps at the Brillouin zone boundaries, and unravels direction dependent effective medium behavior.

  3. Influence of indium clustering on the band structure of semiconducting ternary and quaternarynitride alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca,, I.; Łepkowski, S. P.; Suski, T.

    2009-01-01

    and atomic arrangements are examined. Particular attention is paid to the magnitude of and trends in bowing of the band gaps. Indium composition fluctuation (clustering) is simulated by different distributions of In atoms and it is shown that it strongly influences the band gaps. The gaps are considerably...... show a similar trend. It is suggested that the large variation in the band gaps determined on samples grown in different laboratories is caused by different degrees of In clustering....

  4. Simultaneous Out-of-band Interference Rejection and Radiation Enhancement in an Electronic Product via an EBG Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an application of a planar electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structure with a perspective product implementation in the back of the mind. The focus is on the integration of such structure under the constraint of space and system coexistence. It is discovered that it is possible...... (alternatively, parallel plate noise) and decrease the radiation efficiency of the structure forbidding higher-order modes to propagate and subsequently be diffracted by the ground plane....

  5. Comparison of neurophysiological and MRI findings of patients with multiple sclerosis using oligoclonal band technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellidag, Hamit Y; Eren, Esin; Erdogan, Nezahat; Ture, Sabiha; Yilmaz, Necat

    2013-10-01

    The correlation of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) and intrathecal IgG synthesis are not yet clear in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we investigated the OCB situation and IgG index, cranial and cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and also compared visual evoked potentials (VEP) and somatosensorial evoked potentials (SEP) in order to better understand the OCB pattern and pathogenesis. Retrospective study included 40 patients (19 male, 21 female, mean age 29 ± 4,24) with precise MS diagnosis according to McDonald criteria. Sixteen of the patients were OCB negative, and 24 patients were positive. The different between the OCB situation and number of plaques in cranial and cervical MRI, atrophy, oedema and contrast material retention were insignificant. The different between the OCB situation and VEP and SEP were insignificant. These laboratory findings are all specific, all developing via independent mechanisms and are not related to each other during the silence periods of patients.

  6. Vertical Banded Gastroplasty and Distal Gastric Bypass as Primary Procedures: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox; Oh; Fox

    1996-10-01

    BACKGROUND: Comparing primary vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) and distal gastric bypass (DGBP) patients might assist decision-making based on patient profiles and desired outcomes. METHODS: A prospective study of 81 vertical banded gastroplasty and 60 distal gastric bypass patients. Technical aspects, complications, weight loss, post-op compliance and satisfaction are reported. Length of follow-up is 48 months (VBG) and 36 (DGBP). Lost-to-follow-up 41% (VBG) and 22% (DGBP). Ten per cent of VBGs were revised, with 1% takedown. Three percent DGBPs were converted to proximal GBPs. Demographics are comparable. RESULTS: Operative time was 40 min VBG and 88 DGBP; blood loss 187 cc vs 335 cc; and hospital stay 3 versus 4 days. Exclusive VBG complications include: 1% staple-line leak, 4% intra-abdominal abscess, 1% respiratory failure, 5% pneumonia, 1% intra-abdominal bleed, 1% small bowel obstruction, 2% infected incision, 2% fistula, 2% stenotic or obstructed obstructed stoma, and 1% bezoar. Exclusive DGBP complications include: 2% GI bleed, 12% marginal ulcer, 5% reflux esophagitis, 13% hypocalcemia, 23% hypovitaminosis A and D (12% requiring B12 therapy). Shared complications include hypoproteinemia 6% VBG versus 40% DGBP; excess vomiting (>6 months post-op), 7% versus 10%, excess diarrhea 2% versus 20%, dehydration 1% versus 8%, re-hospitalization 4% versus 15% (hyperalimentation), post-op cholecystectomy 1% versus 5%, weight regain 48% versus 1%. VBG experienced an average of 64% excess weight loss at 36 months versus DGBP 89% excess weight loss. VBG follow-up compliance is generally poor but good for DGBP. Compliance with diet and supplements is equivalent (50%). Satisfaction is 85% and 93% respectively. CONCLUSION: The DGBP provides better long-term weight loss, but nutritional deficiencies occur more often and require close follow-up. The surgery is more complex, but as a primary procedure there are few major complications.

  7. Synthesis, physical properties, and band structure of the layered bismuthide PtBi2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C. Q.; Xing, X. Z.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Chen, B.; Che, L. Q.; Lu, Xin; Dai, Jianhui; Shi, Z. X.

    2016-10-01

    We report details of single-crystal growth of stoichiometric bismuthide PtBi2 whose structure consists of alternate stacking of a Pt layer and Bi bilayer along the c axis. The compound crystallizes in space group P 3 with a hexagonal unit cell of a =b =6.553 Å,c =6.165 Å . Its T -dependent resistivity is typical of a metal whereas a large anisotropy was observed for the in-plane and interplane electrical transport. The magnetization data show opposite sign for fields parallel and perpendicular to the Pt layers, respectively. The magnetic field response of this material shows clearly two types of charge carriers, consistent with the multiple Fermi surfaces revealed in our band structure calculations. The hydrostatic pressure is shown to suppress the resistivity at high T systematically but has little bearing on its low-T transport. Through calorimetric measurements, the density of states at the Fermi level and the Debye temperature are determined to be 0.94 eV-1 per molecule and 145 K, respectively. In addition, the electronic structures and parity analyses are also presented. We find a minimum value of 0.05 eV gap opening at around 2 eV under the Fermi level by invoking spin-orbit interaction. A slab calculation further indicates a surface Dirac cone appearing in the gap of bulk states. We discuss the possibility of PtBi 2 being a candidate for a bulk topological metal, in analogy to the recently proposed topological superconductor β -PdBi2 .

  8. EFFECTIVENESS IN DYNAMIC BALANCE: A COMPARISON BETWEEN FOOT MUSCLE STRENGTHENING USING ELASTIC BAND AND WITHOUT ELASTIC BAND IN CHILDREN AGED 8–12 WITH FLEXIBLE FLATFEET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indri Listyorini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the effects of foot muscle strengthening exercises with and without elastic band to the dynamic balance function in children aged 8–12 years with flexible flatfeet. Methods: Forty-one children (aged 8–12 years with flexible flatfeet and dynamic balance problem were randomly allocated into either the intervention or control group. Both groups received thrice weekly training for 6 weeks. The foot strengthening exercise regimens consisted of pronation, supination, short foot, and tiptoeing using elastic band for the intervention group and without elastic band for the control group. Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT was tested before and after 6 weeks of training. Results: A statistically significant difference of normalized SEBT scores was found for both groups in both legs (p=0.00, p<0.05. The intervention group was significantly better than the control group for both right and left legs (p=0.00, p<0.05. Conclusions: Foot muscle strengthening either with or without elastic band improves dynamic balance in children aged 8–12 years with flexible flatfeet. Exercise given with elastic band significantly shows better improvement in the dynamic balance compared to without elastic band.

  9. Band structure engineering of monolayer MoS₂ by surface ligand functionalization for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen production activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing; Wang, Zilu; Chen, Qian; Hu, Jingguo; Wang, Jinlan

    2014-11-21

    To achieve photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity of MoS2 for hydrogen production through water splitting, the band edges of MoS2 should match with the hydrogen and oxygen production levels. Our first-principles calculations show that the band edges of monolayer MoS2 can be effectively tuned by surface ligand functionalization, resulting from the intrinsic dipole of the ligand itself and the induced dipole at the ligand/MoS2 interface. We further explore the influence of ligand coverage, ligand functionalization and the substrate on the band structure of MoS2. The hybrid C6H5CH2NH2/MoS2/graphene structures may be compelling candidates as they satisfy the stringent requirements of PEC water splitting.

  10. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125− 131Ce ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The negative parity yrast bands of neutron-deficient 125-131Ce nuclei are studied by using the projected shell model approach. Energy levels, transition energies and (1)/(2) ratios are calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The calculations reproduce the band-head spins of negative parity ...

  11. Electronic Band Structures of the Highly Desirable III-V Semiconductors: TB-mBJ DFT Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Gul; Shafiq, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Rashid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Maqbool, M.; Khan, Imad; Rahnamaye-Aliabad, H.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-07-01

    The correct band gaps of semiconductors are highly desirable for their effective use in optoelectronic and other photonic devices. However, the experimental and theoretical results of the exact band gaps are quite challenging and sometimes tricky. In this article, we explore the electronic band structures of the highly desirable optical materials, III-V semiconductors. The main reason of the ineffectiveness of the theoretical band gaps of these compounds is their mixed bonding character, where large proportions of electrons reside outside atomic spheres in the intestinal regions, which are challenging for proper theoretical treatment. In this article, the band gaps of the compounds are revisited and successfully reproduced by properly treating the density of electrons using the recently developed non-regular Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (nTB-mBJ) approach. This study additionally suggests that this theoretical scheme could also be useful for the band gap engineering of the III-V semiconductors. Furthermore, the optical properties of these compounds are also calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  12. Band diagram determination of MOS structures with different gate materials on 3C-SiC substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorski, K.; Przewlocki, H.; Esteve, R.; Bakowski, M.

    2012-03-01

    MOS capacitors were fabricated on 3C-SiC n-type substrate (001) with a 10-μm N-type epitaxial layer. An SiO2 layer of the thickness tOX ≈55 nm was deposited by PECVD. Circular Al, Ni, and Au gate contacts 0.7 mm in diameter were formed by ion beam sputtering and lift-off. Energy band diagrams of the MOS capacitors were determined using the photoelectric, electric, and optical measurement methods. Optical method (ellipsometry) was used to determine the gate and dielectric layer thicknesses and their optical indices: the refraction n and the extinction k coefficients. Electrical method of C = f(VG) characteristic measurements allowed to determine the doping density ND and the flat band voltage VFB in the semiconductor. Most of the parameters which were necessary for the construction of the band diagrams and for determination of the basic physical properties of the structures (e.g. the effective contact potential difference ϕMS) were measured by several photoelectric methods and calculated using the measurement data. As a result, complete energy band diagrams have been determined for MOS capacitors with three different gate materials and they are demonstrated for two different gate voltages VG: for the flat-band in the semiconductor (VG = VFB) and for the flat-band in the dielectric (VG = VG0).

  13. Valence band electronic structure and band alignment of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}(111) heterointerfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabel, J.; Scheiderer, P.; Zapf, M.; Schuetz, P.; Sing, M.; Claessen, R. [Physikalisches Institut and Roentgen Center for Complex Material Systems (RCCM), Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Schlueter, C.; Lee, T.L. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    As in the famous LaAlO{sub 3}(LAO)/SrTiO{sub 3}(STO) (001) a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) also forms at the interface between LAO and STO in (111) orientation. A distinct feature of the (111) interface is its peculiar real space topology. Each bilayer represents a buckled honeycomb lattice similar to graphene which is known theoretically to host various topologically non-trivial states. Bilayer STO in proximity to the interface can be regarded as a three-orbital generalization of graphene with enhanced electron correlations making it a promising candidate for the realization of strongly correlated topological phases. We have investigated the electronic structure of the LAO/STO (111) heterostructure in relation to the oxygen vacancy concentration which we can control by synchrotron light irradiation and oxygen dosing. With hard X-ray photoemission we study the core levels, whereas resonant soft X-ray photoemission is used to probe the interfacial valence band (VB) states. Two VB features are found: a peak at the Fermi level associated with the 2DES and in-gap states at higher binding energies attributed to oxygen vacancies. By varying the oxygen vacancy contribution we can tune the emergence of the VB states and engineer the interfacial band alignment.

  14. ANOTHER LOOK AT THE EASTERN BANDED STRUCTURE: A STELLAR DEBRIS STREAM AND A POSSIBLE PROGENITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillmair, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we re-examine the Eastern Banded Structure (EBS), a stellar debris stream first discovered in Data Release 5 and more recently detected in velocity space by Schlaufman et al. The visible portion of the stream is 18 0 long, lying roughly in the Galactic Anticenter direction and extending from Hydra to Cancer. At an estimated distance of 9.7 kpc, the stream is ∼170 pc across on the sky. The curvature of the stream implies a fairly eccentric box orbit that passes close to both the Galactic center and to the Sun, making it dynamically distinct from the nearby Monoceros, Anticenter, and GD-1 streams. Within the stream is a relatively strong, 2 0 -wide concentration of stars with a very similar color-magnitude distribution that we designate Hydra I. Given its prominence within the stream and its unusual morphology, we suggest that Hydra I is the last vestige of EBS's progenitor, possibly already unbound or in the final throes of tidal dissolution. Though both Hydra I and the EBS have a relatively high-velocity dispersion, given the comparatively narrow width of the stream and the high frequency of encounters with the bulge and massive constituents of the disk that such an eccentric orbit would entail, we suggest that the progenitor was likely a globular cluster and that both it and the stream have undergone significant heating over time.

  15. Multifractal Comparison of Reflectivity and Polarimetric Rainfall Data from C- and X-Band Radars and Respective Hydrological Responses of a Complex Catchment Model

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Paz; Bernard Willinger; Auguste Gires; Abdellah Ichiba; Laurent Monier; Christophe Zobrist; Bruno Tisserand; Ioulia Tchiguirinskaia; Daniel Schertzer

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between C-band and X-band radar data over an instrumented and regulated catchment of the Paris region. We study the benefits of polarimetry and the respective hydrological impacts with the help of rain gauge and flow measurements using a semi-distributed hydrological model. Both types of radar confirm the high spatial variability of the rainfall down to their space resolution (1 km and 250 m, respectively). Therefore, X-band radar data underscore the limitatio...

  16. Separation and identification of structural modes in largely underdetermined scenarios using frequency banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, Roberto; Antoni, Jerome; Garibaldi, Luigi

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, blind source separation (BSS) has gained significant interest in the context of operational modal analysis, as a non-parametric alternative to the identification of mechanical structures from output-only measurements. One persisting limitation of most BSS methods, however, is to they cannot identify more active modes than the number of simultaneously measured outputs. The aim of this work is to propose a solution to the largely underdetermined case - where many more modes are to be identified than the number of available measurements - by dividing the frequency axis in subbands, such that each band provides an (over)determined problem where BSS can be applied separately. The approach comes with the proposal of a new second-order BSS that operates directly in the frequency domain and takes as an input the cross-spectral matrix of the data. A data augmentation technique is also devised to artificially increase the dimension of the measurements in severely undetermined scenarios. Finally, an identification algorithm is introduced that estimates the modal parameters of the separated structural modes. A remarkable aspect of these algorithms is that they are all based on the unified use of multi-filters designed in the frequency domain, yet with different frequency bandwidths. Another particularity of the present paper is to demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach on several benchmark databases with various degrees of difficulty including complex modes, high modal overlap, singular modes, and the presence of engine harmonics. In all cases, the proposed methodology was efficient and, above all, easy to deal with even in largely undetermined cases.

  17. Comparisons between nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus populations in Brazil and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J. Loughry

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available We compared characteristics of a population of nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus studied in the southern United States with a population found in the Atlantic coastal rainforest of Brazil. Adult armadillos in Brazil weighed less than those in the U.S., but when weight was accounted for, did not differ in other measures of body size. However, juveniles in the U.S. were proportionately bigger than those in Brazil. Armadillos in Brazil were less abundant (numbers sighted per h of observation and were active later at night than those in the U.S. Adult sex-ratios were male-biased in both populations. Finally, there was no significant difference in the incidence of littermate associations observed in the two populations, but groups of juveniles (which included non-littermates were observed more frequently in the U.S. Many of these differences may be due to the fact that armadillos are hunted extensively in Brazil but not in the United States.

  18. Analysis and comparison model for measuring tropospheric scintillation intensity for Ku-band frequency in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep JS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has been based on understanding local propagation signal data distribution characteristics and identifying and predicting the overall impact of significant attenuating factors regarding the propagation path such as impaired propagation for a signal being transmitted. Predicting propagation impairment is important for accurate link budgeting, thereby leading to better communication network system designation. This study has thus used sample data for one year concerning beacon satellite operation in Malaysia from April 2008 to April 2009. Data concerning 12GHz frequency (Ku-band and 40° elevation angle was collected and analysed, obtaining average signal amplitude value, ÷ and also standard deviation ó which is normally measured in dB to obtain long-term scintillation intensity distribution. This analysis showed that scintillation intensity distribution followed Gaussian distribution for long-term data distribution. A prediction model was then selected based on the above; Karasawa,
    ITU-R, Van de Kamp and Otung models were compared to obtain the best prediction model performance for selected data regarding specific meteorological conditions. This study showed that the Karasawa model had the best performance for predicting scintillation intensity for the selected da ta.

  19. Constructing Repairable Meta-Structures of Ultra-Broad-Band Electromagnetic Absorption from Three-Dimensional Printed Patterned Shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei-Li; Zhou, Zhili; Wang, Li-Chen; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Mingji; He, Rujie; Chen, Haosen; Yang, Yazheng; Fang, Daining

    2017-12-13

    Ultra-broad-band electromagnetic absorption materials and structures are increasingly attractive for their critical role in competing with the advanced broad-band electromagnetic detection systems. Mechanically soft and weak wax-based materials composites are known to be insufficient to serve in practical electromagnetic absorption applications. To break through such barriers, here we developed an innovative strategy to enable the wax-based composites to be robust and repairable meta-structures by employing a three-dimensional (3D) printed polymeric patterned shell. Because of the integrated merits from both the dielectric loss wax-based composites and mechanically robust 3D printed shells, the as-fabricated meta-structures enable bear mechanical collision and compression, coupled with ultra-broad-band absorption (7-40 and 75-110 GHz, reflection loss  smaller than -10 dB) approaching state-of-the-art electromagnetic absorption materials. With the assistance of experiment and simulation methods, the design advantages and mechanism of employing such 3D printed shells for substantially promoting the electromagnetic absorption performance have been demonstrated. Therefore, such universal strategy that could be widely extended to other categories of wax-based composites highlights a smart stage on which high-performance practical multifunction meta-structures with ultra-broad-band electromagnetic absorption could be envisaged.

  20. Band structure of one-dimensional doped photonic crystal with three level atoms using the Fresnel coefficients method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.; Bakkeshizadeh, S.

    2018-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) composed of double-layered dielectrics. Electric permittivity and magnetic permeability of this crystal depends on the incident electromagnetic wave frequency. We suppose that three level atoms have been added to the second layer of each dielectric and this photonic crystal (PC) has been doped. These atoms can be added to the layer with different rates. In this paper, we have calculated and compared the band structure of the mentioned PC considering the effect of added atoms to the second layer with different rates through the Fresnel coefficients method. We find out that according to the effective medium theory, the electric permittivity of the second layer changes. Also the band structure of PC for both TE and TM polarizations changes, too. The width of bandgaps related to “zero averaged refractive index” and “Bragg” increases. Moreover, new gap branches appear in new frequencies at both TE and TM polarizations. In specific state, two branches of “zero permittivity” gap appear in the PC band structure related to TM polarization. With increasing the amount of the filling rate of total volume with three level atoms, we observe a lot of changes in the PC band structure.

  1. Design, realization and test of C-band accelerating structures for the SPARC-LAB linac energy upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044, Frascati (Italy); Brönnimann, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Cardelli, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Chimenti, P.; Clementi, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044, Frascati (Italy); Ficcadenti, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Gallo, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044, Frascati (Italy); Kalt, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Lollo, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044, Frascati (Italy); Palumbo, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Piersanti, L., E-mail: luca.piersanti@lnf.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Roma (Italy); Schilcher, T. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-11-21

    The energy upgrade of the SPARC-LAB photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy) has been originally conceived replacing one low gradient (13 MV/m) 3 m long SLAC type S-band traveling wave (TW) section with two 1.4 m long C-band accelerating sections. Due to the higher gradients reached by such structures, a higher energy beam can be obtained within the same accelerator footprint length. The use of C-band structures for electron acceleration has been adopted in a few FEL linacs in the world, among others, the Japanese Free Electron Laser at SPring-8 and the SwissFEL at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The C-band sections are traveling wave, constant impedance structures with symmetric input and output axial couplers. Their design has been optimized for the operation with a SLED RF pulse compressor. In this paper we briefly review their design criteria and we focus on the construction, tuning, low and high-power RF tests. We also illustrate the design and realization of the dedicated low level RF system that has been done in collaboration with PSI in the framework of the EU TIARA project. Preliminary experimental results appear to confirm the operation of such structures with accelerating gradients larger than 35 MV/m.

  2. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  3. The angular electronic band structure and free particle model of aromatic molecules: High-frequency photon-induced ring current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncan, Mehmet; Koç, Fatih; Şahin, Mehmet; Köksal, Koray

    2017-05-01

    This work introduces an analysis of the relationship of first-principles calculations based on DFT method with the results of free particle model for ring-shaped aromatic molecules. However, the main aim of the study is to reveal the angular electronic band structure of the ring-shaped molecules. As in the case of spherical molecules such as fullerene, it is possible to observe a parabolic dispersion of electronic states with the variation of angular quantum number in the planar ring-shaped molecules. This work also discusses the transition probabilities between the occupied and virtual states by analyzing the angular electronic band structure and the possibility of ring currents in the case of spin angular momentum (SAM) or orbital angular momentum (OAM) carrying light. Current study focuses on the benzene molecule to obtain its angular electronic band structure. The obtained electronic band structure can be considered as a useful tool to see the transition probabilities between the electronic states and possible contribution of the states to the ring currents. The photoinduced current due to the transfer of SAM into the benzene molecule has been investigated by using analytical calculations within the frame of time-dependent perturbation theory.

  4. Tunable band (pass and stop) filters based on plasmonic structures using Kerr-type nonlinear rectangular nanocavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianfard, Hamed; Khajeheian, Bahareh; Ghayour, Rahim

    2017-12-01

    We have proposed and numerically investigated two plasmonic structures for bandpass and band-stop filters. The bandpass filter is composed of two metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides coupled to each other by a nonlinear rectangular nanocavity. The band-stop filter consists of an MIM waveguide side coupled to a Kerr-type nonlinear rectangular nanocavity. The optical filtering effect is verified by two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. It is demonstrated that based on optical nonlinearity we can easily make the proposed filters tunable by properly adjusting the intensity of incident light without changing the dimensions of the structures. The simulation results revealed that within the transmission spectrum, the selected central wavelength and the bandwidth of the filter can be tuned by the input signal intensity. The proposed structures are suitable to be used as highly dense integrated optical circuits, where limitations on the dimensions of the filter structure are vital.

  5. Arctic sea ice signatures: L-band brightness temperature sensitivity comparison using two radiation transfer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Richter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice is a crucial component for short-, medium- and long-term numerical weather predictions. Most importantly, changes of sea ice coverage and areas covered by thin sea ice have a large impact on heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere. L-band brightness temperatures from ESA's Earth Explorer SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity have been proven to be a valuable tool to derive thin sea ice thickness. These retrieved estimates were already successfully assimilated in forecasting models to constrain the ice analysis, leading to more accurate initial conditions and subsequently more accurate forecasts. However, the brightness temperature measurements can potentially be assimilated directly in forecasting systems, reducing the data latency and providing a more consistent first guess. As a first step towards such a data assimilation system we studied the forward operator that translates geophysical parameters provided by a model into brightness temperatures. We use two different radiative transfer models to generate top of atmosphere brightness temperatures based on ORAP5 model output for the 2012/2013 winter season. The simulations are then compared against actual SMOS measurements. The results indicate that both models are able to capture the general variability of measured brightness temperatures over sea ice. The simulated brightness temperatures are dominated by sea ice coverage and thickness changes are most pronounced in the marginal ice zone where new sea ice is formed. There we observe the largest differences of more than 20 K over sea ice between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. We conclude that the assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures yields high potential for forecasting models to correct for uncertainties in thin sea ice areas and suggest that information on sea ice fractional coverage from higher-frequency brightness temperatures should be used simultaneously.

  6. Arctic sea ice signatures: L-band brightness temperature sensitivity comparison using two radiation transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Friedrich; Drusch, Matthias; Kaleschke, Lars; Maaß, Nina; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Mecklenburg, Susanne

    2018-03-01

    Sea ice is a crucial component for short-, medium- and long-term numerical weather predictions. Most importantly, changes of sea ice coverage and areas covered by thin sea ice have a large impact on heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere. L-band brightness temperatures from ESA's Earth Explorer SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) have been proven to be a valuable tool to derive thin sea ice thickness. These retrieved estimates were already successfully assimilated in forecasting models to constrain the ice analysis, leading to more accurate initial conditions and subsequently more accurate forecasts. However, the brightness temperature measurements can potentially be assimilated directly in forecasting systems, reducing the data latency and providing a more consistent first guess. As a first step towards such a data assimilation system we studied the forward operator that translates geophysical parameters provided by a model into brightness temperatures. We use two different radiative transfer models to generate top of atmosphere brightness temperatures based on ORAP5 model output for the 2012/2013 winter season. The simulations are then compared against actual SMOS measurements. The results indicate that both models are able to capture the general variability of measured brightness temperatures over sea ice. The simulated brightness temperatures are dominated by sea ice coverage and thickness changes are most pronounced in the marginal ice zone where new sea ice is formed. There we observe the largest differences of more than 20 K over sea ice between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. We conclude that the assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures yields high potential for forecasting models to correct for uncertainties in thin sea ice areas and suggest that information on sea ice fractional coverage from higher-frequency brightness temperatures should be used simultaneously.

  7. Atomistic full-quantum transport model for zigzag graphene nanoribbon-based structures: Complex energy-band method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Nan; Luo, Win-Jet; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Chung, Hsien-Ching; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Wu, Jhao-Ying

    2018-01-01

    Using a non-equilibrium Green’s function framework in combination with the complex energy-band method, an atomistic full-quantum model for solving quantum transport problems for a zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbon (zGNR) structure is proposed. For transport calculations, the mathematical expressions from the theory for zGNR-based device structures are derived in detail. The transport properties of zGNR-based devices are calculated and studied in detail using the proposed method.

  8. Effect of elastic strain on the band gaps, band alignment, and electronic structure of epitaxial ASnO3 (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba) films and heterostructures revealed through in situ photoemission, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniecki, John; Yamazaki, Takashi; Aso, Hiroyuki; Imanaka, Yoshihiko; Ricinschi, Dan

    The alkaline earth stannates ASnO3 (A = Ba, Sr, and Ca) are emerging as important materials. Band gaps in stannates are remarkably dependent on volumetric strain with a decrease in volumetric strain of 3 percent in SrSnO3 resulting in an increase in the band gap of 0.35 eV. However, little understanding of volumetric strain dependence on the valence band (VB) electronic structure and band alignments between stannates and other oxides exits. In this talk we will examine the effect of elastic strain on the band gaps, band alignment, and electronic structure of stannate films and heterostructures through in situ photoemission, spectroscopic ellipsometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy with geometric phase analysis, and density functional theory. CaSnO3 (CSO), SrSnO3 (SSO) and La-doped BaSnO3 (BLSO) thin films were grown by pulsed laser epitaxy with strain control via epitaxial buffer layers. While the VB electronic structure is strain dependent VB offsets do not vary significantly with strain, which resulted in ascribing most of the difference in band alignment to the conduction band (CB) edge. Significantly, strain-induced tuning of CB offset differences are as large as 0.6 eV for SSO and may provide a pathway to enhance stannate-based devices.

  9. Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in Rat Offspring Following Maternal Hypothyroxinemia: Structural and Functional Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play crucial roles in brain maturation, neuronal migration, and neocortical lamination. Subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) represent a class of neuronal migration errors in humans that are often associated with childhood epilepsy. We have previously reported...

  10. Electronic structure of helically coiled carbon nanotubes: product Relation between the phason lines and energy band features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, K.; Tamura, R.; Tsukada, M.; Itoh, S.; Ihara, S.

    1996-01-01

    Recently carbon nanotubes with coiled structures (carbon helix) were found and have attracted much attention. The electronic structures of two families of such helices, whose structures are proposed by two of the present authors (Ihara and Itoh), are calculated using a tight-binding method based on development maps. It is shown that the various band structures are classified by parameters characterizing the geometry of helices based on the concept of open-quote open-quote phason line.close-quote close-quote Semimetallic character, which could not be manifested in straight tubes, is found in only one of those families

  11. Conflicting Coupling of Unpaired Nucleons and the Structure of Collective Bands in Odd-Odd Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levon, A.I.; Pasternak, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The conflicting coupling of unpaired nucleons in odd-odd nuclei is discussed. A very simple explanation is suggested for the damping of the energy spacing of the lowest levels in the rotational bands in odd-odd nuclei with the 'conflicting' coupling of an odd proton and an odd neutron comparative to those of the bands based on the state of a strongly coupled particle in the neighboring odd nucleus entering the 'conflicting' configuration.

  12. Comparison of percentage excess weight loss after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobowicz, Maciej; Lech, Paweł; Orłowski, Michał; Siczewski, Wiaczesław; Pawlak, Maciej; Świetlik, Dariusz; Witzling, Mieczysław; Michalik, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) are acceptable options for primary bariatric procedures in patients with body mass index (BMI) 35–55 kg/m2. Aim The aim of this study is to compare the effects of these two bariatric procedures 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. Material and methods Two hundred and two patients were included 72 LSG and 130 LAGB patients. The average age was 38.8 ±11.9 and 39.4 ±10.4 years in LSG and LAGB groups, with initial BMI of 44.1 kg/m2 and 45.2 kg/m2, p = NS. Results The mean percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL) at 6 months for LSG vs. LAGB was 36.3% vs. 30.1% (p = 0.01) and at 12 months was 43.8% vs. 34.6% (p = 0.005). The greatest difference in the mean %EWL at 12 months was observed in patients with initial BMI of 40–49.9 kg/m2 in favor of LSG (47.5% vs. 35.6%; p = 0.01). Two years after surgery there was no advantage of LSG and in the subgroup of patients with BMI 50–55 kg/m2 there was a trend in favor of LAGB (57.2% vs. 30%; p = 0.07). The multiple regression model of independent variables (age, gender, initial BMI and the presence of comorbidities) proved insignificant in prediction of the best outcome in means of %EWL for either operative modality. None of these factors in the logistic regression model could determine the type of surgery that should be used in particular patients. Conclusions During the first 2 years after surgery, the best results were obtained in women with lower BMI undergoing LSG surgery. The LSG provides greater %EWL after a shorter period of time though the difference decreases in time. PMID:25337157

  13. Comparison of the Giemsa C-banded and N-banded karyotypes of two Elymus species, E. dentatus and E. glaucescens (Poaceae; Triticeae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, I.; Seberg, O.; Salomon, B.

    1994-01-01

    The karyotypes of Elymus dentatus from Kashmir and E. glaucescens from Tierra del Fuego, both carrying genomes S and H, were investigated by C- and N-banding. Both taxa had 2n = 4x = 28. The karyotype of E. dentatus was symmetrical with large chromosomes. It had 18 metacentric, four submetacentric...

  14. Band structure of TiO sub 2 -doped yttria-stabilized zirconia probed by soft-x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Higuchi, T; Kobayashi, K; Yamaguchi, S; Fukushima, A; Shin, S

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of TiO sub 2 -doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been studied by soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The valence band is mainly composed of the O 2p state. The O 1s XAS spectrum exhibits the existence of the Ti 3d unoccupied state under the Zr 4d conduction band. The intensity of the Ti 3d unoccupied state increases with increasing TiO sub 2 concentration. The energy separation between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the Ti 3d unoccupied state is in accord with the energy gap, as expected from dc-polarization and total conductivity measurements. (author)

  15. Band structure and phase stability of the copper oxides Cu2O, CuO, and Cu4O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Markus; Eifert, Bianca; Heiliger, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The p-type semiconductor copper oxide has three distinct phases Cu2O, CuO, and Cu4O3 with different morphologies and oxidation states of the copper ions. We investigate the structural stability and electronic band structure of all three copper oxide compounds using ab initio methods within the framework of density functional theory and consider different exchange correlation functionals. While the local density approximation (LDA) fails to describe the semiconducting states of CuO and Cu4O3, the LDA+U and HSE06 hybrid functional describe both compounds as indirect semiconductors. Using the HSE06 hybrid functional we calculate the electronic band structure in the full Brillouin zone for all three copper oxide compounds.

  16. Multifractal Comparison of Reflectivity and Polarimetric Rainfall Data from C- and X-Band Radars and Respective Hydrological Responses of a Complex Catchment Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Paz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison between C-band and X-band radar data over an instrumented and regulated catchment of the Paris region. We study the benefits of polarimetry and the respective hydrological impacts with the help of rain gauge and flow measurements using a semi-distributed hydrological model. Both types of radar confirm the high spatial variability of the rainfall down to their space resolution (1 km and 250 m, respectively. Therefore, X-band radar data underscore the limitations of simulations using a semi-distributed model with sub-catchments of an average size of 2 km. The use of the polarimetric capacity of the Météo-France C-band radar was limited to corrections of the horizontal reflectivity, and its rainfall estimates are adjusted with the help of a rain gauge network. On the contrary, no absolute calibration and scanning optimisation were performed for the polarimetric X-band radar of the Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (hereafter referred to as the ENPC X-band radar. In spite of this and the fact that the catchment is much closer to the C-band radar than to the X-band radar (average distance of 15 km vs. 35 km, respectively, the latter seems to perform at least as well as the former, but with a higher spatial resolution. This was best highlighted with the help of a multifractal analysis, which also shows that the X-band radar was able to pick up a few rainfall extremes that were smoothed out by the C-band radar.

  17. Development of intermediate-scale structure at different altitudes within an equatorial plasma bubble: Implications for L-band scintillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Kakad, B.; Gurram, P.; Sripathi, S.; Sunda, S.

    2017-01-01

    An important aspect of the development of intermediate-scale length (approximately hundred meters to few kilometers) irregularities in an equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) that has not been considered in the schemes to predict the occurrence pattern of L-band scintillations in low-latitude regions is how these structures develop at different heights within an EPB as it rises in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere due to the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Irregularities at different heights over the dip equator map to different latitudes, and their spectrum as well as the background electron density determine the strength of L-band scintillations at different latitudes. In this paper, VHF and L-band scintillations recorded at different latitudes together with theoretical modeling of the scintillations are used to study the implications of this structuring of EPBs on the occurrence and strength of L-band scintillations at different latitudes. Theoretical modeling shows that while S4 index for scintillations on a VHF signal recorded at an equatorial station may be >1, S4 index for scintillations on a VHF signal recorded near the crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) generally does not exceed the value of 1 because the intermediate-scale irregularity spectrum at F layer peak near the EIA crest is shallower than that found in the equatorial F layer peak. This also explains the latitudinal distribution of L-band scintillations. Thus, it is concluded that there is greater structuring of an EPB on the topside of the equatorial F region than near the equatorial F layer peak.

  18. A class of monolayer metal halogenides MX{sub 2}: Electronic structures and band alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Feng; Wang, Weichao; Luo, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Yahui; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Wei-Hua, E-mail: whwangnk@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Electronics and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronic Thin Film Device and Technology, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Xie, Xinjian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China)

    2016-03-28

    With systematic first principles calculations, a class of monolayer metal halogenides MX{sub 2} (M = Mg, Ca, Zn, Cd, Ge, Pb; M = Cl, Br, I) has been proposed. Our study indicates that these monolayer materials are semiconductors with the band gaps ranging from 2.03 eV of ZnI{sub 2} to 6.08 eV of MgCl{sub 2}. Overall, the band gap increases with the increase of the electronegativity of the X atom or the atomic number of the metal M. Meanwhile, the band gaps of monolayer MgX{sub 2} (X = Cl, Br) are direct while those of other monolayers are indirect. Based on the band edge curvatures, the derived electron (m{sub e}) and hole (m{sub h}) effective masses of MX{sub 2} monolayers are close to their corresponding bulk values except that the m{sub e} of CdI{sub 2} is three times larger and the m{sub h} for PbI{sub 2} is twice larger. Finally, the band alignments of all the studied MX{sub 2} monolayers are provided using the vacuum level as energy reference. These theoretical results may not only introduce the monolayer metal halogenides family MX{sub 2} into the emerging two-dimensional materials, but also provide insights into the applications of MX{sub 2} in future electronic, visible and ultraviolet optoelectronic devices.

  19. Band structure engineering and vacancy induced metallicity at the GaAs-AlAs interface

    KAUST Repository

    Upadhyay Kahaly, M.

    2011-09-20

    We study the epitaxial GaAs-AlAs interface of wide gap materials by full-potential density functional theory. AlAsthin films on a GaAs substrate and GaAsthin films on an AlAs substrate show different trends for the electronic band gap with increasing film thickness. In both cases, we find an insulating state at the interface and a negligible charge transfer even after relaxation. Differences in the valence and conduction band edges suggest that the energy band discontinuities depend on the growth sequence. Introduction of As vacancies near the interface induces metallicity, which opens great potential for GaAs-AlAs heterostructures in modern electronics.

  20. The ν4 fundamental band of tetrafluoromethane: structure and broadening coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanskaya, A. V.; Tonkov, Mikhail V.; Boissoles, J.

    2004-01-01

    Broadening coefficients for the ν4 fundamental band of carbon tetrafluoromethane, CF4, have been measured for the systems with argon, helium and nitrogen. Broadening coefficient behavior is similar to that previously reported for linear molecules: they coincide for P and R branches; the m-dependence in case of argon is sharper than that for helium. The broadening for nitrogen and helium are practically the same but the values for nitrogen are scattered around the general tendency. Q-branch broadening is also discussed. Our experimental data permitted us to evaluate the line intensity distribution and integrated intensity of the band.

  1. Internal photoemission for photovoltaic using p-type Schottky barrier: Band structure dependence and theoretical efficiency limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ko-Han; Chang, Yin-Jung

    2018-01-01

    Solar energy conversion via internal photoemission (IPE) across a planar p-type Schottky junction is quantified for aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) in the framework of direct transitions with non-constant matrix elements. Transition probabilities and k-resolved group velocities are obtained based on pseudo-wavefunction expansions and realistic band structures using the pseudopotential method. The k-resolved number of direct transitions, hole photocurrent density, quantum yield (QY), and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) under AM1.5G solar irradiance are subsequently calculated and analyzed. For Al, the parabolic and "parallel-band" effect along the U-W-K path significantly enhances the transition rate with final energies of holes mainly within 1.41 eV below the Fermi energy. For Cu, d-state hot holes mostly generated near the upper edge of 3d bands dominate the hole photocurrent and are weekly (strongly) dependent on the barrier height (metal film thickness). Hot holes produced in the 4s band behave just oppositely to their d-state counterparts. Non-constant matrix elements are shown to be necessary for calculations of transitions due to time-harmonic perturbation in Cu. Compared with Cu, Al-based IPE in p-type Schottky shows the highest PCE (QY) up to about 0.2673% (5.2410%) at ΦB = 0.95 eV (0.5 eV) and a film thickness of 11 nm (20 nm). It is predicted that metals with relatively dispersionless d bands (such as Cu) in most cases do not outperform metals with photon-accessible parallel bands (such as Al) in photon energy conversion using a planar p-type Schottky junction.

  2. Application of the new LDA+GTB method for the band structure calculation of n-type cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, M.M.; Ovchinnikov, S.G.; Gavrichkov, V.A.; Nekrasov, I.A.; Pchelkina, Z.V.; Anisimov, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    A novel hybrid scheme is proposed and applied for band structure calculations of undoped n-type cuprate Nd 2 CuO 4 . The ab initio LDA calculation is used to obtain single electron and Coulomb parameters of the multiband Hubbard-type model. In strong correlation regime the electronic structure within this model is calculated by the generalized tight-binding (GTB) method, that combines the exact diagonalization of the model Hamiltonian for a small cluster with perturbation treatment of the intercluster hopping and interactions. For Nd 2 CuO 4 , this scheme results in charge transfer insulator with value of the gap and band dispersion in agreement to the experimental data

  3. Electronic Band Structure of BaCo_{2}As_{2}: A Fully Doped Ferropnictide Analog with Reduced Electronic Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an investigation with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the Fermi surface and electronic band structure of BaCo_{2}As_{2}. Although its quasinesting-free Fermi surface differs drastically from that of its Fe-pnictide cousins, we show that the BaCo_{2}As_{2} system can be used as an approximation to the bare unoccupied band structure of the related BaFe_{2-x}Co_{x}As_{2} and Ba_{1-x}K_{x}Fe_{2}As_{2} compounds. However, our experimental results, in agreement with dynamical-mean-field-theory calculations, indicate that electronic correlations are much less important in BaCo_{2}As_{2} than in the ferropnictides. Our findings suggest that this effect is due to the increased filling of the electronic 3d shell in the presence of significant Hund’s exchange coupling.

  4. Synchronization of radiation in an oversized coaxial Ka-band backward wave oscillator using two-dimensional Bragg structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Ginzburg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A coaxial Ka-band backward wave oscillator with a two-dimensional Bragg structure located at the output of the interaction space has been studied. This structure has a double-period corrugation and provides azimuthal electromagnetic energy fluxes, which act on the synchronized radiation of an oversized tubular electron beam. Proof-of-principle experiments were conducted based on the Saturn thermionic accelerator (300  keV/200  A/2  μs. In accordance with simulations, narrow-band generation was obtained at a frequency of 30 GHz and a power level of 1.5–2 MW. As a result, the possibility of using a two-dimensional distributed feedback mechanism in oscillators of the Cherenkov type has been demonstrated.

  5. Electronic transport and band structures of GaAs/AlAs nanostructures superlattices for near-infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkissy, Driss; Nafidi, Abdelhakim; Boutramine, Abderrazak; Benchtaber, Nassima; Khalal, Ali; El Gouti, Thami

    2017-01-01

    We report here the theoretical calculations of band structures E( d 1), E( k z , k p ) and effective mass along the growth axis and in the plane of GaAs/Al x Ga1- x As superlattices, in the envelope function formalism. The effect of valence band offset, well thickness and temperature on the band structures, has been also studied. Our results show that a transition from indirect to direct band gap in (GaAs) m /(AlAs)4 takes place between m = 5 and 6 monolayers at room temperature. Samples (GaAs)9/(AlAs)4 and GaAs( d 1 = 10 nm)/Al0.15Ga0.85As( d 2 = 15 nm) have a direct band gap of 1.747 eV at room temperature and 1.546 eV at T = 30 mK, respectively. Their corresponding cutoff wavelengths are located in the near infrared region. We have interpreted the photoluminescence measurements of Ledentsov et al. in GaAs( d 1 = 2.52 nm)/AlAs ( d 1 = 1.16 nm) and the oscillations in the magnetoresistance observed by Kawamura et al. in GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As superlattice. In the later, the existence of discrete quantized levels along the growth direction z indicates extremely low interactions between adjacent wells leading to the use in parallel transport. The position of Fermi level predicts that this sample exhibits n-type conductivity. These results were compared and discussed with the available data in the literature and can be used as a guide for the design of infrared nanostructured detectors.

  6. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells ...

  7. Origin of banded structure and coal lithotype cycles in Kargali coal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The computed value of χ2 exceeds the limiting value suggesting the presence of Markovity and cyclic arrangement of banded coal lithotypes. The Markov chain model for the Kargali bottom seam of the East Bokaro Gondwana sub-basin is based on the transition probability (pij) matrix and positive values of the difference ...

  8. Atomically Thin Ordered Alloys of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Stability and Band Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of modulating the electronic band edges of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) via alloying of different semiconductors within the same group (intra-group alloying). The stability of the ordered alloys is assessed from the calculated mixing enthalpy which is found...

  9. The Electronic Band Structure of Platinum Oxide (PtO) | Omehe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was found out that the LDA calculation of bulk PtO predicted a metallic nature in agreement with previous LDA and GGA calculations but in disagreement with the semiconductor nature favored by experiment. Our LDA+U calculation for both methods predicted PtO to be a semiconductor with a band gap value of 1.4 eV ...

  10. Shear banding and its contribution to texture evolution in rotated Goss orientations of BCC structured materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen-MInh, T.; Sidor, J.J.; Petrov, R.H.; Kestens, L.A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Due to progressive deformation, the dislocation densities in crystals are accumulated and the resistance of grains to further deformation increases. Homogeneous deformation becomes energetically less favorable, which may result for some orientations in strain localization. In-grain shear banding, a

  11. Single and Multipolarimetric P-Band SAR Tomography of Subsurface Ice Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banda, Francesco; Dall, Jørgen; Tebaldini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Agency IceSAR 2012 campaign is discussed. IceSAR 2012 was conceived so as to support the secondary objectives of the future Earth Explorer mission BIOMASS, which will be a SAR instrument with media penetration capabilities due to the use of the P-band frequency. In this regard, a tomographic study of ice...

  12. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Assali, S.

    2016-07-25

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp exciton α-β-γ lines are observed at 2.140–2.164–2.252 eV, respectively, showing clear differences in lifetime, presence of phonon replicas, and temperature-dependence. The excitonic nature of those peaks is critically discussed, leading to a direct band gap of ∼2.190 eV and to a resonant state associated with the γ-line ∼80 meV above the Γ8C conduction band edge.

  13. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada); University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Sekkat, Zouheir [Optics & Photonics Center, Moroccan Foundation for Advanced Science, Innovation and Research, Rabat (Morocco); Abd-lefdil, Mohammed [University of Mohammed V, Faculty of Sciences, Materials Physics Laboratory, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); El Khakani, My Ali, E-mail: elkhakani@emt.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 Blvd. Lionel–Boulet, C.P. 1020, Varennes, QC J3X-1S2 (Canada)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • High quality CZTS thin films grown by means of PLD technique without resorting to any post sulfurization process. • Effect of thermal annealing treatments (in the 200–500 °C range) on the structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties of PLD-CZTS films. • Experimental determination of key optoelectronic parameters (i.e.; E{sub g}, VBM, ϕ, I{sub p}, and χ) enabling the reconstruction of energy band electronic structure of the PLD-CZTS films. • Investigation on the energy band alignments of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials. - Abstract: We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (T{sub a}), but their crystallinity is much improved for T{sub a} ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with T{sub a} (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at T{sub a} = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for T{sub a} = 300–400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV–vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at T{sub a} = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS

  14. Comparison of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling from Rain Attenuation and Optical Disdrometer Measurements at K/Q bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Rain attenuation is strongly dependent on the rain rate, but also on the rain drop size distribution (DSD). Typically, models utilize an average drop size distribution, such as those developed by Laws and Parsons, or Marshall and Palmer. However, individual rain events may possess drop size distributions which could be significantly different from the average and will impact, for example, fade mitigation techniques which utilize channel performance estimates from a signal at a different frequency. Therefore, a good understanding of the characteristics and variability of the raindrop size distribution is extremely important in predicting rain attenuation and instantaneous frequency scaling parameters on an event-toevent basis. Since June 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have measured the attenuation due to rain in Milan, Italy, on the 20/40 GHz beacon signal broadcast from the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni Q/V-band Payload. Concomitant with these measurements are the measurements of drop size distribution and rain rate utilizing a Thies Clima laser precipitation monitor (disdrometer). In this paper, we discuss the comparison of the predicted rain attenuation at 20 and 40 GHz derived from the drop size distribution data with the measured rain attenuation. The results are compared on statistical and real-time bases. We will investigate the performance of the rain attenuation model, instantaneous frequency scaling, and the distribution of the scaling factor. Further, seasonal rain characteristics will be analysed.

  15. Electronic Structures, Bonding Configurations, and Band-Gap-Opening Properties of Graphene Binding with Low-Concentration Fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuhua; Stinespring, Charter D; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    To better understand the effects of low-level fluorine in graphene-based sensors, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals dispersion interactions has been employed to investigate the structure and impact of fluorine defects on the electrical properties of single-layer graphene films. The results show that both graphite-2 H and graphene have zero band gaps. When fluorine bonds to a carbon atom, the carbon atom is pulled slightly above the graphene plane, creating what is referred to as a CF defect. The lowest-binding energy state is found to correspond to two CF defects on nearest neighbor sites, with one fluorine above the carbon plane and the other below the plane. Overall this has the effect of buckling the graphene. The results further show that the addition of fluorine to graphene leads to the formation of an energy band (BF) near the Fermi level, contributed mainly from the 2p orbitals of fluorine with a small contribution from the p orbitals of the carbon. Among the 11 binding configurations studied, our results show that only in two cases does the BF serve as a conduction band and open a band gap of 0.37 eV and 0.24 eV respectively. The binding energy decreases with decreasing fluorine concentration due to the interaction between neighboring fluorine atoms. The obtained results are useful for sensor development and nanoelectronics.

  16. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Navid B.; Milliron, Delia J.; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  17. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Navid B., E-mail: navid.saleh@utexas.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Milliron, Delia J. [McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Aich, Nirupam [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, 14260 (United States); Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  18. Efficient band structure modulations in two-dimensional MnPSe3/CrSiTe3 van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Qi; Wang, Xiaocha; Zou, Jijun; Mi, Wenbo

    2018-05-01

    As a research upsurge, van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures give rise to numerous combined merits and novel applications in nanoelectronics fields. Here, we systematically investigate the electronic structure of MnPSe3/CrSiTe3 vdW heterostructures with various stacking patterns. Then, particular attention of this work is paid on the band structure modulations in MnPSe3/CrSiTe3 vdW heterostructures via biaxial strain or electric field. Under a tensile strain, the relative band edge positions of heterostructures transform from type-I (nested) to type-II (staggered). The relocation of conduction band minimum also brings about a transition from indirect to direct band gap. Under a compressive strain, the electronic properties change from semiconducting to metallic. The physical mechanism of strain-dependent band structure may be ascribed to the shifts of the energy bands impelled by different superposition of atomic orbitals. Meanwhile, our calculations manifest that band gap values of MnPSe3/CrSiTe3 heterostructures are insensitive to the electric field. Even so, by applying a suitable intensity of negative electric field, the band alignment transition from type-I to type-II can also be realized. The efficient band structure modulations via external factors endow MnPSe3/CrSiTe3 heterostructures with great potential in novel applications, such as strain sensors, photocatalysis, spintronic and photoelectronic devices.

  19. Comparison of Chemical Nano Structure, Rheological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research, chemical nano structures, rheological and mechanical properties of long oil alkyd resin which was synthesized using different polybasic acid catalysts have been studied. These catalyst were phosphoric acid, 1,2,4-benzene tricarboxylic acid and succinic acid. The new compounds were compared with ...

  20. Cross comparison of the Collection 6 and Collection 6.1 Terra and Aqua MODIS Bands 1 and 2 using AVHRR N15 and N19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexia; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong J.; Chen, Na

    2017-09-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key scientific instrument that was launched into Earth orbit by NASA in 1999 on board the Terra (EOS AM) satellite and in 2002 on board the Aqua (EOS PM) satellite. Terra and Aqua MODIS collect the entire Earth's images every 1 to 2 days in 36 spectral bands. MODIS band 1 (0.620- 0.670 μm) and band 2 (0.841-0.876 μm) have nadir spatial resolution of 250 m and their measurements are crucial to derive key land surface products. This study evaluates the performance of the Collection 6 (C6, and C6.1) L1B of both Terra and Aqua MODIS bands 1 and 2 using Simultaneous Nadir Overpass (SNO) data to compare with AVHRR/3 sensors. We examine the relative stability between Terra and Aqua MODIS in reference to NOAA N15 and N19 the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/3). The comparisons for MODIS to AVHRR/3 are over a fifteenyear period from 2002 to 2017. Results from this study provide a quantitative assessment of Terra and Aqua MODIS band 1 and band 2 calibration stability and the relative differences through the NOAA N15 and N19 AVHRR/3 sensors.

  1. Electron momentum density and band structure calculations of {alpha}- and {beta}-GeTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadkhiya, Laxman [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Arora, Gunjan [Department of Physics, Techno India NJR Institute of Technology, Udaipur 313002, Rajasthan (India); Rathor, Ashish [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2011-12-15

    We have measured isotropic experimental Compton profile of {alpha}-GeTe by employing high energy (662 keV) {gamma}-radiation from a {sup 137}Cs isotope. To compare our experiment, we have also computed energy bands, density of states, electron momentum densities and Compton profiles of {alpha}- and {beta}-phases of GeTe using the linear combination of atomic orbitals method. The electron momentum density is found to play a major role in understanding the topology of bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level. It is seen that the density functional theory (DFT) with generalised gradient approximation is relatively in better agreement with the experiment than the local density approximation and hybrid Hartree-Fock/DFT. - Highlights: > Compton profile of {alpha}-GeTe using a 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer. > Compared experimental Compton data with density functional theory. > Reported energy bands and density of states of {alpha}- and {beta}-GeTe. > EVED profiles analysed to check the covalent character.

  2. Structural footprinting in protein structure comparison: the impact of structural fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur W John

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One approach for speeding-up protein structure comparison is the projection approach, where a protein structure is mapped to a high-dimensional vector and structural similarity is approximated by distance between the corresponding vectors. Structural footprinting methods are projection methods that employ the same general technique to produce the mapping: first select a representative set of structural fragments as models and then map a protein structure to a vector in which each dimension corresponds to a particular model and "counts" the number of times the model appears in the structure. The main difference between any two structural footprinting methods is in the set of models they use; in fact a large number of methods can be generated by varying the type of structural fragments used and the amount of detail in their representation. How do these choices affect the ability of the method to detect various types of structural similarity? Results To answer this question we benchmarked three structural footprinting methods that vary significantly in their selection of models against the CATH database. In the first set of experiments we compared the methods' ability to detect structural similarity characteristic of evolutionarily related structures, i.e., structures within the same CATH superfamily. In the second set of experiments we tested the methods' agreement with the boundaries imposed by classification groups at the Class, Architecture, and Fold levels of the CATH hierarchy. Conclusion In both experiments we found that the method which uses secondary structure information has the best performance on average, but no one method performs consistently the best across all groups at a given classification level. We also found that combining the methods' outputs significantly improves the performance. Moreover, our new techniques to measure and visualize the methods' agreement with the CATH hierarchy, including the

  3. An ultra-thin dual-band phase-gradient metasurface using hybrid resonant structures for backward RCS reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongzhi; Wu, Chenjun; Ge, Chenchen; Yang, Jiaji; Pei, Xiaojun; Jia, Fan; Gong, Rongzhou

    2017-05-01

    We introduce and investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, a dual-band phase-gradient metasurface (PGM) to accurately facilitate dual-band beams deflection for electromagnetic waves. The designed PGM is composed of two kinds of split-ring resonators as the basic element of a super cell. These hybrid resonant structures can generate phase gradients at two distinct frequencies, which, in turn, generate appropriately artificial wave vectors that meet the requirements for anomalous reflection in terms of generalized Snell's law. Both simulations and experiments are consistent with the theoretical predictions. Further, this PGM can work at 8.9 and 11.4 GHz frequencies providing a phenomenon of anomalous reflection, which is useful for backward radar cross section reduction.

  4. A BAND SELECTION METHOD FOR SUB-PIXEL TARGET DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES BASED ON LABORATORY AND FIELD REFLECTANCE SPECTRAL COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharifi hashjin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developing target detection algorithms has received growing interest in hyperspectral images. In comparison to the classification field, few studies have been done on dimension reduction or band selection for target detection in hyperspectral images. This study presents a simple method to remove bad bands from the images in a supervised manner for sub-pixel target detection. The proposed method is based on comparing field and laboratory spectra of the target of interest for detecting bad bands. For evaluation, the target detection blind test dataset is used in this study. Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve efficiency of the two well-known target detection methods, ACE and CEM.

  5. A retrospective comparison of the modified tension band technique and the parallel titanium cannulated lag screw technique in transverse patella fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Xue; Tan, Lei; Qi, Bao-Chang; Hou, Xiang-Feng; Huang, Yu-Long; Zhang, Hai-Peng; Yu, Tie-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To compare efficacy between the modified tension band technique and the parallel titanium cannulated lag screw technique for the transverse patella fracture. Seventy-two patients were retrospectively analyzed aged 22 to 79 years (mean, 55.6 years) with transverse patella fractures, among whom 37 patients underwent the modified tension band and 35 patients received the titanium cannulated lag screw. Patients were followed up for 1-3 years. We analyzed the difference of operation time, complications, fracture reduction, fracture healing time, and the Iowa score for knee function between both groups. In modified tension band group, five patients had skin irritation and seven suffered wire migration, two of whom required a second operation. In comparison, there were no complications in the titanium cannulated lag screw group, which also had a higher fracture reduction rate and less operation time. The parallel titanium cannulated lag screw technique has superior results and should be considered as an alternative method to treat transverse patella fracture.

  6. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Munroe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM_{01} mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87  MV/m at a breakdown probability of 1.19×10^{-1} per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90  MV/m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89  MV/m at a breakdown probability of 1.09×10^{-1} per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  7. Grammatical Structures in Cross-Cultural Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Н Гладкова

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses how cultural information is embedded at the level of grammar and it treats grammar as inseparable from semantics and pragmatics. The study is done within the approach known as ethnosyntax. The article provides examples of cultural meaning embedded at the level of syntax relying on examples from Russian and English. In particular, it demonstrates variation in impersonal constructions in Russian and causative constructions in English. It then discusses variation in the use of grammatical structures due to the influence of cultural factors on the basis of ways of wording ‘requests’ in English and Russian. The linguistic examples in the discussion are sources from the Russian National Corpus for Russian and Collins Wordbanks Online for English. The article argues for the importance of culture-sensitive linguistic studies in language teaching.

  8. Sound waves induce Volkov-like states, band structure and collimation effect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Leyva, M.; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-01-01

    We find exact states of graphene quasiparticles under a time-dependent deformation (sound wave), whose propagation velocity is smaller than the Fermi velocity. To solve the corresponding effective Dirac equation, we adapt the Volkov-like solutions for relativistic fermions in a medium under a plane electromagnetic wave. The corresponding electron-deformation quasiparticle spectrum is determined by the solutions of a Mathieu equation resulting in band tongues warped in the surface of the Dirac cones. This leads to a collimation effect of electron conduction due to strain waves.

  9. Monolithic dual-band HgCdTe infrared detector structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parish, G

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available , B. L. Musicant, P. Mitra, T. Schimert, F. C. Case, I. B. Bhat, H. Ehsani, and V. Rao, “Independently accessed back-to-back HgCdTe photodiodes: A new dual-band infrared detector,” J. Electron. Mater., vol. 24, p. 669, 1995. [4] X. C. Zhang, C. C... stream_source_info parish_1997.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 12302 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name parish_1997.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 352 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL...

  10. ACCELERATING STRUCTURE: Ultra-low emittance X-band photocathode RF gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Han

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we present the simulation results of a 1.6 cell X-band photocathode RF gun for ultra-low emittance electron beams. It will work at 9.3 GHz. The emittance, bunch length, electron energy and energy spread at the gun exit are optimized at bunch charge of 1pC using PARMELA. Electron bunches with emittance about 0.1 mm · mrad and bunch length less than 100 fs can be obtained from this gun. A PITZ type coupler is adopted in this gun and an initial simulation by MAFIA is also given in this paper.

  11. Sound waves induce Volkov-like states, band structure and collimation effect in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Leyva, M; Naumis, Gerardo G

    2016-01-20

    We find exact states of graphene quasiparticles under a time-dependent deformation (sound wave), whose propagation velocity is smaller than the Fermi velocity. To solve the corresponding effective Dirac equation, we adapt the Volkov-like solutions for relativistic fermions in a medium under a plane electromagnetic wave. The corresponding electron-deformation quasiparticle spectrum is determined by the solutions of a Mathieu equation resulting in band tongues warped in the surface of the Dirac cones. This leads to a collimation effect of electron conduction due to strain waves.

  12. Band Structure and Fermi Surface of Cu2Sb by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method of bandstructure calculation has been applied to the simple tetragonal compound Cu2Sb. The d bands of Cu lie substantially below the Fermi level, and the Fermi surface is a recognizable distortion of the free-electron model. The Fermi surface has sheets......-orbit splitting, and of another closed sheet. Earlier de Haas-van Alphen results are explained semiquantitatively by the model, which also accounts for open orbits seen in high-field magnetoresistance experiments....

  13. An Optimized, Grid Independent, Narrow Band Data Structure for High Resolution Level Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Bang; Museth, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Level sets have recently proven successful in many areas of computer graphics including water simulations and geometric modeling. However, current implementations of these level set methods are limited by factors such as computational efficiency, storage requirements and the restriction to a domain......: Both memory usage and computational efficiency scales linearly with the size of the interface The values in the narrow band can be compressed using quantization without compromising visual quality The level set propagation is independent of the boundaries of an underlying grid. Unlike previous method...

  14. Fine Structure of the Low-Frequency Raman Phonon Bands of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, M. N.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Scott, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Raman spectra of singled-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) produced by laser and are process were studied between 5 and 500 kappa. The line width vs. temperature dependence of the low-frequency Raman bands between 150 and 200/ cm deviates from that expected for phonon decay through phonon-phonon scattering mechanism. The experimental results and their analysis provided convincing evidence that each of the low-frequency Raman lines is a superposition of several narrower Raman lines corresponding to tubes of nearly the same diameter. The application of Raman spectroscopy to probe the distribution of SWNT by both diameter and chirality is discussed.

  15. Efficient Multicriteria Protein Structure Comparison on Modern Processor Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakos, Elias S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast increasing computational demand for all-to-all protein structures comparison (PSC) is a result of three confounding factors: rapidly expanding structural proteomics databases, high computational complexity of pairwise protein comparison algorithms, and the trend in the domain towards using multiple criteria for protein structures comparison (MCPSC) and combining results. We have developed a software framework that exploits many-core and multicore CPUs to implement efficient parallel MCPSC in modern processors based on three popular PSC methods, namely, TMalign, CE, and USM. We evaluate and compare the performance and efficiency of the two parallel MCPSC implementations using Intel's experimental many-core Single-Chip Cloud Computer (SCC) as well as Intel's Core i7 multicore processor. We show that the 48-core SCC is more efficient than the latest generation Core i7, achieving a speedup factor of 42 (efficiency of 0.9), making many-core processors an exciting emerging technology for large-scale structural proteomics. We compare and contrast the performance of the two processors on several datasets and also show that MCPSC outperforms its component methods in grouping related domains, achieving a high F-measure of 0.91 on the benchmark CK34 dataset. The software implementation for protein structure comparison using the three methods and combined MCPSC, along with the developed underlying rckskel algorithmic skeletons library, is available via GitHub. PMID:26605332

  16. Revisiting the coupled-mass system and analogy with a simple band gap structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, L

    2006-01-01

    A great deal of insight can be gained from the analysis of coupled masses connected to springs in order to understand better the origin of band gaps in physical systems. The approach is based on the application of the superposition principle for finding the general solution in simple mechanical systems involving functions, which vary periodically with time. Graphs show that sums of periodic functions oscillating at different frequencies lead to an exchange of energy from one oscillator to another in a simple mechanical system of three objects connected by identical springs. A system of a large number of masses connected to springs having the same spring constant K is then considered and compared with a system in which the spring constants alternate from K to another value G when connecting one mass to another. Using the results found from the mechanical systems, an analogy of charge oscillations excited on both uniform and corrugated surfaces is presented. The results obtained attempt to expand understanding of the origin of the band gap occurring in some systems involving periodic motions

  17. Fermi surface changes in dilute magnesium alloys: a pseudopotential band structure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect has been used to study the Fermi surface of pure magnesium and its dilute alloys containing lithium and indium. The quantum oscillations in magnetization were detected by means of a torque magnetometer in magnetic field up to 36 kilogauss and temperature range of 4.2 0 to 1.7 0 K. The results provide information on the effects of lithium and indium solutes on the Fermi surface of magnesium in changes of extremal cross sections and effective masses as well as the relaxation times associated with the orbits. The nonlocal pseudopotential model proposed by Kimball, Stark and Mueller has been fitted to the Fermi surface of magnesium and extended to include the dilute alloys, fitting all the observed de Haas-van Alphen frequencies with an accuracy of better than 1 percent. A modified rigid band interpretation including both Fermi energy and local band edge changes computed from the model, gives an overall satisfactory description of the observed frequency shifts. With the pseudo-wavefunctions provided by the nonlocal model, the relaxation times in terms of Dingle temperatures for several orbits have been predicted using Sorbello's multiple-plane-wave phase shift model. The calculation with phase shifts obtained from a model potential yields a greater anisotropy than has been observed experimentally, while a two-parameter phase shift model provides a good fit to the experimental results

  18. Band Structure of Topological Insulator BiSbTe1.25Se1.75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohani, H; Mishra, P; Banerjee, A; Majhi, K; Ganesan, R; Manju, U; Topwal, D; Kumar, P S Anil; Sekhar, B R

    2017-07-04

    We present our angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional theory results on quaternary topological insulator (TI) BiSbTe 1.25 Se 1.75 (BSTS) confirming the non-trivial topology of the surface state bands (SSBs) in this compound. We find that the SSBs, which are are sensitive to the atomic composition of the terminating surface have a partial 3D character. Our detailed study of the band bending (BB) effects shows that in BSTS the Dirac point (DP) shifts by more than two times compared to that in Bi 2 Se 3 to reach the saturation. The stronger BB in BSTS could be due to the difference in screening of the surface charges. From momentum density curves (MDCs) of the ARPES data we obtained an energy dispersion relation showing the warping strength of the Fermi surface in BSTS to be intermediate between those found in Bi 2 Se 3 and Bi 2 Te 3 and also to be tunable by controlling the ratio of chalcogen/pnictogen atoms. Our experiments also reveal that the nature of the BB effects are highly sensitive to the exposure of the fresh surface to various gas species. These findings have important implications in the tuning of DP in TIs for technological applications.

  19. Comparison of perceived value structural models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunčana Piri Rajh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Perceived value has been considered an important determinant of consumer shopping behavior and studied as such for a long period of time. According to one research stream, perceived value is a variable determined by perceived quality and perceived sacrifice. Another research stream suggests that the perception of value is a result of the consumer risk perception. This implies the presence of two somewhat independent research streams that are integrated by a third research stream – the one suggesting that perceived value is a result of perceived quality and perceived sacrifices while perceived (performance and financial risk mediates the relationship between perceived quality and perceived sacrifices on the one hand, and perceived value on the other. This paper describes the three approaches (models that have been mentioned. The aim of the paper is to determine which of the observed models show the most acceptable level of fit to the empirical data. Using the survey method, research involving three product categories has been conducted on a sample of Croatian consumers. Collected data was analyzed by the structural equation modeling (SEM method. Research has shown an appropriate level of fit of each observed model to the empirical data. However, the model measuring the effect of perceived risk on perceived value indicates the best level of fit, which implies that perceived performance risk and perceived financial risk are the best predictors of perceived value.

  20. Band structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator quantum wire in the presence of a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2016-07-13

    By means of a numerical diagonalization approach, we calculate the electronic structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3DTI) quantum wire (QW) in the presence of a magnetic field. The QW can be viewed as a 3DTI film with lateral surfaces, when its rectangular cross section has a large aspect ratio. Our calculation indicates that nonchiral edge states emerge because of the confined states at the lateral surfaces. These states completely cover the valence band region among the Landau levels, which reasonably account for the absence of the [Formula: see text] quantum Hall effect in the relevant experimental works. In an ultrathin 3DTI film, inversion between the electron-type and hole-type bands occurs, which leads to the so-called pseudo-spin Hall effect. In a 3DTI QW with a square cross section, a tilting magnetic field can establish well-defined Landau levels in all four surfaces. In such a case, the quantum Hall edge states are localized at the square corners, characterized by the linearly crossing one-dimensional band profile. And they can be shifted between the adjacent corners by simply rotating the magnetic field.

  1. Role of band 3 in the erythrocyte membrane structural changes under thermal fluctuations -multi scale modeling considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana

    2015-12-01

    An attempt was made to discuss and connect various modeling approaches on various time and space scales which have been proposed in the literature in order to shed further light on the erythrocyte membrane rearrangement caused by the cortex-lipid bilayer coupling under thermal fluctuations. Roles of the main membrane constituents: (1) the actin-spectrin cortex, (2) the lipid bilayer, and (3) the trans membrane protein band 3 and their course-consequence relations were considered in the context of the cortex non linear stiffening and corresponding anomalous nature of energy dissipation. The fluctuations induce alternating expansion and compression of the membrane parts in order to ensure surface and volume conservation. The membrane structural changes were considered within two time regimes. The results indicate that the cortex non linear stiffening and corresponding anomalous nature of energy dissipation are related to the spectrin flexibility distribution and the rate of its changes. The spectrin flexibility varies from purely flexible to semi flexible. It is influenced by: (1) the number of band 3 molecules attached to single spectrin filaments, and (2) phosphorylation of the actin-junctions. The rate of spectrin flexibility changes depends on the band 3 molecules rearrangement.

  2. Structural, optical and electrical properties of tin oxide thin films for application as a wide band gap semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Riti; Ahmad, Shabir; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher Majid

    2015-08-01

    Tin oxide (SnO) thin films were synthesized using thermal evaporation technique. Ultra pure metallic tin was deposited on glass substrates using thermal evaporator under high vacuum. The thickness of the tin deposited films was kept at 100nm. Subsequently, the as-deposited tin films were annealed under oxygen environment for a period of 3hrs to obtain tin oxide films. To analyse the suitability of the synthesized tin oxide films as a wide band gap semiconductor, various properties were studied. Structural parameters were studied using XRD and SEM-EDX. The optical properties were studied using UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and the electrical parameters were calculated using the Hall-setup. XRD and SEM confirmed the formation of SnO phase. Uniform texture of the film can be seen through the SEM images. Presence of traces of unoxidised Sn has also been confirmed through the XRD spectra. The band gap calculated was around 3.6eV and the optical transparency around 50%. The higher value of band gap and lower value of optical transparency can be attributed to the presence of unoxidised Sn. The values of resistivity and mobility as measured by the Hall setup were 78Ωcm and 2.92cm2/Vs respectively. The reasonable optical and electrical parameters make SnO a suitable candidate for optoelectronic and electronic device applications.

  3. Structural, optical and electrical properties of tin oxide thin films for application as a wide band gap semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Riti; Ahmad, Shabir; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher Majid, E-mail: amsiddiqui@jmi.ac.in [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Tin oxide (SnO) thin films were synthesized using thermal evaporation technique. Ultra pure metallic tin was deposited on glass substrates using thermal evaporator under high vacuum. The thickness of the tin deposited films was kept at 100nm. Subsequently, the as-deposited tin films were annealed under oxygen environment for a period of 3hrs to obtain tin oxide films. To analyse the suitability of the synthesized tin oxide films as a wide band gap semiconductor, various properties were studied. Structural parameters were studied using XRD and SEM-EDX. The optical properties were studied using UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and the electrical parameters were calculated using the Hall-setup. XRD and SEM confirmed the formation of SnO phase. Uniform texture of the film can be seen through the SEM images. Presence of traces of unoxidised Sn has also been confirmed through the XRD spectra. The band gap calculated was around 3.6eV and the optical transparency around 50%. The higher value of band gap and lower value of optical transparency can be attributed to the presence of unoxidised Sn. The values of resistivity and mobility as measured by the Hall setup were 78Ωcm and 2.92cm{sup 2}/Vs respectively. The reasonable optical and electrical parameters make SnO a suitable candidate for optoelectronic and electronic device applications.

  4. Weakly nonlinear dispersion and stop-band effects for periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    of engineering periodic structures include some building frames, bridge trusses, cranes, railway tracks, and compound pipes. Thus dynamic analysis of spatially periodic structures is relevant for many applications, and attracts much attention. An essential feature of periodic structures is the presence...

  5. Valence Band Structure of InAs1-xBix and InSb1-xBix Alloy Semiconductors Calculated Using Valence Band Anticrossing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Samajdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The valence band anticrossing model has been used to calculate the heavy/light hole and spin-orbit split-off energies in InAs1-xBix and InSb1-xBix alloy systems. It is found that both the heavy/light hole, and spin-orbit split E+ levels move upwards in energy with an increase in Bi content in the alloy, whereas the split E− energy for the holes shows a reverse trend. The model is also used to calculate the reduction of band gap energy with an increase in Bi mole fraction. The calculated values of band gap variation agree well with the available experimental data.

  6. Photonic band structures of periodic arrays of pores in a metallic host: tight-binding beyond the quasistatic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Stroud, David

    2014-03-01

    We have calculated the photonic band structures of metallic inverse opals and of periodic linear chains of spherical pores in a metallic host, below a plasma frequency ωp. In both cases, we use a tight-binding approximation, assuming a Drude dielectric function for the metallic component, but without making the quasistatic approximation. The tight-binding modes are linear combinations of the single-cavity transverse magnetic (TM) modes. For the inverse-opal structures, the lowest modes are analogous to those constructed from the three degenerate atomic p-states in fcc crystals. For the linear chains, in the limit of small spheres compared to a wavelength, the results bear some qualitative resemblance to the dispersion relation for metal spheres in an insulating host, as calculated by Brongersma et al. [Phys. Rev. B 62, R16356 (2000)]. Because the electromagnetic fields of these modes decay exponentially in the metal, there are no radiative losses, in contrast to the case of arrays of metallic spheres in air. We suggest that this tight-binding approach to photonic band structures of such metallic inverse materials may be a useful approach for studying photonic crystals containing metallic components. This work was supported by KIAS, by NSF-MRSEC at OSU (DMR-0820414), and by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46424. Computing resources were provided by OSC and by Abacus at KIAS.

  7. Optical properties and band structure of ZnP{sub 2}-D{sub 4}{sup 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, I.G. [T.G. Shevchenko State University of Pridnestrovie, 25 Oktyabrya street 107, 3300 Tiraspol, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Syrbu, N.N., E-mail: sirbunn@yahoo.com [Technical University of Moldova, 168 Stefan cel Mare Avenue, 2004 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Zalamai, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 5 Academy Street, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2014-05-01

    The emission lines of bound and free excitons and their phonon replicas were observed in the luminescence spectra of ZnP{sub 2}-D{sub 4}{sup 8} crystals doped with Mn, Sn, Cd and Sb measured at 10 K. The emission lines are described by the model of axial center levels. Models of the bands of the bound excitons with different axial centers (Mn, Sn, Cd and Sb) are presented. It was observed that the indirect transitions in the excitonic bands were nonpolarized and that the direct transitions were polarized. The minimal direct energy gaps in the polarization E∥c are due to the allowed Γ{sub 1}→Γ{sub 1} transitions, and the gaps in the polarization E⊥c are due to the Γ{sub 2}→Γ{sub 1} transitions. The temperature shift coefficient of the bands gaps differs for different polarizations in the temperature interval from 2 to 10 K (ΔE/ΔT=3.5 meV/K and 1 meV/K for E∥c and E⊥c, respectively). The optical constants n, k, ε{sub 1}, ε{sub 2,}d{sup 2}ε{sub 1}/dE{sup 2} and d{sup 2}ε{sub 2}/dE{sup 2} were calculated for the energy interval 1.5–10 eV using the Kramers-Kronig analysis of measured reflection spectra. The features observed in these spectra were interpreted using two types theoretical calculations of band structure as optical transitions.

  8. The asymmetric band structure and electrical behavior of the GdScO3/GaN system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopetti, S.; Shekhter, P.; Winter, R.; Tromm, T. C. U.; Schubert, J.; Eizenberg, M.

    2017-05-01

    III-V nitrides are interesting materials for a very wide variety of electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, their interaction with GdScO3 (GSO), a ternary rare earth oxide, is investigated for MOS applications. We compare pulsed laser deposited amorphous and crystalline epitaxial GdScO3 in terms of their band alignment with the underlying GaN substrate and the resulting electrical characteristics of the MOS stack. The crystal structure of GdScO3 and GaN is investigated by means of x-ray diffraction, showing that crystalline oxide is growing epitaxially on GaN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows a staggered band alignment with a GdScO3-GaN valence band offset of 3.6-3.7 eV, which is reflected in a very asymmetric current-voltage behaviour of the MOS capacitors: breakdown at positive bias, significantly earlier for the crystalline oxide (around 5 MV/cm) compared to the amorphous oxide (around 8 MV/cm), and no breakdown up to a field of -14 MV/cm at negative bias. Transmission electron microscopy images show a crystalline, two-atom thick interface layer between GaN and both crystalline and amorphous GdScO3, which is thought to be an electron barrier between GSO and GaN and a possible source of the staggered band alignment. The electrical behaviour can be exploited for asymmetric nano-electronic devices.

  9. Evidence for an ultrafast breakdown of the BeO band structure due to swift argon and xenon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwietz, G; Czerski, K; Roth, M; Grande, P L; Koteski, V; Staufenbiel, F

    2010-10-29

    Auger-electron spectra associated with Be atoms in the pure metal lattice and in the stoichiometric oxide have been investigated for different incident charged particles. For fast incident electrons, for Ar7+ and Ar15+ ions as well as Xe15+ and Xe31+ ions at velocities of 6% to 10% the speed of light, there are strong differences in the corresponding spectral distributions of Be-K Auger lines. These differences are related to changes in the local electronic band structure of BeO on a femtosecond time scale after the passage of highly charged heavy ions.

  10. Higher‐order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Hao [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Shi, Jiaru, E-mail: shij@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  11. Higher-order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Shi, Jiaru; Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  12. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. I. Calculation of band structure and emission spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede; Feuerbacher, B.

    1974-01-01

    of photoemission spectra from W single crystals. The nondirect as well as the direct models for bulk photoemission processes are investigated. The emission from the three low-index surfaces (100), (110), and (111) exhibits strong dependence on direction and acceptance cone. According to the present band model...... there should essentially be no emission normal to the (110) face for photon energies between 9.4 and 10.6 eV. Experimental observation of emission in this gap, however, implies effects not included in the simple bulk models. In particular, effects arising from surface emission have been considered, i.......e., emission of those electrons which are excited in a single-step process from initial states near the surface to final states outside the crystal. The electrons that are emitted from the surface in directions perpendicular to the crystal planes carry information on the one-dimensional surface density...

  13. Compact Multi-band Power Dividers Based on Stub Loaded Stepped-Impedance Resonators with Defected Microstrip Structure (SL-SIR-DMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wei, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Based on conventional Wilkinson power divider, two compact multi-band equal power dividers (PDs) employing stub loaded stepped-impedance resonators with defected microstrip structure (SL-SIR-DMS) is proposed in this paper. The proposed SL-SIR-DMS is analyzed by even/odd mode method. It is found that different defected structures can lead to different frequency responses. In addition, by using DMS, tri-band and even quad-band responses can be easily achieved without increasing the resonator size. As verification, one tri-band equal PD and one quad-band one are fabricated. The predicted results on S parameters are compared with the measured ones and good agreement is found.

  14. Calculation of wakefields in a 17 GHz beam-driven photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the theoretical analysis and computer simulation of the wakefields in a 17 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG structure for accelerator applications. Using the commercial code CST Particle Studio, the fundamental accelerating mode and dipole modes are excited by passing an 18 MeV electron beam through a seven-cell traveling-wave PBG structure. The characteristics of the longitudinal and transverse wakefields, wake potential spectrum, dipole mode distribution, and their quality factors are calculated and analyzed theoretically. Unlike in conventional disk-loaded waveguide (DLW structures, three dipole modes (TM_{11}-like, TM_{12}-like, and TM_{13}-like are excited in the PBG structure with comparable initial amplitudes. These modes are separated by less than 4 GHz in frequency and are damped quickly due to low radiative Q factors. Simulations verify that a PBG structure provides wakefield damping relative to a DLW structure. Simulations were done with both single-bunch excitation to determine the frequency spectrum of the wakefields and multibunch excitation to compare to wakefield measurements taken at MIT using a 17 GHz bunch train. These simulation results will guide the design of next-generation high-gradient accelerator PBG structures.

  15. A narrow-band subwavelength plasmonic waveguide filter with asymmetrical multiple-teeth-shaped structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jin; Huang, Xu Guang; Lin, Xianshi; Zhang, Qin; Jin, Xiaopin

    2009-08-03

    Characteristics of a multiple-teeth-shaped plasmonic filter are analyzed. As an extension of this structure, an asymmetrical multiple-teeth-shaped structure is proposed and numerically simulated by using the finite difference time domain method with perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition. It is found that the asymmetrical structure can realize the function of a narrow-passband filter. The central wavelength of the passband linearly increases with the simultaneous increasing of d(1) and d(2).

  16. Band structure engineering for solar energy applications: Zinc oxide(1-x) selenium(x) films and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Marie Annette

    New technologies motivate the development of new semiconducting materials, for which structural, electrical and chemical properties are not well understood. In addition to new materials systems, there are huge opportunities for new applications, especially in solar energy conversion. In this dissertation I explore the role of band structure engineering of semiconducting oxides for solar energy. Due to the abundance and electrochemical stability of oxides, the appropriate modification could make them appealing for applications in both photovoltaics and photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. This dissertation describes the design, synthesis and evaluation of the alloy ZnO1-xSe x for these purposes. I review several methods of band structure engineering including strain, quantum confinement and alloying. A detailed description of the band anticrossing (BAC) model for highly mismatched alloys is provided, including the derivation of the BAC model as well as recent work and potential applications. Thin film ZnOxSe1-x samples are grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). I describe in detail the effect of growth conditions (temperature, pressure and laser fluence) on the chemistry, structure and optoelectronic properties of ZnOxSe1-x. The films are grown using different combinations of PLD conditions and characterized with a variety of techniques. Phase pure films with low roughness and high crystallinity were obtained at temperatures below 450¢ªC, pressures less than 10-4 Torr and laser fluences on the order of 1.5 J/cm 2. Electrical conduction was still observed despite heavy concentrations of grain boundaries. The band structure of ZnO1-xSex is then examined in detail. The bulk electron affinity of a ZnO thin film was measured to be 4.5 eV by pinning the Fermi level with native defects. This is explained in the framework of the amphoteric defect model. A shift in the ZnO1-xSe x valence band edge with x is observed using synchrotron x-ray absorption and emission

  17. Influence of Nb-doped TiO2 blocking layers as a cascading band structure for enhanced photovoltaic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon-Ryul; Oh, Dong-Hyeun; Ahn, Hyo-Jin

    2018-03-01

    Nb-doped TiO2 (Nb-TiO2) blocking layers (BLs) were developed using horizontal ultrasonic spray pyrolysis deposition (HUSPD). In order to improve the photovoltaic properties of the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), we optimized the Nb doping level of the Nb-TiO2 BLs by controlling the Nb/Ti molar ratio (0, 5, 6, and 7) of the precursor solution for HUSPD. Compared to bare TiO2 BLs, the Nb-TiO2 BLs formed a cascading band structure using the positive shift of the conduction band minimum of the Nb-TiO2 positioned between fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) and TiO2. This results in the increase of the potential current and the suppression of the electron recombination. Hence, it led to the improvement of the electrical conductivity, due to the increased electron concentration by the Nb doping into TiO2. Therefore, the DSSC fabricated with the Nb-TiO2 BLs at a Nb/Ti molar ratio of 6 showed superior photoconversion efficiency (∼7.50 ± 0.20%) as a result of the improved short-circuit current density. This is higher than those with the other Nb-TiO2 BLs and without BL. This improvement of the photovoltaic properties for the DSSCs can be attributed to the synergistic effects of uniform and compact BL relative to the prevention of the backward electron transport at the FTO/electrolyte interface, efficient electron transport at interfaces relative to a cascading band structure of FTO/Nb-TiO2/TiO2 multilayers and the facilitated electron transport at the BLs relative to the increased electrical conductivity of the optimized Nb-TiO2 BLs.

  18. A Comparison of Resistance to Enamel Demineralization after Banding with Four Orthodontic Cements: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Goje

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The teeth banded with the three fluoride releasing cements (conventional GIC, RMGIC, zinc polycarboxylate demonstrated significantly lesser depth of enamel demineralization as measured by depth of dye penetration than did the zinc phosphate and nonbanded and noncemented control group.

  19. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of vacuum annealing on the structural and optical properties of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn 0.75 Mg 0.25 O alloy. XRD studies revealed that all these films werepolycrystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure and there was no trace of additional phases other than ZnO.

  20. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  1. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of vacuum annealing on the structural and optical properties of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn 0.75 Mg 0.25 O alloy. XRD studies revealed that all these films werepolycrystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure and there was no trace of additional phases other than ZnO.

  2. High power testing oa ANL X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, J. G.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Konecny, R.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2002-01-01

    In the second phase of a program to develop a compact accelerator based on a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure, we have conducted high power tests on a traveling-wave and a standing-wave prototype. Indications are that the traveling-wave structure achieved an accelerating gradient of 3-5 MV/m before the input coupling window failed, while the standing wave structure was poorly matched at high power due to contamination of copper residue on its coupling window. To solve both of these problems, a new method for coupling RF into the structures has been developed. The new couplers and the rest of the modular structure are currently under construction and will be tested at the Naval Research Laboratory shortly

  3. Effect of sputtering power on the structure and optical band gap of SiC thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Du, Zuojuan; Xiao, Jianrong

    2017-11-01

    Amorphous SiC (a-SiC) thin films with a quartz plate as the substrate were prepared under different radio frequency (RF) powers through RF magnetron sputtering. Films structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum. The absorption spectra of the thin films were acquired with UV-visible spectroscopy. Results showed that thin films prepared under different RF powers have different structures. With the increase in power, the maximum peak height, mean roughness, and mean square roughness increase initially and then decrease. The thin films are mainly composed of SiC and SiO2 bonds and contain abundant C. ID/IG increases as power increases. The UV-visible light absorption spectra confirmed that the thin films have strong UV absorption capacity but low absorption capacity in the infrared region. The optical band gap of the thin films ranges between 1.29 and 1.80 eV. With the increase in RF power, the sp3/sp2C hybrid bond in the thin films increases, resulting in a reduction of the optical band gap.

  4. Autocorrelation structure of convective rainfall in semiarid-arid climate derived from high-resolution X-Band radar estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat

    2018-02-01

    Small scale rainfall variability is a key factor driving runoff response in fast responding systems, such as mountainous, urban and arid catchments. In this paper, the spatial-temporal autocorrelation structure of convective rainfall is derived with extremely high resolutions (60 m, 1 min) using estimates from an X-Band weather radar recently installed in a semiarid-arid area. The 2-dimensional spatial autocorrelation of convective rainfall fields and the temporal autocorrelation of point-wise and distributed rainfall fields are examined. The autocorrelation structures are characterized by spatial anisotropy, correlation distances 1.5-2.8 km and rarely exceeding 5 km, and time-correlation distances 1.8-6.4 min and rarely exceeding 10 min. The observed spatial variability is expected to negatively affect estimates from rain gauges and microwave links rather than satellite and C-/S-Band radars; conversely, the temporal variability is expected to negatively affect remote sensing estimates rather than rain gauges. The presented results provide quantitative information for stochastic weather generators, cloud-resolving models, dryland hydrologic and agricultural models, and multi-sensor merging techniques.

  5. Enhanced Water Splitting by Fe2O3-TiO2-FTO Photoanode with Modified Energy Band Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eul Noh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of TiO2 layer applied to the conventional Fe2O3/FTO photoanode to improve the photoelectrochemical performance was assessed from the viewpoint of the microstructure and energy band structure. Regardless of the location of the TiO2 layer in the photoanodes, that is, Fe2O3/TiO2/FTO or TiO2/Fe2O3/FTO, high performance was obtained when α-Fe2O3 and H-TiNT/anatase-TiO2 phases existed in the constituent Fe2O3 and TiO2 layers after optimized heat treatments. The presence of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles with high uniformity in the each layer of the Fe2O3/TiO2/FTO photoanode achieved by a simple dipping process seemed to positively affect the performance improvement by modifying the energy band structure to a more favorable one for efficient electrons transfer. Our current study suggests that the application of the TiO2 interlayer, together with α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles present in the each constituent layers, could significantly contribute to the performance improvement of the conventional Fe2O3 photoanode.

  6. Structural color films with lotus effects, superhydrophilicity, and tunable stop-bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Osamu; Kubo, Shoichi; Gu, Zhong-Ze

    2009-01-20

    The structural blue color of a Morpho butterfly originates from the diffraction of light and interference effects due to the presence of the microstructures on the wing of the butterfly. Structural color on the surface of a damselfish reversibly changes between green and blue. Inspired by these creatures, we have been trying to prepare high-quality and functional structural color films. We describe our efforts in this Account. A useful technique to prepare such structural color films in colloidal solution is a "lifting" method, which allows us to quickly fabricate brilliant colloidal crystal films. The thicknesses of the films can be controlled by precisely adjusting the particle concentration and the lifting speed. Moreover, in order to prepare a complicated structure, we have used template methods. Indeed, we have successfully prepared the inverse structure of the wing of a Morpho butterfly with this technique. Initially, however, our structural color films had a whitish appearance due to the scattering of light by defects in the colloidal crystal film. Later, we were able to prepare a non-whitish structural color film by doping an appropriate dye in the colloidal particles to absorb the scattering light. In addition to the structural blue color, the wing of the Morpho butterfly has superhydrophobic properties. According to Wenzel's equation, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties are enhanced when the roughness of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface is increased, respectively. Based on this mechanism, we have successfully prepared structural color films with superhydrophobic properties, as well as with superhydrophilic properties. Another important property that can be seen in nature is tunable structural color, such as the color change that can be seen on the surface of a damselfish. In order to mimic such color change, we have developed several tunable structural color films. In particular, we have successfully prepared phototunable photonic crystals

  7. Results from the CLIC X-BAND structure test program at the NLCTA

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Dolgashev, Valery; Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Wang, Faya; Wang, W Juwen; Doebert, Steffen; Grudiev, Alexej; Riddone, Germana; Wuensh, Walter; Zennaro, Riccardo; Higashi, Yasuo; Higo, Toshiyasu

    2010-01-01

    As part of a SLAC-CERN-KEK col­lab­o­ra­tion on high gra­di­ent X-band struc­ture re­search, sev­er­al pro­to­type struc­tures for the CLIC lin­ear col­lid­er study have been test­ed using two of the high power (300 MW) X-band rf sta­tions in the NLCTA fa­cil­i­ty at SLAC. These struc­tures dif­fer in terms of their man­u­fac­tur­ing (brazed disks and clamped quad­rants), gra­di­ent pro­file (amount by which the gra­di­ent in­creas­es along the struc­ture which op­ti­mizes ef­fi­cien­cy and max­i­mizes sus­tain­able gra­di­ent) and HOM damp­ing (use of slots or waveg­uides to rapid­ly dis­si­pate dipole mode en­er­gy). The CLIC goal in the next few years is to demon­strate the fea­si­bil­i­ty of a CLIC-ready base­line de­sign and to in­ves­ti­gate al­ter­na­tives which could bring even high­er ef­fi­cien­cy. This paper sum­ma­rizes the high gra­di­ent test re­sults from the NLCTA in sup­port of this ef­fort.

  8. The band structures of three-dimensional nonlinear plasma photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the properties of the photonic band gaps (PBGs) for three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, whose equations for calculations also are deduced. The configuration of 3D nonlinear PPCs is the Kerr nonlinear dielectric spheres (Kerr effect is considered) inserted in the plasma background with simple-cubic lattices. The inserted dielectric spheres are Kerr nonlinear dielectrics whose relative permittivities are the functions of the external light intensity. Three different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics are considered, which can be expressed as the functions of space coordinates. The influences of the parameters for the Kerr nonlinear dielectrics on the PBGs also are discussed. The calculated results demonstrate that the locations, bandwidths and number of PBGs can be manipulated with the different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics. Compared with the conventional 3D dielectric PCs and PPCs with simple-cubic lattices, the more PBGs or larger PBG can be achieved in the 3D nonlinear PPCs. Those results provide a new way to design the novel devices based on the PPCs.

  9. X-band accelerator structures: On going R&D at the INFN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Marcelli, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); RICMASS, Rome International Center for Materials Science Superstripes, Via dei Sabelli 119A, 00185 Rome (Italy); Spataro, B. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Dolgashev, V.; Lewandowski, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yeremian, A.D. [SLAC-National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Higashi, Y. [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami-gun, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Rosenzweig, J. [UCLA-Department of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sarti, S. [University of Rome Sapienza, Dipartimento di Fisica, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Caliendo, C. [Istituto di Acustica e Sensoristica, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Castorina, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); University of Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e Informatica, 95126 Catania (Italy); Cibin, G. [Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX110DE (United Kingdom); Carfora, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Leonardi, O. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rigato, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Campostrini, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, via Sommarive, 9, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The next generation of accelerators, from the compact to the large infrastructure dedicated to high energy physics, is highly demanding in terms of accelerating gradients. To upgrade performances of X band linacs at 11.424 GHz many resources are devoted to achieve high accelerating gradients and at the same time to obtain a high reliability. In the framework of a three-year funded project by the Vth Committee of the INFN to the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) and to the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL). Within a broad international collaboration the LNF has been involved in the design, manufacture and test of compact high power standing wave (SW) sections operating at high frequency while LNL is actively involved in the development of new materials and multilayers using PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) methods. We will report about the status of the accelerating device and of the different ongoing R&D activities and characterization procedures such as tests of different materials and metallic coatings.

  10. The band structures of three-dimensional nonlinear plasma photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Feng Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the properties of the photonic band gaps (PBGs for three-dimensional (3D nonlinear plasma photonic crystals (PPCs are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, whose equations for calculations also are deduced. The configuration of 3D nonlinear PPCs is the Kerr nonlinear dielectric spheres (Kerr effect is considered inserted in the plasma background with simple-cubic lattices. The inserted dielectric spheres are Kerr nonlinear dielectrics whose relative permittivities are the functions of the external light intensity. Three different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics are considered, which can be expressed as the functions of space coordinates. The influences of the parameters for the Kerr nonlinear dielectrics on the PBGs also are discussed. The calculated results demonstrate that the locations, bandwidths and number of PBGs can be manipulated with the different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics. Compared with the conventional 3D dielectric PCs and PPCs with simple-cubic lattices, the more PBGs or larger PBG can be achieved in the 3D nonlinear PPCs. Those results provide a new way to design the novel devices based on the PPCs.

  11. Dual-band infrared imaging to detect corrosion damage within airframes and concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    We are developing dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging and detection techniques to inspect air frames and concrete bridge decks for hidden corrosion damage. Using selective DBIR image ratios,, we enhanced surface temperature contrast and removed surface emissivity noise associated with clutter. Our surface temperature maps depicted defect sites, which heat and cool at different rates than their surroundings. Our emissivity-ratio maps tagged and removed the masking effects of surface clutter. For airframe inspections, we used time-resolved DBIR temperature, emissivity-ratio and composite thermal inertia maps to locate corrosion-thinning effects within a flash-heated Boeing 737 airframe. Emissivity-ratio maps tagged and removed clutter sites from uneven paint, dirt and surface markers. Temperature and thermal inertia maps characterized defect sites, types, sizes, thicknesses, thermal properties and material-loss effects from air frame corrosion. For concrete inspections, we mapped DBIR temperature and emissivity-ratio patterns to better interpret surrogate delamination sites within naturally-heated, concrete slabs and remove the clutter mask from sand pile-up, grease stains, rocks and other surface objects.

  12. Flow induced vibrations of the CLIC X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Tessa; Boland, Mark; Riddone, Germana; Samoshkin, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent cooling water in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerating structures will inevitably induce some vibrations. The maximum acceptable amplitude of vibrations is small, as vibrations in the accelerating structure could lead to beam jitter and alignment difficulties. A Finite Element Analysis model is needed to identify the conditions under which turbulent instabilities and significant vibrations are induced. Due to the orders of magnitude difference between the fluid motion and the structure’s motion, small vibrations of the structure will not contribute to the turbulence of the cooling fluid. Therefore the resonant conditions of the cooling channels presented in this paper, directly identify the natural frequencies of the accelerating structures to be avoided under normal operating conditions. In this paper a 2D model of the cooling channel is presented finding spots of turbulence being formed from a shear layer instability. This effect is observed through direct visualization and wavelet ana...

  13. Studies on the S-band bunching system with the Hybrid Bunching-accelerating Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shi-Lun; Gao, Bin

    2018-04-01

    Generally, a standard bunching system is composed of a standing-wave (SW) pre-buncher (PB), a traveling-wave (TW) buncher (B) and a standard accelerating structure. In the industrial area, the bunching system is usually simplified by eliminating the PB and integrating the B and the standard accelerating structure together to form a β-varied accelerating structure. The beam capturing efficiency for this kind of simplified system is often worse than that for the standard one. The hybrid buncher (HB) has been proved to be a successful attempt to reduce the cost but preserve the beam quality as much as possible. Here we propose to exclusively simplify the standard bunching system by integrating the PB, the B and the standard accelerating structure together to form a Hybrid Bunching-accelerating Structure (HBaS). Compared to the standard bunching system, the one based on the HBaS is more compact, and the cost is lowered to the largest extent. With almost the same beam transportation efficiency (∼70%) from the electron gun to the linac exit, the peak-to-peak (p-to-p) beam energy spread and the 1 σ emittance of the linac with the HBaS are ∼20% and ∼60% bigger than those of the linac based on the split PB/B/standard accelerating structure system. Nonetheless, the proposed HBaS can be widely applied in the industrial linacs to greatly increase the beam capturing efficiency without fairly increasing the construction cost.

  14. One-hundred-three compound band-structure benchmark of post-self-consistent spin-orbit coupling treatments in density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, William P.; Blum, Volker

    2017-08-01

    We quantify the accuracy of different non-self-consistent and self-consistent spin-orbit coupling (SOC) treatments in Kohn-Sham and hybrid density functional theory by providing a band-structure benchmark set for the valence and low-lying conduction energy bands of 103 inorganic compounds, covering chemical elements up to polonium. Reference energy band structures for the PBE density functional are obtained using the full-potential (linearized) augmented plane wave code wien2k, employing its self-consistent treatment of SOC including Dirac-type p1 /2 orbitals in the basis set. We use this benchmark set to benchmark a computationally simpler, non-self-consistent all-electron treatment of SOC based on scalar-relativistic orbitals and numeric atom-centered orbital basis functions. For elements up to Z ≈50 , both treatments agree virtually exactly. For the heaviest elements considered (Tl, Pb, Bi, Po), the band-structure changes due to SOC are captured with a relative deviation of 11% or less. For different density functionals (PBE versus the hybrid HSE06), we show that the effect of spin-orbit coupling is usually similar but can be dissimilar if the qualitative features of the predicted underlying scalar-relativistic band structures do not agree. All band structures considered in this work are available online via the NOMAD repository to aid in future benchmark studies and methods development.

  15. Oxygen effects on the interfacial electronic structure of titanyl phthalocyanine film: p-Type doping, band bending and Fermi level alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Toshio; Kanai, Kaname; Ouchi, Yukio; Willis, Martin R.; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The effect of oxygen doping on titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) film was investigated by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The electronic structure of the interface formed between TiOPc films deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was clearly different between the films prepared in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and under O 2 atmosphere (1.3 x 10 -2 Pa). The film deposited in UHV showed downward band bending characteristic of n-type semiconductor, possibly due to residual impurities working as unintentional n-type dopants. On the other hand, the film deposited under O 2 atmosphere showed upward band bending characteristic of p-type semiconductor. Such trends, including the conversion from n- to p-type, are in excellent correspondence with reported field effect transistor characteristics of TiOPc, and clearly demonstrates that bulk TiOPc film was p-doped with oxygen. In order to examine the Fermi level alignment between TiOPc film and the substrate, the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of TiOPc relative to the Fermi level of the conductive substrate was determined for various substrates. The alignment between the Fermi level of conductive substrate and Fermi level of TiOPc film at fixed energy in the bandgap was not observed for the TiOPc film prepared in UHV, possibly because of insufficient charge density in the TiOPc film. This situation was drastically changed when the TiOPc film exposed to O 2 , and clear alignment of the Fermi level fixed at 0.6 eV above the HOMO with the Fermi level of the conducting substrate was observed, probably by p-type doping effect of oxygen. These are the first direct and quantitative information about bulk oxygen doping from the viewpoint of the electronic structure. These results suggest that similar band bending with Fermi level alignment may be also achieved for other organic semiconductors under practical device conditions, and also call for caution at the comparison of experimental

  16. Features of the band structure and conduction mechanisms of n-HfNiSn heavily doped with Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaka, V. A., E-mail: vromaka@polynet.lviv.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Pidstryhach Institute for Applied Problems of Mechanics and Mathematics (Ukraine); Rogl, P. [Universitet Wien, Institut für Physikalische Chemie (Austria); Romaka, V. V. [National University “Lvivska Politechnika” (Ukraine); Kaczorowski, D. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Poland); Krayovskyy, V. Ya. [National University “Lvivska Politechnika” (Ukraine); Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Horyn, A. M. [Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Ukraine)

    2017-02-15

    The crystalline and electronic structures, energy, kinetic, and magnetic characteristics of n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with Y acceptor impurity are studied in the ranges: T = 80–400 K, N{sub A}{sup Y} ≈ 1.9 × 10{sup 20}–5.7 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –3} (x = 0.01–0.30), and H ≤ 10 kG. The nature of the mechanism of structural defect generation is determined, which leads to a change in the band gap and the degree of semiconductor compensation, the essence of which is the simultaneous reduction and elimination of structural donor-type defects as a result of the displacement of ~1% of Ni atoms from the Hf (4a) site, and the generation of structural acceptor-type defects by substituting Hf atoms with Y atoms at the 4a site. The results of calculations of the electronic structure of Hf{sub 1–x}Y{sub x}NiSn are in agreement with the experimental data. The discussion is performed within the Shklovskii–Efros model of a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  17. Ti α - ω phase transformation and metastable structure, revealed by the solid-state nudged elastic band method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkevich, Nikolai; Johnson, Duane D.

    Titanium is on of the four most utilized structural metals, and, hence, its structural changes and potential metastable phases under stress are of considerable importance. Using DFT+U combined with the generalized solid-state nudged elastic band (SS-NEB) method, we consider the pressure-driven transformation between Ti α and ω phases, and find an intermediate metastable body-centered orthorhombic (bco) structure of lower density. We verify its stability, assess the phonons and electronic structure, and compare computational results to experiment. Interestingly, standard density functional theory (DFT) yields the ω phase as the Ti ground state, in contradiction to the observed α phase at low pressure and temperature. We correct this by proper consideration of the strongly correlated d-electrons, and utilize DFT+U method in the SS-NEB to obtain the relevant transformation pathway and structures. We use methods developed with support by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-03ER46026 and DE-AC02-07CH11358). Ames Laboratory is operated for the DOE by Iowa State University under Contract DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  18. High Gradient Performance of NLC/GLC X-Band Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, Steffen; Boffo, Cristian; Bowden, Gordon B; Burke, David; Carter, Harry; Chan, Jose; Dolgashev, Valery A; Frisch, Josef; Funahashi, Y; Gonin, Ivan V; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higashi, Norio; Higashi, Yasuo; Higo, Toshiyasu; Jobe, R Keith; Jones, Roger M; Kawamata, H; Khabiboulline, Timergali N; Kirby, Robert; Kume, T; Lewandowski, James R; Li, Zenghai; McCormick, Douglas; Miller, Roger H; Mishra, Shekhar; Morozumi, Yuichi; Nantista, Christopher D; Nelson, Janice; Pearson, Chris; Romanov, Gennady; Ross, Marc; Schultz, David; Smith, Tonee; Solyak, Nikolay; Tacku Arkan, Tug; Takata, Koji; Takatomi, Toshikazu; Tantawi, Sami G; Toge, Nobu; Ueno, K; Wang, Juwen W; Watanabe, Y

    2005-01-01

    During the past five years, there has been an concerted effort at FNAL, KEK and SLAC to develop accelerator structures that meet the high gradient performance requirements for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and Global Linear Collider (GLC) initiatives. The structure that resulted is a 60-cm-long, traveling-wave design with low group velocity (< 4% c) and a 150 degree phase advance per cell. It has an average iris size that produces an acceptable short-range wakefield in the linacs, and dipole mode damping and detuning that adequately suppresses the long-range wakefield. More than eight such structures have operated over 1000 hours at a 60 Hz pulse rate at the design gradient (65 MV/m) and pulse length (400 ns), and have reached breakdown rate levels below the limit for the linear collider. Moreover, the structures are robust in that the breakdown rates continue to decrease over time, and if the structures are briefly exposed to air, the rates recover to their low values within a few days. This paper pr...

  19. Development and test of a planar R-band accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Merte, R; Peikert, M; Yu, D

    1999-01-01

    Planar accelerating structures, so called muffin tins, are of great interest for new accelerating techniques which are operating at high frequencies. At present the upper frequency limit for high power sources is 29.9855 GHz available at CERN. Therefore a new design of a planar traveling wave constant impedance accelerating structure is presented. A fully engineered 37-cell prototype with an operating frequency of 29.9855 GHz, which is designed for the 2 pi /3-mode, was fabricated by CNC milling technology. The design includes a power coupler, a cavity geometry optimized to compensate the effect of transverse forces, vacuum flanges and beam pipe flanges. Shown are the frequency scan of transmission and reflection measurements compared to numerical simulations with GdfidL. Further, a non resonant bead pull measurement was made to determine and verify the fundamental modes of the structure. The cavity is planned to be powered at the CLIC test stand at CERN. (4 refs).

  20. Valence band structure and density of states effective mass model of biaxial tensile strained silicon based on k · p theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Qian-Wei; Liu Hong-Xia; Wang Shu-Long; Qin Shan-Shan; Wang Zhi-Lin

    2011-01-01

    After constructing a stress and strain model, the valence bands of in-plane biaxial tensile strained Si is calculated by k · p method. In the paper we calculate the accurate anisotropy valance bands and the splitting energy between light and heavy hole bands. The results show that the valance bands are highly distorted, and the anisotropy is more obvious. To obtain the density of states (DOS) effective mass, which is a very important parameter for device modeling, a DOS effective mass model of biaxial tensile strained Si is constructed based on the valance band calculation. This model can be directly used in the device model of metal—oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). It also a provides valuable reference for biaxial tensile strained silicon MOSFET design. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. The effect of Y3+substitution on the structural, optical band-gap, and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, T E P; Pessoni, H V S; Franco, A

    2017-06-28

    In this study we investigated the structural, optical band-gap, and magnetic properties of CoY x Fe 2-x O 4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized using a combustion reaction method without the need for subsequent heat treatment or the calcing process. The particle size measured from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images confirms the nanostructural character in the range of 16-36 nm. The optical band-gap (E g ) values increase with the Y 3+ ion (x) concentration being 3.30 and 3.58 eV for x = 0 and x = 0.04, respectively. The presence of yttrium in the cobalt ferrite (Y-doped cobalt ferrite) structure affects the magnetic properties. For instance, the saturation magnetization, M s and remanent magnetization, M r , decrease from 69 emu g -1 to 33 and 28 to 12 emu g -1 for x = 0 and x = 0.04, respectively. On the other hand the coercivity, H c , increases from 1100 to 1900 Oe for x = 0 and x = 0.04 at room temperature. Also we found that M s , M r , and H c decreased with increasing temperature up to 773 K. The cubic magnetocrystalline constant, K 1 , determined by using the "law of approach" (LA) to saturation decreases with Y 3+ ion concentration and temperature. K 1 values for x = 0 (x = 0.04) were 3.3 × 10 6 erg cm -3 (2.0 × 10 6 erg cm -3 ) and 0.4 × 10 6 erg cm -3 (0.3 × 10 6 erg cm -3 ) at 300 K and 773 K, respectively. The results were discussed in terms of inter-particle interactions induced by thermal fluctuations, and Co 2+ ion distribution over tetrahedral A-sites and octahedral B-sites of the spinel structure due to Y 3+ ion substitution.

  2. Electronic band structure, magnetic, transport and thermodynamic properties of In-filled skutterudites InxCo4Sb12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, J; Da Ros, V; Lenoir, B; Dauscher, A; Candolfi, C; Masschelein, P; Hejtmanek, J; Kutorasinski, K; Tobola, J; Smith, R I; Stiewe, C; Müller, E

    2013-01-01

    The thermoelectric and thermodynamic properties of polycrystalline In x Co 4 Sb 12 (0.0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.26) skutterudites were investigated and analysed between 2 and 800 K by means of electrical resistivity, thermopower, thermal conductivity and specific heat measurements. Hall effect, sound velocity and thermal expansion measurements were also made in order to gain insights into the transport and elastic properties of these compounds. The impact of the In filling on the crystal structure as well as the thermal dynamics of the In atoms were tracked down to 4 K using powder neutron diffraction experiments. Analyses of the transport data were compared with the evolution of the electronic band structure with x determined theoretically within the Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker method with the coherent potential approximation. These calculations indicate that In gives rise to a remarkably large p-like density of states located at the conduction band edge. The electrical properties show typical trends of heavily doped semiconductors regardless of the In content. The thermal transport in CoSb 3 is strongly influenced by the presence of In in the voids of the crystal structure resulting in a drop in the lattice thermal conductivity values in the whole temperature range. The low value of the Grüneisen parameter suggests that this decrease mainly originates from enhanced mass-fluctuations and point-defect scattering mechanisms. The highest thermoelectric figure of merit ZT ∼ 1.0 at 750 K was achieved at the maximum In filling fraction, i.e. for x = 0.26. (paper)

  3. Estimating the vertical structure of intense Mediterranean precipitation using two X-band weather radar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Delrieu, G.; Andrieu, H.

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims at a preliminary approach of multiradar compositing applied to the estimation of the vertical structure of precipitation¿an important issue for radar rainfall measurement and prediction. During the HYDROMET Integrated Radar Experiment (HIRE¿98), the vertical profile of

  4. Half-metallic ferromagnets : From band structure to many-body effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsnelson, M. I.; Irkhin, V. Yu.; Chioncel, L.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; de Groot, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    A review of new developments in theoretical and experimental electronic-structure investigations of half-metallic ferromagnets (HMFs) is presented. Being semiconductors for one spin projection and metals for another, these substances are promising magnetic materials for applications in spintronics

  5. Origami-based mechanical metamaterials with tunable frequency band structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiromi; Pratt, Riley; Yang, Jinkyu

    2017-04-01

    We investigate wave dynamics in origami-based mechanical metamaterials composed of bellows-like origami structures, specifically the Tachi-Miura Polyhedron (TMP). One of the unique features of the TMP is that its structural deformations take place only along the crease lines, therefore the structure can be made of rigid plates and hinges. By utilizing this feature, we introduce linear torsional springs to model the crease lines and derive the force and displacement relationship of the TMP structure along the longitudinal direction. Our analysis shows strain softening/hardening behaviors in compression/tensile regions respectively, and the force-displacement curve can be manipulated by altering the initial configuration of the TMP (e.g., the initial folding angle). We also fabricate physical prototypes and measure the force-displacement behavior to verify our analytical model. Based on this static analysis on the TMP, we simplify the TMP structure into a linkage model, preserving the tunable strain softening/hardening behaviors. Dynamic analysis is also conducted numerically to analyze the frequency response of the simplified TMP unit cell under harmonic excitations. The simplified TMP exhibits a transition between linear and nonlinear behaviors, which depends on the amplitude of the excitation and the initial configuration. In addition, we design a 1D system composed of simplified TMP unit cells and analyze the relationship between frequency and wave number. If two different configurations of the unit cell (e.g., different initial folding angles) are connected in an alternating arrangement, the system develops frequency bandgaps. These unique static/dynamic behaviors can be exploited to design engineering devices which can handle vibrations and impact in an efficient manner.

  6. Comparison of the karyotypes ofPsathyrostachys juncea andP. huashanica (Poaceae) studied by banding techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib; Bothmer, R. von

    1986-01-01

    The karyotypes of P. juncea (Elymus junceus) and P. huashanica (both outbreeders) were investigated by Feulgen-staining and by C-, N-, and Ag-banding, based on a single plant in each case. Both species have 2n = 2x = 14 and large chromosomes, possibly a generic character. The karyotype of P. juncea....... The patterns of both taxa are polymorphic, supporting that both taxa are outbreeders. The karyotypic characters suggest that P. juncea is more closely related to P. fragilis than either is to P. huashanica. N-banding stains weakly. Silver nitrate staining demonstrates that nucleolus organizers of both species...

  7. Investigation of band structure and electrochemical properties of h-BN/rGO composites for asymmetric supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sanjit; Jana, Milan; Samanta, Pranab; Murmu, Naresh C. [Surface Engineering & Tribology Division, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur, 713209 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR-CMERI Campus, Durgapur, 713209 (India); Kim, Nam H. [Advanced Materials Institute of BIN Convergence Technology (BK21 Plus Global), Dept. of BIN Convergence Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk, 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Kuila, Tapas, E-mail: tkuila@gmail.com [Surface Engineering & Tribology Division, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur, 713209 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR-CMERI Campus, Durgapur, 713209 (India); Lee, Joong H., E-mail: jhl@jbnu.ac.kr [Advanced Materials Institute of BIN Convergence Technology (BK21 Plus Global), Dept. of BIN Convergence Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk, 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Carbon Composite Research Centre, Department of Polymer & Nanoscience and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk, 54896 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    The effect of different content of graphene oxide (GO) on the electrical and electrochemical property of h-BN/reduced GO (rGO) hetero-structure is investigated elaborately. The increasing amount of rGO within the h-BN moiety plays fascinating role by reducing the electronic work function while increasing the density of state of the electrode. Furthermore, different h-BN/rGO architecture shows different potential window and the transition from pseudocapacitance to electrochemical double layer capacitance (EDLC) is observed with increasing π-conjugation of C atoms. The rod like h-BN is aligned as sheet while forming super-lattice with rGO. Transmission electron microscopy images show crystalline morphology of the hetero-structure super-lattice. The valance band and Mott-Shotky relationship determined from Mott-Shotky X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the electronic band structure of super-lattice is improved as compared to the insulating h-BN. The h-BN/rGO super-lattice provides high specific capacitance of ∼960 F g{sup −1}. An asymmetric device configured with h-BN/rGO super-lattice and B, N doped rGO shows very high energy and power density of 73 W h kg{sup −1} and 14,000 W kg{sup −1}, respectively. Furthermore, very low relaxation time constant of ∼1.6 ms and high stability (∼80%) after 10,000 charge-discharge cycles ensure the h-BN/rGO super-lattice as potential materials for the next generation energy storage applications. - Highlights: • Band gap energy of boron nitride decreased with increasing graphene oxide content. • Graphene oxide effectively affected the charge storage mechanism of the composite. • Morphology of boron nitride changed from rod to sheet while forming superlattice. • Highly conducting superlattice showed excellent supercapacitor performance. • Asymmetric device exhibited long stability with high energy and power density.

  8. Multi-use applications of dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging for detecting obscured structural defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Precise dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging provides a useful diagnostic tool for wide-area detection of defects from corrosion damage in metal airframes, heat damage in composite structures and structural damage in concrete bridge decks. We use DBIR image ratios to enhance surface temperature contrast, remove surface emissivity noise and increase signal-to-clutter ratios. We clarify interpretation of hidden defect sites by distinguishing temperature differences at defect sites from emissivity differences at clutter sites. This reduces the probability of false calls associated with misinterpreted image data. For airframe inspections, we map flash-heated defects in metal structures. The surface temperature rise above ambient at corrosion-thinned sites correlates with the percentage of material loss from corrosion thinning. For flash-heated composite structures, we measure the temperature-time history which relates to the depth and extent of heat damage. In preparation for bridge deck inspections, we map the natural day and night temperature variations at known concrete slab delamination sites which heat and coot at different rates than their surroundings. The above-ambient daytime and below-ambient nightime delamination site temperature differences correlate with the volume of replaced concrete at the delamination sites.

  9. BRASERO: A Resource for Benchmarking RNA Secondary Structure Comparison Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Allali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pairwise comparison of RNA secondary structures is a fundamental problem, with direct application in mining databases for annotating putative noncoding RNA candidates in newly sequenced genomes. An increasing number of software tools are available for comparing RNA secondary structures, based on different models (such as ordered trees or forests, arc annotated sequences, and multilevel trees and computational principles (edit distance, alignment. We describe here the website BRASERO that offers tools for evaluating such software tools on real and synthetic datasets.

  10. A ppM-focused klystron at X-band with a travelling-wave output structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1994-10-01

    We have developed algorithms for designing disk-loaded travelling-wave output structures for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. We use either a four- or five-cell structure in a π/2 mode. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The matching calculation is not performed on the tapered structure, but rather on a coupler whose input and output cells are the same as the final cell of the tapered structure, and whose interior cells are the same as the penultimate cell in the tapered structure. 2-D calculations using CONDOR model the waveguide as a radial transmission line of adjustable impedance. 3-D calculations with MAFIA model the actual rectangular waveguide and coupling slot. A good match is obtained by adjusting the impedance of the final cell. In 3D, this requires varying both the radius of the cell and the width of the aperture. When the output cell with the best match is inserted in the tapered structure, we obtain excellent cold-test agreement between the 2-D and 3-D models. We use hot-test simulations with CONDOR to design a structure with maximum efficiency and minimum surface fields. We have designed circuits at 11.424 GHz for different perveances. At 440 kV, microperveance 1.2, we calculated 81 MW, 53 percent efficiency, with peak surface field 76 MV/m. A microperveance 0.6 design was done using a ppM stack for focusing. At 470 kV, 193 amps, we calculated 58.7 MW, 64.7 percent efficiency, peak surface field 62.3 MV/m. At 500 kV, 212 amps, we calculated 67.1 MW, 63.3 percent efficiency, peak surface field 66.0 MV/m

  11. Band Structure and Optical Properties of Ordered AuCu3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Lengkeek, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    The optical spectra of ordered AuCu3 have been measured at low temperatures by a direct ellipsometric technique. We find several structural elements above the absorption edge as well as in the infrared. The measured spectra are interpreted in terms of the interband absorption calculated from an a...... with experiment. The Fermi surface is presented and is found to originate mainly in copper 4s and 4p states....

  12. Profiles of persistent slip markings and internal structure of underlying persistent slip bands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polák, Jaroslav; Mazánová, Veronika; Heczko, Milan; Kuběna, Ivo; Man, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 7 (2017), s. 1101-1116 ISSN 8756-758X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA MŠk LM2015069; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-23652S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : copper * dislocation structure * extrusions * fatigue crack initiation * intrusions * stainless steel Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2016

  13. Photonic band gap effect and structural color from silver nanoparticle gelatin emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Mang Hin; Ma, Rui; Lee, Jeffrey Chi Wai; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Sheng, Ping; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2005-10-01

    We have fabricated planar structures of silver nanoparticles in monochromatic gelatin emulsion with a continuous spacing ranging from 0.15-0.40 micron using a two-beam interference of a single laser source. Our planar holograms display a colorful "rainbow" pattern and photonic bandgaps covering the visible and IR ranges. We model the planar silver nanoparticle-gelatin composite system using an effective medium approach and good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment.

  14. single crystal growth, x-ray structure analysis, optical band gap

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... Hg...Hgand Cl...Cl interactions are stabilizing the structures in 3D pattern. UV-vis absorption spectra illustrate the change in opticalband gap from 3.01eVto 3.42eV on replacing the metal halide group.Raman and Hyper-Raman tensors calculations were performed based on single crystal X-ray data and the ...

  15. ASSIST: a fast versatile local structural comparison tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprari, Silvia; Toti, Daniele; Viet Hung, Le; Di Stefano, Maurizio; Polticelli, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Structural genomics initiatives are increasingly leading to the determination of the 3D structure of target proteins whose catalytic function is not known. The aim of this work was that of developing a novel versatile tool for searching structural similarity, which allows to predict the catalytic function, if any, of these proteins. The algorithm implemented by the tool is based on local structural comparison to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and known functional sites. The method uses a geometric hashing approach where information related to residue pairs from the input structures is stored in a hash table and then is quickly retrieved during the comparison step. Tests on proteins belonging to different functional classes, done using the Catalytic Site Atlas entries as targets, indicate that the algorithm is able to identify the correct functional class of the input protein in the vast majority of the cases. The application was developed in Java SE 6, with a Java Swing Graphic User Interface (GUI). The system can be run locally on any operating system (OS) equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine, and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/ASSISTv1.zip.

  16. Valley and band structure engineering of folded MoS(2) bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hengrui; Huang, Di; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Yingguo; Gong, Xingao; Shen, Yuen-Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao; Wu, Shiwei

    2014-10-01

    Artificial structures made of stacked two-dimensional crystals have recently been the focus of intense research activity. As in twisted or stacked graphene layers, these structures can show unusual behaviours and new phenomena. Among the various layered compounds that can be exfoliated, transition-metal dichalcogenides exhibit interesting properties governed by their structural symmetry and interlayer coupling, which are highly susceptible to stacking. Here, we obtain-by folding exfoliated MoS2 monolayers-MoS2 bilayers with different stacking orders, as monitored by second harmonic generation and photoluminescence. Appropriate folding can break the inversion symmetry and suppress interlayer hopping, evoking strong valley and spin polarizations that are not achieved in natural MoS2 bilayers of Bernal stacking. It can also enlarge the indirect bandgap by more than 100 meV through a decrease in the interlayer coupling. Our work provides an effective and versatile means to engineer transition-metal dichalcogenide materials with desirable electronic and optical properties.

  17. Defect induced structural inhomogeneity, ultraviolet light emission and near-band-edge photoluminescence broadening in degenerate In2O3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Souvik; Sarkar, Ketaki; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Schaller, Richard D.; Gosztola, David J.; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate here defect induced changes on the morphology and surface properties of indium oxide (In2O3) nanowires and further study their effects on the near-band-edge (NBE) emission, thereby showing the significant influence of surface states on In2O3 nanostructure based device characteristics for potential optoelectronic applications. In2O3 nanowires with cubic crystal structure (c-In2O3) were synthesized via carbothermal reduction technique using a gold-catalyst-assisted vapor-liquid-solid method. Onset of strong optical absorption could be observed at energies greater than 3.5 eV consistent with highly n-type characteristics due to unintentional doping from oxygen vacancy ({V}{{O}}) defects as confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. A combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and valence band analysis on the nanowire morphology and stoichiometry reveals presence of high-density of {V}{{O}} defects on the surface of the nanowires. As a result, chemisorbed oxygen species can be observed leading to upward band bending at the surface which corresponds to a smaller valence band offset of 2.15 eV. Temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was used to study the nature of the defect states and the influence of the surface states on the electronic band structure and NBE emission has been discussed. Our data reveals significant broadening of the NBE PL peak consistent with impurity band broadening leading to band-tailing effect from heavy doping.

  18. Defect induced structural inhomogeneity, ultraviolet light emission and near-band-edge photoluminescence broadening in degenerate In 2 O 3 nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Souvik; Sarkar, Ketaki; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Schaller, Richard D.; Gosztola, David J.; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate here defect induced changes on the morphology and surface properties of indium oxide (In2O3) nanowires and further study their effects on the near-band-edge (NBE) emission, thereby showing the significant influence of surface states on In2O3 nanostructure based device characteristics for potential optoelectronic applications. In2O3 nanowires with cubic crystal structure (c-In2O3) were synthesized via carbothermal reduction technique using a gold-catalyst-assisted vapor–liquid–solid method. Onset of strong optical absorption could be observed at energies greater than 3.5 eV consistent with highly n-type characteristics due to unintentional doping from oxygen vacancy (VO) defects as confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. A combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and valence band analysis on the nanowire morphology and stoichiometry reveals presence of high-density of VO defects on the surface of the nanowires. As a result, chemisorbed oxygen species can be observed leading to upward band bending at the surface which corresponds to a smaller valence band offset of 2.15 eV. Temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was used to study the nature of the defect states and the influence of the surface states on the electronic band structure and NBE emission has been discussed. Our data reveals significant broadening of the NBE PL peak consistent with impurity band broadening leading to band-tailing effect from heavy doping.

  19. Effects of Ni d-levels on the electronic band structure of NixCd1-xO semiconducting alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Christopher A.; Jaquez, Maribel; Sánchez-Royo, Juan F.; Farahani, Sepher K. V.; McConville, Chris F.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Ting, Min; Yu, Kin M.; Dubón, Oscar D.; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2017-11-01

    NixCd1-xO has a ˜3 eV band edge offset and bandgap varying from 2.2 to 3.6 eV, which is potentially important for transparent electronic and photovoltaic applications. We present a systematic study of the electronic band structure of NixCd1-xO alloys across the composition range. Ion irradiation of alloy samples leads to a saturation of the electron concentration associated with pinning of the Fermi level (EF) at the Fermi stabilization energy, the common energy reference located at 4.9 eV below the vacuum level. The composition dependence of the pinned EF allows determination of the conduction band minimum (CBM) energy relative to the vacuum level. The unusually strong deviation of the CBM energy observed from the virtual crystal approximation is explained by a band anticrossing interaction between localized 3d states of Ni and the extended states of the NixCd1-xO alloy host. The resulting band structure explains the dependence between the composition and the electrical and optical properties of the alloys—the rapid reduction of the electron mobility as well as previously observed positive band gap bowing parameter. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm that the L-point valence band maximum in the Cd-rich alloys are unaffected by the interaction with Ni d-states.

  20. In Vitro Comparison of Zinc Phosphate and Glass Ionomers Ability to Inhibit Decalcification under and Adjacent to Orthodontic Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    orthodontic bands. Tillery and associates 4 noted that enamel *decalcification is the initial step in the development of cariuus lesions . Fluoride has...Adams, F. J. 1967, The effect of fixed orthodontic appliances on the cariogenicity , qualtity and microscopic morphology of oral lactobacilli. J. Oral

  1. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Navid B; Milliron, Delia J; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Calculation of the band structure of GdCo2, GdRh2 e GdIr2 by the APW method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, J.A.B. de.

    1974-03-01

    The band structure of GdCo 2 , GdRh 2 , GdIr 2 has been calculated by the APW method. A histogram of the density of states is presented for each compound. The bands are transition-metal-like, with s-d hybridization near the Fermi level. The 5d character near the Fermi level increases as one goes from Co to Ir

  3. AVHRR Surface Temperature and Narrow-Band Albedo Comparison with Ground Measurements for the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefliger, M.; Steffen, K.; Fowler, C.

    1993-01-01

    An ice-surface temperature retrieval algorithm for the Greenland ice sheet was developed using NOAA 11 thermal radiances from channels 4 and 5. Temperature, pressure and humidity profiles, cloud observations and skin temperatures from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) camp, located at the equilibrium line altitude at 49 deg17 min W, 69 deg 34 min N, were used in the LOWTRAN 7 model. Through a statistical analysis of daily clear sky profiles, the coefficients that correct for the atmospheric effects were determined for the ETH-Camp field season (May to August). Surface temperatures retrieved by this method were then compared against the in situ observations with a maximum difference of 0.6 K. The NOAA 11 narrow-band planetary albedo values for channels 1 and 2 were calculated using pre-launch calibration coefficients. Scattering and absorption by the atmosphere were modelled with LOWTRAN 7. Then, narrow-band albedo values for the AVHRR visible and near infrared channels were compared with in situ high resolution spectral reflectance measurements. In the visible band (580-680 nm), AVHRR-derived narrow-band albedo and the in situ measurements corrected with radiative transfer model LOWTRAN 7 showed a difference of less than 2%. For the near infrared channel (725-1100 nm) the difference between the measured and modelled narrow-band albedo was 14%. These discrepancies could be either the result of inaccurate aerosol scattering modelling (lack of the in situ observation), or the result of sensor drift due to degradation.

  4. Solvent micro-evaporation and concentration gradient synergistically induced crystallization of poly(L-lactide) and ring banded supra-structures with radial periodic variation of thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shaoyong; Li, Hongfei; Wen, Huiying

    2014-01-01

    The crystalline morphology and structure of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) in a PLLA film-chloroform system were investigated by means of wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), polarized optical microscopy (POM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Birefringent and nonbirefringent ring banded supra-structure......The crystalline morphology and structure of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) in a PLLA film-chloroform system were investigated by means of wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), polarized optical microscopy (POM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Birefringent and nonbirefringent ring banded supra...... of thicknesses along the radial direction. The formation of the ring banded supra-structures is associated with diffusion and crystal growth induced periodic variation of concentration gradient, which is attributed to diffusion-related rhythmic growth and the competition between diffusion of polymer segments...

  5. Análisis estructural de un transportador de banda. // Structural analysis of a band conveyor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez Barreras

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo contiene el análisis de comprobación de la estructura de la cuna de una máquina transportadora debanda. En el mismo se determinan las cargas de servicio y las condiciones de apoyo, se efectúa el cálculo lineal por elmétodo de los elementos finitos, y finalmente se valoran los resultados en forma de:· Análisis de las tensiones.· Análisis de los desplazamientos.· Análisis de las deformaciones.Palabras claves: Transportador de banda, estructura, análisis de tensiones, elementos finitos.________________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe present work contains the structure analysis of a belt conveyor cradle. The operation loads and conditions of supportare determined, the lineal calculation is made by the Finite Element Method, and finally the results are valued in form of:· Analysis of tensions.· Analysis of displacements.· Analysis of deformations.Key words: Belt conveyor cradle, structure, tension analysis, finite element.

  6. Carrier Dynamics and Band Structure in InGaAs and InGaAs/InP Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linser, Samuel; Shojaei, Iraj; Jnawali, Giriraj; Wickramasuriya, Nadeeka; Jackson, Howard; Smith, Leigh; Ameruddin, Amira; Caroff, Philippe; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    We use transient Rayleigh scattering (TRS) measurements to explore the electronic energy structure of wurtzite InGaAs nanowires. We studied single core-only InGaAs nanowires as well as strained core-shell InGaAs-InP heterostructures at 300 K and 10 K, with probe photon energies in the near-infrared from 0.79 to 1.16 eV. We report a factor of four enhancement of the typical lifetime of excited states in the core-shell nanowires (500 ps) when compared to the core-only nanowires (125 ps). We observe a clear band-edge-like structure in the core-shell wires at energies of 0.98 eV at 10 K and 0.88 eV at 300 K. In both cases, this structure is at a significantly higher energy than the reported bandgap of bulk zincblende InGaAs of the same nominal composition as our nanowires. We also present a phenomenological fitting model of our TRS spectra which provides insight into the cooling dynamics of the electron-hole plasma within a single photo-excited nanowire. We acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grants DMR 1507844, DMR 1531373 and ECCS 1509706, and the financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  7. A comparison of methods for evaluating structure during ship collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Daidola, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison is provided of the results of various methods for evaluating structure during a ship-to-ship collision. The baseline vessel utilized in the analyses is a 67.4 meter in length displacement hull struck by an identical vessel traveling at speeds ranging from 10 to 30 knots. The structural response of the struck vessel and motion of both the struck and striking vessels are assessed by finite element analysis. These same results are then compared to predictions utilizing the open-quotes Tanker Structural Analysis for Minor Collisionsclose quotes (TSAMC) Method, the Minorsky Method, the Haywood Collision Process, and comparison to full-scale tests. Consideration is given to the nature of structural deformation, absorbed energy, penetration, rigid body motion, and virtual mass affecting the hydrodynamic response. Insights are provided with regard to the calibration of the finite element model which was achievable through utilizing the more empirical analyses and the extent to which the finite element analysis is able to simulate the entire collision event. 7 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic band gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold fil embedded...... in polymer. Radiation is delivered to and from the PC structures with the help of LR-SPP guides that consist of 8 mm wide and 15 nm thick gold stripes attached to wide film sections (of the same thickness) covered with bumps (diameter ~300 nm, height up to 150 nm on each side of the film). We investigate......, is rather weak, so that the photonic bandgap effect might be expected to take place only for some particular propagation directions. Preliminary experiments on LR-SPP bending and splitting at large angles are reported, and further research directions are discussed....

  9. Band structure analysis of a thin plate with periodic arrangements of slender beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Ó.; Zaera, R.; Fernández-Sáez, J.

    2018-04-01

    This work analyzes the wave propagation in structures composed of a periodic arrangement of vertical beams rigidly joined to a plate substrate. Three different configurations for the distribution of the beams have been analyzed: square, triangular, and hexagonal. A dimensional analysis of the problem indicates the presence of three dimensionless groups of parameters controlling the response of the system. The main features of the wave propagation have been found using numerical procedures based on the Finite Element Method, through the application of the Bloch's theorem for the corresponding primitive unit cells. Illustrative examples of the effect of the different dimensionless parameters on the dynamic behavior of the system are presented, providing information relevant for design.

  10. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; Tokarski, J. T.; Sanders, G. D.; Kuhns, P. L.; McGill, S. A.; Reyes, A. P.; Reno, J. L.; Stanton, C. J.; Bowers, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs /A l0.1G a0.9As quantum well film epoxy bonded to a Si substrate with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from the electronic structure and differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the electron conduction band using a modified k .p model based on the Pidgeon-Brown model. Comparison of theory with experiment facilitated the assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband Landau level transitions. The results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in optical nuclear polarization in semiconductors.

  11. Coherent band excitations in CePd 3 : A comparison of neutron scattering and ab initio theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goremychkin, Eugene A.; Park, Hyowon; Osborn, Raymond; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Castellan, John-Paul; Fanelli, Victor R.; Christianson, Andrew D.; Stone, Matthew B.; Bauer, Eric D.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Byler, Darrin D.; Lawrence, Jon M.

    2018-01-11

    In common with many strongly correlated electron systems, intermediate valence compounds are believed to display a crossover from a high-temperature regime of incoherently fluctuating local moments to a low-temperature regime of coherent hybridized bands. We show that inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of CePd3 provides a benchmark for ab initio calculations based on dynamical mean field theory. The magnetic response is strongly momentum dependent thanks to the formation of coherent f-electron bands at low temperature, with an amplitude that is strongly enhanced by local particle-hole interactions. The agreement between experiment and theory shows that we have a robust first-principles understanding of the temperature dependence of f-electron coherence.

  12. Coherent band excitations in CePd3: A comparison of neutron scattering and ab initio theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremychkin, Eugene A.; Park, Hyowon; Osborn, Raymond; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Castellan, John-Paul; Fanelli, Victor R.; Christianson, Andrew D.; Stone, Matthew B.; Bauer, Eric D.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Byler, Darrin D.; Lawrence, Jon M.

    2018-01-01

    In common with many strongly correlated electron systems, intermediate valence compounds are believed to display a crossover from a high-temperature regime of incoherently fluctuating local moments to a low-temperature regime of coherent hybridized bands. We show that inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of CePd3 provides a benchmark for ab initio calculations based on dynamical mean field theory. The magnetic response is strongly momentum dependent thanks to the formation of coherent f-electron bands at low temperature, with an amplitude that is strongly enhanced by local particle-hole interactions. The agreement between experiment and theory shows that we have a robust first-principles understanding of the temperature dependence of f-electron coherence.

  13. Coherent band excitations in CePd3: A comparison of neutron scattering and ab initio theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremychkin, Eugene A; Park, Hyowon; Osborn, Raymond; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Castellan, John-Paul; Fanelli, Victor R; Christianson, Andrew D; Stone, Matthew B; Bauer, Eric D; McClellan, Kenneth J; Byler, Darrin D; Lawrence, Jon M

    2018-01-12

    In common with many strongly correlated electron systems, intermediate valence compounds are believed to display a crossover from a high-temperature regime of incoherently fluctuating local moments to a low-temperature regime of coherent hybridized bands. We show that inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of CePd 3 provides a benchmark for ab initio calculations based on dynamical mean field theory. The magnetic response is strongly momentum dependent thanks to the formation of coherent f-electron bands at low temperature, with an amplitude that is strongly enhanced by local particle-hole interactions. The agreement between experiment and theory shows that we have a robust first-principles understanding of the temperature dependence of f-electron coherence. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. Algebraic methods for a direct calculus of observables in the theory of nuclear band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.

    1983-01-01

    The basis for much of the present understanding of nuclear structure derives from the study of mean field approximations (such as Hartree-Fock or Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) and of small deviations from the mean field (random phase approximation and the cranking model). This review is devoted to the study of a theoretical framework for these and other approximations. The approach is the application of Heisenberg matrix mechanics to the nuclear many-body problem. It utilizes a calculus for matrix elements of suitably chosen simple operators between exact eigenstates of the Hamiltonian. In the first class of investigations, in which single fermion operators were chosen, one ends with a theory providing a justification for and generalization of various core-particle coupling models and a basis for nuclear field theory. In a further group of studies of matrix elements of multipole and/or pair operators, the collective behavior of even nuclei can be examined, divorced from their coupling to neighboring odd nuclei. Various investigations carried out over two decades are described. A common theoretical thread is that the calculations are done uniformly in fermion shell model space in a representation in which the Hamiltonian is diagonal. New developments which may alter these considerations profoundly by enlarging the framework in which they may be carried out are envisaged. (author)

  15. A comparison of the chromosome G-banding pattern in two Sorex species, S. satunini and S. araneus (Mammalia, Insectivora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Borisov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The G-banded karyotype of S. satunini was compared with the karyotype of Sorex araneus. Extensive homology was revealed. The major chromosomal rearrangements involved in the evolutionary divergence of these species have been identified as centric fusions and centromeric shifts. From the known palaeontological age of S. satunini it is obvious that the vast chromosomal polymorphism of the S. araneus group originated during the middle Pleistocene.

  16. A simple and fast heuristic for protein structure comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, David A; González, Juan R; Moreno Vega, Marcos

    2008-03-25

    Protein structure comparison is a key problem in bioinformatics. There exist several methods for doing protein comparison, being the solution of the Maximum Contact Map Overlap problem (MAX-CMO) one of the alternatives available. Although this problem may be solved using exact algorithms, researchers require approximate algorithms that obtain good quality solutions using less computational resources than the formers. We propose a variable neighborhood search metaheuristic for solving MAX-CMO. We analyze this strategy in two aspects: 1) from an optimization point of view the strategy is tested on two different datasets, obtaining an error of 3.5%(over 2702 pairs) and 1.7% (over 161 pairs) with respect to optimal values; thus leading to high accurate solutions in a simpler and less expensive way than exact algorithms; 2) in terms of protein structure classification, we conduct experiments on three datasets and show that is feasible to detect structural similarities at SCOP's family and CATH's architecture levels using normalized overlap values. Some limitations and the role of normalization are outlined for doing classification at SCOP's fold level. We designed, implemented and tested.a new tool for solving MAX-CMO, based on a well-known metaheuristic technique. The good balance between solution's quality and computational effort makes it a valuable tool. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the MAX-CMO measure is tested at SCOP's fold and CATH's architecture levels with encouraging results.

  17. Omnidirectional photonic band gap enlarged by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haifeng [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu Shaobin [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves of Southeast University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210096 (China); Kong Xiangkun; Bian Borui; Dai Yi [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap realized by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure, which is composed of homogeneous unmagnetized plasma and two kinds of isotropic dielectric, is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method. It has been shown that such an omnidirectional photonic band gap originates from Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, and it is insensitive to the incidence angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave. From the numerical results, the frequency range and central frequency of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be tuned by the thickness and density of the plasma but cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order. The bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be notably enlarged. Moreover, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap. It is shown that such new structure Fibonacci quasiperiodic one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals have a superior feature in the enhancement of frequency range of omnidirectional photonic band gap compared with the conventional ternary and conventional Fibonacci quasiperiodic ternary plasma photonic crystals.

  18. Deficits of entropy modulation in schizophrenia are predicted by functional connectivity strength in the theta band and structural clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Pilar, Javier; de Luis-García, Rodrigo; Lubeiro, Alba; de Uribe, Nieves; Poza, Jesús; Núñez, Pablo; Ayuso, Marta; Hornero, Roberto; Molina, Vicente

    2018-01-01

    Spectral entropy (SE) allows comparing task-related modulation of electroencephalogram (EEG) between patients and controls, i.e. spectral changes of the EEG associated to task performance. A SE modulation deficit has been replicated in different schizophrenia samples. To investigate the underpinnings of SE modulation deficits in schizophrenia, we applied graph-theory to EEG recordings during a P300 task and fractional anisotropy (FA) data from diffusion tensor imaging in 48 patients (23 first episodes) and 87 healthy controls. Functional connectivity was assessed from phase-locking values among sensors in the theta band, and structural connectivity was based on FA values for the tracts connecting pairs of regions. From those data, averaged clustering coefficient (CLC), characteristic path-length (PL) and connectivity strength (CS, also known as density) were calculated for both functional and structural networks. The corresponding functional modulation values were calculated as the difference in SE and CLC, PL and CS between the pre-stimulus and response windows during the task. The results revealed a higher functional CS in the pre-stimulus window in patients, predictive of smaller modulation of SE in this group. The amount of increase in theta CS from pre-stimulus to response related to SE modulation in patients and controls. Structural CLC was associated with SE modulation in the patients. SE modulation was predictive of negative symptoms, whereas CLC and PL modulation was associated with cognitive performance in the patients. These results support that a hyperactive functional connectivity and/or structural connective deficits in the patients hamper the dynamical modulation of connectivity underlying cognition.

  19. Probing the Electronic Structure and Band Gap Evolution of Titanium Oxide Clusters (TiO2)n- (n=1-10) Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Hua-jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-01-01

    TiO2 is a wide-band gap semiconductor and it is an important material for photocatalysis. Here we report an experimental investigation of the electronic structure of (TiO2)n clusters and how their band gap evolves as a function of size using anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). PES spectra of (TiO2)n- clusters for n = 1-10 have been obtained at 193 (6.424 eV) and 157 nm (7.866 eV). The high photon energy at 157 nm allows the band gap of the TiO2 clusters to be clearly revealed up to n = 10. The band gap is observed to be strongly size-dependent for n 1 appears to be localized in a tricoordinated Ti atom, creating a single Ti3+ site and making these clusters ideal molecular models for mechanistic understanding of TiO2 surface defects and photocatalytic properties

  20. Studying the Fine Structure and Temporal Variations of the Zodiacal Cloud and Asteroidal Dust Bands Using the 3-Year Near-IR COBE-DIRBE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Sumita

    1999-01-01

    The report presents the results of the data analyses of the DIRBE-COBE data set to study the structure of the zodiacal cloud in the near-infrared wavebands at 1.2, 2.2, and 3.4 microns. The cloud has been divided into two components which have been analyzed and studied separately. The annual variation of the flux in the smooth or low frequency component has been measured in all three bands and the presence of any asymmetries due to the Earth's resonant ring have been studied. The high frequency component which primarily consisted of the asteroidal dust bands. Extensive and careful co-addition was done to extract the central bands in all three wavebands. The ten-degree bands are present in the 1.2 and 2.2 microns but not in the 3.4 micron waveband.

  1. Design and Simulation of Microstrip Hairpin Bandpass Filter with Open Stub and Defected Ground Structure (DGS) at X-Band Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyadi, T.; Mulyasari, S.; Mukhidin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we have designed and simulated a Band Pass Filter (BPF) at X-band frequency. This filter is designed for X-band weather radar application with 9500 MHz center frequency and bandwidth -3 dB is 120 MHz. The filter design was performed using a hairpin microstrip combined with an open stub and defected ground structure (DGS). The substrate used is Rogers RT5880 with a dielectric constant of 2.2 and a thickness of 1.575 mm. Based on the simulation results, it is found that the filter works on frequency 9,44 - 9,56 GHz with insertion loss value at pass band is -1,57 dB.

  2. Exciton spectra and energy band structure of Cu{sub 2}ZnSiSe{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guc, M., E-mail: gmax@phys.asm.md [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Academiei Str. 5, Chisinau MD 2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Levcenko, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Dermenji, L. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Academiei Str. 5, Chisinau MD 2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Gurieva, G. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Schorr, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Free University Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Malteserstr. 74-100, Berlin (Germany); Syrbu, N.N. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau MD-2004, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Arushanov, E. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Academiei Str. 5, Chisinau MD 2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Reflection spectra of Cu{sub 2}ZnSiSe{sub 4} were studied for E ⊥ c and E || c light polarizations. • Four excitonic series are revealed in the reflection spectra at 10 K. • Model of exciton dispersion and the presence of a dead-layer. • Exciton Rydberg energies and free carriers effective masses were calculated. • Reflectivity for E ⊥ c and E || c were analyzed in the region 3–6 eV at 300 K. -- Abstract: Exciton spectra are studied in Cu{sub 2}ZnSiSe{sub 4} single crystals at 10 and 300 K by means of reflection spectroscopy. The exciton parameters, dielectric constant and free carriers effective masses are deduced from experimental spectra by calculations in the framework of a model taking into account the spatial dispersion and the presence of a dead-layer. The structure found in the reflectivity was analyzed and related to the theoretical electronic band structure of close related Cu{sub 2}ZnSiS{sub 4} semiconductor.

  3. Personality correlates (BAS-BIS), self-perception of social ranking, and cortical (alpha frequency band) modulation in peer-group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pagani, Silvia

    2014-06-22

    The perception and interpretation of social hierarchies are a key part of our social life. In the present research we considered the activation of cortical areas, mainly the prefrontal cortex, related to social ranking perception in conjunction with some personality components (BAS - Behavioral Activation System - and BIS - Behavioral Inhibition System). In two experiments we manipulated the perceived superior/inferior status during a competitive cognitive task. Indeed, we created an explicit and strongly reinforced social hierarchy based on incidental rating in an attentional task. Specifically, a peer group comparison was undertaken and improved (Experiment 1) or decreased (Experiment 2) performance was artificially manipulated by the experimenter. For each experiment two groups were compared, based on a BAS and BIS dichotomy. Alpha band modulation in prefrontal cortex, behavioral measures (performance: error rate, ER; response times, RTs), and self-perceived ranking were considered. Repeated measures ANOVAs and regression analyses showed in Experiment 1 a significant improved cognitive performance (decreased ER and RTs) and higher self-perceived ranking in high-BAS participants. Moreover, their prefrontal activity was increased within the left side (alpha band decreasing). Conversely, in Experiment 2 a significant decreased cognitive performance (increased ER and RTs) and lower self-perceived ranking was observed in higher-BIS participants. Their prefrontal right activity was increased in comparison with higher BAS. The regression analyses confirmed the significant predictive role of alpha band modulation with respect of subjects' performance and self-perception of social ranking, differently for BAS/BIS components. The present results suggest that social status perception is directly modulated by cortical activity and personality correlates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of EEG and MEG in source localization of induced human gamma-band oscillations during visual stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2015-08-01

    High frequency gamma oscillations are indications of information processing in cortical neuronal networks. Recently, non-invasive detection of these oscillations have become one of the main research areas in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) studies. The aim of this study, which is a continuation of our previous MEG study, is to compare the capability of the two modalities (EEG and MEG) in localizing the source of the induced gamma activity due to a visual stimulus, using a spatial filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). To do this, the brain activity was recorded using simultaneous MEG and EEG measurement and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head modeling technique, such as, the three-shell concentric spheres and an overlapping sphere (local sphere) have been used as a forward model to calculate the external electromagnetic potentials and fields recorded by the EEG and MEG, respectively. Our results from the time-frequency analysis, at the sensor level, revealed that the parieto-occipital electrodes and sensors from both modalities showed a clear and sustained gamma-band activity throughout the post-stimulus duration and that both modalities showed similar strongest gamma-band peaks. It was difficult to interpret the spatial pattern of the gamma-band oscillatory response on the scalp, at the sensor level, for both modalities. However, the source analysis result revealed that MEG3 sensor type, which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed the source more focally and close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to that of the EEG.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of the tension band wiring principle. A comparison between two different techniques for transverse patella fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Ivan; Stoffel, Karl; Sommer, Christoph; Höntzsch, Dankward; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of the dynamic compression principle of tension band wiring in two techniques for patella fracture treatment. Twelve human cadaveric knees with simulated transverse patella fractures were assigned to two groups for treatment with tension band wiring using either Kirschner (K-) wires or cannulated screws. Biomechanical testing was performed over three knee movement cycles between 90° flexion and 0° full extension. Pressure distribution in the fracture gap and fracture site displacement were evaluated at the 3 rd cycle in 15° steps, namely 90°-75°-60°-45°-30°-15°-0° extension phase and 0°-15°-30°-45°-60°-75°-90° flexion phase. Mean anterior / posterior interfragmentary pressure in the groups with K-wires and cannulated screws ranged within 0.16-0.40MPa / 0.12-0.35MPa and 0.37-0.59MPa / 0.10-0.30MPa, respectively. These changes remained non-significant for both groups and loading phases (P≥0.171). Mean anterior / posterior fracture site displacement for K-wires and cannulated screws ranged within -0.01-0.53mm / 0.11-0.74mm and 0.11-0.55mm / -0.10-0.50mm, respectively. Anterior displacement remained without significant changes for both groups and loading phases (P≥0.112). However, posterior displacement underwent a significant increase in the course of knee extension for K-wires (P≤0.047), but not for cannulated screws (P≥0.202). Significantly smaller displacement at the posterior fracture site was detected in the group with cannulated screws compared to K-wires at 60° and 75° extension phase (P≤0.017), as well as at 45°, 60° and 75° flexion phase (P≤0.018). The critical value of 2mm displacement at the posterior fracture site was not reached for any specimen and fixation technique. Knee extension was accompanied by synchronous increase in quadriceps pulling force. Tension band wiring fulfills from a biomechanical perspective the requirements for sufficient stability of transverse

  6. Comparison of HMM experts with MLP experts in the Full Combination Multi-Band Approach to Robust ASR

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Astrid; Morris, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we apply the Full Combination (FC) multi-band approach, which has originally been introduced in the framework of posterior-based HMM/ANN (Hidden Markov Model/Artificial Neural Network) hybrid systems, to systems in which the ANN (or Multilayer Perceptron (MLP)) is itself replaced by a Multi Gaussian HMM (MGM). Both systems represent the most widely used statistical models for robust ASR (automatic speech recognition). It is shown how the FC formula for the likelihood--based MGMs...

  7. Comparison of UV-B measurements performed with a Brewer spectrophotometer and a new UVB-1 broad band detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Meleti, Charicleia; Ziomas, Ioannis C.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the UV-B erythemal dose, based on solar spectra acquired with a Brewer spectrophotometer at Thessaloniki, Greece, are compared to measurements performed with the recently introduced, by the Yankee Environmental Systems, (Robertson type) broad band solar UV-B detector. The spectral response function of this detector, when applied to the Brewer spectral UV-B measurements, results in remarkably comparable estimates of the erythemal UV-B dose. The two instruments provide similar information on the UV-B dose when they are cross-examined under a variety of meteorological and atmospheric conditions and over the a large range of solar zenith angles and total ozone.

  8. Structural comparison of human mammalian ste20-like kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Record

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The serine/threonine mammalian Ste-20 like kinases (MSTs are key regulators of apoptosis, cellular proliferation as well as polarization. Deregulation of MSTs has been associated with disease progression in prostate and colorectal cancer. The four human MSTs are regulated differently by C-terminal regions flanking the catalytic domains.We have determined the crystal structure of kinase domain of MST4 in complex with an ATP-mimetic inhibitor. This is the first structure of an inactive conformation of a member of the MST kinase family. Comparison with active structures of MST3 and MST1 revealed a dimeric association of MST4 suggesting an activation loop exchanged mechanism of MST4 auto-activation. Together with a homology model of MST2 we provide a comparative analysis of the kinase domains for all four members of the human MST family.The comparative analysis identified new structural features in the MST ATP binding pocket and has also defined the mechanism for autophosphorylation. Both structural features may be further explored for inhibitors design.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  9. Hybrid density functional theory study of Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 band structure for solar cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Dong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 (CIGS alloy based thin film photovoltaic solar cells have attracted more and more attention due to its large optical absorption coefficient, long term stability, low cost and high efficiency. However, the previous theoretical investigation of this material with first principle calculation cannot fulfill the requirement of experimental development, especially the accurate description of band structure and density of states. In this work, we use first principle calculation based on hybrid density functional theory to investigate the feature of CIGS, with B3LYP applied in the CuIn1−xGaxSe2 stimulation of the band structure and density of states. We report the simulation of the lattice parameter, band gap and chemical composition. The band gaps of CuGaSe2, CuIn0.25Ga0.75Se2, CuIn0.5Ga0.5Se2, CuIn0.75Ga0.25Se2 and CuInSe2 are obtained as 1.568 eV, 1.445 eV, 1.416 eV, 1.275 eV and 1.205 eV according to our calculation, which agree well with the available experimental values. The band structure of CIGS is also in accordance with the current theory.

  10. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  11. The structure of the cutaneous pedal glands in the banded snail Cepaea hortensis (Müller, 1774).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Byern, Janek; Cyran, Norbert; Klepal, Waltraud; Rudoll, Livia; Suppan, Johannes; Greistorfer, Sophie

    2018-02-01

    Although gastropods have been crawling through the ocean and on the land for 60 million years, we still know very little about the sticky mucus produced in their foot. Most research has been focused on marine species in particular and, to a lesser extent, on the well-known terrestrial species Arion vulgaris and Cornu aspersum. Within this study, we aim to characterize the foot anatomy of a smaller representative of the family Helicidae, the banded snail Cepaea hortensis. We are particularly interested in the microanatomy of the foot glands, their position, and the histochemical nature of their secretory content. Characterization of the dorsal foot region of Cepaea hortensis reveals four glands, differing in their size and in the granules produced. Histochemically, three of them react positively for sugars (PAS staining and lectin affinity tests for mannose, glucose and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) and acidic proteins (positive Alcian blue and Toluidine blue staining), indicating the presence of acidic glycosaminoglycans. The fourth gland type does not react to any of these dyes. The ventral pedal region includes two different gland types, which are positive for the presence of acidic glycoproteins, with a lectin affinity for mannose only. A comparison with Helix pomatia indicates differences regarding the number of glands and their contents. In Helix, only three gland types are described in the dorsal region of the foot, which show a similar granular appearance but nevertheless differ in their chemical composition. Congruently, there are two gland types in the ventral region in both species, whereas in Helix an additional sugar moiety is found. This raises the question whether these differences between the pedal glandular systems of both helicid species are the result of protection or size-related adaptations, as they occur in the same habitat. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of Polytypism on Optical Properties and Band Structure of Individual Ga(N)P Nanowires from Correlative Spatially Resolved Structural and Optical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Persson, Per O Å; Sukrittanon, Supanee; Kuang, Yanjin; Tu, Charles W; Chen, Weimin M; Buyanova, Irina A

    2015-06-10

    III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have gained significant interest as building blocks in novel nanoscale devices. The one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure architecture allows one to extend band structure engineering beyond quantum confinement effects by utilizing formation of different crystal phases that are thermodynamically unfavorable in bulk materials. It is therefore of crucial importance to understand the influence of variations in the NWs crystal structure on their fundamental physical properties. In this work we investigate effects of structural polytypism on the optical properties of gallium phosphide and GaP/GaNP core/shell NW structures by a correlative investigation on the structural and optical properties of individual NWs. The former is monitored by transmission electron microscopy, whereas the latter is studied via cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping. It is found that structural defects, such as rotational twins in zinc blende (ZB) GaNP, have detrimental effects on light emission intensity at low temperatures by promoting nonradiative recombination processes. On the other hand, formation of the wurtzite (WZ) phase does not notably affect the CL intensity neither in GaP nor in the GaNP alloy. This suggests that zone folding in WZ GaP does not enhance its radiative efficiency, consistent with theoretical predictions. We also show that the change in the lattice structure have negligible effects on the bandgap energies of the GaNP alloys, at least within the range of the investigated nitrogen compositions of <2%. Both WZ and ZB GaNP are found to have a significantly higher efficiency of radiative recombination as compared with that in parental GaP, promising for potential applications of GaNP NWs as efficient nanoscale light emitters within the desirable amber-red spectral range.

  13. Weakly spin-dependent band structures of antiferromagnetic perovskite LaMO3(M  =  Cr, Mn, Fe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Takuya; Ohno, Kaoru; Noda, Yusuke; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2018-02-21

    We investigate the spin-dependent electronic states of antiferromagnetic (AFM) lanthanum chromite (LaCrO 3 ), lanthanum manganite (LaMnO 3 ), and lanthanum ferrite (LaFeO 3 ) using spin-polarized first-principles density functional theory with Hubbard U correction. The band structures are calculated for 15 types of their different AFM structures. It is verified for these structures that there is a very simple rule to identify which wave number [Formula: see text] exhibits spin splitting or degeneracy in the band structure. This rule uses the symmetry operations that map the up-spin atoms onto the down-spin atoms. The resulting spin splitting is very small for the most stable spin configuration of the most stable experimental structure. We discuss a plausible benefit of this characteristic, i.e. the direction-independence of the spin current, in electrode applications.

  14. A systematic study of band structure and electromagnetic properties of neutron rich odd mass Eu isotopes in the projected shell model framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, Rakesh K.; Devi, Rani [University of Jammu, Department of Physics and Electronics, Jammu (India); Khosa, S.K. [Central University of Jammu, Department of Physics and Astronomical Sciences, Jammu (India); Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A. [University of Kashmir, Department of Physics, Srinagar (India)

    2017-10-15

    The positive and negative parity rotational band structure of the neutron rich odd mass Eu isotopes with neutron numbers ranging from 90 to 96 are investigated up to the high angular momentum. In the theoretical analysis of energy spectra, transition energies and electromagnetic transition probabilities we employ the projected shell model. The calculations successfully describe the formation of the ground and excited band structures from the single particle and multi quasiparticle configurations. Calculated excitation energy spectra, transition energies, exact quantum mechanically calculated B(E2) and B(M1) transition probabilities are compared with experimental data wherever available and a reasonably good agreement is obtained with the observed data. The change in deformation in the ground state band with the increase in angular momentum and the increase in neutron number has also been established. (orig.)

  15. Zn x Cd1-x S tunable band structure-directing photocatalytic activity and selectivity of visible-light reduction of CO2 into liquid solar fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lanqin; Kuai, Libang; Li, Yichang; Li, Haijin; Zhou, Yong; Zou, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    A series of Zn x Cd1-x S monodispersed nanospheres were successfully synthesized with tunable band structures. As-prepared Zn x Cd1-x S solid solutions show much enhanced photocatalytic efficiency for CO2 photoreduction in aqueous solutions under visible light irradiation, relative to pure CdS analog. Methanol (CH3OH) and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) are the major products of CO2 photoreduction for the solid solutions with x = 0, 0.2, and 0.5. Interestingly, Zn0.8Cd0.2S photocatalyst with a wide band gap can also additionally generate ethanol (CH3CH2OH) besides CH3OH and CH3CHO. The balance between the band structure-directing redox capacity and light absorption should be considered to influence both product yield and selectivity of CO2 photoreduction. The possible photoreduction mechanism was tentatively proposed.

  16. Theoretical aspects of photonic band gap in 1D nano structure of LN: MgLN periodic layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisodia, Namita

    2015-01-01

    By using the transfer matrix method, we have analyzed the photonic band gap properties in a periodic layer of LN:MgLN medium. The Width of alternate layers of LN and MgLN is in the range of hundred nanometers. The birefringent and ferroelectric properties of the medium (i.e ordinary, extraordinary refractive indices and electric dipole moment) is given due considerations in the formulation of photonic band gap. Effect of electronic transition dipole moment of the medium on photonic band gap is also taken into account. We find that photonic band gap can be modified by the variation in the ratio of the width of two medium. We explain our findings by obtaining numerical values and the effect on the photonic band gap due to variation in the ratio of alternate medium is shown graphically

  17. Modulation of the band structure in bilayer zigzag graphene nanoribbons on hexagonal boron nitride using the force and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyasov, V.V.; Nguyen, Chuong V.; Ershov, I.V.; Nguyen, Chien D.; Hieu, Nguyen N.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of semiconductor–halfmetal–metal transition in the antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering of bilayer zigzag graphene nanoribbons (BZGNRs) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructure using the external force field F ext and transverse electric fields E ext (in the presence of interaction with the substrate) was performed within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). We established critical values of E ext and interlayer distance in the bilayer providing for semiconductor–halfmetal–metal transition in one of electron spin configurations. Our calculations also show that the energy gap E g in the AF-BZGNR/h-BN(0001) heterostructure can be controlled in a wide range of the F ext and E ext . This makes the AF-8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001) heterostructure being potentially promising for application in spintronic devices. - Highlights: • We used DFT to examine the opportunities for modulation of the band structure in AF-8-BZGNR/h-BN(0001). • We estimated the critical values of the F ext and E ext providing for SC-HM-M transition. • The energy gap in the AF-BZGNR/h-BN(0001) can be monitored in a wide range of the F ext and E ext

  18. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Philip M., E-mail: philip.campbell@gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Vogel, Eric M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Ready, W. Jud [Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  19. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  20. Performance comparison of hydrological model structures during low flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, Maria; Stahl, Kerstin; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Clark, Martyn P.; Seibert, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Low flows are still poorly reproduced by common hydrological models since they are traditionally designed to meet peak flow situations best possible. As low flow becomes increasingly important to several target areas there is a need to improve available models. We present a study that assesses the impact of model structure on low flow simulations. This is done using the Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE), which identifies the set of (subjective) decisions made when building a hydrological model, and provides multiple options for each modeling decision. 79 models were built using the FUSE framework, and applied to simulate stream flows in the Narsjø catchment in Norway (119 km²). To allow comparison all new models were calibrated using an automatic optimization method. Low flow and recession analysis of the new models enables us to evaluate model performance focusing on different aspects by using various objective functions. Additionally, model structures responsible for poor performance, and hence unsuitable, can be detected. We focused on elucidating model performance during summer (August - October) and winter low flows which evolve from entirely different hydrological processes in the Narsjø catchment. Summer low flows develop out of a lack of precipitation while winter low flows are due to water storage in ice and snow. The results showed that simulations of summer low flows were throughout poorer than simulations of winter low flows when evaluating with an objective function focusing on low flows; here, the model structure influencing winter low flow simulations is the lower layer architecture. Different model structures were found to influence model performance during the summer season. The choice of other objective functions has the potential to affect such an evaluation. These findings call for the use of different model structures tailored to particular needs.

  1. A comparison of two instructional methods for drawing Lewis Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Kari

    Two instructional methods for teaching Lewis structures were compared -- the Direct Octet Rule Method (DORM) and the Commonly Accepted Method (CAM). The DORM gives the number of bonds and the number of nonbonding electrons immediately, while the CAM involves moving electron pairs from nonbonding to bonding electrons, if necessary. The research question was as follows: Will high school chemistry students draw more accurate Lewis structures using the DORM or the CAM? Students in Regular Chemistry 1 (N = 23), Honors Chemistry 1 (N = 51) and Chemistry 2 (N = 15) at an urban high school were the study participants. An identical pretest and posttest was given before and after instruction. Students were given instruction with either the DORM (N = 45), the treatment method, or the CAM (N = 44), the control for two days. After the posttest, 15 students were interviewed, using a semistructured interview process. The pretest/posttest consisted of 23 numerical response questions and 2 to 6 free response questions that were graded using a rubric. A two-way ANOVA showed a significant interaction effect between the groups and the methods, F (1, 70) = 10.960, p = 0.001. Post hoc comparisons using the Bonferroni pairwise comparison showed that Reg Chem 1 students demonstrated larger gain scores when they had been taught the CAM (Mean difference = 3.275, SE = 1.324, p learning the DORM (Mean difference = 1.931, SE = 0.848, p working memory, and better metacognitive skills. Regular Chemistry 1 students performed better with the CAM, perhaps because it is more visual. Teachers may want to use the CAM or a direct-pairing method to introduce the topic and use the DORM in advanced classes when a correct structure is needed quickly.

  2. A simple and fast heuristic for protein structure comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Vega Marcos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure comparison is a key problem in bioinformatics. There exist several methods for doing protein comparison, being the solution of the Maximum Contact Map Overlap problem (MAX-CMO one of the alternatives available. Although this problem may be solved using exact algorithms, researchers require approximate algorithms that obtain good quality solutions using less computational resources than the formers. Results We propose a variable neighborhood search metaheuristic for solving MAX-CMO. We analyze this strategy in two aspects: 1 from an optimization point of view the strategy is tested on two different datasets, obtaining an error of 3.5%(over 2702 pairs and 1.7% (over 161 pairs with respect to optimal values; thus leading to high accurate solutions in a simpler and less expensive way than exact algorithms; 2 in terms of protein structure classification, we conduct experiments on three datasets and show that is feasible to detect structural similarities at SCOP's family and CATH's architecture levels using normalized overlap values. Some limitations and the role of normalization are outlined for doing classification at SCOP's fold level. Conclusion We designed, implemented and tested.a new tool for solving MAX-CMO, based on a well-known metaheuristic technique. The good balance between solution's quality and computational effort makes it a valuable tool. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the MAX-CMO measure is tested at SCOP's fold and CATH's architecture levels with encouraging results. Software is available for download at http://modo.ugr.es/jrgonzalez/msvns4maxcmo.

  3. Band alignment studies of Al2O3/CuGaO2 and ZnO/CuGaO2 hetero-structures grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajimsha, R.S.; Das, Amit K.; Joshi, M.P.; Kukreja, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Band offset studies at the interface of Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 and ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structures were performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • Valance band offsets (VBO) of these hetero-structures were obtained from respective XPS peak positions and VB spectra using Kraut's equation. • Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 interface exhibited a type I band alignment with valance band offset (VBO) of 4.05 eV whereas type II band alignment was observed in ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structure with a VBO of 2.32 eV. • Schematic band alignment diagram for the interface of these hetero-structures has been constructed. • Band offset and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining insight to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such hetero-structures. - Abstract: We have studied the band offset and alignment of pulsed laser deposited Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 and ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structures using photoelectron spectroscopy. Al 2 O 3 /CuGaO 2 interface exhibited a type I band alignment with valance band offset (VBO) of 4.05 eV whereas type II band alignment was observed in ZnO/CuGaO 2 hetero-structure with a VBO of 2.32 eV. Schematic band alignment diagram for the interface of these hetero-structures has been constructed. Band offset and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining insight to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such hetero-structures

  4. Effects of side-chain and electron exchange correlation on the band structure of perylene diimide liquid crystals: a density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, J T; Lima, M P; Fazzio, A; Xiang, H; Wei, Su-Huai; Dalpian, G M

    2009-04-23

    The structural and electronic properties of perylene diimide liquid crystal PPEEB are studied using ab initio methods based on the density functional theory (DFT). Using available experimental crystallographic data as a guide, we propose a detailed structural model for the packing of solid PPEEB. We find that due to the localized nature of the band edge wave function, theoretical approaches beyond the standard method, such as hybrid functional (PBE0), are required to correctly characterize the band structure of this material. Moreover, unlike previous assumptions, we observe the formation of hydrogen bonds between the side chains of different molecules, which leads to a dispersion of the energy levels. This result indicates that the side chains of the molecular crystal not only are responsible for its structural conformation but also can be used for tuning the electronic and optical properties of these materials.

  5. Quasiparticle self-consistent GW calculations for PbS, PbSe, and PbTe: Band structure and pressure coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede; Cardona,, M.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic band structures of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe in the rocksalt structure are calculated with the quasiparticle self-consistent GW (QSGW) approach with spin-orbit coupling included. The semiconducting gaps and their deformation potentials as well as the effective masses are obtained. The GW...... approximation provides a correct description of the electronic structure around the gap, in contrast to the local-density approximation, which leads to inverted gaps in the lead chalcogenides. The QSGW calculations are in good quantitative agreement with experimental values of the gaps and masses. At moderate...... hole doping a complex filamental Fermi-surface structure develops with ensuing large density of states. The pressure-induced gap closure leads to linear (Dirac-type) band dispersions around the L point....

  6. Comparison of reconfigurable structures for flexible word-length multiplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pfänder

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Binary multiplication continues to be one of the essential arithmetic operations in digital circuits. Even though field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs are becoming more and more powerful these days, the vendors cannot avoid implementing multiplications with high word-lengths using embedded blocks instead of configurable logic. But on the other hand, the circuit's efficiency decreases if the provided word-length of the hard-wired multipliers exceeds the precision requirements of the algorithm mapped into the FPGA. Thus it is beneficial to use multiplier blocks with configurable word-length, optimized for area, speed and power dissipation, e.g. regarding digital signal processing (DSP applications.

    In this contribution, we present different approaches and structures for the realization of a multiplication with variable precision and perform an objective comparison. This includes one approach based on a modified Baugh and Wooley algorithm and three structures using Booth's arithmetic operand recoding with different array structures. All modules have the option to compute signed two's complement fix-point numbers either as an individual computing unit or interconnected to a superior array. Therefore, a high throughput at low precision through parallelism, or a high precision through concatenation can be achieved.

  7. MODEL COMPARISON FOR THE DENSITY STRUCTURE ACROSS SOLAR CORONAL WAVEGUIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Soler, R., E-mail: iarregui@iac.es [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2015-10-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult, and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfvén travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared and their differences quantified. Then, the relative plausibility of the considered models was assessed by performing model comparison. Our results indicate that the evidence in favor of any of the three models is minimal, unless the oscillations are strongly damped. In such a circumstance, the application of model-averaging techniques enables the computation of an evidence-weighted inference that takes into account the plausibility of each model in the calculation of a combined inversion for the unknown physical parameters.

  8. A theoretical study of pressure-induced phase transitions and electronic band structure of anti-A-sesquioxide type {gamma}-Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Uttam; Joshi, Kunj Bihari, E-mail: k_joshi@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India)

    2011-06-29

    Structural parameters and electronic band structure of anti-A-sesquioxide (aAs) type {gamma}-Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} are presented following the first-principles linear combination of atomic orbitals method within the framework of a posteriori density-functional theory implemented in the CRYSTAL code. Pressure-induced phase transitions among the four polymorphs {alpha}, {beta}, cubic-{gamma} and aAs-{gamma} of Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} are examined. Enthalpy-pressure curves do not show the possibility of pressure-induced structural phase transition to the cubic-{gamma} phase. However, {alpha} {yields} aAs-{gamma} and {beta} {yields} aAs-{gamma} structural phase transitions are observed at 139 GPa and 93 GPa, respectively. Band structure calculations predict that aAs-{gamma} Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} is an indirect semiconductor with 4.73 eV bandgap at L point. Variation of bandgap with pressure and deformation potentials are studied for the {alpha}, {beta} and aAs-{gamma} polymorphs. Pressure-dependent band structure calculations reveal that, within the low-pressure limit, bandgaps of {beta} and aAs-{gamma} increase with pressure unlike {alpha}-Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

  9. Comparison of Tension-Band Wiring With the Cable Pin System in Patella Fractures: A Randomized Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qing-xian; Hai, Yong; Du, Xin-ru; Xu, Zi-yu; Lu, Tie; Shan, Lei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jun-lin

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcome of tension-band wiring (TBW) with the cable pin system (CPS) for transverse fractures of the patella. Randomized prospective study. Academic Level I trauma center. From February 2008 to December 2011, 73 consecutive patients with transverse fractures of the patella were prospectively enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: one group was treated using the CPS, and the other group was treated using the modified TBW. The clinical outcome assessment included analyses of the radiographic images, the modified Hospital for Special Surgery scoring system, and complications. The follow-up time ranged from 12 to 29 months. All fractures healed, with a union rate of 100%. The fracture healing time was significantly shorter in the CPS group (8.51 ± 2.59 weeks, n = 34) compared with the TBW group (11.79 ± 3.04 weeks, n = 39). Postoperative complications in the CPS and TBW groups were observed in 1 and 9 patients, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant. The mean Hospital for Special Surgery score for the CPS group (90.53 ± 5.19 points) was significantly higher than that for the TBW group (81.36 ± 12.71 points). The CPS is a viable option for transverse fractures of the patella and is associated with a shorter healing time, fewer complications, and better function than TBW. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Karyotype evolution in Rhinolophus bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera) illuminated by cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Ao, Lei; Feng, Qing; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae) is the second most speciose genus in Chiroptera and has extensively diversified diploid chromosome numbers (from 2n = 28 to 62). In spite of many attempts to explore the karyotypic evolution of this genus, most studies have been based on conventional Giemsa staining rather than G-banding. Here we have made a whole set of chromosome-specific painting probes from flow-sorted chromosomes of Aselliscus stoliczkanus (Hipposideridae). These probes have been utilized to establish the first genome-wide homology maps among six Rhinolophus species with four different diploid chromosome numbers (2n = 36, 44, 58, and 62) and three species from other families: Rousettus leschenaulti (2n = 36, Pteropodidae), Hipposideros larvatus (2n = 32, Hipposideridae), and Myotis altarium (2n = 44, Vespertilionidae) by fluorescence in situ hybridization. To facilitate integration with published maps, human paints were also hybridized to A. stoliczkanus chromosomes. Our painting results substantiate the wide occurrence of whole-chromosome arm conservation in Rhinolophus bats and suggest that Robertsonian translocations of different combinations account for their karyotype differences. Parsimony analysis using chromosomal characters has provided some new insights into the Rhinolophus ancestral karyotype and phylogenetic relationships among these Rhinolophus species so far studied. In addition to Robertsonian translocations, our results suggest that whole-arm (reciprocal) translocations involving multiple non-homologous chromosomes as well could have been involved in the karyotypic evolution within Rhinolophus, in particular those bats with low and medium diploid numbers.

  11. Karyotypic evolution and phylogenetic relationships in the order Chiroptera as revealed by G-banding comparison and chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Lei; Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Gu, Xiaoming; Feng, Qing; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Bats are a unique but enigmatic group of mammals and have a world-wide distribution. The phylogenetic relationships of extant bats are far from being resolved. Here, we investigated the karyotypic relationships of representative species from four families of the order Chiroptera by comparative chromosome painting and banding. A complete set of painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Myotis myotis (family Vespertilionidae) were hybridized onto metaphases of Cynopterus sphinx (2n = 34, family Pteropodidae), Rhinolophus sinicus (2n=36, family Rhinolophidae) and Aselliscus stoliczkanus (2n=30, family Hipposideridae) and delimited 27, 30 and 25 conserved chromosomal segments in the three genomes, respectively. The results substantiate that Robertsonian translocation is the main mode of chromosome evolution in the order Chiroptera, with extensive conservation of whole chromosomal arms. The use of M. myotis (2n=44) probes has enabled the integration of C. sphinx, R. sinicus and A. stoliczkanus chromosomes into the previously established comparative maps between human and Eonycteris spelaea (2n=36), Rhinolophus mehelyi (2n=58), Hipposideros larvatus (2n=32), and M. myotis. Our results provide the first cytogenetic signature rearrangement that supports the grouping of Pteropodidae and Rhinolophoidea in a common clade (i.e. Pteropodiformes or Yinpterochiroptera) and thus improve our understanding on the karyotypic relationships and genome phylogeny of these bat species.

  12. Characterizing the dependence of vegetation model parameters on crop structure, incidence angle, and polarization at L-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneron, J-P.; Pardé, M.; Waldteufel, P.

    2004-01-01

    To retrieve soil moisture over vegetation-covered areas from microwave radiometry, it is necessary to account for vegetation effects. At L-band, many retrieval approaches are based on a simple model that relies on two vegetation parameters: the optical depth (tau) and the single-scattering albedo......, wheat, grass, and alfalfa) based on L-band experimental datasets. The results should be useful for developing more accurate forward modeling and retrieval methods over mixed pixels including a variety of vegetation types....

  13. Ku to V-band 4-bit MEMS phase shifter bank using high isolation SP4T switches and DMTL structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.; Poddar, Ajay K.; Rohde, Ulrich L.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) based on a wide-band 4-bit phase shifter using two back-to-back single-pole-four-throw (SP4T) switches and four different distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) structures that are implemented on 635 µm alumina substrate using surface micromachining process. An SP4T switch is designed with a series-shunt configuration and it demonstrates an average return loss of  >17 dB, an insertion loss of  28 dB up to 60 GHz. A maximum area of the SP4T switch is ~0.76 mm2. Single-pole-single-throw and SP4T switches are capable of handling 1 W of radio frequency (RF) power up to  >100 million cycles at 25° C; they can even sustained up to  >70 million cycles with 1 W at 85 °C. The proposed wide-band phase shifter works at 17 GHz (Ku-band), 25 GHz (K-band), 35 GHz (Ka-band) and 60 GHz (V-band) frequencies. Finally,a 4-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average insertion loss of  10 dB and maximum phase error of ~3.8° at 60 GHz frequency over 500 MHz bandwidth. Total area of the fabricated device is ~11 mm2. In addition, the proposed device works well up to  >107 cycles with 1 W of RF power. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the best reported wide-band MEMS 4-bit phase shifter in the literature that works with a constant resolution.

  14. Self-consistent calculations of energy band structure and thermomechanical properties of some transition metals and their refractory carbides by LMTO-ASA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, V.P.; Yarlborg, T.; Gubanov, V.A.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Self-consistent band structure calculations of V, Nb, VC, NbC, WC are carried out by the methods of LMTO and canonical Anderson zones with account for hybridization. The presence of an abnormally wide the 2pC-5dW-band and band of the 5d-states of tungsten below the Fermi level, predominantly, is found for WC. The crystal lattice constants, moduli of volume elasticity and sound velocities, Debye temperatures and melting temperatures are calculated. The results mainly correspond to the trends observed in the experiements. It is shown that a high VC elasticity is, basically, determined by hybridization of the metal s- and p-states with the carbon 2s- and 2p-states, while hybridization of the 5d-W- and 2pC-, 2sC-states makes the greatest contribution to the extreme elasticity

  15. Pulsed laser deposited BexZn1-xO1-ySy quaternary alloy films: structure, composition, and band gap bowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuzhong; Xu, Maji; Zhang, Mi; Cheng, Hailing; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Qingfeng; Lu, Yinmei; Chen, Jingwen; Chen, Changqing; He, Yunbin

    2018-03-01

    In this work, c-axis preferentially oriented BexZn1-xO1-ySy (BeZnOS) quaternary alloy films were prepared successfully on c-plane sapphire by pulsed laser deposition for the first time. By appropriate adjustment of O2 pressure during the deposition, the grown films exhibited a single-phase hexagonal structure and good crystalline quality. The solid solubility of S in BexZn1-xO1-ySy quaternary alloy was significantly expanded (y ≤ 0.17 or y ≥ 0.35) as a result of simultaneous substitution of cation Zn2+ by smaller Be2+ and anion O2- by bigger S2-. Besides, due to the introduction of BeO with a wide band gap, BeZnOS quaternary films exhibited wider band gaps than the ternary ZnOS films with similar S contents. As the O2 pressure increased from 0.05 Pa to 6 Pa, the band gap of BeZnOS displayed an interesting bowing behavior. The variation range of the band gap was between 3.55 eV and 3.10 eV. The BeZnOS films with a wide band gap show potential applications in fabricating optoelectronic devices such as UV-detectors.

  16. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients. A comparison between gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy with five years of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, Mario; Milone, Marco; Maietta, Paola; Bianco, Paolo; Coretti, Guido; Pisapia, Anna; Gaudioso, Dario; Milone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising progressively, even among elderly patients. Many studies investigated about safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery among aged obese patients. The objective of this review is to assess the benefits relative to risks of weight loss that may be obtained by performing two common bariatric procedures in obese elderly patient. We retrospectively evaluated 10 morbid obese patients older than 60 years reaching 5 years of follow up who respectively underwent Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) or Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB). Eventual changes in comorbidities, weight loss, EWL% were investigated. Although LSG patients required a longer postoperative hospital stay than LAGB patients (p elderly patients. Whereas all patients showed comorbidities resolution, no significant difference in weight loss between LAGB group and LSG group was found at 1 year (EWL% p = 0.87; BMI p = 0.32), 3 years (EWL% p = 0.62; BMI p = 0.79) and 5 years (EWL% p = 0.52; BMI p = 0.46) of follow up. Bariatric surgery is safe and effective to reach obesity related comorbidities resolution among elderly obese patients. Both LAGB and LSG determine a weight loss lesser than observed in a standard bariatric population. In this study LSG is significantly less cost effective than LAGB. Larger studies with longer follow up are however needed to evaluate the real impact of bariatric surgery on weight loss, resolution of comorbidities and improvement of quality of life in elderly obese patients. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Band-edge electronic structure of β-In2S3: the role of s or p orbitals of atoms at different lattice positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zongyan; Cao, Yuechan; Yi, Juan; He, Xijia; Ma, Chenshuo; Qiu, Jianbei

    2012-04-23

    As a promising solar-energy material, the electronic structure and optical properties of Beta phase indium sulfide (β-In(2)S(3)) are still not thoroughly understood. This paper devotes to solve these issues using density functional theory calculations. β-In(2)S(3) is found to be an indirect band gap semiconductor. The roles of its atoms at different lattice positions are not exactly identical because of the unique crystal structure. Additonally, a significant phenomenon of optical anisotropy was observed near the absorption edge. Owing to the low coordination numbers of the In3 and S2 atoms, the corresponding In3-5s states and S2-3p states are crucial for the composition of the band-edge electronic structure, leading to special optical properties and excellent optoelectronic performances. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Inter-Comparison of S-NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Using Hyperspectral Infrared Sounder Measurements as a Transfer Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the calibration consistency of the spectrally-matched thermal emissive bands (TEB between the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS and the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, using observations from their simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNO. Nearly-simultaneous hyperspectral measurements from the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder(AIRS and the S-NPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS are used to account for existing spectral response differences between MODIS and VIIRS TEB. The comparison uses VIIRS Sensor Data Records (SDR in MODIS five-minute granule format provided by the NASA Land Product and Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE and Aqua MODIS Collection 6 Level 1 B (L1B products. Each AIRS footprint of 13.5 km (or CrIS field of view of 14 km is co-located with multiple MODIS (or VIIRS pixels. The corresponding AIRS- and CrIS-simulated MODIS and VIIRS radiances are derived by convolutions based on sensor-dependent relative spectral response (RSR functions. The VIIRS and MODIS TEB calibration consistency is evaluated and the two sensors agreed within 0.2 K in brightness temperature. Additional factors affecting the comparison such as geolocation and atmospheric water vapor content are also discussed in this paper.

  19. A study of the structure of the ν1(HF) absorption band of the СH3СN…HF complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, E. I.; Glazachev, E. V.; Bulychev, V. P.; Koshevarnikov, A. M.; Tokhadze, K. G.

    2015-09-01

    The ν1(HF) absorption band shape of the CH3CN…HF complex is studied in the gas phase at a temperature of 293 K. The spectra of gas mixtures CH3CN/HF are recorded in the region of 4000-3400 cm-1 at a resolution from 0.1 to 0.005 cm-1 with a Bruker IFS-120 HR vacuum Fourier spectrometer in a cell 10 cm in length with wedge-shaped sapphire windows. The procedure used to separate the residual water absorption allows more than ten fine-structure bands to be recorded on the low-frequency wing of the ν1(HF) band. It is shown that the fine structure of the band is formed primarily due to hot transitions from excited states of the low-frequency ν7 librational vibration. Geometrical parameters of the equilibrium nuclear configuration, the binding energy, and the dipole moment of the complex are determined from a sufficiently accurate quantum-chemical calculation. The frequencies and intensities for a number of spectral transitions of this complex are obtained in the harmonic approximation and from variational solutions of anharmonic vibrational problems.

  20. Band structure and photocatalytic activities for H{sub 2} production of ABi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (A = Ca, Sr, Ba)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingxuan; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Hongjie; Lv, Zushun [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-04-15

    A new series of layered perovskite photocatalysts, ABi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (A = Ca, Sr, Ba), were synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-visible spectrometer. The results showed that the structure of ABi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (A = Ca, Sr) is orthorhombic, while that of BaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} is tetragonal. The band gaps of CaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, and BaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} were estimated to be 3.46, 3.43, and 3.30 eV, respectively. It was found from the electronic band structure study, using the density functional theory (DFT) with planewave basis, that the conduction bands of these photocatalysts mainly consist of Nb 4d + Bi 6p + O 2p orbitals and the valence bands are composed of hybridization with O 2p + Nb 4d + Bi 6s orbitals. The photocatalytic activities for water splitting were investigated under UV-light irradiation and indicated that these photocatalysts showed photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} evolution from aqueous solutions containing sacrificial reagents (methanol and Ag{sup +}). (author)