WorldWideScience

Sample records for band radar holographic

  1. Ultra wide band radar holographic imaging of buried waste at DOE sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Gribble, R.P.; Hall, T.E.; Lechelt, W.M.

    1995-04-01

    Ultra wideband linear array holography is a unique real-time imaging technique for in-situ inspection of buried waste at various DOE sites. The array can be mounted on various platforms such as crane booms, pickup trucks, ATVs, and scanned generating ''3-D'' subsurface images in real time. Inspection speeds are 0.5 to 2 meters/sec, if the image is viewed in real time, greater for off-line processing. The Ground Penetrating Holographic (GPH) system developed for inspection of DOE sites employs two 32element arrays of tapered-slot antenna operating at 5-GHz and 2.5-GHz center frequencies. The GPH system, which is mounted on a small trailer with a computer image processor, display, and power supply, is capable of imaging a wide swath (1 to 2 meters) with its linear arrays. The lower frequency array will be used at INEL (for greater depth penetration) because of high soil attenuation. Recent holographic ''3-D'' images of buried waste container lids and dielectrics obtained in Hanford sand and INEL soils at various depths graphically illustrate the unique image resolution capabilities of the system. Experimental results using the 5-GHz array will be presented showing the excellent holographic image quality of various subsurface targets in sand and INEL soil

  2. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  3. S-Band Doppler Wave Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezong Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel shore-based S-band microwave Doppler coherent wave radar (Microwave Ocean Remote SEnsor (MORSE is designed to improve wave measurements. Marine radars, which operate in the X band, have been widely used for ocean monitoring because of their low cost, small size and flexibility. However, because of the non-coherent measurements and strong absorption of X-band radio waves by rain, these radar systems suffer considerable performance loss in moist weather. Furthermore, frequent calibrations to modify the modulation transfer function are required. To overcome these shortcomings, MORSE, which operates in the S band, was developed by Wuhan University. Because of the coherent measurements of this sensor, it is able to measure the radial velocity of water particles via the Doppler effect. Then the relation between the velocity spectrum and wave height spectrum can be used to obtain the wave height spectra. Finally, wave parameters are estimated from the wave height spectra by the spectrum moment method. Comparisons between MORSE and Waverider MKIII are conducted in this study, and the results, including the non-directional wave height spectra, significant wave height and average wave period, are calculated and displayed. The correlation coefficient of the significant wave height is larger than 0.9, whereas that of the average wave period is approximately 0.4, demonstrating the effectiveness of MORSE for the continuous monitoring of ocean areas with high accuracy.

  4. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  5. W-band Solid State Transceiver for Cloud Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed effort seeks to develop a solid state power amplifier (SSPA)-based W-band cloud radar transceiver and demonstrate it on the GSFC airborne Cloud Radar...

  6. Digital Conically Scanned L-Band Radar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort seeks to develop a digitally steered polarimetric phased array L-Band radar utilizing a novel, high performance architecture leveraging recent...

  7. Digital Conically Scanned L-Band Radar, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort seeks to develop a digitally steered polarimetric phased array L-Band radar utilizing a novel, high performance architecture leveraging recent...

  8. Three Band Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design and demonstrate key enabling technologies for Cloud and Precipitation radars capable of closing the observational gaps left by current and...

  9. Development of Method for X-band Weather Radar Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Calibration of the X-band LAWR (Local Area Weather Radar) is traditionally based on an assumed linear relation between the LAWRradar output and the rainfall intensity. However, closer inspections of the data reveal that the validity of this linear assumption is doubtful. Previous studies of this ......Calibration of the X-band LAWR (Local Area Weather Radar) is traditionally based on an assumed linear relation between the LAWRradar output and the rainfall intensity. However, closer inspections of the data reveal that the validity of this linear assumption is doubtful. Previous studies...... of this type of weather radar have also illustrated that the radar commonly has difficulties in estimating high rain rates. Therefore, a new radar–rainfall transformation model and a calibration method have been developed. The new method is based on nonlinear assumptions and is aimed at describing the whole...

  10. Reconfigurable, Wideband Radar Transceiver and Antenna for P-band Stretch Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IAI proposes to develop a Reconfigurable Wideband Radar Transceiver, with direct digital synthesis of P-band radar frequencies, novel high bandwidth P-band antenna...

  11. CAMEX-4 NASA PORTABLE S-BAND MULTIPARAMETER WX RESEARCH RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 NASA Portable S-Band Multiparameter WX Research Radar dataset was collected by the NASA Portable S-band Multiparameter Weather Research Radar (NPOL),...

  12. CAMEX-4 NASA PORTABLE S-BAND MULTIPARAMETER WX RESEARCH RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Portable S-band Multiparameter Weather Research Radar (NPOL) is a Doppler S-band radar that when used continuous operation provides a full volume scan every...

  13. CAMEX-4 MOBILE X-BAND POLARIMETRIC WEATHER RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 Mobile X-Band Polarimetric Weather Radar dataset was collected by the Mobile X-band Polarimetric Weather Radar on Wheels (X-POW), which is a Doppler...

  14. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  15. High efficiency switching power amplifiers for multi-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Jarred; Wells, Justin; Mendez, Sal; Wurth, Tim

    2012-06-01

    The reduction of size, weight, power, and cost (SWaP-C) of radio frequency (RF) components is becoming increasingly important to meet industry requirements. In meeting the SWaP-C objectives, RF components will be required to be smaller and more power efficient than the current state- of- the- art while sustaining high performance functionality. In compliance with SWaP-C and high performance functionality is a High Efficiency Switching Power Amplifier. This study focuses on the more efficient breed of switching power amplifiers (PAs), particularly the Class F PA with new techniques to operate broadband on multiple radar bands. Efficiencies in the range of 60% to 80% for Class F PAs have been reported in literature; however, this efficiency is only attainable over narrow bandwidths on the order of 10%. Several innovative techniques have been identified to increase the efficiency and operational bandwidth of RF power amplifiers (PAs) for radar applications. The amplifier design also incorporates fast turn on and turn off circuits to achieve switching times of less than one microsecond (μs). This enables the PA to be switched off during the receive period to prevent self-generated noise from corrupting the received signal. Also, high-power transmit and receive (T/R) switches at the antenna feed can be eliminated. A wideband PA enables the design of a multi-band radar, reducing the number of components needed for operation in the L and X bands. A high efficiency PA is also key to reducing battery size and cooling requirements in radar applications.

  16. X-Band to W-Band Doppler Radar Using Reconfigurable RF T/R MMIC Series, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TLC demonstrated a high performance remote Doppler Radar adjustable X-band to W-band transceiver chip that can perform well as a FMCW, super-heterodyne or pulse...

  17. CAMEX-4 MOBILE X-BAND POLARIMETRIC WEATHER RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mobile X-band Polarimetric Weather Radar on Wheels (X-POW)is a Doppler scanning radar operating at 9.3 GHz.with horizontal and vertical polarization. Used for...

  18. Reconfigurable L-band Radar Transceiver using Digital Signal Synthesis, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IAI proposes to develop a reconfigurable L-band radar transceiver module. The emphasis will be to implement most of critical radar functionalities like: • Baseband...

  19. Urban High-Resolution Precipitation Product: Combining C-Band and Local X-Band Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfeld, Katharina; Clemens, Marco; Münster, Hans; Ament, Felix

    2014-05-01

    Modelling precipitation induced floods and their impact on flood-prone regions is one of the biggest challenges for hydrometeorological forecasters. The largest source of error in flood forecasting systems is uncertainty in precipitation estimation. In state of the art rainfall-runoff models, precipitation fields from C-band radars are used as input with temporal resolution in the order of 5 minutes and spatial resolution in the order of kilometres. These radars cannot observe the small scale structure of rain events that influences runoff especially in impermeable urban areas. Therefore, precipitation fields with higher spatial and temporal resolution would improve flood forecasting. In recent years radar systems operating in the X-band frequency range have been developed to provide precipitation fields for areas of special interest in higher temporal (1 min or below) and higher spatial resolution (250 m or below) in complementation to nationwide radar networks. However single X-band radars are highly influenced by attenuation. Within the project Precipitation and Attenuation Estimates from a High-Resolution Weather Radar Network (PATTERN) the University of Hamburg and the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology operate a single X-band radar covering the city of Hamburg, Germany. The radar provides precipitation fields with temporal resolution of 30 s and range resolution of 60 m. The area is also covered by the C-band radar Fuhlsbüttel operated by the German Weather Service (DWD) that gives precipitation estimates with a temporal resolution of 5 min and a range resolution of 1 km. We will introduce a method to merge the precipitation fields derived from the X-band radar into the precipitation field provided by the C-band radar Fuhlsbüttel. The observations of radar Fuhlsbüttel will also be integrated in the correction of the attenuated measurements of the X-band radar. The merged precipitation field of both radars will be a valid product to improve rainfall

  20. Heavy Rainfall Monitoring by Polarimetric C-Band Weather Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cremonini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Piemonte region, in the north-western Italy, is characterized by complex orography and Mediterranean influence that often causes extreme rainfall event, during the warm season. Although the region is monitored by a dense gauge network (more than one gauge per 100 km2, the ground measurements are often inadequate to properly observe intense and highly variable precipitations. Polarimetric weather radars provide a unique way to monitor rainfall over wide areas, with the required spatial detail and temporal resolution. Nevertheless, most European weather radar networks are operating at C-band, which may seriously limit quantitative precipitation estimation in heavy rainfall due to relevant power signal attenuation. Phase measurements, unlike power measurements, are not affected by signal attenuation. For this reason, polarimetric radars, for which the differential phase shift measurements are available, provide an additional way in which to estimate precipitation, which is immune to signal attenuation. In this work differential phase based rainfall estimation techniques are applied to analyze two flash-floods: the first one occurred on the Ligurian Apennines on 16 August 2006 and the second occurred on 13 September 2008, causing rain accumulations above 270 mm in few hours.

  1. Determining Tidal Phase Differences from X-Band Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kieran; Bell, Paul; Brown, Jennifer; Plater, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Introduction Previous work by Bell et. al. (2016) has developed a method using X-band marine radar to measure intertidal bathymetry, using the waterline as a level over a spring-neap tidal cycle. This has been used in the Dee Estuary to give a good representation of the bathymetry in the area. However, there are some sources of inaccuracy in the method, as a uniform spatial tidal signal is assumed over the entire domain. Motivation The method used by Bell et. al. (2016) applies a spatially uniform tidal signal to the entire domain. This fails to account for fine-scale variations in water level and tidal phase. While methods are being developed to account for small-scale water level variations using high resolution modelling, a method to determine tidal phase variations directly from the radar intensity images could be advantageous operationally. Methods The tidal phase has been computed using two different methods, with hourly averaged images from 2008. In the first method, the cross-correlation between each raw pixel time series and a tidal signal at a number of lags is calculated, and the lag with the highest correlation to the pixel series is recorded. For the second method, the same method of correlation is used on signals generated by tracking movement of buoys, which show up strongly in the radar image as they move on their moorings with the tidal currents. There is a broad agreement between the two methods, but validation is needed to determine the relative accuracy. The phase has also been calculated using a Fourier decomposition, and agrees broadly with the above methods. Work also needs to be done to separate areas where the recorded phase is due to tidal current (mostly subtidal areas) or due to elevation (mostly the wetting/drying signal in intertidal areas), by classifying radar intensities by the phases and amplitudes of the tides. Filtering out signal variations due to wind strength and attenuation of the radar signal will also be applied. Validation

  2. Ku band - The first year of operation. [Shuttle Orbiter integrated communication and radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J. W.; Haddad, H.; Magnusson, H. G.; Mohler, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter's Ku-band integrated radar and communications system furnishes the preferred link through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TRDS), providing rendezvous radar function. During the first year of operations, communications through TRDS provided a channel for the 48 Mbps data from Spacelab. Attention is presently given to the most significant activities of the radar during its initial year.

  3. Intercomparison of attenuation correction algorithms for single-polarized X-band radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfeld, K.; Berenguer, M.; Sempere Torres, D.

    2018-03-01

    Attenuation due to liquid water is one of the largest uncertainties in radar observations. The effects of attenuation are generally inversely proportional to the wavelength, i.e. observations from X-band radars are more affected by attenuation than those from C- or S-band systems. On the other hand, X-band radars can measure precipitation fields in higher temporal and spatial resolution and are more mobile and easier to install due to smaller antennas. A first algorithm for attenuation correction in single-polarized systems was proposed by Hitschfeld and Bordan (1954) (HB), but it gets unstable in case of small errors (e.g. in the radar calibration) and strong attenuation. Therefore, methods have been developed that restrict attenuation correction to keep the algorithm stable, using e.g. surface echoes (for space-borne radars) and mountain returns (for ground radars) as a final value (FV), or adjustment of the radar constant (C) or the coefficient α. In the absence of mountain returns, measurements from C- or S-band radars can be used to constrain the correction. All these methods are based on the statistical relation between reflectivity and specific attenuation. Another way to correct for attenuation in X-band radar observations is to use additional information from less attenuated radar systems, e.g. the ratio between X-band and C- or S-band radar measurements. Lengfeld et al. (2016) proposed such a method based isotonic regression of the ratio between X- and C-band radar observations along the radar beam. This study presents a comparison of the original HB algorithm and three algorithms based on the statistical relation between reflectivity and specific attenuation as well as two methods implementing additional information of C-band radar measurements. Their performance in two precipitation events (one mainly convective and the other one stratiform) shows that a restriction of the HB is necessary to avoid instabilities. A comparison with vertically pointing

  4. Development and Application of integrated monitoring platform for the Doppler Weather SA-BAND Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Sun, J.; Zhao, C. C.; Chen, H. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The doppler weather SA-band radar is an important part of modern meteorological observation methods, monitoring the running status of radar and the data transmission is important.This paper introduced the composition of radar system and classification of radar data,analysed the characteristics and laws of the radar when is normal or abnormal. Using Macromedia Dreamweaver and PHP, developed the integrated monitoring platform for the doppler weather SA-band radar which could monitor the real-time radar system running status and important performance indicators such as radar power,status parameters and others on Web page,and when the status is abnormal it will trigger the audio alarm.

  5. Conceptual design of high power Ka-band radar transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Alaudin; Hoppe, Daniel; Gillis, Peter

    1986-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design of a 400-kW CW Ka-band transmitter and associated microwave components to be used for planetary radar and serve as a prototype for future spacecraft uplinks is discussed. System requirements for such a transmitter are presented. Performance of the proposed high-power millimeter-wave tube, the gyroklystron, is discussed. Parameters of the proposed power amplifier, beam supply, and monitor and control devices are also presented. Microwave transmission-line components consisting of signal-monitoring devices, mode converter, and an overmoded corrugated feed are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology to meet the system requirements is given, and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  6. Performance of high-resolution X-band radar for rainfall measurement in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. van de Beek

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an analysis of 195 rainfall events gathered with the X-band weather radar SOLIDAR and a tipping bucket rain gauge network near Delft, The Netherlands, between May 1993 and April 1994. The aim of this paper is to present a thorough analysis of a climatological dataset using a high spatial (120 m and temporal (16 s resolution X-band radar. This makes it a study of the potential for high-resolution rainfall measurements with non-polarimetric X-band radar over flat terrain. An appropriate radar reflectivity – rain rate relation is derived from measurements of raindrop size distributions and compared with radar – rain gauge data. The radar calibration is assessed using a long-term comparison of rain gauge measurements with corresponding radar reflectivities as well as by analyzing the evolution of the stability of ground clutter areas over time. Three different methods for ground clutter correction as well as the effectiveness of forward and backward attenuation correction algorithms have been studied. Five individual rainfall events are discussed in detail to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of high-resolution X-band radar and the effectiveness of the presented correction methods. X-band radar is found to be able to measure the space-time variation of rainfall at high resolution, far greater than what can be achieved by rain gauge networks or a typical operational C-band weather radar. On the other hand, SOLIDAR can suffer from receiver saturation, wet radome attenuation as well as signal loss along the path. During very strong convective situations the signal can even be lost completely. In combination with several rain gauges for quality control, high resolution X-band radar is considered to be suitable for rainfall monitoring over relatively small (urban catchments. These results offer great prospects for the new high resolution polarimetric doppler X-band radar IDRA.

  7. Ku/Ka-Band Electrically-Scanned Line Array for Tri-Band Cloud and Precipitation Radar Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed program addresses the need for a spaceborne phased array radar system that operates simultaneously at multiple frequency bands for future NASA remote...

  8. Ku/Ka-band electrically-scanned line array for tri-band cloud and precipitation radar applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A spaceborne radar system that operates simultaneously at multiple frequency bands from microwave through millimeter-wave frequencies can exploit the largely varying...

  9. Challenges in X-band Weather Radar Data Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Application of weather radar data in urban hydrology is evolving and radar data is now applied for both modelling, analysis and real time control purposes. In these contexts, it is all-important that the radar data well calibrated and adjusted in order to obtain valid quantitative precipitation...

  10. Marine X-band Weather Radar Data Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of weather radar data in urban hydrology is evolving and radar data is now applied for both modelling, analysis, and real time control purposes. In these contexts, it is allimportant that the radar data is well calibrated and adjusted in order to obtain valid quantitative precipitation...

  11. Quantitative analysis of X-band weather radar attenuation correction accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2006-01-01

    At short wavelengths, especially C-, X-, and K-band, weather radar signals arc attenuated by the precipitation along their paths. This constitutes a major source of error for radar rainfall estimation, in particular for intense precipitation. A recently developed stochastic simulator of range

  12. AMBER: An X-band FMCW digital beam forming synthetic aperture radar for a tactical UAV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, M.W. van der; Otten, M.P.G.; Huizing, A.G.; Tan, R.G.; Caro Cuenca, M.; Ruizenaar, M.G.A.

    2013-01-01

    An X-band Digital Array Synthetic Aperture Radar for a Short Range Tactical UAV is presented. This system is demonstrated on a manned helicopter and motor glider. The Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave radar principle in combination with digital beam forming over 24 receive channels is used to meet

  13. GPM Ground Validation NASA S-Band Dual Polarimetric (NPOL) Doppler Radar OLYMPEX V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NASA S-Band Dual Polarimetric (NPOL) Doppler Radar OLYMPEX V2 dataset consists of rain rate, reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and other...

  14. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NASA S-BAND DUAL POLARIMETRIC (NPOL) DOPPLER RADAR IFLOODS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NASA S-Band Dual Polarimetric (NPOL) Doppler Radar IFloodS data set was collected from April 30, 2013 to June 16, 2013 near Traer, Iowa as...

  15. GPM GROUND VALIDATION IOWA X-BAND POLARIMETRIC MOBILE DOPPLER WEATHER RADARS IFLOODS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Iowa X-band Polarimetric Mobile Doppler Weather Radars IFloodS dataset was gathered during the IFloodS campaign from April to June 2013...

  16. GPM GROUND VALIDATION MCGILL W-BAND RADAR GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation McGill W-Band Radar GCPEx dataset was collected from February 1, 2012 to February 29, 2012 at the CARE site in Ontario, Canada as a part of...

  17. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DUAL POLARIZED C-BAND DOPPLER RADAR KING CITY GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Dual Polarized C-Band Doppler Radar King City GCPEx dataset has special Range Height Indicator (RHI) and sector scans of several dual...

  18. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ACHIEVE W-BAND CLOUD RADAR IPHEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation ACHIEVE W-Band Cloud Radar IPHEx dataset was gathered during the GPM Ground Validation Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment...

  19. GPM Ground Validation NOAA X-band Polarimetric Radar (NOXP) IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NOAA X-band dual-Polarimetric radar (NOXP) IPHEx dataset consists of differential reflectivity, differential phase shift, co-polar cross...

  20. System Realization of Broad Band Digital Beam Forming for Digital Array Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad band Digital Beam Forming (DBF is the key technique for the realization of Digital Array Radar (DAR. We propose the method of combination realization of the channel equalization and DBF time delay filter function by using adaptive Sample Matrix Inversion algorithm. The broad band DBF function is realized on a new DBF module based on parallel fiber optic engines and Field Program Gate Array (FPGA. Good performance is achieved when it is used to some radar products.

  1. P-band radar ice sounding in Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Kusk, Anders; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2012-01-01

    In February 2011, the Polarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder (POLARIS) was flown in Antarctica in order to assess the feasibility of a potential space-based radar ice sounding mission. The campaign has demonstrated that the basal return is detectable in areas with up to 3 km thick cold ice, in a...

  2. Correlation of S-Band Weather Radar Reflectivity and ACTS Propagation Data in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Eric E.; Flikkema, Paul G.; Henning, Rudolf E.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that Ka-band attenuation due to rainfall and corresponding S-band reflectivity are highly correlated. This paper reports on work whose goal is to determine the feasibility of estimation and, by extension, prediction of one parameter from the other using the Florida ACTS propagation terminal (APT) and the nearby WSR-88D S-band Doppler weather radar facility operated by the National Weather Service. This work is distinguished from previous efforts in this area by (1) the use of a single-polarized radar, preventing estimation of the drop size distribution (e.g., with dual polarization) and (2) the fact that the radar and APT sites are not co-located. Our approach consists of locating the radar volume elements along the satellite slant path and then, from measured reflectivity, estimating the specific attenuation for each associated path segment. The sum of these contributions yields an estimation of the millimeter-wave attenuation on the space-ground link. Seven days of data from both systems are analyzed using this procedure. The results indicate that definite correlation of S-band reflectivity and Ka-band attenuation exists even under the restriciton of this experiment. Based on these results, it appears possible to estimate Ka-band attenuation using widely available operational weather radar data. Conversely, it may be possible to augment current radar reflectivity data and coverage with low-cost attenuation or sky temperature data to improve the estimation of rain rates.

  3. Ocean Wind and Wave Measurements Using X-Band Marine Radar: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ocean wind and wave parameters can be measured by in-situ sensors such as anemometers and buoys. Since the 1980s, X-band marine radar has evolved as one of the remote sensing instruments for such purposes since its sea surface images contain considerable wind and wave information. The maturity and accuracy of X-band marine radar wind and wave measurements have already enabled relevant commercial products to be used in real-world applications. The goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the state of the art algorithms for ocean wind and wave information extraction from X-band marine radar data. Wind measurements are mainly based on the dependence of radar image intensities on wind direction and speed. Wave parameters can be obtained from radar-derived wave spectra or radar image textures for non-coherent radar and from surface radial velocity for coherent radar. In this review, the principles of the methodologies are described, the performances are compared, and the pros and cons are discussed. Specifically, recent developments for wind and wave measurements are highlighted. These include the mitigation of rain effects on wind measurements and wave height estimation without external calibrations. Finally, remaining challenges and future trends are discussed.

  4. Surface properties in West Africa from spaceborne radars in C and Ku bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatras, Christophe; Frappart, Frédéric; Mougin, Eric; Frison, Pierre-Louis; Faye, Gayane; Jarlan, Lionel

    2013-04-01

    We propose to compare the backscattering responses of land surfaces in West Africa for different radar spaceborne sensors: the nadir-looking radar altimeters and the side-looking radar scatterometers at different frequencies (Ku and C bands). The data used come from Envisat-RA2 measurements in Ku-band over the period 2003-2010 and the Jason-2 measurements in C band over mid-2008-2011 for radar altimetry, and from QuikSCAT - SeaWinds in Ku-band and Metop - ASCAT in C-band for radar scatterometry over the same time-spans. Along-track profiles and their temporal variations are analyzed and their behaviours are related to surfaces properties such as soil types, vegetation cover, and surface hydrology. Temporal variations of backscattering coefficients are extracted for main land covers along the bio-climatic transect (stone and sand deserts, saharo-sahelian, sahelian, and soudano-sahelian savannahs, tropical-seasonal and tropical forests) and compared to both rainfall estimates from TRMM and vegetation activity (NDVI) from MODIS. Range of variations of the backscattering signals are given for different surfaces and ecosystems along with delays between peaks of rainfall, backscattering responses of radar altimetry and scatterometry, and vegetation activity. The stability of the backscattering is also estimated over deserts and during the dry season over Sahelian environments. Finally, the complementarity of the different spaceborne sensors for continental surfaces monitoring is pointed out.

  5. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NASA S-BAND DUAL POLARIMETRIC (NPOL) DOPPLER RADAR MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NASA S-band Dual Polarimetric (NPOL) Doppler Radar MC3E dataset was collected by the NASA NPOL radar, which was developed by a research...

  6. Retrieval of Wind Speed Using an L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaldo, Frank M.; Thompson, Donald R.; Badger, Merete

    2007-01-01

    usefulness over the ocean. Most recent wind retrievals from spaceborne SARs have been at C-band for ERS-1/2, Radarsat, and Envisat. With the launch of the sophisticated multi- polarization Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) on the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS), we renew...

  7. Two-Port Dual-Band Microstrip Square-Ring Antenna for Radar Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puskely, J.; Yarovyi, O.; Roederer, A.G.; Mattes, Michael

    A novel two-port, dual-band square-ring microstrip antenna element for wide-angle scanning planar phased array is proposed. The two ports are used to operate the antenna array over the L and S radar bands. Microstrip square-ring radiators are chosen due to their smaller dimensions compared to the

  8. Airborn Ku-band polarimetric radar remote sensing of terrestrial snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon H. Yueh; Steve J. Dinardo; Ahmed Akgiray; Richard West; Donald W. Cline; Kelly Elder

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of the Ku-band polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT) data acquired from five sets of aircraft flights in the winter months of 2006-2008 for the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX-II) in Colorado are described in this paper. The data showed the response of the Ku-band radar echoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation in...

  9. Development and Observation of the Phase Array Radar at X band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushio, T.; Shimamura, S.; Wu, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kawasaki, Z.; Mizutani, F.; Wada, M.; Satoh, S.; Iguchi, T.

    2013-12-01

    A new Phased Array Radar (PAR) system for thunderstorm observation has been developed by Toshiba Corporation and Osaka University under a grant of NICT, and installed in Osaka University, Japan last year. It is now well known that rapidly evolving severe weather phenomena (e.g., microbursts, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes) are a threat to our lives particularly in a densely populated area and is closely related to the production of lightning discharges. Over the past decade, mechanically rotating radar systems at the C-band or S-band have been proved to be effective for weather surveillance especially in a wide area more than 100 km in range. However, severe thunderstorm sometimes develops rapidly on the temporal and spatial scales comparable to the resolution limit (-10 min. and -500m) of typical S-band or C-band radar systems, and cannot be fully resolved with these radar systems. In order to understand the fundamental process and dynamics of such fast changing weather phenomena like lightning and tornado producing thunderstorm, volumetric observations with both high temporal and spatial resolution are required. The phased array radar system developed has the unique capability of scanning the whole sky with 100m and 10 to 30 second resolution up to 60 km. The system adopts the digital beam forming technique for elevation scanning and mechanically rotates the array antenna in azimuth direction within 10 to 30 seconds. The radar transmits a broad beam of several degrees with 24 antenna elements and receives the back scattered signal with 128 elements digitizing at each elements. Then by digitally forming the beam in the signal processor, the fast scanning is realized. After the installation of the PAR system in Osaka University, the initial observation campaign was conducted in Osaka urban area with Ku-band Broad Band Radar (BBR) network, C-band weather radar, and lightning location system. The initial comparison with C band radar system shows that the developed

  10. Empirical Soil Moisture Estimation with Spaceborne L-band Polarimetric Radars: Aquarius, SMAP, and PALSAR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, M. S.; van Zyl, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally, substantial ancillary data is needed to parametrize complex electromagnetic models to estimate soil moisture from polarimetric radar data. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) baseline radar soil moisture retrieval algorithm uses a data cube approach, where a cube of radar backscatter values is calculated using sophisticated models. In this work, we utilize the empirical approach by Kim and van Zyl (2009) which is an optional SMAP radar soil moisture retrieval algorithm; it expresses radar backscatter of a vegetated scene as a linear function of soil moisture, hence eliminating the need for ancillary data. We use 2.5 years of L-band Aquarius radar and radiometer derived soil moisture data to determine two coefficients of a linear model function on a global scale. These coefficients are used to estimate soil moisture with 2.5 months of L-band SMAP and L-band PALSAR-2 data. The estimated soil moisture is compared with the SMAP Level 2 radiometer-only soil moisture product; the global unbiased RMSE of the SMAP derived soil moisture corresponds to 0.06-0.07 cm3/cm3. In this study, we leverage the three diverse L-band radar data sets to investigate the impact of pixel size and pixel heterogeneity on soil moisture estimation performance. Pixel sizes range from 100 km for Aquarius, over 3, 9, 36 km for SMAP, to 10m for PALSAR-2. Furthermore, we observe seasonal variation in the radar sensitivity to soil moisture which allows the identification and quantification of seasonally changing vegetation. Utilizing this information, we further improve the estimation performance. The research described in this paper is supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.

  11. X-Band local area weather radar--preliminary calibration results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, N E

    2002-01-01

    DHI has developed a cost-effective X-Band Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) with a typical range (radius) of 60 km, 500 x 500 m areal resolution and 253 reflection levels. The development is performed in a co-operation with a number of European partners, including Danish Meteorological Institute. The specifications of the weather radar and preliminary results from the calibration are presented. Good calibration results have been obtained using high-resolution rain gauges.

  12. Development of NASA's Next Generation L-Band Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Rafael; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, Seung-Kuk; Ranson, K. Jon; Marrero, Victor; Yeary, Mark

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Next generation Digital Beamforming SAR (DBSAR-2) is a state-of-the-art airborne L-band radar developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The instrument builds upon the advanced architectures in NASA's DBSAR-1 and EcoSAR instruments. The new instrument employs a 16-channel radar architecture characterized by multi-mode operation, software defined waveform generation, digital beamforming, and configurable radar parameters. The instrument has been design to support several disciplines in Earth and Planetary sciences. The instrument was recently completed, and tested and calibrated in a anechoic chamber.

  13. Ocean Wind and Wave Measurements Using X-Band Marine Radar: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Weimin Huang; Xinlong Liu; Eric W. Gill

    2017-01-01

    Ocean wind and wave parameters can be measured by in-situ sensors such as anemometers and buoys. Since the 1980s, X-band marine radar has evolved as one of the remote sensing instruments for such purposes since its sea surface images contain considerable wind and wave information. The maturity and accuracy of X-band marine radar wind and wave measurements have already enabled relevant commercial products to be used in real-world applications. The goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensi...

  14. High-resolution polarimetric X-band weather radar observations at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, T.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the horizontally scanning polarimetric X-band radar IDRA (IRCTR Drizzle Radar) was installed on top of the 213 m high mast at the Dutch meteorological observatory Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR) at Netherlands. This radar complements a large variety of measurement

  15. The lidar dark band: An oddity of the radar bright band analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Although much has sbeen learned from independent radar and lidar studies of atmospheric precipitations, occasionally supported by aircraft profiling, what has been lacking is combined optical, microwave, and insitu observations of the melting layer. Fortunately, the rainshowers on April 21, 1994, during the Remote Cloud Sensing intensive obervations Period (RCSIOP) at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation Testbed (CART) site provided an opportunity for coordinated dual-wavelength University of Utah Polarization Diversity Lidar, University of Massachusetts Cloud Profiling Radar System Doppler Radar, and the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft measurements.

  16. Characteristics of C-band meteorological radar echoes at Petrolina, Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Aragão, Maria Regina; Correia, Magaly De Fatima; Alves de Araújo, Heráclio

    2000-03-01

    A unique set of C-band meteorological radar echoes is analyzed. The data were obtained in Petrolina (9°24S, 40°30W), located in the semi-arid region of Northeast Brazil, from January to June 1985. The characteristics analyzed are echo areas, types and patterns.As in other tropical areas of the world, echoes with an area100 km2 dominated, making up 53% of the total number of echoes while echoes with 100 km2Petrolina surface and upper air data enable speculation that a system of frontal origin penetrating the radar area provided the dynamical forcing to form the bands in June. All five distinct patterns were more frequent in the southeast quadrant of the radar coverage. It is hypothesized that this preferential location may be explained, among other factors, by the interaction between the smooth relief and moisture advection by the southeasterly trade winds.

  17. Analysis of high resolution land clutter using an X-band radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Melebari, A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available . Measurements were performed with an X-band radar system with two instantaneous bandwidths of 40 MHz and 400 MHz. The clutter data was analyzed by fitting the amplitude Probability Distribution Function (PDF) to different distributions using the Method...

  18. Design of a Small, Low Cost, P-Band Airborne Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueras i Ventura, J.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study of the design of a small, low cost, P-band airborne, polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar desired by the Wageningen University and the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (BOS) to carry out forest biomass monitoring in Indonesia is presented. The requirements of the application

  19. Rancang Bangun Band Pass Filter Frekuensi 1.27 GHz untuk Teknologi Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIFAN FITRIANTO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAKSynthetic Apertur Radar (SAR adalah teknologi radar yang digunakan untuk pengambilan gambar suatu objek dalam bentuk 2 atau 3 dimensi (penginderaan jarak jauh. Sistem tersebut  bekerja pada rentang frekuensi 1.265 sampai dengan 1.275 GHZ dengan frekuensi tengahnya 1.27 GHz. Agar sistem SAR ini dapat bekerja dengan optimal, dibutuhkan suatu perangkat filter yang dapat meloloskan frekuensi yang diinginkan. Sebelumnya sudah ada penelitian yang membuat perangkat ini di band frekuensi yang sama namun menggunakan bahan duroid 5880 dan resonator berbentuk kotak. Bandpass filter Pada penelitian ini dirancang dengan menggunakan metode Hairpin line dan bahan epoxy FR4. Hasil pengukuran menunjukkan nilai Return Loss masih cukup besar yaitu -9.33 dB dan nilai Insertion Loss minimal sebesar -13.51 dB.Kata kunci: Syntethic Aperture Radar, Band Pass Filter, Hairpin-lineABSTRACTSynthetic Aperture Radar (SAR is a radar technology that used for taking an object in the form of 2 or 3 dimensions (remote sensing. It works in the frequency range 1.265 to 1.275 GHZ with a middle frequency of 1.27 GHz. SAR system can work optimally if it support a filter device that can pass the desired frequency. Previously there has been research that makes this device in the same frequency band but using 5885 duroid material and square resonator. Bandpass filter In this study designed using Hairpin line method and FR4 epoxy material. The measurement results of Return Loss values are still quite large  arround -9.33 dB and Insertion Loss minimum at -13.51 dB.Keywords: Syntethic Aperture Radar, Band Pass Filter, Hairpin line

  20. Fpga based L-band pulse doppler radar design and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savci, Kubilay

    As its name implies RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging) is an electromagnetic sensor used for detection and locating targets from their return signals. Radar systems propagate electromagnetic energy, from the antenna which is in part intercepted by an object. Objects reradiate a portion of energy which is captured by the radar receiver. The received signal is then processed for information extraction. Radar systems are widely used for surveillance, air security, navigation, weather hazard detection, as well as remote sensing applications. In this work, an FPGA based L-band Pulse Doppler radar prototype, which is used for target detection, localization and velocity calculation has been built and a general-purpose Pulse Doppler radar processor has been developed. This radar is a ground based stationary monopulse radar, which transmits a short pulse with a certain pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Return signals from the target are processed and information about their location and velocity is extracted. Discrete components are used for the transmitter and receiver chain. The hardware solution is based on Xilinx Virtex-6 ML605 FPGA board, responsible for the control of the radar system and the digital signal processing of the received signal, which involves Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detection and Pulse Doppler processing. The algorithm is implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK using the Xilinx System Generator for DSP tool. The field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) implementation of the radar system provides the flexibility of changing parameters such as the PRF and pulse length therefore it can be used with different radar configurations as well. A VHDL design has been developed for 1Gbit Ethernet connection to transfer digitized return signal and detection results to PC. An A-Scope software has been developed with C# programming language to display time domain radar signals and detection results on PC. Data are processed both in FPGA chip and on PC. FPGA uses fixed

  1. A High Efficiency 400W GaN Amplifier for X-Band Radar Remote Sensing Using >50 VDC FETs, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An efficient 400W amplifier for pulse spaceborne radar active remote sensing applications at X-Band will be investigated. Current X-band radar transmitters use TWT...

  2. A G-band 160 GHz T/R Module Concept for Planetary Landing Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, Lorene; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Pukala, David; Sadowy, Gregory; Pollard, Brian; Hodges, Richard

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the concept of a G-band transmit/receive (T/R) module centered at 160 GHz was discussed. The design makes use of state-of-the-art G-band MMIC low noise amplifiers and power amplifiers, and a high speed SPDT InGaAs PIN diode switch. The paper reports on the designs, chip results, and the integration concept for a 160 GHz T/R module. The G-band T/R module has applications toward precision altimetry and velocimetry measurements in landing radar, such as in future planetary landers on the surface of Mars

  3. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation. Deliverable test equipment evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronde, R. G.

    1980-07-01

    The Ku-band test equipment, known as the Deliverable System Test equipment (DSTE), is reviewed and evaluated. The DSTE is semiautomated and computer programs were generated for 14 communication mode tests and 17 radar mode tests. The 31 test modules provide a good cross section of tests with which to exercise the Ku-band system; however, it is very limited when being used to verify Ku-band system performance. More detailed test descriptions are needed, and a major area of concern is the DSTE sell-off procedure which is inadequate.

  4. ANALYSIS OF DEBRIS FLOW DISASTER DUE TO HEAVY RAIN BY X-BAND MP RADAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nishio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available On August 20 of 2014, Hiroshima City (Japan was struck by local heavy rain from an autumnal rain front. The resultant debris flow disaster claimed 75 victims and destroyed many buildings. From 1:30 am to 4:30 am on August 20, the accumulated rainfall in Hiroshima City exceeded 200 mm. Serious damage occurred in the Asakita and Asaminami wards of Hiroshima City. As a disaster prevention measure, local heavy rain (localized torrential rains is usually observed by the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA and by the C-band radar operated by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT of Japan, with spatial resolutions of 2.5 km and 1 km, respectively. The new X-band MP radar system enables more detailed rainfall observations than the C-band radar. In fact, this radar can observe local rainfall throughout Japan in near-real time over a minimum mesh size of 250 m. A fine-scale accumulated rainfall monitoring system is crucial for disaster prevention, and potential disasters can be alerted by the hazard levels of the accumulated rainfall.

  5. Formulation of a generalised switching CFAR with application to X-band maritime surveillance radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Graham V

    2015-01-01

    A generalisation of a switching based detector is examined, allowing the construction of such detectors for target detection in any clutter model of interest. Such detectors are important in radar signal processing because they are robust solutions to the management of interference. Although formulated in general terms, the theory is applied to the design of a switching constant false alarm rate detector for X-band maritime surveillance radar. It is shown that such a detector manages the problem of interference better than standard detection processes.

  6. Mapping Forest Cover and Forest Cover Change with Airborne S-Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K. Ningthoujam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of forest cover, forest carbon stocks and carbon emissions from deforestation and degradation are increasingly important components of sustainable resource management, for combating biodiversity loss and in climate mitigation policies. Satellite remote sensing provides the only means for mapping global forest cover regularly. However, forest classification with optical data is limited by its insensitivity to three-dimensional canopy structure and cloud cover obscuring many forest regions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR sensors are increasingly being used to mitigate these problems, mainly in the L-, C- and X-band domains of the electromagnetic spectrum. S-band has not been systematically studied for this purpose. In anticipation of the British built NovaSAR-S satellite mission, this study evaluates the benefits of polarimetric S-band SAR for forest characterisation. The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS-I radiative transfer model is utilised to understand the scattering mechanisms in forest canopies at S-band. The MIMICS-I model reveals strong S-band backscatter sensitivity to the forest canopy in comparison to soil characteristics across all polarisations and incidence angles. Airborne S-band SAR imagery over the temperate mixed forest of Savernake Forest in southern England is analysed for its information content. Based on the modelling results, S-band HH- and VV-polarisation radar backscatter and the Radar Forest Degradation Index (RFDI are used in a forest/non-forest Maximum Likelihood classification at a spatial resolution of 6 m (70% overall accuracy, κ = 0.41 and 20 m (63% overall accuracy, κ = 0.27. The conclusion is that S-band SAR such as from NovaSAR-S is likely to be suitable for monitoring forest cover and its changes.

  7. Dual-Polarization Observations of Slowly Varying Solar Emissions from a Mobile X-Band Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabella, Marco; Leuenberger, Andreas

    2017-05-22

    The radio noise that comes from the Sun has been reported in literature as a reference signal to check the quality of dual-polarization weather radar receivers for the S-band and C-band. In most cases, the focus was on relative calibration: horizontal and vertical polarizations were evaluated versus the reference signal mainly in terms of standard deviation of the difference. This means that the investigated radar receivers were able to reproduce the slowly varying component of the microwave signal emitted by the Sun. A novel method, aimed at the absolute calibration of dual-polarization receivers, has recently been presented and applied for the C-band. This method requires the antenna beam axis to be pointed towards the center of the Sun for less than a minute. Standard deviations of the difference as low as 0.1 dB have been found for the Swiss radars. As far as the absolute calibration is concerned, the average differences were of the order of -0.6 dB (after noise subtraction). The method has been implemented on a mobile, X-band radar, and this paper presents the successful results that were obtained during the 2016 field campaign in Payerne (Switzerland). Despite a relatively poor Sun-to-Noise ratio, the "small" (~0.4 dB) amplitude of the slowly varying emission was captured and reproduced; the standard deviation of the difference between the radar and the reference was ~0.2 dB. The absolute calibration of the vertical and horizontal receivers was satisfactory. After the noise subtraction and atmospheric correction a, the mean difference was close to 0 dB.

  8. X-Band Radar for Studies of Tropical Storms from High Altitude UAV Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Shannon; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Bradley, Damon

    2007-01-01

    The increased role of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in NASA's suborbital program has created a strong interest in the development of instruments with new capabilities, more compact sizes and reduced weights than the instruments currently operated on manned aircrafts. There is a strong demand and tremendous potential for using high altitude UAV (HUAV) to carry weather radars for measurements of reflectivity and wind fields from tropical storms. Tropical storm genesis frequently occurs in ocean regions that are inaccessible to piloted aircraft due to the long off shore range and the required periods of time to gather significant data. Important factors of interest for the study of hurricane genesis include surface winds, profiled winds, sea surface temperatures, precipitation, and boundary layer conditions. Current satellite precipitation and surface wind sensors have resolutions that are too large and revisit times that are too infrequent to study this problem. Furthermore, none of the spaceborne sensors measure winds within the storm itself. A dual beam X-band Doppler radar, UAV Radar (URAD), is under development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the study of tropical storms from HUAV platforms, such as a Global Hawk. X-band is the most desirable frequency for airborne weather radars since these can be built in a relatively compact size using off-the-shelf components which cost significantly less than other higher frequency radars. Furthermore, X-band radars provide good sensitivity with tolerable attenuation in storms. The low-cost and light-weight URAD will provide new capabilities for studying hurricane genesis by analyzing the vertical structure of tropical cyclones as well as 3D reflectivity and wind fields in clouds. It will enable us to measure both the 3D precipitation structure and surface winds by using two antenna beams: fixed nadir and conical scanning each produced by its associated subsystem. The nadir subsystem is a magnetron based radar

  9. Conceptual design of a 1-MW CW X-band transmitter for planetary radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Conroy, B. L.; Freiley, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design to increase the output power of an existing X-band planetary radar transmitter used for planetary radar exploration from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is presented. The basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar are covered. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered, and the transmitter power amplifier system is discussed. Also included is the design of all of the associated high-power microwave components, the feed system, and the phase-stable exciter. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology needed to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  10. A New Ka-Band Scanning Radar Facility: Polarimetric and Doppler Spectra Measurements of Snow Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oue, M.; Kollias, P.; Luke, E. P.; Mead, J.

    2017-12-01

    Polarimetric radar analyses offer the capability of identification of ice hydrometeor species as well as their spatial distributions. In addition to polarimetric parameter observations, Doppler spectra measurements offer unique insights into ice particle properties according to particle fall velocities. In particular, millimeter-wavelength radar Doppler spectra can reveal supercooled liquid cloud droplets embedded in ice precipitation clouds. A Ka-band scanning polarimetric radar, named KASPR, was installed in an observation facility at Stony Brook University, located 22 km west of the KOKX NEXRAD radar at Upton, NY. The KASPR can measure Doppler spectra and full polarimetric variables, including radar reflectivity, differential reflectivity (ZDR), differential phase (φDP), specific differential phase (KDP), correlation coefficient (ρhv), and linear depolarization ratio (LDR). The facility also includes a micro-rain radar and a microwave radiometer capable of measuring reflectivity profiles and integrated liquid water path, respectively. The instruments collected initial datasets during two snowstorm events and two snow shower events in March 2017. The radar scan strategy was a combination of PPI scans at 4 elevation angles (10, 20, 45, and 60°) and RHI scans in polarimetry mode, and zenith pointing with Doppler spectra collection. During the snowstorm events the radar observed relatively larger ZDR (1-1.5 dB) and enhanced KDP (1-2 ° km-1) at heights corresponding to a plate/dendrite crystal growth regime. The Doppler spectra showed that slower-falling particles ( 1 m s-1). The weakly increased ZDR could be produced by large, faster falling particles such as quasi-spherical aggregates, while the enhanced KDP could be produced by highly-oriented oblate, slowly-falling particles. Below 2 km altitude, measurements of dual wavelength ratio (DWR) based on Ka and S-band reflectivities from the KASPR and NEXRAD radars were available. Larger DWR (>10 dB) suggested

  11. A case study on large-scale dynamical influence on bright band using cloud radar during the Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ambuj K.; Kalapureddy, M. C. R.; Devisetty, Hari Krishna; Deshpande, Sachin M.; Pandithurai, G.

    2018-02-01

    The present study is a first of its kind attempt in exploring the physical features (e.g., height, width, intensity, duration) of tropical Indian bright band using a Ka-band cloud radar under the influence of large-scale cyclonic circulation and attempts to explain the abrupt changes in bright band features, viz., rise in the bright band height by 430 m and deepening of the bright band by about 300 m observed at around 14:00 UTC on Sep 14, 2016, synoptically as well as locally. The study extends the utility of cloud radar to understand how the bright band features are associated with light precipitation, ranging from 0 to 1.5 mm/h. Our analysis of the precipitation event of Sep 14-15, 2016 shows that the bright band above (below) 3.7 km, thickness less (more) than 300 m can potentially lead to light drizzle of 0-0.25 mm/h (drizzle/light rain) at the surface. It is also seen that the cloud radar may be suitable for bright band study within light drizzle limits than under higher rain conditions. Further, the study illustrates that the bright band features can be determined using the polarimetric capability of the cloud radar. It is shown that an LDR value of - 22 dB can be associated with the top height of bright band in the Ka-band observations which is useful in the extraction of the bright band top height and its width. This study is useful for understanding the bright band phenomenon and could be potentially useful in establishing the bright band-surface rain relationship through the perspective of a cloud radar, which would be helpful to enhance the cloud radar-based quantitative estimates of precipitation.

  12. Onboard Interferometric SAR Processor for the Ka-Band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Peral, Eva; Clark, Duane I.; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) onboard processor concept and algorithm has been developed for the Ka-band radar interferometer (KaRIn) instrument on the Surface and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. This is a mission- critical subsystem that will perform interferometric SAR processing and multi-look averaging over the oceans to decrease the data rate by three orders of magnitude, and therefore enable the downlink of the radar data to the ground. The onboard processor performs demodulation, range compression, coregistration, and re-sampling, and forms nine azimuth squinted beams. For each of them, an interferogram is generated, including common-band spectral filtering to improve correlation, followed by averaging to the final 1 1-km ground resolution pixel. The onboard processor has been prototyped on a custom FPGA-based cPCI board, which will be part of the radar s digital subsystem. The level of complexity of this technology, dictated by the implementation of interferometric SAR processing at high resolution, the extremely tight level of accuracy required, and its implementation on FPGAs are unprecedented at the time of this reporting for an onboard processor for flight applications.

  13. Detection of Digital Elevation Model Errors Using X-band Weather Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven D.; deHaag, Maatren Uijt

    2007-01-01

    Flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions requires pilots to manipulate flight controls while referring to a Primary Flight Display. The Primary Flight Display indicates aircraft attitude along with, in some cases, many other state variables such as altitude, speed, and guidance cues. Synthetic Vision Systems have been proposed that overlay the traditional information provided on Primary Flight Displays onto a scene depicting the location of terrain and other geo-spatial features.Terrain models used by these displays must have sufficient quality to avoid providing misleading information. This paper describes how X-band radar measurements can be used as part of a monitor, and/or maintenance system, to quantify the integrity of terrain models that are used by systems such as Synthetic Vision. Terrain shadowing effects, as seen by the radar, are compared in a statistical manner against estimated shadow feature elements extracted from the stored terrain model from the perspective of the airborne observer. A test statistic is defined that enables detection of errors as small as the range resolution of the radar. Experimental results obtained from two aircraft platforms hosting certified commercial-off-the-shelf X-band radars test the premise and illustrate its potential.

  14. Development of wide band digital receiver for atmospheric radars using COTS board based SDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Digital receiver extracts the received echo signal information, and is a potential subsystem for atmospheric radar, also referred to as wind profiling radar (WPR), which provides the vertical profiles of 3-dimensional wind vector in the atmosphere. This paper presents the development of digital receiver using COTS board based Software Defined Radio technique, which can be used for atmospheric radars. The developmental work is being carried out at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), Gadanki. The digital receiver consists of a commercially available software defined radio (SDR) board called as universal software radio peripheral B210 (USRP B210) and a personal computer. USRP B210 operates over a wider frequency range from 70 MHz to 6 GHz and hence can be used for variety of radars like Doppler weather radars operating in S/C bands, in addition to wind profiling radars operating in VHF, UHF and L bands. Due to the flexibility and re-configurability of SDR, where the component functionalities are implemented in software, it is easy to modify the software to receive the echoes and process them as per the requirement suitable for the type of the radar intended. Hence, USRP B210 board along with the computer forms a versatile digital receiver from 70 MHz to 6 GHz. It has an inbuilt direct conversion transceiver with two transmit and two receive channels, which can be operated in fully coherent 2x2 MIMO fashion and thus it can be used as a two channel receiver. Multiple USRP B210 boards can be synchronized using the pulse per second (PPS) input provided on the board, to configure multi-channel digital receiver system. RF gain of the transceiver can be varied from 0 to 70 dB. The board can be controlled from the computer via USB 3.0 interface through USRP hardware driver (UHD), which is an open source cross platform driver. The USRP B210 board is connected to the personal computer through USB 3.0. Reference (10 MHz) clock signal from the radar master oscillator

  15. Advanced W-Band Gallium Nitride Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) for Cloud Doppler Radar Supporting ACE Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop W-band Gallium Nitride (GaN) MMICs to enable the advanced cross-track scanning, dual-frequency Doppler cloud radar concept in support of the...

  16. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NASA S-BAND DUAL POLARIMETRIC (NPOL) DOPPLER RADAR MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA NPOL radar, developed by a research team from Wallops Flight Facility, is a fully transportable and self-contained S-band (10 cm), scanning...

  17. Adaptive Enhancement of X-Band Marine Radar Imagery to Detect Oil Spill Segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Ying; Xu, Jin; Zhu, Xueyuan

    2017-10-14

    Oil spills generate a large cost in environmental and economic terms. Their identification plays an important role in oil-spill response. We propose an oil spill detection method with improved adaptive enhancement on X-band marine radar systems. The radar images used in this paper were acquired on 21 July 2010, from the teaching-training ship "YUKUN" of the Dalian Maritime University. According to the shape characteristic of co-channel interference, two convolutional filters are used to detect the location of the interference, followed by a mean filter to erase the interference. Small objects, such as bright speckles, are taken as a mask in the radar image and improved by the Fields-of-Experts model. The region marked by strong reflected signals from the sea's surface is selected to identify oil spills. The selected region is subject to improved adaptive enhancement designed based on features of radar images. With the proposed adaptive enhancement technique, calculated oil spill detection is comparable to visual interpretation in accuracy.

  18. Adaptive Enhancement of X-Band Marine Radar Imagery to Detect Oil Spill Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Oil spills generate a large cost in environmental and economic terms. Their identification plays an important role in oil-spill response. We propose an oil spill detection method with improved adaptive enhancement on X-band marine radar systems. The radar images used in this paper were acquired on 21 July 2010, from the teaching-training ship “YUKUN” of the Dalian Maritime University. According to the shape characteristic of co-channel interference, two convolutional filters are used to detect the location of the interference, followed by a mean filter to erase the interference. Small objects, such as bright speckles, are taken as a mask in the radar image and improved by the Fields-of-Experts model. The region marked by strong reflected signals from the sea’s surface is selected to identify oil spills. The selected region is subject to improved adaptive enhancement designed based on features of radar images. With the proposed adaptive enhancement technique, calculated oil spill detection is comparable to visual interpretation in accuracy.

  19. CURIE: A low power X-band, low atmospheric boundary layer doppler radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Sakka, Hassan; Weill, Alain; Le Gac, Christophe; Ney, Richard; Chardenal, Laurent; Vinson, Jean Paul; Barthes, Laurent [Lab. Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales, LATMOS/IPSL, Velizy (France); Dupont, Eric [EDF, R and D, CEREA, Chatou (France)

    2009-06-15

    A new X-band Doppler miniradar, the CURIE radar (Canopy Urban Research on Interactions and Exchanges), mainly adapted to low Atmospheric Boundary Layer ABL sounding has been developed at LATMOS (Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales) formerly CETP (Centre d'etude des Environnements Terrestre et Planetaires). After a brief description of the measurement conditions in a turbulent atmosphere, the main characteristics of the new sensor are presented. As an example, we compare CURIE vertical velocity fluctuations with UHF observations to show the vertical velocity measurement validity. As a prospective area of application in clear air, we focus on a first observation of vertical velocity variance which is supposed to be related to entrainment across the inversion layer. As our objective is to study low boundary layers during different atmospheric conditions and since the radar works in the presence of precipitation (as all X-band radar do), we also show vertical rain soundings in the lower part of the ABL and illustrate our findings with results demonstrating comparable reflectivity and precipitation rates as estimated with a disdrometer and with a rain gauge. (orig.)

  20. Airborne Ku-Band Polarimetric Radar Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon; Cline, Donald; Elder, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary analyses of the POLSCAT data acquired from the CLPX-II in winter 2006-2007 are described in this paper. The data showed the response of the Ku-band radarechoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation. We observed about 0.2 to 0.4 dB increases in backscatter for every 1 cm SWE accumulation for sage brush and agricultural fields. The co-polarized VV and HH radar resposnes are similar, while the corss-polarized (VH or HV) echoes showedgreater resposne to the change of SWE. The data also showed the impact of surface hoar growth and freeze/thaw cycles, whichcreated large snow grain sizes and ice lenses, respectively, and consequently increased the radar signals by a few dBs.

  1. POLSCAT Ku-Band Radar Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon; Cline, Donald; Elder, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the POLSCAT data acquired from five sets of aircraft flights in the winter months of 2006-2008 for the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX-II) in Colorado are described in this paper. The data showed the response of the Ku-band radar echoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation in the study site in north central Colorado. We observed about 0.15 to 0.5 dB increases in backscatter for every 1 cm of snow water equivalent (SWE) accumulation for areas with short vegetation. Based on a simplified radiative transfer model, the change detection technique is used to convert the temporal change of radar backscatter into SWE accumulation for dry snow conditions. The resulting SWE accumulation estimates are consistent with the in-situ SWE measurements, with about 2 to 3 cm Root-Mean-Square (RMS) difference for regions with sagebrush or pasture.

  2. X-Band wave radar system for monitoring and risk management of the coastal infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Soldovieri, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The presence of the infrastructures in coastal region entails an increase of the sea level and the shift of the sediment on the bottom with a continuous change of the coastline. In order to preserve the coastline, it has been necessary to resort the use of applications coastal engineering, as the construction of the breakwaters for preventing the coastal erosion. In this frame, the knowledge of the sea state parameters, as wavelength, period and significant wave height and of surface current and bathymetry can be used for the harbor operations and to prevent environmental disasters. In the last years, the study of the coastal phenomena and monitoring of the sea waves impact on the coastal infrastructures through the analysis of images acquired by marine X-band radars is of great interest [1-3]. The possibility to observe the sea surface from radar images is due to the fact that the X-band electromagnetic waves interact with the sea capillary waves (Bragg resonance), which ride on the gravity waves. However, the image acquired by a X-band radar is not the direct representation of the sea state, but it represents the sea surface as seen by the radar. Accordingly, to estimate the sea state parameters as, direction, wavelength, period of dominant waves, the significant wave height as well as the bathymetry and surface current, through a time stack of radar data are required advanced data processing procedures. In particular, in the coastal areas due to the non-uniformity of sea surface current and bathymetry fields is necessary a local analysis of the sea state parameters. In order to analyze the data acquired in coastal area an inversion procedure defined "Local Method" is adopted, which is based on the spatial partitioning of the investigated area in partially overlapping sub-areas. In addition, the analysis of the sea spectrum of each sub-area allows us to retrieve the local sea state parameters. In particular, this local analysis allows us to detect the reflected

  3. An Algorithm for Surface Current Retrieval from X-band Marine Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxi Shen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel current inversion algorithm from X-band marine radar images is proposed. The routine, for which deep water is assumed, begins with 3-D FFT of the radar image sequence, followed by the extraction of the dispersion shell from the 3-D image spectrum. Next, the dispersion shell is converted to a polar current shell (PCS using a polar coordinate transformation. After removing outliers along each radial direction of the PCS, a robust sinusoidal curve fitting is applied to the data points along each circumferential direction of the PCS. The angle corresponding to the maximum of the estimated sinusoid function is determined to be the current direction, and the amplitude of this sinusoidal function is the current speed. For validation, the algorithm is tested against both simulated radar images and field data collected by a vertically-polarized X-band system and ground-truthed with measurements from an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP. From the field data, it is observed that when the current speed is less than 0.5 m/s, the root mean square differences between the radar-derived and the ADCP-measured current speed and direction are 7.3 cm/s and 32.7°, respectively. The results indicate that the proposed procedure, unlike most existing current inversion schemes, is not susceptible to high current speeds and circumvents the need to consider aliasing. Meanwhile, the relatively low computational cost makes it an excellent choice in practical marine applications.

  4. Multifractal analysis of different hydrological products of X-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouri-Plakali, Ilektra; Da Silva Rocha Paz, Igor; Ichiba, Abdellah; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall is widely considered as the hydrological process that triggers all the others. Its accurate measurements are crucial especially when they are used afterwards for the hydrological modeling of urban and peri-urban catchments for decision-making. Rainfall is a complex process and is scale dependent in space and time. Hence a high spatial and temporal resolution of the data is more appropriate for urban modeling. Therefore, a great interest of high-resolution measurements of precipitation in space and time is manifested. Radar technologies have not stopped evolving since their first appearance about the mid-twentieth. Indeed, the turning point work by Marshall-Palmer (1948) has established the Z - R power-law relation that has been widely used, with major scientific efforts being devoted to find "the best choice" of the two associated parameters. Nowadays X-band radars, being provided with dual-polarization and Doppler means, offer more accurate data of higher resolution. The fact that drops are oblate induces a differential phase shift between the two polarizations. The quantity most commonly used for the rainfall rate computation is actually the specific differential phase shift, which is the gradient of the differential phase shift along the radial beam direction. It is even stronger correlated to the rain rate R than reflectivity Z. Hence the rain rate can be computed with a different power-law relation, which again depends on only two parameters. Furthermore, an attenuation correction is needed to adjust the loss of radar energy due to the absorption and scattering as it passes through the atmosphere. Due to natural variations of reflectivity with altitude, vertical profile of reflectivity should be corrected as well. There are some other typical radar data filtering procedures, all resulting in various hydrological products. In this work, we use the Universal Multifractal framework to analyze and to inter-compare different products of X-band radar

  5. Multiple Scattering of Terrestrial Snow in X-band and Ku band Radar Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Tsang, L.; Wenmo, C.; Yueh, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial snow as an important storage of the fresh water plays a key role in the global water cycle. Regional and global snow water equivalence (SWE) distribution has impact on various hydrological, meteorological applications. Using the SAR image at X band and Ku band for remote sensing of SWE is drawing more attention as it can obtain the complete spatial and temporal coverage of snow distribution under nearly all weather conditions. The satellite mission Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory, (CoReH2O), is being evaluated by ESA and the Snow and Cold Land process (SCLP) Satellite Mission was recommended for NASA implementation in the Decadal Survey report. The electromagnetic signatures of different snow structures and snow ground interfaces are studied in both X and Ku band. To characterize the electromagnetic properties of snow, we need to establish the detailed snow structure. Recently, we developed a computer generated bi-continuous media to describe the snow structure. The Maxwell equations are directly applied and solved numerically. Then the results are combined with the dense media radiative equations so that full multiple scattering was considered. To systematically study the snow structure influence to the backscattering signal, we generate a look up table for a few typical types of snow status, such as fresh snow, depth hoar etc. The snow-ground interface is considered as rough surface. The backscattering from the surfaces is calculated through the look up table, which is generated by solving full wave simulations of Numerical Maxwell Model in 3 Dimensional (NMM3D) rough surfaces. Both co-polarization and cross-polarization are computed. The combined model is validated through comparison with recent CLPX, SnowSCAT and SnowSAR field measurements.

  6. Suppression of Time-domain Jitter of Impulse Radio Ultra-wide Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Fu-lai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For Impulse Radio Ultra-Wide Band (IR-UWB radar, the time jitter transforms the static clutters to dynamic clutters. Thus, strong residue exists and false alarms form after traditional direct current suppression. The effect of the time-domain jitter on the life detection capacity is analyzed, and then the phenomenon that the relative time delays between the coupling echoes can reflect the time jitter is pointed out. Based on the coupling echo, a method of time jitter suppression is proposed. Experimental data demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively suppress the residue of strong static clutter, and further improve the life-detection capacity.

  7. Design and use of a mobile, x-band, high range resolution, radar research facility

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Witt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info De Witt_2012_ABSTRACT ONLY.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1179 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name De Witt_2012_ABSTRACT ONLY.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 DESIGN... AND USE OF A MOBILE, X-BAND, HIGH RANGE RESOLUTION, RADAR RESEARCH FACILITY J.J. de Witt*, M.S. Alahmadi†, A. Alzamil# *CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa, jdewitt@csir.co.za , †KACST, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, malahmadi@kacst.edu.sa, #KACST, Riyadh, Saudi...

  8. An X-Band Radar System for Bathymetry and Wave Field Analysis in a Harbour Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ludeno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine X-band radar based systems are well tested to provide information about sea state and bathymetry. It is also well known that complex geometries and non-uniform bathymetries provide a much bigger challenge than offshore scenarios. In order to tackle this issue a retrieval method is proposed, based on spatial partitioning of the data and the application of the Normalized Scalar Product (NSP, which is an innovative procedure for the joint estimation of bathymetry and surface currents. The strategy is then applied to radar data acquired around a harbour entrance, and results show that the reconstructed bathymetry compares well with ground truth data obtained by an echo-sounder campaign, thus proving the reliability of the whole procedure. The spectrum thus retrieved is then analysed to show the evidence of reflected waves from the harbour jetties, as confirmed by chain of hydrodynamic models of the sea wave field. The possibility of using a land based radar to reveal sea wave reflection is entirely new and may open up new operational applications of the system.

  9. Geographical Distribution of Thundersnow and their Properties from GPM Ku-band Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, A.; Liu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Lightning in snow and freezing rain are relatively uncommon, compared to the warm season thunderstorm. These events can be identified by lightning with the surface temperature colder than 0oC, or named as "cold lightning", A six-years of "cold lightning" characteristics and climatology, including seasonal, diurnal, and surface temperature distribution, are generated after collocating WWLLN and NLDN lightning with ERA-Interim 2 meter temperature. The thundersnow cases are further identified with all vertical temperature profile below 0oC, and the freezing rain cases have temperature warmer than 4oC somewhere in the column above the freezing surface. The statistics of thundersnow events from WWLLN and NLDN are compared over the United States (US). Though with different detection efficiency, WWLLN and NLDN demonstrate almost identical geographical distribution of thundersnow over the US. Taking the full advantage of the Global Precipitation Measuring Mission (GPM) Ku band radar, Thunder Snow Features (TSFs) are defined with contiguous area of non-zero near surface snow precipitation derived from Ku radar along with the collocated WWLLN lightning strikes. Though only a small number of TSFs are identified with three year GPM data, all TSFs have maximum radar reflectivity above 30 dBZ at temperature colder than -10oC, which indicates the importance of non-inductive charging in these events.

  10. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    2000-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L- Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  11. Dual Channel S-Band Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave Through-Wall Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the development of a dual channel S-Band frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW system for a through-the-wall imaging (TWRI system. Most existing TWRI systems using FMCW were developed for synthetic aperture radar (SAR which has many drawbacks such as the need for several antenna elements and movement of the system. Our implemented TWRI system comprises a transmitting antenna and two receiving antennas, resulting in a significant reduction of the number of antenna elements. Moreover, a proposed algorithm for range-angle-Doppler 3D estimation based on a 3D shift invariant structure is utilized in our implemented dual channel S-band FMCW TWRI system. Indoor and outdoor experiments were conducted to image the scene beyond a wall for water targets and person targets, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that high-quality imaging can be achieved under both experimental scenarios.

  12. Land Cover Classification Method using Combined Signatures of L-band Radar and Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the utility of combining L-band radar and radiometer measurements for more accurate land cover classification in terms of vegetation type and density. This investigation is relevant in the context of two NASA missions which employ L-band active and passive measurements. The first one, Aquarius, was launched in June 2011 and the second one, SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) is proposed for launch in late 2014. The results of this study can be applied in the observation situation of both of these missions to improve L-band land cover characterization for the benefit of retrieval accuracy of parameters such as soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Brightness temperature, measured by radiometer, is the product of the physical temperature and emissivity of the target. Reflectivity describes how much of radiation incident on the surface reflects and scatters away from it to all directions. The sum of emissivity and reflectivity equals one. On the other hand, backscatter, measured by radar, expresses how much of radiation incident on the surface reflects back to the direction of the radar. The difference between reflectivity and backscatter can be quantified by introducing Normalized Reflection Difference (NRD), which is normalized difference between reflectivity and backscatter. In the proposed method the NRD value is merged with brightness temperature polarization index (MPI) and cross-polarized backscatter to classify the land cover of the measured area. The method is tested using the experimental data obtained with the PALS (Passive and Active L- band System) airborne instrument over numerous locations in US between 1999 and 2008. The PALS instrument performs coincidental radiometer and radar measurements. The in situ data recorded in the abovementioned campaigns allow classification based on not only vegetation type but also based on Vegetation Water Content (VWC), biomass, Leaf Area Index (LAI) soil texture and surface roughness. The

  13. Polarimetric rainfall retrieval from a C-Band weather radar in a tropical environment (The Philippines)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisologo, I.; Vulpiani, G.; Abon, C. C.; David, C. P. C.; Bronstert, A.; Heistermann, Maik

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the potential of polarimetric rainfall retrieval methods for the Tagaytay C-Band weather radar in the Philippines. For this purpose, we combined a method for fuzzy echo classification, an approach to extract and reconstruct the differential propagation phase, Φ DP , and a polarimetric self-consistency approach to calibrate horizontal and differential reflectivity. The reconstructed Φ DP was used to estimate path-integrated attenuation and to retrieve the specific differential phase, K DP . All related algorithms were transparently implemented in the Open Source radar processing software wradlib. Rainfall was then estimated from different variables: from re-calibrated reflectivity, from re-calibrated reflectivity that has been corrected for path-integrated attenuation, from the specific differential phase, and from a combination of reflectivity and specific differential phase. As an additional benchmark, rainfall was estimated by interpolating the rainfall observed by rain gauges. We evaluated the rainfall products for daily and hourly accumulations. For this purpose, we used observations of 16 rain gauges from a five-month period in the 2012 wet season. It turned out that the retrieval of rainfall from K DP substantially improved the rainfall estimation at both daily and hourly time scales. The measurement of reflectivity apparently was impaired by severe miscalibration while K DP was immune to such effects. Daily accumulations of rainfall retrieved from K DP showed a very low estimation bias and small random errors. Random scatter was, though, strongly present in hourly accumulations.

  14. Particle type identification for C-band dual-polarization radar in Darwin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, G.; Protat, A.

    2017-12-01

    The distribution and structure of particle types, such as rain, snow and hail, are of fundamental significance for cloud microphysical studies, quantitative precipitation estimation, and severe weather forecasting. In literature, particle type identification often adopts a fuzzy-logic based method, however, the construction of membership functions in this method heavily relies on empirical relations. We have developed a Bayesian method for particle type identification using C-band dual-polarization weather radar. In this method, the probability density function of polarimetric radar measurements given particle types is investigated by using an Expectation-Maximization clustering technique based on Gaussian Mixture Models, while the prior probability is modelled as a Markov random field. This method has been used to analyze the microphysical characteristics of tropical precipitating clouds in Darwin, Australia. This method can provide accurate particle types for the study of cloud and precipitation formation process, and it can also improve the understanding of weather modification, quantitative precipitation estimation, and numerical weather prediction.

  15. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  16. Bathymetry determination via X-band radar data: a new strategy and numerical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafino, Francesco; Lugni, Claudio; Borge, Jose Carlos Nieto; Zamparelli, Virginia; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with the question of sea state monitoring using marine X-band radar images and focuses its attention on the problem of sea depth estimation. We present and discuss a technique to estimate bathymetry by exploiting the dispersion relation for surface gravity waves. This estimation technique is based on the correlation between the measured and the theoretical sea wave spectra and a simple analysis of the approach is performed through test cases with synthetic data. More in detail, the reliability of the estimate technique is verified through simulated data sets that are concerned with different values of bathymetry and surface currents for two types of sea spectrum: JONSWAP and Pierson-Moskowitz. The results show how the estimated bathymetry is fairly accurate for low depth values, while the estimate is less accurate as the bathymetry increases, due to a less significant role of the bathymetry on the sea surface waves as the water depth increases.

  17. High power Ka-band transmitter for planetary radar and spacecraft uplink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, A.M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Cormier, R.

    1985-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design of a 400 kW CW Ka-Band transmitter and associated microwave components to be used for planetary radar and serve as a prototype for feature spacecraft uplinks is discussed. System requirements for such a transmitter are presented. Performance of the proposed high power millimeter wave tube, the gyroklystron, is discussed. Parameters of the proposed power amplifier, beam supply, and monitor and control devices are also presented, Microwave transmission line components consisting of signal monitoring devices, signal filtering devices, and an overmoded corrugated feed are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the state of the art technology to meet the system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  18. High Power K Sub a -band Transmitter for Planetary Radar and Spacecraft Uplink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Hartop, R. W.; Stone, E. W.; Imbriale, W. A.; Stone, D.; Caplan, M.

    1984-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design of a 400 kW continuous wave (CW)K sub a band transmitter and associated microwave components to be used for planetary radar and serve as a prototype for future spacecraft uplinks is discussed. System requirements for such a transmitter are presented. Performance of the proposed high-power millimeter wave tube, the gyroklystron is discussed. Parameters of the proposed power amplifier, beam supply, and monitor and control devices are also presented. Microwave transmission line components consisting of signal monitoring devices, signal filtering devices, and an overmoded corrugated feed are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the state of the art technology to meet the system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  19. Physics-Based Predictions for Coherent Change Detection Using X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Preiss

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model is developed to describe the interferometric coherency between pairs of SAR images of rough soil surfaces. The model is derived using a dyadic form for surface reflectivity in the Kirchhoff approximation. This permits the combination of Kirchhoff theory and spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR image formation theory. The resulting model is used to describe the interferometric coherency between pairs of SAR images of rough soil surfaces. The theoretical model is applied to SAR images formed before and after surface changes observed by a repeat-pass SAR system. The change in surface associated with a tyre track following vehicle passage is modelled and SAR coherency estimates are obtained. Predicted coherency distributions for both the change and no-change scenarios are used to estimate receiver operator curves for the detection of the changes using a high-resolution, X-band SAR system.

  20. Modulation Model of High Frequency Band Radar Backscatter by the Internal Wave Based on the Third-Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modulation model of radar backscatters is an important topic in the remote sensing of oceanic internal wave by synthetic aperture radar (SAR. Previous studies related with the modulation models were analyzed mainly based on the hypothesis that ocean surface waves are Gaussian distributed. However, this is not always true for the complicated ocean environment. Research has showed that the measurements are usually larger than the values predicted by modulation models for the high frequency radars (X-band and above. In this paper, a new modulation model was proposed which takes the third-order statistics of the ocean surface into account. It takes the situation into consideration that the surface waves are Non-Gaussian distributed under some conditions. The model can explain the discrepancy between the measurements and the values calculated by the traditional models in theory. Furthermore, it can accurately predict the modulation for the higher frequency band. The model was verified by the experimental measurements recorded in a wind wave tank. Further discussion was made about applicability of this model that it performs better in the prediction of radar backscatter modulation compared with the traditional modulation model for the high frequency band radar or under lager wind speeds.

  1. Coupling X-band dual-polarized mini-radars and hydro-meteorological forecast models: the HYDRORAD project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Picciotti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydro-meteorological hazards like convective outbreaks leading to torrential rain and floods are among the most critical environmental issues world-wide. In that context weather radar observations have proven to be very useful in providing information on the spatial distribution of rainfall that can support early warning of floods. However, quantitative precipitation estimation by radar is subjected to many limitations and uncertainties. The use of dual-polarization at high frequency (i.e. X-band has proven particularly useful for mitigating some of the limitation of operational systems, by exploiting the benefit of easiness to transport and deploy and the high spatial and temporal resolution achievable at small antenna sizes. New developments on X-band dual-polarization technology in recent years have received the interest of scientific and operational communities in these systems. New enterprises are focusing on the advancement of cost-efficient mini-radar network technology, based on high-frequency (mainly X-band and low-power weather radar systems for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological forecasting. Within the above context, the main objective of the HYDRORAD project was the development of an innovative mbox{integrated} decision support tool for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological applications. The integrated system tool is based on a polarimetric X-band mini-radar network which is the core of the decision support tool, a novel radar products generator and a hydro-meteorological forecast modelling system that ingests mini-radar rainfall products to forecast precipitation and floods. The radar products generator includes algorithms for attenuation correction, hydrometeor classification, a vertical profile reflectivity correction, a new polarimetric rainfall estimators developed for mini-radar observations, and short-term nowcasting of convective cells. The hydro-meteorological modelling system includes the Mesoscale Model 5

  2. Coupling X-band dual-polarized mini-radars and hydro-meteorological forecast models: the HYDRORAD project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciotti, E.; Marzano, F. S.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Kalogiros, J.; Fessas, Y.; Volpi, A.; Cazac, V.; Pace, R.; Cinque, G.; Bernardini, L.; De Sanctis, K.; Di Fabio, S.; Montopoli, M.; Anagnostou, M. N.; Telleschi, A.; Dimitriou, E.; Stella, J.

    2013-05-01

    Hydro-meteorological hazards like convective outbreaks leading to torrential rain and floods are among the most critical environmental issues world-wide. In that context weather radar observations have proven to be very useful in providing information on the spatial distribution of rainfall that can support early warning of floods. However, quantitative precipitation estimation by radar is subjected to many limitations and uncertainties. The use of dual-polarization at high frequency (i.e. X-band) has proven particularly useful for mitigating some of the limitation of operational systems, by exploiting the benefit of easiness to transport and deploy and the high spatial and temporal resolution achievable at small antenna sizes. New developments on X-band dual-polarization technology in recent years have received the interest of scientific and operational communities in these systems. New enterprises are focusing on the advancement of cost-efficient mini-radar network technology, based on high-frequency (mainly X-band) and low-power weather radar systems for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological forecasting. Within the above context, the main objective of the HYDRORAD project was the development of an innovative integrated decision support tool for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological applications. The integrated system tool is based on a polarimetric X-band mini-radar network which is the core of the decision support tool, a novel radar products generator and a hydro-meteorological forecast modelling system that ingests mini-radar rainfall products to forecast precipitation and floods. The radar products generator includes algorithms for attenuation correction, hydrometeor classification, a vertical profile reflectivity correction, a new polarimetric rainfall estimators developed for mini-radar observations, and short-term nowcasting of convective cells. The hydro-meteorological modelling system includes the Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) and the Army Corps

  3. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  4. Measurement of Precipitation in the Alps Using Dual-Polarization C-Band Ground-Based Radars, the GPM Spaceborne Ku-Band Radar, and Rain Gauges

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Gabella; Peter Speirs; Ulrich Hamann; Urs Germann; Alexis Berne

    2017-01-01

    The complex problem of quantitative precipitation estimation in the Alpine region is tackled from four different points of view: (1) the modern MeteoSwiss network of automatic telemetered rain gauges (GAUGE); (2) the recently upgraded MeteoSwiss dual-polarization Doppler, ground-based weather radar network (RADAR); (3) a real-time merging of GAUGE and RADAR, implemented at MeteoSwiss, in which a technique based on co-kriging with external drift (CombiPrecip) is used; (4) spaceborne observatio...

  5. Multifractal Comparison of Reflectivity and Polarimetric Rainfall Data from C- and X-Band Radars and Respective Hydrological Responses of a Complex Catchment Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Paz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison between C-band and X-band radar data over an instrumented and regulated catchment of the Paris region. We study the benefits of polarimetry and the respective hydrological impacts with the help of rain gauge and flow measurements using a semi-distributed hydrological model. Both types of radar confirm the high spatial variability of the rainfall down to their space resolution (1 km and 250 m, respectively. Therefore, X-band radar data underscore the limitations of simulations using a semi-distributed model with sub-catchments of an average size of 2 km. The use of the polarimetric capacity of the Météo-France C-band radar was limited to corrections of the horizontal reflectivity, and its rainfall estimates are adjusted with the help of a rain gauge network. On the contrary, no absolute calibration and scanning optimisation were performed for the polarimetric X-band radar of the Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (hereafter referred to as the ENPC X-band radar. In spite of this and the fact that the catchment is much closer to the C-band radar than to the X-band radar (average distance of 15 km vs. 35 km, respectively, the latter seems to perform at least as well as the former, but with a higher spatial resolution. This was best highlighted with the help of a multifractal analysis, which also shows that the X-band radar was able to pick up a few rainfall extremes that were smoothed out by the C-band radar.

  6. Challenges with space-time rainfall in urban hydrology highlighted with a semi-distributed model using C-band and X-band radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Rocha Paz, Igor; Ichiba, Abdellah; Skouri-Plakali, Ilektra; Lee, Jisun; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Climate change and global warming are expected to make precipitation events more frequent, more severe and more local. This may have serious consequences for human health, the environment, cultural heritage, economic activities, utilities and public service providers. Then precipitation risk and water management is a key challenge for densely populated urban areas. Applications derived from high (time and space) resolution observation of precipitations are to make our cities more weather-ready. Finer resolution data available from X-band dual radar measurements enhance engineering tools as used for urban planning policies as well as protection (mitigation/adaptation) strategies to tackle climate-change related weather events. For decades engineering tools have been developed to work conveniently either with very local rain gauge networks, or with mainly C-band weather radars that have gradually been set up for space-time remote sensing of precipitation. Most of the time, the C-band weather radars continue to be calibrated by the existing rain gauge networks. Inhomogeneous distributions of rain gauging networks lead to only a partial information on the rainfall fields. In fact, the statistics of measured rainfall is strongly biased by the fractality of the measuring networks. This fractality needs to be properly taken in to account to retrieve the original properties of the rainfall fields, in spite of the radar data calibration. In this presentation, with the help of multifractal analysis, we first demonstrate that the semi-distributed hydrological models statistically reduce the rainfall fields into rainfall measured by a much scarcer network of virtual rain gauges. For this purpose, we use C-band and X-band radar data. The first has a resolution of 1 km in space and 5 min in time and is in fact a product provided by RHEA SAS after treating the Météo-France C-band radar data. The latter is measured by the radar operated at Ecole des Ponts and has a resolution of

  7. Impact of Surface Soil Moisture Variations on Radar Altimetry Echoes at Ku and Ka Bands in Semi-Arid Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Fatras

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Radar altimetry provides information on the topography of the Earth surface. It is commonly used for the monitoring not only sea surface height but also ice sheets topography and inland water levels. The radar altimetry backscattering coefficient, which depends on surface roughness and water content, can be related to surface properties such as surface soil moisture content. In this study, the influence of surface soil moisture on the radar altimetry echo and backscattering coefficient is analyzed over semi-arid areas. A semi-empirical model of the soil’s complex dielectric permittivity that takes into account that small-scale roughness and large-scale topography was developed to simulate the radar echoes. It was validated using waveforms acquired at Ku and Ka-bands by ENVISAT RA-2 and SARAL AltiKa respectively over several sites in Mali. Correlation coefficients ranging from 0.66 to 0.94 at Ku-band and from 0.27 to 0.96 at Ka-band were found. The increase in surface soil moisture from 0.02 to 0.4 (i.e., the typical range of variations in semi-arid areas increase the backscattering from 10 to 15 dB between the core of the dry and the maximum of the rainy seasons.

  8. Ranger© - An Affordable, Advanced, Next-Generation, Dual-Pol, X-Band Weather Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedronsky, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Enterprise Electronics Corporation (EEC) Ranger© system is a new generation, X-band (3 cm), Adaptive Polarization Doppler Weather Surveillance Radar that fills the gap between high-cost, high-power traditional radar systems and the passive ground station weather sensors. Developed in partnership with the University of Oklahoma Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC), the system uses relatively low power solid-state transmitters and pulse compression technology to attain nearly the same performance capabilities of much more expensive traditional radar systems. The Ranger© also employs Adaptive Dual Polarization (ADP) techniques to allow Alternating or Simultaneous Dual Polarization capability with total control over the transmission polarization state using dual independent coherent transmitters. Ranger© has been designed using the very latest technology available in the industry and the technical and manufacturing experience gained through over four decades of successful radar system design and production at EEC. The entire Ranger© design concept emphasizes precision, stability, reliability, and value using proven solid state technology combined with the most advanced motion control system ever conceived for weather radar. Key applications include meteorology, hydrology, aviation, offshore oil/gas drilling, wind energy, and outdoor event situational awareness.

  9. Ku/Ka/W-band Antenna for Electronically-Scanned Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Previously, cloud radars such as CloudSat have been separated from precipitation radars such as TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission) and GPM (Global...

  10. Effects of surface roughness on sea ice freeboard retrieval with an Airborne Ku-Band SAR radar altimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Stefan; Stenseng, Lars; Helm, Veit

    2010-01-01

    Results from two years of the CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) over sea ice in the western Arctic Ocean are presented. The estimation of freeboard, the height of sea ice floating above the water level, is one the main goals of the CryoSat-2 mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) in order...... to investigate sea ice volume changes on an Arctic wide scale. Freeboard retrieval requires precise radar range measurements to the ice surface, therefore we investigate the penetration of the Ku-Band radar waves into the overlying snow cover as well as the effects of sub-footprint-scale surface roughness using...

  11. Measurement of Precipitation in the Alps Using Dual-Polarization C-Band Ground-Based Radars, the GPM Spaceborne Ku-Band Radar, and Rain Gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gabella

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The complex problem of quantitative precipitation estimation in the Alpine region is tackled from four different points of view: (1 the modern MeteoSwiss network of automatic telemetered rain gauges (GAUGE; (2 the recently upgraded MeteoSwiss dual-polarization Doppler, ground-based weather radar network (RADAR; (3 a real-time merging of GAUGE and RADAR, implemented at MeteoSwiss, in which a technique based on co-kriging with external drift (CombiPrecip is used; (4 spaceborne observations, acquired by the dual-wavelength precipitation radar on board the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM core satellite. There are obviously large differences in these sampling modes, which we have tried to minimize by integrating synchronous observations taken during the first 2 years of the GPM mission. The data comprises 327 “wet” overpasses of Switzerland, taken after the launch of GPM in February 2014. By comparing the GPM radar estimates with the MeteoSwiss products, a similar performance was found in terms of bias. On average (whole country, all days and seasons, both solid and liquid phases, underestimation is as large as −3.0 (−3.4 dB with respect to RADAR (GAUGE. GPM is not suitable for assessing what product is the best in terms of average precipitation over the Alps. GPM can nevertheless be used to evaluate the dispersion of the error around the mean, which is a measure of the geographical distribution of the error inside the country. Using 221 rain-gauge sites, the result is clear both in terms of correlation and in terms of scatter (a robust, weighted measure of the dispersion of the multiplicative error around the mean. The best agreement was observed between GPM and CombiPrecip, and, next, between GPM and RADAR, whereas a larger disagreement was found between GPM and GAUGE. Hence, GPM confirms that, for precipitation mapping in the Alpine region, the best results are obtained by combining ground-based radar with rain-gauge measurements using

  12. Evaluating the potential use of a high-resolution X-band polarimetric radar observations in Urban Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Marzano, Frank S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Baldini, Luca; Nikolopoulos, EfThymios; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. Every year in central and south Europe we witness several fatal and economical disasters from severe storm rainfall triggering Flash Floods, and its impacts are increasing worldwide, but remain very difficult to manage. The spatial scale of flash flood occurrence is such that its vulnerability is often focused on dispersed urbanization, transportation and tourism infrastructures (De Marchi and Scolobig 2012). Urbanized and industrialized areas shows peculiar hydrodynamic and meteo-oceanographic features and they concentrate the highest rates of flash floods and fatal disasters. The main causes of disturbance being littoral urban development and harbor activities, the building of littoral rail- and highways, and the presence of several polluted discharges. All the above mentioned characteristics limit our ability to issue timely flood warnings. Precipitation estimates based on raingauge networks are usually associated with low coverage density, particularly at high altitudes. On the other hand, operational weather radar networks may provide valuable information of precipitation at these regimes but reliability of their estimates is often limited due to retrieval (e.g. variability in the reflectivity-to-rainfall relationship) and spatial extent constrains (e.g. blockage issues, overshooting effects). As a result, we currently lack accurate precipitation estimates over urban complex terrain areas, which essentially means that we lack accurate knowledge of the triggering factor for a number of hazards like flash floods and debris flows/landslides occurring in those areas. A potential solution to overcome sampling as well as retrieval uncertainty limitations of current observational networks might be the use of network of low-power dual-polarization X-band radars as complement to raingauges and gap-filling to

  13. GLUE Based Marine X-Band Weather Radar Data Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Beven, Keith; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation methodology (GLUE) is investigated for radar rainfall calibration and uncertainty assessment. The method is used to calibrate radar data collected by a Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR). In contrast to other LAWR data calibrations, the method combines...

  14. Combining C- and X-band Weather Radars for Improving Precipitation Estimates over Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk

    The topic of this thesis is weather radar precipitation measurements. Measuring the spatial and temporal variations of the precipitation by weather radars has significant advantages compared to point measurements from rain gauges within urban drainage applications. Knowledge on how the rainfall...... is distributed between the rain gauges is in itself valuable for retrospective analysis of urban drainage systems. In addition, on-line distributed weather radar precipitation measurements facilitate radar based now-casts of the precipitation. As the radar detects the precipitation before it reaches the urban...... of future system state. Accurate and reliable weather radar measurements are, therefore, important for future developments and achievements within urban drainage. This PhD study investigates two types of weather radars. Both systems are in operational use in Denmark today. A network of meteorological C...

  15. Performance Analysis of Ultra-Wideband Channel for Short-Range Monopulse Radar at Ka-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiko Iwakiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-range resolution is inherently provided with Ka-band ultra-wideband (UWB vehicular radars. The authors have developed a prototype UWB monopulse radar equipped with a two-element receiving antenna array and reported its measurement results. In this paper, a more detailed verification using these measurements is presented. The measurements were analyzed employing matched filtering and eigendecomposition, and then multipath components were extracted to examine the behavior of received UWB monopulse signals. Next, conventional direction finding algorithms based on narrowband assumption were evaluated using the extracted multipath components, resulting in acceptable angle-of-arrival (AOA from the UWB monopulse signal regardless of wideband signals. Performance degradation due to a number of averaging the received monopulses was also examined to design suitable radar's waveforms.

  16. Towards Snowpack Characterization using C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Forman, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Sentinel 1A and 1B, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA), carries a C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor that can be used to monitor terrestrial snow properties. This study explores the relationship between terrestrial snow-covered area, snow depth, and snow water equivalent with Sentinel 1 backscatter observations in order to better characterize snow mass. Ground-based observations collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST) in Caribou, Maine in the United States are also used in the comparative analysis. Sentinel 1 Ground Range Detected (GRD) imagery with Interferometric Wide swath (IW) were preprocessed through a series of steps accounting for thermal noise, sensor orbit, radiometric calibration, speckle filtering, and terrain correction using ESA's Sentinel Application Platform (SNAP) software package, which is an open-source module written in Python. Comparisons of dual-polarized backscatter coefficients (i.e., σVV and σVH) with in-situ measurements of snow depth and SWE suggest that cross-polarized backscatter observations exhibit a modest correlation between both snow depth and SWE. In the case of the snow-covered area, a multi-temporal change detection method was used. Results using Sentinel 1 yield similar spatial patterns as when using hyperspectral observations collected by the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). These preliminary results suggest the potential application of Sentinel 1A/1B backscatter coefficients towards improved discrimination of snow cover, snow depth, and SWE. One goal of this research is to eventually merge C-band SAR backscatter observations with other snow information (e.g., passive microwave brightness temperatures) as part of a multi-sensor snow assimilation framework.

  17. Multifractal Comparison of Reflectivity and Polarimetric Rainfall Data from C- and X-Band Radars and Respective Hydrological Responses of a Complex Catchment Model

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Paz; Bernard Willinger; Auguste Gires; Abdellah Ichiba; Laurent Monier; Christophe Zobrist; Bruno Tisserand; Ioulia Tchiguirinskaia; Daniel Schertzer

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between C-band and X-band radar data over an instrumented and regulated catchment of the Paris region. We study the benefits of polarimetry and the respective hydrological impacts with the help of rain gauge and flow measurements using a semi-distributed hydrological model. Both types of radar confirm the high spatial variability of the rainfall down to their space resolution (1 km and 250 m, respectively). Therefore, X-band radar data underscore the limitatio...

  18. UAVSAR - A New Airborne L-Band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Lou, Yunling

    2009-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed a new airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) which has become available for use by the scientific community in January, 2009. Pod mounted, the UAVSAR was designed to be portable among a variety of aircraft, including unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The instrument operates in the L-Band, has a resolution under 2m from a GPS altitude of 12Km and a swath width of approximately 20Km. UAVSAR currently flies on a modified Gulfstream-III aircraft, operated by NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. The G-III platform enables repeat-pass interferometric measurements, by using a modified autopilot and precise kinematic differential GPS to repeatedly fly the aircraft within a specified 10m tube. The antenna is electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of speed and wind direction. The instrument can be controlled remotely, AS AN OPTION, using the Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL). This allows simulation of the telepresence environment necessary for flight on UAS. Potential earth science research and applications include surface deformation, volcano studies, ice sheet dynamics, and vegetation structure.

  19. Adventures in Holographic Dimer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Karch, Andreas; /Washington U., Seattle; Yaida, Sho; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    We abstract the essential features of holographic dimer models, and develop several new applications of these models. Firstly, semi-holographically coupling free band fermions to holographic dimers, we uncover novel phase transitions between conventional Fermi liquids and non-Fermi liquids, accompanied by a change in the structure of the Fermi surface. Secondly, we make dimer vibrations propagate through the whole crystal by way of double trace deformations, obtaining nontrivial band structure. In a simple toy model, the topology of the band structure experiences an interesting reorganization as we vary the strength of the double trace deformations. Finally, we develop tools that would allow one to build, in a bottom-up fashion, a holographic avatar of the Hubbard model.

  20. Sensitivity of C-Band Polarimetric Radar-Based Drop Size Distribution Measurements to Maximum Diameter Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of rain drop size distribution (DSD) parameters from polarimetric radar observations is accomplished by first establishing a relationship between differential reflectivity (Z(sub dr)) and the central tendency of the rain DSD such as the median volume diameter (D0). Since Z(sub dr) does not provide a direct measurement of DSD central tendency, the relationship is typically derived empirically from rain drop and radar scattering models (e.g., D0 = F[Z (sub dr)] ). Past studies have explored the general sensitivity of these models to temperature, radar wavelength, the drop shape vs. size relation, and DSD variability. Much progress has been made in recent years in measuring the drop shape and DSD variability using surface-based disdrometers, such as the 2D Video disdrometer (2DVD), and documenting their impact on polarimetric radar techniques. In addition to measuring drop shape, another advantage of the 2DVD over earlier impact type disdrometers is its ability to resolve drop diameters in excess of 5 mm. Despite this improvement, the sampling limitations of a disdrometer, including the 2DVD, make it very difficult to adequately measure the maximum drop diameter (D(sub max)) present in a typical radar resolution volume. As a result, D(sub max) must still be assumed in the drop and radar models from which D0 = F[Z(sub dr)] is derived. Since scattering resonance at C-band wavelengths begins to occur in drop diameters larger than about 5 mm, modeled C-band radar parameters, particularly Z(sub dr), can be sensitive to D(sub max) assumptions. In past C-band radar studies, a variety of D(sub max) assumptions have been made, including the actual disdrometer estimate of D(sub max) during a typical sampling period (e.g., 1-3 minutes), D(sub max) = C (where C is constant at values from 5 to 8 mm), and D(sub max) = M*D0 (where the constant multiple, M, is fixed at values ranging from 2.5 to 3.5). The overall objective of this NASA Global Precipitation Measurement

  1. X-Band to W-Band Doppler Radar Using Reconfigurable RF T/R MMIC Series, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, TLC will demonstrate and deliver a remote mixed-mode adjustable X-band to W-band transceiver chip that can perform well as a FMCW, super-heterodyne...

  2. Probabilistic discrimination between liquid rainfall events, hailstorms, biomass burning and industrial fires from C-Band Radar Polarimetric Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, J. M.; Sepúlveda, J.; Hoyos, C.; Herrera, L.

    2017-12-01

    Characterization and identification of fire and hailstorm events using weather radar data in a tropical complex topography region is an important task in risk management and agriculture. Polarimetric variables from a C-Band Dual polarization weather radar have potential uses in particle classification, due to the relationship their sensitivity to shape, spatial orientation, size and fall behavior of particles. In this sense, three forest fires and two chemical fires were identified for the Áburra Valley regions. Measurements were compared between each fire event type and with typical data radar retrievals for liquid precipitation events. Results of this analysis show different probability density functions for each type of event according to the particles present in them. This is very important and useful result for early warning systems to avoid precipitation false alarms during fire events within the study region, as well as for the early detection of fires using radar retrievals in remote cases. The comparative methodology is extended to hailstorm cases. Complementary sensors like laser precipitation sensors (LPM) disdrometers and meteorological stations were used to select dates of solid precipitation occurrence. Then, in this dates weather radar data variables were taken in pixels surrounding the stations and solid precipitation polar values were statistically compared with liquid precipitation values. Spectrum precipitation measured by LPM disdrometer helps to define typical features like particles number, fall velocities and diameters for both precipitation types. In addition, to achieve a complete hailstorm characterization, other meteorological variables were analyzed: wind field from meteorological stations and radar wind profiler, profiling data from Micro Rain Radar (MRR), and thermodynamic data from a microwave radiometer.

  3. Evaluating the Solar Slowly Varying Component at C-Band Using Dual- and Single-Polarization Weather Radars in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gabella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Six C-band weather radars located in Europe (Finland, Netherlands, and Switzerland have been used to monitor the slowly varying solar emission, which is an oscillation with an amplitude of several decibels and a period of approximately 27 days. It is caused by the fact that the number of active regions that enhance the solar radio emission with respect to the quiet component, as seen from Earth, varies because of the Sun’s rotation about its axis. The analysis is based on solar signals contained in the polar volume data produced during the operational weather scan strategy. This paper presents hundreds of daily comparisons between radar estimates and the Sun’s reference signal, during the current active Sun period (year 2014. The Sun’s reference values are accurately measured by the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO at S-band and converted to C-band using a standard DRAO formula. Vertical and horizontal polarization receivers are able to capture the monthly oscillation of the solar microwave signal: the standard deviation of the log-transformed ratio between radars and the DRAO reference ranges from 0.26 to 0.4 dB. A larger coefficient (and a different value for the quiet Sun component in the standard formula improves the agreement.

  4. High-depth-resolution 3-dimensional radar-imaging system based on a few-cycle W-band photonic millimeter-wave pulse generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Wun, Jhih-Min; Chen, Wei; Peng, Sui-Wei; Shi, Jin-Wei; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-06-17

    We demonstrate that a near-single-cycle photonic millimeter-wave short-pulse generator at W-band is capable to provide high spatial resolution three-dimensional (3-D) radar imaging. A preliminary study indicates that 3-D radar images with a state-of-the-art ranging resolution of around 1.2 cm at the W-band can be achieved.

  5. Development of an Airborne Ka-band FMCW Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In the field of airborne earth observation there is a special interest in lightweight, low cost imaging radars of high resolution. Such radar systems could play an essential role in small-scale earth observation applications such as the monitoring of dikes, watercourses or areas in which gas pipes

  6. Extracting bird migration information from C-band Doppler weather radars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gasteren, H.; Holleman, I.; Bouten, W.; van Loon, E.; Shamoun-Baranes, J.

    2008-01-01

    Although radar has been used in studies of bird migration for 60 years, there is still no network in Europe for comprehensive monitoring of bird migration. Europe has a dense network of military air surveillance radars but most systems are not directly suitable for reliable bird monitoring. Since

  7. Operational Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Initiation Forecasting Utilizing S-Band Dual-Polarization Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Kumjian, 2013a; 2013c). 2.6 Dual-Polarization Studies of Lightning Initiation Since the implementation of DP radar, meteorologist and...Course in Cloud Physics. Butterworth- Heinmann Pub. Rinehart, R. E., 2010: Radar for Meteorologists . 5th ed. Rinehart. Rutledge, S. A., and W. A

  8. Estimating the vertical structure of intense Mediterranean precipitation using two X-band weather radar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Delrieu, G.; Andrieu, H.

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims at a preliminary approach of multiradar compositing applied to the estimation of the vertical structure of precipitation¿an important issue for radar rainfall measurement and prediction. During the HYDROMET Integrated Radar Experiment (HIRE¿98), the vertical profile of

  9. High Resolution Radar Imaging using Coherent MultiBand Processing Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Ebeling, R.P.; Huizing, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution radar imaging techniques can be used in ballistic missile defence systems to determine the type of ballistic missile during the boost phase (threat typing) and to discriminate different parts of a ballistic missile after the boost phase. The applied radar imaging technique is 2D

  10. TDMA X-band FMCW MIMO radar for short range surveillance applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.; Maas, A.P.M.; Hoogeboom, P.; Rossum, W.L. van

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this paper was aimed at the design of a compact radar device to be used for private area surveillance applications. The radar is connected to a pan tilt zoom camera and it provides the camera system with high accuracy position information (bearing and range) of moving targets;

  11. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar Corrections Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Karen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toto, Tami [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The KAZRCOR Value -added Product (VAP) performs several corrections to the ingested KAZR moments and also creates a significant detection mask for each radar mode. The VAP computes gaseous attenuation as a function of time and radial distance from the radar antenna, based on ambient meteorological observations, and corrects observed reflectivities for that effect. KAZRCOR also dealiases mean Doppler velocities to correct velocities whose magnitudes exceed the radar’s Nyquist velocity. Input KAZR data fields are passed through into the KAZRCOR output files, in their native time and range coordinates. Complementary corrected reflectivity and velocity fields are provided, along with a mask of significant detections and a number of data quality flags. This report covers the KAZRCOR VAP as applied to the original KAZR radars and the upgraded KAZR2 radars. Currently there are two separate code bases for the different radar versions, but once KAZR and KAZR2 data formats are harmonized, only a single code base will be required.

  12. Development of Coatings for Radar Absorbing Materials at X-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Singh, Samarjit

    2018-03-01

    The present review gives a brief account on some of the technical features of radar absorbing materials (RAMs). The paper has been presented with a concentrated approach towards the material aspects for achieving enhanced radar absorption characteristics for its application as a promising candidate in stealth technology and electromagnetic interference (EMI) minimization problems. The effect of metal particles doping/dispersion in the ferrites and dielectrics has been discussed for obtaining tunable radar absorbing characteristics. A short theoretical overview on the development of absorber materials, implementation of genetic algorithm (GA) in multi-layering and frequency selective surfaces (FSSs) based multi-layer has also been presented for the development of radar absorbing coatings for achieving better absorption augmented with broadband features in order to counter the radar detection systems.

  13. Holographic memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Berg, R.H.; Hvilsted, Søren

    1999-01-01

    A Two-dimensional holographic memory for archival storage is described. Assuming a coherent transfer function, an A4 page can be stored at high resolution in an area of 1 mm(2). Recently developed side-chain liquid crystalline azobenzene polyesters are found to be suitable media for holographic s...

  14. An Operative X-band Mini-radar Network to Monitor Rainfall Events with High Time and Space Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bertoldo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing frequency of extreme and very localized precipitation events have been causing landslides, floods and casualties, especially in Sicily, due to its complex orography, and to the presence of densely inhabited areas just at the mouth of small basins. In order to monitor such phenomena with the needed high resolution in time and space, an experimental network of X-band mini-radars, exclusively devoted to monitor rain, has been installed in some parts of Sicily since November 2010. The network is made up by 4 mini weather radars able to acquire a rain map every minute (or even at shorter intervals with a radial space resolution better than 100 m within a range of up to 30 km. Their low cost and the easiness of installation make such radars ideal for monitoring small areas or even just limited angular sectors, since it is more convenient to install more than one instrument instead of choosing special site locations or spending for installation support. The raw data are immediately processed in real time by the software installed on each radar unit, Cartesian maps are locally produced, compressed and transmitted via GPRS to a server where ad hoc products for the users are prepared and made available on a web site. A few examples of final products and some comparisons with rain gauges are presented.

  15. Texture-Analysis-Incorporated Wind Parameters Extraction from Rain-Contaminated X-Band Nautical Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for extracting wind parameters from rain-contaminated X-band nautical radar images is presented. The texture of the radar image is first generated based on spatial variability analysis. Through this process, the rain clutter in an image can be removed while the wave echoes are retained. The number of rain-contaminated pixels in each azimuthal direction of the texture is estimated, and this is used to determine the azimuthal directions in which the rain-contamination is negligible. Then, the original image data in these directions are selected for wind direction and speed retrieval using the modified intensity-level-selection-based wind algorithm. The proposed method is applied to shipborne radar data collected from the east Coast of Canada. The comparison of the radar results with anemometer data shows that the standard deviations of wind direction and speed using the rain mitigation technique can be reduced by about 14.5° and 1.3 m/s, respectively.

  16. Ku-Band radar penetration into Snow over Arctic Sea Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Stefan; Stenseng, Lars; Helm, Veit

    knowledge of the reflection horizon is critical for sea ice thickness retrieval, validation data is necessary to investigate the penetration of radar waves into the snow for the upcoming CryoSat-2 mission. Furthermore, the combination of both optical and RF wavelengths might be used to derive snow thickness...... observations are converted into freeboard profiles, taking the different footprints into account when comparing the two systems. Based on the probability distribution of laser and radar freeboard we discuss the specific characteristics of both systems and the apparent radar penetration over sea ice...

  17. Reconfigurable L-band Radar Transceiver using Digital Signal Synthesis, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II proposal, builds upon the extensive research and digital radar design that has been successfully completed during the Phase I contract. Key innovations...

  18. Numerical evaluation of an air- to-air missile radar cross section signature at X-band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bender Perotoni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The remote detection of a vehicle requires that some kinds of its emissions are tracked and detected. Usually, electromagnetic emissions are used in the form of radar (electromagnetic waves in the range of radiofrequency and microwaves. Different types of antennas are used as sensors, tailored to the signal frequency band and its polarization, as well as to the target distance (higher gain antennas used for low amplitude signals. For the specific case of radars, the use of computational methods to address the electromagnetic signature (spatial pattern of the scattered energy from the object has become widespread, given the high costs and complex equipment associated with these respective measurements. Therefore, the use of computer simulation is ideally suited for creating a realistic database of targets and its respective signatures. The same computer-created signatures database can also be used for the thermal range, enabling a complete technology solution for the signature and design of stealth vehicles, with reduced emissions.

  19. Wet and full-depth glide snow avalanche onset monitoring and detection with ground based Ku-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Célia; Bühler, Yves; Leinss, Silvan; Hajnsek, Irena

    2017-04-01

    Wet and full-depth glide snow avalanches can be of considerable danger for people and infrastructure in alpine regions. In Switzerland avalanche hazard predictions are performed by the Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF. However these predictions are issued on regional scale and do not yield information about the current status of particular slopes of interest. To investigate the potential of radar technology for avalanche prediction on the slope scale, we performed the following experiment. During the winter seasons 2015/2016 and 2016/2017, a ground-based Ku-band radar was placed in the vicinity of Davos (GR) in order to monitor the Dorfberg slope with 4-minute measurement intervals [1]. With Differential Interferometry [2] line of sight movements on the order of a fraction of the radar wavelength (1.7 cm) can be measured. Applying this technique to the Dorfberg scenario, it was possible to detect snowpack displacement of up to 0.4 m over 3 days in the avalanche release area prior to a snow avalanche event. A proof of concept of this approach was previously made by [3-5]. The analysis of the snowpack displacement history of such release areas shows that an avalanche is generally released after several cycles of acceleration and deceleration of a specific area of the snowpack, followed by an abrupt termination of the movement at the moment of the avalanche release. The acceleration and deceleration trends are related to thawing and refreezing of the snowpack induced by the daily temperature variations. The proposed method for the detection of snowpack displacements as indication for potential wet and full-depth glide snow avalanches is a promising tool to increase avalanche safety on specific slopes putting infrastructure or people at risk. The identification of a singular signature to discriminate the time window immediately prior to the release is still under investigation, but the ability to monitor snowpack displacement allows for mapping of zones

  20. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  1. Detecting and Quantifying Forest Change: The Potential of Existing C- and X-Band Radar Datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai A Tanase

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the opportunity provided by global interferometric radar datasets for monitoring deforestation, degradation and forest regrowth in tropical and semi-arid environments. The paper describes an easy to implement method for detecting forest spatial changes and estimating their magnitude. The datasets were acquired within space-borne high spatial resolutions radar missions at near-global scales thus being significant for monitoring systems developed under the United Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. The approach presented in this paper was tested in two areas located in Indonesia and Australia. Forest change estimation was based on differences between a reference dataset acquired in February 2000 by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and TanDEM-X mission (TDM datasets acquired in 2011 and 2013. The synergy between SRTM and TDM datasets allowed not only identifying changes in forest extent but also estimating their magnitude with respect to the reference through variations in forest height.

  2. Characterization of VHF radar observations associated with equatorial Spread F by narrow-band optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sekar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The VHF radars have been extensively used to investigate the structures and dynamics of equatorial Spread F (ESF irregularities. However, unambiguous identification of the nature of the structures in terms of plasma depletion or enhancement requires another technique, as the return echo measured by VHF radar is proportional to the square of the electron density fluctuations. In order to address this issue, co-ordinated radar backscatter and thermospheric airglow intensity measurements were carried out during March 2003 from the MST radar site at Gadanki. Temporal variations of 630.0-nm and 777.4-nm emission intensities reveal small-scale ("micro" and large-scale ("macro" variations during the period of observation. The micro variations are absent on non-ESF nights while the macro variations are present on both ESF and non-ESF nights. In addition to the well-known anti-correlation between the base height of the F-region and the nocturnal variation of thermospheric airglow intensities, the variation of the base height of the F-layer, on occasion, is found to manifest as a bottomside wave-like structure, as seen by VHF radar on an ESF night. The micro variations in the airglow intensities are associated with large-scale irregular plasma structures and found to be in correspondence with the "plume" structures obtained by VHF radar. In addition to the commonly observed depletions with upward movement, the observation unequivocally reveals the presence of plasma enhancements which move downwards. The observation of enhancement in 777.4-nm airglow intensity, which is characterized as plasma enhancement, provides an experimental verification of the earlier prediction based on numerical modeling studies.

  3. Continuous monitoring of biophysical Eucalyptus sp. parameters using interferometric synthetic aperture radar data in P and X bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Fábio Furlan; dos Santos, João Roberto; Mura, José Claudio

    2016-04-01

    This work aims to verify the applicability of models obtained using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for estimation of biophysical Eucalyptus saligna parameters [diameter of breast height (DBH), total height and volume], as a method of continuous forest inventory. In order to obtain different digital elevation models, and the interferometric height (Hint) to retrieve the tree heights, SAR surveying was carried out by an airborne interferometric SAR in two frequencies X and P bands. The study area, located in the Brazilian southeast region (S 22°53‧22″/W 45°26‧16″ and S 22°53‧22″/W 45°26‧16″), comprises 128.64 hectares of Eucalyptus saligna stands. The methodological procedures encompassed: forest inventory, topographic surveying, radar mapping, radar processing, and multivariable regression techniques to build Eucalyptus volume, DBH, and height models. The statistical regression pointed out Hint and interferometric coherence as the most important variables for the total height and DBH estimation; for the volume model, however, only the Hint variable was selected. The performance of the biophysical models from the second campaign, two years later (2006), were consistent and its results are very promising for updating annual inventories needed for managing Eucalyptus plantations.

  4. Breaking Kelvin-Helmholtz waves and cloud-top entrainment as revealed by K-band Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Ralph, F. Martin

    1993-01-01

    Radars have occasionally detected breaking Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) waves under clear-air conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer and in the free troposphere. However, very few direct measurements of such waves within clouds have previously been reported and those have not clearly documented wave breaking. In this article, we present some of the most detailed and striking radar observations to date of breaking KH waves within clouds and at cloud top and discuss their relevance to the issue of cloud-top entrainment, which is believed to be important in convective and stratiform clouds. Aircraft observations reported by Stith suggest that vortex-like circulations near cloud top are an entrainment mechanism in cumuliform clouds. Laboratory and modeling studies have examined possibility that KH instability may be responsible for mixing at cloud top, but direct observations have not yet been presented. Preliminary analyses shown here may help fill this gap. The data presented in this paper were obtained during two field projects in 1991 that included observations from the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory's K-band Doppler radar (wavelength = 8.7 mm) and special rawinsonde ascents. The sensitivity (-30 dBZ at 10 km range), fine spatial resolution (375-m pulse length and 0.5 degrees beamwidth), velocity measurement precision (5-10 cm s-1), scanning capability, and relative immunity to ground clutter make it sensitive to non-precipitating and weakly precipitating clouds, and make it an excellent instrument to study gravity waves in clouds. In particular, the narrow beam width and short pulse length create scattering volumes that are cylinders 37.5 m long and 45 m (90 m) in diameter at 5 km (10 km) range. These characteristics allow the radar to resolve the detailed structure in breaking KH waves such as have been seen in photographic cloud images.

  5. A Statistical Method for Reducing Sidelobe Clutter for the Ku-Band Precipitation Radar on Board the GPM Core Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takuji; Iguchi, Toshio; Kojima, Masahiro; Liao, Liang; Masaki, Takeshi; Hanado, Hiroshi; Meneghini, Robert; Oki, Riko

    2016-01-01

    A statistical method to reduce the sidelobe clutter of the Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) of the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on board the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is described and evaluated using DPR observations. The KuPR sidelobe clutter was much more severe than that of the Precipitation Radar on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), and it has caused the misidentification of precipitation. The statistical method to reduce sidelobe clutter was constructed by subtracting the estimated sidelobe power, based upon a multiple regression model with explanatory variables of the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of surface, from the received power of the echo. The saturation of the NRCS at near-nadir angles, resulting from strong surface scattering, was considered in the calculation of the regression coefficients.The method was implemented in the KuPR algorithm and applied to KuPR-observed data. It was found that the received power from sidelobe clutter over the ocean was largely reduced by using the developed method, although some of the received power from the sidelobe clutter still remained. From the statistical results of the evaluations, it was shown that the number of KuPR precipitation events in the clutter region, after the method was applied, was comparable to that in the clutter-free region. This confirms the reasonable performance of the method in removing sidelobe clutter. For further improving the effectiveness of the method, it is necessary to improve the consideration of the NRCS saturation, which will be explored in future work.

  6. Mini-RF S- and X-Band Bistatic Radar Observations of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G. W.; Carter, L. M.; Stickle, A. M.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Nolan, M. C.; Morgan, G. A.; Schroeder, D. M.; Mini-RF Team

    2017-10-01

    Mini-RF is operating in concert with the Arecibo Observatory and the Goldstone DSS-13 antenna to collect bistatic radar data. We will provide an update on science questions being addressed by the Mini-RF team in the current LRO extended mission.

  7. Autocorrelation structure of convective rainfall in semiarid-arid climate derived from high-resolution X-Band radar estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat

    2018-02-01

    Small scale rainfall variability is a key factor driving runoff response in fast responding systems, such as mountainous, urban and arid catchments. In this paper, the spatial-temporal autocorrelation structure of convective rainfall is derived with extremely high resolutions (60 m, 1 min) using estimates from an X-Band weather radar recently installed in a semiarid-arid area. The 2-dimensional spatial autocorrelation of convective rainfall fields and the temporal autocorrelation of point-wise and distributed rainfall fields are examined. The autocorrelation structures are characterized by spatial anisotropy, correlation distances 1.5-2.8 km and rarely exceeding 5 km, and time-correlation distances 1.8-6.4 min and rarely exceeding 10 min. The observed spatial variability is expected to negatively affect estimates from rain gauges and microwave links rather than satellite and C-/S-Band radars; conversely, the temporal variability is expected to negatively affect remote sensing estimates rather than rain gauges. The presented results provide quantitative information for stochastic weather generators, cloud-resolving models, dryland hydrologic and agricultural models, and multi-sensor merging techniques.

  8. A procedure to correct the effects of a relative delay between the quadrature components of radar signals at base band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grydeland

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The real and imaginary parts of baseband signals are obtained from a real narrow-band signal by quadrature mixing, i.e. by mixing with cosine and sine signals at the narrow band's selected center frequency. We address the consequences of a delay between the outputs of the quadrature mixer, which arise when digital samples of the quadrature baseband signals are not synchronised, i.e. when the real and imaginary components have been shifted by one or more samples with respect to each other. Through analytical considerations and simulations of such an error on different synthetic signals, we show how this error can be expected to afflict different measurements. In addition, we show the effect of the error on actual incoherent scatter radar data obtained by two different digital receiver systems used in parallel at the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. The analytical considerations indicate a procedure to correct the error, albeit with some limitations due to a small singular region. We demonstrate the correction procedure on actually afflicted data and compare the results to simultaneously acquired unafflicted data. We also discuss the possible data analysis strategies, including some that avoid dealing directly with the singular region mentioned above.

  9. High-resolution mapping of wetland vegetation biomass and distribution with L-band radar in southeastern coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N. M.; Simard, M.; Byrd, K. B.; Windham-Myers, L.; Castaneda, E.; Twilley, R.; Bevington, A. E.; Christensen, A.

    2017-12-01

    Louisiana coastal wetlands account for approximately one third (37%) of the estuarine wetland vegetation in the conterminous United States, yet the spatial distribution of their extent and aboveground biomass (AGB) is not well defined. This knowledge is critical for the accurate completion of national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. We generated high-resolution baselines maps of wetland vegetation extent and biomass at the Atchafalaya and Terrebonne basins in coastal Louisiana using a multi-sensor approach. Optical satellite data was used within an object-oriented machine learning approach to classify the structure of wetland vegetation types, offering increased detail over currently available land cover maps that do not distinguish between wetland vegetation types nor account for non-permanent seasonal changes in extent. We mapped 1871 km2 of wetlands during a period of peak biomass in September 2015 comprised of flooded forested wetlands and leaf, grass and emergent herbaceous marshes. The distribution of aboveground biomass (AGB) was mapped using JPL L-band Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). Relationships between time-series radar imagery and field data collected in May 2015 and September 2016 were derived to estimate AGB at the Wax Lake and Atchafalaya deltas. Differences in seasonal biomass estimates reflect the increased AGB in September over May, concurrent with periods of peak biomass and the onset of the vegetation growing season, respectively. This method provides a tractable means of mapping and monitoring biomass of wetland vegetation types with L-band radar, in a region threatened with wetland loss under projections of increasing sea-level rise and terrestrial subsidence. Through this, we demonstrate a method that is able to satisfy the IPCC 2013 Wetlands Supplement requirement for Tier 2/Tier 3 reporting of coastal wetland GHG inventories.

  10. Deployment and Performance of an X-Band Dual-Polarization Radar during the Southern China Monsoon Rainfall Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An X-band dual-polarization radar (XPRAD was deployed in Guangdong province as part of the Southern China Monsoon Rainfall Experiment (SCMREX during the storm season in 2016. This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of XPRAD observations during SCMREX with emphasis on data processing and rainfall products. The differential phase-based attenuation correction and radar calibration using self-consistency of dual-polarization observables are presented. It is found that the standard deviation of the Z d r bias is less than 0.2 dB based on ‘light rain at low angle’ and ‘dry aggregate snow’ observations. Cross-comparison with two standard S-band China New Generation Weather Radars (CINRAD shows that the bias of Z h has a mean value less than 1.5 dBZ and a standard deviation less than 0.5 dBZ. In addition, fifteen rainfall events that occurred during the intensive observing period (IOP are analyzed to demonstrate the rainfall estimation performance of XPRAD. In particular, rainfall accumulations at 1-, 2- and 3-h scales derived using R( K d p and R( Z h , Z d r relations are evaluated using national level rain gauge data and CINRAD-based rainfall estimation. The results show that both R( K d p - and R( Z h , Z d r -based products agree well with the rain gauge observations and CINRAD estimation. The difference between R ( K d p and R ( Z h , Z d r is not significant, although R ( K d p shows slightly better performance than R ( Z h , Z d r .

  11. Dynamic gauge adjustment of high-resolution X-band radar data for convective rain storms: Model-based evaluation against measured combined sewer overflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Morten; Grum, Morten; Linde, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    overflows from urban drainage systems, and we furthermore investigate the importance of the aggregation period of the adjustment scheme. This is done by continuously adjusting X-band radar data based on the previous 5–30 min of rain data recorded by multiple rain gauges and propagating the rainfall......, well defined, 64 ha urban catchment, for nine overflow generating rain events. The dynamically adjusted radar data perform best when the aggregation period is as small as 10–20 min, in which case it performs much better than static adjusted radar data and data from rain gauges situated 2–3 km away....

  12. A W-Band Heterodyne FMCW Radar Based on TX IQ-Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feger, Reinhard; Wagner, Christoph; Stelzer, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    In this paper a method to realize a heterodyne frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar is presented. The proposed principle relies on the use of an inphase/quadrature (IQ)-modulator as single-sideband-mixer to shift the frequency of the FMCW-output away from dc. Since in any IQ-modulator phase and amplitude imbalances occur, the effect of these imbalances will be investigated by deriving the corresponding signal model. Based on this analysis, a method to compensate the imbalances by a predistortion of the modulation signal will be derived. The presented method does not require special test signals or additional hardware, but relies on a standard FMCW measurement onto a calibration target. A prototype radar system was built and used in test measurements to verify the proposed principle. The measurement results show that a suppression of unwanted signal components caused by IQ-imbalances better than 45 dB is achievable.

  13. Modelling a C-Band Space Surveillance Radar using Systems Tool Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Abbreviations AGI Analytical Graphics, Inc. CFAR Constant False Alarm Rate CW Continuous Wave ITU International Telecommunications Union LEO Low Earth...constant false alarm rate ( CFAR ) receiver adjusts the detection threshold based on the noise in reference ’cells’ around the cell being examined for...alarm and the RCS fluctuation type (taken from the target RCS properties). For CFAR radar, the probability of detection is also a function of the

  14. Disdrometer-based C-Band Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) in a highly complex terrain region in tropical Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, J.; Hoyos Ortiz, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    An adequate quantification of precipitation over land is critical for many societal applications including agriculture, hydroelectricity generation, water supply, and risk management associated with extreme events. The use of rain gauges, a traditional method for precipitation estimation, and an excellent one, to estimate the volume of liquid water during a particular precipitation event, does not allow to fully capture the highly spatial variability of the phenomena which is a requirement for almost all practical applications. On the other hand, the weather radar, an active remote sensing sensor, provides a proxy for rainfall with fine spatial resolution and adequate temporary sampling, however, it does not measure surface precipitation. In order to fully exploit the capabilities of the weather radar, it is necessary to develop quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) techniques combining radar information with in-situ measurements. Different QPE methodologies are explored and adapted to local observations in a highly complex terrain region in tropical Colombia using a C-Band radar and a relatively dense network of rain gauges and disdrometers. One important result is that the expressions reported in the literature for extratropical locations are not representative of the conditions found in the tropical region studied. In addition to reproducing the state-of-the-art techniques, a new multi-stage methodology based on radar-derived variables and disdrometer data is proposed in order to achieve the best QPE possible. The main motivation for this new methodology is based on the fact that most traditional QPE methods do not directly take into account the different uncertainty sources involved in the process. The main advantage of the multi-stage model compared to traditional models is that it allows assessing and quantifying the uncertainty in the surface rain rate estimation. The sub-hourly rainfall estimations using the multi-stage methodology are realistic

  15. W-band Solid State Power Amplifier for Remote Sensing Radars, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High power, compact, reliable and affordable power amplifiers operating in the W-band (94 GHz region) are critical to realizing transmitters for many NASA missions...

  16. W-Band Solid State Power Amplifier for Remote Sensing Radars, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High power, compact, reliable and affordable power amplifiers operating in the W-band (94 GHz region) are critical to realizing transmitters for many NASA missions...

  17. Systematic retrieval of ejecta velocities and gas fluxes at Etna volcano using L-Band Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouhier, Mathieu; Donnadieu, Franck

    2011-11-01

    Strombolian-type volcanic activity is characterized by a series of gas bubbles bursting at the top of a magma column and leading to the ejection of lava clots and gas emission at the surface. The quantitative analysis of physical parameters (e.g., velocity, size, and mass fluxes) controlling the emission dynamics of these volcanic products is very important for the understanding of eruption source mechanisms but remains difficult to obtain in a systematic fashion. Ground-based Doppler radar is found to be a very effective tool for measuring ejecta velocities at a high acquisition rate and close to the emission source. We present here a series of measurements carried out at Mt. Etna's Southeast crater, using an L-band volcanological Doppler radar, during the 4 July 2001 Strombolian eruptions. Doppler radar data are supplemented by the analysis of video snapshots recorded simultaneously. We provide here a set of physical parameters systematically retrieved from 247 Strombolian explosions spanning 15 min and occurring during the paroxysm of the eruption from 21:30 to 21:45 UT. The time-average values give a maximum particle velocity of V_{{}}^p = {94}.{7}± {24} {{m/s}} , a bulk lava jet velocity of {V_{{{{PW - rad}}}}} = {37}.{6}± {1}.{9} {{m/s}} , and an initial gas velocity at the source vent of V_0^g = {118}.{4}± {36} {{m/s}} . The time-averaged particle diameter is found to be about {D_{{{{PW - rad}}}}} = {4}.{2}± {2}.{1} {{cm}} . The volume and mass gas fluxes are estimated from time-averaged source gas velocities over the sequence duration at Q_v^g = {3} - {11} × {1}{0^{{3}}}{{{m}}^{{3}}}{{/s}} and Q_m^g = 0.{5} - {2} × {1}{0^{{3}}}{{kg/s}} , respectively.

  18. SIMULATION OF THE Ku-BAND RADAR ALTIMETER SEA ICE EFFECTIVE SCATTERING SURFACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonboe, Rasmus; Andersen, Søren; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2006-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to simulate the sea ice radar altimeter effective scattering surface variability as a function of snow depth and density. Under dry snow conditions without layering these are the primary snow parameters affecting the scattering surface variability. The model...... is initialised with in situ data collected during the May 2004 GreenIce ice camp in the Lincoln Sea (73ºW; 85ºN). Our results show that the snow cover is important for the effective scattering surface depth in sea ice and thus for the range measurement, ice freeboard and ice thickness estimation....

  19. Using X-band Weather Radar Measurements to Monitor the Integrity of Digital Elevation Models for Synthetic Vision Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Further, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a realtime monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around the Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  20. ESTIMATION OF WIDE BAND RADAR CROSS SECTION (RCS OF REGULAR SHAPED OBJECTS USING METHOD OF MOMENTS (MOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madheswaran

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern fighter aircrafts, ships, missiles etc need to be very low Radar Cross Section (RCS designs, to avoid detection by hostile radars. Hence accurate prediction of RCS of complex objects like aircrafts is essential to meet this requirement. A simple and efficient numerical procedure for treating problems of wide band RCS prediction Perfect Electric Conductor (PEC objects is developed using Method of Moment (MoM. Implementation of MoM for prediction of RCS involves solving Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE for electric current using the vector and scalar potential solutions, which satisfy the boundary condition that the tangential electric field at the boundary of the PEC body is zero. For numerical purposes, the objects are modeled using planar triangular surfaces patches. Set of special sub-domain type basis functions are defined on pairs of adjacent triangular patches. These basis functions yield a current representation free of line or point charges at sub-domain boundaries. Once the current distribution is obtained, dipole model is used to find Scattering field in free space. RCS can be calculated from the scattered and incident fields. Numerical results for a square plate, a cube, and a sphere are presented over a bandwidth.

  1. K-band Doppler radar for contact-less overnight sleep marker assessment: a pilot validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasireddy, Rakesh; Roth, Corinne; Mathis, Johannes; Goette, Josef; Jacomet, Marcel; Vogt, Andreas

    2017-09-11

    An estimated 45 million persons in Europe are annually subjected to sleep-wake disorders. State-of-the-art polysomnography provides sophisticated insights into sleep (patho)physiology. A drawback of the method, however, is the obtrusive setting dependent on a clinical-based sleep laboratory with high operational costs. A contact-less prototype was developed to monitor limb movements and vital signs during sleep. A dual channel K-band Doppler radar transceiver captured limb movements and periodic chest wall motion due to respiration and heart activity. A wavelet transform based multi-resolution analysis (MRA) approach isolated limb movements, respiration, and heart rate from the demodulated signal. A test bench setup characterized the prototype simulating near physiological chest wall motions caused by periodic respiration and heartbeats in humans. Single- and multi-tone test bench simulations showed extremely low relative percentage errors of the prototype for respiratory and heart rate within -2 and 1%. The performance of the prototype was validated in overnight comparative studies, involving two healthy volunteers, with polysomnography as the reference. The prototype has successfully classified limb movements, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88.9 and 76.8% respectively, and has achieved accurate respiratory and heart rate measurement performance with overall absolute errors of 1 breath per minute for respiration and 3 beats per minute for heart rate. This pilot study shows that K-band Doppler radar and wavelet transform MRA seem to be valid for overnight sleep marker assessment. The contact-less approach might offer a promising solution for home-based sleep monitoring and assessment.

  2. Study on coding strategies for radar coded-aperture imaging in terahertz band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo; Luo, Chenggao; Deng, Bin; Qin, Yuliang; Wang, Hongqiang

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the principle of coded-aperture imaging and microwave radar coincidence imaging (RCI), terahertz radar coded-aperture imaging (RCAI) is proposed to obtain high-resolution, forward-looking, and staring imaging. The terahertz RCAI method resolves target scatterers using the correlation processing of the modulated echoes and the reference signal matrix. This process is similar to the basic principle of RCI. To investigate the coding strategies of terahertz RCAI, this study derives three signal models describing operation with the coded aperture placed separately in the transmitting terminal and the receiving terminal and in both of them simultaneously. Furthermore, coding strategies are categorized according to coded-aperture placement and encoded signal, including amplitude modulation and phase modulation. In addition, qualitative and quantitative analysis methods are introduced to describe the resolving ability of terahertz RCAI. Numerical simulations are performed to analyze and compare the performance on different coding strategies. These analyses can provide constructive guidelines for the design of terahertz RCAI systems.

  3. Suitability of GaN and LDMOS for 70–82% efficiency 120–200W HPA addressing spaceborne P-band radar applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Gallou, N.; Vidkjær, Jens; Poivey, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of P-band (435 MHz) HPA based on different technologies (GaN HEMT, LDMOS FET) for future use in pace radar applications in the context of the Biomass project. In particular best in class PAE of 70%–82% is targeted and achieved for power levels of 120W. In orde...

  4. Suitability of GaN and LDMOS for 70–82% efficiency 120–200W HPA addressing spaceborne P-band radar applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Gallou, N.; Vidkjær, Jens; Poivey, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of P-band (435 MHz) HPA based on different technologies (GaN HEMT, LDMOS FET) for future use in pace radar applications in the context of the Biomass project. In particular best in class PAE of 70%–82% is targeted and achieved for power levels of 120W. In order...

  5. Detection of Biomass Fires and Tracking of Plumes in Southeast Brazil with S-Band Radars and TITAN Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Gerhard; Saraiva, Ernandes A.; Gomes, Ana M.; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Ramires, Thiago

    2013-04-01

    The S-band radars of the Meteorological Research Institute (IPMet) in Bauru and Presidente Prudente are situated within major sugar cane producing regions in the State of São Paulo, where the sugar cane is harvested from April until November, generally by burning sectors of the plantations prior to manual harvesting, resulting in large quantities of aerosols being emitted into the atmosphere, not only negatively affecting local towns, but also regions much further away. In the absence of rain during the dry winter season, the actual fires and subsequent plumes can be observed by IPMet's S-band Doppler radars within their 240 km quantitative ranges, deploying a special scanning cycle which was configured to provide a better vertical resolution up to the anticipated detectable top of the plumes (10 elevations from 10,0° down to 0,3°; resolution of 250 m in range and 1° in azimuth; 7,5 min per volume scan). During August 2010, a one-month multi-disciplinary pilot study was executed with two-fold objectives in two separate regions of the Bauru radar range: to verify the onset of the actual fire and quantify the combustion process and to characterize the effects of those emissions on the atmosphere. The TITAN (Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis and Nowcasting) Software was deployed to determine the intensity of the initial fire (based on radar reflectivity in dBZ), and subsequently the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the smoke plume and the velocity of dispersion. The thresholds used for tracking the smoke envelopes were 10 dBZ with a minimum volume of 2 km3, but the position and extent of already diluted plumes could be identified up to 100-150 km range at -6 dBZ. Samples of the biomass material were collected to characterize and quantify the fuel mass before and after burning, which could be related to the fire intensity and subsequent aerosol density of the smoke plume (experimental site ca 50 km east of Bauru). At another remote site (Ourinhos

  6. Ice fall streaks in a warm front . An S-band polarimetric radar study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppas, Stavros; Crosier, Jonathan; Choularton, Thomas; Bower, Keith

    2017-04-01

    On 21st January 2009, a maturing low pressure system approached the UK along with several associated systems. An observational research flight (part of the APPRAISE-Clouds project) took place in southern England, sampling the leading warm front of this system. During the flight, the Warm Conveyor Belt (WCB) was well depicted by the radar Doppler velocity parameter. Simultaneously, extensive ice fall streaks appeared on ZDR RHI scans as long slanted zones of high ZDR. It seems that there is a connection between the WCB activity and the formation and structure of the ice fall streaks. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability caused by the WCB played a key role on their formation. Moreover, in-situ measurements showed that the ice fall streaks had a very specific substance and they can affect the surface precipitation.

  7. Use of the SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) P band for detection of the Moche and Lambayeque canal networks in the Apurlec region, Perù

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria; Santovito, Maria Rosaria; Pica, Giulia; Catapano, Ilaria; Fornaro, Gianfranco; Lanari, Riccardo; Soldovieri, Francesco; Wester La Torre, Carlos; Fernandez Manayalle, Marco Antonio; Longo, Francesco; Facchinetti, Claudia; Formaro, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, research attention has been devoted to the development of a new class of airborne radar systems using low frequency bands ranging from VHF/UHF to P and L ones. In this frame, the Italian Space Agency (ASI) has promoted the development of a new multi-mode and multi-band airborne radar system, which can be considered even a "proof-of-concept" for the next space-borne missions. In particular, in agreement with the ASI, the research consortium CO.RI.S.T.A. has in charge the design, development and flight validation of such a kind of system, which is the first airborne radar entirely built in Italy. The aim was to design and realize a radar system able to work in different modalities as: nadir-looking sounder at VHF band (163 MHz); side-looking imager (SAR) at P band with two channels at 450 MHz and 900 MHz. The P-band is a penetration radar. Exploiting penetration features of low frequency electromagnetic waves, dielectric discontinuities of observed scene due to inhomogeneous materials rise up and can be detected on the resulting image. Therefore buried objects or targets placed under vegetation may be detected. Penetration capabilities essentially depend on microwave frequency. Typically, penetration distance is inversely proportional to microwave frequency. The higher the frequency, the lower the penetration depth. Terrain characteristics affect penetration capabilities. Humidity acts as a shield to microwave penetration. Hence terrain with high water content are not good targets for P-band applicability. Science community, governments and space agencies have increased their interest about low frequency radar for their useful applicability in climatology, ecosystem monitoring, glaciology, archaeology. The combination of low frequency and high relative bandwidth of such a systems has a large applicability in both military and civilian applications, ranging from forestry applications, biomass measuring, archaeological and geological exploration

  8. Land cover classification accuracy from electro-optical, X, C, and L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, Mark Gregory

    The fusion of electro-optical (EO) multi-spectral satellite imagery with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data was explored with the working hypothesis that the addition of multi-band SAR will increase the land-cover (LC) classification accuracy compared to EO alone. Three satellite sources for SAR imagery were used: X-band from TerraSAR-X, C-band from RADARSAT-2, and L-band from PALSAR. Images from the RapidEye satellites were the source of the EO imagery. Imagery from the GeoEye-1 and WorldView-2 satellites aided the selection of ground truth. Three study areas were chosen: Wad Medani, Sudan; Campinas, Brazil; and Fresno- Kings Counties, USA. EO imagery were radiometrically calibrated, atmospherically compensated, orthorectifed, co-registered, and clipped to a common area of interest (AOI). SAR imagery were radiometrically calibrated, and geometrically corrected for terrain and incidence angle by converting to ground range and Sigma Naught (?0). The original SAR HH data were included in the fused image stack after despeckling with a 3x3 Enhanced Lee filter. The variance and Gray-Level-Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) texture measures of contrast, entropy, and correlation were derived from the non-despeckled SAR HH bands. Data fusion was done with layer stacking and all data were resampled to a common spatial resolution. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) decision rule was used for the supervised classifications. Similar LC classes were identified and tested for each study area. For Wad Medani, nine classes were tested: low and medium intensity urban, sparse forest, water, barren ground, and four agriculture classes (fallow, bare agricultural ground, green crops, and orchards). For Campinas, Brazil, five generic classes were tested: urban, agriculture, forest, water, and barren ground. For the Fresno-Kings Counties location 11 classes were studied: three generic classes (urban, water, barren land), and eight specific crops. In all cases the addition of SAR to EO resulted

  9. Processing Ultra Wide Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Data with Motion Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Soren Norvang

    1996-01-01

    Several issues makes the processing of ultra wide band (UWB) SAR data acquired from an airborne platform difficult. The character of UWB data invalidates many of the usual SAR batch processing techniques, leading to the application of wavenumber domain type processors...This paper will suggest and evaluate an algorithm which combines a wavenumber domain processing algorithm with a motion compensation procedure which enables motion compensation to be applied as a function of target range and the azimuth angle.

  10. Integration of Optical and X-Band Radar Data for Pasture Biomass Estimation in an Open Savannah Woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmidt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pasture biomass is an important quantity globally in livestock industries, carbon balances, and bushfire management. Quantitative estimates of pasture biomass or total standing dry matter (TSDM at the field scale are much desired by land managers for land-resource management, forage budgeting, and conservation purposes. Estimates from optical satellite imagery alone tend to saturate in the cover-to-mass relationship and fail to differentiate standing dry matter from litter. X-band radar imagery was added to complement optical imagery with a structural component to improve TSDM estimates in rangelands. High quality paddock-scale field data from a northeastern Australian cattle grazing trial were used to establish a statistical TSDM model by integrating optical satellite image data from the Landsat sensor with observations from the TerraSAR-X (TSX radar satellite. Data from the dry season of 2014 and the wet season of 2015 resulted in models with adjusted r2 of 0.81 in the dry season and 0.74 in the wet season. The respective models had a mean standard error of 332 kg/ha and 240 kg/ha. The wet and dry season conditions were different, largely due to changed overstorey vegetation conditions, but not greatly in a pasture ‘growth’ sense. A more robust combined-season model was established with an adjusted r2 of 0.76 and a mean standard error of 358 kg/ha. A clear improvement in the model performance could be demonstrated when integrating HH polarised TSX imagery with optical satellite image products.

  11. X-Band high range resolution radar measurements of sea surface forward scatter at low grazing angles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, JC

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Radar measurements of a radar calibration sphere test target suspended in sea surface multipath propagation conditions are reported. Wideband measurements together with high range resolution (HRR) processing were employed to resolve the direct...

  12. Characterization of Mediterranean hail-bearing storms using an operational polarimetric X-band radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vulpiani

    2015-11-01

    It is based on an iterative approach that uses a very short-length (1 km moving window, allowing proper capture of the observed high radial gradients of the differential phase. The parameterization of the attenuation correction algorithm, which uses the reconstructed differential phase shift, is derived from electromagnetic simulations based on 3 years of drop size distribution (DSD observations collected in Rome (Italy. A fuzzy logic hydrometeor classification algorithm was also adopted to support the analysis of the storm characteristics. The precipitation field amounts were reconstructed using a combined polarimetric rainfall algorithm based on reflectivity and specific differential phase. The first storm was observed on 21 February when a winter convective system that originated in the Tyrrhenian Sea, marginally hit the central-eastern coastline of Sicily, causing a flash flood in Catania. Due to an optimal location (the system is located a few kilometers from the city center, it was possible to retrieve the storm characteristics fairly well, including the amount of rainfall field at the ground. Extemporaneous signal extinction, caused by close-range hail core causing significant differential phase shift in a very short-range path, is documented. The second storm, on 21 August 2013, was a summer mesoscale convective system that originated from a Mediterranean low pressure system lasting a few hours that eventually flooded the city of Syracuse. The undergoing physical process, including the storm dynamics, is inferred by analyzing the vertical sections of the polarimetric radar measurements. The high registered amount of precipitation was fairly well reconstructed, although with a trend toward underestimation at increasing distances. Several episodes of signal extinction were clearly manifested during the mature stage of the observed supercells.

  13. Polarimetric C-/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations of Melting Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, J. A.; Beckers, J. F.; Brossier, E.; Haas, C.

    2013-12-01

    Operational ice information services rely heavily on space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for the production of ice charts to meet their mandate of providing timely and accurate sea ice information to support safe and efficient marine operations. During the summer melt period, the usefulness of SAR data for sea ice monitoring is limited by the presence of wet snow and melt ponds on the ice surface, which can mask the signature of the underlying ice. This is a critical concern for ice services whose clients (e.g. commercial shipping, cruise tourism, resource exploration and extraction) are most active at this time of year when sea ice is at its minimum extent, concentration and thickness. As a result, there is a need to further quantify the loss of ice information in SAR data during the melt season and to identify what information can still be retrieved about ice surface conditions and melt pond evolution at this time of year. To date the majority of studies have been limited to analysis of single-polarization C-band SAR data. This study will investigate the potential complimentary and unique sea ice information that polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data can provide to supplement the information available from traditional single co-polarized C-band SAR data. A time-series of polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data was acquired over Jones Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, in the vicinity of the Grise Fiord, Nunavut. Five RADARSAT-2 Wide Fine Quad-pol images and 11 TerraSAR-X StripMap dual-pol (HH/VV) images were acquired. The time-series begins at the onset of melt in early June and extends through advanced melt conditions in late July. Over this period several ponding and drainage events and two snowfall events occurred. Field observations of sea ice properties were collected using an Ice Mass Balance (IMB) buoy, hourly photos from a time-lapse camera deployed on a coastal cliff, and manual in situ measurements of snow thickness and melt pond depth

  14. Pendugaan Potensi Cadangan Karbon Hutan di Atas Permukaan pada Ekosistem Mangrove Berbasis Synthetic Aperture Radar L-BAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Fatwa Hudaya

    2016-10-01

    ABSTRACT The government policy to reduce the GHG (Green House Gas emision from forestry sector, the need for sufficient forest carbon stock measurement system which encompass a faster measurement and covering broader geographic area to estimate the potential of forest carbon stock is now growing, one of which is the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR in radar remote sensing systems. The objectives of this study are to demonstrate the strong relationship between the L-band backscatter of ALOS PALSAR and the aboveground carbon stock in mangrove forest; and its sensitivity level. The information resulted from this study can be useful in reducing strategies of GHG (Green House Gases emision, due to the climate change mitigation efforts in Indonesia. The study site was located at the area of mangrove forest, in Kubu Raya regency, West Kalimantan. The estimation models for aboveground biomass carbon stock was obtained from a quantitative analysis using regression method; i.e. by correlating the values of ALOS PALSAR 50m Res. backscatters at HH and HV polarization with the actual biomass total amount resulted from field -based allometric plots measurements. The estimation models were subsequently use for forest carbon stocks quantification in mangroves, and its distribution geographically. Strong relationship was found with coefficient of determination (R2 62 % on HH polarization based on the equation model of Y=1647e0,358BS_HH  and , 98.6 % on HV polarization based on the equation model of Y = 6,828BS_HV2 + 279,4BS_HV + 2870; two models of carbon density classification maps i.e. model-1 (HH and model-2 (HV are also resulted from the two equation models. The quantity of AGB (aboveground biomass of  mangrove forest in Kubu Raya district found as 178.43 Mg/ ha, while the aboveground biomass carbon is 5,334,454.9 Mg (Mega grams or 5,3 Mt (Mega tons of carbon, and the capacity of carbon dioxide (CO2 sequestration is 19.451 Mt (megatons CO2 equivalent. The Sensitivity of L-band

  15. Design of a radar system based on compact cavity-backed ultra wide band slot antennas for ground penetrating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnard, F.

    2012-04-01

    Antennas with broadband characteristics have recently found various applications in modern ultra wide band (UWB) communication systems and in ground penetrating radar (GPR). Our applications are focused on imaging the subsurface of a large range of civil engineering structures at several depths using a bistatic GPR positioned on or close to the ground surface. The development of a compact (34*29 cm2) broadband pair of antennas operating in the frequency band from 0.27 to 3.1 GHz, whose radiation characteristics have been preliminary studied theoretically in details in different configurations, is to allow the probing of the subsurface in several frequency sub-bands using a step frequency (SF-GPR) acquisition mode. Microstrip patch antennas (MPAs) are one of the most basic and important types of planar antennas because they offer many advantages such as compact size, low-cost, ease of fabrication, light weight, and various shapes design. However, a low bandwidth and a low gain are the main shortcomings for such planar structure. The microstrip antenna has now reached maturity and many techniques have been suggested for achieving a high bandwidth such as using more complex shapes, parasitic elements, multilayer configurations and the tuning of the feed line. In this paper, an original printed rectangular slot antenna fed by a 50 Ohms CPW (coplanar waveguide) transmission line tuned by a E-shaped patch is presented. Presently, little work has been made to lower the operating frequency band of microstrip antennas at frequencies less than 0.8 MHz and to reduce the antenna size at these frequencies because major applications concern UWB wireless communications. By choosing a relative combination of a E-shaped patch, a linear feed line and a rectangular slot, we have designed an antenna structure on a FR4 substrate (h=1.5mm) with a very wide operating bandwidth whose nearly half of the spectrum covers frequencies lower than 1 GHz. A partial shield, only opened towards the

  16. Riding Quality Model for Asphalt Pavement Monitoring Using Phase Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiya Yoshikazu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There are difficulties associated with near-real time or frequent pavement monitoring, because it is time consuming and costly. This study aimed to develop a binary logit model for the evaluation of highway riding quality, which could be used to monitor pavement conditions. The model was applied to investigate the influence of backscattering values of Phase Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR. Training data obtained during 3–7 May 2007 was used in the development process, together with actual international roughness index (IRI values collected along a highway in Ayutthaya province, Thailand. The analysis showed that an increase in the backscattering value in the HH or the VV polarization indicated the poor condition of the pavement surface and, of the two, the HH polarization is more suitable for developing riding quality evaluation. The model developed was applied to analyze highway number 3467, to demonstrate its capability. It was found that the assessment accuracy of the prediction of the highway level of service was 97.00%. This is a preliminary study of the proposed technique and more intensive investigation must be carried out using ALOS/PALSAR images in various seasons.

  17. Fuzzy-logic detection and probability of hail exploiting short-range X-band weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vincenzo; Picciotti, Errico; Mazzarella, Vincenzo; Marzano, Frank Silvio; Budillon, Giorgio

    2018-03-01

    This work proposes a new method for hail precipitation detection and probability, based on single-polarization X-band radar measurements. Using a dataset consisting of reflectivity volumes, ground truth observations and atmospheric sounding data, a probability of hail index, which provides a simple estimate of the hail potential, has been trained and adapted within Naples metropolitan environment study area. The probability of hail has been calculated starting by four different hail detection methods. The first two, based on (1) reflectivity data and temperature measurements and (2) on vertically-integrated liquid density product, respectively, have been selected from the available literature. The other two techniques are based on combined criteria of the above mentioned methods: the first one (3) is based on the linear discriminant analysis, whereas the other one (4) relies on the fuzzy-logic approach. The latter is an innovative criterion based on a fuzzyfication step performed through ramp membership functions. The performances of the four methods have been tested using an independent dataset: the results highlight that the fuzzy-oriented combined method performs slightly better in terms of false alarm ratio, critical success index and area under the relative operating characteristic. An example of application of the proposed hail detection and probability products is also presented for a relevant hail event, occurred on 21 July 2014.

  18. CAMEX-4 TOGA RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TOGA radar dataset consists of browse and radar data collected from the TOGA radar during the CAMEX-4 experiment. TOGA is a C-band linear polarized doppler radar...

  19. An X-Band Radar Terrain Feature Detection Method for Low-Altitude SVS Operations and Calibration Using LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Campbell, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    To enable safe use of Synthetic Vision Systems at low altitudes, real-time range-to-terrain measurements may be required to ensure the integrity of terrain models stored in the system. This paper reviews and extends previous work describing the application of x-band radar to terrain model integrity monitoring. A method of terrain feature extraction and a transformation of the features to a common reference domain are proposed. Expected error distributions for the extracted features are required to establish appropriate thresholds whereby a consistency-checking function can trigger an alert. A calibration-based approach is presented that can be used to obtain these distributions. To verify the approach, NASA's DC-8 airborne science platform was used to collect data from two mapping sensors. An Airborne Laser Terrain Mapping (ALTM) sensor was installed in the cargo bay of the DC-8. After processing, the ALTM produced a reference terrain model with a vertical accuracy of less than one meter. Also installed was a commercial-off-the-shelf x-band radar in the nose radome of the DC-8. Although primarily designed to measure precipitation, the radar also provides estimates of terrain reflectivity at low altitudes. Using the ALTM data as the reference, errors in features extracted from the radar are estimated. A method to estimate errors in features extracted from the terrain model is also presented.

  20. Precipitation evidences on X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery: an approach for quantitative detection and estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Saverio; Marzano, Frank S.; Montopoli, Mario; Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno

    2017-04-01

    Spaceborne synthetic aperture radars (SARs) operating at L-band and above are nowadays a well-established tool for Earth remote sensing; among the numerous civil applications we can indicate flood areas detection and monitoring, earthquakes analysis, digital elevation model production, land use monitoring and classification. Appealing characteristics of this kind of instruments is the high spatial resolution ensured in almost all-weather conditions and with a reasonable duty cycle and coverage. This result has achieved by the by the most recent generation of SAR missions, which moreover allow polarimetric observation of the target. Nevertheless, atmospheric clouds, in particular the precipitating ones, can significantly affect the signal backscattered from the ground surface (e.g. Ferrazzoli and Schiavon, 1997), on both amplitude and phase, with effects increasing with the operating frequency. In this respect, proofs are given by several recent works (e.g. Marzano et al., 2010, Baldini et al., 2014) using X-Band SAR data by COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) missions. On the other hand, this sensitivity open interesting perspectives towards the SAR observation, and eventually quantification, of precipitations. In this respect, a proposal approach for X-SARs precipitation maps production and cloud masking arise from our work. Cloud masking allows detection of precipitation compromised areas. Respect precipitation maps, satellite X-SARs offer the unique possibility to ingest within flood forecasting model precipitation data at the catchment scale. This aspect is particularly innovative, even if work has been done the late years, and some aspects need to still address. Our developed processing framework allows, within the cloud masking stage, distinguishing flooded areas, precipitating clouds together with permanent water bodies, all appearing dark in the SAR image. The procedure is mainly based on image segmentation techniques and fuzzy logic (e.g. Pulvirenti et

  1. Storm Identification, Tracking and Forecasting Using High-Resolution Images of Short-Range X-Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Shah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rain nowcasting is an essential part of weather monitoring. It plays a vital role in human life, ranging from advanced warning systems to scheduling open air events and tourism. A nowcasting system can be divided into three fundamental steps, i.e., storm identification, tracking and nowcasting. The main contribution of this work is to propose procedures for each step of the rain nowcasting tool and to objectively evaluate the performances of every step, focusing on two-dimension data collected from short-range X-band radars installed in different parts of Italy. This work presents the solution of previously unsolved problems in storm identification: first, the selection of suitable thresholds for storm identification; second, the isolation of false merger (loosely-connected storms; and third, the identification of a high reflectivity sub-storm within a large storm. The storm tracking step of the existing tools, such as TITANand SCIT, use only up to two storm attributes, i.e., center of mass and area. It is possible to use more attributes for tracking. Furthermore, the contribution of each attribute in storm tracking is yet to be investigated. This paper presents a novel procedure called SALdEdA (structure, amplitude, location, eccentricity difference and areal difference for storm tracking. This work also presents the contribution of each component of SALdEdA in storm tracking. The second order exponential smoothing strategy is used for storm nowcasting, where the growth and decay of each variable of interest is considered to be linear. We evaluated the major steps of our method. The adopted techniques for automatic threshold calculation are assessed with a 97% goodness. False merger and sub-storms within a cluster of storms are successfully handled. Furthermore, the storm tracking procedure produced good results with an accuracy of 99.34% for convective events and 100% for stratiform events.

  2. Synergy of radar altimetry and L-Band passive microwave data to improve Arctic sea ice thickness information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, S.; Ricker, R.; Kaleschke, L.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of sea ice thickness can be achieved by different sensors that are based on independent physical retrieval methods. Consequently, these methods differ in sensitivity for certain sea ice types and thickness ranges as well as in the spatial and temporal resolution of the geophysical product. However, estimating Arctic sea ice volume requires retrieval methods that are able to obtain thickness information across the entire sea ice thickness range. Currently, this requirement is only met by laser altimeter and radar data, such as from ICESat or CryoSat-2. Other retrieval strategies that are realized by the evaluation of surface emissivity in microwave frequencies are restricted to the thin first-year sea ice thickness range, where the upper thickness threshold is defined by the wavelength among other factors. It is however the thin thickness ranges, where altimeter-based sea ice thickness estimates show the highest relative uncertainty, since the method requires a detectable elevation of ice floes above the local sea surface. We show first result of a data fusion of sea ice thickness fields obtained from CryoSat-2 freeboard and L-Band surface emission measurements of the SMOS satellite. We implemented the data fusion with an optimal interpolation between the two datasets on a weekly basis, where the parameters of the optimal interpolation are based on the sensor characteristics and the uncertainties of the sea ice thickness data fields from both sources. The differences of both data products are used to discuss the potential preferential sampling in both datasets. In addition, we use dedicated airborne and shipborne validation data in the marginal ice zone in the Barents Sea to assess the characteristics the individual and merged sea ice thickness information.

  3. Analysis of the extinction effect on precipitation measurements with C-Band Radar by means of simulation and measurement; Analyse des Extinktionseffektes bei Niederschlagsmessungen mit einem C-Band Radar anhand von Simulation und Messung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahak, U.

    2005-02-01

    The extinction of microwave energy by hydrometeors is an error source when interpreting radar precipitation measurements quantitatively. Energy is constantly detracted from a travelling radar pulse, which ultimately leeds to an underestimation of the precipitation intensity. Correction procedures proposed in literature mostly rely on the assumption of a well-defined relation between radar reflectivity and extinction which is valid on average for rain; those algorithms often proof to be unstable. With regard to that, the present thesis deals with the variability of extinction for given radar reflectivity (taking into account different precipitation types, including melting particles), since this can be an important source of the abovementioned instability. First, theoretical methods are applied (Mie-scattering, effective complex refractive index for melting hydrometeors). Those calculations suffer from a lot of uncertainties. Therefore, extinction parameters are derived experimentally as well, using measurements of two radars whose measuring volumes overlap. To this end, a new dual radar method was developed, which tries to take into account the various error sources in the best possible way. As a result, it is found that the extinction of microwaves by hydrometeors is extremely variable for given radar reflectivity, which has important consequences for the development of correction procedures. (orig.)

  4. Air impurity in holographic photonic crystals made with dichromated gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhi; Li, Songtao; Liu, Dahe

    2010-11-01

    The physical mechanism of the air impurity in volume holographic photonic crystals was investigated in this paper. The photonic forbidden band with the air impurity was analyzed and calculated by the transfer matrix method. Verifications were carried out using one dimensional holographic photonic crystals made with Dichromated Gelatin (DCG), and the impurity modes were observed.

  5. Effects of changing rice cultural practices on C-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter using Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar data in the Mekong River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam-Dao, Nguyen; Le Toan, Thuy; Apan, Armando; Bouvet, Alexandre; Young, Frank; Le-van, Trung

    2009-11-01

    Changes in rice cultivation systems have been observed in the Mekong River Delta, Vietnam. Among the changes in cultural practices, the change from transplanting to direct sowing, the use of water-saving technology, and the use of high production method could have impacts on radar remote sensing methods previously developed for rice monitoring. Using Envisat (Environmental Satellite) ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) data over the province of An Giang, this study showed that the radar backscattering behaviour is much different from that of the reported traditional rice. At the early stage of the season, direct sowing on fields with rough and wet soil surface provides very high backscatter values for HH (Horizontal transmit - Horizontal receive polarisation) and VV (Vertical transmit - Vertical receive polarisation) data, as a contrast compared to the very low backscatter of fields covered with water before emergence. The temporal increase of the backscatter is therefore not observed clearly over direct sowing fields. Hence, the use of the intensity temporal change as a rice classifier proposed previously may not apply. Due to the drainage that occurs during the season, HH, VV and HH/VV are not strongly related to biomass, in contrast with past results. However, HH/VV ratio could be used to derive the rice/non-rice classification algorithm for all conditions of rice fields in the test province. The mapping results using the HH/VV polarization ratio at a single date in the middle period of the rice season were assessed using statistical data at different districts in the province, where very high accuracy was found. The method can be applied to other regions, provided that the synthetic aperture radar data are acquired during the peak period of the rice season, and that few training fields provide adjusted threshold values used in the method.

  6. A comparative cepstral based analysis of simulated and measured S-band and X-band radar Doppler spectra of human motion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Eeden, WD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A simulation for human Doppler response is developed based on the Carnegie Mellon University motion capture database. This data is used to simulate human Doppler response as it would be seen by a radar system and this data is compared to measured...

  7. The design and development of signal-processing algorithms for an airborne x-band Doppler weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Shaun R.

    1994-01-01

    Improved measurements of precipitation will aid our understanding of the role of latent heating on global circulations. Spaceborne meteorological sensors such as the planned precipitation radar and microwave radiometers on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) provide for the first time a comprehensive means of making these global measurements. Pre-TRMM activities include development of precipitation algorithms using existing satellite data, computer simulations, and measurements from limited aircraft campaigns. Since the TRMM radar will be the first spaceborne precipitation radar, there is limited experience with such measurements, and only recently have airborne radars become available that can attempt to address the issue of the limitations of a spaceborne radar. There are many questions regarding how much attenuation occurs in various cloud types and the effect of cloud vertical motions on the estimation of precipitation rates. The EDOP program being developed by NASA GSFC will provide data useful for testing both rain-retrieval algorithms and the importance of vertical motions on the rain measurements. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and development of real-time embedded parallel algorithms used by EDOP to extract reflectivity and Doppler products (velocity, spectrum width, and signal-to-noise ratio) as the first step in the aforementioned goals.

  8. On the feasibility of space-based radar ice sounding of the Antarctic ice sheet at P-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Kusk, Anders; Corr, Hugh

    parameters and system parameters envisioned for a space-based radar. The first step is accomplished by establishing empirical models of the attenuation coefficients and backscatter coefficients for the surface, volume and base of glaciers, ice shelves, central ice sheets etc.. The models are used...

  9. Savannah woody structure modelling and mapping using multifrequency (X-, C- and L-band) synthetic aperture radar data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, L:

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available status – a defining but challenging set of characteristics typical of African savannahs. Active remote sensing systems (e.g. Light Detection and Ranging – LiDAR; Synthetic Aperture Radar - SAR), on the other hand, may be more effective in quantifying...

  10. Advancing NASA’s AirMOSS P-Band Radar Root Zone Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm via Incorporation of Richards’ Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Sadeghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P-band radar remote sensing applied during the Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS mission has shown great potential for estimation of root zone soil moisture. When retrieving the soil moisture profile (SMP from P-band radar observations, a mathematical function describing the vertical moisture distribution is required. Because only a limited number of observations are available, the number of free parameters of the mathematical model must not exceed the number of observed data. For this reason, an empirical quadratic function (second order polynomial is currently applied in the AirMOSS inversion algorithm to retrieve the SMP. The three free parameters of the polynomial are retrieved for each AirMOSS pixel using three backscatter observations (i.e., one frequency at three polarizations of Horizontal-Horizontal, Vertical-Vertical and Horizontal-Vertical. In this paper, a more realistic, physically-based SMP model containing three free parameters is derived, based on a solution to Richards’ equation for unsaturated flow in soils. Evaluation of the new SMP model based on both numerical simulations and measured data revealed that it exhibits greater flexibility for fitting measured and simulated SMPs than the currently applied polynomial. It is also demonstrated that the new SMP model can be reduced to a second order polynomial at the expense of fitting accuracy.

  11. DSD Characteristics of a Mid-Winter Tornadic Storm Using C-Band Polarimetric Radar and Two 2D-Video Disdrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurai, M.; Petersen, W. A.; Carey, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    Drop size distributions in an evolving tornadic storm are examined using C-band polarimetric radar observations and two 2D-video disdrometers. The E-F2 storm occurred in mid-winter (21 January 2010) in northern Alabama, USA, and caused widespread damage. The evolution of the storm occurred within the C-band radar coverage and moreover, several minutes prior to touch down, the storm passed over a site where several disdrometers including two 2D video disdrometers (2DVD) had been installed. One of the 2DVDs is a low profile unit and the other is a new next generation compact unit currently undergoing performance evaluation. Analyses of the radar data indicate that the main region of precipitation should be treated as a "big-drop" regime case. Even the measured differential reflectivity values (i.e. without attenuation correction) were as high as 6-7 dB within regions of high reflectivity. Standard attenuation-correction methods using differential propagation phase have been "fine tuned" to be applicable to the "big drop" regime. The corrected reflectivity and differential reflectivity data are combined with the co-polar correlation coefficient and specific differential phase to determine the mass-weighted mean diameter, Dm, and the width of the mass spectrum, (sigma)M, as well as the intercept parameter , Nw. Significant areas of high Dm (3-4 mm) were retrieved within the main precipitation areas of the tornadic storm. The "big drop" regime assumption is substantiated by the two sets of 2DVD measurements. The Dm values calculated from 1-minute drop size distributions reached nearly 4 mm, whilst the maximum drop diameters were over 6 mm. The fall velocity measurements from the 2DVD indicate almost all hydrometeors to be fully melted at ground level. Drop shapes for this event are also being investigated from the 2DVD camera data.

  12. KydroSAT: a Ku/Ka band synthetic aperture radar space mission concept for high-resolution mapping of hydrometeorological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Saverio; Marzano, Frank S.; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Bombaci, Ornella; Giancristofaro, Domenico; Macelloni, Giovanni; Lemmetyinem, Juha; Giudici, Davide; Poghosyan, Armen

    2017-10-01

    Spaceborne X-band synthetic aperture radars (SARs) represent a well-established tool for Earth remote sensing at very high spatial resolution (order of meters). Until now, SAR has not been exploited for hydrological cycle modelling and numerical weather forecast, however, there are scientific evidences that at X band and beyond: i) atmospheric precipitation in liquid and ice phase affect SAR imagery and its intensity can be retrieved, ii) snow areal extent and mass (water-equivalent) can be detected and estimated. KydroSAT mission concept foresees a miniaturised fully-digital SAR at Ku and Ka band (KydroSAR), specifically devoted to detecting and estimating atmospheric precipitation and surface snow; its baseline includes dual-polarization capability, high orbit duty cycle (>75%), flexible ground resolution (5-150 m), and a large variable swath (50-150 km), doubled with formation of two minisatellites both carrying a KydroSAR. Moreover, the mission concept foresees the along-track convoy with the COSMO-SkyMed and SAOCOM SAR platforms, allowing the observation of the same scene at L, X, Ku and Ka bands. The challenging requirements of this architecture require the development of new technologies such as Digital Beam Forming and Direct Digital to RF Conversion. In order to exploit the synergic approach of the KydroSAT convoy for precipitation, in this work we will simulate and discuss the SAR response at X, Ku and Ka bands of the same scene, using the SAR forward model described in Mori et al. (2017). Subsequently, an example retrieval of Snow Equivalent Water (SWE) by Ku-SAR will be given.

  13. Characterization of the precipitation in southwestern part of Greece with X-band Doppler radar, 2-D video disdrometer and rain gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Defer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We document precipitation in the southwestern part of Greece with the National Observatory of Athens (NOA X-band radar, NOA 2D video disdrometer and a network of rain gauges. The observations were collected between February and April 2004. Time evolution of the drop size distribution (DSD is presented for the 9 March 2004 case where rain rate (computed on 1-min period was measured up to 80 mm/h and reflectivity at the location of the disdrometer exceeded 40 dBZ. We then present the differences of DSD as function of the rain rate for the studied case as well as for the entire observations of the field experiment. It shows that higher the rain rate is, larger the range of the DSD and higher the concentration of the raindrops are.

  14. A compressive sensing-based computational method for the inversion of wide-band ground penetrating radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, A.; Gottardi, G.; Moriyama, T.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents an innovative computational approach for the inversion of wideband ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. The retrieval of the dielectric characteristics of sparse scatterers buried in a lossy soil is performed by combining a multi-task Bayesian compressive sensing (MT-BCS) solver and a frequency hopping (FH) strategy. The developed methodology is able to benefit from the regularization capabilities of the MT-BCS as well as to exploit the multi-chromatic informative content of GPR measurements. A set of numerical results is reported in order to assess the effectiveness of the proposed GPR inverse scattering technique, as well as to compare it to a simpler single-task implementation.

  15. KARIN: The Ka-Band Radar Interferometer for the Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Peral, Eva; McWatters, Dalia; Pollard, Brian; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Hughes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several nadir profiling radar altimeters have provided our first global look at the ocean basin-scale circulation and the ocean mesoscale at wavelengths longer than 100 km. Due to sampling limitations, nadir altimetry is unable to resolve the small wavelength ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale that are responsible for the vertical mixing of ocean heat and gases and the dissipation of kinetic energy from large to small scales. The proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission would be a partnership between NASA, CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spaciales) and the Canadian Space Agency, and would have as one of its main goals the measurement of ocean topography with kilometer-scale spatial resolution and centimeter scale accuracy. In this paper, we provide an overview of all ocean error sources that would contribute to the SWOT mission.

  16. A SiGe BiCMOS double-balanced mixer with active balun for X-band Doppler radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Rasmus S.; Johansen, Tom K.; Tamborg, Kjeld M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an X-band doublebalanced mixer in SiGe BiCMOS technology. The mixer core consists of a LO Matched quad diode ring using diode-connected Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBTs). The mixer is integrated with a low-noise, high-linearity active balun on the RF port...

  17. Pulse holographic measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Baik, Seong Hoon; Hong, Seok Kyung; Kim, Jeong Moog; Kim, Duk Hyun

    1992-01-01

    With the development of laser, remote inspection techniques using laser have been growing on. The inspection and measurement techniques by pulse holography are well-established technique for precise measurement, and widely used in various fields of industry now. In nuclear industry, this technology is practically used because holographic inspection is remote, noncontact, and precise measurement technique. In relation to remote inspection technology in nuclear industry, state-of-the art of pulse HNDT (Holographic non-destructive testing) and holographic measurement techniques are examined. First of all, the fundamental principles as well as practical problems for applications are briefly described. The fields of pulse holography have been divided into the HNDT, flow visualization and distribution study, and other application techniques. Additionally holographic particle study, bubble chamber holography, and applications to other visualization techniques are described. Lastly, the current status for the researches and applications of pulse holography to nuclear industry which are carried out actively in Europe and USA, is described. (Author)

  18. UV holographic filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyashova, Zoya N.

    2017-11-01

    A new approach to UV holographic filter's manufacturing, when the filters are the volume reflection holograms, working in UV region in the second Bragg diffraction order, is offered. The method is experimentally realized for wavelength of 266 nm.

  19. Defining a relationship between incident wave parameters and morphologic evolution of shoals on ebb tidal deltas using long term X-band radar observation from RIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humberston, J. L.; McNinch, J.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology of tidal inlet ebb-shoals varies dynamically over time, particularly in response to large wave events. Understanding which wave qualities most influence shoals' evolution would support advancements in sediment bypassing models as well as targeted maintenance dredging for hydrographic purposes. Unfortunately, shallow and rapidly changing bathymetry, turbid waters and ambiguous wave speeds resulting from multiple shoaling and de-shoaling areas limits many traditional surveying techniques from obtaining the spatial and temporal resolution necessary to effectively characterize shoal development. The Radar Inlet Observing System (RIOS) is a uniquely designed mobile X-band radar system that can be deployed to inlet environments and, using roof-mounted solar panels and an automatically triggered highly efficient diesel generator, run automated hourly collections and wirelessly stream data for up to several months at a time in nearly all weather and water conditions. During 2015 and early 2016, RIOS was deployed to St. Augustine Inlet, FL., New River Inlet, N.C., and Oregon Inlet, N.C. for periods of one to six months to allow for measureable shoal evolution. During deployments, ten minute collections (at 1 Hz) were conducted every hour and the data gridded to a 5m alongshore/cross-shore grid. Raw intensity returns were time-averaged and analyzed to define three metrics of shoal evolution: movement direction, movement velocity and inferred bathymetry. For each location and time period, wave frequencies, wave directions and significant wave heights were collected from the nearest wave-buoy. Time lapse videos of shoal positions were inspected and used in concert with cross-correlations values from each pair of shoal and wave parameters to determine the incident wave qualities most strongly relating to shoal evolution. Preliminary results suggest wave height, more than frequency, controls shoal movement. Wave direction and size collaboratively appear to direct

  20. GOLD MINERAL PROSPECTING USING PHASED ARRAY TYPE L-BAND SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR (PALSAR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING DATA, CENTRAL GOLD BELT, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beiranvand Pour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bentong-Raub Suture Zone (BRSZ of Peninsular Malaysia is one of the significant structural zones in Sundaland, Southeast Asia. It forms the boundary between the Gondwana-derived Sibumasu terrane in the west and Sukhothai arc in the east. The BRSZ is also genetically related to the sediment-hosted/orogenic gold deposits associated with the major lineaments and form-lines in the central gold belt Central Gold Belt of Peninsular Malaysia. In tropical environments, heavy tropical rainforest and intense weathering makes it impossible to map geological structures over long distances. Advances in remote sensing technology allow the application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data in geological structural analysis for tropical environments. In this investigation, the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR satellite remote sensing data were used to analyse major geological structures in Peninsular Malaysia and provide detailed characterization of lineaments and form-lines in the BRSZ, as well as its implication for sediment-hosted/orogenic gold exploration in tropical environments. The major geological structure directions of the BRSZ are N-S, NNE-SSW, NE-SW and NW-SE, which derived from directional filtering analysis to PALSAR data. The pervasive array of N-S faults in the study area and surrounding terrain is mainly linked to the N-S trending of the Suture Zone. N-S striking lineaments are often cut by younger NE-SW and NW-SE-trending lineaments. Gold mineralized trends lineaments are associated with the intersection of N-S, NE-SW, NNW-SSE and ESE-WNW faults and curvilinear features in shearing and alteration zones. Lineament analysis on PALSAR satellite remote sensing data is a useful tool for detecting the boundary between the Gondwana-derived terranes and major geological features associated with suture zone especially for large inaccessible regions in tropical environments.

  1. Constraining holographic technicolor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levkov, D.G., E-mail: levkov@ms2.inr.ac.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Rubakov, V.A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Moscow State University, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Troitsky, S.V.; Zenkevich, Y.A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-19

    We obtain a new bound on the value of Peskin-Takeuchi S parameter in a wide class of bottom-up holographic models for technicolor. Namely, we show that weakly coupled holographic description in these models implies S Much-Greater-Than 0.2. Our bound is in conflict with the results of electroweak precision measurements, so it strongly disfavors the models we consider.

  2. Determination of radar MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  3. Using multi-polarization C- and L-band synthetic aperture radar to estimate biomass and soil moisture of wheat fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mehdi; McNairn, Heather

    2017-06-01

    Biomass and soil moisture are two important parameters for agricultural crop monitoring and yield estimation. In this study, the Water Cloud Model (WCM) was coupled with the Ulaby soil moisture model to estimate both biomass and soil moisture for spring wheat fields in a test site in western Canada. This study exploited both C-band (RADARSAT-2) and L-band (UAVSAR) Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) for this purpose. The WCM-Ulaby model was calibrated for three polarizations (HH, VV and HV). Subsequently two of these three polarizations were used as inputs to an inversion procedure, to retrieve either soil moisture or biomass without the need for any ancillary data. The model was calibrated for total canopy biomass, the biomass of only the wheat heads, as well as for different wheat growth stages. This resulted in a calibrated WCM-Ulaby model for each sensor-polarization-phenology-biomass combination. Validation of model retrievals led to promising results. RADARSAT-2 (HH-HV) estimated total wheat biomass with root mean square (RMSE) and mean average (MAE) errors of 78.834 g/m2 and 58.438 g/m2; soil moisture with errors of 0.078 m3/m3 (RMSE) and 0.065 m3/m3 (MAE) are reported. During the period of crop ripening, L-band estimates of soil moisture had accuracies of 0.064 m3/m3 (RMSE) and 0.057 m3/m3 (MAE). RADARSAT-2 (VV-HV) produced interesting results for retrieval of the biomass of the wheat heads. In this particular case, the biomass of the heads was estimated with accuracies of 38.757 g/m2 (RSME) and 33.152 g/m2 (MAE). For wider implementation this model will require additional data to strengthen the model accuracy and confirm estimation performance. Nevertheless this study encourages further research given the importance of wheat as a global commodity, the challenge of cloud cover in optical monitoring and the potential of direct estimation of the weight of heads where wheat production lies.

  4. Holographic Entanglement Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    We review the developments in the past decade on holographic entanglement entropy, a subject that has garnered much attention owing to its potential to teach us about the emergence of spacetime in holography. We provide an introduction to the concept of entanglement entropy in quantum field theories, review the holographic proposals for computing the same, providing some justification for where these proposals arise from in the first two parts. The final part addresses recent developments linking entanglement and geometry. We provide an overview of the various arguments and technical developments that teach us how to use field theory entanglement to detect geometry. Our discussion is by design eclectic; we have chosen to focus on developments that appear to us most promising for further insights into the holographic map. This is a preliminary draft of a few chapters of a book which will appear sometime in the near future, to be published by Springer. The book in addition contains a discussion of application o...

  5. Computer generated holographic microtags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1998-01-01

    A microlithographic tag comprising an array of individual computer generated holographic patches having feature sizes between 250 and 75 nanometers is disclosed. The tag is a composite hologram made up of the individual holographic patches and contains identifying information when read out with a laser of the proper wavelength and at the proper angles of probing and reading. The patches are fabricated in a steep angle Littrow readout geometry to maximize returns in the -1 diffracted order. The tags are useful as anti-counterfeiting markers because of the extreme difficulty in reproducing them. 5 figs

  6. Estimating the Above-Ground Biomass in Miombo Savanna Woodlands (Mozambique, East Africa Using L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Vasconcelos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of forest above-ground biomass (AGB is important for such broader applications as decision making, forest management, carbon (C stock change assessment and scientific applications, such as C cycle modeling. However, there is a great uncertainty related to the estimation of forest AGB, especially in the tropics. The main goal of this study was to test a combination of field data and Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR backscatter intensity data to reduce the uncertainty in the estimation of forest AGB in the Miombo savanna woodlands of Mozambique (East Africa. A machine learning algorithm, based on bagging stochastic gradient boosting (BagSGB, was used to model forest AGB as a function of ALOS PALSAR Fine Beam Dual (FBD backscatter intensity metrics. The application of this method resulted in a coefficient of correlation (R between observed and predicted (10-fold cross-validation forest AGB values of 0.95 and a root mean square error of 5.03 Mg·ha−1. However, as a consequence of using bootstrap samples in combination with a cross validation procedure, some bias may have been introduced, and the reported cross validation statistics could be overoptimistic. Therefore and as a consequence of the BagSGB model, a measure of prediction variability (coefficient of variation on a pixel-by-pixel basis was also produced, with values ranging from 10 to 119% (mean = 25% across the study area. It provides additional and complementary information regarding the spatial distribution of the error resulting from the application of the fitted model to new observations.

  7. Robust flood area detection using a L-band synthetic aperture radar: Preliminary application for Florida, the U.S. affected by Hurricane Irma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, H.; Ohki, M.; Abe, T.

    2017-12-01

    Urgent crisis response for a hurricane-induced flood needs urgent providing of a flood map covering a broad region. However, there is no standard threshold values for automatic flood identification from pre-and-post images obtained by satellite-based synthetic aperture radars (SARs). This problem could hamper prompt data providing for operational uses. Furthermore, one pre-flood SAR image does not always represent potential water surfaces and river flows especially in tropical flat lands which are greatly influenced by seasonal precipitation cycle. We are, therefore, developing a new method of flood mapping using PALSAR-2, an L-band SAR, which is less affected by temporal surface changes. Specifically, a mean-value image and a standard-deviation image are calculated from a series of pre-flood SAR images. It is combined with a post-flood SAR image to obtain normalized backscatter amplitude difference (NoBADi), with which a difference between a post-flood image and a mean-value image is divided by a standard-deviation image to emphasize anomalous water extents. Flooding areas are then automatically obtained from the NoBADi images as lower-value pixels avoiding potential water surfaces. We applied this method to PALSAR-2 images acquired on Sept. 8, 10, and 12, 2017, covering flooding areas in a central region of Dominican Republic and west Florida, the U.S. affected by Hurricane Irma. The output flooding outlines are validated with flooding areas manually delineated from high-resolution optical satellite images, resulting in higher consistency and less uncertainty than previous methods (i.e., a simple pre-and-post flood difference and pre-and-post coherence changes). The NoBADi method has a great potential to obtain a reliable flood map for future flood hazards, not hampered by cloud cover, seasonal surface changes, and "casual" thresholds in the flood identification process.

  8. Heterodyned holographic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, NG

    In holographic spectroscopy an image of an interference pattern is projected onto a detector and transformed back to the input spectrum. The general characteristics are similar to those of Fourier transform spectroscopy, but the spectrum is obtained without scanning. In the heterodyned arrangement

  9. The holographic entropy cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  10. HOMES - Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HOMES (Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy) is a space telescope that employs a double dispersion architecture, using a holographic optical element...

  11. Forest above ground biomass estimation and forest/non-forest classification for Odisha, India, using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, M.; Kiran Chand, T. R.; Fararoda, R.; Jha, C. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Tropical forests contribute to approximately 40 % of the total carbon found in terrestrial biomass. In this context, forest/non-forest classification and estimation of forest above ground biomass over tropical regions are very important and relevant in understanding the contribution of tropical forests in global biogeochemical cycles, especially in terms of carbon pools and fluxes. Information on the spatio-temporal biomass distribution acts as a key input to Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation Plus (REDD+) action plans. This necessitates precise and reliable methods to estimate forest biomass and to reduce uncertainties in existing biomass quantification scenarios. The use of backscatter information from a host of allweather capable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems during the recent past has demonstrated the potential of SAR data in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / nonforest classification. In the present study, Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) / Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data along with field inventory data have been used in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / non-forest classification over Odisha state, India. The ALOSPALSAR 50 m spatial resolution orthorectified and radiometrically corrected HH/HV dual polarization data (digital numbers) for the year 2010 were converted to backscattering coefficient images (Schimada et al., 2009). The tree level measurements collected during field inventory (2009-'10) on Girth at Breast Height (GBH at 1.3 m above ground) and height of all individual trees at plot (plot size 0.1 ha) level were converted to biomass density using species specific allometric equations and wood densities. The field inventory based biomass estimations were empirically integrated with ALOS-PALSAR backscatter coefficients to derive spatial forest above ground biomass estimates for the study area. Further, The Support Vector Machines (SVM) based Radial

  12. Real-time holographic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smigielski, Paul; Albe, Felix; Dischli, Bernard

    1992-08-01

    Some new experiments concerning holographic endoscopy are presented. The quantitative measurements of deformations of objects are obtained by the double-exposure and double- reference beam method, using either a cw-laser or a pulsed laser. Qualitative experiments using an argon laser with time-average holographic endoscopy are also presented. A video film on real-time endoscopic holographic interferometry was recorded with the help of a frequency-doubled YAG-laser working at 25 Hz for the first time.

  13. Digital Base Band Converter As Radar Vlbi Backend / Dbbc Kā Ciparošanas Sistēma Radara Vlbi Novērojumiem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuccari, G.; Bezrukovs, Vl.; Nechaeva, M.

    2012-12-01

    A digital base band converter (DBBC) system has been developed by the Istituto di Radioastronomia (Noto, Italy) for increasing the sensitivity of European VLBI Network (EVN) by expanding the full observed bandwidth using numerical methods. The output data rate of this VLBI-backend is raised from 1 to 4 Gbps for each radiotelescope. All operations related to the signal processing (frequency translation, amplification, frequency generation with local oscillators, etc.) are transferred to the digital domain, which allows - in addition to well-known advantages coming from digital technologies - achieving better repeatability, precision, simplicity, etc. The maximum input band of DBBC system is 3.5 GHz, and the instantaneous bandwidth is up to 1 GHz for each radio frequency/intermediate frequency (RF/IF) out of the eight possible. This backend is a highly powerful platform for other radioastronomy applications, and a number of additional so-called personalities have been developed and used. This includes PFB (polyphase filter bank) receivers and Spectra for high resolution spectroscopy. An additional new development with the same aim - to use the DBBC system as a multi-purpose backend - is related to the bi-static radar observations including Radar VLBI. In such observations it is possible to study the population of space debris, with detection of even centimetre class fragments. A powerful transmitter is used to illuminate the sky region to be analyzed, and the echoes coming from known or unknown objects are reflected to one or more groundbased telescopes thus producing a single-dish or interferometric detection. The DBBC Radar VLBI personality is able to realize a high-resolution spectrum analysis, maintaining in the central area the echo signal at the expected frequency including the Doppler shift of frequency. For extremely weak signals a very large integration time is needed, so for this personality different input parameters are provided. The realtime information

  14. Characterising regional landslide initiation thresholds in Scotland, UK using NIMROD c-band precipitation radar and the BGS National Landslide Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postance, Benjamin; Hillier, John; Dijkstra, Tom; Dixon, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting changes in slope stability and the location and timing of landslide events is of great scientific and societal interest. This is particularly the case in the context of critical infrastructure systems as these can cross many geological and hydro-geological domains and provide essential societal services. An established area of enquiry is that of characterising site, regional and national scale hydro-meteorological proxies (e.g. precipitation intensity/duration, antecedent precipitation or soil moisture deficit) to distil antecedent and initiation landslide threshold conditions. However, the application of such methods often suffers from limited spatio-temporal availability of meteorological data and landslide inventories. There are relatively few studies applying remotely sensed meteorological data to examine precursory conditions at national, regional and local scale. This study seeks to address this by applying remotely sensed meteorological data to examine precursory conditions at national, regional and local scale in combination with information derived from the BGS National Landslide Database. There are a total 115 landslides in Scotland, UK with recorded date of failure in the BGS National Landslide Database covering the period 2004 to 2015. To determine landslide initiation thresholds high resolution (15 minute 5km2) c-band precipitation intensity (mm/hr) radar data are analysed leading to the establishment of precipitation intensity time series for each landslide location. These time series enable calculation of derived explanatory variables including daily mean, max, volume and the aggregation of antecedent values at 3, 6, 18, 36 and 72 days. The statistical significance of each variable is determined, with the lowest probability of the observed occurrences being due to chance taken as indicating the best explanation. Combinations of thresholds and various spatial scales are examined to identify national and regional triggering conditions

  15. Holographic Optical Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Although the basic idea may be traced back to the earlier X-ray diffraction studies of Sir W. L. Bragg, the holographic method as we know it was invented by D. Gabor in 1948 as a two-step lensless imaging technique to enhance the resolution of electron microscopy, for which he received the 1971 Nobel Prize in physics. The distinctive feature of holography is the recording of the object phase variations that carry the depth information, which is lost in conventional photography where only the intensity (= squared amplitude) distribution of an object is captured. Since all photosensitive media necessarily respond to the intensity incident upon them, an ingenious way had to be found to convert object phase into intensity variations, and Gabor achieved this by introducing a coherent reference wave along with the object wave during exposure. Gabor's in-line recording scheme, however, required the object in question to be largely transmissive, and could provide only marginal image quality due to unwanted terms simultaneously reconstructed along with the desired wavefront. Further handicapped by the lack of a strong coherent light source, optical holography thus seemed fated to remain just another scientific curiosity, until the field was revolutionized in the early 1960s by some major breakthroughs: the proposition and demonstration of the laser principle, the introduction of off-axis holography, and the invention of volume holography. Consequently, the remainder of that decade saw an exponential growth in research on theory, practice, and applications of holography. Today, holography not only boasts a wide variety of scientific and technical applications (e.g., holographic interferometry for strain, vibration, and flow analysis, microscopy and high-resolution imagery, imaging through distorting media, optical interconnects, holographic optical elements, optical neural networks, three-dimensional displays, data storage, etc.), but has become a prominent am advertising

  16. IceBridge Snow Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra wide-band snow radar over land and sea ice in the Arctic...

  17. IceBridge Snow Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra wide-band snow radar over land and sea ice in the Arctic...

  18. Holographic entanglement entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Rangamani, Mukund

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of developments in the field of holographic entanglement entropy. Within the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence, it is shown how quantum entanglement is computed by the area of certain extremal surfaces. The general lessons one can learn from this connection are drawn out for quantum field theories, many-body physics, and quantum gravity. An overview of the necessary background material is provided together with a flavor of the exciting open questions that are currently being discussed. The book is divided into four main parts. In the first part, the concept of entanglement, and methods for computing it, in quantum field theories is reviewed. In the second part, an overview of the AdS/CFT correspondence is given and the holographic entanglement entropy prescription is explained. In the third part, the time-dependence of entanglement entropy in out-of-equilibrium systems, and applications to many body physics are explored using holographic methods. The last part f...

  19. The assessment of data mining algorithms for modelling Savannah woody cover using multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) datasets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neural Network and Random Forest) with the use of X-band (TerraSAR-X), C-band (RADARSAT-2) and L-band (ALOS PALSAR) datasets. This study illustrated that the ANN, REPTree and RF non-parametric modelling algorithms were the most ideal with high CC...

  20. A holographic bound for D3-brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood; Myrzakul, Aizhan; Myrzakulov, Ratbay [Eurasian National University, Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Eurasian National University, Department of General Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Bahamonde, Sebastian [University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, we will regularize the holographic entanglement entropy, holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility for a configuration of D3-branes. We will also study the regularization of the holographic complexity from the action for a configuration of D3-branes. It will be demonstrated that for a spherical shell of D3-branes the regularized holographic complexity is always greater than or equal to the regularized fidelity susceptibility. Furthermore, we will also demonstrate that the regularized holographic complexity is related to the regularized holographic entanglement entropy for this system. Thus, we will obtain a holographic bound involving regularized holographic complexity, regularized holographic entanglement entropy and regularized fidelity susceptibility of a configuration of D3-brane. We will also discuss a bound for regularized holographic complexity from action, for a D3-brane configuration. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysics Simulated using a Meso-Scale Model Coupled with a Spectral Bin Microphysical Scheme through Comparison with Observation Data by Ship-Borne Doppler and Space-Borne W-Band Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, T.; Nakajima, T.; Khain, A. P.; Saito, K.; Takemura, T.; Okamoto, H.; Nishizawa, T.; Tao, W.-K.

    2012-01-01

    Equivalent radar reflectivity factors (Ze) measured by W-band radars are directly compared with the corresponding values calculated from a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic meso-scale model coupled with a spectral-bin-microphysical (SBM) scheme for cloud. Three case studies are the objects of this research: one targets a part of ship-borne observation using 95 GHz Doppler radar over the Pacific Ocean near Japan in May 2001; other two are aimed at two short segments of space-borne observation by the cloud profiling radar on CloudSat in November 2006. The numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulations reproduce general features of vertical structures of Ze and Doppler velocity. A main problem in the reproducibility is an overestimation of Ze in ice cloud layers. A frequency analysis shows a strong correlation between ice water contents (IWC) and Ze in the simulation; this characteristic is similar to those shown in prior on-site studies. From comparing with the empirical correlations by the prior studies, the simulated Ze is overestimated than the corresponding values in the studies at the same IWC. Whereas the comparison of Doppler velocities suggests that large-size snowflakes are necessary for producing large velocities under the freezing level and hence rules out the possibility that an overestimation of snow size causes the overestimation of Ze. Based on the results of several sensitivity tests, we conclude that the source of the overestimation is a bias in the microphysical calculation of Ze or an overestimation of IWC. To identify the source of the problems needs further validation research with other follow-up observations.

  2. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... fundamental frequency following the provisions of § 15.31(m). (3) For systems operating in the 23.12-29.0 GHz... with the transmitter operating continuously at a fundamental frequency. The video bandwidth of the... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems...

  3. Holographic magnetisation density waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, Aristomenis [Centre for Particle Theory and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,Stockton Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Pantelidou, Christiana [Departament de Fisica Quantica i Astrofisica & Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona,Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D=4 Einstein theory coupled to a scalar and two U(1) gauge fields. The solutions are holographically dual to d=3 CFTs in a constant external magnetic field along one of the U(1)’s. Below a critical temperature the system’s magnetisation density becomes inhomogeneous, leading to spontaneous formation of current density waves. We find that the transition can be of second order and that the solutions which minimise the free energy locally in the parameter space of solutions have averaged stressed tensor of a perfect fluid.

  4. Holographic twin Higgs model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Michael; Telem, Ofri

    2015-05-15

    We present the first realization of a "twin Higgs" model as a holographic composite Higgs model. Uniquely among composite Higgs models, the Higgs potential is protected by a new standard model (SM) singlet elementary "mirror" sector at the sigma model scale f and not by the composite states at m_{KK}, naturally allowing for m_{KK} beyond the LHC reach. As a result, naturalness in our model cannot be constrained by the LHC, but may be probed by precision Higgs measurements at future lepton colliders, and by direct searches for Kaluza-Klein excitations at a 100 TeV collider.

  5. Improving Weather Radar Precipitation Estimates by Combining two Types of Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of how Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) X-band measurements can be combined with meteorological C–band measurements into a single radar product. For this purpose, a blending method has been developed which combines the strengths of the two radar systems. Combining...... the two radar types achieves a radar product with both long range and high temporal resolution. It is validated that the blended radar product performs better than the individual radars based on ground observations from laser disdrometers. However, the data combination is challenged by lower performance...... of the LAWR. Although both radars benefits from the data combination, it is also found that advection based temporal interpolation is a more favourable method for increasing the temporal resolution of meteorological C–band measurements....

  6. The traveltime holographic principle

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Y.

    2014-11-06

    Fermat\\'s interferometric principle is used to compute interior transmission traveltimes τpq from exterior transmission traveltimes τsp and τsq. Here, the exterior traveltimes are computed for sources s on a boundary B that encloses a volume V of interior points p and q. Once the exterior traveltimes are computed, no further ray tracing is needed to calculate the interior times τpq. Therefore this interferometric approach can be more efficient than explicitly computing interior traveltimes τpq by ray tracing. Moreover, the memory requirement of the traveltimes is reduced by one dimension, because the boundary B is of one fewer dimension than the volume V. An application of this approach is demonstrated with interbed multiple (IM) elimination. Here, the IMs in the observed data are predicted from the migration image and are subsequently removed by adaptive subtraction. This prediction is enabled by the knowledge of interior transmission traveltimes τpq computed according to Fermat\\'s interferometric principle. We denote this principle as the ‘traveltime holographic principle’, by analogy with the holographic principle in cosmology where information in a volume is encoded on the region\\'s boundary.

  7. Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) mosaic for the Kahiltna terrane, Alaska, 2007-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher J.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has initiated a multi-disciplinary study investigating the applicability of remote sensing technologies for geologic mapping and identification of prospective areas for base and precious metal deposits in remote parts of Alaska. The Kahiltna terrane in southwestern Alaska was selected for investigation because of its known mineral deposits and potential for additional mineral resources. An assortment of technologies is being investigated to aid in remote analysis of terrain, and includes imaging spectroscopy (hyperspectral remote sensing), high spatial resolution electro-optical imagery, and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). However, there are significant challenges to applying imaging spectroscopy and electro-optical imagery technologies in this area because of the low solar angle for parts of the year, seasonal periods of darkness and snow cover, and the frequently cloudy weather that characterizes Alaska. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was selected because this technology does not rely on solar illumination and has all-weather capability.

  8. Quality assessment of weather radar wind profiles during bird migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleman, I.; van Gasteren, H.; Bouten, W.

    2008-01-01

    Wind profiles from an operational C-band Doppler radar have been combined with data from a bird tracking radar to assess the wind profile quality during bird migration. The weather radar wind profiles (WRWPs) are retrieved using the well-known volume velocity processing (VVP) technique. The X-band

  9. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  10. Holographic Vortex Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David

    2010-01-01

    A holographic vortex coronagraph (HVC) has been proposed as an improvement over conventional coronagraphs for use in high-contrast astronomical imaging for detecting planets, dust disks, and other broadband light scatterers in the vicinities of stars other than the Sun. Because such light scatterers are so faint relative to their parent stars, in order to be able to detect them, it is necessary to effect ultra-high-contrast (typically by a factor of the order of 1010) suppression of broadband light from the stars. Unfortunately, the performances of conventional coronagraphs are limited by low throughput, dispersion, and difficulty of satisfying challenging manufacturing requirements. The HVC concept offers the potential to overcome these limitations.

  11. Mach's holographic principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, Justin; Parikh, Maulik

    2009-01-01

    Mach's principle is the proposition that inertial frames are determined by matter. We put forth and implement a precise correspondence between matter and geometry that realizes Mach's principle. Einstein's equations are not modified and no selection principle is applied to their solutions; Mach's principle is realized wholly within Einstein's general theory of relativity. The key insight is the observation that, in addition to bulk matter, one can also add boundary matter. Given a space-time, and thus the inertial frames, we can read off both boundary and bulk stress tensors, thereby relating matter and geometry. We consider some global conditions that are necessary for the space-time to be reconstructible, in principle, from bulk and boundary matter. Our framework is similar to that of the black hole membrane paradigm and, in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space-times, is consistent with holographic duality.

  12. A Holographic Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Ana Maria

    2013-02-01

    In the Fall of '87 Rudie Berkhout and myself started a very intense and fruitful collaboration producing a series of holographic art pieces that were experimental but that reflected our different artistic sensibilities. The masters were made in my portrait studio in the Museum of Holography in New York using a pulse laser and later transferred in my Long Island City Studio. These pieces were shown at the Holocenter in 2009 and poignantly, it was the last show that Rudie had while he was alive. My paper details the process of an artistic collaboration, its pitfalls and advantages, its conflicts and compromises. It will illuminate the creative process that from two separate and very different streams melded into beautiful and evocative art.

  13. On holographic defect entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, John [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jensen, Kristan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, SUNY Stony Brook,Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); O’Bannon, Andy [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Tsatis, Efstratios [8 Kotylaiou Street, Athens 11364 (Greece); Wrase, Timm [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    We study a number of (3+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3+1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1+1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions.

  14. On holographic defect entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John; Jensen, Kristan; O'Bannon, Andy; Tsatis, Efstratios; Wrase, Timm

    2014-05-01

    We study a number of (3 + 1)- and (2 + 1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3 + 1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1 + 1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions.

  15. NAMMA NASA POLARIMETRIC DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR (NPOL) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL), developed by a research team from Wallops Flight Facility, is a fully transportable and self-contained S-band research radar that...

  16. Holographic Waveguided See-Through Display Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for lightweight, space suit-mounted displays, Luminit proposes a novel Holographic Waveguided See-Through Display. Our proposed Holographic...

  17. 3D holographic printer: fast printing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexander V; Putilin, Andrey N; Kopenkin, Sergey S; Borodin, Yuriy P; Druzhin, Vladislav V; Dubynin, Sergey E; Dubinin, German B

    2014-02-10

    This article describes the general operation principles of devices for synthesized holographic images such as holographic printers. Special emphasis is placed on the printing speed. In addition, various methods to increase the printing process are described and compared.

  18. Assessment of the performance of X-band satellite radar data for landslide mapping and monitoring: Upper Tena Valley case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Notti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyse the advantages and disadvantages of using the new X-band SAR data acquired by TerraSAR-X sensors for landslides mapping. This dataset has been processed using a Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique over the Upper Tena Valley (Central Pyrenees, Spain. In the first section, the geological and geomorphological setting of the study area is introduced, focusing on the description of the landslide inventory. Then the Stable Point Network technique is briefly described, followed by the assessment of the performance of the X-band SAR dataset. In this context, we present first a model to predict the distribution of Persistent Scatterers based on the slope geometry and the land use information, which has then been validated with X-band data results. On a second stage, we have assessed the performance of X-band dataset to detect and monitor mapped landslides. Finally some illustrative case studies are shown demonstrating the potential of using X-band SAR data not only for landslide mapping but also to detect and monitor deformations affecting human infrastructures.

  19. Utilite des images de radar aeroporte en bande C pour l'evaluation du stade de croissance de la canne a sucre et des cultures maraicheres en milieu tropical, dans une optique de conservation des sols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Nathalie Lucie

    1998-12-01

    This study aims at determining how images from an airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System, in C-band and with two polarisation configurations, can help evaluate the degree of protection offered to soils by vegetation against erosion in tropical areas. With the objective of supplying information to improve the planning of images from the RADARSAT satellite for soil conservation projects, the study aims at establishing which incident angles and which climatic conditions improve contrasts between bare and protected soils. The study encompasses three sites in Costa Rica. Two of them are located in the central cordillera, in mountainous terrain: the Tierra Blanca site where root crops dominate, and the Juan Vinas site where sugar cane is cultivated. The images have been prepared to allow the quantitative analysis of radar backscattering. The first stage of the analysis compares the discriminating capacities of images acquired on each site with different incident angles and polarisations. In general, the backscattering coefficient of crops has shown a lower tendency to diminish in function of local incident angle than that of bare soil. Results suggest that for sugar cane in relatively dry conditions, it is possible to distinguish plots of bare soil from vegetated ones on the basis of their average backscattering coefficient, except for very high incident angles (higher than 73°). The second part of the analysis treats of the complementarity of the HH and VV polarisations and of images acquired with different incident angles. From the results of this study, we can draw recommendations for the acquisition of RADARSAT images even if the images studied here present a higher spatial resolution and higher incident angles, in many cases. Higher incident angles are recommended because they enhance contrasts between bare soil plots and vegetated ones. The very high incident angles at which we observed the opposite effect are not attainable with satellite radars. Relief causes

  20. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  1. Holographic Information Storage and Retrieval. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. R.

    A four-month investigation was made of holographic information storage and retrieval. After an extensive review of the state of the art of various holographic systems, it was concluded that digital holographic storage techniques hold the greatest promise for commercial development, especially since they are particularly well suited to computer…

  2. Holographic Gratings for Slow-Neutron Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Juergen; Pruner, Christian; Tomita, Yasuo; Geltenbort, Peter; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Gyergyek, Saso; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Fally, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of holographic gratings for neutron-optics applications is reviewed. We summarize the properties of gratings recorded in deuterated (poly)methylmethacrylate, holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystals and nanoparticle-polymer composites revealed by diffraction experiments with slow neutrons. Existing and anticipated neutron-optical instrumentations based on holographic gratings are discussed.

  3. In-line digital holographic imaging in volume holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaomin; Lin, Wei-Tang; Chen, Hsi-Hsun; Wang, Po-Hao; Yeh, Li-Hao; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Singh, Vijay Raj; Luo, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    A dual-plane in-line digital holographic imaging method incorporating volume holographic microscopy (VHM) is presented to reconstruct objects in a single shot while eliminating zero-order and twin-image diffracted waves. The proposed imaging method is configured such that information from different axial planes is acquired simultaneously using multiplexed volume holographic imaging gratings, as used in VHM, and recorded as in-line holograms where the corresponding reference beams are generated in the fashion of Gabor's in-line holography. Unlike conventional VHM, which can take axial intensity information only at focal depths, the proposed method digitally reconstructs objects at any axial position. Further, we demonstrate the proposed imaging technique's ability to effectively eliminate zero-order and twin images for single-shot three-dimensional object reconstruction.

  4. Radar for tracer particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Felix; Herminghaus, Stephan; Huang, Kai

    2017-05-01

    We introduce a radar system capable of tracking a 5 mm spherical target continuously in three dimensions. The 10 GHz (X-band) radar system has a transmission power of 1 W and operates in the near field of the horn antennae. By comparing the phase shift of the electromagnetic wave traveling through the free space with an IQ-mixer, we obtain the relative movement of the target with respect to the antennae. From the azimuth and inclination angles of the receiving antennae obtained in the calibration, we reconstruct the target trajectory in a three-dimensional Cartesian system. Finally, we test the tracking algorithm with target moving in circular as well as in pendulum motions and discuss the capability of the radar system.

  5. Detection of target distance in the presence of an interfering reflection using a frequency-stepped double side-band suppressed carrier microwave radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.; Marshall, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for detecting the distance to a highly reflective target in the presence of an interesting reflection using a frequency-stepped double-sideband suppressed carrier (DSBSC) microwave-millimeter-wave radar system is analytically derived. The main result of the analysis shows that the measured group delays produced by the DSBSC system possess a periodicity inversely proportional to the difference between the time delays to the target and interferer, independent of the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR). Simulation results are presented in the context of electron plasma density range estimation using a block diagram communications CAD tool. A unique and accurate plasma model is introduced. A high-resolution spectral estimation technique based on an autoregressive time series analysis is applied to the measured group delays, and it is shown that accurate target distance estimates may be obtained, independent of SIR.

  6. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  7. A compact broadband high efficient X-band 9-watt PHEMT MMIC high-power amplifier for phased array radar applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hek, A.P. de; Hunneman, P.A.H.; Demmler, M.; Hulsmann, A.

    1999-01-01

    ln this paper the development and measurement results of a compact broadband 9-Watt high efficient X-band high-power amplifier are discussed. The described amplifier has the following state-of-the art performance: an average ouput power of 9 Watt, a gain of 20 dB and an average Power Added

  8. On holographic entanglement density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushterov, Nikola I.; O'Bannon, Andy; Rodgers, Ronnie

    2017-10-01

    We use holographic duality to study the entanglement entropy (EE) of Conformal Field Theories (CFTs) in various spacetime dimensions d, in the presence of various deformations: a relevant Lorentz scalar operator with constant source, a temperature T , a chemical potential μ, a marginal Lorentz scalar operator with source linear in a spatial coordinate, and a circle-compactified spatial direction. We consider EE between a strip or sphere sub-region and the rest of the system, and define the "entanglement density" (ED) as the change in EE due to the deformation, divided by the sub-region's volume. Using the deformed CFTs above, we show how the ED's dependence on the strip width or sphere radius, L, is useful for characterizing states of matter. For example, the ED's small- L behavior is determined either by the dimension of the perturbing operator or by the first law of EE. For Lorentz-invariant renormalization group (RG) flows between CFTs, the "area theorem" states that the coefficient of the EE's area law term must be larger in the UV than in the IR. In these cases the ED must therefore approach zero from below as L→∞. However, when Lorentz symmetry is broken and the IR fixed point has different scaling from the UV, we find that the ED often approaches the thermal entropy density from above, indicating area theorem violation.

  9. Gyroklystron-Powered WARLOC Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, B. G.; Cheung, W. J.; Gregers-Hansen, V.; Linde, G.; Ngo, M.

    2003-12-01

    A high-power, coherent, W-band (94 GHz) millimeter-wave radar has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. This radar, named WARLOC, employs a 100 kW peak power, 10 kW average power gyro-klystron as the final power amplifier, an overmoded transmission line system, and a quasi-optical duplexer, together with a high gain antenna, four-channel receiver, and state-of-the-art signal processing. The gyro-amplifiers and the implementation in the WARLOC radar will be described.

  10. Holographic inspection of nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, A.L.; Armour, I.A.; Glanville, R.; Malcolm, G.J.; Wright, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The high resolution, enormous depth of field and high tolerance to radiation of holography mean that it has great potential as an inspection tool in the nuclear industry. In addition, the ability of double-pulse holography to yield detailed information on vibration over the whole field of both large and small structures provides measurements that often cannot be obtained in any other way. This paper reviews the development of equipment for the holographic inspection of nuclear fuel elements; a portable holocamera for use inside reactors; and the application of holographic techniques for vibration measurements in a nuclear power station. (author)

  11. Millimeter radar improves target identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2011-06-01

    Recently developed millimeter wave radar has advantages for target identification over conventional microwave radar which typically use lower frequencies. We describe the pertinent features involved in the construction of the new millimeter wave radar, the pseudo-optical cavity source and the quasi-optical duplexer. The long wavelength relative to light allows the radar beam to penetrate through most weather because the wavelength is larger than the particle size for dust, drizzle rain, fog. Further the mm wave beam passes through an atmospheric transmission window that provides a dip in attenuation. The higher frequency than conventional radar provides higher Doppler frequencies, for example, than X-band radar. We show by simulation that small characteristic vibrations and slow turns of an aircraft become visible so that the Doppler signature improves identification. The higher frequency also reduces beam width, which increases transmit and receive antenna gains. For the same power the transmit beam extends to farther range and the increase in receive antenna gain increases signal to noise ratio for improved detection and identification. The narrower beam can also reduce clutter and reject other noise more readily. We show by simulation that the radar can be used at lower elevations over the sea than conventional radar.

  12. Reduction of Stationary Clutter in Radar,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-30

    coded passive interference (which consists of indivi- dual dipole packets dropped at certain intervals [2.30] and other stationary clutter present in...1958. 2.9. Cliquot, R. The band L radars of "type Orly". L’Onde Electrique , May 1961. 2.10. Decca Air Surveillance Radar DASR-! (Company catalogue...artificial obstacles in the form of a cloud of dipoles tuned 104 to the radar wavelength. As in the previous paragraph we will limit ourselves to a brief

  13. Spectrum Sharing Radar: Coexistence via Xampling

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Deborah; Mishra, Kumar Vijay; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a spectrum sharing technology enabling interference-free operation of a surveillance radar and communication transmissions over a common spectrum. A cognitive radio receiver senses the spectrum using low sampling and processing rates. The radar is a cognitive system that employs a Xampling-based receiver and transmits in several narrow bands. Our main contribution is the alliance of two previous ideas, CRo and cognitive radar (CRr), and their adaptation to solve the spectr...

  14. High-speed holographic camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaro, Marc

    The high-speed holographic camera is a disgnostic instrument using holography as an information storing support. It allows us to take 10 holograms, of an object, with exposures times of 1,5ns, separated in time by 1 or 2ns. In order to get these results easily, no mobile part is used in the set-up [fr

  15. Conformal symmetry and holographic cosmology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bzowski, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel approach to cosmology using gauge/gravity duality. Analysis of the implications of conformal invariance in field theories leads to quantitative cosmological predictions which are in agreement with current data. Furthermore, holographic cosmology extends the theory of

  16. Thermalization after holographic bilocal quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'eva, Irina Ya.; Khramtsov, Mikhail A.; Tikhanovskaya, Maria D.

    2017-09-01

    We study thermalization in the holographic (1 + 1)-dimensional CFT after simultaneous generation of two high-energy excitations in the antipodal points on the circle. The holographic picture of such quantum quench is the creation of BTZ black hole from a collision of two massless particles. We perform holographic computation of entanglement entropy and mutual information in the boundary theory and analyze their evolution with time. We show that equilibration of the entanglement in the regions which contained one of the initial excitations is generally similar to that in other holographic quench models, but with some important distinctions. We observe that entanglement propagates along a sharp effective light cone from the points of initial excitations on the boundary. The characteristics of entanglement propagation in the global quench models such as entanglement velocity and the light cone velocity also have a meaning in the bilocal quench scenario. We also observe the loss of memory about the initial state during the equilibration process. We find that the memory loss reflects on the time behavior of the entanglement similarly to the global quench case, and it is related to the universal linear growth of entanglement, which comes from the interior of the forming black hole. We also analyze general two-point correlation functions in the framework of the geodesic approximation, focusing on the study of the late time behavior.

  17. Holographic complexity and spacetime singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbón, José L.F.; Rabinovici, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of holographic complexity in various AdS/CFT models containing cosmological crunch singularities. We find that a notion of complexity measured by extremal bulk volumes tends to decrease as the singularity is approached in CFT time, suggesting that the corresponding quantum states have simpler entanglement structure at the singularity.

  18. Speckle fields in holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockshin, Gennady R.; Kozel, Stanislav M.; Bielonuchkin, V. E.

    1990-07-01

    The objects which are investigated which are investigated with the help of the holographic interferometry methods as a rule scatter light diffusely, therefore the two-expositional hologram reconstructs the result of interference of the speckle-fields f ('4 and f() scattered by th object at the initial (1) and final (2) states.

  19. Emergent spacetime and holographic CFTs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Showk, Sheer; Papadodimas, Kyriakos

    2012-01-01

    We discuss universal properties of conformal field theories with holographic duals. A central feature of these theories is the existence of a low-lying sector of operators whose correlators factorize. We demonstrate that factorization can only hold in the large central charge limit. Using conformal

  20. Solid State KA-Band, Solid State W-Band and TWT Amplifiers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I of the proposal describes plans to develop a state of the art transmitter for the W-Band and KA -Band Cloud Radar system. Our focus will be concentrated in...

  1. Bird Migration Echoes Observed by Polarimetric Radar

    OpenAIRE

    MINDA, Haruya; FURUZAWA, Fumie A.; SATOH, Shinsuke; NAKAMURA, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    A C-band polarimetric radar on Okinawa Island successfully observed large-scale bird migrations over the western Pacific Ocean. The birds generated interesting polarimetric signatures. This paper describes the signatures and speculates bird behavior.

  2. TCSP CLOUD RADAR SYSTEM (CRS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cloud Radar System (CRS) provides vertically profiled reflectivity and Doppler velocity at aircraft nadir along the flight track. The CRS is a 94 GHz (W-band; 3...

  3. Three-dimensional radar imaging techniques and systems for near-field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed three-dimensional holographic (synthetic aperture) radar imaging techniques and systems for a wide variety of near-field applications. These applications include radar cross-section (RCS) imaging, personnel screening, standoff concealed weapon detection, concealed threat detection, through-barrier imaging, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Sequentially-switched linear arrays are used for many of these systems to enable high-speed data acquisition and 3-D imaging. In this paper, the techniques and systems will be described along with imaging results that demonstrate the utility of near-field 3-D radar imaging for these compelling applications.

  4. Monitoring of rain water storage in forests with satellite radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Kuiper, PJC

    The sensitivity of radar backscatter to the amount of intercepted rain in temperate deciduous forests is analyzed to determine the feasibility of retrieval of this parameter from satellite radar data. A backscatter model is validated with X-band radar measurements of a single tree exposed to rain. A

  5. Vertical Pointing Weather Radar for Built-up Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Thorndahl, Søren; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2008-01-01

      A cost effective vertical pointing X-band weather radar (VPR) has been tested for measurement of precipitation in urban areas. Stationary tests indicate that the VPR performs well compared to horizontal weather radars, such as the local area weather radars (LAWR). The test illustrated...

  6. TCSP ER-2 DOPPLER RADAR (EDOP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TCSP ER-2 DOPPLER RADAR (EDOP) dataset was collected by the ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP), which is an X-band (9.6 GHz) Doppler radar mounted in the nose of the ER-2...

  7. CAMEX-4 ER-2 DOPPLER RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 ER-2 Doppler Radar dataset was collected by the ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP), which is an X-band (9.6 GHz) Doppler radar mounted in the nose of ER-2. The...

  8. Rancang Bangun Sistem Pengolah Sinyal Remote Display Pada Marine Radar Menggunakan Matlab

    OpenAIRE

    Rudy Yuwono, ST., M.Sc., Sahirul Alam., Dwi Fadila Kurniawan, ST., MT

    2013-01-01

    Salah satu contoh marine radar adalah Furuno 1932 Mark-2, yang merupakan jenis radar pulsa X-band non-doppler. Kelemahan radar ini adalah tampilannya yang menggunakan monitor crt monokrom warna hijau. Pada paper ini akan dibahas mengenai pembuatan sistem display radar menggunakan Matlab dengan kelebihan dalam menampilkan target dengan gradasi warna berdasarkan kuat sinyal radar yang dipantulkannya. Tahapan pertama dalam mengolah sinyal radar adalah proses sampling untuk mendapatkan data sinya...

  9. Concept Development for Advanced Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The effort will focus on P-Band and L-band polarimetric radar architectures that employ advanced and innovative techniques to increase the science value of the...

  10. Lithographically-Scribed Planar Holographic Optical CDMA Devices and Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mossberg, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    .... Holographic Bragg Reflectors (HBRs) comprise an exemplary lithographically scribed fully integrated holographic device useful for multiplexing of wavelength differentiated optical signals and general purpose spectral filtering...

  11. Holographic entanglement entropy in general holographic superconductor models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yan [School of Mathematics and Computer Science, Shaanxi University of Technology,Hanzhong, Shaanxi 723000 (China); Pan, Qiyuan [Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University,Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China)

    2014-06-03

    We study the entanglement entropy of general holographic dual models both in AdS soliton and AdS black hole backgrounds with full backreaction. We find that the entanglement entropy is a good probe to explore the properties of the holographic superconductors and provides richer physics in the phase transition. We obtain the effects of the scalar mass, model parameter and backreaction on the entropy, and argue that the jump of the entanglement entropy may be a quite general feature for the first order phase transition. In strong contrast to the insulator/superconductor system, we note that the backreaction coupled with the scalar mass can not be used to trigger the first order phase transition if the model parameter is below its bottom bound in the metal/superconductor system.

  12. Holographic complexity in gauge/string superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Momeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following a methodology similar to [1], we derive a holographic complexity for two dimensional holographic superconductors (gauge/string superconductors with backreactions. Applying a perturbation method proposed by Kanno in Ref. [2], we study behaviors of the complexity for a dual quantum system near critical points. We show that when a system moves from the normal phase (T>Tc to the superconductor phase (Tholographic complexity will be divergent.

  13. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es; Sanchez, Guillermo [Departamento de Matematica y Ciencia de la Computacion, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: gsanchez@usach.cl

    2009-08-31

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c{>=}1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c{>=}1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X)

  14. Homodyne detection of holographic memory systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urness, Adam C.; Wilson, William L.; Ayres, Mark R.

    2014-09-01

    We present a homodyne detection system implemented for a page-wise holographic memory architecture. Homodyne detection by holographic memory systems enables phase quadrature multiplexing (doubling address space), and lower exposure times (increasing read transfer rates). It also enables phase modulation, which improves signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to further increase data capacity. We believe this is the first experimental demonstration of homodyne detection for a page-wise holographic memory system suitable for a commercial design.

  15. Holographic QCD, entanglement entropy, and critical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, M.; Lezgi, M.

    2017-10-01

    Based on gauge-gravity duality, by using holographic entanglement entropy, we have done a phenomenological study to probe the confinement-deconfinement phase transition in the holographic model resembling quantum chromodynamics with two massless flavors and three colors. Our outcomes are in perfect agreement with the expected results, qualitatively and quantitatively. We find out that the (holographic) entanglement entropy is a reliable order parameter for probing the phase transition.

  16. Radar Image, Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The southeast part of the island of Hokkaido, Japan, is an area dominated by volcanoes and volcanic caldera. The active Usu Volcano is at the lower right edge of the circular Lake Toya-Ko and near the center of the image. The prominent cone above and to the left of the lake is Yotei Volcano with its summit crater. The city of Sapporo lies at the base of the mountains at the top of the image and the town of Yoichi -- the hometown of SRTM astronaut Mamoru Mohri -- is at the upper left edge. The bay of Uchiura-Wan takes up the lower center of the image. In this image, color represents elevation, from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest. The radar image has been overlaid to provide more details of the terrain. Due to a processing problem, an island in the center of this crater lake is missing and will be properly placed when further SRTM swaths are processed. The horizontal banding in this image is a processing artifact that will be removed when the navigation information collected by SRTM is fully calibrated. This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 100 by 150 kilometers (62

  17. Holographic Two-Photon Induced Photopolymerization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Holographic two-photon-induced photopolymerization (HTPIP) offers distinct advantages over conventional one-photon-induced photopolymerization and current techniques...

  18. Holographic spectrum-splitting optical systems for solar photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deming

    Solar energy is the most abundant source of renewable energy available. The relatively high cost prevents solar photovoltaic (PV) from replacing fossil fuel on a larger scale. In solar PV power generation the cost is reduced with more efficient PV technologies. In this dissertation, methods to improve PV conversion efficiency with holographic optical components are discussed. The tandem multiple-junction approach has achieved very high conversion efficiency. However it is impossible to manufacture tandem PV cells at a low cost due to stringent fabrication standards and limited material types that satisfy lattice compatibility. Current produced by the tandem multi-junction PV cell is limited by the lowest junction due to series connection. Spectrum-splitting is a lateral multi-junction concept that is free of lattice and current matching constraints. Each PV cell can be optimized towards full absorption of a spectral band with tailored light-trapping schemes. Holographic optical components are designed to achieve spectrum-splitting PV energy conversion. The incident solar spectrum is separated onto multiple PV cells that are matched to the corresponding spectral band. Holographic spectrum-splitting can take advantage of existing and future low-cost technologies that produces high efficiency thin-film solar cells. Spectrum-splitting optical systems are designed and analyzed with both transmission and reflection holographic optical components. Prototype holograms are fabricated and high optical efficiency is achieved. Light-trapping in PV cells increases the effective optical path-length in the semiconductor material leading to improved absorption and conversion efficiency. It has been shown that the effective optical path length can be increased by a factor of 4n2 using diffusive surfaces. Ultra-light-trapping can be achieved with optical filters that limit the escape angle of the diffused light. Holographic reflection gratings have been shown to act as angle

  19. Holographic reflector for reflective LCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Murillo-Mora, Luis M.; Iwata, Fujio

    1997-05-01

    We describe a new holographic optical element to improve the image's quality of a reflective liquid crystal displays (LCDs). This new holographic reflector consists basically of 2 layers: a volume type transmission hologram layer and a metallic reflection layer. Compared with conventional reflectors for reflective LCDs, a high optical efficiency can be obtained because the hologram is able to concentrate the reflected light to the observer's eyes. Also, it avoids the problems of glare in the LCDs by deviating the reflected incident light (used for display) away from the direction of the direct reflection light. The transmission hologram's low wavelength selectivity permits us to obtain a near white color reflector for reflective LCDs which for multiple applications is the preferable color for the background.

  20. Holographic Chern-Simons defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky,Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Melby-Thompson, Charles M. [Department of Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS),The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Meyer, René [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS),The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Sugimoto, Shigeki [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS),The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-06-28

    We study SU(N) Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in the presence of defects that shift the Chern-Simons level from a holographic point of view by embedding the system in string theory. The model is a D3-D7 system in Type IIB string theory, whose gravity dual is given by the AdS soliton background with probe D7 branes attaching to the AdS boundary along the defects. We holographically renormalize the free energy of the defect system with sources, from which we obtain the correlation functions for certain operators naturally associated to these defects. We find interesting phase transitions when the separation of the defects as well as the temperature are varied. We also discuss some implications for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and for 2-dimensional QCD.

  1. Holographic multiverse and conformal invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garriga, Jaume [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Vilenkin, Alexander, E-mail: jaume.garriga@ub.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, 212 College Ave., Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We consider a holographic description of the inflationary multiverse, according to which the wave function of the universe is interpreted as the generating functional for a lower dimensional Euclidean theory. We analyze a simple model where transitions between inflationary vacua occur through bubble nucleation, and the inflating part of spacetime consists of de Sitter regions separated by thin bubble walls. In this model, we present some evidence that the dual theory is conformally invariant in the UV.

  2. Constructive use of holographic projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der FU, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Revisiting the old problem of existence of interacting models of QFT with new conceptual ideas and mathematical tools, one arrives at a novel view about the nature of QFT. The recent success of algebraic methods in establishing the existence of factorizing models suggests new directions for a more intrinsic constructive approach beyond Lagrangian quantization. Holographic projection simplifies certain properties of the bulk theory and hence is a promising new tool for these new attempts. (author)

  3. Photopolymerizable Nanocomposites for Holographic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Elsa

    2010-01-01

    Photopolymerizable nanocomposites with good optical properties consisting of an acrylamide based photopolymer and zeolite nanoparticles (Beta, zeolite A, AlPO-18, silicalite-1 and zeolite L) were fabricated and characterized for holographic applications. The colloidal zeolite solutions used in this project were characterized by several techniques including X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy to ensure their success...

  4. Exploiting Temporal Secondary Access Opportunities in Radar Spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Tercero, Miurel; Sung, Ki Won; Zander, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we quantify the temporal opportunities for secondary access to radar spectrum. Secondary users are assumed to be WLANs which opportunistically share the radar frequency band under the constraint that the aggregate interference does not harm radar operation. Each WLAN device employs dynamic frequency selection (DFS) as a mechanism to protect the radar from the interference. We also consider an advanced interference protection mechanism, which is termed temporal DFS. It exploits ...

  5. Mass production of holographic transparent components for augmented and virtual reality applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Juan Manuel; Dimov, Fedor; Padiyar, Joy; Coe-Sullivan, Seth

    2017-06-01

    Diffractive optics such as holographic optical elements (HOEs) can provide transparent and narrow band components with arbitrary incident and diffracted angles for near-to-eye commercial electronic products for augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and smart glass applications. In this paper, we will summarize the operational parameters and general optical geometries relevant for near-to-eye displays, the holographic substrates available for these applications, and their performance characteristics and ease of manufacture. We will compare the holographic substrates available in terms of fabrication, manufacturability, and end-user performance characteristics. Luminit is currently emplacing the manufacturing capacity to serve this market, and this paper will discuss the capabilities and limitations of this unique facility.

  6. Holographic interferometry in construction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartikainen, T.

    1995-12-31

    In this work techniques for visualizing phase and opaque objects by ruby laser interferometry are introduced. A leakage flow as a phase object is studied by holographic interferometry and the intensity distribution of the interferograms presenting the leakage flow are computer-simulated. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the leakage flow is made. The analysis is based on the experimental and theoretical results presented in this work. The holographic setup and the double pass method for visualizing leakage flow are explained. A vibrating iron plate is the opaque object. Transient impact waves are generated by a pistol bullet on the iron plate and visualized by holographic interferometry. An apparatus with the capability of detecting and calculating the delays necessary for laser triggering is introduced. A time series of interferograms presenting elastic wave formation in an iron plate is shown. A computer-simulation of the intensity distributions of these interferograms is made. An analysis based on the computer-simulation and the experimental data of the transient elastic wave is carried out and the results are presented. (author)

  7. Holographic gunsights for small arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Anthony M.; Sieczka, Eric J.; Radler, Richard; Upatnieks, Juris

    1996-05-01

    Holographic gunsights were first demonstrated in the mid 1970s by researchers at the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) under contracts with the Air Force and the Army. The sights utilized He-Ne gas lasers and were designed for use with large weapons systems. With the advent of low cost visible laser diode, ERIM formed a new company, EOTech, to develop, manufacture and market a holographic gun sight for small arms. A hologram is used to reconstruct the image of a reticle pattern that appears at the target plane. Unlike red-dot sights, virtually any reticle pattern, 2D or 3D, can be formed. The design challenges include an opto-mechanical package that is compact, light weight and low cost which can withstand recoils up to 4,000 Gs and provide fine elevation/windage pointing adjustments, and optics that are aberration-free and stable over a wide temperature range. Manufacturing challenges include the mass production of high quality holographic optics at low cost and the precision alignment of the very low f/number optics.

  8. Shuttle Imaging Radar-C mission operations - Technology test bed for Earth Observing System synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, J. P.; Collins, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mission operations for the Space Radar Lab (SRL), particularly in the areas of real-time replanning and science activity coordination, are presented. The two main components of SRL are the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C and the X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Earth Observing System SAR will be a multispectral, multipolarization radar satellite that will provide information over an entire decade, permitting scientists to monitor large-scale changes in the earth's environment over a long period of time.

  9. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  10. Wide angles, color, holographic infinity optics display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarinos, J. R.; Coleman, D. J.

    1981-03-01

    This project demonstrates the feasibility of producing a holographic compound spherical beamsplitter mirror with full color response. Furthermore, this holographic beamsplitter was incorporated into a Pancake Window display system as a replacement for the classical glass spherical beamsplitter and its performance and color capabilities have been demonstrated.

  11. Holographic complexity for time-dependent backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood, E-mail: davoodmomeni78@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@googlemail.com [Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Bahamonde, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.beltran.14@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Myrzakulov, Ratbay [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2016-11-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the holographic complexity for time-dependent asymptotically AdS geometries. We will first use a covariant zero mean curvature slicing of the time-dependent bulk geometries, and then use this co-dimension one spacelike slice of the bulk spacetime to define a co-dimension two minimal surface. The time-dependent holographic complexity will be defined using the volume enclosed by this minimal surface. This time-dependent holographic complexity will reduce to the usual holographic complexity for static geometries. We will analyze the time-dependence as a perturbation of the asymptotically AdS geometries. Thus, we will obtain time-dependent asymptotically AdS geometries, and we will calculate the holographic complexity for such time-dependent geometries.

  12. Holographic brain: a good analogy gone bad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2002-07-01

    One way of honoring the world's two greatest holographers is to remove from their field the association with the offbeat world of the holographic mind. Basing itself on analogical musings of two very creative scientists who were themselves not holographers, this 'field' of the holographic brain has strayed far from science and into the absurd. So much absurdity has been written by so many people that the one legitimate study of holographic principle in dolphins has been grouped too often with the nonsense. Here is taken most of the 'target statements' form one book. We could not bear to read them all this closely. We will attempt to determine what tidbit of fact led to the statements and to suggest alternative explanations when there is something to explain.

  13. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  14. Investigations of the lower and middle atmosphere at the Arecibo Observatory and a description of the new VHF radar project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottger, J.; Ierkic, H. M.; Zimmerman, R. K.; Hagen, J.

    1986-01-01

    The atmospheric science research at the Arecibo Observatory is performed by means of (active) radar methods and (passive) optical methods. The active methods utilize the 430 NHz radar, the S-band radar on 2380 MHz, and a recently constructed Very High Frequency (VHF) radar. The passive methods include measurements of the mesopause temperature by observing the rotational emissions from OH-bands. The VHF radar design is discussed.

  15. Holographic Read-Only Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, F.; Zhou, G.; Psaltis, D.

    The most successful use of optical memories so far has been as read-only memories (ROM). A main reason for this success has been the availability of inexpensive methods to mass-produce copies of recorded disks. This has made it possible to publish data (audio, video, databases, computer games) and distribute it widely through normal retail channels. In this chapter, we show results of a holographic read-only memory (HROM) of which digital data on a master disk can be copied onto replicate disks efficiently.

  16. Space Radar Image of Phnom Phen, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the city of Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia. Phnom Penh lies at the confluence of the Mekong River and the Basak Sab. The city was originally established in 1434 to succeed Angkor Thom as capital of the Khmer Nation. Phnom Penh is the bright blue and orange area west of the rivers, near the center of the image. The red, light blue and purple colors indicate differences in vegetation height and structure. Radar images like this one are being used by archaeologists to investigate ruins in the Angkor area in northern Cambodia. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 15, 1994. The image is 27 kilometers by 27 kilometers (17 miles by 17 miles) and is centered at 11.5 degrees north latitude, 105.0 degrees East longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  17. Space Radar Image of Randonia Rain Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This multi-frequency space radar image of a tropical rainforest in western Brazil shows rapidly changing land use patterns and it also demonstrates the capability of the different radar frequencies to detect and penetrate heavy rainstorms. This color image was created by combining the three separate radar frequencies into a composite image. The three black and white images below represent the individual frequencies. The lower left image, X-band vertically transmitted and received, is blue in the color image; the lower center image, C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received is green; and the lower right image, L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received is red. A heavy downpour in the lower center of the image appears as a black 'cloud' in the X-band image, the same area is shows up faintly in the C-band image, and is invisible in the L-band image. When combined in the color image, the rain cell appears red and yellow. Although radar can usually 'see' through clouds, short radar wavelengths (high frequency), such as X and C-band, can be changed by unusually heavy rain cells. L-band, at a 24 cm (9 inches) wavelength, is unaffected by such rain cells. By analyzing the way the radar changes, scientist can estimate rainfall rates. The area shown is in the state of Rondonia, in western Brazil. The pink areas are pristine tropical rainforest, and the blue and green patches are areas where the forest has been cleared for agriculture. Cleared areas are typically able to support intense farming for a only few years, before soil erosion renders the fields unusable. Radar imaging can be used to monitor not only the rainforest destruction, but also the rates of recovery of abandoned fields. This image is 35.2 kilometers by 21.3 kilometers (21.8 miles by 13.2 miles) and is centered at 11.2 degrees south latitude, 61.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic

  18. Exploring holographic Composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croon, Djuna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex,BN1 9QH Brighton (United Kingdom); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, ON (Canada); Dillon, Barry M.; Huber, Stephan J.; Sanz, Veronica [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex,BN1 9QH Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-13

    Simple Composite Higgs models predict new vector-like fermions not too far from the electroweak scale, yet LHC limits are now sensitive to the TeV scale. Motivated by this tension, we explore the holographic dual of the minimal model, MCHM{sub 5}, to try and alleviate this tension without increasing the fine-tuning in the Higgs potential. Interestingly, we find that lowering the UV cutoff in the 5D picture allows for heavier top partners and less fine-tuning. In the 4D dual this corresponds to increasing the number of “colours” N, thus increasing the decay constant of the Goldstone Higgs. This is essentially a ‘Little Randall-Sundrum Model’, which are known to reduce some flavour and electroweak constraints. Furthermore, in anticipation of the ongoing efforts at the LHC to put bounds on the top Yukawa, we demonstrate that deviations from the SM can be suppressed or enhanced with respect to what is expected from mere symmetry arguments in 4D. We conclude that the 5D holographic realisation of the MCHM{sub 5} with a small UV cutoff is not in tension with the current experimental data.

  19. Holographic baryons from oblate instantons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozali, Moshe; Stang, Jared B.; Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-02-01

    We investigate properties of baryons in a family of holographic field theories related to the Sakai-Sugimoto model of holographic QCD. Starting with the N f = 2 Sakai-Sugimoto model, we truncate to a 5D Yang-Mills action for the gauge fields associated with the noncompact directions of the flavor D8-branes. We define a free parameter γ that controls the strength of this Yang-Mills term relative to the Chern-Simons term that couples the Abelian gauge field to the SU(2) instanton density. Moving away from γ = 0 should incorporate some of the effects of taking the Sakai-Sugimoto model away from large 't Hooft coupling λ. In this case, the baryon ground state corresponds to an oblate SU(2) instanton on the bulk flavor branes: the usual SO(4) symmetric instanton is deformed to spread more along the field theory directions than the radial direction. We numerically construct these anisotropic instanton solutions for various values of γ and calculate the mass and baryon charge profile of the corresponding baryons. Using the value γ = 2.55 that has been found to best fit the mesonic spectrum of QCD, we find a value for the baryon mass of 1.19 GeV, significantly more realistic than the value 1.60 GeV computed previously using an SO(4) symmetric ansatz for the instanton.

  20. Fidelity susceptibility as holographic PV-criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood, E-mail: davoodmomeni78@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@googlemail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia – Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Myrzakulov, Kairat, E-mail: kairatmyrzakul@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Myrzakulov, Ratbay, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2017-02-10

    It is well known that entropy can be used to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. In this paper, we will use complexity to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. Thus, we will analyze the relation among holographic complexity, fidelity susceptibility, and thermodynamics in extended phase space. We will demonstrate that fidelity susceptibility (which is the informational complexity dual to a maximum volume in AdS) can be related to the thermodynamical volume (which is conjugate to the cosmological constant in the extended thermodynamic phase space). Thus, this letter establishes a relation among geometry, thermodynamics, and information theory, using complexity.

  1. Robust Sparse Sensing Using Weather Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, K. V.; Kruger, A.; Krajewski, W. F.; Xu, W.

    2014-12-01

    The ability of a weather radar to detect weak echoes is limited by the presence of noise or unwanted echoes. Some of these unwanted signals originate externally to the radar system, such as cosmic noise, radome reflections, interference from co-located radars, and power transmission lines. The internal source of noise in microwave radar receiver is mainly thermal. The thermal noise from various microwave devices in the radar receiver tends to lower the signal-to-noise ratio, thereby masking the weaker signals. Recently, the compressed sensing (CS) technique has emerged as a novel signal sampling paradigm that allows perfect reconstruction of signals sampled at frequencies lower than the Nyquist rate. Many radar and remote sensing applications require efficient and rapid data acquisition. The application of CS to weather radars may allow for faster target update rates without compromising the accuracy of target information. In our previous work, we demonstrated recovery of an entire precipitation scene from its compressed-sensed version by using the matrix completion approach. In this study, we characterize the performance of such a CS-based weather radar in the presence of additive noise. We use a signal model where the precipitation signals form a low-rank matrix that is corrupted with (bounded) noise. Using recent advances in algorithms for matrix completion from few noisy observations, we reconstruct the precipitation scene with reasonable accuracy. We test and demonstrate our approach using the data collected by Iowa X-band Polarimetric (XPOL) weather radars.

  2. Social Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    development and exploration of courses of action. Recent events suggest the great potential of social media as an important input for this 21st century...unrestricted data domain consisting of open source English and foreign language data of varying types, including social media  Engineering to process and...Ideology identification in multiple languages  Emotion analysis of social media for instability monitoring Social Radar RTA HFM-201/RSM

  3. Some applications of holographic interferometry in biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbeni, Jean P. L.

    1992-03-01

    Holographic interferometry is well adapted for the determination of 2D strain fields in osseous structures. The knowledge of those strain fields is important for the understanding of structure behavior such as arthrosis.

  4. Holographic equipartition from first order action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the idea that gravity is emergent has attract many people's attention. The "Emergent Gravity Paradigm" is a program that develop this idea from the thermodynamical point of view. It expresses the Einstein equation in the language of thermodynamics. A key equation in this paradigm is the holographic equipartition which says that, in all static spacetimes, the degrees of freedom on the boundary equal those in the bulk. And the time evolution of spacetime is drove by the departure from the holographic equipartition. In this paper, we get the holographic equipartition and its generalization from the first order formalism, that is, the connection and its conjugate momentum are considered to be the canonical variables. The final results have similar structure as those from the metric formalism. It gives another proof of holographic equipartition.

  5. Entanglement entropy and complexity for one-dimensional holographic superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Kord Zangeneh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Holographic superconductor is an important arena for holography, as it allows concrete calculations to further understand the dictionary between bulk physics and boundary physics. An important quantity of recent interest is the holographic complexity. Conflicting claims had been made in the literature concerning the behavior of holographic complexity during phase transition. We clarify this issue by performing a numerical study on one-dimensional holographic superconductor. Our investigation shows that holographic complexity does not behave in the same way as holographic entanglement entropy. Nevertheless, the universal terms of both quantities are finite and reflect the phase transition at the same critical temperature.

  6. Holographic recording using a digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Ryder S.; Smith, Steven L.; Molnar, Raymond A.; Benton, Stephen A.

    1999-03-01

    We describe the use of a digital micromirror device (Texas Instruments, Inc.'s DMDTM) as a spatial light modulator for holographic applications. Questions of the interferometric effects of the moving mirror structure and the appropriateness of pulse-width modulation for grayscale imaging are addressed. Compensation for the particular attributes of DMD imaging has allowed the creation of full-color holographic stereograms of high image quality.

  7. Proton beam writing for producing holographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ow, Y.S.; Breese, M.B.H.; Bettiol, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the writing of computer generated hologram diffraction patterns using focused 2 MeV proton beam irradiation. These patterns were designed using a ray tracing algorithm and written directly into a thick polymethylmethacrylate layer. When the developed holographic pattern was illuminated with a 650 nm laser it produced a good reconstructed image. This work provides means of forming high-resolution, high aspect ratio holographic images in polymers for applications in data storage using switchable holography.

  8. Deuteron transverse densities in holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Chandan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Physics, Kanpur (India); Chakrabarti, Dipankar [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Physics, Kanpur (India); Zhao, Xingbo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    We investigate the transverse charge density in the longitudinally as well as transversely polarized deuteron using the recent empirical description of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in the framework of holographic QCD. The predictions of the holographic QCD are compared with the results of a standard phenomenological parameterization. In addition, we evaluate GPDs and the gravitational form factors for the deuteron. The longitudinal momentum densities are also investigated in the transverse plane. (orig.)

  9. Holographic lenses for building integrated concentrating photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemisana, Daniel; Collados, Ma Victoria; Quintanilla, Manuel; Atencia, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A holographic solar concentrator has been designed, constructed and characterised. • The system configuration is suitable for building integration. • The holographic lens diffracts in the bandwidth to which the cell is more sensitive. • The system prevents the cell overheating. • The use of the holographic element increases the electrical efficiency of the system. - Abstract: A volume transmission phase holographic element was designed and constructed to perform as a building integrated photovoltaic concentrator. The holographic lens diffracts light in the spectral bandwidth to which the cell presents the highest sensitivity with a concentration factor of 3.6X. In this way, the cell is protected from overheating because the infrared for which the solar cell is not sensitive is not concentrated. In addition, based on the asymmetric angular selectivity of the volume hologram and based on the linear concentration, only single-axis tracking is needed. The use of the holographic element increases the efficiency of the PV cell by 3% and the fill factor by 8%

  10. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the

  11. Soft Pomeron in Holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ballon-Bayona, Alfonso; Costa, Miguel S; Djurić, Marko

    2016-01-01

    We study the graviton Regge trajectory in Holographic QCD as a model for high energy scattering processes dominated by soft pomeron exchange. This is done by considering spin J fields from the closed string sector that are dual to glueball states of even spin and parity. In particular, we construct a model that governs the analytic continuation of the spin J field equation to the region of real J < 2, which includes the scattering domain of negative Maldelstam variable t. The model leads to approximately linear Regge trajectories and is compatible with the measured values of 1.08 for the intercept and 0.25 GeV$^{-2}$ for the slope of the soft pomeron. The intercept of the secondary pomeron trajectory is in the same region of the subleading trajectories, made of mesons, proposed by Donnachie and Landshoff, and should therefore be taken into account.

  12. Defect CFTs and holographic multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiol, Bartomeu, E-mail: bfiol@ub.edu [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    We investigate some aspects of a recent proposal for a holographic description of the multiverse. Specifically, we focus on the implications on the suggested duality of the fluctuations of a bubble separating two universes with different cosmological constants. We do so by considering a similar problem in a 2+1 CFT with a codimension one defect, obtained by an M5-brane probe embedding in AdS{sub 4} × S{sup 7}, and studying its spectrum of fluctuations. Our results suggest that the kind of behavior required by the spectrum of bubble fluctuations is not likely to take place in defect CFTs with an AdS dual, although it might be possible if the defect supports a non-unitary theory.

  13. Note on subregion holographic complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Pratim; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2017-07-01

    The volume inside a Ryu-Takayanagi surface has been conjectured to be related to the complexity of subregions of the boundary field theory. Here, we study the behavior of this volume analytically, when the entangling surface has a strip geometry. We perform systematic expansions in the low- and high-temperature regimes for AdS-Schwarzschild and RN-AdS black holes. In the latter regime, we point out spurious divergences that might occur due to the limitations of a near horizon expansion. A similar analysis is performed for extremal black holes and, at large charge, we find that there might be some new features of the volume as compared to the area. Finally, we numerically study a four-dimensional RN-AdS black hole in global AdS, the entangling surface being a sphere. We find that the holographic complexity captures essentially the same information as the entanglement entropy, as far as phase transitions are concerned.

  14. Holographic Storage of Biphoton Entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Han-Ning; Zhang, Han; Yang, Sheng-Jun; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Rui, Jun; Deng, You-Jin; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Chen, Shuai; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Jin, Xian-Min; Zhao, Bo; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-05-01

    Coherent and reversible storage of multiphoton entanglement with a multimode quantum memory is essential for scalable all-optical quantum information processing. Although a single photon has been successfully stored in different quantum systems, storage of multiphoton entanglement remains challenging because of the critical requirement for coherent control of the photonic entanglement source, multimode quantum memory, and quantum interface between them. Here we demonstrate a coherent and reversible storage of biphoton Bell-type entanglement with a holographic multimode atomic-ensemble-based quantum memory. The retrieved biphoton entanglement violates the Bell inequality for 1μs storage time and a memory-process fidelity of 98% is demonstrated by quantum state tomography.

  15. Emergent Spacetime and Holographic CFTs

    CERN Document Server

    El-Showk, Sheer

    2012-01-01

    We discuss universal properties of conformal field theories with holographic duals. A central feature of these theories is the existence of a low-lying sector of operators whose correlators factorize. We demonstrate that factorization can only hold in the large central charge limit. Using conformal invariance and factorization we argue that these operators are naturally represented as fields in AdS as this makes the underlying linearity of the system manifest. In this class of CFTs the solution of the conformal bootstrap conditions can be naturally organized in structures which coincide with Witten diagrams in the bulk. The large value of the central charge suggests that the theory must include a large number of new operators not captured by the factorized sector. Consequently we may think of the AdS hologram as an effective representation of a small sector of the CFT, which is embedded inside a much larger Hilbert space corresponding to the black hole microstates.

  16. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  17. Reduction of the recorded speckle noise in holographic 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsugi, Takeru; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2013-01-14

    A holographic 3D printer produces a high-quality 3D image reproduced by a full-color, full-parallax holographic stereogram with high-density light-ray recording. In order to produce a high-resolution holographic stereogram, we have to solve the problem of speckle noise in this system. For equalizing an intensity distribution inside the elementary hologram, the object beam is modulated by a diffuser. However the diffuser typically generates speckles, which is recorded in the holographic stereogram. It is localized behind the reconstructed image as a granularity noise. First we show the problems of some conventional ways for suppressing the granularity noise using a band-limited diffuser, and then we analyze an approach using a moving diffuser for the reduction of this noise. In the result, it is found that recording with a moving diffuser is effective for reducing the granularity noise at infinity of reconstructed image, although an alternative noise occurs. Moreover we propose a new method introducing multiple exposures to suppress the noise effectively.

  18. Space Radar Image of Taipei, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The northern end of the island country of Taiwan, including the capital city of Taipei, is shown in this spaceborne radar image. Taipei is the bright blue and red area in the lower center of the image. A portion of the city sits on an island surrounded by the Keelung and Freshwater Rivers. The main channel of the Freshwater River is to the right of the island and appears dark in the image. The channel to the left of the island is no longer active and appear slighter. Rugged, heavily vegetated mountains surround the city and are shown in green. The runways of the Chiang Kai Shek International Airport are seen as dark parallel strips in the upper left of the image. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 10, 1994. The image is 50 kilometers by 33 kilometers (31 miles by 20 miles) and is centered at 25.1 degrees north latitude, 121.5 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  19. Proceedings of the COST 75 final seminar on advanced weather radar systems; Beitraege des Instituts zum COST 75 final seminar on advanced weather radar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, R.; Flender, F.; Hagen, M.; Hoeller, H.; Keil, C.; Meischner, P.

    1998-07-01

    Across Europe more than 110 weather radars are in operation. More than 60 of them are Doppler radars and this number is increasing steadily. Doppler systems are becoming an operational standard. Most systems operate in C-band, with the exception of the Spanish radar network which is composed of S-band Doppler radars. Radar product composites are available for Scandinavia and Central Europe. National networks exist for the UK, France and Spain. Europe further is fortunate to have 8 polarimetric Doppler radars used mainly for research. In Italy some of those systems are used also for operational nowcasting applications for dedicated customers. The Chilbolton multiparameter Doppler radar operates at S-band. (orig.)

  20. A Parallel, High-Fidelity Radar Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, M.; Fasenfest, B.

    2010-09-01

    Accurate modeling of Space Surveillance sensors is necessary for a variety of applications. Accurate models can be used to perform trade studies on sensor designs, locations, and scheduling. In addition, they can be used to predict system-level performance of the Space Surveillance Network to a collision or satellite break-up event. A high fidelity physics-based radar simulator has been developed for Space Surveillance applications. This simulator is designed in a modular fashion, where each module describes a particular physical process or radar function (radio wave propagation & scattering, waveform generation, noise sources, etc.) involved in simulating the radar and its environment. For each of these modules, multiple versions are available in order to meet the end-users needs and requirements. For instance, the radar simulator supports different atmospheric models in order to facilitate different methods of simulating refraction of the radar beam. The radar model also has the capability to use highly accurate radar cross sections generated by the method of moments, accelerated by the fast multipole method. To accelerate this computationally expensive model, it is parallelized using MPI. As a testing framework for the radar model, it is incorporated into the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA). TESSA is based on a flexible, scalable architecture, designed to exploit high-performance computing resources and allow physics-based simulation of the SSA enterprise. In addition to the radar models, TESSA includes hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, optical brightness calculations, optical system models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, simulation analysis and visualization tools. Within this framework, observations and tracks generated by the new radar model are compared to results from a phenomenological radar model. In particular, the new model will be

  1. High Resolution Imaging Ground Penetrating Radar Design and Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders II, Charles Phillip

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulation of a microwave band, high resolution imaging ground penetrating radar. A conceptual explanation is given on the mechanics of wave-based imaging, followed by the governing radar equations. The performance specifications for the imaging system are given as inputs to the radar equations, which output the full system specifications. Those specifications are entered into a MATLAB simulation, and the simulation results are discussed with respect to bot...

  2. Interpretation of the distortion of ground-penetrating radar propagated and reflected waves - development of a multi-frequency tomography; Interpretation de la distorsion des signaux georadar propages et reflechis. Developpement d'une tomographie par bandes de frequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollender, F

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of research for waste disposal in deep geological formations, the French agency for nuclear waste management (ANDRA) has to dispose of non-destructive investigation methods to characterize the medium. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) could be used for this purpose in the case of granitic sites. The work presented here deals with this geophysical method. The classical interpretation of GPR data consists in the localization of geological discontinuities by signal amplitude or arrival time analysis. The main objective of our studies is the interpretation of the radar wave distortion (due to propagation and reflection phenomena), not only to localize discontinuities but also to contribute to their identification. Three preliminary studies have been carried out in order to understand on the one hand, the complexity of the electromagnetic phenomena in the geological medium at radar frequency, and on the other hand, the radar equipment constraints. First, the dispersion and the attenuation characterized by a Q variable factor of the GPR waves are shown with the support of dielectric laboratory measurements. A model, which only requires three parameters, is proposed in order to describe this behavior. Second, the radiation patterns of borehole radar antenna are studied. We show that the amplitude and frequency content of the emitted signal are variable versus the emission angle. An analytical method is proposed to study these phenomena. Finally, instrumental drifts of GPR equipment are studied. Emission time, sampling frequency and amplitude fluctuations are described. These elements are taken into account for the processing of propagated signals by tomographic inversion. Medium anisotropy and borehole trajectory errors are inserted in algorithms in order to cancel artifacts which compromised the previous interpretation. A pre-processing method, based on wave separation algorithm, is applied on data in order to increase tomogram resolution. A new

  3. Comparing holographic dark energy models with statefinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Jing-Lei; Zhang, Jing-Fei

    2014-01-01

    We apply the statefinder diagnostic to the holographic dark energy models, including the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model, the new holographic dark energy model, the new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) model, and the Ricci dark energy model. In the low-redshift region the holographic dark energy models are degenerate with each other and with the ΛCDM model in the H(z) and q(z) evolutions. In particular, the HDE model is highly degenerate with the ΛCDM model, and in the HDE model the cases with different parameter values are also in strong degeneracy. Since the observational data are mainly within the low-redshift region, it is very important to break this lowredshift degeneracy in the H(z) and q(z) diagnostics by using some quantities with higher order derivatives of the scale factor. It is shown that the statefinder diagnostic r(z) is very useful in breaking the low-redshift degeneracies. By employing the statefinder diagnostic the holographic dark energy models can be differentiated efficiently in the low-redshift region. The degeneracy between the holographic dark energy models and the ΛCDM model can also be broken by this method. Especially for the HDE model, all the previous strong degeneracies appearing in the H(z) and q(z) diagnostics are broken effectively. But for the NADE model, the degeneracy between the cases with different parameter values cannot be broken, even though the statefinder diagnostic is used. A direct comparison of the holographic dark energy models in the r-s plane is also made, in which the separations between the models (including the ΛCDM model) can be directly measured in the light of the current values {r 0 , s 0 } of the models. (orig.)

  4. Space Radar Image of Wenatchee, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows a segment of the Columbia River as it passes through the area of Wenatchee, Washington, about 220 kilometers (136 miles) east of Seattle. The Wenatchee Mountains, part of the Cascade Range, are shown in green at the lower left of the image. The Cascades create a 'rain shadow' for the region, limiting rainfall east of the range to less than 26 centimeters (10 inches) per year. The radar's ability to see different types of vegetation is highlighted in the contrast between the pine forests, that appear in green and the dry valley plain that shows up as dark purple. The cities of Wenatchee and East Wenatchee are the grid-like areas straddling the Columbia River in the left center of the image. With a population of about 60,000, the region produces about half of Washington state's lucrative apple crop. Several orchard areas appear as green rectangular patches to the right of the river in the lower right center. Radar images such as these can be used to monitor land use patterns in areas such as Wenatchee, that have diverse and rapidly changing urban, agricultural and wild land pressures. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 10, 1994. The image is 38 kilometers by 45 kilometers (24 miles by 30 miles) and is centered at 47.3 degrees North latitude, 120.1 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  5. Cryogenic Volume-Phase Holographic Grisms for MOIRCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebizuka, Noboru; Ichiyama, Kotaro; Yamada, Toru; Tokoku, Chihiro; Onodera, Masato; Hanesaka, Mai; Kodate, Kashiko; Katsuno Uchimoto, Yuka; Maruyama, Miyoko; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Ichi; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori; Ichikawa, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    We have developed high-dispersion VPH (volume phase holographic) grisms with zinc selenide (ZnSe) prisms for the cryogenic optical system of MOIRCS (Multi-Object near-InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph) for Y-, J-, H-, and K-band observations. We fabricated VPH gratings using a hologram resin. After several heat cycles at between room temperature and 120 K, the VPH gratings were assembled to grisms by gluing with two ZnSe prisms. Several heat cycles were also carried out for the grisms before being installed into MOIRCS. We measured the efficiencies of the VPH grisms in a laboratory, and found them to be 70%-82%. The performances obtained by observations of MOIRCS with the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope have been found to be very consistent with the results in the laboratory test. This is the first astronomical application of cryogenic VPH grisms.

  6. Comparison of CloudSat and TRMM radar reflectivities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basically W-band radar that CloudSat flies suffers strong attenuation in precipitating clouds and its reflectivity value rarely exceeds 20 dBZ though its technical specification indicates the upper measurement limit to be 40 dBZ. TRMM radar, on the other hand, cannot measure values below 17 dBZ. In fact combining data from ...

  7. CAMEX-4 ER-2 DOPPLER RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) is an X-band (9.6 GHz) Doppler radar mounted in the nose of ER-2. The instrument has two fixed antennas, one pointing at nadir and the...

  8. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  9. Microwave emissions from police radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, J M; Wagner, J P; Congleton, J J; Rock, J C

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated police officers' exposures to microwaves emitted by traffic radar units. Exposure measurements were taken at approximated ocular and testicular levels of officers seated in patrol vehicles. Comparisons were made of the radar manufacturers' published maximum power density specifications and actual measured power densities taken at the antenna faces of those units. Four speed-enforcement agencies and one transportation research institute provided 54 radar units for evaluation; 17 different models, encompassing 4 frequency bands and 3 antenna configurations, were included. Four of the 986 measurements taken exceeded the 5 mW/cm2 limit accepted by the International Radiation Protection Association and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement, though none exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, American National Standards Institute, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, or Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard of 10 mW/cm2. The four high measurements were maximum power density readings taken directly in front of the radar. Of the 812 measurements taken at the officers' seated ocular and testicular positions, none exceeded 0.04 mW/cm2; the highest of these (0.034 mW/cm2) was less than 1% of the most conservative current safety standards. High exposures in the limited region directly in front of the radar aperture are easily avoided with proper training. Results of this study indicate that police officer exposure to microwave radiation is apparently minimal. However, because of uncertainty in the medical and scientific communities concerning nonionizing radiation, it is recommended that law enforcement agencies implement a policy of prudent avoidance, including purchasing units with the lowest published maximum power densities, purchasing dash/rear deck-mounted units with antennae mounted outside the patrol vehicle, and training police officers to use the "stand-by" mode

  10. TCSP ER-2 DOPPLER RADAR (EDOP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The EDOP provides vertically profiled reflectivity and Doppler velocity at aircraft nadir along the flight track. The ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) is an X-band (9.6...

  11. MAGELLAN BISTATIC RADAR CALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Calibrated data from three orbits of S-Band (13 cm wavelength) Magellan bistatic radar data collected with NASA antenna DSS 63 on 5 June 1994 when the specular point...

  12. GPM GROUND VALIDATION WYOMING CLOUD RADAR (WCR) LPVEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation W-Band Cloud Radar (WCR) LPVEx dataset contains data collected during the Light Precipitation Evaluation Experiment (LPVEx) in September...

  13. A Dual-Wavelength Radar Technique to Detect Hydrometeor Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the feasibility of a Ku- and Ka-band space/air-borne dual wavelength radar algorithm to discriminate various phase states of precipitating hydrometeors. A phase-state classification algorithm has been developed from the radar measurements of snow, mixed-phase and rain obtained from stratiform storms. The algorithm, presented in the form of the look-up table that links the Ku-band radar reflectivities and dual-frequency ratio (DFR) to the phase states of hydrometeors, is checked by applying it to the measurements of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Airborne Precipitation Radar Second Generation (APR-2). In creating the statistically-based phase look-up table, the attenuation corrected (or true) radar reflectivity factors are employed, leading to better accuracy in determining the hydrometeor phase. In practice, however, the true radar reflectivities are not always available before the phase states of the hydrometeors are determined. Therefore, it is desirable to make use of the measured radar reflectivities in classifying the phase states. To do this, a phase-identification procedure is proposed that uses only measured radar reflectivities. The procedure is then tested using APR-2 airborne radar data. Analysis of the classification results in stratiform rain indicates that the regions of snow, mixed-phase and rain derived from the phase-identification algorithm coincide reasonably well with those determined from the measured radar reflectivities and linear depolarization ratio (LDR).

  14. Holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility as holographic information dual to different volumes in AdS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Mazhari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility have been defined as new quantities dual to different volumes in AdS. In this paper, we will use these new proposals to calculate both of these quantities for a variety of interesting deformations of AdS. We obtain the holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility for an AdS black hole, Janus solution, a solution with cylindrical symmetry, an inhomogeneous background and a hyperscaling violating background. It is observed that the holographic complexity depends on the size of the subsystem for all these solutions and the fidelity susceptibility does not have any such dependence.

  15. Holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility as holographic information dual to different volumes in AdS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazhari, N.S., E-mail: najmemazhari86@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Momeni, Davood, E-mail: davoodmomeni78@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Bahamonde, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.beltran.14@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@googlemail.com [Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia - Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia, V1V 1V7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Myrzakulov, Ratbay, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2017-03-10

    The holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility have been defined as new quantities dual to different volumes in AdS. In this paper, we will use these new proposals to calculate both of these quantities for a variety of interesting deformations of AdS. We obtain the holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility for an AdS black hole, Janus solution, a solution with cylindrical symmetry, an inhomogeneous background and a hyperscaling violating background. It is observed that the holographic complexity depends on the size of the subsystem for all these solutions and the fidelity susceptibility does not have any such dependence.

  16. An automatic holographic adaptive phoropter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirsolaimani, Babak; Peyghambarian, N.; Schwiegerling, Jim; Bablumyan, Arkady; Savidis, Nickolaos; Peyman, Gholam

    2017-08-01

    Phoropters are the most common instrument used to detect refractive errors. During a refractive exam, lenses are flipped in front of the patient who looks at the eye chart and tries to read the symbols. The procedure is fully dependent on the cooperation of the patient to read the eye chart, provides only a subjective measurement of visual acuity, and can at best provide a rough estimate of the patient's vision. Phoropters are difficult to use for mass screenings requiring a skilled examiner, and it is hard to screen young children and the elderly etc. We have developed a simplified, lightweight automatic phoropter that can measure the optical error of the eye objectively without requiring the patient's input. The automatic holographic adaptive phoropter is based on a Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor and three computercontrolled fluidic lenses. The fluidic lens system is designed to be able to provide power and astigmatic corrections over a large range of corrections without the need for verbal feedback from the patient in less than 20 seconds.

  17. Holographic interferometry of high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIlwain, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements in turbulent flows have been historically performed using various types of probes and optical diagnostic methods. In general, probes suffer from plasma perturbation effects and are single point determination methods. Optical methods appear to be better suited to determinations in turbulent flows, however interpretation of the resulting data can often be complex. Methods such as laser Doppler anemometry, which relies on entrained particles, suffers from the fact that particles small enough to be swept along by the plasma are usually melted or sublimed in the plasma. Light refraction or diffraction methods such as shadow photography, interferometry, and holography have also been used to observe plasma flows. These methods typically suffer from the difficulty of interpreting line of sight images and obtaining quantitative data. A new method based on multi-pass holographic interferometry will be discussed. This method has certain advantages which can significantly simplify the complexity of line of sight interferometry image deconvolution. When the method employs high speed cinematography, time resolved images of the plasma flow can be obtained. This method has been applied to both transferred and non-transferred arcs and various types of DC-plasma torch produced jets. These studies and conclusions as to the usefulness of the technique are presented

  18. Theta dependence in holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolini, Lorenzo [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi' , Università di Pisa and INFN, Sezione di Pisa,Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bigazzi, Francesco [INFN, Sezione di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bolognesi, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi' , Università di Pisa and INFN, Sezione di Pisa,Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Cotrone, Aldo L. [INFN, Sezione di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Manenti, Andrea [Institute of Physics, EPFL,Rte de la Sorge, BSP 728, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2017-02-07

    We study the effects of the CP-breaking topological θ-term in the large N{sub c} QCD model by Witten, Sakai and Sugimoto with N{sub f} degenerate light flavors. We first compute the ground state energy density, the topological susceptibility and the masses of the lowest lying mesons, finding agreement with expectations from the QCD chiral effective action. Then, focusing on the N{sub f}=2 case, we consider the baryonic sector and determine, to leading order in the small θ regime, the related holographic instantonic soliton solutions. We find that while the baryon spectrum does not receive O(θ) corrections, this is not the case for observables like the electromagnetic form factor of the nucleons. In particular, it exhibits a dipole term, which turns out to be vector-meson dominated. The resulting neutron electric dipole moment, which is exactly the opposite as that of the proton, is of the same order of magnitude of previous estimates in the literature. Finally, we compute the CP-violating pion-nucleon coupling constant ḡ{sub πNN}, finding that it is zero to leading order in the large N{sub c} limit.

  19. Holographic confinement in inhomogeneous backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marolf, Donald; Wien, Jason [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2016-08-02

    As noted by Witten, compactifying a d-dimensional holographic CFT on an S{sup 1} gives a class of (d−1)-dimensional confining theories with gravity duals. The prototypical bulk solution dual to the ground state is a double Wick rotation of the AdS{sub d+1} Schwarzschild black hole known as the AdS soliton. We generalize such examples by allowing slow variations in the size of the S{sup 1}, and thus in the confinement scale. Coefficients governing the second order response of the system are computed for 3≤d≤8 using a derivative expansion closely related to the fluid-gravity correspondence. The primary physical results are that i) gauge-theory flux tubes tend to align orthogonal to gradients and along the eigenvector of the Hessian with the lowest eigenvalue, ii) flux tubes aligned orthogonal to gradients are attracted to gradients for d≤6 but repelled by gradients for d≥7, iii) flux tubes are repelled by regions where the second derivative along the tube is large and positive but are attracted to regions where the eigenvalues of the Hessian are large and positive in directions orthogonal to the tube, and iv) for d>3, inhomogeneities act to raise the total energy of the confining vacuum above its zeroth order value.

  20. Linearity of holographic entanglement entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almheiri, Ahmed [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics,Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dong, Xi [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Swingle, Brian [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics,Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-02-14

    We consider the question of whether the leading contribution to the entanglement entropy in holographic CFTs is truly given by the expectation value of a linear operator as is suggested by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. We investigate this property by computing the entanglement entropy, via the replica trick, in states dual to superpositions of macroscopically distinct geometries and find it consistent with evaluating the expectation value of the area operator within such states. However, we find that this fails once the number of semi-classical states in the superposition grows exponentially in the central charge of the CFT. Moreover, in certain such scenarios we find that the choice of surface on which to evaluate the area operator depends on the density matrix of the entire CFT. This nonlinearity is enforced in the bulk via the homology prescription of Ryu-Takayanagi. We thus conclude that the homology constraint is not a linear property in the CFT. We also discuss the existence of ‘entropy operators’ in general systems with a large number of degrees of freedom.

  1. Space radar image of Mount Everest

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    These are two comparison images of Mount Everest and its surroundings, along the border of Nepal and Tibet. The peak of Mount Everest, the highest elevation on Earth at 8,848 meters (29,028 feet), can be seen near the center of each image. The image at the top was acquired through thick cloud cover by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 16, 1994. The image on the bottom is an optical photograph taken by the Endeavour crew under clear conditions during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR on October 10, 1994. Both images show an area approximately 70 kilometers by 38 kilometers (43 miles by 24 miles) that is centered at 28.0 degrees north latitude and 86.9 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors in the radar image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Radar illumination is from the top of the frame. The optical photograph has been geometrically adjusted to better match the area shown in the radar image. Many features of the Himalayan terrain are visible in both images. Snow covered areas appear white in the optical photograph while the same areas appear bright blue in the radar image. The radar image was taken in early spring and shows deep snow cover, while the optical photograph was taken in late summer and shows minimum snow cover. The curving and branching features seen in both images are glaciers. The two wavelengths and multiple polarizations of the SIR-C radar are sensitive to characteristics of the glacier surfaces that are not detected by conventional photography, such as the ice roughness, water content and stratification. For this reason, the glaciers show a variety of colors in the radar image (blue, purple, red

  2. Holographic dark energy in the DGP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Norman; Lepe, Samuel; Pena, Francisco; Avelino, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    The braneworld model proposed by Dvali, Gabadadze, and Porrati leads to an accelerated universe without cosmological constant or any other form of dark energy. Nevertheless, we have investigated the consequences of this model when an holographic dark energy is included, taking the Hubble scale as IR cutoff. We have found that the holographic dark energy leads to an accelerated flat universe (de Sitter-like expansion) for the two branches: ε=±1, of the DGP model. Nevertheless, in universes with no null curvature the dark energy presents an EoS corresponding to a phantom fluid during the present era and evolving to a de Sitter-like phase for future cosmic time. In the special case in which the holographic parameter c is equal to one we have found a sudden singularity in closed universes. In this case the expansion is decelerating. (orig.)

  3. Holographic bulk viscosity: GPR vs EO

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex; Kiritsis, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Recently Eling and Oz (EO) proposed a formula for the holographic bulk viscosity, in arXiv:1103.1657, derived from the null horizon focusing equation. This formula seems different from that obtained earlier by Gubser, Pufu and Rocha (GPR) in arXiv:0806.0407 calculated from the IR limit of the two-point function of the trace of the stress tensor. The two were shown to agree only for some simple scaling cases. We point out that the two formulae agree in two non-trivial holographic theories describing RG flows. The first is the strongly coupled N=2* gauge theory plasma. The second is the semi-phenomenological model of Improved Holographic QCD.

  4. Anomalous transport and holographic momentum relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copetti, Christian; Fernández-Pendás, Jorge; Landsteiner, Karl; Megías, Eugenio

    2017-09-01

    The chiral magnetic and vortical effects denote the generation of dissipationless currents due to magnetic fields or rotation. They can be studied in holographic models with Chern-Simons couplings dual to anomalies in field theory. We study a holographic model with translation symmetry breaking based on linear massless scalar field backgrounds. We compute the electric DC conductivity and find that it can vanish for certain values of the translation symmetry breaking couplings. Then we compute the chiral magnetic and chiral vortical conductivities. They are completely independent of the holographic disorder couplings and take the usual values in terms of chemical potential and temperature. To arrive at this result we suggest a new definition of energy-momentum tensor in presence of the gravitational Chern-Simons coupling.

  5. Holographic correlation functions in Critical Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Giorgos; Olea, Rodrigo

    2017-11-01

    We compute the holographic stress tensor and the logarithmic energy-momentum tensor of Einstein-Weyl gravity at the critical point. This computation is carried out performing a holographic expansion in a bulk action supplemented by the Gauss-Bonnet term with a fixed coupling. The renormalization scheme defined by the addition of this topological term has the remarkable feature that all Einstein modes are identically cancelled both from the action and its variation. Thus, what remains comes from a nonvanishing Bach tensor, which accounts for non-Einstein modes associated to logarithmic terms which appear in the expansion of the metric. In particular, we compute the holographic 1-point functions for a generic boundary geometric source.

  6. Holographic duality in condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Zaanen, Jan; Sun, Ya-Wen; Schalm, Koenraad

    2015-01-01

    A pioneering treatise presenting how the new mathematical techniques of holographic duality unify seemingly unrelated fields of physics. This innovative development morphs quantum field theory, general relativity and the renormalisation group into a single computational framework and this book is the first to bring together a wide range of research in this rapidly developing field. Set within the context of condensed matter physics and using boxes highlighting the specific techniques required, it examines the holographic description of thermal properties of matter, Fermi liquids and superconductors, and hitherto unknown forms of macroscopically entangled quantum matter in terms of general relativity, stars and black holes. Showing that holographic duality can succeed where classic mathematical approaches fail, this text provides a thorough overview of this major breakthrough at the heart of modern physics. The inclusion of extensive introductory material using non-technical language and online Mathematica not...

  7. Holographic dark energy in the DGP model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Universidad de Santiago, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Santiago (Chile); Lepe, Samuel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, Francisco [Universidad de La Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Avelino, Arturo [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Fisica, DCI, Codigo Postal 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2012-09-15

    The braneworld model proposed by Dvali, Gabadadze, and Porrati leads to an accelerated universe without cosmological constant or any other form of dark energy. Nevertheless, we have investigated the consequences of this model when an holographic dark energy is included, taking the Hubble scale as IR cutoff. We have found that the holographic dark energy leads to an accelerated flat universe (de Sitter-like expansion) for the two branches: {epsilon}={+-}1, of the DGP model. Nevertheless, in universes with no null curvature the dark energy presents an EoS corresponding to a phantom fluid during the present era and evolving to a de Sitter-like phase for future cosmic time. In the special case in which the holographic parameter c is equal to one we have found a sudden singularity in closed universes. In this case the expansion is decelerating. (orig.)

  8. Liquid crystals for holographic optical data storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matharu, Avtar; Jeeva, S.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    , is discussed. Polymeric liquid crystals play an important role in the development of materials for holographic storage and photoresponsive materials based on azobenzene are targeted for discussion due to their ease of photo- reversion between trans- and cis- states. Although the final polymer may not be liquid......A tutorial review is presented to inform and inspire the reader to develop and integrate strong scientific links between liquid crystals and holographic data storage, from a materials scientist's viewpoint. The principle of holographic data storage as a means of providing a solution...... causing cis - trans-isomerisation can be used to control helix pitch. A brief mention of liquid crystals is also made since these materials may be of future interest since they are optically transparent and amenable to photo- induced anisotropy....

  9. Holographic subregion complexity for singular surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshaei, Elaheh [Isfahan University of Technology, Department of Physics, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mollabashi, Ali [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirzad, Ahmad [Isfahan University of Technology, Department of Physics, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Recently holographic prescriptions were proposed to compute the quantum complexity of a given state in the boundary theory. A specific proposal known as 'holographic subregion complexity' is supposed to calculate the complexity of a reduced density matrix corresponding to a static subregion. We study different families of singular subregions in the dual field theory and find the divergence structure and universal terms of holographic subregion complexity for these singular surfaces. We find that there are new universal terms, logarithmic in the UV cut-off, due to the singularities of a family of surfaces including a kink in (2 + 1) dimensions and cones in even dimensional field theories. We also find examples of new divergent terms such as squared logarithm and negative powers times the logarithm of the UV cut-off parameter. (orig.)

  10. A New Approach for Speckle Reduction in Holographic 3D printer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsugi, Takeru; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    A Holographic 3D printer produces a high quality 3D image reproduced by a full-color, full-parallax holographic stereogram with high-density light-ray recording. But speckle-pattern noise localized behind the reconstructed image is causing a loss of the display quality. This noise is originated from the speckle generated by a diffuser for equalizing the intensity distribution of the object light on the recording medium. We analyze some conventional ways for speckle reduction using a band-limited diffuser, and it is found that these ways cannot reduce the noise sufficiently. Then we propose two methods, one introduces a moving diffuser and the other introduces multiple exposures and a digital diffuser called as 4L-PRPS.

  11. Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Launched February 11, 2000, the STS-99 Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) was the most ambitious Earth mapping mission to date. This illustration shows the Space Shuttle Endeavour orbiting some 145 miles (233 kilometers) above Earth. With C-band and X-band outboard anternae at work, one located in the Shuttle bay and the other located on the end of a 60-meter deployable mast, the SRTM radar was able to penetrate clouds as well as provide its own illumination, independent of daylight, obtaining 3-dimentional topographic images of the world's surface up to the Arctic and Antarctic Circles. The mission completed 222 hours of around the clock radar mapping, gathering enough information to fill more than 20,000 CDs.

  12. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f0(1500) and f0(1710).

  13. Holographic investigation of an industrial robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtoglu, A; Abramson, N; Carlsson, T

    1988-07-15

    Compliance of a revolute robot manipulator is studied experimentally by holographic interferometry using a pulsed ruby laser. In the analysis, loads simulating forces that the robot is subjected to in actual cases were applied to the robot in different robot configurations. Thereby, the elastic compliance and deformation patterns of each joint and link were obtained. Experiments were performed on the ASEA IRb/6. The great influence of load-induced effects on accuracy were verified. The results provide a sound basis for corrective measures intended to minimize these effects. Holographic interferometry provides an extremely reliable way of revealing the 3-D behavior of a robot under load.

  14. Digital holographic Michelson interferometer for nanometrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevrygin, Alexander A.; Korotkov, V. I.; Pulkin, S. A.; Tursunov, I. M.; Venediktov, D. V.; Venediktov, V. Yu.; Volkov, O. V.

    2014-11-01

    The paper considers the dynamic holographic interferometry schemes with amplification (multiplication) of holographic fringes and with correction for distortions, imposed by the interferometer scheme elements. The use of digital microscope and of the matrix light modulator with direct addressing provides the completely digital closed-loop performance of the overall system for real-time evaluation of nano-scale objects size. Considered schemes were verified in the laboratory experiment, using the Michelson micro-interferometer, equipped by the USB-microscope and digital holography stage, equipped by the Holoeye spatial light modulator.

  15. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Kim, Bom Soo; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent

  16. Holographic Aspects of a Relativistic Nonconformal Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyong Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a general D-dimensional Schwarzschild-type black brane solution of the Einstein-dilaton theory and derive, by using the holographic renormalization, its thermodynamics consistent with the geometric results. Using the membrane paradigm, we calculate the several hydrodynamic transport coefficients and compare them with the results obtained by the Kubo formula, which shows the self-consistency of the gauge/gravity duality in the relativistic nonconformal theory. In order to understand more about the relativistic non-conformal theory, we further investigate the binding energy, drag force, and holographic entanglement entropy of the relativistic non-conformal theory.

  17. Entropy-Corrected Holographic Dark Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Hao

    2009-01-01

    The holographic dark energy (HDE) is now an interesting candidate of dark energy, which has been studied extensively in the literature. In the derivation of HDE, the black hole entropy plays an important role. In fact, the entropy-area relation can be modified due to loop quantum gravity or other reasons. With the modified entropy-area relation, we propose the so-called 'entropy-corrected holographic dark energy' (ECHDE) in the present work. We consider many aspects of ECHDE and find some interesting results. In addition, we briefly consider the so-called 'entropy-corrected agegraphic dark energy' (ECADE). (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  18. Interacting holographic dark energy with logarithmic correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Farooq, M. Umar

    2010-01-01

    The holographic dark energy (HDE) is considered to be the most promising candidate of dark energy. Its definition is motivated from the entropy-area relation which depends on the theory of gravity under consideration. Recently a new definition of HDE is proposed with the help of quantum corrections to the entropy-area relation in the setup of loop quantum cosmology. Employing this new definition, we investigate the model of interacting dark energy and derive its effective equation of state. Finally we establish a correspondence between generalized Chaplygin gas and entropy-corrected holographic dark energy

  19. Waves from Radar and Optical Observations of the MLT region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Iain

    Over the past few years we have developed the Australian MLT radar network and established a Rayleigh Lidar system at Buckland Park (BP). In 2009 we obtained funding for a SuperDARN class radar to be installed at BP. This will occur in 2010. Our interest is in the use of this dual frequency radar (typical operating frequencies are between 8 and 12 MHz) for meteor studies of the MLT region. The relatively low operating frequencies of these radars result in an increase the count rates of detected usable meteors (because count rate is proportional to the square root of the transmitted power, and the wavelength raised to 1.5th power), and hence the quality of the derived winds. Most meteor radars operate in the 30 to 55 MHz frequency range. The height coverage is also extended upwards by using a lower frequency because of the larger initial radius of the meteor trails at greater heights. Data from existing SuperDARN radars is available from the Bruny Island radar in Tasmania (available from 1999 -present), and the Unwin radar in southern NZ (available form 2004 -present). While not ideal because of the limited height discrimination available with these older radars, the results extend the information of the dynamics of the MLT region to latitudes below 50S. Opportunities for siting radars on land in this latitude band are limited, and it is a correspondingly very sparse data region. Preliminary results from the radar network will be presented and discussed.

  20. The design and evaluation of a 5.8 ghz laptop-based radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Kevin Chi-Ming

    This project involves design and analysis of a 5.8 GHz laptop-based radar system. The radar system measures Doppler, ranging and forming Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images utilizing Matlab software provided from MIT Open Courseware and performs data acquisition and signal processing. The main purpose of this work is to bring new perspective to the existing radar project by increasing the ISM band frequency from 2.4 GHz to 5.8 GHz and to carry out a series of experiments on the implementation of the radar kit. Demonstrating the radar at higher operating frequency is capable of providing accurate data results in Doppler, ranging and SAR images.

  1. A 24GHz Radar Receiver in CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the system design and circuit implementation of a 24GHz-band short-range radar receiver in CMOS technology. The propagation and penetration properties of EM wave offer the possibility of non-contact based remote sensing and through-the-wall imaging of distance stationary or

  2. Space Radar Image of Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This space radar image of Athens, Greece, shows the sprawling, modern development of this ancient capital city. Densely populated urban areas appear in shades of pink and light green. The Acropolis the dark green triangular patch in the center of the image. Archaeological discoveries indicate Athens has been continuously occupied for at least the last 5,000 years. Numerous ships, shown as bright dots, are seen in the harbor areas in the upper left part of the image. The port city of Piraeus is at the left center. This image is 45 kilometers by 45 kilometers (28 miles by 28 miles) and is centered at 37.9 degrees north latitude, 23.7 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations are as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on October 2, 1994 onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  3. Space Radar Image of Central Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the central part of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia that shows how the tropical rainforest typical of this country is being impacted by human activity. Native forest appears in green in this image, while prominent pink areas represent places where the native forest has been cleared. The large rectangular areas have been cleared for palm oil plantations. The bright pink zones are areas that have been cleared since 1989, while the dark pink zones are areas that were cleared before 1989. These radar data were processed as part of an effort to assist oil and gas companies working in the area to assess the environmental impact of both their drilling operations and the activities of the local population. Radar images are useful in these areas because heavy cloud cover and the persistent smoke and haze associated with deforestation have prevented usable visible-light imagery from being acquired since 1989. The dark shapes in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image are a chain of lakes in flat coastal marshes. This image was acquired in October 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Environmental changes can be easily documented by comparing this image with visible-light data that were acquired in previous years by the Landsat satellite. The image is centered at 0.9 degrees north latitude and 101.3 degrees east longitude. The area shown is 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  4. Holographic Snapshots of Laser Wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Michael

    2006-10-01

    Tabletop plasma accelerators driven by intense ultrashort laser pulses or charged-particle bunches can now produce GeV-range electron beams and femtosecond x-ray and gamma-ray pulses, providing compact radiation sources for application in medicine, nuclear engineering, materials science and high-energy physics. In these accelerators, electrons surf on >100 GeV/m electric fields (thousands of times stronger than in conventional accelerators) generated within plasma structures (e.g. electron plasma waves, ``bubbles'' devoid of electrons) propagating behind the driving pulse. Because of their microscopic size and luminal velocity, however, critical features of these structures that determine the energy, energy spread, collimation and charge of the accelerated beam have eluded direct single-shot observation, inhibiting progress in producing high quality beams and in correlating beam properties with wake structure. Here we demonstrate single shot visualization of laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) structures for the first time, using Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique designed to image structures propagating near light speed. Our holographic ``snapshots'' capture the evolution of multiple wake periods, and resolve wavefront curvature seen previously only in simulations. These previously invisible features underlie wave breaking, electron injection and focusing within the wake, the key determinants of beam quality. We reconstruct wake morphology in real-time, providing experimental feedback and optimization. Beyond accelerators, we anticipate that FDH will provide an unprecedented visualization and feedback capability for structures created in diverse laser- and particle-plasma interactions, including fast ignition for laser fusion and plasma-based amplification and compresssion of ultra-intense laser pulses.

  5. Space Radar Image of Bahia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a color composite image of southern Bahia, Brazil, centered at 15.22 degree south latitude and 39.07 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 38th orbit of Earth on October 2, 1994. The image covers an area centered over the Una Biological Reserve, one the largest protected areas in northeastern Brazil. The 7,000-hectare reserve is administered by the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and is part of the larger Atlantic coastal forest, a narrow band of rain forest extending along the eastern coast of Brazil. The Atlantic coastal forest of southern Bahia is one of the world's most threatened and diverse ecosystems. Due to widespread settlement, only 2 to 5 percent of the original forest cover remains. Yet the region still contains an astounding variety of plants and animals, including a large number of endemic species. More than half of the region's tree species and 80 percent of its animal species are indigenous and found nowhere else on Earth. The Una Reserve is also the only federally protected habitat for the golden-headed lion tamarin, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey and many other endangered species. In the past few years, scientists from Brazilian and international conservation organizations have coordinated efforts to study the biological diversity of this region and to develop practical and economically viable options for preserving the remaining primary forests in southern Bahia. The shuttle imaging radar is used in this study to identify various land uses and vegetation types, including remaining patches of primary forest, cabruca forest (cacao planted in the understory of the native forest), secondary forest, pasture and coastal mangrove. Standard remote-sensing technology that relies on light reflected from the forest canopy cannot accurately distinguish between cabruca and undisturbed forest. Optical remote sensing is also

  6. Experimentelles FMCW-Radar zur hochfrequenten Charakterisierung von Windenergieanlagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Karsten; Werner, Jens; Schwartau, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    During the increasing dissemination of renewable energy sources the potential and actual interference effects of wind turbine plants became obvious. Turbines reflect the signals of weather radar and other radar systems. In addition to the static radar echoes, in particular the Doppler echoes are to be mentioned as an undesirable impairment Keränen (2014). As a result, building permit is refused for numerous new wind turbines, as the potential interference can not be reliably predicted. As a contribution to the improvement of this predictability, measurements are planned which aim at the high-frequency characterisation of wind energy installations. In this paper, a cost-effective FMCW radar is presented, which is operated in the same frequency band (C-band) as the weather radars of the German weather service. Here, the focus is on the description of the hardware design including the considerations used for its dimensioning.

  7. The proposed flatland radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  8. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  9. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  10. Radar Reflectivity and Specific Attenuation in Melting Layer measured with Ground-based Ka-Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiko; Furukawa, Kinji; Suzuki, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    The scattering/attenuation characteristics of Ka-band radiowaves are measured with a dual Ka-band radar system whichi has been developed by JAXA. The dual Ka-band radar system consists of two nearly identical Ka-band FM-CW radars, and the precipitation systems between two radars are observed in opposite directions. From this experiment, equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) and specific attenuation (k) are simultaneously obtained. Since calculation of k includes double differences along the radio path, the result is sensitive to the experimental parameters. Parameter tunings in data analysis including small change of radar elevation angles, etc are applied. After the parameter tuning, the k and Ze are reasonably obtained for clear melting layers, where Ze has a shape of a shelf, and k had a peak at the shoulder of the shelf. The results are qualitatively consistent with ground-based particle measurements. The results are used to evaluate the scattering/attenuation assumptions in the dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) aboard the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite.

  11. Holographic space: presence and absence in time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin-Ren; Richardson, Martin

    2017-03-01

    In terms of contemporary art, time-based media generally refers to artworks that have duration as a dimension and unfold to the viewer over time, that could be a video, slide, film, computer-based technologies or audio. As part of this category, holography pushes this visual-oriented narrative a step further, which brings a real 3D image to invite and allow audiences revisiting the scene of the past, at the moment of recording in space and time. Audiences could also experience the kinetic holographic aesthetics through constantly moving the viewing point or illumination source, which creates dynamic visual effects. In other words, when the audience and hologram remain still, the holographic image can only be perceived statically. This unique form of expression is not created by virtual simulation; the principal of wavefront reconstruction process made holographic art exceptional from other time-based media. This project integrates 3D printing technology to explore the nature of material aesthetics, transiting between material world and holographic space. In addition, this series of creation also reveals the unique temporal quality of a hologram's presence and absence, an ambiguous relationship existing in this media.

  12. Conductivity of Holographic Superconductor within Ginzburg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The frequency-dependent conductivity is obtained for the holographic superconductor by using the Ginzburg–Landau theory with a |Ψ|4 term. Our results show that |Ψ|4 term plays a role in the low-temperature behaviour of the conductivity.

  13. Monopole correlations in holographically flavored liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, N.

    2015-01-01

    Many-body systems with a conserved U(1) current in (2+1) dimensions may be probed by weakly gauging this current and studying correlation functions of magnetic monopole operators in the resulting dynamical gauge theory. We study such monopole correlations in holographic liquids with fundamental

  14. Composite materials inspection. [ultrasonic vibration holographic NDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erf, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the application requirements, advantages, and limitations of nondestructive testing by a technique of ultrasonic-vibration holographic-interferometry readout used in a production control facility for the inspection of a single product such as composite compressor blades. It is shown that, for the detection and characterization of disbonds in composite material structures, this technique may represent the most inclusive test method.

  15. Phases of kinky holographic nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot-Ripley, Matthew; Sutcliffe, Paul; Zamaklar, Marija [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Road, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-17

    Holographic QCD at finite baryon number density and zero temperature is studied within the five-dimensional Sakai-Sugimoto model. We introduce a new approximation that models a smeared crystal of solitonic baryons by assuming spatial homogeneity to obtain an effective kink theory in the holographic direction. The kink theory correctly reproduces a first order phase transition to lightly bound nuclear matter. As the density is further increased the kink splits into a pair of half-kink constituents, providing a concrete realization of the previously suggested dyonic salt phase, where the bulk soliton splits into constituents at high density. The kink model also captures the phenomenon of baryonic popcorn, in which a first order phase transition generates an additional soliton layer in the holographic direction. We find that this popcorn transition takes place at a density below the dyonic salt phase, making the latter energetically unfavourable. However, the kink model predicts only one pop, rather than the sequence of pops suggested by previous approximations. In the kink model the two layers produced by the single pop form the surface of a soliton bag that increases in size as the baryon chemical potential is increased. The interior of the bag is filled with abelian electric potential and the instanton charge density is localized on the surface of the bag. The soliton bag may provide a holographic description of a quarkyonic phase.

  16. A holographic model for black hole complementarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, David A.; Thorlacius, Larus

    2016-01-01

    We explore a version of black hole complementarity, where an approximate semiclassical effective field theory for interior infalling degrees of freedom emerges holographically from an exact evolution of exterior degrees of freedom. The infalling degrees of freedom have a complementary description in terms of outgoing Hawking radiation and must eventually decohere with respect to the exterior Hamiltonian, leading to a breakdown of the semiclassical description for an infaller. Trace distance is used to quantify the difference between the complementary time evolutions, and to define a decoherence time. We propose a dictionary where the evolution with respect to the bulk effective Hamiltonian corresponds to mean field evolution in the holographic theory. In a particular model for the holographic theory, which exhibits fast scrambling, the decoherence time coincides with the scrambling time. The results support the hypothesis that decoherence of the infalling holographic state and disruptive bulk effects near the curvature singularity are complementary descriptions of the same physics, which is an important step toward resolving the black hole information paradox.

  17. Phases of kinky holographic nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot-Ripley, Matthew; Sutcliffe, Paul; Zamaklar, Marija

    2016-10-01

    Holographic QCD at finite baryon number density and zero temperature is studied within the five-dimensional Sakai-Sugimoto model. We introduce a new approximation that models a smeared crystal of solitonic baryons by assuming spatial homogeneity to obtain an effective kink theory in the holographic direction. The kink theory correctly reproduces a first order phase transition to lightly bound nuclear matter. As the density is further increased the kink splits into a pair of half-kink constituents, providing a concrete realization of the previously suggested dyonic salt phase, where the bulk soliton splits into constituents at high density. The kink model also captures the phenomenon of baryonic popcorn, in which a first order phase transition generates an additional soliton layer in the holographic direction. We find that this popcorn transition takes place at a density below the dyonic salt phase, making the latter energetically unfavourable. However, the kink model predicts only one pop, rather than the sequence of pops suggested by previous approximations. In the kink model the two layers produced by the single pop form the surface of a soliton bag that increases in size as the baryon chemical potential is increased. The interior of the bag is filled with abelian electric potential and the instanton charge density is localized on the surface of the bag. The soliton bag may provide a holographic description of a quarkyonic phase.

  18. Holographic entanglement entropy and gravitational anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, A.; Detournay, S.; Iqbal, N.; Perlmutter, E.

    2014-01-01

    We study entanglement entropy in two-dimensional conformal field theories with a gravitational anomaly. In theories with gravity duals, this anomaly is holographically represented by a gravitational Chern-Simons term in the bulk action. We show that the anomaly broadens the Ryu-Takayanagi minimal

  19. Holographic applications of logarithmic conformal field theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grumiller, D.; Riedler, W.; Rosseel, J.; Zojer, T.

    2013-01-01

    We review the relations between Jordan cells in various branches of physics, ranging from quantum mechanics to massive gravity theories. Our main focus is on holographic correspondences between critically tuned gravity theories in anti-de Sitter space and logarithmic conformal field theories in

  20. A holographic model for black hole complementarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, David A. [Physics Department, Brown University,Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Thorlacius, Larus [University of Iceland, Science Institute,Dunhaga 3, IS-107, Reykjavik (Iceland); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics,Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova University Centre, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-12-07

    We explore a version of black hole complementarity, where an approximate semiclassical effective field theory for interior infalling degrees of freedom emerges holographically from an exact evolution of exterior degrees of freedom. The infalling degrees of freedom have a complementary description in terms of outgoing Hawking radiation and must eventually decohere with respect to the exterior Hamiltonian, leading to a breakdown of the semiclassical description for an infaller. Trace distance is used to quantify the difference between the complementary time evolutions, and to define a decoherence time. We propose a dictionary where the evolution with respect to the bulk effective Hamiltonian corresponds to mean field evolution in the holographic theory. In a particular model for the holographic theory, which exhibits fast scrambling, the decoherence time coincides with the scrambling time. The results support the hypothesis that decoherence of the infalling holographic state and disruptive bulk effects near the curvature singularity are complementary descriptions of the same physics, which is an important step toward resolving the black hole information paradox.

  1. On new proposal for holographic BCFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Chong-Sun; Miao, Rong-Xin [Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University,Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences,National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Guo, Wu-Zhong [Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences,National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2017-04-14

    This paper is an extended version of our short letter on a new proposal for holographic boundary conformal field, i.e., BCFT. By using the Penrose-Brown-Henneaux (PBH) transformation, we successfully obtain the expected boundary Weyl anomaly. The obtained boundary central charges satisfy naturally a c-like theorem holographically. We then develop an approach of holographic renormalization for BCFT, and reproduce the correct boundary Weyl anomaly. This provides a non-trivial check of our proposal. We also investigate the holographic entanglement entropy of BCFT and find that our proposal gives the expected orthogonal condition that the minimal surface must be normal to the spacetime boundaries if they intersect. This is another support for our proposal. We also find that the entanglement entropy depends on the boundary conditions of BCFT and the distance to the boundary; and that the entanglement wedge behaves a phase transition, which is important for the self-consistency of AdS/BCFT. Finally, we show that the proposal of https://arxiv.org/abs/1105.5165 is too restrictive that it always make vanishing some of the boundary central charges.

  2. Scalar Condensation of Holographic Superconductors using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We study holographic superconductors analytically by using the Ginzburg–Landau action with the γ-quartic term | |4. Our results show that γ-term plays a role in the scalar condensation. It is found that the system displays two kinds of critical temperatures. One is independent of γ. But the other increases with ...

  3. Photopolymer for Optical Holography and Holographic Interferometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květoň, M.; Lédl, Vít; Havránek, A.; Fiala, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 1 (2010), s. 107-113 ISSN 1022-1360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : holographic interferometry * holography * photopolymerization * recording material * refractive index Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/masy.200900093/pdf

  4. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  5. Novel radar techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klemm, Richard; Lombardo, Pierfrancesco; Nickel, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Novel Radar Techniques and Applications presents the state-of-the-art in advanced radar, with emphasis on ongoing novel research and development and contributions from an international team of leading radar experts. This volume covers: Real aperture array radar; Imaging radar and Passive and multistatic radar.

  6. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  7. Weather Radar Impact Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent an inventory of the national impacts of wind turbine interference with NEXRAD radar stations. This inventory was developed by the NOAA Radar...

  8. Radar Weather Observation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Weather Observation is a set of archived historical manuscripts stored on microfiche. The primary source of these radar weather observations manuscript records...

  9. Noise Radar Technology Basics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thayaparan, T; Wernik, C

    2006-01-01

    .... In this report, the basic theory of noise radar design is treated. The theory supports the use of noise waveforms for radar detection and imaging in such applications as covert military surveillance and reconnaissance...

  10. Network radar countermeasure systems integrating radar and radar countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Qiuxi

    2016-01-01

    This is the very first book to present the network radar countermeasure system. It explains in detail the systematic concept of combining radar and radar countermeasures from the perspective of the information acquisition of target location, the optimization of the reconnaissance and detection, the integrated attack of the signals and facilities, and technological and legal developments concerning the networked system. It achieves the integration of the initiative and passivity, detection and jamming. The book explains how the system locates targets, completes target identification, tracks targets and compiles the data.

  11. Phased-array radar for airborne systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahim, Raghbir S.; Foshee, James J.; Chang, Kai

    2003-09-01

    Phased array antenna systems, which support high pulse rates and high transmit power, are well suited for radar and large-scale surveillance. Sensors and communication systems can function as the eyes and ears for ballistic missile defense applications, providing early warning of attack, target detection and identification, target tracking, and countermeasure decision. In such applications, active array radar systems that contain solid-state transmitter sources and low-noise preamplifiers for transmission and reception are preferred over the conventional radar antennas, because the phased array radar offers the advantages of power management and efficiency, reliability, signal reception, beam steering target detection. The current phased array radar designs are very large, complex and expensive and less efficient because of high RF losses in the phase control circuits used for beam scan. Several thousands of phase shifters and drivers may be required for a single system thus making the system very complex and expensive. This paper describes the phased array radar system based on high power T/R modules, wide-band radiating planar antenna elements and very low loss wide-band phase control circuits (requiring reduced power levels) for beam scan. The phase shifter design is based on micro-strip feed lines perturbed by the proximity of voltage controlled piezoelectric transducer (PET). Measured results have shown an added insertion loss of less than 1 dB for a phase shift of 450 degrees from 2 to 20 GHz. The new wideband phased array radar design provides significant reduction in size cost and weight. Compared to the conventional phased array systems, the cost saving is more than 15 to 1.

  12. Design of an active array filtenna for radar applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cifola, L.; Gerini, G.; Berg, S. van den; Water, F. van de

    2014-01-01

    A novel design of an S-band active array antenna with enhanced frequency selectivity properties, for radar applications, is presented. The array unit cell consists of a stacked-patch radiator, characterized by an operational bandwidth of [2.8 - 3.4] GHz. A microstrip two-pole band pass filter is

  13. High resolution imaging of particle interactions in a large bubble chamber using holographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari, Homaira.

    1988-01-01

    Particle interactions were recorded holographically in a large volume of the 15-foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab. This cryogenic bubble chamber was filled with a heavy Neon-Hydrogen mixture and was exposed to a wideband neutrino beam with mean energy of 150 GeV. The use of holography in combination with conventional photography provides a powerful tool for direct detection of short-lived particles. Holography gives a high resolution over a large depth of field which can not be achieved with conventional photography. A high-power pulsed ruby laser was used as the holographic light source. Since short pulses of some 50 ns duration at the required energy were found to give rise to boiling during the chamber's expansion, a reduction of the instantaneous power at a given energy was required to suppress this unwanted after-effect. This was achieved by developing a unique technique for stretching the pulses using an electro-optic feedback loop. One hundred thousand holograms were produced during a wide-band neutrino experiment (E-632, 1985) using a dark-field holographic system. Analysis of a sample of holograms shows a resolution of 150 μm was achieved in an ovoidal shape fiducial volume of 0.48 m 3 % of the 14 m 3 total fiducial volume of the chamber

  14. Space radar image of New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This radar image of the New York city metropolitan area. The island of Manhattan appears in the center of the image. The green-colored rectangle on Manhattan is Central Park. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 10, 1994. North is toward the upper right. The area shown is 75.0 kilometers by 48.8 kilometers (46.5 miles by 30.2 miles). The image is centered at 40.7 degrees north latitude and 73.8 degrees west longitude. In general, light blue areas correspond to dense urban development, green areas to moderately vegetated zones and black areas to bodies of water. The Hudson River is the black strip that runs from the left edge to the upper right corner of the image. It separates New Jersey, in the upper left of the image, from New York. The Atlantic Ocean is at the bottom of the image where two barrier islands along the southern shore of Long Island are also visible. John F. Kennedy International Airport is visible above these islands. Long Island Sound, separating Long Island from Connecticut, is the dark area right of the center of the image. Many bridges are visible in the image, including the Verrazano Narrows, George Washington and Brooklyn bridges. The radar illumination is from the left of the image; this causes some urban zones to appear red because the streets are at a perpendicular angle to the radar pulse. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). Radar images like this one could be used as a tool for city planners and resource managers to map and monitor land use patterns. The radar imaging systems can clearly detect the variety of landscapes in the area, as well as the density of urban

  15. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  16. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  17. Space Radar Image of Tuva, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows part of the remote central Asian region of Tuva, an autonomous republic of the Russian Federation. Tuva is a mostly mountainous region that lies between western Mongolia and southern Siberia. This image shows the area just south of the republic's capital of Kyzyl. Most of the red, pink and blue areas in the image are agricultural fields of a large collective farming complex that was developed during the era of the Soviet Union. Traditional agricultural activity in the region, still active in remote areas, revolves around practices of nomadic livestock herding. White areas on the image are north-facing hillsides, which develop denser forests than south-facing slopes. The river in the upper right is one of the two major branches of the Yenesey River. Tuva has received some notoriety in recent years due to the intense interest of the celebrated Caltech physicist Dr. Richard Feynman, chronicled in the book 'Tuva or Bust' by Ralph Leighton. The image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band SyntheticAperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour onOctober 1, 1994. The image is 56 kilometers by 74 kilometers (35 miles by 46 miles) and is centered at 51.5 degrees north latitude, 95.1 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar fequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted andreceived; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and verticallyreceived. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to PlanetEarth program.

  18. Similarities and differences between three coexisting spaceborne radars in global rainfall and snowfall estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoqiang; Wen, Yixin; Gao, Jinyu; Long, Di; Ma, Yingzhao; Wan, Wei; Hong, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Precipitation is one of the most important components in the water and energy cycles. Radars are considered the best available technology for observing the spatial distribution of precipitation either from the ground since the 1980s or from space since 1998. This study, for the first time ever, compares and evaluates the only three existing spaceborne precipitation radars, i.e., the Ku-band precipitation radar (PR), the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), and the Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The three radars are matched up globally and intercompared in the only period which they coexist: 2014-2015. In addition, for the first time ever, TRMM PR and GPM DPR are evaluated against hourly rain gauge data in Mainland China. Results show that DPR and PR agree with each other and correlate very well with gauges in Mainland China. However, both show limited performance in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) known as the Earth's third pole. DPR improves light precipitation detectability, when compared with PR, whereas CPR performs best for light precipitation and snowfall. DPR snowfall has the advantage of higher sampling rates than CPR; however, its accuracy needs to be improved further. The future development of spaceborne radars is also discussed in two complementary categories: (1) multifrequency radar instruments on a single platform and (2) constellations of many small cube radar satellites, for improving global precipitation estimation. This comprehensive intercomparison of PR, CPR, and DPR sheds light on spaceborne radar precipitation retrieval and future radar design.

  19. Space Radar Image of Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and its surroundings, centered at 51.17 north latitude and 30.15 west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 16th orbit on October 1, 1994. The area is located on the northern border of the Ukraine Republic and was produced by using the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The differences in the intensity are due to differences in vegetation cover, with brighter areas being indicative of more vegetation. These data were acquired as part of a collaboration between NASA and the National Space Agency of Ukraine in Remote Sensing and Earth Sciences. NASA has included several sites provided by the Ukrainian space agency as targets of opportunity during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The Ukrainian space agency also plans to conduct airborne surveys of these sites during the mission. The Chernobyl nuclear power plant is located toward the top of the image near the Pripyat River. The 12-kilometer (7.44-mile)-long cooling pond is easily distinguishable as an elongated dark shape in the center near the top of the image. The reactor complex is visible as the bright area to the extreme left of the cooling pond and the city of Chernobyl is the bright area just below the cooling pond next to the Pripyat River. The large dark area in the bottom right of the image is the Kiev Reservoir just north of Kiev. Also visible is the Dnieper River, which feeds into the Kiev Reservoir from the top of the image. The Soviet government evacuated 116,000 people within 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) of the Chernobyl reactor after the explosion and fire on April 26, 1986. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight

  20. Biophotopol: A Sustainable Photopolymer for Holographic Data Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Beléndez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Photopolymers have proved to be useful for different holographic applications such as holographic data storage or holographic optical elements. However, most photopolymers have certain undesirable features, such as the toxicity of some of their components or their low environmental compatibility. For this reason, the Holography and Optical Processing Group at the University of Alicante developed a new dry photopolymer with low toxicity and high thickness called biophotopol, which is very adequate for holographic data storage applications. In this paper we describe our recent studies on biophotopol and the main characteristics of this material.

  1. Experimental study of dual polarized radar return from the sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, S. A.; Kapustin, I. A.; Lavrova, O. Yu.; Molkov, A. A.; Sergievskaya, I. A.; Shomina, O. V.

    2017-10-01

    Dual-polarized microwave radars are of particular interest nowadays as perspective tool of ocean remote sensing. Microwave radar backscattering at moderate and large incidence angles according to conventional models is determined by resonance (Bragg) surface waves typically of cm-scale wavelength range. Some recent experiments have indicated, however, that an additional, non Bragg component (NBC) contributes to the radar return. The latter is considered to occur due to wave breaking. At present our understanding of the nature of different components of radar return is still poor. This paper presents results of field experiment using an X-/C-/S-band Doppler radar operating at HH- and VVpolarizations. The intensity and radar Doppler shifts for Bragg and non Bragg components are retrieved from measurements of VV and HH radar returns. Analysis of a ratio of VV and HH radar backscatter - polarization ratio (PR) has demonstrated a significant role of a non Bragg component. NBC contributes significantly to the total radar backscatter, in particular, at moderate incidence angles (about 50-70 deg.) it is 2-3 times smaller than VV Bragg component and several times larger that HH Bragg component. Both NBC and BC depend on azimuth angle, being minimal for cross wind direction, but NBC is more isotropic than BC. It is obtained that velocities of scatterers retrieved from radar Doppler shifts are different for Bragg waves and for non Bragg component; NBC structures are "faster" than Bragg waves particularly for upwind radar observations. Bragg components propagate approximately with phase velocities of linear gravity-capillary waves (when accounting for wind drift). Velocities of NBC scatterers depend on radar band, being the largest for S-band and the smallest at X-band, this means that different structures on the water surface are responsible for non Bragg scattering in a given radar band.

  2. Basics and first experiments demonstrating isolation improvements in the agile polarimetric FM-CW radar – PARSAX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krasnov, O.A.; Babur, G.P.; Wang, Z.; Ligthart, L.P.; Van der Zwan, F.

    2010-01-01

    The article describes the IRCTR PARSAX radar system, the S-band high-resolution Doppler polarimetric frequency modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) radar with dual-orthogonal sounding signals, which has the possibility to measure all elements of the radar target polarization scattering matrix

  3. Influence of the vertical profile of reflectivity on radar-estimated rain rates at short time steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Delrieu, G.; Andrieu, H.; Creutin, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    The present study aims to demonstrate the major influence of the vertical heterogeneity of rainfall on radar rain gauge assessment. For this purpose, an experimental setup was deployed during the HYDROMET Integrated Radar Experiment (HIRE-98) based on a conventional S-band weather radar operating at

  4. LBA-ECO LC-15 JERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar, 1- km Mosaic, Amazon Basin: 1995-1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains two image mosaics of L-band radar backscatter and two image mosaics of first order texture. The two backscatter images are mosaics of L-band...

  5. Reheating of the Universe as holographic thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinsuke.kawai@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Nakayama, Yu [California Institute of Technology, 452-48, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-08-10

    Assuming gauge/gravity correspondence we study reheating of the Universe using its holographic dual. Inflaton decay and thermalisation of the decay products correspond to collapse of a spherical shell and formation of a blackhole in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The reheating temperature is computed as the Hawking temperature of the developed blackhole probed by a dynamical boundary, and is determined by the inflaton energy density and the AdS radius, with corrections from the dynamics of the shell collapse. For given initial energy density of the inflaton field the holographic model typically gives lower reheating temperature than the instant reheating scenario, while it is shown to be safely within phenomenological bounds.

  6. Reheating of the Universe as holographic thermalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Kawai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Assuming gauge/gravity correspondence we study reheating of the Universe using its holographic dual. Inflaton decay and thermalisation of the decay products correspond to collapse of a spherical shell and formation of a blackhole in the dual anti-de Sitter (AdS spacetime. The reheating temperature is computed as the Hawking temperature of the developed blackhole probed by a dynamical boundary, and is determined by the inflaton energy density and the AdS radius, with corrections from the dynamics of the shell collapse. For given initial energy density of the inflaton field the holographic model typically gives lower reheating temperature than the instant reheating scenario, while it is shown to be safely within phenomenological bounds.

  7. HOLOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION OF CYLINDRICAL PIEZOCERAMIC TRANSDUCERS VIBRATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vasiliauskas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The piezomaterial used in cylindrical piezoceramic transducers vibrations requiring high precision displacements indicates that accuracy depends on design and technological factors. The analyzed criteria have made possible to choose the piezomaterial for optimal mechatronic system having a maximal displacement. The experimental investigation of precision vibrosystems by means of 3D holographic visualization enables one to obtain appreciably larger amount of information about the vibrating surface in comparison with traditional methods. On the basis of the developed methodology of analyzing the experimental data derived from 3D holographic visualization and by using the experimental holography stand, we have obtained results making it possible to optimize the design of operation of the piezoceramic mechatronic system or its separate elements.

  8. Peptide oligomers for holographic data storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf Henrik; Hvilsted, Søren; Ramanujam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    SEVERAL classes of organic materials (such as photoanisotropic liquid-crystalline polymers(1-4) and photorefractive polymers(5-7)) are being investigated for the development of media for optical data storage. Here we describe a new family of organic materials-peptide oligomers containing azobenzene...... chromophores-which appear particularly promising for erasable holographic data storage applications. The rationale for our approach is to use the structural properties of peptide-like molecules to impose orientational order on the chromophores, and thereby optimize the optical properties of the resulting...... materials. Here we show that holographic gratings with large first-order diffraction efficiencies (up to 80%) can be written and erased optically in oligomer films only a few micrometres thick. The holograms also exhibit good thermal stability, and are not erased after heating to 180 degrees C for one month...

  9. Towards understanding Regge trajectories in holographic QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cata, Oscar

    2007-01-01

    We reassess a work done by Migdal on the spectrum of low-energy vector mesons in QCD in the light of the anti-de Sitter (AdS)-QCD correspondence. Recently, a tantalizing parallelism was suggested between Migdal's work and a family of holographic duals of QCD. Despite the intriguing similarities, both approaches face a major drawback: the spectrum is in conflict with well-tested Regge scaling. However, it has recently been shown that holographic duals can be modified to accommodate Regge behavior. Therefore, it is interesting to understand whether Regge behavior can also be achieved in Migdal's approach. In this paper we investigate this issue. We find that Migdal's approach, which is based on a modified Pade approximant, is closely related to the issue of quark-hadron duality breakdown in QCD

  10. Radar based autonomous sensor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Most surveillance systems combine camera sensors with other detection sensors that trigger an alert to a human operator when an object is detected. The detection sensors typically require careful installation and configuration for each application and there is a significant burden on the operator to react to each alert by viewing camera video feeds. A demonstration system known as Sensing for Asset Protection with Integrated Electronic Networked Technology (SAPIENT) has been developed to address these issues using Autonomous Sensor Modules (ASM) and a central High Level Decision Making Module (HLDMM) that can fuse the detections from multiple sensors. This paper describes the 24 GHz radar based ASM, which provides an all-weather, low power and license exempt solution to the problem of wide area surveillance. The radar module autonomously configures itself in response to tasks provided by the HLDMM, steering the transmit beam and setting range resolution and power levels for optimum performance. The results show the detection and classification performance for pedestrians and vehicles in an area of interest, which can be modified by the HLDMM without physical adjustment. The module uses range-Doppler processing for reliable detection of moving objects and combines Radar Cross Section and micro-Doppler characteristics for object classification. Objects are classified as pedestrian or vehicle, with vehicle sub classes based on size. Detections are reported only if the object is detected in a task coverage area and it is classified as an object of interest. The system was shown in a perimeter protection scenario using multiple radar ASMs, laser scanners, thermal cameras and visible band cameras. This combination of sensors enabled the HLDMM to generate reliable alerts with improved discrimination of objects and behaviours of interest.

  11. Interacting holographic dark energy with logarithmic correction

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil, Mubasher; Farooq, M. Umar

    2010-01-01

    The holographic dark energy (HDE) is considered to be the most promising candidate of dark energy. Its definition is originally motivated from the entropy-area relation which depends on the theory of gravity under consideration. Recently a new definition of HDE is proposed with the help of quantum corrections to the entropy-area relation in the setup of loop quantum cosmology. Using this new definition, we investigate the model of interacting dark energy and derive its effective equation of s...

  12. Geometric Analogue of Holographic Reduced Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Aerts, Diederik; Czachor, Marek; De Moor, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Holographic reduced representations (HRR) are based on superpositions of convolution-bound $n$-tuples, but the $n$-tuples cannot be regarded as vectors since the formalism is basis dependent. This is why HRR cannot be associated with geometric structures. Replacing convolutions by geometric products one arrives at reduced representations analogous to HRR but interpretable in terms of geometry. Variable bindings occurring in both HRR and its geometric analogue mathematically correspond to two ...

  13. Using a portable holographic camera in cosmetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakanas, R.; Gudaitis, G. A.; Zacharovas, S. J.; Ratcliffe, D. B.; Hirsch, S.; Frey, S.; Thelen, A.; Ladrière, N.; Hering, P.

    2006-07-01

    The HSF-MINI portable holographic camera is used to record holograms of the human face. The recorded holograms are analyzed using a unique three-dimensional measurement system that provides topometric data of the face with resolution less than or equal to 0.5 mm. The main advantages of this method over other, more traditional methods (such as laser triangulation and phase-measurement triangulation) are discussed.

  14. Holographic cosmological models on the braneworld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile); Saavedra, Joel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: joel.saavedra@ucv.cl; Pena, Francisco [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de la Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile)

    2009-01-26

    In this Letter we have studied a closed universe which a holographic energy on the brane whose energy density is described by {rho}(H)=3c{sup 2}H{sup 2} and we obtain an equation for the Hubble parameter. This equation gave us different physical behavior depending if c{sup 2}>1 or c{sup 2}<1 against of the sign of the brane tension.

  15. Conductivity of Holographic Superconductor within Ginzburg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    e-mail: newbayren@163.com. Abstract. The frequency-dependent conductivity is obtained for the holographic superconductor by using the Ginzburg–Landau theory with ... gravity sector is ds2 = −f (r)dt2 + dr2 f (r) + r2(dx2 + dy2) with f (r) = r2. L − M r . L is the AdS radius, and M is the mass of the black hole. The large r limit ...

  16. Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning holographic lidar receivers are currently in use in two operational lidar systems, PHASERS (Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing) and now HARLIE (Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment). These systems are based on volume phase holograms made in dichromated gelatin (DCG) sandwiched between 2 layers of high quality float glass. They have demonstrated the practical application of this technology to compact scanning lidar systems at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths, the ability to withstand moderately high laser power and energy loading, sufficient optical quality for most direct detection systems, overall efficiencies rivaling conventional receivers, and the stability to last several years under typical lidar system environments. Their size and weight are approximately half of similar performing scanning systems using reflective optics. The cost of holographic systems will eventually be lower than the reflective optical systems depending on their degree of commercialization. There are a number of applications that require or can greatly benefit from a scanning capability. Several of these are airborne systems, which either use focal plane scanning, as in the Laser Vegetation Imaging System or use primary aperture scanning, as in the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar or the Large Aperture Scanning Airborne Lidar. The latter class requires a large clear aperture opening or window in the aircraft. This type of system can greatly benefit from the use of scanning transmission holograms of the HARLIE type because the clear aperture required is only about 25% larger than the collecting aperture as opposed to 200-300% larger for scan angles of 45 degrees off nadir.

  17. Shrinkage measurement for holographic recording materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Francés, J.; Navarro Fuster, V.; Neipp, C.; Ortuño, M.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2017-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for new holographic recording materials. One of them are photopolymers, which are becoming a classic media in this field. Their versatility is well known and new possibilities are being created by including new components, such as nanoparticles or dispersed liquid crystal molecules in classical formulations, making them interesting for additional applications in which the thin film preparation and the structural modification have a fundamental importance. Prior to obtaining a wide commercialization of displays based on photopolymers, one of the key aspects is to achieve a complete characterization of them. In this sense, one of the main parameters to estimate and control is the shrinkage of these materials. The volume variations change the angular response of the hologram in two aspects, the angular selectivity and the maximum diffraction efficiency. One criteria for the recording material to be used in a holographic data storage application is the shrinkage, maximum of 0.5%. Along this work, we compare two different methods to measure the holographic recording material shrinkage. The first one is measuring the angle of propagation for both diffracted orders +/-1 when slanted gratings are recorded, so that an accurate value of the grating vector can be calculated. The second one is based on interference measurements at zero spatial frequency limit. We calculate the shrinkage for three different photopolymers: a polyvinyl alcohol acrylamide (PVA/AA) based photopolymer, one of the greenest photopolymers whose patent belongs to the Alicante University called Biophotopol and on the last place a holographic-dispersed liquid crystal photopolymer (H-PDLC).

  18. Magnonic holographic imaging of magnetic microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, D.; Chiang, H.; Bhowmick, T.; Volodchenkov, A.D.; Ranjbar, M.; Liu, G.; Jiang, C.; Warren, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Khivintsev, Y.; Filimonov, Y. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov Branch, Saratov 410019 (Russian Federation); Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Garay, J.; Lake, R.; Balandin, A.A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Khitun, A., E-mail: akhitun@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    We propose and demonstrate a technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves. In this approach, the object of interest is placed on top of a magnetic testbed made of material with low spin wave damping. There are micro-antennas incorporated in the testbed. Two of these antennas are used for spin wave excitation while another one is used for the detecting of inductive voltage produced by the interfering spin waves. The measurements are repeated for different phase differences between the spin wave generating antennas which is equivalent to changing the angle of illumination. The collected data appear as a 3D plot – the holographic image of the object. We present experimental data showing magnonic holographic images of a low-coercivity Si/Co sample, a high-coercivity sample made of SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} and a diamagnetic copper sample. We also present images of the three samples consisting of a different amount of SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} powder. The imaging was accomplished on a Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}(FeO{sub 4}){sub 3} testbed at room temperature. The obtained data reveal the unique magnonic signatures of the objects. Experimental data is complemented by the results of numerical modeling, which qualitatively explain the characteristic features of the images. Potentially, magnonic holographic imaging may complement existing techniques and be utilized for non-destructive in-situ magnetic object characterization. The fundamental physical limits of this approach are also discussed. - Highlights: • A technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves is proposed. • In this technique, magnetic structures appear as 3D objects. • Several holographic images of magnetic microstructures are presented.

  19. A shape dynamical approach to holographic renormalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Henrique; Gryb, Sean; Koslowski, Tim; Mercati, Flavio; Smolin, Lee

    2015-01-01

    We provide a bottom-up argument to derive some known results from holographic renormalization using the classical bulk-bulk equivalence of General Relativity and Shape Dynamics, a theory with spatial conformal (Weyl) invariance. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to advertise the simple classical mechanism, trading off gauge symmetries, that underlies the bulk-bulk equivalence of General Relativity and Shape Dynamics to readers interested in dualities of the type of AdS/conformal field theory (CFT); and (2) to highlight that this mechanism can be used to explain certain results of holographic renormalization, providing an alternative to the AdS/CFT conjecture for these cases. To make contact with the usual semiclassical AdS/CFT correspondence, we provide, in addition, a heuristic argument that makes it plausible that the classical equivalence between General Relativity and Shape Dynamics turns into a duality between radial evolution in gravity and the renormalization group flow of a CFT. We believe that Shape Dynamics provides a new perspective on gravity by giving conformal structure a primary role within the theory. It is hoped that this work provides the first steps toward understanding what this new perspective may be able to teach us about holographic dualities. (orig.)

  20. Entanglement from dissipation and holographic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantcheff, M. Botta; Gadelha, Alexandre L.; Marchioro, Dáfni F. Z.; Nedel, Daniel Luiz

    2018-02-01

    In this work we study a dissipative field theory where the dissipation process is manifestly related to dynamical entanglement and put it in the holographic context. Such endeavour is realized by further development of a canonical approach to study quantum dissipation, which consists of doubling the degrees of freedom of the original system by defining an auxiliary one. A time dependent entanglement entropy for the vacumm state is calculated and a geometrical interpretation of the auxiliary system and the entropy is given in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence using the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. We show that the dissipative dynamics is controlled by the entanglement entropy and there are two distinct stages: in the early times the holographic interpretation requires some deviation from classical General Relativity; in the later times the quantum system is described as a wormhole, a solution of the Einstein's equations near to a maximally extended black hole with two asymptotically AdS boundaries. We focus our holographic analysis in this regime, and suggest a mechanism similar to teleportation protocol to exchange (quantum) information between the two CFTs on the boundaries (see Maldacena et al. in Fortschr Phys 65(5):1700034, arXiv:1704.05333 [hep-th], 2017).

  1. Drawing Lines with Light in Holographic Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin-Ren; Richardson, Martin

    2013-02-01

    This paper explores the dynamic and expressive possibilities of holographic art through a comparison of art history and technical media such as photography, film and holographic technologies. Examples of modern art and creative expression of time and motions are examined using the early 20th century art movement, Cubism, where subjects are portrayed to be seen simultaneously from different angles. Folding space is represented as subject matter as it can depict space from multiple points of time. The paper also investigates the way holographic art has explored time and space. The lenticular lens-based media reveal a more subjective poetic art in the form of the lyrical images and messages as spectators pass through time, or walk along with the piece of work through an interactive process. It is argued that photographic practice is another example of artistic representation in the form of aesthetic medium of time movement and as such shares a common ground with other dynamic expression that require time based interaction.

  2. Effect of quintessence on holographic fermionic spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Xiao-Mei [Yangzhou University, Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou (China); Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Wu, Jian-Pin [Bohai University, Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Jinzhou (China)

    2017-10-15

    In this letter, we investigate the holographic fermionic spectrum without/with dipole coupling dual to the Reissner-Nordstroem anti-de Sitter (RN-AdS) black brane surrounded by quintessence. We find that the low energy excitation of this fermionic system without dipole coupling behaves as a non-Fermi liquid. In particular, the introduction of quintessence aggravates the degree of deviation from a Fermi liquid. For the system with dipole coupling, the phase transition from (non-)Fermi liquid to Mott phase can be observed. The ratio between the width of gap and the critical temperature, beyond which the gap closes, is also worked out. We find that this ratio is larger than that of the holographic fermionic system dual to the RN-AdS black brane and even the material of V O{sub 2}. It means that our holographic system with quintessence can model new phenomena of the condensed matter system and provide some new insights in their regard. (orig.)

  3. Holographic complexity and noncommutative gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Josiah; Eccles, Stefan; Fischler, Willy; Xiao, Ming-Lei

    2018-03-01

    We study the holographic complexity of noncommutative field theories. The four-dimensional N=4 noncommutative super Yang-Mills theory with Moyal algebra along two of the spatial directions has a well known holographic dual as a type IIB supergravity theory with a stack of D3 branes and non-trivial NS-NS B fields. We start from this example and find that the late time holographic complexity growth rate, based on the "complexity equals action" conjecture, experiences an enhancement when the non-commutativity is turned on. This enhancement saturates a new limit which is exactly 1/4 larger than the commutative value. We then attempt to give a quantum mechanics explanation of the enhancement. Finite time behavior of the complexity growth rate is also studied. Inspired by the non-trivial result, we move on to more general setup in string theory where we have a stack of D p branes and also turn on the B field. Multiple noncommutative directions are considered in higher p cases.

  4. On the Holographic Bound in Newtonian Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Isidro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The holographic principle sets an upper bound on the total (Boltzmann entropy content of the Universe at around 10 123 k B ( k B being Boltzmann’s constant. In this work we point out the existence of a remarkable duality between nonrelativistic quantum mechanics on the one hand, and Newtonian cosmology on the other. Specifically, nonrelativistic quantum mechanics has a quantum probability fluid that exactly mimics the behaviour of the cosmological fluid, the latter considered in the Newtonian approximation. One proves that the equations governing the cosmological fluid (the Euler equation and the continuity equation become the very equations that govern the quantum probability fluid after applying the Madelung transformation to the Schroedinger wavefunction. Under the assumption that gravitational equipotential surfaces can be identified with isoentropic surfaces, this model allows for a simple computation of the gravitational entropy of a Newtonian Universe. In a first approximation, we model the cosmological fluid as the quantum probability fluid of free Schroedinger waves. We find that this model Universe saturates the holographic bound. As a second approximation, we include the Hubble expansion of the galaxies. The corresponding Schroedinger waves lead to a value of the entropy lying three orders of magnitude below the holographic bound. Current work on a fully relativistic extension of our present model can be expected to yield results in even better agreement with empirical estimates of the entropy of the Universe.

  5. Electromagnetic baryon form factors from holographic QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keun-Young; Zahed, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    In the holographic model of QCD suggested by Sakai and Sugimoto, baryons are chiral solitons sourced by D4 instantons in bulk of size 1/(λ) 1/2 with λ = g 2 N c . We quantize the D4 instanton semiclassically using h-bar = 1/(N c λ) and non-rigid constraints on the vector mesons. The holographic baryon is a small chiral bag in the holographic direction with a Cheshire cat smile. The vector-baryon interactions occur at the core boundary of the instanton in D4. They are strong and of order 1/( h-bar ) 1/2 . To order h-bar 0 the electromagnetic current is entirely encoded on the core boundary and vector-meson dominated. To this order, the electromagnetic charge radius is of order λ 0 . The meson contribution to the baryon magnetic moments sums identically to the core contribution. The proton and neutron magnetic moment are tied by a model independent relation similar to the one observed in the Skyrme model.

  6. A shape dynamical approach to holographic renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Henrique; Gryb, Sean; Koslowski, Tim; Mercati, Flavio; Smolin, Lee

    2015-01-01

    We provide a bottom-up argument to derive some known results from holographic renormalization using the classical bulk-bulk equivalence of General Relativity and Shape Dynamics, a theory with spatial conformal (Weyl) invariance. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to advertise the simple classical mechanism, trading off gauge symmetries, that underlies the bulk-bulk equivalence of General Relativity and Shape Dynamics to readers interested in dualities of the type of AdS/conformal field theory (CFT); and (2) to highlight that this mechanism can be used to explain certain results of holographic renormalization, providing an alternative to the AdS/CFT conjecture for these cases. To make contact with the usual semiclassical AdS/CFT correspondence, we provide, in addition, a heuristic argument that makes it plausible that the classical equivalence between General Relativity and Shape Dynamics turns into a duality between radial evolution in gravity and the renormalization group flow of a CFT. We believe that Shape Dynamics provides a new perspective on gravity by giving conformal structure a primary role within the theory. It is hoped that this work provides the first steps toward understanding what this new perspective may be able to teach us about holographic dualities.

  7. Constraining holographic cosmology using Planck data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Gould, Elizabeth; Skenderis, Kostas

    2017-06-01

    Holographic cosmology offers a novel framework for describing the very early Universe in which cosmological predictions are expressed in terms of the observables of a three-dimensional quantum field theory (QFT). This framework includes conventional slow-roll inflation, which is described in terms of a strongly coupled QFT, but it also allows for qualitatively new models for the very early Universe, where the dual QFT may be weakly coupled. The new models describe a universe which is nongeometric at early times. While standard slow-roll inflation leads to a (near-) power-law primordial power spectrum, perturbative super-renormalizable QFTs yield a new holographic spectral shape. Here, we compare the two predictions against cosmological observations. We use CosmoMC to determine the best fit parameters, and MultiNest for Bayesian evidence, comparing the likelihoods. We find that the dual QFT should be nonperturbative at the very low multipoles (l ≲30 ), while for higher multipoles (l ≳30 ) the new holographic model, based on perturbative QFT, fits the data just as well as the standard power-law spectrum assumed in Λ CDM cosmology. This finding opens the door to applications of nonperturbative QFT techniques, such as lattice simulations, to observational cosmology on gigaparsec scales and beyond.

  8. Drawing Lines with Light in Holographic Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yin-Ren; Richardson, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the dynamic and expressive possibilities of holographic art through a comparison of art history and technical media such as photography, film and holographic technologies. Examples of modern art and creative expression of time and motions are examined using the early 20th century art movement, Cubism, where subjects are portrayed to be seen simultaneously from different angles. Folding space is represented as subject matter as it can depict space from multiple points of time. The paper also investigates the way holographic art has explored time and space. The lenticular lens-based media reveal a more subjective poetic art in the form of the lyrical images and messages as spectators pass through time, or walk along with the piece of work through an interactive process. It is argued that photographic practice is another example of artistic representation in the form of aesthetic medium of time movement and as such shares a common ground with other dynamic expression that require time based interaction.

  9. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed and investigated the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. For example, rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis makes a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOEs for use at the first three harmonic wavelengths of Nd:YAG lasers. The diffraction efficiency, diffraction angle, focal length, focal spot size and optical losses were measured for several HOEs and holographic gratings, and found to be suitable for use as lidar receiver telescopes, and in many cases could also serve as the final collimating and beam steering optic for the laser transmitter. Two lidar systems based on this technology have been designed, built, and successfully tested in atmospheric science applications. This technology will enable future spaceborne lidar missions by significantly lowering the size, weight, power requirement and cost of a large aperture, narrow field of view scanning telescope.

  10. Magnonic holographic imaging of magnetic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, D.; Chiang, H.; Bhowmick, T.; Volodchenkov, A. D.; Ranjbar, M.; Liu, G.; Jiang, C.; Warren, C.; Khivintsev, Y.; Filimonov, Y.; Garay, J.; Lake, R.; Balandin, A. A.; Khitun, A.

    2017-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves. In this approach, the object of interest is placed on top of a magnetic testbed made of material with low spin wave damping. There are micro-antennas incorporated in the testbed. Two of these antennas are used for spin wave excitation while another one is used for the detecting of inductive voltage produced by the interfering spin waves. The measurements are repeated for different phase differences between the spin wave generating antennas which is equivalent to changing the angle of illumination. The collected data appear as a 3D plot - the holographic image of the object. We present experimental data showing magnonic holographic images of a low-coercivity Si/Co sample, a high-coercivity sample made of SrFe12O19 and a diamagnetic copper sample. We also present images of the three samples consisting of a different amount of SrFe12O19 powder. The imaging was accomplished on a Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 testbed at room temperature. The obtained data reveal the unique magnonic signatures of the objects. Experimental data is complemented by the results of numerical modeling, which qualitatively explain the characteristic features of the images. Potentially, magnonic holographic imaging may complement existing techniques and be utilized for non-destructive in-situ magnetic object characterization. The fundamental physical limits of this approach are also discussed.

  11. Comparison between HF radar current data and moored ADCP currentmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosoli, S.

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of accuracy of a two-sites shore-based HF Radar network along the Venice Lagoon littoral was attempted by means of comparison with a 57.5 day-long ADCP current time series for the period September-October 2002. Results showed that radar measurements were accurate ( O . The main differences between the HF radar and surface ADCP currents can be explained in terms of random errors affecting the measurement technique and the daily sea breeze forcing, since low-pass filtering of current time series significantly improved the correlation and decreased the RMS of the differences between the two measured data set. Comparison of the semidiurnal (M2, S2) tidal band suggested good agreement between tidal ellipse amplitudes. Wind forcing on a daily time-scale (sea-breeze) was associated with larger differences between radar and ADCP currents at a diurnal band due to the presence of a vertical shear in the surface layer

  12. Space Radar Image of Safsaf, North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a false-color image of the uninhabited Safsaf Oasis in southern Egypt near the Egypt/Sudan border. It was produced from data obtained from the L-band and C-band radars that are part of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard space shuttle Endeavour on April 9, 1994. The image is centered at 22 degree north latitude, 29 degrees east longitude. It shows detailed structures of bedrock; the dark blue sinuous lines are braided channels that occupy part of an old broad river valley. On the ground and in optical photographs, this big valley and the channels in it are invisible because they are entirely covered by windblown sand. Some of these same channels were observed in SIR-A images in 1981. It is hypothesized that the large valley was carved by one of several ancient predecessor rivers that crossed this part of North Africa, flowing westward, tens of millions of years before the Nile River existed. The Nile flows north about 300 kilometers (200 miles) to the east. The small channels are younger, and probably formed during relatively wet climatic periods within the past few hundred thousand years. This image shows that the channels are in a river valley located in an area where U.S. Geological Survey geologists and archeologists discovered an unusual concentration of hand axes (stone tools) used by Early Man (Homo erectus) hundreds of thousands of years ago. The image clearly shows that in wetter times, the valley would have supported game animals and vegetation. Today, as a result of climate change, the area in uninhabited and lacks water except fora few scattered oases. This color composite image was produced from C-band and L-band horizontal polarization images. The C-band image was assigned red, the L-band (HH) polarization image is shown in green, and the ratio of these two images (LHH/CHH) appears in blue. The primary and composite colors on the image indicate the degree to which the C-band, H-band, their ratio

  13. An Algorithm Based Wavelet Entropy for Shadowing Effect of Human Detection Using Ultra-Wideband Bio-Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Huijun; Liu, Miao; Zhang, Yang; Liang, Fulai; Qi, Fugui; Chen, Fuming; Lv, Hao; Wang, Jianqi; Zhang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-wide band (UWB) radar for short-range human target detection is widely used to find and locate survivors in some rescue missions after a disaster. The results of the application of bistatic UWB radar for detecting multi-stationary human targets have shown that human targets close to the radar antennas are very often visible, while those farther from radar antennas are detected with less reliability. In this paper, on account of the significant difference of frequency content between the...

  14. Use of holographic environment in business and educational application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, A.Q.K.; Shaikh, M.Z.; Khanzada, T.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Holographic environment is based on high-equipped Multimedia information systems. These are based on the evolving powers of computers to handle huge volume of information. Holographic environment is a simulated environment that allows the user to touch and interact with projections, which are derived from the distant real environment. A new communications technology is being developed that will facilitate to interact inside a simulated environment, even if you are thousands of miles apart. This is done with enhancing the electro-holography, which is the computer based generation of diffraction fringes from 3D input data and the display of the reconstructed object in real-time. This research paper presents the design and development of holographic environment for reduction of distances in business and educational applications. The Holographic Environment development with the use of multimedia information systems is discussed. In Particular the characteristics of holographic data and the current research results in the area of real time holographic display systems are spanned. The Technical components of holographic system are also encountered. Finally, issues of improvement in efficiency of Holographic Environments by compression of data are presented along with its utilization for educational and business applications. (author)

  15. Rewritable azobenzene polyester for polarization holographic data storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerekes, A; Sajti, Sz.; Loerincz, Emoeke

    2000-01-01

    Optical storage properties of thin azobenzene side-chain polyester films were examined by polarization holographic measurements. The new amorphous polyester film is the candidate material for the purpose of rewritable holographic memory system. Temporal formation of anisotropic and topographic...... and erasing was tested. The ability of azobenzene polyester for rewriting was found satisfactory after many writing-erasing cycles....

  16. Holographic bounds on the UV cutoff scale in inflationary cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keski-Vakkuri, Esko; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2003-01-01

    We discuss how holographic bounds can be applied to the quantum fluctuations of the inflaton. In general the holographic principle will lead to a bound on the UV cutoff scale of the effective theory of inflation, but it will depend on the coarse-graining prescription involved in calculating...

  17. Realization of an optical interferometer based on holographic optics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The paper describes a simple and cost effective method for the realization of an optical interferometer based on holographic optics, which use minimal bulk optical components. The optical arrangement in the proposed method involves a very simple alignment procedure and inexpensive holographic recording material is ...

  18. Space Radar Image of Flevoland, Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-frequency false color image of Flevoland, The Netherlands, centered at 52.4 degrees north latitude, 5.4 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994. It was produced by combining data from the X-band, C-band and L-band radars. The area shown is approximately 25 kilometers by 28 kilometers (15-1/2 by 17-1/2 miles). Flevoland, which fills the lower two-thirds of the image, is a very flat area that is made up of reclaimed land that is used for agriculture and forestry. At the top of the image, across the canal from Flevoland, is an older forest shown in red; the city of Harderwijk is shown in white on the shore of the canal. At this time of the year, the agricultural fields are bare soil, and they show up in this image in blue. The changes in the brightness of the blue areas are equal to the changes in roughness. The dark blue areas are water and the small dots in the canal are boats. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is being used for both calibration and agricultural studies. Several soil and crop ground-truth studies will be conducted during the shuttle flight. In addition, about 10calibration devices and 10 corner reflectors have been deployed to calibrate and monitor the radar signal. One of these transponders can be seen as a bright star in the lower right quadrant of the image. This false-color image was made using L-band total power in the red channel, C-band total power in the green channel, and X-band VV polarization in the blue channel. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by

  19. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  20. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  1. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  2. Holographic characterization of colloidal particles in turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Fook Chiong; Kasimbeg, Priya; Ruffner, David B.; Hlaing, Ei Hnin; Blusewicz, Jaroslaw M.; Philips, Laura A.; Grier, David G.

    2017-10-01

    Holographic particle characterization uses in-line holographic microscopy and the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure the diameter and the refractive index of individual colloidal particles in their native dispersions. This wealth of information has proved invaluable in fields as diverse as soft-matter physics, biopharmaceuticals, wastewater management, and food science but so far has been available only for dispersions in transparent media. Here, we demonstrate that holographic characterization can yield precise and accurate results even when the particles of interest are dispersed in turbid media. By elucidating how multiple light scattering contributes to image formation in holographic microscopy, we establish the range conditions under which holographic characterization can reliably probe turbid samples. We validate the technique with measurements on model colloidal spheres dispersed in commercial nanoparticle slurries.

  3. Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope is the collection of weather radar imagery for the period prior to the beginning of the Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) system...

  4. Operation of a Radar Altimeter over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, Matthew D.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis presents documentation for the Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) pulse compression radar altimeter and its role in the NASA Multisensor Airborne Altimetry Experiment over Greenland in 1993. The AAFE Altimeter is a Ku-band microwave radar which has demonstrated 14 centimeter range precision in operation over arctic ice. Recent repairs and improvements were required to make the Greenland missions possible. Transmitter, receiver and software modifications, as well as the integration of a GPS receiver are thoroughly documented. Procedures for installation, and operation of the radar are described. Finally, suggestions are made for further system improvements.

  5. Combined radar and telemetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  6. Multimode/Multifrequency Low Frequency Airborne Radar Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the design of multimode/multifrequency airborne radar suitable for imaging and subsurface sounding. The system operates at relatively low frequencies in the band ranging from VHF to UHF. It is able to work in two different modalities: (i nadir-looking sounder in the VHF band (163 MHz and (ii side-looking imager (SAR in the UHF band with two channels at 450 MHz and 860 MHz. The radar has been completely designed by CO.Ri.S.T.A. for what concerns the RF and the electronic aspect, and by the University of Calabria for what concerns the design, realization, and test of SAR antennas. The radar has been installed on a civil helicopter and its operation has been validated in flight in both sounder and imager modality. Preliminary surveys have been carried out over different areas of Campania region, South Italy.

  7. Use of Seasat satellite radar imagery for the detection of standing water beneath forest vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.; Demarcke, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Seasat synthetic aperture radar, operating at a 23-cm, L-band wavelength, detected anomalous tonal patterns in areas having relatively uniform vegetable canopy. These anomalously high radar returns were shown to be related more to the underlying terrain (areas of standing water) than to the vegetation canopy. These results show that L-band radars, imaging forested terrain in a Seasat configuration, are sensitive to gross changes in vegetation, and may even penetrate the vegetation canopy, providing an unmistakable radar signature. Properly designed space imaging radar shuttle experiments, using multiple frequency and polarization radars of various depression angles, may provide documentation for a flood-monitoring capability. Height, configuration, and density of the biomass in conjunction with frequency and incidence angle of the imaging system are shown to be important factors in formulating a backscatter model, but the relative significance of each is yet to be determined.

  8. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  9. MWR, Meteor Wind Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements of a state of the art meteor wind radar, and acceptable comprises in the interests of economy, are detailed. Design consideration of some existing and proposed radars are discussed. The need for international cooperation in mesopause level wind measurement, such as that being fostered by the MAP GLOBMET (Global Meteor Observations System) project, is emphasized.

  10. Quantum synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.

    2017-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) uses sensor motion to generate finer spatial resolution of a given target area. In this paper we explore the theoretical potential of quantum synthetic aperture quantum radar (QSAR). We provide theoretical analysis and simulation results which suggest that QSAR can provide improved detection performance over classical SAR in the high-noise low-brightness regime.

  11. Aspects of Radar Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    LÜNEBURG, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    This contribution is a tutorial introduction to the phenomenological theory of radar polarimetry for the coherent scatter case emphasizing monostatic backscattering and forward scattering (transmission). Characteristic similarities and differences between radar polarimetry and optical polarimetry and the role of linear and antilinear operators (time-reversal) are pointed out and typical polarimetric invariants are identified.

  12. Equatorial MU Radar project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system

  13. Heavy quarkonium states with the holographic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Defu; Ren, Hai-cang

    2008-01-01

    The quarkonium states in a quark-gluon plasma is examined with the heavy quark potential implied by the holographic principle. Both the vanila AdS-Schwarzschild metric and the one with an infrared cutoff are considered. The dissociation temperature is calculated by solving the Schrödinger equation of the potential model. In the case of the AdS-Schwarzschild metric with a IR cutoff, the ratios of the dissociation temperatures for J/ψ and Upsilon with the U-ansatz of the potential to the deconfinement temperature are found to agree with the lattice results within a factor of two.

  14. AC conductivity for a holographic Weyl semimetal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignani, Gianluca; Marini, Andrea; Peña-Benitez, Francisco; Speziali, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia,I.N.F.N. Sezione di Perugia,Via Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2017-03-23

    We study the AC electrical conductivity at zero temperature in a holographic model for a Weyl semimetal. At small frequencies we observe a linear dependence in the frequency. The model shows a quantum phase transition between a topological semimetal (Weyl semimetal phase) with a non vanishing anomalous Hall conductivity and a trivial semimetal. The AC conductivity has an intermediate scaling due to the presence of a quantum critical region in the phase diagram of the system. The phase diagram is reconstructed using the scaling properties of the conductivity. We compare with the experimental data of https://www.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.93.121110 obtaining qualitative agreement.

  15. Combined constraints on holographic bosonic technicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Primulando, Reinard

    2010-01-01

    We consider a model of strong electroweak symmetry breaking in which the expectation value of an additional, possibly composite, scalar field is responsible for the generation of fermion masses. The dynamics of the strongly coupled sector is defined and studied via its holographic dual, and does not correspond to a simple, scaled-up version of QCD. We consider the bounds from perturbative unitarity, the S parameter, and the mass of the Higgs-like scalar. We show that the combination of these constraints leaves a relatively limited region of parameter space viable, and suggests the qualitative features of the model that might be probed at the LHC.

  16. Recent progress in holographic wavefront sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodatskiy, Bogdan; Kovalev, Michael; Malinina, Polina; Odinokov, Sergey; Soloviev, Maksim; Venediktov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Many areas of optical science and technology require fast and accurate measurement of the radiation wavefront shape. Today there are known a lot of wavefront sensor (WFS) techniques, and their number is growing up. The last years have brought a growing interest in several schematics of WFS, employing the holography principles and holographic optical elements (HOE). Some of these devices are just the improved versions of the standard and most popular Shack-Hartman WFS, while other are based on the intrinsic features of HOE.

  17. Fourier holography in holographic optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodatskiy, Bogdan; Kovalev, Michael; Malinina, Polina; Odinokov, Sergey; Soloviev, Maksim; Venediktov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Many areas of optical science and technology require fast and accurate measurement of the radiation wavefront shape. Today there are known a lot of wavefront sensor (WFS) techniques, and their number is growing up. The last years have brought a growing interest in several schematics of WFS, employing the holography principles and holographic optical elements (HOE). Some of these devices are just the improved versions of the standard and most popular Shack-Hartman WFS, while other are based on the intrinsic features of HOE.

  18. Charge transport by holographic Fermi surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Thomas; Liu, Hong; McGreevy, John; Vegh, David

    2013-01-01

    We compute the contribution to the conductivity from holographic Fermi surfaces obtained from probe fermions in an AdS charged black hole. This requires calculating a certain part of the one-loop correction to a vector propagator on the charged black hole geometry. We find that the current dissipation is as efficient as possible and the transport lifetime coincides with the single-particle lifetime. In particular, in the case where the spectral density is that of a marginal Fermi liquid, the resistivity is linear in temperature.

  19. Simple recipe for holographic Weyl anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugini, F. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción,Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Diaz, D.E. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello,Autopista Concepción-Talcahuano 7100, Talcahuano (Chile)

    2017-04-20

    We propose a recipe — arguably the simplest — to compute the holographic type-B Weyl anomaly for general higher-derivative gravity in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. In 5 and 7 dimensions we identify a suitable basis of curvature invariants that allows to read off easily, without any further computation, the Weyl anomaly coefficients of the dual CFT. We tabulate the contributions from quadratic, cubic and quartic purely algebraic curvature invariants and also from terms involving derivatives of the curvature. We provide few examples, where the anomaly coefficients have been obtained by other means, to illustrate the effectiveness of our prescription.

  20. Holographic complexity of cold hyperbolic black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbón, José L.F.; Martín-García, Javier

    2015-01-01

    AdS black holes with hyperbolic horizons provide strong-coupling descriptions of thermal CFT states on hyperboloids. The low-temperature limit of these systems is peculiar. In this note we show that, in addition to a large ground state degeneracy, these states also have an anomalously large holographic complexity, scaling logarithmically with the temperature. We speculate on whether this fact generalizes to other systems whose extreme infrared regime is formally controlled by Conformal Quantum Mechanics, such as various instances of near-extremal charged black holes.

  1. A simple holographic scenario for gapped quenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Esperanza; Bosch, Guillermo Milans del [Instituto de Física Teórica IFT UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-24

    We construct gravitational backgrounds dual to a family of field theories parameterized by a relevant coupling. They combine a non-trivial scalar field profile with a naked singularity. The naked singularity is necessary to preserve Lorentz invariance along the boundary directions. The singularity is however excised by introducing an infrared cutoff in the geometry. The holographic dictionary associated to the infrared boundary is developed. We implement quenches between two different values of the coupling. This requires considering time dependent boundary conditions for the scalar field both at the AdS boundary and the infrared wall.

  2. Production of diffraction gratings using holographic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecevit, F.N.; Guven, H.; Aydin, R.

    1989-09-01

    Holographic transmission gratings are produced using low power He-Ne laser and the 488-nm Ar-ion laser line. From the observed data of the Hg spectrum and the 488.0-nm, 514.5-nm and 632.8-nm laser lines the fringe spacings of the gratings are calculated. Using the gratings produced with the He-Ne laser the Rydberg constant is determined by measuring the diffraction angles of the Balmer series in the H-atomic spectrum. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  3. Holographic Lattices Give the Graviton a Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Mike; Vegh, David

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the DC conductivity of holographic theories with translational invariance broken by a background lattice. We show that the presence of the lattice induces an effective mass for the graviton via a gravitational version of the Higgs mechanism. This allows us to obtain, at leading order in the lattice strength, an analytic expression for the DC conductivity in terms of the size of the lattice at the horizon. In locally critical theories this leads to a power law resistivity that is in agreement with an earlier field theory analysis of Hartnoll and Hofman.

  4. More on boundary holographic Witten diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshiki

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we discuss geodesic Witten diagrams in general holographic conformal field theories with boundary or defect. In boundary or defect conformal field theory, two-point functions are nontrivial and can be decomposed into conformal blocks in two distinct ways; ambient channel decomposition and boundary channel decomposition. In our previous work [A. Karch and Y. Sato, J. High Energy Phys. 09 (2017) 121., 10.1007/JHEP09(2017)121] we only consider two-point functions of same operators. We generalize our previous work to a situation where operators in two-point functions are different. We obtain two distinct decomposition for two-point functions of different operators.

  5. Contrast enhancing techniques in digital holographic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobera, J; Coupland, J M

    2008-01-01

    A digital holographic microscope (DHM) can be considered as a microscope with an extended depth of field. From a single DHM recording the propagating component of the scattered field can be reconstructed in three dimensions (3D). As in conventional white light microscopy contrasting enhancing techniques can be applied to highlight characteristics of interest. If these techniques are used to enhance the reconstruction from a DHM, then it is important to understand the characteristics of these techniques in 3D. In this paper the performance of phase contrast, differential interference contrast, Hoffman and spiral phase contrast visualization methods are discussed in 3D

  6. Heavy quarkonium in a holographic basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the heavy quarkonium within the basis light-front quantization approach. We implement the one-gluon exchange interaction and a confining potential inspired by light-front holography. We adopt the holographic light-front wavefunction (LFWF as our basis function and solve the non-perturbative dynamics by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix. We obtain the mass spectrum for charmonium and bottomonium. With the obtained LFWFs, we also compute the decay constants and the charge form factors for selected eigenstates. The results are compared with the experimental measurements and with other established methods.

  7. Spaceborne weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  8. Intelligent radar data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzbaur, Ulrich D.

    The application of artificial intelligence principles to the processing of radar signals is considered theoretically. The main capabilities required are learning and adaptation in a changing environment, processing and modeling information (especially dynamics and uncertainty), and decision-making based on all available information (taking its reliability into account). For the application to combat-aircraft radar systems, the tasks include the combination of data from different types of sensors, reacting to electronic counter-countermeasures, evaluation of how much data should be acquired (energy and radiation management), control of the radar, tracking, and identification. Also discussed are related uses such as monitoring the avionics systems, supporting pilot decisions with respect to the radar system, and general applications in radar-system R&D.

  9. Observations and modeling of fog by cloud radar and optical sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.; Hoogeboom, P.; Russchenberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    Fog is a significant factor affecting the public traffic because visibility is reduced to a large extent. Therefore the determination of optical visibility in fog from radar instruments has received much interest. To observe fog with radar, high frequency bands (millimeter waves) have the best option. A 35 GHz cloud radar at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research in the Netherlands has been used to make fog measurements in the "fog mode". Meanwhile, in-situ visibility sensors (...

  10. Retrieval of the raindrop size distribution from polarimetric radar data using double-moment normalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Raupach, Timothy H.; Berne, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    A new technique for estimating the raindrop size distribution (DSD) from polarimetric radar data is proposed. Two statistical moments of the DSD are estimated from polarimetric variables, and the DSD is reconstructed. The technique takes advantage of the relative invariance of the double-moment normalised DSD. The method was tested using X-band radar data and networks of disdrometers in three different climatic regions. Radar-derived estimates of the DSD compare reasonably well to observation...

  11. Studies of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill With the UAVSAR Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Minchew, Brent; Holt, Benjamin; Hensley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    On 22- 23 June 2010, the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) L band radar imaged the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the effects of oil that was transported within the Gulf of Mexico. We describe the campaign and discuss the unique contributions of the UAVSAR radar to the study of the detection, migration, and impact of oil from the spill. We present an overview of UAVSAR data analyses that support the original science goals of the campaign, namely, (1) algorithm d...

  12. Principles of modern radar radar applications

    CERN Document Server

    Scheer, James A

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Radar Applications is the third of the three-volume seriesof what was originally designed to be accomplished in one volume. As the final volumeof the set, it finishes the original vision of a complete yet bounded reference for radartechnology. This volume describes fifteen different system applications or class ofapplications in more detail than can be found in Volumes I or II.As different as the applications described, there is a difference in how these topicsare treated by the authors. Whereas in Volumes I and II there is strict adherence tochapter format and leve

  13. Video Tape Recording Techniques for SEASAT Radar Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    signal spectrum. RESUME, Un enrigistreur vidio A bande magn~tique ARVIN/ECHO WRR-441 ’a deux canaux a 6tf utilisfi dans un systame pour enr~gistrer les...donn~es du radars de SEASAT. Les canaux de 1’enrggistreur vid~o 6taient limit~s a une largeur de bande de 6 MHz tandis que les donnies du radar...may be assigned this document) 10. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT QUALIFIED REQUESTERS MAY OBTAIN COPIES OF THIS DOCUMENT FROM THEIR DEFENCE DOCUMENTATION

  14. A High Efficiency 1kWatt GaN amplifier for P-Band pulsed applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An improved efficiency amplifier for high power pulse applications at P-Band will be investigated that will support space based RADAR systems. Current P-Band pulsed...

  15. A High Efficiency 1kWatt GaN Amplifier for P-Band Pulsed Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An improved efficiency amplifier for high power pulse applications at P-Band will be investigated that will support space based RADAR systems. Current P-Band pulsed...

  16. Observations and modeling of fog by cloud radar and optical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Hoogeboom, P.; Russchenberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    Fog is a significant factor affecting the public traffic because visibility is reduced to a large extent. Therefore the determination of optical visibility in fog from radar instruments has received much interest. To observe fog with radar, high frequency bands (millimeter waves) have the best

  17. Spectral Polarimetric Features Analysis of Wind Turbine Clutter in Weather Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, J.; Krasnov, O.A.; Unal, C.M.H.; Medagli, S.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Wind turbine clutter has gradually become a concern for the radar community for its increasing size and quantity worldwide. Based on the S-band polarimetric Doppler PARSAX radar measurements, this paper demonstrates the micro-Doppler features and spectral-polarimetric characteristic of wind turbine

  18. Random holographic "large worlds" with emergent dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2016-11-01

    I propose a random network model governed by a Gaussian weight corresponding to Ising link antiferromagnetism as a model for emergent quantum space-time. In this model, discrete space is fundamental, not a regularization; its spectral dimension ds is not a model input but is, rather, completely determined by the antiferromagnetic coupling constant. Perturbative terms suppressing triangles and favoring squares lead to locally Euclidean ground states that are Ricci flat "large worlds" with power-law extension. I then consider the quenched graphs of lowest energy for ds=2 and ds=3 , and I show how quenching leads to the spontaneous emergence of embedding spaces of Hausdorff dimension dH=4 and dH=5 , respectively. One of the additional, spontaneous dimensions can be interpreted as time, causality being an emergent property that arises in the large N limit (with N the number of vertices). For ds=2 , the quenched graphs constitute a discrete version of a 5D-space-filling surface with a number of fundamental degrees of freedom scaling like N2 /5, a graph version of the holographic principle. These holographic degrees of freedom can be identified with the squares of the quenched graphs, which, being triangle-free, are the fundamental area (or loop) quanta.

  19. Diffusion in solids with holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingyu

    1996-12-01

    It is of great importance for the formation of p-n junction in semiconductors by penetrating some impurities through the depth near the surface, so it has long been paid attention to control the concentration distribution of impurities during the diffusion process. In recent years, ionic carburizing, and ion bombardment penetration etc. for the treatment of metal surface have also attracted by material sciences. It requires that the diffusion depth and the diffusion time of the impurities should be under precise control. Different methods, such as the method of radioisotopic detection and the method of chemical analysis have been adopted, however, the reports of different workers are very different, especially in the real time measurement, so, finding new method is never ending. In 1984, H. Fenichel have performed experiments on the solutions of table salt and sugar with the method of holographic interferometry. As for metals which are opaque for the visible light, but they become transparent by making them into a very thin film so that, in principle, the diffusion of atoms within a film is capable of measure by holographic interferometry. Alternatively, the electromagnetic waves within 1 - 70 micrometers wavelengths may be utilized, some materials, such as high purified germanium and silicon are good materials for infrared transmission. Some fluorides of alkaline-earth metals have high transmittance in the range of 1 - 8 micrometers , the concentration of impurities in the semiconductor and metal surface treatment are of 1015 - 1020 atoms per cubic cm, which is capable of detection.

  20. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Li, Miao, E-mail: asiahu@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: linan@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: zhangzhh@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ω{sub hde} are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ{sup 2}{sub min}=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain −0.07<Ω{sub Λ0}<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ω{sub hde0}<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  1. Random holographic "large worlds" with emergent dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugenberger, Carlo A

    2016-11-01

    I propose a random network model governed by a Gaussian weight corresponding to Ising link antiferromagnetism as a model for emergent quantum space-time. In this model, discrete space is fundamental, not a regularization; its spectral dimension d_{s} is not a model input but is, rather, completely determined by the antiferromagnetic coupling constant. Perturbative terms suppressing triangles and favoring squares lead to locally Euclidean ground states that are Ricci flat "large worlds" with power-law extension. I then consider the quenched graphs of lowest energy for d_{s}=2 and d_{s}=3, and I show how quenching leads to the spontaneous emergence of embedding spaces of Hausdorff dimension d_{H}=4 and d_{H}=5, respectively. One of the additional, spontaneous dimensions can be interpreted as time, causality being an emergent property that arises in the large N limit (with N the number of vertices). For d_{s}=2, the quenched graphs constitute a discrete version of a 5D-space-filling surface with a number of fundamental degrees of freedom scaling like N^{2/5}, a graph version of the holographic principle. These holographic degrees of freedom can be identified with the squares of the quenched graphs, which, being triangle-free, are the fundamental area (or loop) quanta.

  2. Sonorous images through digital holographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Sandford-Richardson, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    The art of the last fifty years has significantly surrounded the presence of the body, the relationship between human and interactive technologies. Today in interactive art, there are not only representations that speak of the body but actions and behaviours that involve the body. In holography, the image appears and disappears from the observer's vision field; because the holographic image is light, we can see multidimensional spaces, shapes and colours existing on the same time, presence and absence of the image on the holographic plate. And the image can be flowing in front of the plate that sometimes people try touching it with his hands. That means, to the viewer will be interactive events, with no beginning or end that can be perceived in any direction, forward or backward, depending on the relative position and the time the viewer spends in front of the hologram. To explore that feature we are proposing an installation with four holograms, and several sources of different kind of sounds connected with each hologram. When viewers will move in front of each hologram they will activate different sources of sound. The search is not only about the images in the holograms, but also the looking for different types of sounds that this demand will require. The digital holograms were produced using the HoloCam Portable Light System with the 35 mm camera Canon 700D to capture image information, it was then edited on computer using the Motion 5 and Final Cut Pro X programs.

  3. Holographic photon production in heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iatrakis, Ioannis [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Center for Extreme Matter and Emergent Phenomena,Utrecht University,Leuvenlaan 4, 3584 CE Utrecht (Netherlands); Kiritsis, Elias [Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics,Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology,Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); APC, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, APC, UMR 7164 CNRS,F-75205 Paris (France); Shen, Chun [Department of Physics, McGill University,3600 University Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Yang, Di-Lun [Theoretical Research Division, Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako,Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2017-04-07

    The thermal-photon emission from strongly coupled gauge theories at finite temperature is calculated using holographic models for QCD in the Veneziano limit (V-QCD). The emission rates are then embedded in hydrodynamic simulations combined with prompt photons from hard scattering and the thermal photons from hadron gas to analyze the spectra and anisotropic flow of direct photons at RHIC and LHC. The results from different sources responsible for the thermal photons in QGP including the weakly coupled QGP (wQGP) from perturbative calculations, strongly coupled N=4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) plasma (as a benchmark for reference), and Gubser’s phenomenological holographic model are then compared. It is found that the direct-photon spectra are enhanced in the strongly coupled scenario compared with the ones in the wQGP, especially at high momenta. Moreover, both the elliptic flow and triangular flow of direct photons are amplified at high momenta for V-QCD and the SYM plasma. The results are further compared with experimental observations.

  4. Commensurability effects in holographic homogeneous lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Tomas; Krikun, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    An interesting application of the gauge/gravity duality to condensed matter physics is the description of a lattice via breaking translational invariance on the gravity side. By making use of global symmetries, it is possible to do so without scarifying homogeneity of the pertinent bulk solutions, which we thus term as “homogeneous holographic lattices." Due to their technical simplicity, these configurations have received a great deal of attention in the last few years and have been shown to correctly describe momentum relaxation and hence (finite) DC conductivities. However, it is not clear whether they are able to capture other lattice effects which are of interest in condensed matter. In this paper we investigate this question focusing our attention on the phenomenon of commensurability, which arises when the lattice scale is tuned to be equal to (an integer multiple of) another momentum scale in the system. We do so by studying the formation of spatially modulated phases in various models of homogeneous holographic lattices. Our results indicate that the onset of the instability is controlled by the near horizon geometry, which for insulating solutions does carry information about the lattice. However, we observe no sharp connection between the characteristic momentum of the broken phase and the lattice pitch, which calls into question the applicability of these models to the physics of commensurability.

  5. Ricci-Gauss-Bonnet holographic dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2018-03-01

    We present a model of holographic dark energy in which the infrared cutoff is determined by both the Ricci and the Gauss-Bonnet invariants. Such a construction has the significant advantage that the infrared cutoff, and consequently the holographic dark energy density, does not depend on the future or the past evolution of the universe, but only on its current features, and moreover it is determined by invariants, whose role is fundamental in gravitational theories. We extract analytical solutions for the behavior of the dark energy density and equation-of-state parameters as functions of the redshift. These reveal the usual thermal history of the universe, with the sequence of radiation, matter and dark energy epochs, resulting in the future to a complete dark energy domination. The corresponding dark energy equation-of-state parameter can lie in the quintessence or phantom regime, or experience the phantom-divide crossing during the cosmological evolution, and its asymptotic value can be quintessencelike, phantomlike, or be exactly equal to the cosmological-constant value. Finally, we extract the constraints on the model parameters that arise from big bang nucleosynthesis.

  6. The holographic dual of the Penrose transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Yasha

    2018-01-01

    We consider the holographic duality between type-A higher-spin gravity in AdS4 and the free U( N) vector model. In the bulk, linearized solutions can be translated into twistor functions via the Penrose transform. We propose a holographic dual to this transform, which translates between twistor functions and CFT sources and operators. We present a twistorial expression for the partition function, which makes global higher-spin symmetry manifest, and appears to automatically include all necessary contact terms. In this picture, twistor space provides a fully nonlocal, gauge-invariant description underlying both bulk and boundary spacetime pictures. While the bulk theory is handled at the linear level, our formula for the partition function includes the effects of bulk interactions. Thus, the CFT is used to solve the bulk, with twistors as a language common to both. A key ingredient in our result is the study of ordinary spacetime symmetries within the fundamental representation of higher-spin algebra. The object that makes these "square root" spacetime symmetries manifest becomes the kernel of our boundary/twistor transform, while the original Penrose transform is identified as a "square root" of CPT.

  7. Holographic superconductor on a novel insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yi; Liu, Peng; Wu, Jian-Pin; Wu, Meng-He

    2018-01-01

    We construct a holographic superconductor model, based on a gravity theory, which exhibits novel metal-insulator transitions. We investigate the condition for the condensation of the scalar field over the parameter space, and then focus on the superconductivity over the insulating phase with a hard gap, which is supposed to be Mott-like. It turns out that the formation of the hard gap in the insulating phase benefits the superconductivity. This phenomenon is analogous to the fact that the pseudogap phase can promote the pre-pairing of electrons in high {T}{{c}} cuprates. We expect that this work can shed light on understanding the mechanism of high {T}{{c}} superconductivity from the holographic side. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (11575195, 11775036, 11305018), Y.L. also acknowledges the support from Jiangxi young scientists (JingGang Star) program and 555 talent project of Jiangxi Province. J. P. Wu is also supported by Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (201602013)

  8. Holographic gauge mediation via strongly coupled messengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuirk, Paul; Shiu, Gary; Sumitomo, Yoske

    2010-01-01

    We consider a relative of semidirect gauge mediation where the hidden sector exists at large 't Hooft coupling. Such scenarios can be difficult to describe using perturbative field theory methods but may fall into the class of holographic gauge mediation scenarios, meaning that they are amenable to the techniques of gauge/gravity duality. We use a recently found gravity solution to examine one such case, where the hidden sector is a cascading gauge theory resulting in a confinement scale not much smaller than the messenger mass. In the original construction of holographic gauge mediation, as in other examples of semidirect gauge mediation at strong coupling, the primary contributions to visible sector soft terms come from weakly coupled messenger mesons. In contrast to these examples, we describe the dual of a gauge theory where there are significant contributions from scales in which the strongly coupled messenger quarks are the effective degrees of freedom. In this regime, the visible sector gaugino mass can be calculated entirely from holography.

  9. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui; Li, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ω hde are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ 2 min =426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain −0.07<Ω Λ0 <0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ω hde0 <0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model

  10. Holographic quenches towards a Lifshitz point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilo, Giancarlo [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,C.P. 66318, CEP: 05315-970, São Paulo (Brazil); Cuadros-Melgar, Bertha [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, Universidade de São Paulo,Estrada Municipal do Campinho S/N, CEP: 12602-810, Lorena (Brazil); Abdalla, Elcio [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,C.P. 66318, CEP: 05315-970, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-02-01

    We use the holographic duality to study quantum quenches of a strongly coupled CFT that drive the theory towards a non-relativistic fixed point with Lifshitz scaling. We consider the case of a Lifshitz dynamical exponent z close to unity, where the non-relativistic field theory can be understood as a specific deformation of the corresponding CFT and, hence, the standard holographic dictionary can be applied. On the gravity side this amounts to finding a dynamical bulk solution which interpolates between AdS and Lishitz spacetimes as time evolves. We show that an asymptotically Lifshitz black hole is always formed in the final state. This indicates that it is impossible to reach the vacuum state of the Lifshitz theory from the CFT vacuum as a result of the proposed quenching mechanism. The nonequilibrium dynamics following the breaking of the relativistic scaling symmetry is also probed using both local and non-local observables. In particular, we conclude that the equilibration process happens in a top-down manner, i.e., the symmetry is broken faster for UV modes.

  11. Vibration measurements by pulsed digital holographic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin, Staffan; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Perez-Lopez, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2005-02-01

    Digital holographic interferometry in combination with a flexible fiber endoscope allows high precision measurements of deformations on hidden objects surfaces, inside cavities and objects with small access apertures. A digital holographic endoscopy system is described with a frequency-doubled, twin oscillator Q-switched pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. A sequence of digital hologram pairs are recorded with a maximum repetition rate of 260 ms. Each digital hologram is captured at separate video frames of a CCD-camera. The time separation between the laser pulses from each cavity can be set in the range from 50 to 500 μs. The digital holograms are transferred to a PC via a frame grabber and evaluated quantitatively by the Fourier transform method. The resulting phase fringe pattern has the information needed to evaluate quantitatively the amount of the deformation. Experimental results of vibration measurements of hidden mechanical and biological object surfaces are presented. The quality of the results obtained by mechanical object surfaces is usually higher than for biological surfaces. This can be explained easily by the fact that a biological surface is much more complex than a mechanical surface in the sense that some parts of the surface may reflect the light well whereas other parts may absorb the light. Also, biological surfaces are translucent, which means that part of the light may enter inside the sample where it may be absorbed or reflected.

  12. Noncommutative extension of AdS–CFT and holographic superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Pramanik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this Letter, we consider a Non-Commutative (NC extension of AdS–CFT correspondence and its effects on holographic superconductors. NC corrections are incorporated via the NC generalization of Schwarzschild black hole metric in AdS with the probe limit. We study NC effects on the relations connecting the charge density and the critical temperature of the Holographic Superconductors. Furthermore, condensation operator of the superconductor has been analyzed. Our results suggest that generically, NC effects increase the critical temperature of the holographic superconductor.

  13. Noncommutative extension of AdS-CFT and holographic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Souvik; Das, Sudipta; Ghosh, Subir

    2015-03-01

    In this Letter, we consider a Non-Commutative (NC) extension of AdS-CFT correspondence and its effects on holographic superconductors. NC corrections are incorporated via the NC generalization of Schwarzschild black hole metric in AdS with the probe limit. We study NC effects on the relations connecting the charge density and the critical temperature of the Holographic Superconductors. Furthermore, condensation operator of the superconductor has been analyzed. Our results suggest that generically, NC effects increase the critical temperature of the holographic superconductor.

  14. Noncommutative extension of AdS–CFT and holographic superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Souvik, E-mail: souvick.in@gmail.com; Das, Sudipta, E-mail: sudipta_jumaths@yahoo.co.in; Ghosh, Subir, E-mail: subir_ghosh2@rediffmail.com

    2015-03-06

    In this Letter, we consider a Non-Commutative (NC) extension of AdS–CFT correspondence and its effects on holographic superconductors. NC corrections are incorporated via the NC generalization of Schwarzschild black hole metric in AdS with the probe limit. We study NC effects on the relations connecting the charge density and the critical temperature of the Holographic Superconductors. Furthermore, condensation operator of the superconductor has been analyzed. Our results suggest that generically, NC effects increase the critical temperature of the holographic superconductor.

  15. Doped Poly(methyl Methacrylate) Photopolymers for Holographic Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shiuan Huei; Lin, June-Hua; Chen, Po-Lin; Shiao, Yi-Nan; Hsu, Ken Y.

    In this paper, we report our investigations on thick holographic recording material of the phenanthrenequinone doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PQ:PMMA) photopolymer. The design strategy and fabrication technique for making thick polymer samples with negligible shrinkage and good optical quality are presented. The physical mechanism for holographic recording in PQ:PMMA material is described, and methods for improving are proposed. Based on these methods, photopolymer samples with different compositions are fabricated and experimentally characterized. The results show that by modifying compositions, the material sensitivity and dynamic range for volume holographic recording have been improved.

  16. The Volume Holographic Optical Storage Potential in Azobenzene Containing Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren; Sanchez, Carlos; Alcalá, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Volume holographic data storage is one of the most promising techniques to improve both the storage capacity of devices and the transfer data rate. Among the materials proposed as storage data media, azobenzene containing polymers have received much attention. Some of their properties seem...... to be suitable for holographic storage applications. However, they still present several problems, mainly those related with light sensitivity, response time and stability of the stored information. In this article we review the work performed on volume holographic storage using azobenzene containing polymers...

  17. Inflation via logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darabi, F.; Felegary, F. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Setare, M.R. [University of Kurdistan, Department of Science, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We study the inflation in terms of the logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy (LECHDE) model with future event horizon, particle horizon, and Hubble horizon cut-offs, and we compare the results with those obtained in the study of inflation by the holographic dark energy HDE model. In comparison, the spectrum of primordial scalar power spectrum in the LECHDE model becomes redder than the spectrum in the HDE model. Moreover, the consistency with the observational data in the LECHDE model of inflation constrains the reheating temperature and Hubble parameter by one parameter of holographic dark energy and two new parameters of logarithmic corrections. (orig.)

  18. Holographic entropy inequalities and gapped phases of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Ning; Cao, ChunJun; Walter, Michael; Wang, Zitao

    2015-01-01

    We extend our studies of holographic entropy inequalities to gapped phases of matter. For any number of regions, we determine the linear entropy inequalities satisfied by systems in which the entanglement entropy satisfies an exact area law. In particular, we find that all holographic entropy inequalities are valid in such systems. In gapped systems with topological order, the “cyclic inequalities” derived recently for the holographic entanglement entropy generalize the Kitaev-Preskill formula for the topological entanglement entropy. Finally, we propose a candidate linear inequality for general 4-party quantum states.

  19. Holographic interferometry using a digital photo-camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekanina, H.; Hledik, S.

    2001-01-01

    The possibilities of running digital holographic interferometry using commonly available compact digital zoom photo-cameras are studied. The recently developed holographic setup, suitable especially for digital photo-cameras equipped with an un detachable object lens, is used. The method described enables a simple and straightforward way of both recording and reconstructing of a digital holographic interferograms. The feasibility of the new method is verified by digital reconstruction of the interferograms acquired, using a numerical code based on the fast Fourier transform. Experimental results obtained are presented and discussed. (authors)

  20. Inflation via logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darabi, F.; Felegary, F.; Setare, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    We study the inflation in terms of the logarithmic entropy-corrected holographic dark energy (LECHDE) model with future event horizon, particle horizon, and Hubble horizon cut-offs, and we compare the results with those obtained in the study of inflation by the holographic dark energy HDE model. In comparison, the spectrum of primordial scalar power spectrum in the LECHDE model becomes redder than the spectrum in the HDE model. Moreover, the consistency with the observational data in the LECHDE model of inflation constrains the reheating temperature and Hubble parameter by one parameter of holographic dark energy and two new parameters of logarithmic corrections. (orig.)