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Sample records for band noise increase

  1. Lunar Noise-Temperature Increase Measurements at S-Band, X-Band, and Ka-Band Using a 34-Meter-Diameter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2006-08-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will cause an increase in receiver noise temperature that needs to be accounted for in telemetry, radio science, or ranging link budgets. The Deep Space Network may be required to use its antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature increase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular offset of the antenna beam from the center of the lunar disk. This article quantifies such a set of measurements acquired at DSS 13, a 34-m-diameter research and development beam-waveguide antenna located at Goldstone, California, at three different telecommunication frequencies, S-band (2.3 GHz), X-band (8.4 GHz), and Ka-band (32 GHz), over a wide range of lunar phase, for both disk-centered and limb-centered positions of the antenna beam.

  2. A programmable ultra-low noise X-band exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMullen, A; Hoover, L R; Justice, R D; Callahan, B S

    2001-07-01

    A programmable ultra-low noise X-band exciter has been developed using commercial off-the-shelf components. Its phase noise is more than 10 dB below the best available microwave synthesizers. It covers a 7% frequency band with 0.1-Hz resolution. The X-band output at +23 dBm is a combination of signals from an X-band sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator (SLCO), a low noise UHF frequency synthesizer, and special-purpose frequency translation and up-conversion circuitry.

  3. Amperometric Noise at Thin Film Band Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon T.; Heien, Michael L.; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    polymers and measured the current noise in physiological buffer solution for a wide range of different electrode areas. The noise measurements could be modeled by an analytical expression, representing the electrochemical cell as a resistor and capacitor in series. The studies revealed three domains...

  4. X-/Ka-band dichroic plate noise temperature reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veruttipong, W.; Lee, P.

    1994-11-01

    The X-/Ka-band (8.4 GHz/32.0 GHz) dichroic plate installed as DSS 13 contributes an estimated 3 K to the system noise temperature at 32.0 GHz. Approximately 1 percent of the Ka-band incident field is reflected by the plate into the 300-K environment of the DSS-13 pedestal room. A low-cost, easily implemented method of reducing the noise temperature is presented. Using a curved reflector, the reflected field can be re-focused into an 80-K cold load, reducing the noise temperature contribution of the dichroic plate by about 2 K.

  5. Noise in Broad-Band Hydrophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    accolertion and pressure in water A• / , ILLUS’.RATIONrs (coat 1d ) 22 Aaplifiar and titrisi nOise backgnnumd JMT 1 BUTION’ . ... . .. t. .* .*. . *. . *** o. o...Then, Z (fros equation (49c)) W 2 1 S2 2n,- - 2(69)QU 2ni(69 This appriisate relationship has boon used in the following ezW , even wtare the element is

  6. Prewhitening for Narrow-Band Noise in Subspace Methods for Noise Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental issue in connection with subspace methods for noise reduction is that the covariance matrix for the noise is required to have full rank, in order for the prewhitening step to be defined. However, there are important cases where this requirement is not fulfilled, typically when...... that works also for rank deficient noise. We also demonstrate how to formulate this algorithm by means of a quotient ULV decomposition, which allows for faster computation and updating. Finally we apply our algorithm to a problem involving a speech signal contaminated by narrow-band noise....

  7. The method of narrow-band audio classification based on universal noise background model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Rui; Bao, Chang-chun

    2013-03-01

    Audio classification is the basis of content-based audio analysis and retrieval. The conventional classification methods mainly depend on feature extraction of audio clip, which certainly increase the time requirement for classification. An approach for classifying the narrow-band audio stream based on feature extraction of audio frame-level is presented in this paper. The audio signals are divided into speech, instrumental music, song with accompaniment and noise using the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In order to satisfy the demand of actual environment changing, a universal noise background model (UNBM) for white noise, street noise, factory noise and car interior noise is built. In addition, three feature schemes are considered to optimize feature selection. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm achieves a high accuracy for audio classification, especially under each noise background we used and keep the classification time less than one second.

  8. Active Noise Control for Narrow-band and Broad-band Signals Using Q-Learning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Raeisy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic noise pollution is one of the serious disasters in the current industrialized life. Though traditional solutions based on noise absorption have many different applications, but these methods have low performance for low frequency noises. Active Noise Control (ANC has been introduced to resolve this problem. In this paper, a new active method is introduced for suppressing acoustic noises based on the reinforcement learning. To achieve this, an algorithm to control periodic noises is suggested. Then, the method is developed further to deal with multi-tonal signals with a large number of harmonics. At the next step, the broad-band signals are considered. The problem is broken into some sub-problems in frequency domain and each is solved via a reinforcement learning approach. In all of the proposed techniques no model for the environment is needed. Combining the reinforcement learning and the traditional methods in ANC for broad-band signals is a new line research considered here. This combination could increase the speed of the response, but some information of the dynamics of the environment is needed. This will cause the system to become compatible with gradual changes of the environment. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. Wide-band CMOS low-noise amplifier exploiting thermal-noise canceling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, Federico; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Known elementary wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental tradeoff between noise figure (NF) and source impedance matching, which limits the NF to values typically above 3 dB. Global negative feedback can be used to break this tradeoff, however, at the price of potential instability. In contra

  10. ICI mitigation in concurrent multi-band receiver due to the phase noise and IQ imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui-Kyu; Ryu, Heung-Gyoon

    2012-06-01

    For the next generation long-term evolution (LTE) advanced mobile communication system, 100 MHz bandwidth and 1 Gbit/s data speed are needed. However, there is not enough and wide vacant frequency band. Therefore, spectrum aggregation method has been studied to extend available frequency bands. Frequency synthesiser and power amplifier of transceiver should cover this wide bandwidth. The phase noise and In-phase and quadrature (IQ) imbalance would increase, which would be a serious problem in this transceiver. Also, signal-to-noise ratio becomes degraded because of nonlinearity and the quantisation noises of the Analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) in the receiver. Uplink of LTE-advanced uses Aggregated DFT-spread (NxDFT-S) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals. Since the effect of the phase noise and IQ imbalance are more serious in the multi-band Discrete Fourier transform (DFT)-spreading OFDM system, we like to analyse the effect of inter-carrier interference in frequency domain of receiver and the degradation of bit error rate (BER) performance. Also, by the channel response in frequency domain of the uplink system, we separate phase noise and IQ imbalance effect. Finally, we like to propose a compensation method that estimates the channel exactly and removes IQ imbalance and phase noise. Simulation result shows that the proposed method achieves the 2 dB performance gain of BER = 10-4.

  11. On-Orbit Noise Characterization of MODIS Reflective Solar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Amit; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Junqiang; Geng, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), launched on the Terra and Aqua spacecrafts, was designed to collect complementary and comprehensive measurements of the Earth's properties on a global scale. The 20 reflective solar bands (RSBs), covering a wavelength range from 0.41 to 2.1 micrometers, are calibrated on-orbit using regularly scheduled solar diffuser (SD) observations. Although primarily used for on-orbit gain derivation, the SD observations also facilitate the characterization of the detector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In addition to the calibration requirement of 2% for the reflectance factors and 5% for the radiances, the required SNRs are also specified for all RSB at their typical scene radiances. A methodology to characterize the on-orbit SNR for the MODIS RSB is presented. Overall performance shows that a majority of the RSB continue to meet the specification, therefore performing well. A temporal decrease in the SNR, observed in the short-wavelength bands, is attributed primarily to the decrease in their detector responses. With the exception of the inoperable and noisy detectors in band 6 identified prelaunch, the detectors of AquaMODIS RSB perform better than TerraMODIS. The approach formulated for on-orbit SNR characterization can also be used by other sensors that use on-board SDs for their on-orbit calibration (e.g., Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership [SNPP]-Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite).

  12. Subtraction of temperature induced phase noise in the LISA frequency band

    CERN Document Server

    Nofrarias, M; Karnesis, N; Garcia, A F; Hewitson, M; Heinzel, G; Danzmann, K

    2013-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations are expected to be one of the limiting factors for gravitational wave detectors in the very low frequency range. Here we report the characterisation of this noise source in the LISA Pathfinder optical bench and propose a method to remove its contribution from the data. Our results show that temperature fluctuations are indeed limiting our measurement below one millihertz, and that their subtraction leads to a factor 5.6 (15 dB) reduction in the noise level at the lower end of the LISA measurement band 10^{-4} Hz, which increases to 20.2 (26 dB) at even lower frequencies, i.e., 1.5x10^{-5} Hz. The method presented here can be applied to the subtraction of other noise sources in gravitational wave detectors in the general situation where multiple sensors are used to characterise the noise source.

  13. On-Orbit Noise Characterization for MODIS Reflective Solar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Xie, X.; Angal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Since launch, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has operated successfully on-board the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and EOS Aqua spacecraft. MODIS is a passive cross-track scanning radiometer that makes observations in 36 spectral bands with spectral wavelengths from visible (VIS) to long-wave infrared. MODIS bands 1-19 and 26 are the reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2 micrometers. They are calibrated on-orbit using an on-board solar diffuser (SD) and a SD stability monitor (SDSM) system. For MODIS RSB, the level 1B calibration algorithm produces top of the atmosphere reflectance factors and radiances for every pixel of the Earth view. The sensor radiometric calibration accuracy, specified at each spectral band's typical scene radiance, is 2% for the RSB reflectance factors and 5% for the RSB radiances. Also specified at the typical scene radiance is the detector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a key sensor performance parameter that directly impacts its radiometric calibration accuracy and stability, as well as the image quality. This paper describes an on-orbit SNR characterization approach developed to evaluate and track MODIS RSB detector performance. In order to perform on-orbit SNR characterization, MODIS RSB detector responses to the solar illumination reflected from the SD panel must be corrected for factors due to variations of the solar angles and the SD bi-directional reflectance factor. This approach enables RSB SNR characterization to be performed at different response levels for each detector. On-orbit results show that both Terra and Aqua MODIS RSB detectors have performed well since launch. Except for a few noisy or inoperable detectors which were identified pre-launch, most RSB detectors continue to meet the SNR design requirements and are able to maintain satisfactory short-term stability. A comparison of on-orbit noise characterization results with results derived from pre

  14. Noise robust automatic speech recognition with adaptive quantile based noise estimation and speech band emphasizing filter bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Casper Stork; Graversen, Carina; Gregersen, Andreas Gregers;

    2005-01-01

    An important topic in Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) is to reduce the effect of noise, in particular when mismatch exists between the training and application conditions. Many noise robutness schemes within the feature processing domain use as a prerequisite a noise estimate prior...... to the appearance of the speech signal which require noise robust voice activity detection and assumptions of stationary noise. However, both of these requirements are often not met and it is therefore of particular interest to investigate methods like the Quantile Based Noise Estimation (QBNE) mehtod which...... estimates the noise during speech and non-speech sections without the use of a voice activity detector. While the standard QBNE-method uses a fixed pre-defined quantile accross all frequency bands, this paper suggests adaptive QBNE (AQBNE) which adapts the quantile individually to each frequency band...

  15. Narrow band noise response of a Belleville spring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    This study of nonlinear dynamics includes (i) an identification of quasi-steady states of response using equivalent linearization, (ii) the temporal simulation of the system using Heun's time step procedure on time domain analytic signals, and (iii) a laboratory experiment. An attempt has been made to select material and measurement parameters so that nearly the same systems are used and analyzed for all three parts of the study. This study illustrates important features of nonlinear response to narrow band excitation: (a) states of response that the system can acquire with transitions of the system between those states, (b) the interaction between the noise source and the vibrating load in which the source transmits energy to or draws energy from the load as transitions occur; (c) the lag or lead of the system response relative to the source as transitions occur that causes the average frequencies of source and response to differ; and (d) the determination of the state of response (mass or stiffness controlled) by observation of the instantaneous phase of the influence function. These analyses take advantage of the use of time domain analytic signals that have a complementary role to functions that are analytic in the frequency domain.

  16. Low-Resistant Band-Passing Noise and Its Dynamical Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Zhan-Wu

    2007-01-01

    We propose an n-order noise, which is realized by driving an n-order linear differential equation with a Gaussian white noise. The time-derivative noise is a low-resistant band-passing noise. If the derivative noise is regarded as a thermal one, the system has a vanishing effective friction and it should induce ballistic diffusion of a free particle at long times. The simulation method for the generalized Langevin equation driven by the n-order noise is discussed systematically. The features of three-order derivative noises are presented when they are applied to a ratchet system.

  17. A NEW DE-NOISING METHOD BASED ON 3-BAND WAVELET AND NONPARAMETRIC ADAPTIVE ESTIMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Peng Yuhua; Yang Mingqiang; Xue Peijun

    2007-01-01

    Wavelet de-noising has been well known as an important method of signal de-noising.Recently,most of the research efforts about wavelet de-noising focus on how to select the threshold,where Donoho method is applied widely.Compared with traditional 2-band wavelet,3-band wavelet has advantages in many aspects.According to this theory,an adaptive signal de-noising method in 3-band wavelet domain based on nonparametric adaptive estimation is proposed.The experimental results show that in 3-band wavelet domain,the proposed method represents better characteristics than Donoho method in protecting detail and improving the signal-to-noise ratio of reconstruction signal.

  18. Molecular Electronic Angular Motion Transducer Broad Band Self-Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Agafonov, Vadim; Egorov, Egor; Antonov, Alexander; Shabalina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular electronic transfer (MET) angular motion sensors combine high technical characteristics with low cost. Self-noise is one of the key characteristics which determine applications for MET sensors. However, until the present there has not been a model describing the sensor noise in the complete operating frequency range. The present work reports the results of an experimental study of the self-noise level of such sensors in the frequency range of 0.01–200 Hz. Based on the experimental data, a theoretical model is developed. According to the model, self-noise is conditioned by thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of the operating fluid flow in the frequency range of 0.01–2 Hz. At the frequency range of 2–100 Hz, the noise power spectral density has a specific inversely proportional dependence of the power spectral density on the frequency that could be attributed to convective processes. In the high frequency range of 100–200 Hz, the noise is conditioned by the voltage noise of the electronics module input stage operational amplifiers and is heavily reliant to the sensor electrical impedance. The presented results allow a deeper understanding of the molecular electronic sensor noise nature to suggest the ways to reduce it. PMID:26610502

  19. Transient noise reduction in cochlear implant users: a multi-band approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Dyballa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A previously-tested transient noise reduction (TNR algorithm for cochlear implant (CI users was modified to detect and attenuate transients independently across multiple frequency-bands. Since speech and transient noise are often spectrally distinct, we hypothesized that benefits in speech intelligibility can be achieved over the earlier single- band design. Fifteen experienced CI users (49 to 72 years were tested unilaterally using pre-processed stimuli delivered directly to a speech processor. Speech intelligibility in transient and soft stationary noise, subjective sound quality and the recognition of warning signals was investigated in three processing conditions: no TNR (TNRoff, single- band TNR (TNRsgl and multi-band TNR (TNRmult. Notably, TNRmult improved speech reception thresholds (SRTs in cafeteria noise and office noise by up to 3 dB over both TNRoff and TNRsgl, and yielded higher comfort and clarity ratings in cafeteria noise. Our results indicate that multi-band transient noise reduction may be advantageous compared to a single-band approach, and reveal a substantial overall potential for TNR to improve speech perception and listening comfort in CI users.

  20. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, G.A.; Clark, R.N.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Chrien, T.H.; Gorelick, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectra identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  1. Coherent noise removal in seismic data with dual-tree M-band wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Laurent; Chaux, Caroline; Ker, Stéphan

    2007-09-01

    Seismic data and their complexity still challenge signal processing algorithms in several applications. The advent of wavelet transforms has allowed improvements in tackling denoising problems. We propose here coherent noise filtering in seismic data with the dual-tree M-band wavelet transform. They offer the possibility to decompose data locally with improved multiscale directions and frequency bands. Denoising is performed in a deterministic fashion in the directional subbands, depending of the coherent noise properties. Preliminary results show that they consistently better preserve seismic signal of interest embedded in highly energetic directional noises than discrete critically sampled and redundant separable wavelet transforms.

  2. Applying sub-band energy extraction to noise cancellation of ultrasonic NDT signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi ZHANG; Pei-wen QUE; Wei LIANG

    2008-01-01

    In ultrasonic non-destructive tests,the echo signal at the flaw is highly complex due to the interference of multiple echoes with random amplitudes and phases,and is disturbed by all kinds of noises,such as thermal noise,digitalization noise,and structure noise.In this paper,the ultrasonic signal was decomposed by empirical mode decomposition (EMD) to obtain the intrinsic mode function (IMF) components according to ultrasonic defect echo signals occuring at the corresponding time,and the energy of the ultrasonic signal was concentrated.The IMF component selection criterion based on sub-band energy extraction was proposed to extract the ultrasonic signal component accurately and automatically from IMF components.When the selected IMF components were filtered by a band pass filter,the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was enhanced greatly.

  3. Low Noise Amplifiers for 140 Ghz Wide-Band Cryogenic Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkoski, Patricia V.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Lai, Richard; Sarkozy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We report S-parameter and noise measurements for three different Indium Phosphide 35-nanometer-gate-length High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) designs operating in the frequency range centered on 140 gigahertz. When packaged in a Waveguide Rectangular-6.1 waveguide housing, the LNAs have an average measured noise figure of 3.0 decibels - 3.6 decibels over the 122-170 gigahertz band. One LNA was cooled to 20 degrees Kelvin and a record low noise temperature of 46 Kelvin, or 0.64 decibels noise figure, was measured at 152 gigahertz. These amplifiers can be used to develop receivers for instruments that operate in the 130-170 gigahertz atmospheric window, which is an important frequency band for ground-based astronomy and millimeter-wave imaging applications.

  4. Dolphins adjust species-specific frequency parameters to compensate for increasing background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, Elena; Gamba, Marco; Perez-Gil, Monica; Martin, Vidal Martel; Giacoma, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An increase in ocean noise levels could interfere with acoustic communication of marine mammals. In this study we explored the effects of anthropogenic and natural noise on the acoustic properties of a dolphin communication signal, the whistle. A towed array with four elements was used to record environmental background noise and whistles of short-beaked common-, Atlantic spotted- and striped-dolphins in the Canaries archipelago. Four frequency parameters were measured from each whistle, while Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) of the background noise were measured at the central frequencies of seven one-third octave bands, from 5 to 20 kHz. Results show that dolphins increase the whistles' frequency parameters with lower variability in the presence of anthropogenic noise, and increase the end frequency of their whistles when confronted with increasing natural noise. This study provides the first evidence that the synergy among SPLs has a role in shaping the whistles' structure of these three species, with respect to both natural and anthropogenic noise.

  5. Evidence that ship noise increases stress in right whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Rosalind M; Parks, Susan E; Hunt, Kathleen E; Castellote, Manuel; Corkeron, Peter J; Nowacek, Douglas P; Wasser, Samuel K; Kraus, Scott D

    2012-06-22

    Baleen whales (Mysticeti) communicate using low-frequency acoustic signals. These long-wavelength sounds can be detected over hundreds of kilometres, potentially allowing contact over large distances. Low-frequency noise from large ships (20-200 Hz) overlaps acoustic signals used by baleen whales, and increased levels of underwater noise have been documented in areas with high shipping traffic. Reported responses of whales to increased noise include: habitat displacement, behavioural changes and alterations in the intensity, frequency and intervals of calls. However, it has been unclear whether exposure to noise results in physiological responses that may lead to significant consequences for individuals or populations. Here, we show that reduced ship traffic in the Bay of Fundy, Canada, following the events of 11 September 2001, resulted in a 6 dB decrease in underwater noise with a significant reduction below 150 Hz. This noise reduction was associated with decreased baseline levels of stress-related faecal hormone metabolites (glucocorticoids) in North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). This is the first evidence that exposure to low-frequency ship noise may be associated with chronic stress in whales, and has implications for all baleen whales in heavy ship traffic areas, and for recovery of this endangered right whale population.

  6. V-band low-noise integrated circuit receiver. [for space communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K.; Louie, K.; Grote, A. J.; Tahim, R. S.; Mlinar, M. J.; Hayashibara, G. M.; Sun, C.

    1983-01-01

    A compact low-noise V-band integrated circuit receiver has been developed for space communication systems. The receiver accepts an RF input of 60-63 GHz and generates an IF output of 3-6 GHz. A Gunn oscillator at 57 GHz is phaselocked to a low-frequency reference source to achieve high stability and low FM noise. The receiver has an overall single sideband noise figure of less than 10.5 dB and an RF to IF gain of 40 dB over a 3-GHz RF bandwidth. All RF circuits are fabricated in integrated circuits on a Duroid substrate.

  7. Modeling and Measurement of Phase Noise in GaAs HBT Ka-Band Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Lenk, Friedrich; Schott, Matthias; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Accurate oscillator phase-noise simulation is a key problem in MMIC design, which is not solved satisfactory so far and needs further investigation. In this paper, a Ka-band MMIC oscillator with GaInP/GaAs HBT and on-chip resonator is treated as an example. Measured phase noise reaches -90 dBc/Hz and below at 100 kHz offset. To evaluate phase-noise predic-tion, the circuit is simulated using different commercial simulation tools and HBT models. Con-siderable differences in simulation results ...

  8. Fouling in your own nest: vessel noise increases biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A; Wilkens, Serena L; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Globally billions of dollars are spent each year on attempting to reduce marine biofouling on commercial vessels, largely because it results in higher fuel costs due to increased hydrodynamic drag. Biofouling has been long assumed to be primarily due to the availability of vacant space on the surface of the hull. Here, it is shown that the addition of the noise emitted through a vessel's hull in port increases the settlement and growth of biofouling organisms within four weeks of clean surfaces being placed in the sea. More than twice as many bryozoans, oysters, calcareous tube worms and barnacles settled and established on surfaces with vessel noise compared to those without. Likewise, individuals from three species grew significantly larger in size in the presence of vessel noise. The results demonstrate that vessel noise in port is promoting biofouling on hulls and that underwater sound plays a much wider ecological role in the marine environment than was previously considered possible.

  9. A multi-band environment-adaptive approach to noise suppression for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saki, Fatemeh; Mirzahasanloo, Taher; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an improved environment-adaptive noise suppression solution for the cochlear implants speech processing pipeline. This improvement is achieved by using a multi-band data-driven approach in place of a previously developed single-band data-driven approach. Seven commonly encountered noisy environments of street, car, restaurant, mall, bus, pub and train are considered to quantify the improvement. The results obtained indicate about 10% improvement in speech quality measures.

  10. Noise Performance of Heterojunction DDR MITATT Devices Based on at W-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suranjana Banerjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise performance of different structures of anisotype heterojunction double-drift region (DDR mixed tunneling and avalanche transit time (MITATT devices has been studied. The devices are designed for operation at millimeter-wave W-band frequencies. A simulation model has been developed to study the noise spectral density and noise measure of the device. Two different mole fractions and of Ge and corresponding four types of device structure are considered for the simulation. The results show that the -Si heterojunction DDR structure of MITATT device excels all other structures as regards noise spectral density ( sec and noise measure (33.09 dB as well as millimeter-wave properties such as DC-to-RF conversion efficiency (20.15% and CW power output (773.29 mW.

  11. Localization of Narrow-Band Sources in Unknown Spatially Correlated Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Bourennane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In subspace-based method for direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation of signal wavefronts, the additive noise term is often assumed to be spatially white or known to within a multiplicative scalar. When the noise is nonwhite but has a known covariance matrix, we can still handle the problem through prewhitening. However, the problem turns to be complex when the noise field is completely unknown. In this paper, we study the localization of the sources, when the noise covariance matrix is one unknown band matrix. An iterative denoising algorithm based on the noise subspace spanned by the eigenvectors associated with the smallest eigenvalues is developed. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by computer simulations. We also test the proposed algorithm with some experimental data recorded during an underwater acoustic experiment.

  12. Efficient heralding of O-band passively spatial-multiplexed photons for noise-tolerant quantum key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mao Tong; Lim, Han Chuen

    2014-09-22

    When implementing O-band quantum key distribution on optical fiber transmission lines carrying C-band data traffic, noise photons that arise from spontaneous Raman scattering or insufficient filtering of the classical data channels could cause the quantum bit-error rate to exceed the security threshold. In this case, a photon heralding scheme may be used to reject the uncorrelated noise photons in order to restore the quantum bit-error rate to a low level. However, the secure key rate would suffer unless one uses a heralded photon source with sufficiently high heralding rate and heralding efficiency. In this work we demonstrate a heralded photon source that has a heralding efficiency that is as high as 74.5%. One disadvantage of a typical heralded photon source is that the long deadtime of the heralding detector results in a significant drop in the heralding rate. To counter this problem, we propose a passively spatial-multiplexed configuration at the heralding arm. Using two heralding detectors in this configuration, we obtain an increase in the heralding rate by 37% and a corresponding increase in the heralded photon detection rate by 16%. We transmit the O-band photons over 10 km of noisy optical fiber to observe the relation between quantum bit-error rate and noise-degraded second-order correlation function of the transmitted photons. The effects of afterpulsing when we shorten the deadtime of the heralding detectors are also observed and discussed.

  13. The effect of ASE reinjection configuration through FBGs on the gain and noise figure performance of L-Band EDFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Fırat Ertaç; Altuncu, Ahmet

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we present the gain and noise figure performance improvement in L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (L-EDFA) provided by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) reinjection through different configurations of 1533 nm band FBGs. The experimental results are compared with a single-stage bidirectionally pumped conventional L-EDFA design. It is shown that when the forward and/or the backward ASE noise is partly reinjected to L-EDFA using a double/single 1533 nm fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), the gain and noise figure performance of L-EDFA increases depending on the FBG configuration. The best gain and NF performance in our L-EDFA was achieved by reinjection of forward and backward ASE through FBG1 and FBG2 leading to an 4.5 dB increase in gain and 1 dB decrease in NF at 1585 nm and -30 dBm input signal power. The results show that both FBGs must be used at the same time to improve gain and NF performance in L-band EDFAs.

  14. An X-Band low-power and low-phase-noise VCO using bondwire inductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a low-power low-phase-noise voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO has been designed and, fabricated in 0.25 μm SiGe BiCMOS process. The resonator of the VCO is implemented with on-chip MIM capacitors and a single aluminum bondwire. A tail current filter is realized to suppress flicker noise up-conversion. The measured phase noise is −126.6 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from a 7.8 GHz carrier. The figure of merit (FOM of the VCO is −192.5 dBc/Hz and the VCO core consumes 4 mA from a 3.3 V power supply. To the best of our knowledge, this is the best FOM and the lowest phase noise for bondwire VCOs in the X-band. This VCO will be used for satellite communications.

  15. Reduction of the 1/f Noise Induced Phase Noise in a CMOS Ring Oscillator by Increasing the Amplitude of Oscillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierkink, S.L.J.; Wel, van der A.P.; Hoogzaad, G.; Klumperink, E.A.M.; Tuijl, van A.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Spectrum measurement results of a CMOS ring oscillator are presented that show a 10 dB decrease in 1/f noise induced phase noise at a 2 dB increase in carrier power. Simple ring oscillator theory predicts that the 1/f noise induced phase noise is independent of carrier power. It is shown that an inc

  16. A 115dB-DR Audio DAC with –61dBFS out-of-band noise

    OpenAIRE

    Westerveld, Hugo; Schinkel, Daniël; Tuijl, van, B.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-band noise (OBN) is troublesome in analog circuits that process the output of a noise-shaping audio DAC. It causes slewing in amplifiers and aliasing in sampling circuits like ADCs and class-D amplifiers. Nonlinearity in these circuits also causes cross-modulation of the OBN into the audio band. These mechanisms lead to a higher noise level and more distortion in the audio band. OBN also leads to interference in the LF and MF band, compromising e.g. AM radio reception. To avoid these p...

  17. Wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on 40-GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    We have performed wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on semiconductor 40-GHz mode-locked lasers by employing electrical waveguide components for the radio-frequency circuit. The intrinsic timing jitters of lasers with one, two, and three quantum wells (QW) are compared and our design...... prediction, concerning noise versus number of QWs, for the first time corroborated by experiments. A minimum jitter of 44 fs is found, by extrapolating to the Nyquist frequency, for the one-QW device having nearly transform-limited pulses of 1.2 ps. This jitter is nearly three times lower than for a three...

  18. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A dual-band frequency synthesizer for CMMB application with low phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu; Jun, Yan; Yin, Shi; Foster, Dai Fa

    2010-09-01

    A wide-band frequency synthesizer with low phase noise is presented. The frequency tuning range is from 474 to 858 MHz which is compatible with U-band CMMB application while the S-band frequency is also included. Three VCOs with selectable sub-band are integrated on chip to cover the target frequency range. This PLL is fabricated with 0.35 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology. The measured result shows that the RMS phase error is less than 1° and the reference spur is less than -60 dBc. The proposed PLL consumes 20 mA current from a 2.8 V supply. The silicon area occupied without PADs is 1.17 mm2.

  19. 5 CFR 9701.344 - Special within-band increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special within-band increases. 9701.344 Section 9701.344 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT... exceptional skills in critical areas or who make exceptional contributions to mission accomplishment or in...

  20. An experimental investigation of low-frequency noise in 8-mm-band Gunn-diode oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, I. A.; Malyshev, V. M.; Meshcheriakov, A. V.

    1989-07-01

    The noise characteristics of Ka-band Gunn oscillators are studied. The dependences of the frequency fluctuations on the SWR and load phases are analyzed. A comparison of the noise characteristics of Ka- and X-band Gunn oscillators shows that their fluctuation levels are about the same if they are calculated at the same oscillation frequency. The amplitude fluctuation is 10 dB lower in Ka-band oscillators.

  1. Sound Pressure Levels Measured in a University Concert Band: A Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Nicholas V., III

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have reported public school band directors as experiencing noise-induced hearing loss. Little research has focused on collegiate band directors and university student musicians. The present study measures the sound pressure levels generated within a university concert band and compares sound levels with the criteria set by the…

  2. Ka-band bistatic ground-based SAR using noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, K.; Mogyla, A.; Vyplavin, P.; Palamarchuk, V.; Zemlyaniy, O.; Tarasenko, V.; Zaets, N.; Skretsanov, V.; Shubniy, A.; Glamazdin, V.; Natarov, M.; Nechayev, O.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, one of the actual problems is remote monitoring of technical state of large objects. Different methods can be used for that purpose. The most promising of them relies on application of ground based synthetic aperture radars (SAR) and differential interferometry. We have designed and tested Ground Based Noise Waveform SAR based on noise radar technology [1] and synthetic aperture antennas [2]. It enabled to build an instrument for precise all-weather monitoring of large objects in real-time. We describe main performance of ground-based interferometric SAR which uses continuous Ka-band noise waveform as a probe signal. Besides, results of laboratory trials and evaluation of its main performance are presented as well.

  3. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  4. A Multi-Section Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier for Ultrabroad-Band Gain-Flattened Low-Noise Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoyuki; Akiyama; Mitsuru; Sugawara; Koji; Otsubo; Hiroji; Ebe; Nobuaki; Hatori; Yasuhiko; Arakawa

    2003-01-01

    We propose an ultrabroad-band 1R regenerator utilizing a multi-section quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier. Due to the reduced electron states, quantum dot is beneficial in broadening the gain spectrum and lowering the noise figure. Combining this with a multi-section structure drastically improves the gain equality among the different bound states, leading to an increase in the maximum output power and an improvement of the noise figure.

  5. A Multi-Section Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier for Ultrabroad-Band Gain-Flattened Low-Noise Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoyuki Akiyama; Mitsuru Sugawara; Koji Otsubo; Hiroji Ebe; Nobuaki Hatori; Yasuhiko Arakawa

    2003-01-01

    We propose an ultrabroad-band 1R regenerator utilizing a multi-section quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier.Due to the reduced electron states, quantum dot is beneficial in broadening the gain spectrum and lowering the noise figure. Combining this with a multi-section structure drastically improves the gain equality among the different bound states, leading to an increase in the maximum output power and an improvement of the noise figure.

  6. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro, E-mail: juanpedro.cascales@uam.es; Martínez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G., E-mail: farkhad.aliev@uam.es [Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada C3, Instituto Nicolas Cabrera (INC), Condensed Matter Physics Institute (IFIMAC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Chang, Cui-Zu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Guerrero, Rubén [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-21

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunneling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunneling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.

  7. Broad-band Gausssian noise is most effective in improving motor performance and is most pleasant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eTrenado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern attempts to improve human performance focus on stochastic resonance (SR. SR is a phenomenon in nonlinear systems characterized by a response increase of the system induced by a particular level of input noise. Recently, we reported that an optimum level of 0-15 Hz Gaussian noise applied to the human index finger improved static isometric force compensation. A possible explanation was a better sensorimotor integration caused by increase in sensitivity of peripheral receptors and/or of internal SR. The present study in 10 subjects compares SR effects in the performance of the same motor task and on pleasantness, by applying three Gaussian noises chosen on the sensitivity of the fingertip receptors (0-15 Hz mostly for Merkel receptors, 250-300 Hz for Pacini corpuscules and 0-300 Hz for all. We document that only the 0-300 Hz noise induced SR effect during the transitory phase of the task. In contrast, the motor performance was improved during the stationary phase for all three noise frequency bandwidths. This improvement was stronger for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz than for 0-15 Hz noise. Further, we found higher degree of pleasantness for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz noise bandwidths than for 0-15 Hz. Thus, we show that the most appropriate Gaussian noise that could be used in haptic gloves is the 0-300 Hz, as it improved motor performance during both stationary and transitory phases. In addition, this noise had the highest degree of pleasantness and thus reveals that the glabrous skin can also forward pleasant sensations. These new findings provide worthy information for neurorehabilitation.

  8. Broad-band Gaussian noise is most effective in improving motor performance and is most pleasant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenado, Carlos; Mikulić, Areh; Manjarrez, Elias; Mendez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Huethe, Frank; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2014-01-01

    Modern attempts to improve human performance focus on stochastic resonance (SR). SR is a phenomenon in non-linear systems characterized by a response increase of the system induced by a particular level of input noise. Recently, we reported that an optimum level of 0-15 Hz Gaussian noise applied to the human index finger improved static isometric force compensation. A possible explanation was a better sensorimotor integration caused by increase in sensitivity of peripheral receptors and/or of internal SR. The present study in 10 subjects compares SR effects in the performance of the same motor task and on pleasantness, by applying three Gaussian noises chosen on the sensitivity of the fingertip receptors (0-15 Hz mostly for Merkel receptors, 250-300 Hz for Pacini corpuscles and 0-300 Hz for all). We document that only the 0-300 Hz noise induced SR effect during the transitory phase of the task. In contrast, the motor performance was improved during the stationary phase for all three noise frequency bandwidths. This improvement was stronger for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz than for 0-15 Hz noise. Further, we found higher degree of pleasantness for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz noise bandwidths than for 0-15 Hz. Thus, we show that the most appropriate Gaussian noise that could be used in haptic gloves is the 0-300 Hz, as it improved motor performance during both stationary and transitory phases. In addition, this noise had the highest degree of pleasantness and thus reveals that the glabrous skin can also forward pleasant sensations.

  9. Investigation of LO-leakage cancellation and DC-offset influence on flicker-noise in X-band mixers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Rasmus; Johansen, Tom; Tamborg, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation on the influences in 1/f noise of LO-leakage and DC-offset cancellation for X-band mixers. Conditions for LO-leakage cancellation and zero DC-offset is derived. Measurements on a double balanced diode mixer shows an improvement in noise figure from 14.3dB to 12...

  10. A 115dB-DR Audio DAC with –61dBFS out-of-band noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, Hugo; Schinkel, Daniël; Tuijl, van Ed

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-band noise (OBN) is troublesome in analog circuits that process the output of a noise-shaping audio DAC. It causes slewing in amplifiers and aliasing in sampling circuits like ADCs and class-D amplifiers. Nonlinearity in these circuits also causes cross-modulation of the OBN into the audio ba

  11. A 115dB-DR Audio DAC with –61dBFS out-of-band noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, H.J.; Schinkel, Daniel; van Tuijl, Adrianus Johannes Maria

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-band noise (OBN) is troublesome in analog circuits that process the output of a noise-shaping audio DAC. It causes slewing in amplifiers and aliasing in sampling circuits like ADCs and class-D amplifiers. Nonlinearity in these circuits also causes cross-modulation of the OBN into the audio

  12. Low phase noise GaAs HBT VCO in Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yan; Yuming, Zhang; Hongliang, Lü; Yimen, Zhang; Yue, Wu; Yifeng, Liu

    2015-02-01

    Design and fabrication of a Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) using commercially available 1-μm GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor technology is presented. A fully differential common-emitter configuration with a symmetric capacitance with a symmetric inductance tank structure is employed to reduce the phase noise of the VCO, and a novel π-feedback network is applied to compensate for the 180° phase shift. The on-wafer test shows that the VCO exhibits a phase noise of -96.47 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset and presents a tuning range from 28.312 to 28.695 GHz. The overall dc current consumption of the VCO is 18 mA with a supply voltage of -6 V The chip area of the VCO is 0.7 × 0.7 mm2.

  13. Response of a Shape Memory Alloy Beam Model under Narrow Band Noise Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To describe the hysteretic nonlinear characteristic of the strain-stress relation of shape memory alloy (SMA, a Van-der-Pol hysteretic cycle is applied to simulate the hysteretic loops. Then, the model of a simply supported SMA beam subject to transverse narrow band noise excitation with nonlinear damping was proposed. The deterministic and the stochastic responses are studied, respectively, applying the multiple scale method. The stability of the steady state responses is analyzed by Floquet theory and the moment method. The numerical simulation results quite agree with the theoretical analysis.

  14. Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver for Fast Frequency Hopping Systems during Partial-Band Noise Jamming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖立民; 许希斌; 姚彦

    2001-01-01

    Diversity combining technologies are analyzed for fastfrequency-hopping spread spectrum systems during partial-band noise jamming to develop a novel combining receiver called an Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver (ATCCR). The optimal clipping level for an ATCCR is analyzed, computed, and compared with several other diversity combining technologies. Since the ATCCR can estimate the power of the jamming and the number of jammed frequency cells to adaptively adjust the clipper's threshold, the system performance using the adaptive threshold clipper combining technique can be greatly improved.

  15. Hydrogen-Saturated Saline Protects Intensive Narrow Band Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Guinea Pigs through an Antioxidant Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwei; Yu, Ning; Lu, Yan; Wu, Longjun; Chen, Daishi; Guo, Weiwei; Zhao, Lidong; Liu, Mingbo; Yang, Shiming; Sun, Xuejun; Zhai, Suoqiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate hydrogen-saturated saline protecting intensive narrow band noise-induced hearing loss. Guinea pigs were divided into three groups: hydrogen-saturated saline; normal saline; and control. For saline administration, the guinea pigs were given daily abdominal injections (1 ml/100 g) 3 days before and 1 h before narrow band noise exposure (2.5–3.5 kHz 130 dB SPL, 1 h). The guinea pigs in the control group received no treatment. The hearing function was assessed by the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) recording. The changes of free radicals in the cochlea before noise exposure, and immediately and 7 days after noise exposure were also examined. By Scanning electron microscopy and succinate dehydrogenase staining, we found that pre-treatment with hydrogen-saturated saline significantly reduced noise-induced hair cell damage and hearing loss. We also found that the malondialdehyde, lipid peroxidation, and hydroxyl levels were significantly lower in the hydrogen-saturated saline group after noise trauma, indicating that hydrogen-saturated saline can decrease the amount of harmful free radicals caused by noise trauma. Our findings suggest that hydrogen-saturated saline is effective in preventing intensive narrow band noise-induced hearing loss through the antioxidant effect. PMID:24945316

  16. Increased noise signal processing in incoherent radar systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Chesanovskyi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The work is devoted to the method of increasing coherence and noise immunity pulse radar systems with incoherent sources probing signals. Problem. Incongruities between a resolution and a range of pulsed radar systems can not be resolved within the classical approaches of building incoherent radar systems, requiring new approaches in their construction. The main part. The paper presents a method of two-stage processing incoherent pulsed radar signals, allowing to compensate and use the information available to them and the angular amplitude of spurious modulation. Conclusions. Simulation results and research functions of these expressions of uncertainty indicate that use volatility as an additional transmitter modulation allows to significantly improve the resolution and robustness of the radar system.

  17. Stochastic resonance in a voltage-controlled MEMS-slider: increasing the signal-to-noise ratio with noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; de Boer, Meint J.; Brookhuis, Robert Anton; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that, using stochastic resonance (SR) in a voltage-controlled MEMS-slider, the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by adding white noise. Using a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) based process, we realised a slider structure with periodic capacitive structures to obtain tunable unstable

  18. Broad-band Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps (10-150 s) across the United States from ambient noise data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kaifeng; Luo, Yinhe; Xie, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of imaging broad-band (10-150 s) Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps on a continental scale using ambient noise tomography (ANT). We obtain broad-band Rayleigh waves from cross-correlations of ambient noise data between all station pairs of USArray and measure the dispersion curves from these cross-correlations at a period band of 10-150 s. The large-scale dense USArray enables us to obtain over 500 000 surface wave paths which cover the contiguous United States densely. Using these paths, we generate Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 10-150 s periods. Our phase velocity maps are similar to other reported phase velocity maps based on ambient noise data at short periods (phase velocity maps from ANT can be used to construct 3-D lithospheric and asthenospheric velocity structures.

  19. Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up using band-limited phase noise in CERN PSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartullo, D.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Timko, H.

    2017-07-01

    Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up (from 1 eVs to 1.4 eVs) for LHC beams in the CERN PS Booster is currently achievied using sinusoidal phase modulation of a dedicated high-harmonic RF system. In 2021, after the LHC injectors upgrade, 3 eVs should be extracted to the PS. Even if the current method may satisfy the new requirements, it relies on low-power level RF improvements. In this paper another method of blow-up was considered, that is the injection of band-limited phase noise in the main RF system (h=1), never tried in PSB but already used in CERN SPS and LHC, under different conditions (longer cycles). This technique, which lowers the peak line density and therefore the impact of intensity effects in the PSB and the PS, can also be complementary to the present method. The longitudinal space charge, dominant in the PSB, causes significant synchrotron frequency shifts with intensity, and its effect should be taken into account. Another complication arises from the interaction of the phase loop with the injected noise, since both act on the RF phase. All these elements were studied in simulations of the PSB cycle with the BLonD code, and the required blow-up was achieved.

  20. Phase noise measurements of the 400-kW, 2.115-GHz (S-band) transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, P.; Hoppe, D.; Bhanji, A.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement theory is described and a test method to perform phase noise verification using off-the-shelf components and instruments is presented. The measurement technique described consists of a double-balanced mixer used as phase detector, followed by a low noise amplifier. An FFT spectrum analyzer is then used to view the modulation components. A simple calibration procedure is outlined that ensures accurate measurements. A block diagram of the configuration is presented as well as actual phase noise data from the 400 kW, 2.115 GHz (S-band) klystron transmitter.

  1. Phase Noise Enhancement of the GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Micromachined Cavity Resonators at Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Insang; Kim, Chungwoo; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul; Song, Cimoo

    1999-06-01

    We introduce a new structure of the micromachined cavity resonator coupled GaAs-based oscillator to enhance the phase noise and the frequency stability. The oscillator and the cavity are designed for Ka-band applications. Compared to the free running oscillator, the cavity resonator coupled oscillator showed the phase noise enhancement of about 20 dB. The phase noises of about -110 and -85 dBc/Hz are obtained at 1 MHz and 100 kHz offset frequency, respectively. The frequency pushing for the gate bias of the cavity coupled oscillator is about two order of magnitude less than that of the free running oscillator.

  2. Hearing Threshold and Equal Loudness Level Contours of 1/3-octave Noise Bands in a Diffuse Sound Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maja Kirstine E.; Poulsen, Torben

    1994-01-01

    Hearing threshold levels and equal loudness level contours of 1/3-octave noise bands at 40 phons and 60 phon were measured for 27 normal hearing listeners in an approximately diffuse sound field. The threshold data in the frequency range 125 Hz to 1 kHz were 3-6 dB higher than the values given in...

  3. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  4. Robust AlGaN/GaN low noise amplifier MMICs for C-, Ku- and Ka-band space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijker, E.M.; Rodenburg, M.; Hoogland, J.A.; Heijningen, M. van; Seelmann-Eggebert, M.; Quay, R.; Brückner, P.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2009-01-01

    The high power capabilities in combination with the low noise performance of Gallium Nitride (GaN) makes this technology an excellent choice for robust receivers. This paper presents the design and measured results of three different LNAs, which operate in C-, Ku-, and Ka-band. The designs are reali

  5. Gain and noise properties of small-signal erbium-doped fiber amplifiers pumped in the 980-nm band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, B.; Chirravuri, J.; Miniscalco, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have experimentally and theoretically investigated the effects of detuning the pump wavelength on the gain and noise properties of small-signal, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers codirectionally pumped in the 980-nm band. While the pump wavelength can be varied over a wide range with little...

  6. Low Power Narrow-Band Inductively Source Degenerated LNA in Presence of Substrate Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the design and analysis of the inductively source degenerated low noise amplifier for the ultra-wideband application. This technique uses the linearization and the current MOSFET model for calculation of noise figure for the LNA. The impedance, two port network correlation matrix for the parasitic noise component and noise figure is also presented.

  7. Reduction of Simultaneous Switching Noise in Analog Signal Band on a Chip

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In the era of VLSI the technological advancements have lead us to integrate not only digital circuits of high device density but both digital and analog circuits on to the same chip. In recent years the number of devices on a chip has spectacularly increased, all because of the downward scaling in sizes of the devices. But because of this dramatic scaling the devices have become more sensitive to the power-ground noise. Now in designing a mix signal system within single silicon die that has h...

  8. Low Noise Quantum Frequency Conversion from Rb Wavelengths to Telecom O-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Solmeyer, Neal; Stack, Daniel; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    Ideal quantum repeaters would be composed of long-lived quantum memories entangled with flying qubits. They are becoming essential elements to achieve quantum communication over long distances in a quantum network. However, quantum memories based on neutral atoms operate at wavelengths in the near infrared, unsuitable for long distance communication. The ability to coherently convert photons entangled with quantum memories into telecom wavelengths reduces the transmission loss in optical fibers and therefore dramatically improves the range of a quantum repeater. Furthermore, quantum frequency conversion (QFC) can enable entanglement and communication between different types of quantum memories, thus creating a versatile hybrid quantum network. A recent experiment has shown the conversion of heralded photons from Rb-based memories to the telecom C-band. We implement a setup using a nonlinear PPLN waveguide for the QFC into a wavelength region where the noise-floor would be limited by dark counts rather than pump photons. Our approach uses a pump laser at a much longer wavelength. It has the advantage that the strong pump itself and the broad background in the PPLN can be nearly completely filtered from the converted signal. Such low background level allows for the conversion to be done on the heralding photon, which enables the generated entanglement to be used in a scalable way to multiple nodes remotely situated and to subsequent protocols.

  9. Phase effects in masking by harmonic complexes: detection of bands of speech-shaped noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroche, Mickael L D; Culling, John F; Chatterjee, Monita

    2014-11-01

    When phase relationships between partials of a complex masker produce highly modulated temporal envelopes on the basilar membrane, listeners may detect speech information from temporal dips in the within-channel masker envelopes. This source of masking release (MR) is however located in regions of unresolved masker partials and it is unclear how much of the speech information in these regions is really needed for intelligibility. Also, other sources of MR such as glimpsing in between resolved masker partials may provide sufficient information from regions that disregard phase relationships. This study simplified the problem of speech recognition to a masked detection task. Target bands of speech-shaped noise were restricted to frequency regions containing either only resolved or only unresolved masker partials, as a function of masker phase relationships (sine or random), masker fundamental frequency (F0) (50, 100, or 200 Hz), and masker spectral profile (flat-spectrum or speech-shaped). Although masker phase effects could be observed in unresolved regions at F0s of 50 and 100 Hz, it was only at 50-Hz F0 that detection thresholds were ever lower in unresolved than in resolved regions, suggesting little role of envelope modulations for harmonic complexes with F0s in the human voice range and at moderate level.

  10. A joint resonance frequency estimation and in-band noise reduction method for enhancing the detectability of bearing fault signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozchalooi, I. Soltani; Liang, Ming

    2008-05-01

    The vibration signal measured from a bearing contains vital information for the prognostic and health assessment purposes. However, when bearings are installed as part of a complex mechanical system, the measured signal is often heavily clouded by various noises due to the compounded effect of interferences of other machine elements and background noises present in the measuring device. As such, reliable condition monitoring would not be possible without proper de-noising. This is particularly true for incipient bearing faults with very weak signature signals. A new de-noising scheme is proposed in this paper to enhance the vibration signals acquired from faulty bearings. This de-noising scheme features a spectral subtraction to trim down the in-band noise prior to wavelet filtering. The Gabor wavelet is used in the wavelet transform and its parameters, i.e., scale and shape factor are selected in separate steps. The proper scale is found based on a novel resonance estimation algorithm. This algorithm makes use of the information derived from the variable shaft rotational speed though such variation is highly undesirable in fault detection since it complicates the process substantially. The shape factor value is then selected by minimizing a smoothness index. This index is defined as the ratio of the geometric mean to the arithmetic mean of the wavelet coefficient moduli. De-noising results are presented for simulated signals and experimental data acquired from both normal and faulty bearings with defective outer race, inner race, and rolling element.

  11. Ranging and target detection performance through lossy media using an ultrawideband S-band through-wall sensing noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonny; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2013-05-01

    An S-band noise radar has been developed for through-wall ranging and tracking of targets. Ranging to target is achieved by the cross-correlation between the time-delayed reflected return signal and the replica of the transmit signal; both are bandlimited ultrawideband (UWB) noise signals. Furthermore, successive scene subtraction allows for target tracking using the range profiles created by the cross-correlation technique. In this paper, we explore the performance of the radar system for target detection through varied, lossy media (e.g. a 4-inch thick brick wall and an 8-inch thick cinder-block wall) via correlation measurements using the S-band radar system. Moreover, we present a qualitative analysis of the S-band noise radar as operated under disparate testing configurations (i.e. different walls, targets, and distances.) with different antennas (e.g. dual polarized horns, helical antennas with different ground planes, etc.). In addition, we discuss key concepts of the noise radar design, considerations for an antenna choice, as well as experimental results for a few scenarios.

  12. Testing Time and Frequency Fiber-Optic Link Transfer by Hardware Emulation of Acoustic-Band Optical Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipiński Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The low-frequency optical-signal phase noise induced by mechanical vibration of the base occurs in field-deployed fibers. Typical telecommunication data transfer is insensitive to this type of noise but the phenomenon may influence links dedicated to precise Time and Frequency (T&F fiber-optic transfer that exploit the idea of stabilization of phase or propagation delay of the link. To measure effectiveness of suppression of acoustic noise in such a link, a dedicated measurement setup is necessary. The setup should enable to introduce a low-frequency phase corruption to the optical signal in a controllable way. In the paper, a concept of a setup in which the mechanically induced acoustic-band optical signal phase corruption is described and its own features and measured parameters are presented. Next, the experimental measurement results of the T&F transfer TFTS-2 system’s immunity as a function of the fibre-optic length vs. the acoustic-band noise are presented. Then, the dependency of the system immunity on the location of a noise source along the link is also pointed out.

  13. Using technical noise to increase the signal to noise ratio in weak measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kedem, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    The advantages of weak measurements, and especially measurements of imaginary weak values, for precision enhancement, are discussed. A situation is considered in which the initial state of the measurement device varies randomly on each run, and is shown to be in fact beneficial when imaginary weak values are used. The result is supported by numerical calculation and also provides an explanation for the reduction of technical noise in some recent experimental results. A connection to quantum metrology formalism is made.

  14. Models of weather effects on noise temperature and attenuation for Ka- and X-band telemetry performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1987-02-01

    Models that show the effects of weather on noise temperature and attenuation of deep space telemetry signals received by the Deep Space Network (DSN) at Ka- and X-band (32 and 8.5 GHz) are developed. These models were used to compare the performance of telemetry links at these two frequencies. The models build on an earlier 1982 model that used three months of water vapor radiometer measurements (31.4 GHz) at Goldstone, augmented with one year of radiosonde measurements made at Edwards Air Force Base. This 1986 model accounts for annual variations of rainfall and extends to a model for Canberra, Australia, and Madrid, Spain. The results show, for example, that at Ka-band, 30 degrees elevation angle, Goldstone weather adds less than 23 + or - 2 K to the system temperature 80% of the time, while Canberra or Madrid weather adds less than 32 + or - 5 K 80% of the time. At X-band, the comparable numbers are 5.1 + or - 0.2 K and 5.7 + or - 0.4 K. A simple analysis shows a substantial telemetry system signal-to-noise ratio advantage when operating at Ka-band compared to X-band.

  15. Low cost low phase noise PLL controlled push-push VCOs in k- and ka- bands, stabilized by cavity resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Tsvelykh, I. S.; B. A. Kotserzhynskyi

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates push-push VCOs in K-band (with second harmonic output at 24 GHz) and in Ka-band (with third harmonic output at 36 GHz), and PLL synthesizers on their basis. Oscillators are stabilized by a rectangular resonant metallic cavity. Output signal power within the frequency tuning range changes in the limits of -11,5 -7,6 dBm and -11,8 -10,9 dBm for 24 GHz and 36 GHz oscillators respectively. Single sideband (SSB) phase noise spectral densities of -91 dBc/Hz for 24 GHz oscilla...

  16. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  17. A Ka-band monolithic low phase noise coplanar waveguide oscillator using InAlAs/InGaAs HBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Delong; Hsu, Shawn; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Chin, Patrick; Block, Tom

    2002-02-01

    A Ka-band oscillator has been designed, fabricated and tested using InAlAs/InGaAs HBTs. Coplanar waveguide technology has been employed to improve the Q-factor of the circuit. An output power of 2.6 dBm with DC to RF conversion efficiency of 7.8% was measured at 31.7 GHz. Low phase noise of -87 and -112 dBc/Hz were achieved at an offset frequency of 100 kHz and 1 MHz respectively. These low phase noise values can be attributed to the low 1/ f noise of the InAlAs/InGaAs HBT devices and the coplanar design used for the circuit.

  18. Audio-band coating thermal noise measurement for Advanced LIGO with a multimode optical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, S.; Yu, H.; Yam, W.; Martynov, D.; Evans, M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes coresonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10-17 m /√{Hz } in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  19. Wide-band detection of the third moment of shot noise by a hysteretic Josephson junction

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeev, A. V.; Meschke, M.; Peltonen, J. T.; Heikkila, T. T.; Pekola, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    We use a hysteretic Josephson junction as an on-chip detector of the third moment of shot noise of a tunnel junction. The detectable bandwidth is determined by the plasma frequency of the detector, which is about 50 GHz in the present experiment. The third moment of shot noise results in a measurable change of the switching rate when reversing polarity of the current through the noise source. We analyze the observed asymmetry assuming adiabatic response of the detector.

  20. Inductorless Ultra-Wide Band Front-End Chip Design with Noise Cancellation Technology for Wireless Communication Applications 10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jhin-fang HUANG; Ming-chun HSU; Ron-yi LIU

    2010-01-01

    An inductorless Ultra-Wide Band (UWB) receiver front-end chip design used in wireless communications for the frequency band of 3.1~4.8 GHz is presented. This homodyne receiver mainly consists of a differential Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) circuit followed by a down-converting mixer. The proposed LNA circuit with a noise canceling resistor is connected to the CMOS device's body to reduce the substrate thermal noise. Simulation and measurement results show that the chip can reduce the front-end Noise Figure (NF) about 0.5dB and achieve the Conversion Gain (CG) of 19.44~21.57 dB and double-sideband NF less than 7.8 dB. Also, the input third-order intercept point (IIP3) is -11 dBm, and the input second-order intercept point (IIP2) is 49 dBm. Fabricated in TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS technology, this chip occupies only 0.167 mm2 and dissipates power 59.2 mW.

  1. An X-Band low-power and low-phase-noise VCO using bondwire inductor

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, K.; F. Herzel; Scheytt, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a low-power low-phase-noise voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) has been designed and, fabricated in 0.25 μm SiGe BiCMOS process. The resonator of the VCO is implemented with on-chip MIM capacitors and a single aluminum bondwire. A tail current filter is realized to suppress flicker noise up-conversion. The measured phase noise is −126.6 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from a 7.8 GHz carrier. The figure of merit (FOM) of the VCO is −192.5 dBc/Hz and the VCO cor...

  2. Real-time ultrawide-band group delay profile monitoring through low-noise incoherent temporal interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongwoo; Malacarne, Antonio; Azaña, José

    2011-02-28

    A simple, highly accurate measurement technique for real-time monitoring of the group delay (GD) profiles of photonic dispersive devices over ultra-broad spectral bandwidths (e.g. an entire communication wavelength band) is demonstrated. The technique is based on time-domain self-interference of an incoherent light pulse after linear propagation through the device under test, providing a measurement wavelength range as wide as the source spectral bandwidth. Significant enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the self-interference signal has been observed by use of a relatively low-noise incoherent light source as compared with the theoretical estimate for a white-noise light source. This fact combined with the use of balanced photo-detection has allowed us to significantly reduce the number of profiles that need to be averaged to reach a targeted GD measurement accuracy, thus achieving reconstruction of the device GD profile in real time. We report highly-accurate monitoring of (i) the group-delay ripple (GDR) profile of a 10-m long chirped fiber Bragg grating over the full C band (~42 nm), and (ii) the group velocity dispersion (GVD) and dispersion slope (DS) profiles of a ~2-km long dispersion compensating fiber module over an ~72-nm wavelength range, both captured at a 15 frames/s video rate update, with demonstrated standard deviations in the captured GD profiles as low as ~1.6 ps.

  3. Noise-induced nitrotyrosine increase and outer hair cell death in guinea pig cochlea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Wei-ju; SHI Xiao-rui; Alfred Nuttall

    2013-01-01

    Background Modern research has provided new insights into the biological mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss,and a number of studies showed the appearance of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during and after noise exposure.This study was designed to investigate the noise exposure induced nitrotyrosine change and the mechanism of outer hair cells death in guinea pig cochlea.Method Thirty guinea pigs were used in this study.The experimental animals were either exposed for 4 hours per day to broadband noise at 122 dB SPL (A-weighted) for 2 consecutive days or perfused cochleae with 5 mg/ml of the SIN1 solutions,an exogenous NO and superoxide donor,for 30 minutes.Then the cochleae of the animals were dissected.Propidium iodide (PI),a DNA intercalating fluorescent probe,was used to trace morphological changes in OHC nuclei.The distribution of nitrotyrosine (NT) in the organ of Corti and the cochlear lateral wall tissue from the guinea pigs were examined using fluorescence immunohistochemistry method.Whole mounts of organ of Corti were prepared.Morphological and fluorescent changes were examined under a confocal microscope.Results Either after noise exposure or after SIN1 perfusion,outer hair cells (OHCs) death with characteristics of both apoptotic and necrotic degradation appeared.Nitrotyrosine immunolabeling could be observed in the OHCs from the control animals.After noise exposure,NT immunostaining became much greater than the control animals in OHCs.The apoptotic OHC has significant increase of nitrotyrosine in and around the nucleus following noise exposure.In the normal later wall of cochleae,relatively weak nitrotyrosine immunolabeling could be observed.After noise exposure,nitrotyrosine immunoactivity became stronger in stria vascularis.Conclusion Noise exposure induced increase of nitrotyrosine production is associated with OHCs death suggesting reactive nitrogen species participation in the cochlear

  4. A low-noise high dynamic-range time-domain EMI measurement system for CISPR Band E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, C.; Russer, P.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a broadband time-domain EMI measurement system for measurements from 9 kHz to 18 GHz is presented that allows for compliant EMI measurements in CISPR Band E. Combining ultra-fast analog-to-digital-conversion and real-time digital signal processing on a field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) with ultra-broadband multi-stage down-conversion, scan times can be reduced by several orders of magnitude in comparison to a traditional heterodyne EMI-receiver. The ultra-low system noise floor of 6-8 dB and the real-time spectrogram allow for the characterisation of the time-behaviour of EMI near the noise floor. EMI measurements of electronic consumer devices and electric household appliances are presented.

  5. Swiss AlpArray: deployment of the Swiss AlpArray temporary broad-band stations and their noise characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Irene; Kissling, Edi; Clinton, John; Hetényi, György; Šipka, Vesna; Stipćević, Josip; Dasović, Iva; Solarino, Stefano; Wéber, Zoltán; Gráczer, Zoltán; Electronics Lab, SED

    2016-04-01

    One of the main actions of the AlpArray European initiative is the deployment of a dense seismic broad-band network, that complements the existing permanent stations. This will ensure a spatially homogeneous seismic coverage of the greater Alpine area for at least two years, allowing a great number of innovative scientific works to be carried out. Our contribution to the AlpArray Seismic Network consists in the deployment of 24 temporary broad-band stations: three in Switzerland, twelve in Italy, three in Croatia, three in Bosnia and Herzegovina and three in Hungary. This deployment is lead by ETH Zurich and founded by the Swiss-AlpArray Sinergia programme by SNSF, and is the result of a fruitful collaboration between five research institutes. Stations were installed between Autumn and Winter 2015. Our installations are both free field and in-house and consist of 21 STS-2 and 3 Trillium Compact sensors equipped with Taurus digitizers and 3G telemetry sending data in real time to the ETH EIDA node. In this work, we present sites and stations setting and we discuss in details the characteristics in terms of site effects and noise level of each station. In particular we analyse the power spectral density estimates investigating the major source of noise and the background noise related to seasons, time of the day, human activities and type of installation. In addition we will show examples of data usage - i.e. earthquake locations, noise cross correlations, measures of surface wave dispersion curves. We thanks the Swiss AlpArray Field Team: Blanchard A., Erlanger E. D., Jarić D., Herak D., M. Herak, Hermann M., Koelemeijer P. J., Markušić S., Obermann A., Sager K., Šikman S., Singer J., Winterberg S. SED Electronic Lab: Barman S., Graf P., Hansemann R., Haslinger F., Hiemer S., Racine R., Tanner R., Weber F.

  6. Miniature Low-Noise G-Band I-Q Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Pukala, David M.; Gaier, Todd C.; Tanner, Alan B.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjom H.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    Weather forecasting, hurricane tracking, and atmospheric science applications depend on humidity sounding of atmosphere. Current instruments provide these measurements from groundbased, airborne, and low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites by measuring radiometric temperature on the flanks of the 183-GHz water vapor line. Miniature, low-noise receivers have been designed that will enable these measurements from a geostationary, thinned array sounder, which is based on hundreds of low-noise receivers that convert the 180-GHz signal directly to baseband in-phase and in-quadrature signals for digitization and correlation. The developed receivers provide a noise temperature of 450 K from 165 to 183 GHz (NF = 4.1 dB), and have a mass of 3 g while consuming 24 mW of power. These are the most sensitive broadband I-Q receivers at this frequency range that operate at room temperature, and are significantly lower in mass and power consumption than previously reported receivers.

  7. X波段低噪声放大器设计%Design of X-Band Low Noise Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马万雄; 陈昌明; 张川

    2013-01-01

    It was difficult to choose circuit topology of X-band low noise amplifier,so an amplifier was designed and simulated. This amplifier,using NEC's NE3210S01 ,had a micro-strip impedance converting matching structure and a three-stage cascade topology. The ADS software was used as a tool to design, optimize and simulate. The designed amplifier exhibited broadband operation from 9. 2 GHz ~9. 6 GHz with noise figure less than 1. 7 dB,band gain 33. 5 dB,band gain flatness less than 0. 3 dB and VSWR less than 1.5. The amplifier has been applied to the X-band receiver with good results. The method of design can be refered for engineering.%针对目前X波段低噪声放大器的电路拓扑结构不易选择,故提出了一种采用微带分支线匹配结构和三级级联方式的X波段低噪声放大器(LNA).放大器选用NEC低噪声放大管NE3210S01,利用ADS(Advanced Design System)软件设计、仿真、优化,放大器实测结果表明:在9.2 GHz~ 9.6 GHz频带内,噪声系数小于1.7 dB,带内增益达到33.5 dB,带内增益平坦度AG≤±0.3 dB,输入、输出驻波比均小于1.5.该放大器已应用于X波段接收机,效果良好,其设计方法可供工程应用参考.

  8. Experimental Demonstration of Nonlinearity and Phase Noise Tolerant 16-QAM OFDM W-Band (75–110 GHz) Signal Over Fiber System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2014-01-01

    We propose a nonlinearity and phase noise tolerant orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) W-band signal over fiber system based on phase modulation and photonic heterodyne up-conversion techniques. By heterodyne mixing the phase-modulated optical OFDM signal with a free-running laser...... in the photodiode, the constant envelope OFDM W-band wireless signal is obtained to suppress the nonlinear impairments. Moreover, the phase noises of the beating lasers appear as additive terms to the desired signal, and could be easily filtered out without complex phase noise estimation and compensation algorithms...

  9. Low-noise X-band Oscillator and Amplifier Technologies: Comparison and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    noise include feedback, feedforward, parallel HBT’s, predistortion , and linear amplification using non-linear components (LINC) [13]. The last two...design techniques ( predistortion and LINC) are primarily aimed at amplifier efficiency and are not considered in this writing because both introduce

  10. How Might People Near National Roads Be Affected by Traffic Noise as Electric Vehicles Increase in Number? A Laboratory Study of Subjective Evaluations of Environmental Noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Walker

    Full Text Available We face a likely shift to electric vehicles (EVs but the environmental and human consequences of this are not yet well understood. Simulated auditory traffic scenes were synthesized from recordings of real conventional and EVs. These sounded similar to what might be heard by a person near a major national road. Versions of the simulation had 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% EVs. Participants heard the auditory scenes in random order, rating each on five perceptual dimensions such as pleasant-unpleasant and relaxing-stressful. Ratings of traffic noise were, overall, towards the negative end of these scales, but improved significantly when there were high proportions of EVs in the traffic mix, particularly when there were 80% or 100% EVs. This suggests a shift towards a high proportion of EVs is likely to improve the subjective experiences of people exposed to traffic noise from major roads. The effects were not a simple result of EVs being quieter: ratings of bandpass-filtered versions of the recordings suggested that people's perceptions of traffic noise were specifically influenced by energy in the 500-2000 Hz band. Engineering countermeasures to reduce noise in this band might be effective for improving the subjective experience of people living or working near major roads, even for conventional vehicles; energy in the 0-100 Hz band was particularly associated with people identifying sound as 'quiet' and, again, this might feed into engineering to reduce the impact of traffic noise on people.

  11. How Might People Near National Roads Be Affected by Traffic Noise as Electric Vehicles Increase in Number? A Laboratory Study of Subjective Evaluations of Environmental Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ian; Kennedy, John; Martin, Susanna; Rice, Henry

    2016-01-01

    We face a likely shift to electric vehicles (EVs) but the environmental and human consequences of this are not yet well understood. Simulated auditory traffic scenes were synthesized from recordings of real conventional and EVs. These sounded similar to what might be heard by a person near a major national road. Versions of the simulation had 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% EVs. Participants heard the auditory scenes in random order, rating each on five perceptual dimensions such as pleasant-unpleasant and relaxing-stressful. Ratings of traffic noise were, overall, towards the negative end of these scales, but improved significantly when there were high proportions of EVs in the traffic mix, particularly when there were 80% or 100% EVs. This suggests a shift towards a high proportion of EVs is likely to improve the subjective experiences of people exposed to traffic noise from major roads. The effects were not a simple result of EVs being quieter: ratings of bandpass-filtered versions of the recordings suggested that people's perceptions of traffic noise were specifically influenced by energy in the 500-2000 Hz band. Engineering countermeasures to reduce noise in this band might be effective for improving the subjective experience of people living or working near major roads, even for conventional vehicles; energy in the 0-100 Hz band was particularly associated with people identifying sound as 'quiet' and, again, this might feed into engineering to reduce the impact of traffic noise on people.

  12. Repeated exposure to noise increases tolerance in a coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Mills, Suzanne C; Lecchini, David; Nedelec, Brendan; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-09-01

    Some anthropogenic noise is now considered pollution, with evidence building that noise from human activities such as transportation, construction and exploration can impact behaviour and physiology in a broad range of taxa. However, relatively little research has considered the effects of repeated or chronic noise; extended exposures may result in habituation or sensitisation, and thus changes in response. We conducted a field-based experiment at Moorea Island to investigate how repeated exposure to playback of motorboat noise affected a coral reef fish (Dascyllus trimaculatus). We found that juvenile D. trimaculatus increased hiding behaviour during motorboat noise after two days of repeated exposure, but no longer did so after one and two weeks of exposure. We also found that naïve individuals responded to playback of motorboat noise with elevated ventilation rates, but that this response was diminished after one and two weeks of repeated exposure. We found no strong evidence that baseline blood cortisol levels, growth or body condition were affected by three weeks of repeated motorboat-noise playback. Our study reveals the importance of considering how tolerance levels may change over time, rather than simply extrapolating from results of short-term studies, if we are to make decisions about regulation and mitigation.

  13. Increasing LIGO sensitivity by feedforward subtraction of auxiliary length control noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadors, Grant; Kawabe, Keita; Riles, Keith

    2013-04-01

    LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory [Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana] measures the differential length of 4-km Michelson arms with Fabry-Perot cavities. Length changes could indicate strain caused by astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. Fundamentally limited by seismic noise, thermal suspension noise, and laser shot noise in different frequency bands, a LIGO interferometer's sensitivity can also be degraded by additional relative motion of the inner arm cavity mirrors due to imperfectly-servoed Michelson motion. In this project we seek to subtract the effects of this residual motion by feedforward correction of the gravitational-wave data channel. We divide data from LIGO's sixth science run into 1024-second time windows and numerically fit a filter representing the frequency-domain transfer function from Michelson servo noise to gravitational wave channel for each window. Finally, the Michelson servo channel is processed through the filter and is subtracted from the gravitational-wave signal channel. The algorithm used in this procedure will be described with a preliminary assessment of the achievable sensitivity improvement.

  14. Speech Enhancement Algorithm Using Sub band Two Step Decision Directed Approach with Adaptive Weighting factor and Noise Masking Threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Dhanaskodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Speech Enhancement plays an important role in any of the speech processing systems like speech recognition, mobile communication, hearing aid. Approach: In this work, human perceptual auditory masking effect is incorporated into the single channel speech enhancement algorithm. The algorithm is based on a criterion by which the audible noise may be masked rather than being attenuated and thereby reducing the chance of distortion to speech. The basic decision directed approach is for efficient reduction of musical noise, that includes the estimation of the a priori SNR which is a crucial parameter of the spectral gain, follows the a posteriori SNR with a delay of one frame in speech frames. In this work a simple adaptive speech enhancement technique, using an adaptive sigmoid type function to determine the weighting factor of the TSDD algorithm is employed based on a sub band approach. In turn the spectral estimate is used to obtain a perceptual gain factor. Results: Objective and subjective measures like SNR, MSE, IS distance and were obtained, which shows the ability of the proposed method for efficient enhancement of noisy speech Conclusion/Recommendations: Performance assessment shows that our proposal can achieve a more significant noise reduction and a better spectral estimation of weak speech spectral components from a noisy signal as compared to the conventional speech enhancement algorithm.

  15. A low-noise K-Ka band oscillator using AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madihian, Mohammad; Takahashi, Hideki

    1991-01-01

    The design considerations, fabrication process, and performance of the first K-Ka-band oscillator implemented using a self-aligned AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) are described. A large-signal time-domain-based design approach has been used which applies a SPICE-F simulator for optimization of the oscillator circuit parameters for maximum output power. The oscillator employs a 2 x 10 sq mm emitter AlGaAs/GaAs HBT that was fabricated using a pattern inversion technology. The HBT has a base current 1/f noise power density lower than 1 x 10 to the -20th sq A/Hz at 1 kHz and lower than 1 x 10 to the -22nd sq A/Hz at 100 kHz for a collector current of 1 mA. The oscillator, which is composed of only low-Q microstrip transmission lines, has a phase noise of -80 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz off carrier when operated at 26.6 GHz. These results indicate the applicability of the HBTs to low-phase-noise monolithic oscillators at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, where both Si bipolar transistors and GaAs FETs are absent.

  16. Secure communication in fiber optic systems via transmission of broad-band optical noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, O; Eyal, A; Shtaif, M

    2008-03-03

    We propose a new scheme for data encryption in the physical layer. Our scheme is based on the distribution of a broadband optical noise-like signal between Alice and Bob. The broadband signal is used for the establishment of a secret key that can be used for the secure transmission of information by using the one-time-pad method. We characterize the proposed scheme and study its applicability to the existing fiber-optics communications infrastructure.

  17. ADC non-linear error corrections for low-noise temperature measurements in the LISA band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjuan, J; Lobo, A; Mateos, N [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai, CSIC, Fac. de Ciencies, Torre C5, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J [Dep. Eng. Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Ed. C4, J Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); DIaz-Aguilo, M, E-mail: sanjuan@ieec.fcr.e [Dep. Fisica Aplicada, UPC, Campus Nord, Ed. B4/B5, J Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Temperature fluctuations degrade the performance of different subsystems in the LISA mission. For instance, they can exert stray forces on the test masses and thus hamper the required drag-free accuracy. Also, the interferometric system performance depends on the stability of the temperature in the optical elements. Therefore, monitoring the temperature in specific points of the LISA subsystems is required. These measurements will be useful to identify the sources of excess noise caused by temperature fluctuations. The required temperature stability is still to be defined, but a figure around 10{mu}K Hz{sup -1/2} from 0.1 mHz to 0.1 Hz can be a good rough guess. The temperature measurement subsystem on board the LISA Pathfinder mission exhibits noise levels of 10{mu}K Hz{sup -1/2} for f >0.1 mHz. For LISA, based on the above hypothesis, the measurement system should overcome limitations related to the analog-to-digital conversion stage which degrades the performance of the measurement when temperature drifts. Investigations on the mitigation of such noise will be here presented.

  18. Improved design for low noise Nb SIS devices for Band 9 of ALMA (600 - 720 GHz)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodewijk, C. F. J.; Kroug, M.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Mena, F. P.; Baryshev, A. M.; Wild, W.

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting-insulating-superconducting mixers incorporating a novel design were fabricated and evaluated for heterodyne detection in the frequency range of 600 to 720 GHz (ALMA Band 9). The improved design consists in tapering the corners of the RF transformer and a careful optimization of the d

  19. Comparison of Model Prediction With Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Vine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Kerr, Yann H.

    2005-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.413 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of surface parameters such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity that are needed to understand the hydrological cycle and ocean circulation. Radiation from celestial sources (mostly galactic) is strong...

  20. Influence from Polarized Galactic Background Noise on L-band Measurements of the Sea Surface Salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The polarimetric EMIRAD radiometer, based on novel digital down conversion and detection techniques, has been installed on a C-130 aircraft from the Royal Danish. Air Force during the L-band Ocean Salinity Airborne Campaign (LOSAC) in 2001 and 2003. Full 360° circle flight patterns around the same...

  1. Double-pass high-gain low-noise EDFA over S- and C+L-bands by tunable fundamental-mode leakage loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Ming; Chen, Nan-Kuang; Lai, Yinchieh; Chi, Sien

    2007-02-19

    We demonstrate a high-gain low-noise double-pass tunable EDFA over S- and C+L-bands by discretely introducing fundamental-mode leakage loss in a 16-m-long standard C-band Er(3+)-doped fiber. The amplified spontaneous emission at the wavelengths of longer than 1530 nm can be substantially attenuated by the ASE suppressing filters to maintain high population inversion and to squeeze out the optical gain for S-band signals. When the filters are disabled, the gain bandwidth immediately returns back to the C+L-bands. Under S-band operation, a 37 dB small signal gain and a minimum 4.84 dB noise figure at 1486.9 nm are achieved with a 980 nm pump power of 154 mW.

  2. Relation of focal hair-cell lesions to noise-exposure parameters from a 4- or a 0.5-kHz octave band of noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Gary W; Bohne, Barbara A

    2009-08-01

    In a previous study, we examined the relation between total energy in a noise exposure and the percentage losses of outer (OHC) and inner (IHC) hair cells in the basal and apical halves of 607 chinchilla cochleae [Harding, G.W., Bohne, B.A., 2004a. Noise-induced hair-cell loss and total exposure energy: analysis of a large data set. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115, 2207-2220]. The animals had been exposed continuously to either a 4-kHz octave band of noise (OBN) at 47-108 dB SPL for 0.5h-36 d, or a 0.5-kHz OBN at 65-128 dB SPL for 3.5h-433 d. Interrupted exposures were also employed with both OBNs. Post-exposure recovery times ranged from 0 to 913 days. Cluster analysis was used to separate the data into three magnitudes of damage. The data were also separated into recovery times of 0 days (acute) and >0 days (chronic) and the apical and basal halves of the organ of Corti (OC). A substantial part of these hair-cell losses occurred in focal lesions (i.e., >or=50% loss of IHCs, OHCs or both over a distance of >or=0.03 mm). This aspect of the damage from noise was not included in the previous analysis. The present analysis describes, within the same three clusters, the apex-to-base distribution of 1820 focal lesions found in 468 of 660 (71%) noise-exposed cochleae. In these cochleae, OC length in mm was converted to percent distance from the apex. The lesion data were analyzed for location in percent distance from the apex and size (mm) of the lesions. In 55 of 140 (39%) non-noise-exposed, control OCs, there were 186 focal hair-cell lesions, the characteristics of which were also determined. Focal lesions with hair-cell loss >or=50% involved predominantly OHCs, IHCs only, or both OHCs and IHCs (i.e., combined OHC-IHC lesions). The predominantly OHC and combined lesions were pooled together for the analysis. The distributions of lesion location (in percent distance from the apex), weighted by lesion size (in percent of OC length) were tallied in 2%-distance bins. In controls

  3. Beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris) passive acoustic detection in increasing ambient noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jessica; Jarvis, Susan; Moretti, David; Morrissey, Ronald; Dimarzio, Nancy; Johnson, Mark; Tyack, Peter; Thomas, Len; Marques, Tiago

    2011-02-01

    Passive acoustic detection is being increasingly used to monitor visually cryptic cetaceans such as Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) that may be especially sensitive to underwater sound. The efficacy of passive acoustic detection is traditionally characterized by the probability of detecting the animal's sound emissions as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. The probability of detection can be predicted using accepted, but not necessarily accurate, models of the underwater acoustic environment. Recent field studies combining far-field hydrophone arrays with on-animal acoustic recording tags have yielded the location and time of each sound emission from tagged animals, enabling in-situ measurements of the probability of detection. However, tagging studies can only take place in calm seas and so do not reflect the full range of ambient noise conditions under which passive acoustic detection may be used. Increased surface-generated noise from wind and wave interaction degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of animal sound receptions at a given distance leading to a reduction in probability of detection. This paper presents a case study simulating the effect of increasing ambient noise on detection of M. densirostris foraging clicks recorded from a tagged whale swimming in the vicinity of a deep-water, bottom-mounted hydrophone array.

  4. Localization in band random matrix models with and without increasing diagonal elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-ge

    2002-06-01

    It is shown that localization of eigenfunctions in the Wigner band random matrix model with increasing diagonal elements can be related to localization in a band random matrix model with random diagonal elements. The relation is obtained by making use of a result of a generalization of Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory, which shows that reduced Hamiltonian matrices with relatively small dimensions can be introduced for nonperturbative parts of eigenfunctions, and by employing intermediate basis states, which can improve the method of the reduced Hamiltonian matrix. The latter model deviates from the standard band random matrix model mainly in two aspects: (i) the root mean square of diagonal elements is larger than that of off-diagonal elements within the band, and (ii) statistical distributions of the matrix elements are close to the Lévy distribution in their central parts, except in the high top regions.

  5. S-band cryogenic low-noise amplifier%S波段低温低噪声放大器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马群

    2013-01-01

    中介绍了S波段低温低噪声放大器的研制.在15K左右的环境温度下,300MHz带宽内,实测放大器的等效噪声温度≤4.6K,增益≥35dB,增益平坦度≤1.0clB,输入、输出回波损耗≤-20dB.它已经成功运用于射电天文等领域.%A S-band cryogenic low-noise amplifier was designed and manufactured.When it was cooled down to ambient temperature about 15K,the circuit could provide greater than 35dB of gain,noise temperature was less than 4.6K,gain flatness was less than 1.0dB,input and output return-loss was less than-20dB in the bandwidth of 300MHz.The amplifier was successfully applied to radio astronomy and other fields.

  6. A K-Band RF-MEMS-Enabled Reconfigurable and Multifunctional Low-Noise Amplifier Hybrid Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Malmqvist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A K-band (18–26.5 GHz RF-MEMS-enabled reconfigurable and multifunctional dual-path LNA hybrid circuit (optimised for lowest/highest possible noise figure/linearity, resp. is presented, together with its subcircuit parts. The two MEMS-switched low-NF (higher gain and high-linearity (lower gain LNA circuits (paths present 16.0 dB/8.2 dB, 2.8 dB/4.9 dB and 15 dBm/20 dBm of small-signal gain, noise figure, and 1 dB compression point at 24 GHz, respectively. Compared with the two (fixed LNA subcircuits used within this design, the MEMS-switched LNA circuit functions show minimum 0.6–1.3 dB higher NF together with similar values of P1 dB at 18–25 GHz. The gain of one LNA circuit path is reduced by 25–30 dB when the MEMS switch and active circuitry used within in the same switching branch are switched off to select the other LNA path and minimise power consumption.

  7. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanfei [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Shen, Huijie, E-mail: shj588@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Zhang, Linke [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430063 (China); Su, Yongsheng, E-mail: suyongsheng1981@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Yu, Dianlong [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Integrated Logistics Support, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range. - Highlights: • A metamaterial-type pipe system with Bragg and resonant acoustic gaps. • A low-frequency acoustic coupled gap. • Exact coupling condition for Bragg and resonant gaps. • Effects of resonant parameters on coupled gaps.

  8. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanfei; Shen, Huijie; Zhang, Linke; Su, Yongsheng; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range.

  9. A 0.18 {mu}m CMOS dual-band low power low noise amplifier for a global navigation satellite system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Bing; Zhuang Yiqi; Li Zhenrong; Jin Gang, E-mail: waxmax@126.com [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents a dual-band low noise amplifier for the receiver of a global navigation satellite system. The differences between single band and multi-band design methods are discussed. The relevant parameter analysis and the details of circuit design are presented. The test chip was implemented in a TSMC 0.18 {mu}m 1P4M RF CMOS process. The LNA achieves a gain of 16.8 dB/18.9 dB on 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz. The measured noise figure is around 1.5-1.7 dB on both bands. The LNA consumes less than 4.3 mA of current from a 1.8 V power supply. The measurement results show consistency with the design. And the LNA can fully satisfy the demands of the GNSS receiver. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  10. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS A 0.18 μm CMOS dual-band low power low noise amplifier for a global navigation satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Li; Yiqi, Zhuang; Zhenrong, Li; Gang, Jin

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a dual-band low noise amplifier for the receiver of a global navigation satellite system. The differences between single band and multi-band design methods are discussed. The relevant parameter analysis and the details of circuit design are presented. The test chip was implemented in a TSMC 0.18 μm 1P4M RF CMOS process. The LNA achieves a gain of 16.8 dB/18.9 dB on 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz. The measured noise figure is around 1.5-1.7 dB on both bands. The LNA consumes less than 4.3 mA of current from a 1.8 V power supply. The measurement results show consistency with the design. And the LNA can fully satisfy the demands of the GNSS receiver.

  11. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  12. Implementation of IIR ADF for narrow band noise elimination by using of DSP; DSP ni yoru kyotaiiki zatsuon jokyoyo IIR-ADF no jitsugen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, T.; Yamaguchi, E.; Takumi, I.; Hata, M. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Nakano, M. [Denso Corp., Nagoya (Japan)

    1997-12-20

    An Adaptive Digital Filter (ADF), which has palarel connected 2nd order IIR filters, for narrow band noise elimination is proposed already. The proposed adaptation algorithm, however, does not take account of delay caused by anti-alias Low-Pass Filter (LPF) and Analogue to Digital (A/D), and Digital to Analogue (D/A) converter. So, in real applications, the ADF implemented with Digital Signal Processor (DSP) shows poor capability of eliminating narrow band noise. In this paper, we propose a method to compensate phase of output signal from ADF. The compensation is accomplished with 1st order FIR filter inserted in the output line of the ADF. We also show how to set the coefficient values of the FIR filter. And, we scrutinize ability to eliminate noise and computational cost through practical implementation of the ADF and the proposed phase compensation filter. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A fully integrated W-band push-push CMOS VCO with low phase noise and wide tuning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, To-Po

    2011-07-01

    A circuit topology suitable for a low-phase-noise wide-tuning-range push-push voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is proposed in this paper. By applying varactors connected between drain and source terminations of the cross-coupled pair, the tuning range is effectively increased and the phase noise is improved. Moreover, a small capacitor is inserted between the VCO core and testing buffer to reduce loading effects on the VCO core. Furthermore, the enhanced second-harmonic output signal is extracted at middle of the varactors, leading to the elimination of RF choke at VCO's second-harmonic output port and a reduced chip size. Based on the proposed architecture, this VCO fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS exhibits a measured 6.35% tuning range. Operating at a supply voltage of 1.2 V, the VCO core consumes 7.5-mW dc power, and the measured phase noise is -75 dBc/Hz and -91.5 dBc/Hz at 100-kHz and 1-MHz offsets from the 77.8-GHz carrier, respectively. Compared with previously published silicon-based VCOs over 70 GHz, this work can simultaneously achieve low phase noise, wide tuning range, and low dc power consumption, leading to a superior figure of merit (FOM), and better figure of merit considering the tuning range (FOM(T)). In addition, this fully integrated VCO also demonstrates the highest operation frequency among previously published 0.18-μm CMOS VCOs.

  14. Design and analysis of a K-band low-phase-noise phase-locked loop with subharmonically injection-locked technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yen-Liang; Chang, Hong-Yeh

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and analysis of a K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz) low-phase-noise phase-locked loop (PLL) with the subharmonically injection-locked (SIL) technique. The phase noise of the PLL with subharmonic injection is investigated, and a modified phase noise model of the PLL with SIL technique is proposed. The theoretical calculations agree with the experimental results. Moreover, the phase noise of the PLL can be improved with the subharmonic injection. To achieve K-band operation with low dc power consumption, a divide-by-3 injection-locked frequency divider (ILFD) is used as a frequency prescaler. The measured phase noise of the PLL without injection is -110 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset at the operation frequency of 23.08 GHz. With the subharmonic injection, the measured phase noises at 1 MHz offset are -127, -127, and -119 dBc/Hz for the subharmonic injection number NINJ = 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Moreover, the performance of the proposed PLL with and without SIL technique can be compared with the reported advanced CMOS PLLs.

  15. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of marine seismic data: A case study from offshore Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyoun; Jang, Seonghyung

    2016-11-01

    Subsurface imaging is difficult without removing the multiples intrinsic to most marine seismic data. Choosing the right multiple suppression method when working with marine data depends on the type of multiples and sometimes involves trial and error. A major amount of multiple energy in seismic data is related to the large reflectivity of the surface. Surface-related multiple elimination (SRME) is effective for suppressing free-surface-related multiples. Although SRME has some limitations, it is widely used because it requires no assumptions about the subsurface velocities, positions, and reflection coefficients of the reflector causing the multiples. The common reflector surface (CRS) stacking technique uses CRS reflectors rather than common mid-point (CMP) reflectors. It stacks more traces than conventional stacking methods and increases the signal-to-noise ratio. The purpose of this study is to address a process issue for multiple suppression with SRME and Radon filtering, and to increase the signal-to-noise ratio by using CRS stacking on seismic data from the eastern continental margin of Korea. To remove free surface multiples, SRME and Radon filtering are applied to attenuate the interbed multiples. Results obtained using synthetic data and field data show that the combination of SRME and Radon filtering is effective for suppressing free-surface multiples and peg-leg multiples. Applying CRS stacking to seismic data in which multiples have been eliminated increases the signal-to-noise ratio for the area examined, which is being considered for carbon dioxide capture and storage.

  16. A wide-band low phase noise LC-tuned VCO with constant KVCO/ωosc for LTE PLL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄继伟; 王志功; 李奎利; 李正平; 王永平

    2012-01-01

    A wideband LC-tuned voltage-controlled oscillator (LC-VCO) applied in LTE PLL frequency synthesizers with constant KVCO/ωosc is described,In order to minimize the loop bandwidth variations of PLL,a varactor array is proposed,which consists of a series of differential variable capacitor pairs and a series of single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches to connect Vtune or VDD.The switches are controlled by switching bits.With this scheme,the ratio of KV =(6)Cvar/(6)Vtune and the capacitance value of the capacitor array maintains relatively constant; furthermore,the loop bandwidth of the PLL fluctuation is suppressed.The 3.2-4.6-GHz VCO for multi-band LTE PLL is fabricated in a 0.13-μm RF-CMOS process.The VCO exhibits a maximum variation of KVCO/ωosc of only ±4%.The VCO also exhibits a low phase-noise of-124 dBc/Hz at a 1-MHz offset frequency and a low current consumption of 18.0 mA with a 1.2-V power supply.

  17. Partial sleep deprivation by environmental noise increases food intake and body weight in obesity resistant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Teske, Jennifer A.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sleep-restriction in humans increases risk for obesity, but previous rodent studies show weight loss following sleep deprivation, possibly due to stressful-methods used to prevent sleep. Obesity-resistant (OR) rats exhibit consolidated-sleep and resistance to weight-gain. We hypothesized that sleep disruption by a less-stressful method would increase body weight, and examined effect of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on body weight in OR and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Design and Methods OR and SD rats (n=12/group) were implanted with transmitters to record sleep/wake. After baseline recording, six SD and six OR rats underwent 8 h PSD during light-phase for 9 d. Sleep was reduced using recordings of random noise. Sleep/wake states were scored as wakefulness (W), slow-wave-sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement-sleep (REMS). Total number of transitions between stages, SWS-delta-power, food intake and body weight were documented. Results Exposure to noise decreased SWS and REMS time, while increasing W time. Sleep-deprivation increased number of transitions between stages and SWS-delta-power. Further, PSD during the rest phase increased recovery-sleep during active phase. The PSD SD and OR rats had greater food intake and body weight compared to controls Conclusions PSD by less-stressful means increases body weight in rats. Also, PSD during rest phase increases active period sleep. PMID:23666828

  18. Narrow band noise as a model of time-dependent accelerations - Study of the stability of a fluid surface in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casademunt, Jaume; Zhang, Wenbin; Vinals, Jorge; Sekerka, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic model to analyze in quantitative detail the effect of the high frequency components of the residual accelerations onboard spacecraft (often called g-jitter) on fluid motion. The residual acceleration field is modeled as a narrow band noise characterized by three independent parameters: its intensity G squared, a dominant frequency Omega, and a characteristic spectral width tau exp -1. The white noise limit corresponds to Omega tau goes to O, with G squared tau finite, and the limit of a periodic g-jitter (or deterministic limit) can be recovered for Omega tau goes to infinity, G squared finite. The analysis of the response of a fluid surface subjected to a fluctuating gravitational field leads to the stochastic Mathieu equation driven by both additive and multiplicative noise. We discuss the stability of the solutions of this equation in the two limits of white noise and deterministic forcing, and in the general case of narrow band noise. The results are then applied to typical microgravity conditions.

  19. Impulse response characterization of the propagation and scattering environment in through-wall applications using an S-band noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonny; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2012-06-01

    An ultrawideband (UWB) random noise radar operating at S-Band has been developed for through-wall detection, ranging, tracking, and imaging of targets. The system transmits a bandlimited UWB noise signal and accomplishes detection by cross-correlating the reflected signal with a time-delayed replica of the transmit signal. Noise radars have been found eminently suitable for most though-wall radar applications. Yet, in such scenarios, the antennas and the barrier (i.e. the wall) cause distortions in the return signal due to their frequency-dependent radiation and loss characteristics, respectively. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of characterizing the impulse response of various barriers and obstructions via measurements with the S-Band noise radar. As is well known, the entire operation of a linear system (e.g., antenna or barrier) can be captured in its impulse response h(t), i.e. the output of the system when excited by an impulse function at its input, δ(t). Thus, impulse response testing, generally, provides a complete diagnosis of the system over its entire mode of operation. This paper will present results on our impulse response characterization of the propagation and scattering environment through a barrier by the atypical method of cross correlation of noise signals. In addition, we will introduce a simple electromagnetic forward model for wall propagation and accompanying simulations.

  20. Optical beat interference noise reduction by using out-of-band RF clipping tone signal in remotely fed OFDMA-PON link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Min; Yang, Seung-Min; Mun, Kyung-Hak; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-07-28

    A novel technique for mitigating the optical beat interference (OBI) noise in an optical orthogonal frequency division multiple access passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) uplink transmission is presented. By using an out of signal band RF clipping tone to the optical seed carrier, the OBI noise has been reduced and the resulting throughput and spectral efficiency has been improved. As an experimental verification, we demonstrate that the spectral efficiency of 23 km and 50 km have been doubled in the OFDMA-PON uplink transmission.

  1. Strong negative self regulation of prokaryotic transcription factors increases the intrinsic noise of protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekel, Dov J; Jenkins, Dafyd J

    2008-01-18

    Many prokaryotic transcription factors repress their own transcription. It is often asserted that such regulation enables a cell to homeostatically maintain protein abundance. We explore the role of negative self regulation of transcription in regulating the variability of protein abundance using a variety of stochastic modeling techniques. We undertake a novel analysis of a classic model for negative self regulation. We demonstrate that, with standard approximations, protein variance relative to its mean should be independent of repressor strength in a physiological range. Consequently, in that range, the coefficient of variation would increase with repressor strength. However, stochastic computer simulations demonstrate that there is a greater increase in noise associated with strong repressors than predicted by theory. The discrepancies between the mathematical analysis and computer simulations arise because with strong repressors the approximation that leads to Michaelis-Menten-like hyperbolic repression terms ceases to be valid. Because we observe that strong negative feedback increases variability and so is unlikely to be a mechanism for noise control, we suggest instead that negative feedback is evolutionarily favoured because it allows the cell to minimize mRNA usage. To test this, we used in silico evolution to demonstrate that while negative feedback can achieve only a modest improvement in protein noise reduction compared with the unregulated system, it can achieve good improvement in protein response times and very substantial improvement in reducing mRNA levels. Strong negative self regulation of transcription may not always be a mechanism for homeostatic control of protein abundance, but instead might be evolutionarily favoured as a mechanism to limit the use of mRNA. The use of hyperbolic terms derived from quasi-steady-state approximation should also be avoided in the analysis of stochastic models with strong repressors.

  2. Strong negative self regulation of Prokaryotic transcription factors increases the intrinsic noise of protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Dafyd J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many prokaryotic transcription factors repress their own transcription. It is often asserted that such regulation enables a cell to homeostatically maintain protein abundance. We explore the role of negative self regulation of transcription in regulating the variability of protein abundance using a variety of stochastic modeling techniques. Results We undertake a novel analysis of a classic model for negative self regulation. We demonstrate that, with standard approximations, protein variance relative to its mean should be independent of repressor strength in a physiological range. Consequently, in that range, the coefficient of variation would increase with repressor strength. However, stochastic computer simulations demonstrate that there is a greater increase in noise associated with strong repressors than predicted by theory. The discrepancies between the mathematical analysis and computer simulations arise because with strong repressors the approximation that leads to Michaelis-Menten-like hyperbolic repression terms ceases to be valid. Because we observe that strong negative feedback increases variability and so is unlikely to be a mechanism for noise control, we suggest instead that negative feedback is evolutionarily favoured because it allows the cell to minimize mRNA usage. To test this, we used in silico evolution to demonstrate that while negative feedback can achieve only a modest improvement in protein noise reduction compared with the unregulated system, it can achieve good improvement in protein response times and very substantial improvement in reducing mRNA levels. Conclusion Strong negative self regulation of transcription may not always be a mechanism for homeostatic control of protein abundance, but instead might be evolutionarily favoured as a mechanism to limit the use of mRNA. The use of hyperbolic terms derived from quasi-steady-state approximation should also be avoided in the analysis of stochastic

  3. A low-noise X-band microstrip VCO with 2.5 GHz tuning range using a GaN-on-SiC p-HEMT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.M.P.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2005-01-01

    A low-noise X-band microstrip hybrid VCO has been designed and realised using a 2 × 50 μm GaN-on-SiC pseudo-morphic HEMT as the active device. The transistor has been manufactured by TIGER and features a gate-length of 0.15 μm, an fT of 22 GHz, a break-down voltage of 42 Volts and an Idss, close to

  4. Increased visible-light photocatalytic activity of TiO2 via band gap manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Ashley Marie

    Hydrogen gas is a clean burning fuel that has potential applications in stationary and mobile power generation and energy storage, but is commercially produced from non-renewable fossil natural gas. Using renewable biomass as the hydrocarbon feed instead could provide sustainable and carbon-neutral hydrogen. We focus on photocatalytic oxidation and reforming of methanol over modified titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles to produce hydrogen gas. Methanol is used as a model for biomass sugars. By using a photocatalyst, we aim to circumvent the high energy cost of carrying out endothermic reactions at commercial scale. TiO2 is a semiconductor metal oxide of particular interest in photocatalysis due to its photoactivity under ultraviolet illumination and its stability under catalytic reaction conditions. However, TiO2 primarily absorbs ultraviolet light, with little absorption of visible light. While an effective band gap for absorbance of photons from visible light is 1.7 eV, TiO2 polymorphs rutile and anatase, have band gaps of 3.03 eV and 3.20 eV respectively, which indicate ultraviolet light. As most of incident solar radiation is visible light, we hypothesize that decreasing the band gap of TiO2 will increase the efficiency of TiO2 as a visible-light active photocatalyst. We propose to modify the band gap of TiO2 by manipulating the catalyst structure and composition via metal nanoparticle deposition and heteroatom doping in order to more efficiently utilize solar radiation. Of the metal-modified Degussa P25 TiO2 samples (P25), the copper and nickel modified samples, 1%Cu/P25 and 1%Ni/P25 yielded the lowest band gap of 3.05 eV each. A difference of 0.22 eV from the unmodified P25. Under visible light illumination 1%Ni/P25 and 1%Pt/P25 had the highest conversion of methanol of 9.9% and 9.6%, respectively.

  5. Audio-band Coating Thermal Noise Measurement for Advanced LIGO with a Multi-mode Optical Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Gras, S; Yam, W; Martynov, D; Evans, M

    2016-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes co-resonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10^-17 m\\rtHz in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  6. Evidence for a change in the radiation mechanism in the hard state of GRO J1655-40. Hysteresis in the broad-band noise components

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P; Sobolewska, M A; Malzac, J

    2013-01-01

    We have analysed RXTE archival data to study the aperiodic variability of the black-hole binary GRO J1655-40 during the hard state of the 2005 outburst. We computed the 0.008-64 Hz power spectral density during the rise and decay of the 2005 outburst, and we found that they were reasonably well modelled by the sum of two, broad Lorenztian functions in most cases (plus a narrow QPO) which correspond to three different variability components. Our aim is to study the evolution of the timing properties of the source during the outburst, by studying the correlation between the characteristics of the broad-band noise components in the power spectra and the source luminosity. Our results suggest that the whole power spectrum shifts to high (low) frequencies as the source luminosity increases (decreases), in agreement with previous studies of other black hole binaries. However, we also detect a strong "hysteresis" pattern in the "frequency-luminosity" plots, and show that the "critical" luminosity limit, above which ...

  7. Broad band shock associated noise predictions in axisymmetric and asymmetric jets using an improved turbulence scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyan, Anuroopa; Karabasov, Sergey A.

    2017-04-01

    Supersonic jets that are subject to off-design operating conditions are marked by three distinct regions in their far-field spectra: mixing noise, screech and Broadband Shock Associated Noise (BBSAN). BBSAN is conspicuous by the prominent multiple peaks. The Morris and Miller BBSAN model that is based on an acoustic analogy, offering a straightforward implementation for RANS, forms the foundation of the present work. The analogy model robustly captures the peak frequency noise, that occurs near Strouhal number of about 1, based on the nozzle exit diameter but leads to major sound under prediction for higher frequencies. In the jet mixing noise literature, it has been shown that an inclusion of frequency dependence into the characteristic length and temporal scales of the effective noise sources improves the far-field noise predictions. In the present paper, several modifications of the original Morris and Miller model are considered that incorporate the frequency dependent scales as recommended in the jet mixing noise literature. In addition to these, a new mixed scale model is proposed that incorporates a correlation scale that depends both on the mean-flow velocity gradient and the standard mixing noise-type scaling based on the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. In comparison with the original Morris and Miller model, the mixed scale model shows considerable improvements in the noise predictions for the benchmark axisymmetric convergent-divergent and convergent jets. Further to this validation, the new model has been applied for improved predictions for elliptic jets of various eccentricity. It has been shown that, for the same thrust conditions, the elliptical nozzles lead to noise reduction at the source in comparison with the baseline axisymmetric jets.

  8. Does aircraft noise exposure increase the risk of hypertension in the population living near airports in France?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Lefèvre, Marie; Champelovier, Patricia; Lambert, Jacques; Laumon, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    The largest study until now around 6 major European airports, the HYENA (HYpertension and Exposure to Noise near Airports) study, reported an excess risk of hypertension related to long-term aircraft noise exposure. The DEBATS (Discussion on the health effects of aircraft noise) study investigated the relationship between this exposure and the risk of hypertension in men and in women near French airports. Blood pressure of 1244 participants older than 18 years of age was measured. Information about health, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors was collected by means of a face-to-face questionnaire performed at home by an interviewer. Aircraft noise exposure was assessed for each participant's home address using noise maps. They were calculated with the Integrated Noise Model with a 1 dB(A)-resolution. The major potential confounders being risk factors for hypertension were included in the logistic regression models: age, occupational activity, body mass index, physical activity and alcohol consumption. After adjustment for the main potential confounders, an exposure-response relationship was evidenced between the risk of hypertension and aircraft noise exposure at night for men only. A 10-dB(A) increase in Lnight was associated with an OR of 1.34 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.97). These findings contribute to the overall evidence suggesting that aircraft noise exposure at night-time may increase the risk of hypertension in men. Hypertension is a well-known and established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The association reported in the present study between aircraft noise and hypertension implies that aircraft noise might be a risk factor also for cardiovascular disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Study of Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Critical-Band Energy Spectrum of Speech as Acoustic Indicators of Laryngeal and Voice Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan U. Cholayya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic analysis of speech signals is a noninvasive technique that has been proved to be an effective tool for the objective support of vocal and voice disease screening. In the present study acoustic analysis of sustained vowels is considered. A simple k-means nearest neighbor classifier is designed to test the efficacy of a harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR measure and the critical-band energy spectrum of the voiced speech signal as tools for the detection of laryngeal pathologies. It groups the given voice signal sample into pathologic and normal. The voiced speech signal is decomposed into harmonic and noise components using an iterative signal extrapolation algorithm. The HNRs at four different frequency bands are estimated and used as features. Voiced speech is also filtered with 21 critical-bandpass filters that mimic the human auditory neurons. Normalized energies of these filter outputs are used as another set of features. The results obtained have shown that the HNR and the critical-band energy spectrum can be used to correlate laryngeal pathology and voice alteration, using previously classified voice samples. This method could be an additional acoustic indicator that supplements the clinical diagnostic features for voice evaluation.

  10. Study of Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio and Critical-Band Energy Spectrum of Speech as Acoustic Indicators of Laryngeal and Voice Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholayya Niranjan U

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic analysis of speech signals is a noninvasive technique that has been proved to be an effective tool for the objective support of vocal and voice disease screening. In the present study acoustic analysis of sustained vowels is considered. A simple -means nearest neighbor classifier is designed to test the efficacy of a harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR measure and the critical-band energy spectrum of the voiced speech signal as tools for the detection of laryngeal pathologies. It groups the given voice signal sample into pathologic and normal. The voiced speech signal is decomposed into harmonic and noise components using an iterative signal extrapolation algorithm. The HNRs at four different frequency bands are estimated and used as features. Voiced speech is also filtered with 21 critical-bandpass filters that mimic the human auditory neurons. Normalized energies of these filter outputs are used as another set of features. The results obtained have shown that the HNR and the critical-band energy spectrum can be used to correlate laryngeal pathology and voice alteration, using previously classified voice samples. This method could be an additional acoustic indicator that supplements the clinical diagnostic features for voice evaluation.

  11. Long-term underwater sound measurements in the shipping noise indicator bands 63Hz and 125Hz from the port of Falmouth Bay, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, J K; Blondel, Ph; Godley, B J; Pikesley, S K; Witt, M J; Johanning, L

    2016-09-15

    Chronic low-frequency anthropogenic sound, such as shipping noise, may be negatively affecting marine life. The EU's Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) includes a specific indicator focused on this noise. This indicator is the yearly average sound level in third-octave bands with centre frequencies at 63Hz and 125Hz. These levels are described for Falmouth Bay, UK, an active port at the entrance to the English Channel. Underwater sound was recorded for 30min h(-1) over the period June 2012 to November 2013 for a total of 435days. Mean third-octave levels were louder in the 125-Hz band (annual mean level of 96.0dB re 1μPa) than in the 63-Hz band (92.6dB re 1 μPa). These levels and variations are assessed as a function of seasons, shipping activity and wave height, providing comparison points for future monitoring activities, including the MSFD and emerging international regulation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease decreases cortical beta band coherence in the resting state and increases cortical beta band power during executive control☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jobi S.; Strunk, Jon; Mak-McCully, Rachel; Houser, Melissa; Poizner, Howard; Aron, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    It is not yet well understood how dopaminergic therapy improves cognitive and motor function in Parkinson's disease (PD). One possibility is that it reduces the pathological synchronization within and between the cortex and basal ganglia, thus improving neural communication. We tested this hypothesis by recording scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in PD patients when On and Off medication, during a brief resting state epoch (no task), and during performance of a stop signal task that is thought to engage two partially overlapping (or different) frontal-basal-ganglia circuits. For resting state EEG, we measured pair-wise coherence between scalp electrodes in several frequency bands. Consistent with previous studies, in the Off medication state, those patients with the greatest clinical impairment had the strongest coherence, especially in the beta band, indicating pathological over-synchronization. Dopaminergic medication reduced this coherence. For the stop signal task, On vs. Off medication increased beta band power over right frontal cortex for successful stopping and over bilateral sensorimotor cortex for going, especially for those patients who showed greater clinical improvement. Thus, medication reduced pathological coherence in beta band at rest and increased task related beta power for two potentially dissociable cortico-basal ganglia circuits. These results support the hypothesis that dopaminergic medication in PD improves neural communication both at rest and for executive and motor function. PMID:24273711

  13. Dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease decreases cortical beta band coherence in the resting state and increases cortical beta band power during executive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jobi S; Strunk, Jon; Mak-McCully, Rachel; Houser, Melissa; Poizner, Howard; Aron, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    It is not yet well understood how dopaminergic therapy improves cognitive and motor function in Parkinson's disease (PD). One possibility is that it reduces the pathological synchronization within and between the cortex and basal ganglia, thus improving neural communication. We tested this hypothesis by recording scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in PD patients when On and Off medication, during a brief resting state epoch (no task), and during performance of a stop signal task that is thought to engage two partially overlapping (or different) frontal-basal-ganglia circuits. For resting state EEG, we measured pair-wise coherence between scalp electrodes in several frequency bands. Consistent with previous studies, in the Off medication state, those patients with the greatest clinical impairment had the strongest coherence, especially in the beta band, indicating pathological over-synchronization. Dopaminergic medication reduced this coherence. For the stop signal task, On vs. Off medication increased beta band power over right frontal cortex for successful stopping and over bilateral sensorimotor cortex for going, especially for those patients who showed greater clinical improvement. Thus, medication reduced pathological coherence in beta band at rest and increased task related beta power for two potentially dissociable cortico-basal ganglia circuits. These results support the hypothesis that dopaminergic medication in PD improves neural communication both at rest and for executive and motor function.

  14. Increased noise levels have different impacts on the anti-predator behaviour of two sympatric fish species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene K Voellmy

    Full Text Available Animals must avoid predation to survive and reproduce, and there is increasing evidence that man-made (anthropogenic factors can influence predator-prey relationships. Anthropogenic noise has been shown to have a variety of effects on many species, but work investigating the impact on anti-predator behaviour is rare. In this laboratory study, we examined how additional noise (playback of field recordings of a ship passing through a harbour, compared with control conditions (playback of recordings from the same harbours without ship noise, affected responses to a visual predatory stimulus. We compared the anti-predator behaviour of two sympatric fish species, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus and the European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus, which share similar feeding and predator ecologies, but differ in their body armour. Effects of additional-noise playbacks differed between species: sticklebacks responded significantly more quickly to the visual predatory stimulus during additional-noise playbacks than during control conditions, while minnows exhibited no significant change in their response latency. Our results suggest that elevated noise levels have the potential to affect anti-predator behaviour of different species in different ways. Future field-based experiments are needed to confirm whether this effect and the interspecific difference exist in relation to real-world noise sources, and to determine survival and population consequences.

  15. Increase of Carrier-to-Noise Ratio in GPS Receivers Caused by Continuous-Wave Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increased use of personal private devices (PPDs is drawing greater attention to the effects of continuous-wave interference (CWI on the performance of global positioning system (GPS receivers. The effective carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N0, an essential index of GNSS receiver performance, is studied in this paper. Receiver tracking performance deteriorates in the presence of interference. Hence, the effective C/N0, which measures tracking performance, decreases. However, simulations and bench tests have shown that the effective C/N0 may increase in the presence of CWI. The reason is that a sinusoidal signal is induced by the CWI in the correlator and may be tracked by the carrier tracking loop. Thus, the effective carrier power depends on the power of the signal induced by the CWI, and the effective C/N0 increases with the power of the CWI. The filtering of the CWI in the carrier tracking loop correlator and its effect on the phase locked loop (PLL tracking performance are analyzed. A mathematical model of the effect of the CWI on the effective C/N0 is derived. Simulation results show that the proposed model is more accurate than existing models, especially when the jam-to-signal ratio (JSR is greater than 30 dBc.

  16. The Scaling of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise with Increasing Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    A physical explanation for the saturation of broadband shock-associated noise (BBSAN) intensity with increasing jet stagnation temperature has eluded investigators. An explanation is proposed for this phenomenon with the use of an acoustic analogy. To isolate the relevant physics, the scaling of BBSAN peak intensity level at the sideline observer location is examined. The equivalent source within the framework of an acoustic analogy for BBSAN is based on local field quantities at shock wave shear layer interactions. The equivalent source combined with accurate calculations of the propagation of sound through the jet shear layer, using an adjoint vector Green's function solver of the linearized Euler equations, allows for predictions that retain the scaling with respect to stagnation pressure and allows for saturation of BBSAN with increasing stagnation temperature. The sources and vector Green's function have arguments involving the steady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes solution of the jet. It is proposed that saturation of BBSAN with increasing jet temperature occurs due to a balance between the amplication of the sound propagation through the shear layer and the source term scaling.

  17. Experimental Demonstration of Ideal Noise Shaping in Resonant Tunneling Delta-Sigma Modulator for High Resolution, Wide Band Analog-to-Digital Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Koichi; Sakou, Mario; Matsubara, Wataru; Mizutani, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Hideaki

    2006-04-01

    A ΔΣ modulator using a frequency modulation intermediate signal was demonstrated using a resonant tunneling logic gate called a monostable bistable transition logic element (MOBILE). This ΔΣ modulator is based on the nature of an FM signal and suitable for high-speed operation. Experiments using an InP-based MOBILE demonstrate good noise shaping characteristics. Moreover, the operation with a higher FM carrier frequency than the sampling frequency was demonstrated, showing equally good noise shaping performance. This makes the design of the voltage-controlled oscillator, which is a key component of the FM ΔΣ modulator, much easier. Consequently, an FM ΔΣ modulator using MOBILE is promising for high-resolution, wide-band analog-to-digital converters (ADCs).

  18. Binaural beats increase interhemispheric alpha-band coherence between auditory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcà, Marco; Mottaz, Anaïs; Guggisberg, Adrian G

    2016-02-01

    Binaural beats (BBs) are an auditory illusion occurring when two tones of slightly different frequency are presented separately to each ear. BBs have been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes through synchronization of the brain hemispheres. To test this, we recorded electroencephalograms (EEG) at rest and while participants listened to BBs or a monaural control condition during which both tones were presented to both ears. We calculated for each condition the interhemispheric coherence, which expressed the synchrony between neural oscillations of both hemispheres. Compared to monaural beats and resting state, BBs enhanced interhemispheric coherence between the auditory cortices. Beat frequencies in the alpha (10 Hz) and theta (4 Hz) frequency range both increased interhemispheric coherence selectively at alpha frequencies. In a second experiment, we evaluated whether this coherence increase has a behavioral aftereffect on binaural listening. No effects were observed in a dichotic digit task performed immediately after BBs presentation. Our results suggest that BBs enhance alpha-band oscillation synchrony between the auditory cortices during auditory stimulation. This effect seems to reflect binaural integration rather than entrainment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of timing noise on targeted and narrow-band coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ashton, G; Prix, R

    2014-01-01

    Most continuous gravitational-wave searches use Taylor expansions in the phase to model the spindown of neutron stars. Studies of pulsars demonstrate that their electromagnetic (EM) emissions suffer from timing noise, small deviations in the phase from Taylor expansion models. How the mechanism producing EM emission is related to any continuous gravitational-wave (CW) emission is unknown; if they either interact or are locked in phase then the CW will also experience timing noise. Any disparity between the signal and the search template used in matched filtering methods will result in a loss of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), referred to as 'mismatch'. In this work we assume the CW suffers a similar level of timing noise to its EM counterpart. We inject and recover fake CW signals, which include timing noise generated from observational data on the Crab pulsar. Measuring the mismatch over durations of order ~ 10 months, the effect is for the most part found to be small. This suggests recent so-called 'narrow-ban...

  20. Exposure to ELF-pulse modulated X band microwaves increases in vitro human astrocytoma cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Castejón, C; Pérez-Bruzón, R N; Llorente, M; Pes, N; Lacasa, C; Figols, T; Lahoz, M; Maestú, C; Vera-Gil, A; Del Moral, A; Azanza, M J

    2009-12-01

    Common concern about the biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) is increasing with the expansion of X-band microwaves (MW). The purpose of our work was to determine whether exposure to MW pulses in this range can induce toxic effects on human astrocytoma cells. Cultured astrocytoma cells (Clonetics line 1321N1) were submitted to 9.6 GHz carrier, 90% amplitude modulated by extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMF pulses inside a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode cell (GTEM-cell). Astrocytoma cultures were maintained inside a GTEM-incubator in standard culture conditions at 37+/-0.1 degrees C, 5% CO2, in a humidified atmosphere. Two experimental conditions were applied with field parameters respectively of: PW 100-120 ns; PRF 100-800 Hz; PRI 10-1.25 ms; power 0.34-0.60 mW; electric field strength 1.25-1.64 V/m; magnetic field peak amplitude 41.4-54.6 microOe. SAR was calculated to be 4.0 x 10-4 W/Kg. Astrocytoma samples were grown in a standard incubator. Reaching 70-80% confluence, cells were transferred to a GTEM-incubator. Experimental procedure included exposed human astrocytoma cells to MW for 15, 30, 60 min and 24 h and unexposed sham-control samples. Double blind method was applied. Our results showed that cytoskeleton proteins, cell morphology and viability were not modified. Statistically significant results showed increased cell proliferation rate under 24h MW exposure. Hsp-70 and Bcl-2 antiapoptotic proteins were observed in control and treated samples, while an increased expression of connexin 43 proteins was found in exposed samples. The implication of these results on increased proliferation is the subject of our current research.

  1. A novel 3-stage structure for a low-noise, high-gain and gain-flattened L-band erbium doped fiber amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强则煊; 何赛灵; 张徐亮; 沈林放

    2004-01-01

    The configuration of the novel three-stage L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier with very large and flat gain and very low noise figure presented in this paper uses the forward ASE (amplified spontaneous emission) from the first section of the EDF (erbium-doped fiber) and the backward ASE from the third section of the EDF (both serve as the secondary pump sources of energy) to pump the second EDF. To improve the pump efficiency, the power of the pump is split into two parts (with a ratio of e.g. 2:7). The characteristics of this L-band EDFA are studied on the basis of the Giles Model with ASE.

  2. A novel 3-stage structure for a low-noise, high-gain and gain-flattened L-band erbium doped fiber amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强则煊; 何赛灵; 张徐亮; 沈林放

    2004-01-01

    The configuration of the novel three-stage L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier with very large and flat gain and very low noise figure presented in this paper uses the forward ASE (amplified spontaneous emission) from the first section of the EDF (erbium-doped fiber) and the backward AS E from the third section of the EDF (both serve as the secondary pump sources of energy) to pump the second EDF. To improve the pump efficiency, the power of the pump is split into two parts(with a ratio of e.g. 2:7). The characteristics of this L-band EDFA are studied on the basis of the Giles Model with ASE.

  3. A low-phase-noise wide-band CMOS quadrature VCO for multi-standard RF front-ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fard, Ali; Andreani, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    A low phase noise CMOS LC quadrature VCO (QVCO) with a wide frequency range of 3.6-5.6 GHz, designed in a standard 0.18 μm process for multi-standard front-ends, is presented. A significant advantage of the topology is the larger oscillation amplitude when compared to other conventional QVCO...... structures. The QVCO is compared to a double cross-coupled LC-tank differential oscillator, both in theory and experiments, for evaluation of its phase noise, providing a good insight into its performance. The measured data displays up to 2 dBc/Hz lower phase noise in the 1/f2 region for the QVCO, when...... consuming twice the current of the differential VCO, based on an identical LC-tank. Experimental results on the QVCO show a phase noise level of -127.5 dBc/Hz at 3 MHz offset from a 5.6 GHz carrier while dissipating 8 mA of current, resulting in a figure of merit of 181.3 dBc/Hz....

  4. Exposure to industrial wideband noise increases connective tissue in the rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João R Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rats were daily exposed (eight hours/day for a period of four weeks to the same high-intensity wideband noise that was recorded before in a large textile plant. Histologic observation of liver sections of the rats was used to perform quantitative comparison of hepatic connective tissue (dyed by Masson trichromic staining between the noise-exposed and control animals. For that, we have photographed at random centrolobular areas of stained rat liver sections. We found that noise exposure resulted in significant enhancement in the area of collagen-rich connective tissue present in the centrolobular domain of the rat liver. Our data strengthen previous evidence showing that fibrotic transformation is a systemic effect of chronic exposure of rodents and humans to industrial wideband noise.

  5. Increased Alpha Band Functional Connectivity Following the Quadrato Motor Training: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lasaponara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quadrato Motor Training (QMT is a new training paradigm, which was found to increase cognitive flexibility, creativity and spatial cognition. In addition, QMT was reported to enhance inter- and intra-hemispheric alpha coherence as well as Fractional Anisotropy (FA in a number of white matter pathways including corpus callosum. Taken together, these results seem to suggest that electrophysiological and structural changes induced by QMT may be due to an enhanced interplay and communication of the different brain areas within and between the right and the left hemisphere. In order to test this hypothesis using the exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA, we estimated the current neural density and lagged linear connectivity (LLC of the alpha band in the resting state electroencephalography (rsEEG recorded with open (OE and closed eyes (CE at three different time points, following 6 and 12 weeks of daily QMT. Significant changes were observed for the functional connectivity. In particular, we found that limbic and fronto-temporal alpha connectivity in the OE condition increased after 6 weeks, while it enhanced at the CE condition in occipital network following 12-weeks of daily training. These findings seem to show that the QMT may have dissociable long-term effects on the functional connectivity depending on the different ways of recording rsEEG. OE recording pointed out a faster onset of Linear Lag Connectivity modulations that tend to decay as quickly, while CE recording showed sensible effect only after the complete 3-months training.

  6. Impulse noise transiently increased the permeability of nerve and glial cell membranes, an effect accentuated by a recent brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säljö, Annette; Huang, Ying-Lai; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2003-08-01

    A single exposure to intense impulse noise may cause diffuse brain injury, revealed by increased expression of immediate early gene products, transiently altered distribution of neurofilaments, accumulation of beta-amyloid precursor protein, apoptosis, and gliosis. Neither hemorrage nor any gross structural damage are seen. The present study focused on whether impulse noise exposure increased the permeability of nerve and glial cell membranes to proteins. Also, we investigated whether a preceding, minor focal surgical brain lesion accentuated the leakage of cytosolic proteins. Anaesthetized rats were exposed to a single impulse noise at either 199 or 202 dB for 2 milliseconds. Transiently elevated levels of the cellular protein neuron specific enolase (NSE) and the glial cytoplasmic protein S-100 were recorded in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during the first hours after the exposure to 202 dB. A surgical brain injury, induced the day before the exposure to the impulse noise, was associated with significantly increased concentrations of both markers in the CSF. It is concluded that intense impulse noise damages both nerve and glial cells, an effect aggravated by a preexisting surgical lesion. The impulse of the shock wave, i.e. the pressure integrated over time, is likely to be the injurious mechanism. The abnormal membrane permeability and the associated cytoskeletal changes may initiate events, which eventually result in a progressive diffuse brain injury.

  7. Simulation-based conceptual design of an acoustic metamaterial with full band gap using an air-based 1-3 piezoelectric composite for ultrasonic noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Shahrokh; Eskandari-Ghadi, Morteza; Rahimian, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims at proposing a novel type of acoustic metamaterials with complete band gap composed of piezoelectric rods with square array as inclusions embedded in an air background (matrix). A modified plane wave expansion method accompanied with the principles of the Bloch-Floquet method with electromechanical coupling effect and also impedance spectra are used to get a band frequency and to investigate the passband for the selected cut of piezoelectric rods. We investigate both the electromechanical coupling coefficient and mechanical quality factor and their dependency to passband and bandwidth, which depends on both the density and the wave impedance of the matrix and the inclusions (rods). The ratio of the volume of inclusion to the matrix is used to define the fill factor or the so-called inclusion ratio, to introduce the bandwidth as a function of that. Furthermore, the fabrication method is presented in this paper. The results make a suitable foundation for design purposes and may develop an inherently passive ultrasonic noise control. In addition, the results provide the required guidance for a simulation-based design of elastic wave filters or wave guide that might be useful in high-precision mechanical systems operated in certain frequency ranges and switches made of piezoelectric materials; they also propose a novel type of elastic metamaterials, which is independent of the wave direction and has an equal sensitivity in all directions in which it reacts omnidirectionally and mitigates the occupational noise exposure.

  8. A 220-1100 MHz low phase-noise frequency synthesizer with wide-band VCO and selectable I/Q divider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chen; Renjie, Gong; Xu, Cheng; Yulin, Zhang; Zhong, Gao; Guiliang, Guo; Yuepeng, Yan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a low phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer which provides an in-phase/quadrature-phase (I/Q) signal over a frequency range of 220-1100 MHz for wireless networks of industrial automation (WIA) applications. Two techniques are proposed to achieve the wide range. First, a 1.4-2.2 GHz ultralow gain voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is adopted by using 128 tuning curves. Second, a selectable I/Q divider is employed to divide the VCO frequency by 2 or 3 or 4 or 6. Besides, a phase-switching prescaler is proposed to lower PLL phase noise, a self-calibrated charge pump is used to suppress spur, and a detect-boosting phase frequency detector is adopted to shorten settling time. With a 200 kHz loop bandwidth, lowest measured phase noise is -106 dBc/Hz at a 10 kHz offset and -131 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset. Fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process, the synthesizer occupies a chip area of 1.2 mm2, consumes only 15 mW from the 1.8 V power supply, and settles within 13.2 μs. The synthesizer is optimized for the WIA applications, but can also be used for other short-range wireless communications, such as 433, 868, 916 MHz ISM band applications.

  9. A low-phase-noise Ka-band push-push voltage-controlled oscillator using CMOS/glass-integrated passive device technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a Ka-band CMOS push-push voltage- controlled oscillator (VCO) integrated into a glass-integrated passive device (GIPD) process is presented. The transformer, λ/4 transmission line, and inductors of the VCO are realized in the GIPD process, achieving superior performances, and therefore improve the phase noise of the VCO. Moreover, the transformer-based VCO is a differential Hartley topology to further reduce the phase noise and chip area. Operating at 1.8 V supply voltage, the VCO core consumes merely 3.8 mW of dc power. The measured phase noise is -109.18 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from the 30.84 GHz oscillation frequency. The push-push VCO also demonstrates a 24.5 dB fundamental rejection, and exhibits an 8.4% tuning range. Compared with recently published CMOS-based VCOs, it is observed that the proposed VCO exhibits excellent performance under low power consumption.

  10. Human detection and ranging at long range and through light foliage using a W-band noise radar with an embedded tone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a millimeter-wave (mm-wave) radar system that has been used to range humans concealed in light foliage at 30 meters and range exposed humans at distances up to 213 meters. Human micro-Doppler is also detected through light foliage at 30 meters and up to 90 meters when no foliage is present. This is done by utilizing a composite signal consisting of two waveforms: a wide-band noise waveform and a single tone. These waveforms are summed together and transmitted simultaneously. Matched filtering of the received and transmitted noise signals is performed to range targets with high resolution, while the received single tone signal is used for Doppler analysis. The Doppler measurements are used to distinguish between different human movements using characteristic micro-Doppler signals. Using hardware and software filters allows for simultaneous processing of both the noise and Doppler waveforms. Our measurements establish the mm-wave system's ability to range humans up to 213 meters and distinguish between different human movements at 90 meters. The radar system was also tested through light foliage. In this paper, we present results on human target ranging and Doppler characterization of human movements.

  11. A method of forecasting wide band noise in axial blowers. Part 2; Prognoseverfahren fuer den Breitbandlaerm bei Axialventilatoren. Teil 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Carolus, T. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Fluid- und Thermodynamik

    2003-05-01

    Apart from the aerodynamic data of blowers, their acoustic properties are gaining importance. In industrial practice, blower noise is commonly estimated by very simple methods which only take account of very basic machine parameters. On the other hand, many semi-empirical models have been published for calculating blower noise which require more detailed input parameters, e.g. the velocity field around the blades, boundary layer parameters, etc. These models promise to be more accurate than the simple methods. [German] Neben den aerodynamischen Daten gewinnt die Schallleistung von Ventilatoren in zunehmendem Masse an Bedeutung. In der industriellen Praxis wird das Ventilatorgeraeusch bislang mit sehr einfachen Verfahren abgeschaetzt, die nur grundlegende Maschinengroessen beruecksichtigen. In der Literatur findet man allerdings eine Vielzahl semi-empirischer Modelle fuer die Schallleistungsberechnung von Ventilatoren, die detailliertere Eingangsparameter wie das Geschwindigkeitsfeld um die Schaufeln, Grenzschichtparameter usw. erfordern. Diese Modelle versprechen eine bessere Schallprognose als die einfachen Verfahren. (orig.)

  12. Hybrid and electric low-noise cars cause an increase in traffic accidents involving vulnerable road users in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Stephan; Petri, Maximilian; Haas, Philipp; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Due to resource scarcity, the number of low-noise and electric cars is expected to increase rapidly. The frequent use of these cars will lead to a significant reduction of traffic related noise and pollution. On the other hand, due to the adaption and conditioning of vulnerable road users the number of traffic accidents involving pedestrians and bicyclists is postulated to increase as well. Children, older people with reduced eyesight and the blind are especially reliant on a combination of acoustic and visual warning signals with approaching or accelerating vehicles. This is even more evident in urban areas where the engine sound is the dominating sound up to 30 kph (kilometres per hour). Above this, tyre-road interaction is the main cause of traffic noise. With the missing typical engine sound a new sound design is necessary to prevent traffic accidents in urban areas. Drivers should not be able to switch the sound generator off.

  13. A PLL Exploiting Sub-Sampling of the VCO Output to Reduce In-band Phase Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Boshali, Mounir; Nauta, Bram

    2009-01-01

    Abstract— In this paper, we present a 2.2-GHz low jitter PLL based on sub-sampling. It uses a phase-detector/charge-pump (PD/CP) that sub-samples the VCO output with the reference clock. In contrast to what happens in a classical PLL, the PD/CP noise is not multiplied by N2 in this sub-sampling PLL.

  14. A PLL Exploiting Sub-Sampling of the VCO Output to Reduce In-band Phase Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Xiang; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Boshali, Mounir; Nauta, Bram

    2009-01-01

    Abstract— In this paper, we present a 2.2-GHz low jitter PLL based on sub-sampling. It uses a phase-detector/charge-pump (PD/CP) that sub-samples the VCO output with the reference clock. In contrast to what happens in a classical PLL, the PD/CP noise is not multiplied by N2 in this sub-sampling PLL.

  15. Utilization of multi-band OFDM modulation to increase traffic rate of phosphor-LED wireless VLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Liu, Yen-Liang

    2015-01-26

    To increase the traffic rate in phosphor-LED visible light communication (VLC), a multi-band orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) modulation is first proposed and demonstrated. In the measurement, we do not utilize optical blue filter to increase modulation bandwidth of phosphor-LED in the VLC system. In this proposed scheme, different bands of OFDM signals are applied to different LED chips in a LED lamp, this can avoid the power fading and nonlinearity issue by applying the same OFDM signal to all the LED chips in a LED lamp. Here, the maximum increase percentages of traffic rates are 41.1%, 17.8% and 17.8% under received illuminations of 200, 500 and 1000 Lux, respectively, when the proposed three-band OFDM modulation is used in the VLC system. In addition, the analysis and verification by experiments are also performed.

  16. Longest increasing subsequence as expectation of a simple nonlinear stochastic partial differential equation with a low noise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzav, E; Nechaev, S; Vasilyev, O

    2007-06-01

    We report some observations concerning the statistics of longest increasing subsequences (LIS). We argue that the expectation of LIS, its variance, and apparently the full distribution function appears in statistical analysis of some simple nonlinear stochastic partial differential equation in the limit of very low noise intensity.

  17. Increasing the noise immunity of optical-electronic systems based on video cameras with an optical converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronenko, M. P.; Gulyaev, P. Yu; Seregin, A. E.; Poluhina, K. G.

    2015-11-01

    The luminophor coating of an electro- optical converter afterglow introduces an additional error to the measurement. The ratio that allows to calculate the intensity of spurious illumination at each subsequent frame have been determinate according to experimental data of luminescence kinetics. The proposed method increases the noise immunity of the electrooptical converter by eliminating luminophor afterglow.

  18. Acute partial sleep deprivation due to environmental noise increases weight gain by reducing energy expenditure in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Jennifer B; Teske, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic partial sleep deprivation (SD) by environmental noise exposure increases weight gain and feeding in rodents, which contrasts weight loss after acute SD by physical methods. This study tested whether acute environmental noise exposure reduced sleep and its effect on weight gain, food intake, physical activity, and energy expenditure (EE). It was hypothesized that acute exposure would (1) increase weight gain and feeding and (2) reduce sleep, physical activity, and EE (total and individual components); and (3) behavioral changes would persist throughout recovery from SD. Three-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats slept ad libitum, were noise exposed (12-h light cycle), and allowed to recover (36 h). Weight gain, food intake, sleep/wake, physical activity, and EE were measured. Acute environmental noise exposure had no effect on feeding, increased weight gain (P sleep (P sleep, rest, and physical activity reduce total EE and contribute to weight gain during acute SD and recovery from SD. These data emphasize the importance of increasing physical activity after SD to prevent obesity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  19. Improved analog and AC performance with increased noise immunity using nanotube junctionless field effect transistor (NJLFET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewari, Sonam; Nath, Vandana; Haldar, Subhasis; Deswal, S. S.; Gupta, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper for the first time, the noise immunity and analog performance of nanotube junctionless field effect transistor (NJLFET) has been investigated. Small signal AC performance metrics namely Scattering parameters (S-parameters) have been analyzed along with analog parameters to validate the suitability of NJLFET for RFIC design. NJLFET performance is examined by comparing its performance with junctionless gate-all-around (JLGAA) MOSFET. It has been inferred that NJLFET has improved I on/ I off ratio directing improved digital performance at higher channel lengths, reduced channel resistance ( R ch) which enables the MOSFET to provide a low resistance path to current and improved early voltage ( V EA) which shows the capability for high-gain amplification and higher g m/ g d directing high intrinsic dc gain. Higher f Tmax for NJLFET has been observed posing its potential for terahertz applications. Higher gain transconductance frequency product makes NJLFET an ultimate device for high-speed switching applications. Higher maximum transducer power gain in NJLFET implies higher power gain than JLGAA MOSFET. Also, NJLFET exhibits lower harmonic distortion and it has been explained by significant reduction in third-order derivative of transconductance, g m3. Reduction in g m3 shows that NJLFET provides better linearity over JLGAA and is more suitable for RFIC design. Also the S-parameters namely S11, S12, S21 and S22 have been analyzed to verify the small signal performance. A lower magnitude for reflection coefficients S11 and S22 depicts minimum reflection and higher matching between ports in NJLFET than JLGAA MOSFET. Higher voltage gains S12 and S21 are present in NJLFET than its counterpart which shows the higher gains that can be achieved using nanotube architecture. The noise metrics which are noise figure and noise conductance show significant reduction for NJLFET justifying its noise immunity.

  20. Electro-Static Discharge Protection Design for V-Band Low-Noise Amplifier Using Radio Frequency Junction Varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Sing-Kai; Hsu, Shawn S. H.

    2013-04-01

    The RF junction varactors are employed as electro-static discharge (ESD) protection devices and co-designed with 60 GHz low-noise amplifier (LNA) fabricated in a 65-nm CMOS technology. The junction varactor acts as an ESD diode to bypass ESD current during ESD zapping, and also utilized as a capacitor to be a part of input matching network of the LNA in normal RF operation. By transmission line pulse (TLP) measurement, the ESD protection capabilities of RF junction varactors are characterized with different device parameters. The experimental results demonstrate excellent second breakdown currents (It2) and high ratios of the ESD levels to parasitic capacitances (VESD/CESD). With ESD/matching co-design methodology, the ESD-protected LNA demonstrates a second breakdown current It2 of 1.4 A, corresponding to a 2-kV human-body-model (HBM) ESD protection level with a noise figure (NF) of 6.6 dB and a peak gain of 16.5 dB at 60 GHz under a power consumption of only 28 mW.

  1. Evaluation of Variable-Depth Liner Configurations for Increased Broadband Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.; Howerton, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of variable-depth geometry on the amount of noise reduction that can be achieved with acoustic liners. Results for two variable-depth liners tested in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube demonstrate significant broadband noise reduction. An impedance prediction model is combined with two propagation codes to predict corresponding sound pressure level profiles over the length of the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The comparison of measured and predicted sound pressure level profiles is sufficiently favorable to support use of these tools for investigation of a number of proposed variable-depth liner configurations. Predicted sound pressure level profiles for these proposed configurations reveal a number of interesting features. Liner orientation clearly affects the sound pressure level profile over the length of the liner, but the effect on the total attenuation is less pronounced. The axial extent of attenuation at an individual frequency continues well beyond the location where the liner depth is optimally tuned to the quarter-wavelength of that frequency. The sound pressure level profile is significantly affected by the way in which variable-depth segments are distributed over the length of the liner. Given the broadband noise reduction capability for these liner configurations, further development of impedance prediction models and propagation codes specifically tuned for this application is warranted.

  2. Rheotaxis performance increases with group size in a coupled phase model with sensory noise. The effects of noise and group size on rheotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicoli, A.; Bak-Coleman, J.; Coombs, S.; Paley, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many fish exhibit rheotaxis, a behavior in which fish orient themselves relative to flow. Rheotaxis confers many benefits, including energetic cost savings and interception of drifting prey. Despite the fact that most species of fish school during at least some portion of their life, little is known about the importance of rheotactic behavior to schooling fish and, conversely, how the presence of nearby conspecifics affects rheotactic behavior. Understanding how rheotaxis is modified by social factors is thus of ecological importance. Here we present a mathematical model in the form of an all-to-all, coupled-oscillator framework over the non-Euclidean space of fish orientations to model group rheotactic behavior. Individuals in the model measure the orientation of their neighbors and the flow direction relative to their own orientation. These measures are corrupted by sensory noise. We study the effect of sensory noise and group size on internal (i.e., within the school) and external (i.e., with the flow) disagreement in orientation. We find that under noisy environmental conditions, increased group size improves rheotaxis. Results of this study have implications for understanding animal behavior, as well as for potential applications in bio-inspired engineering.

  3. Rhythmic masking release: Contribution of cues for perceptual organization to the cross-spectral fusion of concurrent narrow-band noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Martine; Bregman, Albert S.; Ahad, Pierre A.

    2002-04-01

    The contribution of temporal asynchrony, spatial separation, and frequency separation to the cross-spectral fusion of temporally contiguous brief narrow-band noise bursts was studied using the Rhythmic Masking Release paradigm (RMR). RMR involves the discrimination of one of two possible rhythms, despite perceptual masking of the rhythm by an irregular sequence of sounds identical to the rhythmic bursts, interleaved among them. The release of the rhythm from masking can be induced by causing the fusion of the irregular interfering sounds with concurrent ``flanking'' sounds situated in different frequency regions. The accuracy and the rated clarity of the identified rhythm in a 2-AFC procedure were employed to estimate the degree of fusion of the interferring sounds with flanking sounds. The results suggest that while synchrony fully fuses short-duration noise bursts across frequency and across space (i.e., across ears and loudspeakers), an asynchrony of 20-40 ms produces no fusion. Intermediate asynchronies of 10-20 ms produce partial fusion, where the presence of other cues is critical for unambiguous grouping. Though frequency and spatial separation reduced fusion, neither of these manipulations was sufficient to abolish it. For the parameters varied in this study, stimulus onset asynchrony was the dominant cue determining fusion, but there were additive effects of the other cues. Temporal synchrony appears to be critical in determining whether brief sounds with abrupt onsets and offsets are heard as one event or more than one.

  4. Wide band noise: Calculation of the wide-band aeroacoustic noise spectrum of axial blower rotors on the basis of flow field variables. With user info on the program 'SIBNOISE-AX'. Final report; Breitbandlaerm - Berechnung des breitbandigen aeroakustischen Geraeuschspektrums von Axialventilatorlaufraedern aus Stromfeldgroessen. Mit Benutzeranleitung zum Programm 'SIBNOISE-AX'. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carolus, T.; Schneider, M.

    2002-10-01

    A computer program for predicting the wide-band noise spectrom of axial blower rotors from flow field variables was developed. First, a bibliographic search was carried out on current methods of noise prediction. The main input parameters of the selected methods were varied systematically in the sense of a sensitivity analysis in order to check the plausibility of the results and assess the accuracy required of the input parameters. The selected methods were implemented in a user-friendly PC program ('SIBNOISE-AX'). The methods and the computer program were tested using the example of two blowers, i.e. a low-pressure and a high-pressure axial blower. Both blowers were calculated without guide wheels as the research project focused on rotor wheel noise only. Aerodynamic and acoustic data were obtained in a standard test stand in order to provide a data base. Time-averaged flow fields in the rotor wheels were calculated using a commercial CFD code, and parameters like boundary layer thickness and relevant velocities in the blade region were derived which - in addition to simple estimates - were used as input parameters in the noise prediction methods. The results provided by the calculations differed depending on the method employed, but some methods provided results that were in good agreement with the measurements. Their accuracy was sufficient even when the input parameters were only estimated and could be improved further by using the numerically calculated flow field parameters. The research project was thus completed successfully.

  5. Reduction of timing jitter and intensity noise in normal-dispersion passively mode-locked fiber lasers by narrow band-pass filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Peng; Song, Youjian; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kwon, Dohyeon; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-11-17

    Fiber lasers mode-locked with normal cavity dispersion have recently attracted great attention due to large output pulse energy and femtosecond pulse duration. Here we accurately characterized the timing jitter of normal-dispersion fiber lasers using a balanced cross-correlation method. The timing jitter characterization experiments show that the timing jitter of normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber lasers can be significantly reduced by using narrow band-pass filtering (e.g., 7-nm bandwidth filtering in this work). We further identify that the timing jitter of the fiber laser is confined in a limited range, which is almost independent of cavity dispersion map due to the amplifier-similariton formation by insertion of the narrow bandpass filter. The lowest observed timing jitter reaches 0.57 fs (rms) integrated from 10 kHz to 10 MHz Fourier frequency. The rms relative intensity noise (RIN) is also reduced from 0.37% to 0.02% (integrated from 1 kHz to 5 MHz Fourier frequency) by the insertion of narrow band-pass filter.

  6. Complex noise exposures: an energy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahroon, W A; Hamernik, R P; Davis, R I

    1993-02-01

    Industrial noise environments usually present a complex stimulus to the exposed individual. These environments often contain mixtures of multiply reflected impact noises and a relatively Gaussian broadband noise. Noise exposure standards do not consider the possibility of interactions between the two classes of noise that can exacerbate the amount of hearing trauma. This paper presents the results of a large series of experiments designed to document the hazard posed to hearing from complex noise exposures. Twenty-three groups of chinchillas with 5 to 11 animals per group (total N = 135) were exposed for 5 days to either octave bands of noise, impacts alone, or combinations of impact and octave bands of noise. Evoked potential measures of hearing thresholds and cochleograms were used to quantify the noise-induced trauma. The results show that, for sound exposure levels (SEL) which produce less than approximately 10 dB PTS (permanent threshold shift) or 5% total sensory cell loss, equal-energy exposures tend to produce equivalent effects on hearing. However, there is a range of at least 10 dB in the SEL parameter where hearing loss from equal-energy exposures at a particular SEL can be exacerbated by increasing the repetition rate of the impacts or by the addition of a Gaussian low-level noise. The exacerbation of trauma from the addition of a Gaussian continuous noise is dependent upon the spectrum of that noise.

  7. High intensity interior aircraft noise increases the risk of high diastolic blood pressure in Indonesian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the effects of aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, and other factors on the risk of high diastolic blood pressure (DBP in Indonesian Air Force pilots.Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted using data extracted from annual medical check-ups indoctrination aerophysiologic training records at the Saryanto Aviation and Aerospace Health Institute (LAKESPRA in Jakarta from January 2003 – September 2008. For analysis of DBP: the case group with DBP ≥ 90 mmHg were compared with contral group with DBP < 79 mmHG. One case matched to 12 controls.Results: Out of 567 pilots, 544 (95.9% had complete medical records. For this analysis there were 40 cases of high DBP and 480 controls for DBP. Pilots exposed to aircraft noise 90-95 dB rather than 70-80 dB had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 2.70; 95% confi dence interval (CI = 1.05-6.97]. Pilots with resting pulse rates of ≥ 81/minute rather than ≤ 80/minute had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.26-5.61. In terms of total fl ight hours, pilots who had 1401-11125 hours rather than 147-1400 hours had a 3.2-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 3.18; 95% CI = 1.01-10.03.Conclusion: High interior aircraft noise, high total flight hours,  and high resting pulse rate, increased risk for high DBP. Self assessment of resting pulse rate can be used to control the risk of high DBP. (Med J Indones 2009; 276: 276-82Keywords: diastolic blood pressure, aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, military pilots

  8. Does gastric banding for morbid obesity reduce or increase gastroesophageal reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Pekka; Victorzon, Mikael; Niemi, Risto; Mäkelä, Jyrki

    2006-11-01

    Conflicting results regarding the influence of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have been published. A prospective follow-up study was conducted in 31 patients (male/female 5/26, mean age 44 +/- 11 SD years) with 24-hour pH and manometry recordings, symptom assessment, and upper GI endoscopy. Total number of reflux episodes decreased from a mean value of 44.6 +/- 23.7 SD preoperatively to 22.9 +/- 17.1 postoperatively (P=0.0006), after a median follow-up time of 19 months (range 7-32 months). Total reflux time decreased from 9.5% +/- 6.2% to 3.5% +/- 3.7%, P=0.0009, and DeMeester score decreased from 38.5 +/- 24.9 to 18.6 +/- 20.4, P=0.03. Symptomatic patients decreased from 48.4% preoperatively to 16.1% postoperatively (P=0.01), medication for GERD decreased from 35.5% to 12.9% (P=0.05), and the diagnosis of GERD on 24-hour pH recordings decreased from 77.4% to 37.5% (P=0.01). There were no pouch enlargements seen on upper GI endoscopy. Esophageal motility was unchanged, but 36% of the patients had incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter following the operation (P<0.0001). Mean BMI decreased from 46.0 +/- 5.46 to 38.4 +/- 6.45 (P<0.0001), excess weight from 60.0 kg +/- 18.58 kg, 44.9% +/- 6.56% to 38.4 kg +/- 20.27 kg, 28.4% +/- 10.97% (P<0.0001). No association between the postoperative diagnosis of GERD and the amount of weight loss could be found. The correctly placed gastric band is an effective anti-reflux barrier in the short term. Long-term results have to be awaited.

  9. Increasing LIGO sensitivity by feedforward subtraction of auxiliary length control noise

    CERN Document Server

    Meadors, Grant David; Riles, Keith

    2013-01-01

    LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, has been designed and constructed to measure gravitational wave strain via differential arm length. The LIGO 4-km Michelson arms with Fabry-Perot cavities have auxiliary length control servos for suppressing Michelson motion of the beam-splitter and arm cavity input mirrors, which degrades interferometer sensitivity. We demonstrate how a post-facto pipeline called AMPS improves a data sample from LIGO Science Run~6 with feedforward subtraction. Dividing data into 1024-second windows, AMPS numerically fits filter functions representing the frequency-domain transfer functions from Michelson length channels into the gravitational-wave strain data channel for each window, then subtracts the filtered Michelson channel noise (witness) from the strain channel (target). In this paper we describe the algorithm, assess achievable improvements in sensitivity to astrophysical sources, and consider relevance to future interferometry.

  10. Partial sleep deprivation by environmental noise increases food intake and body weight in obesity-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Teske, Jennifer A; Billington, Charles J; Kotz, Catherine M

    2013-07-01

    Sleep restriction in humans increases risk for obesity, but previous rodent studies show weight loss following sleep deprivation, possibly due to stressful methods used to prevent sleep. Obesity-resistant (OR) rats exhibit consolidated-sleep and resistance to weight gain. It was hypothesized that sleep disruption by a less-stressful method would increase body weight, and the effect of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on body weight in OR and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was examined. OR and SD rats (n = 12/group) were implanted with transmitters to record sleep/wake. After baseline recording, six SD and six OR rats underwent 8 h PSD during light phase for 9 days. Sleep was reduced using recordings of random noise. Sleep/wake states were scored as wakefulness (W), slow-wave-sleep (SWS), and rapid-eye-movement-sleep (REMS). Total number of transitions between stages, SWS-delta-power, food intake, and body weight were documented. Exposure to noise decreased SWS and REMS time, while increasing W time. Sleep-deprivation increased the number of transitions between stages and SWS-delta-power. Further, PSD during the rest phase increased recovery sleep during the active phase. The PSD SD and OR rats had greater food intake and body weight compared to controls PSD by less-stressful means increases body weight in rats. Also, PSD during the rest phase increases active period sleep. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  11. A Low Power Differential C-band Low Noise Amplifier Based on Noise Cancellation Technology%基于噪声抵消技术的低功耗C频段差分低噪声放大器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵飞义; 张万荣; 丁春宝; 陈昌麟; 胡瑞心; 卓汇涵; 江之韵; 白杨; 陈亮

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a low power differential low noise amplifier( LNA) for C-band application based on noise cancellation technology is presented. The LNA consists of input stage, amplifier stage and output buffer stage. The input stage realizes the input match and noise cancellation by a cascade of the differential pairs of direct cross coupling and cross coupling. Current reuse structure with resistance-inductance paral-lel feedback is adopted at amplifier stage to obtain high gain, good gain flatness and low power consump-tion. The output stage employs a source-follower to achieve excellent output match. Based on TSMC 0. 18 μm CMOS process library,the simulation results show that over the C-band, the gain is 20. 4 ± 0. 5 dB, noise figure over 2. 3~2. 4 dB, input and output match loss is below -11 dB, stable factor than 1, 1 dB compress point is -16. 6 dBm, IIP3 is -7 dBm at 6. 5 GHz. With the power supply voltage of 2. 5 V, the circuit power consumption is only 6. 75 mW.%设计了一款基于噪声抵消技术的低功耗C频段的差分低噪声放大器。该放大器由输入级、放大级以及输出缓冲级3个模块构成,其中输入级采用电容交叉耦合的差分对与直接交叉耦合结构差分对级联,实现输入匹配及噪声抵消;放大级采用具有电阻-电感并联反馈的电流复用结构来获得高的增益、良好的增益平坦性及低的功耗;输出缓冲级采用源跟随器结构,实现良好的输出匹配。基于TSMC 0.18μm CMOS工艺库,验证表明在C频段,放大器的增益为20.4±0.5 dB,噪声系数介于2.3~2.4 dB之间,输入和输出的回波损耗均优于-11 dB,稳定因子恒大于1,在6.5 GHz下,1 dB压缩点为-16.6 dBm,IIP3为-7 dBm,在2.5 V电压下,电路功耗仅为6.75 mW。

  12. Factors limiting performance in a multitone intensity-discrimination task: disentangling non-optimal decision weights and increased internal noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Oberfeld

    Full Text Available To identify factors limiting performance in multitone intensity discrimination, we presented sequences of five pure tones alternating in level between loud (85 dB SPL and soft (30, 55, or 80 dB SPL. In the "overall-intensity task", listeners detected a level increment on all of the five tones. In the "masking task", the level increment was imposed only on the soft tones, rendering the soft tones targets and loud tones task-irrelevant maskers. Decision weights quantifying the importance of the five tone levels for the decision were estimated using methods of molecular psychophysics. Compatible with previous studies, listeners placed higher weights on the loud tones than on the soft tones in the overall-intensity condition. In the masking task, the decisions were systematically influenced by the to-be-ignored loud tones (maskers. Using a maximum-likelihood technique, we estimated the internal noise variance and tested whether the internal noise was higher in the alternating-level five-tone sequences than in sequences presenting only the soft or only the loud tones. For the overall-intensity task, we found no evidence for increased internal noise, but listeners applied suboptimal decision weights. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that the presence of the loud tones does not impair the precision of the representation of the intensity of the soft tones available at the decision stage, but that this information is not used in an optimal fashion due to a difficulty in attending to the soft tones. For the masking task, in some cases our data indicated an increase in internal noise. Additionally, listeners applied suboptimal decision weights. The maximum-likelihood analyses we developed should also be useful for other tasks or other sensory modalities.

  13. Artificial Neural Network classification of operator workload with an assessment of time variation and noise-enhancement to increase performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander James Casson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Workload classification---the determination of whether a human operator is in a high or low workload state to allow their working environment to be optimized---is an emerging application of passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI systems. Practical systems must not only accurately detect the current workload state, but also have good temporal performance: requiring little time to set up and train the classifier, and ensuring that the reported performance level is consistent and predictable over time. This paper investigates the temporal performance of an Artificial Neural Network based classification system. For networks trained on little EEG data good classification accuracies (86% are achieved over very short time frames, but substantial decreases in accuracy are found as the time gap between the network training and the actual use is increased. Noise-enhanced processing, where artificially generated noise is deliberately added to the testing signals, is investigated as a potential technique to mitigate this degradation without requiring the network to be re-trained using more data. Small stochastic resonance effects are demonstrated whereby the classification process gets better in the presence of more noise. The effect is small and does not eliminate the need for re-training, but it is consistent, and this is the first demonstration of such effects for non-evoked/free-running EEG signals suitable for passive BCI.

  14. Artificial Neural Network classification of operator workload with an assessment of time variation and noise-enhancement to increase performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Workload classification-the determination of whether a human operator is in a high or low workload state to allow their working environment to be optimized-is an emerging application of passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems. Practical systems must not only accurately detect the current workload state, but also have good temporal performance: requiring little time to set up and train the classifier, and ensuring that the reported performance level is consistent and predictable over time. This paper investigates the temporal performance of an Artificial Neural Network based classification system. For networks trained on little EEG data good classification accuracies (86%) are achieved over very short time frames, but substantial decreases in accuracy are found as the time gap between the network training and the actual use is increased. Noise-enhanced processing, where artificially generated noise is deliberately added to the testing signals, is investigated as a potential technique to mitigate this degradation without requiring the network to be re-trained using more data. Small stochastic resonance effects are demonstrated whereby the classification process gets better in the presence of more noise. The effect is small and does not eliminate the need for re-training, but it is consistent, and this is the first demonstration of such effects for non-evoked/free-running EEG signals suitable for passive BCI.

  15. 一种Ka波段低噪声下变频器组件%Novel Ka-band low-noise down-converter assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鸣; 李兴国

    2006-01-01

    An efficient way to design a down-converter assembly for the Ka-band millimeter system is presented, in which dielectric resonators (DR's) are adopted in the Schottky barrier diode image recovery mixer and the local oscillator (LO). DR structures guarantee high frequency stability with an acceptable volume. The configurations of low noise amplifier, mixer and oscillator in the assembly are described and fabricated to estimate the chain performance. According to the verification results, the assembly exhibits the noise figure of less than 5 dB over 1 GHz frequency range, and the single-sideband phase noise (200 kHz offset from carrier frequency) of - 70 dBc/Hz. Utilizing the DR structure, the frequency stability of the local oscillator is less than 60 × 10-6/℃.%介绍了一种用于毫米波系统的下变频器,其中混频器采用了肖特基二极管镜频回收混频结构,振荡器采用了DRO(dielectric resonator oscillator)结构以提高系统性能,以保证在合适的体积内实现较高的频率稳定度.描述了系统中低噪声放大器、混频器、振荡器的性能,用于评估系统链路性能,最后合并制作在单个基片上.根据测试结果,该下变频器的噪声系数在35 GHz处1 GHz频率范围内小于5 dB,单边带相位噪声系数在偏离载波200 kHz处达到-70 dBc/Hz.由于采用了介质谐振结构,本振的频率稳定度小于60×10-6/℃.

  16. Nighttime aircraft noise impairs endothelial function and increases blood pressure in patients with or at high risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank; Kolle, Kristoffer; Kreuder, Katharina; Schnorbus, Boris; Wild, Philip; Hechtner, Marlene; Binder, Harald; Gori, Tommaso; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest the existence of a relationship between aircraft noise exposure and increased risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. Patients with established coronary artery disease and endothelial dysfunction are known to have more future cardiovascular events. We therefore tested the effects of nocturnal aircraft noise on endothelial function in patients with or at high risk for coronary artery disease. 60 Patients (50p 1-3 vessels disease; 10p with a high Framingham Score of 23%) were exposed in random and blinded order to aircraft noise and no noise conditions. Noise was simulated in the patients' bedroom and consisted of 60 events during one night. Polygraphy was recorded during study nights, endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery), questionnaires and blood sampling were performed on the morning after each study night. The mean sound pressure levels L eq(3) measured were 46.9 ± 2.0 dB(A) in the Noise 60 nights and 39.2 ± 3.1 dB(A) in the control nights. Subjective sleep quality was markedly reduced by noise from 5.8 ± 2.0 to 3.7 ± 2.2 (p aircraft noise markedly impairs endothelial function in patients with or at risk for cardiovascular disease. These vascular effects appear to be independent from annoyance and attitude towards noise and may explain in part the cardiovascular side effects of nighttime aircraft noise.

  17. Transient increase of intact visual field size by high-frequency narrow-band stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Mark A; Seifert, Doerthe; Poggel, Dorothe A; Strasburger, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Three patients with visual field defects were stimulated with a square matrix pattern, either static, or flickering at frequencies that had been found to either promote or not promote blindsight performance. Comparison between pre- and post-stimulation perimetric maps revealed an increase in the size of the intact visual field but only for flicker frequencies previously found to promote blindsight. These changes were temporary but dramatic - in two instances the intact field was increased by an area of ∼30 deg(2) of visual angle. These results indicate that not only does specific high-frequency stimulus flicker promote blindsight, but that intact visual field size may be increased by stimulation at the same frequencies. Our findings inform speculation on both the brain mechanisms and the potency of temporal modulation for altering the functional visual field.

  18. Increased thalamic gamma band activity correlates with symptom relief following deep brain stimulation in humans with Tourette's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Maling

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is an idiopathic, childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder, which is marked by persistent multiple motor and phonic tics. The disorder is highly disruptive and in some cases completely debilitating. For those with severe, treatment-refractory TS, deep brain stimulation (DBS has emerged as a possible option, although its mechanism of action is not fully understood. We performed a longitudinal study of the effects of DBS on TS symptomatology while concomitantly examining neurophysiological dynamics. We present the first report of the clinical correlation between the presence of gamma band activity and decreased tic severity. Local field potential recordings from five subjects implanted in the centromedian nucleus (CM of the thalamus revealed a temporal correlation between the power of gamma band activity and the clinical metrics of symptomatology as measured by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale and the Modified Rush Tic Rating Scale. Additional studies utilizing short-term stimulation also produced increases in gamma power. Our results suggest that modulation of gamma band activity in both long-term and short-term DBS of the CM is a key factor in mitigating the pathophysiology associated with TS.

  19. Forecasting of wide band noise in axial blowers. Part 1; Prognoseverfahren fuer den Breitbandlaerm bei Axialventilatoren - Teil 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Carolus, T. [Universitaet Siegen (Germany). Institut fuer Fluid- und Thermodynamik

    2003-04-01

    Next to the aerodynamic data, acoustic emissions of blowers are getting increasing attention. So far, estimates have been very simple, but a number of semi-empirical models have also been published which require more detailed parameters, e.g. the velocity field around the blades, boundary layer parameter, etc. These models provide more accurate predictions than the simpler methods. [German] Neben den aerodynamischen Daten gewinnt die Schallleistung von Ventilatoren in zunehmendem Masse an Bedeutung. In der industriellen Praxis wird das Ventilatorgeraeusch bislang mit sehr einfachen Verfahren abgeschaetzt, die nur grundlegende Maschinengroessen beruecksichtigen. In der Literatur findet man allerdings eine Vielzahl semi-empirischer Modelle fuer die Schallleistungsberechnung von Ventilatoren, die detailliertere Eingangsparameter wie das Geschwindigkeitsfeld um die Schaufeln, Grenzschichtparameter usw. erfordern. Diese Modelle versprechen eine bessere Schallprognose als die einfachen Verfahren. (orig.)

  20. Reduction of turbomachinery noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, Ian A. (Inventor); Brookfield, John M. (Inventor); Sell, Julian (Inventor); Hayden, Belva J. (Inventor); Ingard, K. Uno (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    In the invention, propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise characteristic of interaction of a turbomachine blade wake, produced by a turbomachine blade as the blade rotates, with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade, are reduced. This is accomplished by injection of fluid into the blade wake through a port in the rotor blade. The mass flow rate of the fluid injected into the blade wake is selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake. With this fluid injection, reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved. In a further noise reduction technique, boundary layer fluid is suctioned into the turbomachine blade through a suction port on the side of the blade that is characterized as the relatively low-pressure blade side. As with the fluid injection technique, the mass flow rate of the fluid suctioned into the blade is here selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake; reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved with this suction technique. Blowing and suction techniques are also provided in the invention for reducing noise associated with the wake produced by fluid flow around a stationary blade upstream of a rotating turbomachine.

  1. Increase in Beta-Band Activity during Preparation for Overt Speech in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörös, Peter; Doñamayor, Nuria; Wittke, Catharina; Al-Khaled, Mohamed; Brüggemann, Norbert; Münte, Thomas F

    2017-01-01

    Speech impairment is a frequent and often serious symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD), characterized by a disorder of phonation, articulation and prosody. While research on the pathogenesis of the prominent limb motor symptoms has made considerable progress in recent years, the pathophysiology of PD speech impairment is still incompletely understood. To investigate the neural correlates of speech production in PD, EEG was recorded in 14 non-demented patients with idiopathic PD and preserved verbal fluency on regular dopaminergic medication (8 women; mean age ± SD: 69.5 ± 8.0 years). The control group consisted of 15 healthy age-matched individuals (7 women; age: 69.7 ± 7.0 years). All participants performed a visually-cued, overt speech production task; required utterances were papapa and pataka. During the preparatory phase of speech production, in a time window of 200-400 ms after presentation of the visual cue, β-power was significantly increased in PD patients compared to healthy controls. Previous research has shown that the physiological decrease of β-power preceding limb movement onset is delayed and smaller in PD patients off medication and normalizes under dopaminergic treatment. By contrast, our study demonstrates that β-power during preparation for speech production is higher in patients on dopaminergic therapy than controls. Thus, our results suggest that the mechanisms that regulate β-activity preceding limb movement and speech production differ in PD. The pathophysiological role of this increase in β-power during speech preparation needs to be determined.

  2. Optimizing the configuration of a superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavity to increase the maximum achievable gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.

    2014-02-01

    We present a design of a superconducting rf photonic band gap (SRF PBG) accelerator cell with specially shaped rods in order to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and improve the effectiveness of the PBG structure for suppression of higher order modes (HOMs). The ability of PBG structures to suppress long-range wakefields is especially beneficial for superconducting electron accelerators for high power free-electron lasers (FELs), which are designed to provide high current continuous duty electron beams. Using PBG structures to reduce the prominent beam-breakup phenomena due to HOMs will allow significantly increased beam-breakup thresholds. As a result, there will be possibilities for increasing the operation frequency of SRF accelerators and for the development of novel compact high-current accelerator modules for the FELs.

  3. Prediction of the dynamic oscillation threshold in a clarinet model with a linearly increasing blowing pressure : Influence of noise

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeot, Baptiste; Vergez, Christophe; Gazengel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effects of noise and precision on a simplified model of the clarinet driven by a variable control parameter. In a previous work [5], the dynamic oscillation threshold of a simplified model of a clarinet is obtained analytically. In the present article, the sensitivity of the dynamic threshold on precision is analyzed as a stochastic variable introduced in the model. A new theoretical expression is given for the dynamic thresholds in presence of the stochastic variable, providing a fair prediction of the thresholds found in finite-precision simulations. The dynamic thresholds are found to depend on increase rate and are independent on the initial value of the parameter, both in simulations and in theory.

  4. The influence of flow conditions on the wide-band noise of an axial blower; Der Einfluss der Zustroembedingungen auf das breitbandige Geraeusch eines Axialventilators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.

    2006-07-01

    Blower noise is calculated using semi-empirical methods presented in the relevant literature, and the results are compared with measurements. The noise fractions of the various sources are calculated separately in this method, and the results are then put together, also spectrally. One focal aspect was the investigation of the mechanism ''interaction of fan blades with inflow turbulence'', which is a dominant noise mechanism even if the degree of turbulence is still relatively low. Hot wire measurements served to provide information on the characteristic turbulence parameters of different flow configurations towards the fan, which were used as input variables in the noise calculation methods. The forecasted spectral noise levels as well as the total noise levels were in satisfactory agreement with measurements for all flow configurations investigated. (orig.)

  5. Efficient, Narrow-Pass-Band Optical Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Stephen P.

    1996-01-01

    Optical filters with both narrow pass bands and high efficiencies fabricated to design specifications. Offer tremendous improvements in performance for number of optical (including infrared) systems. In fiber-optic and free-space communication systems, precise frequency discrimination afforded by narrow pass bands of filters provide higher channel capacities. In active and passive remote sensors like lidar and gas-filter-correlation radiometers, increased efficiencies afforded by filters enhance detection of small signals against large background noise. In addition, sizes, weights, and power requirements of many optical and infrared systems reduced by taking advantage of gains in signal-to-noise ratios delivered by filters.

  6. Involvement of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in MK-801-increased gamma band oscillation power in rat cortical electroencephalograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyoshi, T; Kambe, D; Karasawa, J; Chaki, S

    2014-11-07

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAr) has been considered to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In rodent electroencephalogram (EEG) studies, non-competitive NMDAr antagonists have been reported to produce aberrant basal gamma band oscillation (GBO), as observed in schizophrenia. Aberrations in GBO power have attracted attention as a translational biomarker for the development of novel antipsychotic drugs. However, the neuronal mechanisms as well as the pharmacological significance of NMDAr antagonist-induced aberrant GBO power have not been fully investigated. In the present study, to address the above questions, we examined the pharmacological properties of MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg)-increased basal GBO power in rat cortical EEG. Riluzole (3-10 mg/kg), a glutamate release inhibitor, reduced the MK-801-increased basal GBO power. In contrast, L-838,417 (1-3 mg/kg), an α2/3/5 subunit-selective GABAA receptor-positive allosteric modulator, enhanced the GBO increase. Antipsychotics such as haloperidol (0.05-0.3 mg/kg) and clozapine (1-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated the MK-801-increased GBO power. Likewise, LY379268 (0.3-3 mg/kg), an metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor (mGlu2/3 receptor) agonist, reduced the GBO increase in a dose-dependent manner, which was antagonized by an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY341495. These results suggest that an increase in cortical GBO power induced by NMDAr hypofunction can be attributed to the aberrant activities of both excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons in local circuits. The aberrant cortical GBO power reflecting cortical network dysfunction observed in schizophrenia might be a useful biomarker for the discovery of novel antipsychotic drugs.

  7. Manifestation of peripherial coding in the effect of increasing loudness and enhanced discrimination of the intensity of tone bursts before and after tone burst noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimskaya-Korsavkova, L. K.

    2017-07-01

    To find the possible reasons for the midlevel elevation of the Weber fraction in intensity discrimination of a tone burst, a comparison was performed for the complementary distributions of spike activity of an ensemble of space nerves, such as the distribution of time instants when spikes occur, the distribution of interspike intervals, and the autocorrelation function. The distribution properties were detected in a poststimulus histogram, an interspike interval histogram, and an autocorrelation histogram—all obtained from the reaction of an ensemble of model space nerves in response to an auditory noise burst-useful tone burst complex. Two configurations were used: in the first, the peak amplitude of the tone burst was varied and the noise amplitude was fixed; in the other, the tone burst amplitude was fixed and the noise amplitude was varied. Noise could precede or follow the tone burst. The noise and tone burst durations, as well as the interval between them, was 4 kHz and corresponded to the characteristic frequencies of the model space nerves. The profiles of all the mentioned histograms had two maxima. The values and the positions of the maxima in the poststimulus histogram corresponded to the amplitudes and mutual time position of the noise and the tone burst. The maximum that occurred in response to the tone burst action could be a basis for the formation of the loudness of the latter (explicit loudness). However, the positions of the maxima in the other two histograms did not depend on the positions of tone bursts and noise in the combinations. The first maximum fell in short intervals and united intervals corresponding to the noise and tone burst durations. The second maximum fell in intervals corresponding to a tone burst delay with respect to noise, and its value was proportional to the noise amplitude or tone burst amplitude that was smaller in the complex. An increase in tone burst or noise amplitudes was caused by nonlinear variations in the two

  8. Development of low-noise high-speed analog ASIC for X-ray CCD cameras and wide-band X-ray imaging sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hirose, Shin-nosuke; Imatani, Ritsuko; Nagino, Ryo; Anabuki, Naohisa; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Doty, John P.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development and performance evaluation of the mixed-signal Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) developed for the signal processing of onboard X-ray CCD cameras and various types of X-ray imaging sensors in astrophysics. The quick and low-noise readout is essential for the pile-up free imaging spectroscopy with a future X-ray telescope. Our goal is the readout noise of 5e- r . m . s . at the pixel rate of 1 Mpix/s that is about 10 times faster than those of the currently working detectors. We successfully developed a low-noise ASIC as the front-end electronics of the Soft X-ray Imager onboard Hitomi that was launched on February 17, 2016. However, it has two analog-to-digital converters per chain due to the limited processing speed and hence we need to correct the difference of gain to obtain the X-ray spectra. Furthermore, its input equivalent noise performance is not satisfactory (> 100 μV) at the pixel rate higher than 500 kpix/s. Then we upgrade the design of the ASIC with the fourth-order ΔΣ modulators to enhance its inherent noise-shaping performance. Its performance is measured using pseudo CCD signals with variable processing speed. Although its input equivalent noise is comparable with the conventional one, the integrated non-linearity (0.1%) improves to about the half of that of the conventional one. The radiation tolerance is also measured with regard to the total ionizing dose effect and the single event latch-up using protons and Xenon, respectively. The former experiment shows that all of the performances does not change after imposing the dose corresponding to 590 years in a low earth orbit. We also put the upper limit on the frequency of the latch-up to be once per 48 years.

  9. Simulation-based design of a steerable acoustic warning device to increase (H)EV detectability while reducing urban noise pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Genechten, B.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation-based design methodology used in the eVADER project for the development of targeted acoustic warning devices for increased detectability of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (HEVs) while, at the same time, reducing urban noise pollution compared to conventional

  10. Hybrid wide-band, low-phase-noise scheme for Raman lasers in atom interferometry by integrating an acousto-optic modulator and a feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yao, Zhanwei; Li, Runbing; Lu, Sibin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-02-10

    We report a hybrid scheme for phase-coherent Raman lasers with low phase noise in a wide frequency range. In this scheme, a pair of Raman lasers with a frequency difference of 3.04 GHz is generated by the ±1-order diffracted lights of an acousto-optic modulator (1.52 GHz), where a feedback loop is simultaneously applied for suppressing the phase noise. The beat width of the Raman lasers is narrower than 3 Hz. In the low-frequency range, the phase noise of the Raman lasers is suppressed by 35 dB with the feedback. The phase noise is less than -109  dBc/Hz in the high-frequency range. The sensitivity of an atom gyroscope employing the hybrid Raman lasers can be implicitly improved 10 times. Due to the better high-frequency response, the sensitivity is not limited by the durations of Raman pulses. This work is important for improving the performance of atom-interferometer-based measurements.

  11. Increased polyp detection using narrow band imaging compared with high resolution endoscopy in patients with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S. Boparai; F.J.C. van den Broek; S. van Eeden; P. Fockens; E. Dekker

    2011-01-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is associated with colorectal cancer and is characterized by multiple hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs) and adenomas. Narrow band imaging (NBI) may improve the detection of polyps in HPS. We aimed to compare polyp miss rates with NBI with tho

  12. The Reflecting Brain: Reflection Competence in an Educational Setting Is Associated with Increased Electroencephalogram Activity in the Alpha Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, Christian; Reitinger, Johannes; Seyfried, Clemens; Schneckenleitner, Eva; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' ability to critically reflect classroom situations in relation to their own actions constitutes an important prerequisite to improve teaching performance and professional behavior. This study investigated electroencephalogram activity in the alpha band during a reflection task before and after training in a sample of preservice teachers.…

  13. Natural and man-made terrestrial electromagnetic noise: an outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meloni

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial environment is continuously exposed to electromagnetic radiations which set up a «background» electromagnetic noise. Within the Non Ionizing Radiation band (NIR, i.e. for frequencies lower than 300 GHz, this background can have a natural or an artificial origin. Natural origins of electromagnetic radiations are generally atmospheric or cosmic while artificial origins are technological applications, power transmission, communications, etc. This paper briefly describes the natural and man-made electromagnetic noise in the NIR band. Natural noise comes from a large variety of sources involving different physical phenomena and covering a wide range of frequencies and showing various propagation characteristics with an extremely broad range of power levels. Due to technological growth man-made electromagnetic noise is nowadays superimposed on natural noise almost everywhere on Earth. In the last decades man-made noise has increased dramatically over and above the natural noise in residential and business areas. This increase has led some scientists to consider possible negative effects of electromagnetic waves on human life and living systems in general. Accurate measurements of natural and man-made electromagnetic noise are necessary to understand the relative power levels in the different bands and their influence on life.

  14. 非理想NNC-DFH接收机抗部分频带干扰性能分析%Performance analysis of non-ideal noise-normalization combining differential frequency hopping receiver in partial-band jamming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈晓旭; 娄景艺; 高俊

    2012-01-01

    为改善差分跳频系统的抗部分频带干扰性能,提出一种噪声归一化合并差分跳频接收机模型.采用矩生成函数法推导了非理想噪声功率估计条件下系统误符号率的联合上界.将信道建模为瑞利衰落信道,同时考虑了加性背景热噪声的影响.数值和仿真结果验证了理论分析的正确性.研究结果表明:在噪声估计不存在严重偏差时(估计误差因子满足0.1<λ<3.0),噪声归一化合并差分跳频接收机在最坏部分频带干扰下的性能优于乘积合并和线性合并差分跳频接收机,且当噪声估计值略低于理想估计值时(0.2<λ<0.6),系统误符号性能优于理想噪声估计条件下的误符号性能.%A differential frequency hopping (DFH) receiver utilizing noise-normalization combining (NNC) was proposed to improve its performance of rejecting partial-band noise jamming (PBNJ). Symbol error rate (SER) upper bound of this receiver under PBNJ was analyzed using moment generating function method with non-ideal noise power estimation considered. DFH signal was assumed Rayleigh faded and corrupted by additive background thermal noise. The theoretical analysis was validated by the numerical and simulation results. It is shown that when the noise power estimation error is not great ( 0. 1 <λ A < 3. 0 , λis the estimation error factor) , NNC-DFH receiver is superior to the product combining DFH receiver and the linear combing DFH receiver when they are jammed by the worst-case PBNJ. System with noise power a little lower estimated (0. 2 < λ < 0. 6) outperforms that with ideal noise power estimation.

  15. Ambient noise levels and detection threshold in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Andrea; Ottemöller, Lars; Keers, Henk

    2016-07-01

    Ambient seismic noise is caused by a number of sources in specific frequency bands. The quantification of ambient noise makes it possible to evaluate station and network performance. We evaluate noise levels in Norway from the 2013 data set of the Norwegian National Seismic Network as well as two temporary deployments. Apart from the station performance, we studied the geographical and temporal variations, and developed a local noise model for Norway. The microseism peaks related to the ocean are significant in Norway. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between oceanic weather conditions and noise levels. We find a correlation of low-frequency noise (0.125-0.25 Hz) with wave heights up to 900 km offshore. High (2-10 Hz) and intermediate (0.5-5 Hz) frequency noise correlates only up to 450 km offshore with wave heights. From a geographic perspective, stations in southern Norway show lower noise levels for low frequencies due to a larger distance to the dominant noise sources in the North Atlantic. Finally, we studied the influence of high-frequency noise levels on earthquake detectability and found that a noise level increase of 10 dB decreases the detectability by 0.5 magnitude units. This method provides a practical way to consider noise variations in detection maps.

  16. Underwater noise from a wave energy converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tougaard, Jakob

    A recent addition to the anthropogenic sources of underwater noise is offshore wave energy converters. Underwater noise was recorded from the Wavestar wave energy converter located at Hastholm, Denmark (57°7.73´N, 8°37.23´E). The Wavestar is a full-scale test and demonstration converter...... in full operation and start and stop of the converter. Median broad band (10 Hz – 20 kHz) sound pressure level (Leq) was 123 dB re. 1 Pa, irrespective of status of the wave energy converter (stopped, running or starting/stopping). The most pronounced peak in the third-octave spectrum was in the 160 Hz...... significant noise above ambient could be detected above the 250 Hz band. The absolute increase in noise above ambient was very small. L50 third-octave levels in the four bands with the converter running were thus only 1-2 dB above ambient L50 levels. The noise recorded 25 m from the wave energy converter...

  17. Threshold Shifts and Cochlear Injury in Chinchillas Exposed to Octave Bands of Noise Centered at 63 and 1000 HZ for 9 Days,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    2.0 kHz. The 1000-Hz octave bands produced more permanent threshold shift at the lower 33 %.. . %. , Ic CV) 1 00 EuG LLS) 2C C LJ5- 0o x ezw CA OJ...Officer Commander Naval Medical R&D Command US Army Transportation School National Naval Medical Center ATTN: ATSPoTD-ST Bethesda, 1D 20014 (1) Fort

  18. A Mixed-Methods Trial of Broad Band Noise and Nature Sounds for Tinnitus Therapy: Group and Individual Responses Modeled under the Adaptation Level Theory of Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Mithila; Searchfield, Grant D

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A randomized cross-over trial in 18 participants tested the hypothesis that nature sounds, with unpredictable temporal characteristics and high valence would yield greater improvement in tinnitus than constant, emotionally neutral broadband noise. Study Design: The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary measures were: loudness and annoyance ratings, loudness level matches, minimum masking levels, positive and negative emotionality, attention reaction and discrimination time, anxiety, depression and stress. Each sound was administered using MP3 players with earbuds for 8 continuous weeks, with a 3 week wash-out period before crossing over to the other treatment sound. Measurements were undertaken for each arm at sound fitting, 4 and 8 weeks after administration. Qualitative interviews were conducted at each of these appointments. Results: From a baseline TFI score of 41.3, sound therapy resulted in TFI scores at 8 weeks of 35.6; broadband noise resulted in significantly greater reduction (8.2 points) after 8 weeks of sound therapy use than nature sounds (3.2 points). The positive effect of sound on tinnitus was supported by secondary outcome measures of tinnitus, emotion, attention, and psychological state, but not interviews. Tinnitus loudness level match was higher for BBN at 8 weeks; while there was little change in loudness level matches for nature sounds. There was no change in minimum masking levels following sound therapy administration. Self-reported preference for one sound over another did not correlate with changes in tinnitus. Conclusions: Modeled under an adaptation level theory framework of tinnitus perception, the results indicate that the introduction of broadband noise shifts internal adaptation level weighting away from the tinnitus signal, reducing tinnitus magnitude. Nature sounds may modify the affective components of tinnitus via a secondary, residual pathway, but this appears to be less important

  19. A Mixed-Methods Trial of Broad Band Noise and Nature Sounds for Tinnitus Therapy: Group and Individual Responses Modeled under the Adaptation Level Theory of Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Mithila; Searchfield, Grant D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A randomized cross-over trial in 18 participants tested the hypothesis that nature sounds, with unpredictable temporal characteristics and high valence would yield greater improvement in tinnitus than constant, emotionally neutral broadband noise. Study Design: The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary measures were: loudness and annoyance ratings, loudness level matches, minimum masking levels, positive and negative emotionality, attention reaction and discrimination time, anxiety, depression and stress. Each sound was administered using MP3 players with earbuds for 8 continuous weeks, with a 3 week wash-out period before crossing over to the other treatment sound. Measurements were undertaken for each arm at sound fitting, 4 and 8 weeks after administration. Qualitative interviews were conducted at each of these appointments. Results: From a baseline TFI score of 41.3, sound therapy resulted in TFI scores at 8 weeks of 35.6; broadband noise resulted in significantly greater reduction (8.2 points) after 8 weeks of sound therapy use than nature sounds (3.2 points). The positive effect of sound on tinnitus was supported by secondary outcome measures of tinnitus, emotion, attention, and psychological state, but not interviews. Tinnitus loudness level match was higher for BBN at 8 weeks; while there was little change in loudness level matches for nature sounds. There was no change in minimum masking levels following sound therapy administration. Self-reported preference for one sound over another did not correlate with changes in tinnitus. Conclusions: Modeled under an adaptation level theory framework of tinnitus perception, the results indicate that the introduction of broadband noise shifts internal adaptation level weighting away from the tinnitus signal, reducing tinnitus magnitude. Nature sounds may modify the affective components of tinnitus via a secondary, residual pathway, but this appears to be less important

  20. Ambiguity noise analysis of a SAR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haishan; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    The presence of range and azimuth (or Doppler) ambiguities in synthetic aperture radars (SARs) is well known. The ambiguity noise is related to the antenna pattern and the value of pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Because a new frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) SAR has the characters of low cost and small size, and the capacity of real-time signal processing, the antenna will likely vibrate or deform due to a lack of the stabilized platform. And the value of PRF cannot be much high because of the high computation burden for the real-time processing. The aim of this study is to access and improve the performance of a new FMCW SAR system based on the ambiguity noise. First, the quantitative analysis of the system's ambiguity noise level is performed; an antenna with low sidelobes is designed. The conclusion is that the range ambiguity noise is small; the azimuth ambiguity noise is somewhat increased, however, it is sufficiently small to have marginal influence on the image quality. Finally, the ambiguity noise level is measured using the imaging data from a Ku-band FMCW SAR. The results of this study show that the measured noise level coincides with the theoretical noise level.

  1. Loss of Myh14 Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in CBA/CaJ Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Linqing; Jin, Yecheng; Sun, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Aizhen; Wen, Zongzhuang; Zhou, Yichen; Xia, Ming

    2016-01-01

    MYH14 is a member of the myosin family, which has been implicated in many motile processes such as ion-channel gating, organelle translocation, and the cytoskeleton rearrangement. Mutations in MYH14 lead to a DFNA4-type hearing impairment. Further evidence also shows that MYH14 is a candidate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) susceptible gene. However, the specific roles of MYH14 in auditory function and NIHL are not fully understood. In the present study, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to establish a Myh14 knockout mice line in CBA/CaJ background (now referred to as Myh14−/− mice) and clarify the role of MYH14 in the cochlea and NIHL. We found that Myh14−/− mice did not exhibit significant hearing loss until five months of age. In addition, Myh14−/− mice were more vulnerable to high intensity noise compared to control mice. More significant outer hair cell loss was observed in Myh14−/− mice than in wild type controls after acoustic trauma. Our findings suggest that Myh14 may play a beneficial role in the protection of the cochlea after acoustic overstimulation in CBA/CaJ mice. PMID:28101381

  2. Loss of Myh14 Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in CBA/CaJ Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MYH14 is a member of the myosin family, which has been implicated in many motile processes such as ion-channel gating, organelle translocation, and the cytoskeleton rearrangement. Mutations in MYH14 lead to a DFNA4-type hearing impairment. Further evidence also shows that MYH14 is a candidate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL susceptible gene. However, the specific roles of MYH14 in auditory function and NIHL are not fully understood. In the present study, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to establish a Myh14 knockout mice line in CBA/CaJ background (now referred to as Myh14−/− mice and clarify the role of MYH14 in the cochlea and NIHL. We found that Myh14−/− mice did not exhibit significant hearing loss until five months of age. In addition, Myh14−/− mice were more vulnerable to high intensity noise compared to control mice. More significant outer hair cell loss was observed in Myh14−/− mice than in wild type controls after acoustic trauma. Our findings suggest that Myh14 may play a beneficial role in the protection of the cochlea after acoustic overstimulation in CBA/CaJ mice.

  3. Oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and increased brain atrophy in early stages of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine if the presence of oligoclonal bands (OB at early stages of multiple sclerosis was associated with higher brain atrophy, when compared with patients without OB. METHODS: Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients with less than two years of disease onset and OB detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were included. SIENAX was used for total brain volume (TBV, gray matter volume (GMV, and white matter volume (WMV. RESULTS: Forty patients were included, 29 had positive IgG-OB. No differences were found between positive and negative patients in gender, expanded disability status scale (EDSS, treatment received, and T2/T1 lesion load. TBV in positive IgG-OB patients was 1.5 mm³ x 10(6 compared with 1.64 mm³ x 10(6 in the negative ones (p=0.02. GMV was 0.51 mm³ x 10(6 in positive IgG-OB compared with 0.62 mm³ x 10(6 in negative ones (p=0.002. No differences in WMV (p=0.09 were seen. CONCLUSIONS: IgG-OB in the CSF was related to neurodegeneration magnetic resonance (MR markers in early RRMS.

  4. Neural Networks and Their Applications in Noise - Information Storage and Retrieval Systems, and in the Rejection of Narrow-Band Interference in Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijjani, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of neural network models has created new algorithms and application opportunities in parallel signal processing. Here, an M-ary extension of the Hopfield model is presented and is shown to have a substantially higher error correction capability, when compared to the Hopfield model. A digital image processing experiment is successfully conducted to illustrate the new model, and a holographic implementation is proposed. The use of neural networks and of linear combination filters are investigated in connection with the problem of user identification in code division multiple access systems. A multi-layer back-propagation perceptron model is then presented as a means of detecting a wideband signal in the presence of narrowband jammers and additive white Gaussian noise. The performance of the neural network is compared to that of the estimation type filter that uses a least mean squared adaptive filter, in terms of the interference rejection capability, the bit error rate and the overall robustness of the system. The nonlinear neural network filter is found to offer a faster convergence rate and an overall better performance over the LMS Widrow-Hoff filter.

  5. Critical increase in Na-doping facilitates acceptor band movements that yields ~180 meV shallow hole conduction in ZnO bulk crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Narendra S.; Yim, Haena; Choi, Ji-Won

    2017-03-01

    Stable p-type conduction in ZnO has been a long time obstacle in utilizing its full potential such as in opto-electronic devices. We designed a unique experimental set-up in the laboratory for high Na-doping by thermal diffusion in the bulk ZnO single crystals. SIMS measurement shows that Na concentration increases by 3 orders of magnitude, to ~3 × 1020 cm‑3 as doping temperature increases to 1200 °C. Electronic infrared absorption was measured for Na-acceptors. Absorption bands were observed near (0.20–0.24) eV. Absorption bands blue shifted by 0.04 eV when doped at 1200 °C giving rise to shallow acceptor level. NaZn band movements as a function of doping temperature are also seen in Photoluminescence emission (PL), Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and UV-Vis transmission measurements. Variable temperature Hall measurements show stable p-type conduction with hole binding energy ~0.18 eV in ZnO samples that were Na-doped at 1200 °C.

  6. Increased conductivities of Cr doped Al{sub 2−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} powders due to band gap narrowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badar, Nurhanna [Centre for Nanomaterials Research, Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); School of Physics and Materials Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); Kamarulzaman, Norlida, E-mail: norlyk@salam.uitm.edu.my [Centre for Nanomaterials Research, Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); School of Physics and Materials Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); Rusdi, Roshidah; Abdul Aziz, Nor Diyana [Centre for Nanomaterials Research, Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); School of Physics and Materials Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor 40450 (Malaysia); Kun Fun, Hoong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-15

    A high Cr content in the synthesized Al{sub 2−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} materials was achieved via a new synthesis route, the self propagating combustion method, for investigation of the effect of Cr substitution on the electrical, optical band gap and structural characteristics of the modified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the samples were pure and that Cr was successfully substituted in the crystal lattice. The cell parameters and volume are linearly dependent on the Cr content. AC impedance spectroscopy results show that conductivity of the Cr doped samples increases exponentially with Cr content. This is attributed to band gap narrowing of the Al{sub 2−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} powders as obtained from UV–visible spectrophotometric studies.

  7. Photo-thermal Shot Noise in End Mirrors of LIGO due to Correlation of Power Fluctuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shi-Chen; WAN Zhen-Zhu; LI Huan; LIU Zhong-Zhu

    2006-01-01

    The effect of input power fluctuation on photo-thermal shot noise in the end mirrors of a laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) is analysed according to the statistical optics, which is a supplement of Braginsky's research. The laser light folding in LIGO increases a correlation of input power fluctuation in the photo-thermal shot noise. This part of noise has spectral density proportional to ω-2 in low frequency bands, and ω-4 in high frequency bands. It is not a white noise and may affect the processing about data of interferometers. To obtain an advanced LIGO, photo-thermal shot noise in end mirrors due to correlation of input power fluctuation is up to Braginsky's photo-thermal noise in the frequency range 1-100Hz.

  8. Analysis of Jamming Parameters Selecting of Band-limited Gaussian Noise to GPS Military Signals%GP S军码信号的带限高斯噪声干扰参数选择分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛虎; 吴德伟

    2014-01-01

    为了提高带限高斯噪声对GPS军码信号的干扰效率,以 GPS接收机的码跟踪误差作为干扰效果评估指标,对其特定干信比下的干扰频偏和干扰带宽进行优化确定。在分析 GPS P(Y)码和M码信号功率谱特点的基础上,根据非相干超前减滞后处理码跟踪环路工作原理,理论推导得到干扰频偏和干扰带宽与码跟踪误差的解析式。基于实际情况设置接收机码环参数,分别定量地仿真计算出不同干信比下针对 P(Y)码和 M码信号的高效干扰频偏和干扰带宽。以造成码环失锁所需干信比最小为主要评判准则,同时考虑干扰易实施性和频域滤波等因素的影响,通过综合比较得出:当干信比在50~60 dB 范围内时,针对 P(Y)码信号的干扰频偏和干扰带宽分别设置为0和8.8 MHz,针对正弦 BOC 和余弦 BOC 调制的 M码信号的干扰频偏分别设置为9.833 MHz和10.9 MHz,干扰带宽统一设置为10 MHz。%For the sake of improving j amming efficiency of band-limited Gaussian noise to GPS military sig-nals,this paper use code tracking error of GPS receiver as the j amming effect evaluation index to optimize band-limited Gaussian noise jamming frequency offset and bandwidth under given JSR.On the basis of a-nalysis GPS P(Y)code and M code signal power spectrum characteristics,according to operating principle of non-coherent early-minus-late power DLL,the expression between j amming frequency offset and band-width with code tracking error is obtained through theoretical derivation.Based on practical condition to set the DLL parameters of receiver,the efficient band-limited Gaussian noise j amming frequency offset and bandwidth to P(Y)code and M code signal is simulated and calculated quantitatively under the different JSR respectively.Taking the minimum JSR of causing DLL lock-lose as primary opting criterion,at the same time to consider the influence of j amming implement complexity and frequency domain

  9. Studies of RF Noise Induced Bunch Lengthening at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Rivetta, C H; Baudrenghien, P; Butterworth, A C; Molendijk, J C

    2011-01-01

    Radio Frequency noise induced bunch lengthening can strongly affect the Large Hadron Collider performance through luminosity reduction, particle loss, and other effects. Models and theoretical formalisms demonstrating the dependence of the LHC longitudinal bunch length on the RF station noise spectral content have been presented*,**. Initial measurements validated these studies and determined the performance limiting RF components. For the existing LHC LLRF implementation the bunch length increases with a rate of 1 mm/hr, which is higher than the intrabeam scattering diffusion and leads to a 27% bunch length increase over a 20 hour store. This work presents measurements from the LHC that better quantify the relationship between the RF noise and longitudinal emittance blowup. Noise was injected at specific frequency bands and with varying amplitudes at the LHC accelerating cavities. The experiments presented in this paper confirmed the predicted effects on the LHC bunch length due to both the noise around the ...

  10. FET noise studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucel, R. A.

    1981-03-01

    The GaAs FET oscillator is an alternative device for voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) applications because of its inherent wide-band electronic tunability, the variety of operating modes possible such as common source, common gate, etc., and the ease of circuit design. However, it has one major drawback, namely, its high near-carrier 1/f noise which makes it unsuitable for many applications, such as radar systems. This report describes the progress made during the report period in understanding the physical mechanisms responsible for this noise. During this period, an extensive experimental study was made of the 1/f noise properties of a variety of oscillators constructed of FET chips fabricated under controlled conditions. Using in-house grown epitaxial wafers, FET's were fabricated from both buffered and unbuffered active layers, with and without epitaxially grown contact layers, and with and without surface passivation. The experimental results show a good correlation between the trap-generated 1/f baseband noise and the near-carrier 1/f FM noise. The primary sources of the noise are presumed to be either deep traps within the depletion layer under the gate or surface states at the gate-semiconductor interface, probably the latter. An improvement of the order of 10 dB in the near carrier FM noise level is obtained when a buffer layer separates the active layer from the substrate. Optical experiments indicated an electron trap level approximately 0.41 eV below the conduction band. A noise model was devised to explain the modulation process for upconverting baseband 1/f noise to the carrier band by depletion layer modulation.

  11. New microangiography system development providing improved small vessel imaging, increased contrast-to-noise ratios, and multiview 3D reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhls, Andrew T.; Patel, Vikas; Ionita, Ciprian; Noël, Peter B.; Walczak, Alan M.; Rangwala, Hussain S.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    A new microangiographic system (MA) integrated into a c-arm gantry has been developed allowing precise placement of a MA at the exact same angle as the standard x-ray image intensifier (II) with unchanged source and object position. The MA can also be arbitrarily moved about the object and easily moved into the field of view (FOV) in front of the lower resolution II when higher resolution angiographic sequences are needed. The benefits of this new system are illustrated in a neurovascular study, where a rabbit is injected with contrast media for varying oblique angles. Digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) images were obtained and compared using both the MA and II detectors for the same projection view. Vessels imaged with the MA appear sharper with smaller vessels visualized. Visualization of ~100 μm vessels was possible with the MA whereas not with the II. Further, the MA could better resolve vessel overlap. Contrast to noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for vessels of varying sizes for the MA versus the II and were found to be similar for large vessels, approximately double for medium vessels, and infinitely better for the smallest vessels. In addition, a 3D reconstruction of selected vessel segments was performed, using multiple (three) projections at oblique angles, for each detector. This new MA/II integrated system should lead to improved diagnosis and image guidance of neurovascular interventions by enabling initial guidance with the low resolution large FOV II combined with use of the high resolution MA during critical parts of diagnostic and interventional procedures.

  12. Application of input amplitude masks in image encryption with spatially incoherent illumination for increase of decrypted images signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Molodtsov, Dmitriy Y.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Shifrina, Anna V.

    2016-04-01

    The majority of existing methods of optical encryption use not only light intensity distribution, easily registered with photosensors, but also its phase distribution. This provides best encryption strength for fixed quantities of elements and phase levels in a mask. Downsides are holographic registration scheme used in order to register not only light intensity distribution but also its phase distribution and speckle noise occurring due to coherent illumination. That factors lead to very poor decryption quality when it comes from computer simulations to optical implementations. Method of optical encryption with spatially incoherent illumination does not have drawbacks inherent to coherent systems, however, as only light intensity distribution is considered, mean value of image to be encrypted is always above zero which leads to intensive zero spatial frequency peak in image spectrum. Therefore, in case of spatially incoherent illumination, image spectrum, as well as encryption key spectrum, cannot be white. If encryption is based on convolution operation, no matter coherent light used or not, Fourier spectrum amplitude distribution of encryption key should overlap Fourier spectrum amplitude distribution of image to be encrypted otherwise loss of information is unavoidable. Another factor affecting decrypted image quality is original image spectrum. Usually, most part of image energy is concentrated in area of low frequencies. Consequently, only this area in encrypted image contains information about original image, while other areas contain only noise. We propose to use additional encoding of input scene to increase size of the area containing useful information. This provides increase of signal-to-noise ratio in encrypted image and consequentially increases quality of decrypted images. Results of computer simulations of test images optical encryption with spatially incoherent illumination and additional input amplitude masks are presented.

  13. Runs 800, 813, 842 and physics runs from 18.1.77 to 21.5.77, Development of a new set-up for working line measurements including a Fast Fourier Transform Spectrum Analyser and using weak beam excitiation with broad-band noise

    CERN Document Server

    Borer, J

    1977-01-01

    Runs 800, 813, 842 and physics runs from 18.1.77 to 21.5.77, Development of a new set-up for working line measurements including a Fast Fourier Transform Spectrum Analyser and using weak beam excitiation with broad-band noise

  14. Parallel β-sheet vibration band increases with proteins dipole moment under exposure to 1765 MHz microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2016-02-01

    Effects of exposure of 4 h to mobile phones microwaves at 1765 MHz at a power density around 940 mW/m(2) on four typical proteins (hemoglobin in H2 O solution, and myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme in D2 O solution) were studied by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and Fourier self-deconvolution analysis. Increase in intensity of parallel β-sheet component around 1635 cm(-1) was observed after exposure of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin, showing that a mechanism of unfolding occurred after exposure, whereas no appreciable change in the amide I region occurred after lysozyme exposure. In addition, a relationship between protein dipole moment and protein unfolding rate was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient r = 0.973 and 95% confidence interval.

  15. Increase in Beta-Band Activity during Preparation for Overt Speech in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sörös

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Speech impairment is a frequent and often serious symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD, characterized by a disorder of phonation, articulation and prosody. While research on the pathogenesis of the prominent limb motor symptoms has made considerable progress in recent years, the pathophysiology of PD speech impairment is still incompletely understood. To investigate the neural correlates of speech production in PD, EEG was recorded in 14 non-demented patients with idiopathic PD and preserved verbal fluency on regular dopaminergic medication (8 women; mean age ± SD: 69.5 ± 8.0 years. The control group consisted of 15 healthy age-matched individuals (7 women; age: 69.7 ± 7.0 years. All participants performed a visually-cued, overt speech production task; required utterances were papapa and pataka. During the preparatory phase of speech production, in a time window of 200–400 ms after presentation of the visual cue, β-power was significantly increased in PD patients compared to healthy controls. Previous research has shown that the physiological decrease of β-power preceding limb movement onset is delayed and smaller in PD patients off medication and normalizes under dopaminergic treatment. By contrast, our study demonstrates that β-power during preparation for speech production is higher in patients on dopaminergic therapy than controls. Thus, our results suggest that the mechanisms that regulate β-activity preceding limb movement and speech production differ in PD. The pathophysiological role of this increase in β-power during speech preparation needs to be determined.

  16. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    -sectional area. To study the band-gap for travelling waves, a repeated inner segment of the optimized beams is analyzed using Floquet theory and the waveguide finite element (WFE) method. Finally, the frequency response is computed for the optimized beams when these are subjected to an external time......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...

  17. Low-noise amplifiers for satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelehan, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is pointed out that over the past several years significant advances have been made in the overall capability of both microwave and mm-wave receivers. This is particularly apparent in the telecom market. Integral parts of advanced receiver technology are low-noise receivers. The advances currently being achieved in low-noise technology are partly based on developments in GaAs semiconductor technology. The development of high-cutoff-frequency beam lead mixer diodes has led to the development of mm-wave low-noise mixers with excellent low-noise capability. The advanced techniques are now being employed in field-deployable systems. Low noise is an important factor in satellite communications applications. Attention is given to C-band fixed satellite service, C-band parametric amplifiers, C-band FET, and X band, the Ku band, and the 30/20 GHz band.

  18. Does exposure to aircraft noise increase the mortality from cardiovascular disease in the population living in the vicinity of airports? Results of an ecological study in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Evrard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of aircraft noise on health is of growing concern. We investigated the relationship between this exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. We performed an ecological study on 161 communes (commune being the smallest administrative unit in France close to the following three major French airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Lyon Saint-Exupéry, and Toulouse-Blagnac. The mortality data were provided by the French Center on Medical Causes of Death for the period 2007-2010. Based on the data provided by the French Civil Aviation Authority, a weighted average exposure to aircraft noise (L den AEI was computed at the commune level. A Poisson regression model with commune-specific random intercepts, adjusted for potential confounding factors including air pollution, was used to investigate the association between mortality rates and L den AEI. Positive associations were observed between L den AEI and mortality from cardiovascular disease [adjusted mortality rate ratio (MRR per 10 dB(A increase in L den AEI = 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.11-1.25], coronary heart disease [MRR = 1.24 (1.12-1.36], and myocardial infarction [MRR = 1.28 (1.11-1.46]. Stroke mortality was more weakly associated with L den AEI [MRR = 1.08 (0.97-1.21]. These significant associations were not attenuated after the adjustment for air pollution. The present ecological study supports the hypothesis of an association between aircraft noise exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction. However, the potential for ecological bias and the possibility that this association could be due to residual confounding cannot be excluded.

  19. Does exposure to aircraft noise increase the mortality from cardiovascular disease in the population living in the vicinity of airports? Results of an ecological study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Bouaoun, Liacine; Champelovier, Patricia; Lambert, Jacques; Laumon, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The impact of aircraft noise on health is of growing concern. We investigated the relationship between this exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. We performed an ecological study on 161 communes (commune being the smallest administrative unit in France) close to the following three major French airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Lyon Saint-Exupéry, and Toulouse-Blagnac. The mortality data were provided by the French Center on Medical Causes of Death for the period 2007-2010. Based on the data provided by the French Civil Aviation Authority, a weighted average exposure to aircraft noise (L den AEI) was computed at the commune level. A Poisson regression model with commune-specific random intercepts, adjusted for potential confounding factors including air pollution, was used to investigate the association between mortality rates and L den AEI. Positive associations were observed between L den AEI and mortality from cardiovascular disease [adjusted mortality rate ratio (MRR) per 10 dB(A) increase in L den AEI = 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.25], coronary heart disease [MRR = 1.24 (1.12-1.36)], and myocardial infarction [MRR = 1.28 (1.11-1.46]. Stroke mortality was more weakly associated with L den AEI [MRR = 1.08 (0.97-1.21]. These significant associations were not attenuated after the adjustment for air pollution. The present ecological study supports the hypothesis of an association between aircraft noise exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction. However, the potential for ecological bias and the possibility that this association could be due to residual confounding cannot be excluded.

  20. Contributions to the development of microwave active circuits: metamaterial dual-band active filters and broadband differential low-noise amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    García Pérez, Óscar Alberto

    2011-01-01

    New telecommunication systems require electronic components with increasing performance. Microwave active circuits are not an exception. In fact, these active devices (such as amplifiers, active filters, oscillators, mixers, switches, modulators, etc.) are a key part of any modern communication device and, in many cases, the components that greatly limit the overall system performance. During the last decades, engineers have been improving the performance and operation capabilities of such ac...

  1. An examination of the effects of various noise on physiological sensibility responses by using human EEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, W. H.; Lee, J. K.; Son, T. Y.; Hwang, S. H.; Choi, H. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M. S. [Hyundai Motor Company, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study investigated human stress levels based on electroencephalogram (EEG) data and carried out a subjective evaluation analysis about noise. Visual information is very important for finding human's emotional state. And relatively more previous works have been done than those using auditory stimulus. Since there are fewer previous works, we thought that using auditory stimulus is good choice for our study. Twelve human subjects were exposed to classic piano, ocean wave, army alarm, ambulance, and mosquito noises. We used two groups of comfortable and uncomfortable noises are to see the difference between the definitely different two groups to confirm usefulness of using this setting of experiment. EEG data were collected during the experimental session. The subjects were tested in a soundproof chamber and asked to minimize blinking, head movement, and swallowing during the experiment. The total time of the noise experiment included the time of the relaxation phase, during which the subjects relaxed in silence for 10 minutes. The relaxation phase was followed by a 20 -second noise exposure. The alpha band activities of the subjects were significantly decreased for the ambulance and mosquito noises, as it compared to the classic piano and ocean wave noises. The alpha band activities of the subjects decreased by 12.8 ± 2.3% for the ocean wave noise, decreased by 32.0 ± 5.4% for the army alarm noise, decreased by 34.5 ± 6.7% for the ambulance noise and decreased by 58.3 ± 9.1% for the mosquito noise compared to that of classic piano. On the other hand, their beta band activities were significantly increased for the ambulance and mosquito noises as it compared to classic piano and ocean wave. The beta band activities of the subjects increased by 7.9 ± 1.7% for the ocean wave noise, increased by 20.6 ± 5.3% for the army alarm noise, increased by 48.0 ± 7.5% for the ambulance noise and increased by 61.9 ± 11.2% for the mosquito noise, as it is compared

  2. ECG De-noising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kevin; Jensen, Søren Hjøllund; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a widely used noninvasive method to study the rhythmic activity of the heart and thereby to detect the abnormalities. However, these signals are often obscured by artifacts from various sources and minimization of these artifacts are of paramount important. This paper...... proposes two adaptive techniques, namely the EEMD-BLMS (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition in conjunction with the Block Least Mean Square algorithm) and DWT-NN (Discrete Wavelet Transform followed by Neural Network) methods in minimizing the artifacts from recorded ECG signals, and compares...... their performance. These methods were first compared on two types of simulated noise corrupted ECG signals: Type-I (desired ECG+noise frequencies outside the ECG frequency band) and Type-II (ECG+noise frequencies both inside and outside the ECG frequency band). Subsequently, they were tested on real ECG recordings...

  3. An improved protocol for mRNA quantification after fluorescence-activated cell sorting with an increased signal to noise ratio in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Arisa; Maeda, Tomoko; Watanabe, Mikio; Hidaka, Yoh; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Takano, Toru

    2014-07-01

    We established a method to analyze cells collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) named mRNA quantification after FACS (FACS-mQ), in which cells are labeled with a fluorescent dye in a manner that minimizes RNA degradation, and then cells sorted by FACS are examined by analyzing their gene expression profile. In this study, we established a modified protocol to analyze molecules with a low expression level, such as N-cadherin and thyroid transcription factor, by improving the signal to noise ratio in flow cytometry. Use of a fluorophore-conjugated second antibody and the appropriate choice of a fluorescence dye showed a marked increase in the signal to noise ratio. Use of the Can Get Signal Immunostain in diluting antibodies shortened the reaction time. In real-time reverse transcription-PCR, a significant decrease in the copy number of intracellular mRNAs was not observed after in-tube immunostaining. These results indicated that the present protocol is useful for separating and analyzing cells by FACS-mQ, targeting a molecule with a low expression level.

  4. Installation of the light tight cover for the SSD modules (the modules are behind the aluminium plate). The silicon sensors are sensitive to light tight, so ambient light will increase the noise and may even damage them.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G.

    2004-01-01

    Installation of the light tight cover for the SSD modules (the modules are behind the aluminium plate). The silicon sensors are sensitive to light tight , so ambient light will increase the noise and may even damage them.

  5. Sea Ice Deformation State From Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery - Part II: Effects of Spatial Resolution and Noise Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang; Dall, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    . The areal fraction at C-band remains constant. The retrieved average distance between deformation features increases both at C- and L-bands, as the image resolution gets coarser. The influence of noise becomes noticeable if its level is equal or larger than the average intensity backscattered from the level......C- and L-band airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery acquired at like- and cross-polarization over sea ice under winter conditions is examined with the objective to study the discrimination between level ice and ice deformation features. High-resolution low-noise data were analysed....... The signal-to-noise ratio is varied between typical noise levels for airborne imagery and satellite data. Areal fraction of deformed ice and average deformation distance are determined for each image product. At L-band, the retrieved values of the areal fraction get larger as the image resolution is degraded...

  6. Challenges and limitations in retrofitting facilities for low frequency noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierzba, P. [ATCO Noise Management, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The trend to revise and increase environmental regulations regarding low frequency noise emissions from oil and gas facilities was discussed. Noise related complaints can often be traced to low frequency noise, which is the unwanted sound with a frequency range falling within 31.5-Hz, 63-Hz, and 125-Hz octave bands. This paper also discussed the challenges and limitations of field retrofits of the facilities aimed at reducing low frequency noise. The main sources of low frequency noise associated with a compression facility are the radiator cooler, engine exhaust and the building envelope. Regulators are paying close attention not only to the overall noise exposure as measured by the A-weighted levels, but also to the quality of noise emitted by the particular frequency spectrum. The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board recently issued Noise Control Directive 38 and made it a requirement to perform low frequency noise impact assessment for permitting of all new energy facilities. Under Directive 38, the low frequency noise assessment is to be performed using the C-weighted scale as a measure in addition to the previously used A-weighted scale. Directive 38 recommends that in order to avoid low frequency noise problems the difference between the C-weighted and A-weighted levels at the residential locations should be lower than 20 dB. This implies that noise should be limited to 60 dBC for Category 1 residences of low dwelling density. Small upgrades and changes can be made to lower low frequency noise emissions. These may include upgrading building wall insulation, providing wall-to-skid isolation system, upgrading the fan blades, or reducing the rpm of the fans. It was concluded that these upgrades should be considered for facilities in close proximity to residential areas. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  7. Phase Noise of Optically Generated Microwave Using Sideband Injection Locking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jin; SUN Chang-Zheng; SONG Yu; XIONG Bing; LUO Yi

    2008-01-01

    Optically generated 20-GHz microwave carriers with phase noise lower than -75 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset and lower than -90 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz offset are obtained using single- and double-sideband injection locking. Within the locking range, the effect of sideband injection locking can be regarded as narrow-band amplification of the modulation sidebands. Increasing the current of slave laser will increase the power of beat signal and reduce the phase noise to a certain extent. Double-sideband injection locking can increase the power of the generated microwave carrier while keeping the phase noise at a low level. It is also revealed that partially destruction of coherence between the two beating lights in the course of sideband injection locking would impair the phase noise performance.

  8. Description of the Tile Calorimeter noise with increasing Pile-up for $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\rm{TeV}$ data collected during 2011

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In this note the noise in the Tile calorimeter is investigated with special attention to the pile-up effect. A full survey of the TileCal cells is performed, based both on pseudorapidity, bunch position in a train and number of interactions per bunch crossing. Several periods of 2011 data collected by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\rm{TeV}$ were used in the analysis. Just one run from each data-taking period corresponding to different pile-up conditions was examined. The data were recorded by zero bias trigger. The Monte Carlo simulation was reweighted to the pile-up conditions of the data. This study contributes to a better knowledge of the Tile Calorimeter response and performance under increasing pile-up conditions.

  9. Measuring time-domain spectral induced polarization in the on-time: decreasing acquisition time and increasing signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    2015-12-01

    Combined resistivity and time-domain direct current induced polarization (DCIP) measurements are traditionally carried out with a 50% duty cycle current waveform, taking the resistivity measurements during the on-time and the IP measurements during the off-time. One drawback with this method is that only half of the acquisition time is available for resistivity and IP measurements, respectively. In this paper, this limitation is solved by using a current injection with 100% duty cycle and also taking the IP measurements in the on-time. With numerical modelling of current waveforms with 50% and 100% duty cycles we show that the waveforms have comparable sensitivity for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters and that signal level is increased up to a factor of 2 if the 100% duty cycle waveform is used. The inversion of field data acquired with both waveforms confirms the modelling results and shows that it is possible to retrieve similar inversion models with either of the waveforms when inverting for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters with the waveform of the injected current included in the forward computations. Consequently, our results show that on-time measurements of IP can reduce the acquisition time by up to 50% and increase the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 100% almost without information loss. Our findings can contribute and have a large impact for DCIP surveys in general and especially for surveys where time and reliable data quality are important factors. Specifically, the findings are of value for DCIP surveys conducted in urban areas where anthropogenic noise is an issue and the heterogeneous subsurface demands time-consuming 3D acquisitions.

  10. Genetic selection for context-dependent stochastic phenotypes: Sp1 and TATA mutations increase phenotypic noise in HIV-1 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Miller-Jensen

    Full Text Available The sequence of a promoter within a genome does not uniquely determine gene expression levels and their variability; rather, promoter sequence can additionally interact with its location in the genome, or genomic context, to shape eukaryotic gene expression. Retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV, integrate their genomes into those of their host and thereby provide a biomedically-relevant model system to quantitatively explore the relationship between promoter sequence, genomic context, and noise-driven variability on viral gene expression. Using an in vitro model of the HIV Tat-mediated positive-feedback loop, we previously demonstrated that fluctuations in viral Tat-transactivating protein levels generate integration-site-dependent, stochastically-driven phenotypes, in which infected cells randomly 'switch' between high and low expressing states in a manner that may be related to viral latency. Here we extended this model and designed a forward genetic screen to systematically identify genetic elements in the HIV LTR promoter that modulate the fraction of genomic integrations that specify 'Switching' phenotypes. Our screen identified mutations in core promoter regions, including Sp1 and TATA transcription factor binding sites, which increased the Switching fraction several fold. By integrating single-cell experiments with computational modeling, we further investigated the mechanism of Switching-fraction enhancement for a selected Sp1 mutation. Our experimental observations demonstrated that the Sp1 mutation both impaired Tat-transactivated expression and also altered basal expression in the absence of Tat. Computational analysis demonstrated that the observed change in basal expression could contribute significantly to the observed increase in viral integrations that specify a Switching phenotype, provided that the selected mutation affected Tat-mediated noise amplification differentially across genomic contexts. Our study

  11. Helicopter Noise And Noise Abatement Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoj Galović

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The helicopter generated noise at and around the airports islower than the noise generated by aeroplanes, since their numberof operations, i. e. the number of takeoffs and landings ismuch lower than the takeoffs and landings of the aeroplanes.Out of some hundred operations a day, helicopters participatewith approximately 15%, but the very impact of noise is by nomeans negligible, since the number of helicopter flights aboveurban areas is constantly increasing.This paper attempts to analyse this phenomenon and thetype of helicopter generated noise, its negative impacts, to explainthe flight procedures and the operative procedures duringtakeoff, landing and overflight of helicopters in operations inthe vicinity and outside airports, as well as the methods of measuringand determining the limit of noise [eve~ and the resultingproblems.

  12. Inter modulation noise in trans linear filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, G.; Svelto, V. [Pavia Univ., Pavia (Italy). Dipt. di Elettronica

    1999-06-01

    The noise properties of trans linear filters operated in class A and class AB is examined, discussing how the output noise power depends on the circuit topology. It is shown that for in band useful signal the output noise does not depend on the relative position of the transistors in the filter.

  13. 对GPS接收机带限高斯噪声压制干扰的干扰带宽选择分析∗%Analysis of Band-limited Gaussian Noise Blanket Jamming Bandwidth Choosing to GPS Receiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛虎; 吴德伟; 卢虎

    2015-01-01

    Aim at the problem of low efficiency of band-limited Gaussian noise jamming, using code tracking error and ephemeris bit error rate of GPS receiver as the jamming effect evaluation index, on the basis of analysis characteristics of GPS C/A code, P( Y) code and M code signal power spectral density, to carry on the theoretical derivation about jamming bandwidth influence code tracking and ephemeris demodulation process, the existence of optimal jamming bandwidth is judged qualitative. The quantitative simulation results show that when the JSR is small, the bit error rate influence should be fully considered, the jamming bandwidth which causes the biggest code tracking er-ror should reduce a little as the best jamming bandwidth for C/A code signal, the best jamming bandwidth should choose the jamming band-width which causes the biggest code tracking error for the P( Y) code and M code signal.%针对带限高斯噪声干扰效率低下的问题,以GPS接收机码跟踪误差和星历误码率作为干扰效果评估准则,在分析GPS C/A码、P( Y)码和M码信号功率谱特点的基础上,通过对干扰带宽影响码跟踪和星历解调过程进行理论推导,定性的判断出最佳干扰带宽的存在。定量的仿真分析结果表明:对于C/A码信号,当干信比较小时,要充分考虑到误码率的影响,将造成码跟踪误差最大的干扰带宽减小一些,作为其最佳干扰带宽;而对于P( Y)码和M码信号,应选择造成码跟踪误差最大的干扰带宽,作为其最佳干扰带宽。

  14. Modulation transfer functions at Ka band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesany, Vahid; Sistani, Bita; Salam, Asif; Haimov, Samuel; Gogineni, Prasad; Moore, Richard K.

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is often used to describe the modulation of the radar signal by the long waves. MTFs were measured at 35 GHz (Ka band) with a switched-beam vector slope gauge/scatterometer on the research platform NORDSEE as part of the SAXON-FPN experiment. Three independent measurements of the scattering were available for each height measurement. This provided the opportunity to average the time series to reduce the effects of fading noise and sea spikes, or, alternatively, to append the time series to achieve more degrees of freedom in the spectral estimates. For upwind measurements, the phase of the VV-polarized Ka-band MTF was always positive, which implies that the maximum of the radar return originates from the forward face of the long-scale waves. This phase increases with increasing wind speed. The magnitude of the MTF decreases with increasing wind speed.

  15. The subjective importance of noise spectral content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Donald; Phillips, Jonathan; Denman, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents secondary Standard Quality Scale (SQS2) rankings in overall quality JNDs for a subjective analysis of the 3 axes of noise, amplitude, spectral content, and noise type, based on the ISO 20462 softcopy ruler protocol. For the initial pilot study, a Python noise simulation model was created to generate the matrix of noise masks for the softcopy ruler base images with different levels of noise, different low pass filter noise bandwidths and different band pass filter center frequencies, and 3 different types of noise: luma only, chroma only, and luma and chroma combined. Based on the lessons learned, the full subjective experiment, involving 27 observers from Google, NVIDIA and STMicroelectronics was modified to incorporate a wider set of base image scenes, and the removal of band pass filtered noise masks to ease observer fatigue. Good correlation was observed with the Aptina subjective noise study. The absence of tone mapping in the noise simulation model visibly reduced the contrast at high levels of noise, due to the clipping of the high levels of noise near black and white. Under the 34-inch viewing distance, no significant difference was found between the luma only noise masks and the combined luma and chroma noise masks. This was not the intuitive expectation. Two of the base images with large uniform areas, `restaurant' and `no parking', were found to be consistently more sensitive to noise than the texture rich scenes. Two key conclusions are (1) there are fundamentally different sensitivities to noise on a flat patch versus noise in real images and (2) magnification of an image accentuates visual noise in a way that is non-representative of typical noise reduction algorithms generating the same output frequency. Analysis of our experimental noise masks applied to a synthetic Macbeth ColorChecker Chart confirmed the color-dependent nature of the visibility of luma and chroma noise.

  16. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  17. Exterior Noise Due to Interaction of Tire-Thermoplastic Transverse Rumble Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haron Zaiton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transverse rumble strips (TRS are a common choice to reduce vehicle speed and increase driver alertness on roadways. However, there is a potential trade-off using them on rural roadway due to the noise problem created when vehicles go over the strips. The present study investigated the noise level, spectral analysis and the possible noise generation mechanism when the TRS hit by a vehicle. Ten-raised-rumbler (RR and three-layer-overlapped (TLO were selected in this study as they have received complaints from the public. Results showed that RR generated relatively higher noise and impulse at low speed, and increased sound level in each octave band. Based on these results, RR may irritate human ears even when the vehicle travels at low speed. It was found that RR increased all noise generation mechanism of tire-pavement interaction whilst for the TLO increased structural resonance, sidewall and surface texture vibration.

  18. Plasmonic mass and Johnson-Nyquist noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Qin, Ling; Ham, Donhee

    2015-09-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the thermal noise spectrum of a conductor to its linear response properties, with the ohmic resistance arising from the electron scattering being the most notable linear response property. But the linear response also includes the collective inertial acceleration of electrons, which should in principle influence the thermal noise spectrum as well. In practice, this effect would be largely masked by the Planck quantization for traditional conductors with short electron scattering times. But recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of conductors with greatly increased electron scattering times, with which the collective inertial effect can critically affect the thermal noise spectrum. In this paper we highlight this collective inertial effect-that is, the plasmonic effect-on the thermal noise spectrum under the framework of semiclassical electron dynamics, from both fundamental microscopic and practical modeling points of view. In graphene, where non-zero collective inertia arises from zero single-electron effective mass and where both electron and hole bands exist together, the thermal noise spectrum shows rich temperature and frequency dependencies, unseen in traditional conductors.

  19. BDNF in Lower Brain Parts Modifies Auditory Fiber Activity to Gain Fidelity but Increases the Risk for Generation of Central Noise After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumak, Tetyana; Rüttiger, Lukas; Lee, Sze Chim; Campanelli, Dario; Zuccotti, Annalisa; Singer, Wibke; Popelář, Jiří; Gutsche, Katja; Geisler, Hyun-Soon; Schraven, Sebastian Philipp; Jaumann, Mirko; Panford-Walsh, Rama; Hu, Jing; Schimmang, Thomas; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Syka, Josef; Knipper, Marlies

    2016-10-01

    For all sensory organs, the establishment of spatial and temporal cortical resolution is assumed to be initiated by the first sensory experience and a BDNF-dependent increase in intracortical inhibition. To address the potential of cortical BDNF for sound processing, we used mice with a conditional deletion of BDNF in which Cre expression was under the control of the Pax2 or TrkC promoter. BDNF deletion profiles between these mice differ in the organ of Corti (BDNF (Pax2) -KO) versus the auditory cortex and hippocampus (BDNF (TrkC) -KO). We demonstrate that BDNF (Pax2) -KO but not BDNF (TrkC) -KO mice exhibit reduced sound-evoked suprathreshold ABR waves at the level of the auditory nerve (wave I) and inferior colliculus (IC) (wave IV), indicating that BDNF in lower brain regions but not in the auditory cortex improves sound sensitivity during hearing onset. Extracellular recording of IC neurons of BDNF (Pax2) mutant mice revealed that the reduced sensitivity of auditory fibers in these mice went hand in hand with elevated thresholds, reduced dynamic range, prolonged latency, and increased inhibitory strength in IC neurons. Reduced parvalbumin-positive contacts were found in the ascending auditory circuit, including the auditory cortex and hippocampus of BDNF (Pax2) -KO, but not of BDNF (TrkC) -KO mice. Also, BDNF (Pax2) -WT but not BDNF (Pax2) -KO mice did lose basal inhibitory strength in IC neurons after acoustic trauma. These findings suggest that BDNF in the lower parts of the auditory system drives auditory fidelity along the entire ascending pathway up to the cortex by increasing inhibitory strength in behaviorally relevant frequency regions. Fidelity and inhibitory strength can be lost following auditory nerve injury leading to diminished sensory outcome and increased central noise.

  20. Study of signal-to-noise ratio driven by colored noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jin

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)driven by colored noise and weak input signals. Based on the Cauchy-Schwarz and Rayleigh quotients inequalities, an analytical expression of SNR is developed, and its upper band is closely related to the Fisher information of noise. For mimicking the colored noise, we adopt the first-order moving-average model and propose the optimal input signal waveform. The stochastic resonance effect in threshold systems is demonstrated for the Gaussian mixture colored noise. The obtained results will be interesting in the case of improving the nonlinear filter performance by adding noise to the weak signal corrupted by the colored noise.

  1. Simulation of realistic instrument noise for GRACE follow-on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmer, Matthias; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    Computer simulations have been an indispensable tool in assessing and predicting the performance of gravity recovery satellite missions, both present and future. Future satellite missions like GRACE follow-on will measure Earth's gravity with a much higher precision than their predecessors. This increased precision makes it necessary to reevaluate the applicability of current simulation strategies to future gravity missions. In past simulation efforts, effects that are known to be relevant factors for mission performance are often approximated or modeled incompletely. One such effect is the noise applied to simulated observables like precise orbits or K-Band ranges. These noisy observables are generated by adding simple white noise of a specific power to noise-free raw measurements. The noisy observables are then used in closed-loop simulations to quantify the performance of specific instruments, or a mission scenario as a whole. This work presents strategies to generate more realistic noise for satellite missions as implemented in the GROOPS (Gravity Recovery Object Orientated Programming System) software package. A generic interface for different noise generators is implemented in GROOPS. This interface is used to add different types of noise, such as white noise, colored or correlated noise, or noise with a given power spectral density to generated observables. It is thus possible to study the effect of the chosen noise model on the generated observable, and conversely the recovered gravity field as a whole. A better knowledge of the noise characteristics of the instruments on GRACE and GRACE follow-on will allow us to improve our understanding of their complex interactions. It will also allow us to improve our processing strategies for both simulated and real data, and will thus lead to a more precise and better understood recovered gravity field.

  2. Reduction of quantum noise and increase of amplification of gravitational waves signals in Michelson interferometer by the use of squeezed states

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Aryeh, Yacob

    2010-01-01

    It is shown in the present Letter that the quantum noise due to high laser intensities in Michelson interferometer for gravitational waves detection can be reduced by sending squeezed vacuum states to the 'dark' port of the interferometer. The experimental details of such physical system have been described in a recent article by Barak and Ben-Aryeh (JOSA-B, 25, 361(2008)). In another very recent article by Voronov and Weyrauch (Phys. Rev.A 81, 053816 (2010)) they have followed our methods for treating the same physical system, and have pointed out an error in the sign of one of our expressions thus claiming for the elimination of our physical results. I show here a method by which the expectation value for the photon number operator is increased and at the same time the standard deviation is reduced. Although due to the mistake in sign in our expression the physical method for obtaining such result is different from our original study [1], the main physical effect can remain .

  3. X-Band PLL Synthesizer

    OpenAIRE

    P. Kutin; Vagner, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with design and realization of a PLL synthesizer for the microwave X−band. The synthesizer is intended for use as a local oscillator in a K−band downconverter. The design goal was to achieve very low phase noise and spurious free signal with a sufficient power level. For that purpose a low phase noise MMIC VCO was used in phase locked loop. The PLL works at half the output frequency, therefore there is a frequency doubler at the output of the PLL. The output signal ...

  4. An Increase in Alpha Band Frequency in Resting State EEG after Electrical Stimulation of the Ear in Tinnitus Patients—A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielczarek, Marzena; Michalska, Joanna; Polatyńska, Katarzyna; Olszewski, Jurek

    2016-01-01

    In our clinic invasive transtympanal promontory positive DC stimulations were first used, with a success rate of 42%. However, non-invasive hydrotransmissive negative DC stimulations are now favored, with improvement being obtained in 37.8% directly after the treatment, and 51.3% in a follow up 1 month after treatment. The further improvement after 1 month may be due to neuroplastic changes at central level as a result of altered peripheral input. The aim of the study was to determine how/whether a single electrical stimulation of the ear influences cortical activity, and whether changes observed in tinnitus after electrical stimulation are associated with any changes in cortical activity recorded in EEG. The study included 12 tinnitus patients (F–6, M-6) divided into two groups. Group I comprised six patients with unilateral tinnitus - unilateral, ipsilateral ES was performed. Group II comprised six patients with bilateral tinnitus—bilateral ES was performed. ES was performed using a custom-made apparatus. The active, silver probe—was immersed inside the external ear canal filled with saline. The passive electrode was placed on the forehead. The stimulating frequency was 250 Hz, the intensity ranged from 0.14 to 1.08 mA. The voltage was kept constant at 3 V. The duration of stimulation was 4 min. The EEG recording (Deymed QEST 32) was performed before and after ES. The patients assessed the intensity of tinnitus on the VAS 1-10. Results: In both groups an improvement in VAS was observed—in group I—in five ears (83.3%), in group II—in seven ears (58.3%). In Group I, a significant increase in the upper and lower limit frequency of alpha band was observed in the central temporal and frontal regions following ES. These changes, however, were not correlated with improvement in tinnitus. No significant changes were observed in the beta and theta bands and in group II. Preliminary results of our research reveal a change in cortical activity after electrical

  5. Psychoacoustic study on contribution of fan noise to engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Liu, Hai; Bi, Fengrong; Ni, Guangjian; Zhang, Guichang; Lin, Jiewei; Yu, Hanzhengnan

    2012-07-01

    There are more researches on engine fan noise control focusing on reducing fan noise level through optimizing fan structure, and a lot of research achievements have been obtained. However, researches on the effect of fan noise to engine noise quality are lacking. The influences of the effects of fan structure optimization on the engine noise quality are unclear. Thus, there will be a decline in fan noise level, but the deterioration of engine noise quality. Aiming at the above problems, in consideration of fan structure design and engine noise quality, an innovative method to analyze the contribution of fan noise to engine noise quality using psychoacoustic theory is proposed. The noises of diesel engine installing different cooling fans are measured by using the acoustic pressure method. The experiment results are regarded as analysis samples. The model of sensory pleasantness is used to analyze the sound quality of a diesel engine with different cooling fans. Results show that after installing 10-blade fan in medium diameter the sensory pleasantness at each test point is increased, and the increase is 13.53% on average, which indicate the improvement of the engine noise quality. In order to verify the psychoacoustical analysis, the subjective assessment is carried out. The test result shows the noise quality of engine installed 10-blade fan in medium diameter is most superior. 1/3 octave frequency spectrum analysis is used to study the reason of the improvement of engine noise quality. It is found that after installing proper cooling fan the sound pressure level below 400 Hz are obviously increased, the frequency assignment and spectral envelope are more reasonable and a proper cooling fan can optimize the spectrum structure of the engine noise. The psychoacoustic study is applied in the contribution of fan noise to engine noise, and the idea of engine sound quality improvement through the structure optimization is proposed.

  6. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    -sectional area. To study the band-gap for travelling waves, a repeated inner segment of the optimized beams is analyzed using Floquet theory and the waveguide finite element (WFE) method. Finally, the frequency response is computed for the optimized beams when these are subjected to an external time......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...

  7. Increasing the number and signal-to-noise ratio of OBS traces with supervirtual refraction interferometry and free-surface multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, P.

    2013-01-10

    The theory of supervirtual interferometry is modified so that free-surface related multiple refractions can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of primary refraction events by a factor proportional to√Ns, where Ns is the number of post-critical sources for a specified refraction multiple. We also show that refraction multiples can be transformed into primary refraction events recorded at virtual hydrophones located between the actual hydrophones. Thus, data recorded by a coarse sampling of ocean bottom seismic (OBS) stations can be transformed, in principle, into a virtual survey with P times more OBS stations, where P is the order of the visible free-surface related multiple refractions. The key assumption is that the refraction arrivals are those of head waves, not pure diving waves. The effectiveness of this method is validated with both synthetic OBS data and an OBS data set recorded offshore from Taiwan. Results show the successful reconstruction of far-offset traces out to a source-receiver offset of 120 km. The primary supervirtual traces increase the number of pickable first arrivals from approximately 1600 to more than 3100 for a subset of the OBS data set where the source is only on one side of the recording stations. In addition, the head waves associated with the first-order free-surface refraction multiples allow for the creation of six new common receiver gathers recorded at virtual OBS station located about half way between the actual OBS stations. This doubles the number of OBS stations compared to the original survey and increases the total number of pickable traces from approximately 1600 to more than 6200. In summary, our results with the OBS data demonstrate that refraction interferometry can sometimes more than quadruple the number of usable traces, increase the source-receiver offsets, fill in the receiver line with a denser distribution of OBS stations, and provide more reliable picking of first arrivals. Apotential liability

  8. Joint L-/C-Band Code and Carrier Phase Linear Combinations for Galileo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Henkel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear code combinations have been considered for suppressing the ionospheric error. In the L-band, this leads to an increased noise floor. In a combined L- and C-band (5010–5030 MHz approach, the ionosphere can be eliminated and the noise floor reduced at the same time. Furthermore, combinations that involve both code- and carrier-phase measurements are considered. A new L-band code-carrier combination with a wavelength of 3.215 meters and a noise level of 3.92 centimeters is found. The double difference integer ambiguities of this combination can be resolved by extending the system of equations with an ionosphere-free L-/C-band code combination. The probability of wrong fixing is reduced by several orders of magnitude when C-band measurements are included. Carrier smoothing can be used to further reduce the residual variance of the solution. The standard deviation is reduced by a factor 7.7 if C-band measurements are taken into account. These initial findings suggest that the combined use of L- and C-band measurements, as well as the combined code and phase processing are an attractive option for precise positioning.

  9. Protective effect of propofol on noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jian; Duan, Na; Wang, Qiang; Jing, Gui-Xia; Xiao, Ying

    2017-02-15

    Iatrogenic noise produced by mastoid or craniotomy drills may cause hearing damage, which is induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction of cochlear blood flow (CoBF). This study investigated whether propofol could reduce noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a guinea pig model. Sixty-four male pigmented guinea pigs were randomly and equally divided into 4 groups: control, noise, propofol and propofol+noise. Propofol was infused intravenously for 20min prior to noise exposure with a loading dose of 5mg·kg(-1) for 5min and a maintenance infusion of 20mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) for 135min. For noise exposure, an octave band noise at a 124dB sound pressure level (SPL) was administered to animals for 2h. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and CoBF were monitored continuously. Auditory function was measured by the level of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) before and at 1h, 72h and 240h after noise exposure. Cochlear levels of 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso-PGF2α) were measured immediately after the termination of noise exposure. Cochlear silver nitrate staining and outer hair cell (OHC) counting were performed after the final functional test. Noise exposure caused decreases in the CoBF and DPOAE amplitudes, over-generation of 8-iso-PGF2α and the loss of OHCs. Pre-treatment with propofol significantly increased the CoBF and DPOAE amplitudes, decreased 8-iso-PGF2α and the loss of OHCs. Propofol exerted protective effects against NIHL in this animal model by suppressing a lipid peroxidation reaction and improving CoBF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Banded all-optical OFDM super-channels with low-bandwidth receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Binhuang; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Zhuang, Leimeng; Lowery, Arthur James

    2016-08-08

    We propose a banded all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (AO-OFDM) transmission system based on synthesising a number of truncated sinc-shaped subcarriers for each sub-band. This approach enables sub-band by sub-band reception and therefore each receiver's electrical bandwidth can be significantly reduced compared with a conventional AO-OFDM system. As a proof-of-concept experiment, we synthesise 6 × 10-Gbaud subcarriers in both conventional and banded AO-OFDM systems. With a limited receiver electrical bandwidth, the experimental banded AO-OFDM system shows 2-dB optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) benefit over conventional AO-OFDM at the 7%-overhead forward error correction (FEC) threshold. After transmission over 800-km of single-mode fiber, ≈3-dB improvement in Q-factor can be achieved at the optimal launch power at a cost of increasing the spectral width by 14%.

  11. An adaptive algorithm for noise rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, D E; Knoebel, S B

    1978-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm for the rejection of noise artifact in 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings is described. The algorithm is based on increased amplitude distortion or increased frequency of fluctuations associated with an episode of noise artifact. The results of application of the noise rejection algorithm on a high noise population of test tapes are discussed.

  12. An increase in alpha band frequency in resting state EEG after electrical stimulation of the ear in tinnitus patients - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Mielczarek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In our clinic invasive transtympanal promontory positive DC stimulations were first used, with a success rate of 42%. However, non-invasive hydrotransmissive negative DC stimulations are now favoured, with improvement being obtained in 37.8% directly after the treatment, and 51.3% in a follow up one month after treatment. The further improvement after one month may be due to neuroplastic changes at central level as a result of altered peripheral input. The aim of the study was to determine how a single electrical stimulation of the ear influences cortical activity, and whether changes observed in tinnitus after electrical stimulation are associated with any changes in cortical activity recorded in EEG.The study included 12 tinnitus patients(F–6, M-6 divided into two groups. Group I comprised six patients with unilateral tinnitus - unilateral, ipsilateral ES was performed. Group II comprised six patients with bilateral tinnitus - bilateral ES was performed.Electrical stimulation was performed using a custom-made apparatus.The active, silver probe – was immersed inside the external ear canal filled with saline. The passive electrode was placed on the forehead. The stimulating frequency was 250Hz, the intensity ranged from 0.14 to 1.08 mA. The voltage was kept constant at 3V. The duration of stimulation was four minutes. The EEG recording (Deymed QEST 32 was performed before and after electrical stimulation. We assessed the intensity of tinnitus on the visual analogue scale (1-10. Results.In both groups an improvement in VAS was observed– in group I - in five ears (83.3%, in group II - in seven ears (58.3%. In Group I,a significant increase in the upper and lower limits of the alpha frequency range was observed in the left central temporal and left frontal regions following electrical stimulation. These changes, however, were not correlated with improvement in tinnitus. No significant changes were observed in the beta and theta bands and in

  13. Landsat-7 ETM+: 12 years on-orbit reflective-band radiometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Haque, M.O.; Barsi, J.A.; Micijevic, E.; Helder, D.L.; Thome, K.J.; Aaron, D.; Czapla-Myers, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor has been operating on orbit for more than 12 years, and characterizations of its performance have been ongoing over this period. In general, the radiometric performance of the instrument has been remarkably stable: 1) noise performance has degraded by 2% or less overall, with a few detectors displaying step changes in noise of 2% or less; 2) coherent noise frequencies and magnitudes have generally been stable, though the within-scan amplitude variation of the 20 kHz noise in bands 1 and 8 disappeared with the failure of the scan line corrector and a new similar frequency noise (now about 18 kHz) has appeared in two detectors in band 5 and increased in magnitude with time; 3) bias stability has been better than 0.25 DN out of a normal value of 15 DN in high gain; 4) relative gains, the differences in response between the detectors in the band, have generally changed by 0.1% or less over the mission, with the exception of a few detectors with a step response change of 1% or less; and 5) gain stability averaged across all detectors in a band, which is related to the stability of the absolute calibration, has been more stable than the techniques used to measure it. Due to the inability to confirm changes in the gain (beyond a few detectors that have been corrected back to the band average), ETM+ reflective band data continues to be calibrated with the prelaunch measured gains. In the worst case, some bands may have changed as much as 2% in uncompensated absolute calibration over the 12 years.

  14. Low Noise Millimeter Wave LNA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I effort will result in a low noise MMIC G-Band amplifier the covers the entire 165 to 193GHz frequency range. The amplifier will be designed using a 50nm...

  15. Airframe-Jet Engine Integration Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Antcliff, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the noise radiated by a jet mounted under the wing of an aircraft exceeds that of the same jet in a stand-alone environment. The increase in noise is referred to as jet engine airframe integration noise. The objectives of the present investigation are, (1) To obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for jet engine airframe integration noise or installation noise. (2) To develop a prediction model for jet engine airframe integration noise. It is known that jet mixing noise consists of two principal components. They are the noise from the large turbulence structures of the jet flow and the noise from the fine scale turbulence. In this investigation, only the effect of jet engine airframe interaction on the fine scale turbulence noise of a jet is studied. The fine scale turbulence noise is the dominant noise component in the sideline direction. Thus we limit out consideration primarily to the sideline.

  16. X-Band PLL Synthesizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kutin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with design and realization of a PLL synthesizer for the microwave X−band. The synthesizer is intended for use as a local oscillator in a K−band downconverter. The design goal was to achieve very low phase noise and spurious free signal with a sufficient power level. For that purpose a low phase noise MMIC VCO was used in phase locked loop. The PLL works at half the output frequency, therefore there is a frequency doubler at the output of the PLL. The output signal from the frequency doubler is filtered by a band-pass filter and finally amplified by a single stage amplifier.

  17. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Clean Air Act Overview Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Clean Air Act Title IV - ... noises in the community (from your neighbor, boom cars, lawn equipment, etc.) and from commercial businesses (factory, ...

  18. The spatial structure of underwater noise due to shipping activities in the Celtic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Underwater noise is now classed as pollution alongside chemical pollution and marine litter (MSFD, 2012). Underwater noise from man-made sources arises from a number of sources including shipping activities. There are numerous examples of sound-induced effects recorded for various marine mammals, either in controlled situations, or opportunistically (MSFD-GES, 2012). Broad or narrow band continuous sounds, as well as pulses, have been documented to cause effects ranging from slight behaviour change, to activity disruption, avoidance or abandonment of preferred habitat (see Clark et al., 2009). Underwater ambient noise generated by shipping activities has increased significantly over the past decades (e.g. Mcdonald et al., 2006). Noise from shipping is a major contributor to the ambient noise levels in ocean, particularly at low (

  19. Thermal Noise Canceling in LNAs: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Most wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the te

  20. Noise Trauma Induced Plastic Changes in Brain Regions outside the Classical Auditory Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Di; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The effects of intense noise exposure on the classical auditory pathway have been extensively investigated; however, little is known about the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on non-classical auditory areas in the brain such as the lateral amygdala (LA) and striatum (Str). To address this issue, we compared the noise-induced changes in spontaneous and tone-evoked responses from multiunit clusters (MUC) in the LA and Str with those seen in auditory cortex (AC). High-frequency octave band noise (10–20 kHz) and narrow band noise (16–20 kHz) induced permanent thresho ld shifts (PTS) at high-frequencies within and above the noise band but not at low frequencies. While the noise trauma significantly elevated spontaneous discharge rate (SR) in the AC, SRs in the LA and Str were only slightly increased across all frequencies. The high-frequency noise trauma affected tone-evoked firing rates in frequency and time dependent manner and the changes appeared to be related to severity of noise trauma. In the LA, tone-evoked firing rates were reduced at the high-frequencies (trauma area) whereas firing rates were enhanced at the low-frequencies or at the edge-frequency dependent on severity of hearing loss at the high frequencies. The firing rate temporal profile changed from a broad plateau to one sharp, delayed peak. In the AC, tone-evoked firing rates were depressed at high frequencies and enhanced at the low frequencies while the firing rate temporal profiles became substantially broader. In contrast, firing rates in the Str were generally decreased and firing rate temporal profiles become more phasic and less prolonged. The altered firing rate and pattern at low frequencies induced by high frequency hearing loss could have perceptual consequences. The tone-evoked hyperactivity in low-frequency MUC could manifest as hyperacusis whereas the discharge pattern changes could affect temporal resolution and integration. PMID:26701290

  1. Ex / Noise / CERN / Deerhoof

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN, SM18,

    2015-01-01

    Indie rockers Deerhoof battled with the noise of CERN’s magnet test facilities on 30 August 2015. The band visited CERN at the invitation of ATLAS physicist James Beacham, whose pilot project Ex/Noise/CERN collides experimental music artists with experimental particle physics. Credits: -Producer- CERN Video Productions James Beacham François Briard -Director- Noemi Caraban -Camera- Yann Krajewski Piotr Traczyk Noemi Caraban -Crane operator- Antonio Henrique Jorge-Costa -Live recording at CERN- Mixing at Rec studio/Geneva By Serge Morattel -Infography- Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban -Deerhoof- John Dieterich Satomi Matsuzaki Ed Rodriguez Greg Saunier w/Deron Pulley SPECIAL THANKS TO: Michal Strychalski Marta Bajko Maryline Charrondiere Luca Bottura Christian Giloux Rodrigue Faes Mariane Catallon Georgina Hobgen Hailey Reissman Marine Bass

  2. Background noise cancellation for improved acoustic detection of manatee vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2005-06-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of an increase in the number of collisions with boats. A device to alert boaters of the presence of manatees, so that a collision can be avoided, is desired. A practical implementation of the technology is dependent on the hydrophone spacing and range of detection. These parameters are primarily dependent on the manatee vocalization strength, the decay of the signal's strength with distance, and the background noise levels. An efficient method to extend the detection range by using background noise cancellation is proposed in this paper. An adaptive line enhancer (ALE) that can detect and track narrow band signals buried in broadband noise is implemented to cancel the background noise. The results indicate that the ALE algorithm can efficiently extract the manatee calls from the background noise. The improved signal-to-noise ratio of the signal can be used to extend the range of detection of manatee vocalizations and reduce the false alarm and missing detection rate in their natural habitat. .

  3. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct networks of neurons that extend the range. The range increases more rapidly with network size when we make use of heterogeneous populations of neurons with a variety of thresholds, rather than homogeneous populations of neurons all with the same threshold. The limited precision of neural responses thus can have a direct effect on the optimal network structure, with diverse functional properties of the constituent neurons supporting an economical information processing strategy that reduces the metabolic costs of handling a broad...

  4. Health Effects of Noise Exposure in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Environmental noise exposure, such as road traffic noise and aircraft noise, is associated with a range of health outcomes in children. Children demonstrate annoyance responses to noise, and noise is also related to lower well-being and stress responses, such as increased levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Noise does not cause more serious mental health problems, but there is growing evidence for an association with increased hyperactivity symptoms. Studies also suggest that noise might cause changes in cardiovascular functioning, and there is some limited evidence for an effect on low birth weight. There is robust evidence for an effect of school noise exposure on children's cognitive skills such as reading and memory, as well as on standardised academic test scores. Environmental noise does not usually reach levels that are likely to affect children's hearing; however, increasing use of personal electronic devices may leave some children exposed to harmful levels of noise.

  5. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Christopher

    levels that shows good agreement with 85% of the temporal data. Bed stresses associated with currents can produce propagating ambient noise by mobilizing sediments. The strength of the tidal currents in northern Admiralty Inlet produces bed stresses in excess of 20 Pa. Significant increases in noise levels at frequencies from 4-30 kHz, with more modest increases noted from 1-4 kHz, are attributed to mobilized sediments. Sediment-generated noise during strong currents masks background noise from other sources, including vessel traffic. Inversions of the acoustic spectra for equivalent grain sizes are consistent with qualitative observations of the seabed composition. Bed stress calculations using log layer, Reynolds stress, and inertial dissipation techniques generally agree well and are used to estimate the shear stresses at which noise levels increase for different grain sizes. Ambient noise levels in one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 1 kHz to 25 kHz are dominated by sediment-generated noise and can be accurately predicted using the near-bed current velocity above a critical threshold. When turbulence is advected over a pressure sensitive transducer, the turbulent pressure fluctuations can be measured as noise, though these pressure fluctuations are not propagating sound and should not be interpreted as ambient noise. Based on measurements in both Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound and the Chacao Channel, Chile, two models are developed for flow-noise. The first model combined measurements of mean current velocities and turbulence and agrees well with data from both sites. The second model uses scaling arguments to model the flow-noise based solely on the mean current velocity. This model agrees well with the data from the Chacao Channel but performs poorly in Admiralty Inlet, a difference attributed to differences turbulence production mechanisms. At both sites, the spectral slope of flow noise follows a f-3.2 dependence, suggesting partial cancellation of

  6. A 2.2GHz 7.6mW Sub-Sampling PLL with -126dBc/Hz In-band Phase Noise and 0.15psrms Jitter in 0.18μm CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bohsali, M.; Nauta, Bram

    2009-01-01

    A clock with low phase-noise/jitter is a prerequisite for high-performance ADCs, wireline and optical data links and radio transceivers. This paper presents a 2.2GHz clock-generation PLL. It uses a phase-detector/charge-pump (PD/CP) that sub-samples the VCO output with the reference clock. The PLL

  7. Low Noise Amplifier for 2.45 GHz Frequency Band at 0.18 μm CMOS Technology for IEEE Standard 802.11 b/g WLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viranjay M. Srivastava

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of low noise amplifier (LNA at 2.45 GHz and integrated at 0.18 µm RF CMOS process technology. This type of LNA at 2.45 GHz is use in the Bluetooth receiver. The proposed method is useful to optimize noise performance and power gain while maintaining good input and output matching. The amplifier is designed to be used as first stage of a receiver for wireless communication. The main aim of designer is to achieve low noise figure with improved gain with the help of CMOS technology by using single stage n-MOS amplifier. The simulation results show a forward gain of 14.0 dB, a noise-figure of 0.5 dB and stability factor is approximate unity, in which the circuit operates at 14.2 mA drain current with supply voltage of 3.5 V and biasing voltage of 1.5 V.

  8. Band Together!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    After nearly a decade as band director at St. James High School in St. James, Missouri, Derek Limback knows that the key to building a successful program is putting the program itself above everything else. Limback strives to augment not only his students' musical prowess, but also their leadership skills. Key to his philosophy is instilling a…

  9. Weather Forecasting for Ka-band Operations: Initial Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Wu, L.; Slobin, S.

    2016-08-01

    As lower frequency bands (e.g., 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz) have become oversubscribed during the past several decades, NASA has become interested in using higher frequency bands (e.g., 26 GHz and 32 GHz) for telemetry, thus making use of the available wider bandwidth. However, these bands are more susceptible to atmospheric degradation. Currently, flight projects tend to be conservative in preparing their communications links by using worst-case or conservative assumptions. Such assumptions result in nonoptimum data return. We explore the use of weather forecasting for Goldstone and Madrid for different weather condition scenarios to determine more optimal values of atmospheric attenuation and atmospheric noise temperature for use in telecommunication link design. We find that the use of weather forecasting can provide up to 2 dB or more of increased data return when more favorable conditions are forecast. Future plans involve further developing the technique for operational scenarios with interested flight projects.

  10. X-band uplink feedcone capabilities, components, and layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, H.; Freiley, A.; Hartop, R.

    1986-11-01

    Two new X-(7.2 GHz up, 8.4 GHz down) and S-band (2.1 to 2.3 Ghz) common aperture (XSC) feedcones are being added to the DSS 45 and DSS 65 34-Meter Efficiency Antennas. These new feedcones are modifications of the existing SXC feedcone design incorporating a new high power (20-kW) X-band transmitter. The modified Antenna Microwave Subsystem design also incorporates two additional X-band low noise amplifiers and greater phase stability performance to meet both the increased stability requirements for Galileo gravity wave experiments and requirements for spacecraft navigation near the Sun. A third XSC will be constructed for DSS 15 later.

  11. Occupational Noise Frequencies and the Incidence of Hypertension in a Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiu-Shong; Young, Li-Hao; Yu, Tzu-Yi; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-07-15

    Occupational noise exposure is associated with cardiovascular disease, but little is known about the contributions of noise frequency components. This retrospective study investigated the relationship between exposure to different noise frequencies and the incidence of hypertension. A cohort of 1,002 volunteers from 4 machinery and equipment manufacturing companies in Taichung, Taiwan, was followed from 1973 to 2012. Personal noise measurements and environmental octave-band analyses were performed to divide subjects into different exposure groups. Cox regression models were used to estimate the relative risk of hypertension. Participants exposed to ≥80 A-weighted decibels (dBA) over 8 years had a higher relative risk of hypertension (relative risk = 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.85) compared with those exposed to <75 dBA. Significant exposure-response patterns were observed between incident hypertension and stratum of noise exposure at frequencies of 250 Hz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz, 4 kHz, and 8 kHz. The strongest effect was found at 4 kHz; a 20-dBA increase in noise exposure at 4 kHz was associated with a 34% higher risk of hypertension (relative risk = 1.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.77). Occupational noise exposure may be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, and the 4 kHz component of occupational noise exposure may have the strongest relationship with hypertension.

  12. A maximum noise fraction transform with improved noise estimation for hyperspectral images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang; ZHANG Bing; GAO LianRu; CHEN DongMei

    2009-01-01

    Feature extraction is often performed to reduce spectral dimension of hyperspectral images before image classification.The maximum noise fraction (MNF) transform is one of the most commonly used spectral feature extraction methods.The spectral features in several bands of hyperspectral images are submerged by the noise.The MNF transform is advantageous over the principle component (PC) transform because it takes the noise information in the spatial domain into consideration.However,the experiments described in this paper demonstrate that classification accuracy is greatly influenced by the MNF transform when the ground objects are mixed together.The underlying mechanism of it is revealed and analyzed by mathematical theory.In order to improve the performance of classification after feature extraction when ground objects are mixed in hyperspectral images,a new MNF transform,with an Improved method of estimating hyperspectral Image noise covariance matrix (NCM),is presented.This improved MNF transform is applied to both the simulated data and real data.The results show that compared with the classical MNF transform,this new method enhanced the ability of feature extraction and increased classification accuracy.

  13. Road traffic noise and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Hvidberg, Martin; Andersen, Zorana J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before.......Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before....

  14. Prewhitening for Rank-Deficient Noise in Subspace Methods for Noise Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2005-01-01

    A fundamental issue in connection with subspace methods for noise reduction is that the covariance matrix for the noise is required to have full rank, in order for the prewhitening step to be defined. However, there are important cases where this requirement is not fulfilled, e.g., when the noise...... also for rank deficient noise. We also demonstrate how to formulate this algorithm by means of a quotient ULV decomposition, which allows for faster computation and updating. Finally we apply our algorithm to a problem involving a speech signal contaminated by narrow-band noise....

  15. Monitoring of Noise During Ganeshotsav

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. P. Saler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound is a form of energy emitted by a vibrating body causing change in pressure of the surrounding elastic medium through which energy is transmitted. Noise has been defined as unwanted sound. Noise is a disturbance to the human environment which is escalating at a high rate. There are numerous effects of noise on human and environment due to the increase in noise pollution slowly, insensibly; we seem to accept noise and the physiological and psychological deterioration that accompanies it as an inevitable part of our lives. Althoughattempts have been made to regulate noise pollution by setting standards for some of the major sources of noise, we often are unable to monitor them. One such source of noise in India is celebration of festival and especially in Maharashtra, the biggest festival- Ganeshostav. The way noise levels are increasing year by year during this festival, it seems we enjoy these sounds, though it has harmful effects on Human Health and Environment. This paper focuses on study of noise pollution during Ganesh Festival and also its other causes and effects.

  16. Airport noise and teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, L.D.; Layde, P.M.; Erickson, J.D.

    1979-07-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to high-noise levels near major airports may cause increased incidence of birth defects in the offspring of parents residing near these airports. Using data gathered in Metropolitan Atlanta during 1970 to 1972, we compared the rates of seventeen categories of defects in high- and low-noise census tracts. No significant differences were observed. However, when we subdivided the category of central nervous system defects into several subcategories of specific defects, we noted a significantly increased incidence of spina bifida without hydrocephalus in the high-noise areas. Because of the small number of cases associated with this finding we did a matched case-control study using all cases of central nervous system defects born during the years 1968 to 1976. No significantly increased risk for residents in the high-noise areas was noted in this study. It is our opinion that noise or other factors associated with residence near airports are unlikely to be important environmental teratogens.

  17. Noise measurements for single and multiple operation of 50 kw wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    The noise characteristics of the U.S. Windpower Inc., 50 kw wind turbine generator were measured at various distances from 30 m to 1100 m and for a range of output power. The generated noise is affected by the aerodynamic wakes of the tower legs at frequencies below about 120 Hz and the blade trailing edge thickness at frequencies of about 2 kHz. Rope strakes and airfoil fairings on the legs did not result in substantial noise reductions. Sharpening the blade trailing edges near the tip was effective in reducing broad band noise near 2 kHz. For multiple machines the sound fields are superposed. A three-fold increase in number of machines (from 1 to 3) results in a predicted increase in he sound pressure level of about 5 dB. The detection threshold for 14 machines operating in a 13 - 20 mph wind is observed to be at approximately 1160 m in the downwind direction.

  18. Implementasi Metode Kombinasi Mean Filter Dan Median Filter Untuk Mereduksi Gaussian Noise, Salt And Pepper Noise, Speckle Noise, Dan Exponential Noise Pada Citra Digital

    OpenAIRE

    Fadillah, Azhar

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of image as form of information is currently increasing. Poor quality of image can reduce its information contained in image. For example, the image contains noise so the information that contained in the image are not clear. Noise on the digital image can be either Gaussian noise, Salt and Pepper Noise, Speckle Noise, and Exponential Noise. One of the mechanisms used to reduce the noise is filtering. Mean Filter method and Median Filter method are a very good method to redu...

  19. Experimental assessment of anomalous low-frequency noise increase at the onset of Gunn oscillations in InGaAs planar diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Ó.; Alimi, Y.; Song, A.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Pérez, S.; Mateos, J.; González, T.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the presence of anomalous low-frequency fluctuations during the initiation of higher frequency oscillations in InGaAs-based Gunn planar diodes has been evidenced and investigated. Accurate measurements showing the evolution of the power spectral density of the device with respect to the applied voltage have been carried out. Such spectra have been obtained in the wide frequency range between 10 MHz and 43.5 GHz, simultaneously covering both the low-frequency noise and the fundamental oscillation peak at some tens of GHz. This provides valuable information to better understand how these fluctuations appear and how these are distributed in frequency. For much higher frequency operation, such understanding can be utilized as a simple tool to predict the presence of Gunn oscillations without requiring a direct detection.

  20. Underwater radiated noise levels of a research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Ethan H; Schmidt, Val; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M

    2013-04-01

    U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy's underwater radiated noise signature was characterized in the central Arctic Ocean during different types of ice-breaking operations. Propulsion modes included transit in variable ice cover, breaking heavy ice with backing-and-ramming maneuvers, and dynamic positioning with the bow thruster in operation. Compared to open-water transit, Healy's noise signature increased approximately 10 dB between 20 Hz and 2 kHz when breaking ice. The highest noise levels resulted while the ship was engaged in backing-and-ramming maneuvers, owing to cavitation when operating the propellers astern or in opposing directions. In frequency bands centered near 10, 50, and 100 Hz, source levels reached 190-200 dB re: 1 μPa at 1 m (full octave band) during ice-breaking operations.

  1. Modeling aircraft noise induced sleep disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Sarah M.

    One of the primary impacts of aircraft noise on a community is its disruption of sleep. Aircraft noise increases the time to fall asleep, the number of awakenings, and decreases the amount of rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Understanding these changes in sleep may be important as they could increase the risk for developing next-day effects such as sleepiness and reduced performance and long-term health effects such as cardiovascular disease. There are models that have been developed to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. However, most of these models only predict the percentage of the population that is awakened. Markov and nonlinear dynamic models have been developed to predict an individual's sleep structure during the night. However, both of these models have limitations. The Markov model only accounts for whether an aircraft event occurred not the noise level or other sound characteristics of the event that may affect the degree of disturbance. The nonlinear dynamic models were developed to describe normal sleep regulation and do not have a noise effects component. In addition, the nonlinear dynamic models have slow dynamics which make it difficult to predict short duration awakenings which occur both spontaneously and as a result of nighttime noise exposure. The purpose of this research was to examine these sleep structure models to determine how they could be altered to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. Different approaches for adding a noise level dependence to the Markov Model was explored and the modified model was validated by comparing predictions to behavioral awakening data. In order to determine how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic sleep models it was necessary to have a more detailed sleep stage classification than was available from visual scoring of sleep data. An automatic sleep stage classification algorithm was developed which extracts different features of polysomnography data including the

  2. Environmental noise characteristics of the MOD5-B (3.2 MW) wind turbine generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Both narrow band and broad band acoustic data were obtained for the MOD5-B wind turbine for a range of wind speeds from 5.8 to 14.3 m/s; for a range of power outputs from 300 to 3100 kW; and for various azimuth angles and distances. Comparisons are made with those of other large machines and with predictions by available methods. The highest levels occur at the lower frequencies and generally decrease as the frequency increases. Low frequency rotational noise components were more intense than expected for an upwind machine and are believed to result from localized wind gradients across the rotor disk due to upwind terrain features. Predicted broad band spectra follow the general trends of the data but tend to underestimate the levels in the frequency range where the turbulent boundary layer-trailing edge interaction noise is expected to be significant.

  3. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  4. Selective Vulnerability of the Cochlear Basal Turn to Acrylonitrile and Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pouyatos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to acrylonitrile, a high-production industrial chemical, can promote noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL in the rat even though this agent does not itself produce permanent hearing loss. The mechanism by which acrylonitrile promotes NIHL includes oxidative stress as antioxidant drugs can partially protect the cochlea from acrylonitrile+noise. Acrylonitrile depletes glutathione levels while noise can increase the formation of reactive oxygen species. It was previously noted that the high-frequency or basal turn of the cochlea was particularly vulnerable to the combined effects of acrylonitrile and noise when the octave band noise (OBN was centered at 8 kHz. Normally, such a noise would be expected to yield damage at a more apical region of the cochlea. The present study was designed to determine whether the basal cochlea is selectively sensitive to acrylonitrile or whether, by adjusting the frequency of the noise band, it would be possible to control the region of the auditory impairment. Rats were exposed to one of three different OBNs centered at different frequencies (4 kHz, 110 dB and 8 or 16 kHz at 97 dB for 5 days, with and without administration of acrylonitrile (50 mg/kg/day. The noise was set to cause limited NIHL by itself. Auditory function was monitored by recording distortion products, by compound action potentials, and by performing cochlear histology. While the ACN-only and noise-only exposures induced no or little permanent auditory loss, the three exposures to acrylonitrile+noise produced similar auditory and cochlear impairments above 16 kHz, despite the fact that the noise exposures covered 2 octaves. These observations show that the basal cochlea is much more sensitive to acrylonitrile+noise than the apical partition. They provide an initial basis for distinguishing the pattern of cochlear injury that results from noise exposure from that which occurs due to the combined effects of noise and a chemical

  5. Noise and health of children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, W.

    2000-01-01

    The world of the child is becoming noisier and noisier. Compared to the mid-fifties environ-mental noise levels (sources such as road traffic, aircraft) increased substantially, causing higher noise levels during day- and night-time at home, at school and during out- and indoors leisure time activit

  6. Radar cross-sectional study using noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    A noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar cross-section (RCS) of targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 50 GHz. The noise radar RCS measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-5000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used.

  7. Low noise road surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bolčina, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Noise is everywhere. Noise is a sound that makes people stressful and irritate. It often couses sleep disorders and also health problems like different cardiovascular disorders, hearing loss…In most cases traffic noise is the most disturbing. There are different ways to prevent people from traffic noise like building noise barriers and insulation of facades. However noise barriers and insulation of facades do not prevent noise formation, but are lowering existing noise. Another disadvantage i...

  8. New microangiography system development providing improved small vessel imaging, increased contrast to noise ratios, and multi-view 3D reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhls, Andrew T; Patel, Vikas; Ionita, Ciprian; Noël, Peter B; Walczak, Alan M; Rangwala, Hussain S; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A new microangiographic system (MA) integrated into a c-arm gantry has been developed allowing precise placement of a MA at the exact same angle as the standard x-ray image intensifier (II) with unchanged source and object position. The MA can also be arbitrarily moved about the object and easily moved into the field of view (FOV) in front of the lower resolution II when higher resolution angiographic sequences are needed. The benefits of this new system are illustrated in a neurovascular study, where a rabbit is injected with contrast media for varying oblique angles. Digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) images were obtained and compared using both the MA and II detectors for the same projection view. Vessels imaged with the MA appear sharper with smaller vessels visualized. Visualization of ~100 μm vessels was possible with the MA whereas not with the II. Further, the MA could better resolve vessel overlap. Contrast to noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for vessels of varying sizes for the MA versus the II and were found to be similar for large vessels, approximately double for medium vessels, and infinitely better for the smallest vessels. In addition, a 3D reconstruction of selected vessel segments was performed, using multiple (three) projections at oblique angles, for each detector. This new MA/II integrated system should lead to improved diagnosis and image guidance of neurovascular interventions by enabling initial guidance with the low resolution large FOV II combined with use of the high resolution MA during critical parts of diagnostic and interventional procedures.

  9. Probabilistic solutions of nonlinear oscillators excited by combined colored and white noise excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu-Siu, Guo; Qingxuan, Shi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems combined to Gaussian white noise and Gaussian/non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are investigated. By expressing colored noise excitation as a second-order filtered white noise process and introducing colored noise as an additional state variable, the equation of motion for SDOF system under colored noise is then transferred artificially to multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) system under white noise excitations with four-coupled first-order differential equations. As a consequence, corresponding Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation governing the joint probabilistic density function (PDF) of state variables increases to 4-dimension (4-D). Solution procedure and computer programme become much more sophisticated. The exponential-polynomial closure (EPC) method, widely applied for cases of SDOF systems under white noise excitations, is developed and improved for cases of systems under colored noise excitations and for solving the complex 4-D FPK equation. On the other hand, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method is performed to test the approximate EPC solutions. Two examples associated with Gaussian and non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are considered. Corresponding band-limited power spectral densities (PSDs) for colored noise excitations are separately given. Numerical studies show that the developed EPC method provides relatively accurate estimates of the stationary probabilistic solutions, especially the ones in the tail regions of the PDFs. Moreover, statistical parameter of mean-up crossing rate (MCR) is taken into account, which is important for reliability and failure analysis. Hopefully, our present work could provide insights into the investigation of structures under random loadings.

  10. A 3 to 5 GHz low-phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Yaohua; Mei Niansong; Chen Hu; Huang Yumei; Hong Zhiliang

    2012-01-01

    A low-phase-noise ∑-△ fractional-N frequency synthesizer for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers is presented.The voltage controlled oscillator is designed with a modified digital controlled capacitor array to extend the tuning range and minimize phase noise.A high-resolution adaptive frequency calibration technique is introduced to automatically choose frequency bands and increase phase-noise immunity.A prototype is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology.The experimental results show that the designed 1.2 V wideband frequency synthesizer is locked from 3.05 to 5.17 GHz within 30μs,which covers all five required frequency bands.The measured in-band phase noise are -89,-95.5 and -101 dBc/Hz for 3.8 GHz,2 GHz and 948 MHz carriers,respectively,and accordingly the out-of-band phase noise are -121,-123 and -132 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset,which meet the phase-noise-mask requirements of the above-mentioned standards.

  11. Morphologies of omega band auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuo; Yukimatu, Akira Sessai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hori, Tomoaki

    2017-08-01

    We examined the morphological signatures of 315 omega band aurora events observed using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm ground-based all-sky imager network over a period of 8 years. We find that omega bands can be classified into the following three subtypes: (1) classical (O-type) omega bands, (2) torch or tongue (T-type) omega bands, and (3) combinations of classical and torch or tongue (O/T-type) omega bands. The statistical results show that T-type bands occur the most frequently (45%), followed by O/T-type bands (35%) and O-type bands (18%). We also examined the morphologies of the omega bands during their formation, from the growth period to the declining period through the maximum period. Interestingly, the omega bands are not stable, but rather exhibit dynamic changes in shape, intensity, and motion. They grow from small-scale bumps (seeds) at the poleward boundary of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, rather than via the rotation or shear motion of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, and do not exhibit any shear motion during the periods of auroral activity growth. Furthermore, the auroral luminosity is observed to increase during the declining period, and the total time from the start of the growth period to the end of the declining period is found to be about 20 min. Such dynamical signatures may be important in determining the mechanism responsible for omega band formation.

  12. Quantum 1/f noise in GaN FETs, HFETs, MODFETs, and their oscillators' phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Peter H.; Hall, Amanda M.; Morkoç, Hadis

    2007-02-01

    GaN-based FETs, HFETs and MODFETs are ideally suited for use in high-power amplifiers and oscillators, due to their large band gap and high operating voltages. According to the quantum 1/f theory, the larger effective mass implied for the carriers also leads to lower fundamental 1/f noise and to lower resulting phase noise close to the carrier frequency. We have therefore studied the quantum 1/f noise sources in the channel and in the gate insulation. For the channel, a combination of conventional and coherent Quantum 1/f Effect (Q1/fE) is present, with the conventional Q1/fE dominant in the sub-threshold part of the channel toward the drain. It turns out that the quantum 1/f parameter "s" that determines the fraction of the two forms of Q1/fE, is no longer increasing proportionally to the width of the device w, when the latter exceeds the length of the channel. A logarithmic dependence on w is obtained for s instead. This is why an extremely large width w does not automatically lead to coherent Q1/fE in HFETs. Conventional Q1/fE applies for the gate insulation, with contributions of the much larger piezoelectric Q1/fE in spontaneously polarized AlGaN, if gate leakage is present. The noise figure is calculated, including all contributions. Finally, the minimal expected oscillator phase noise is calculated from the Q1/fE in the dissipative elements, even for perfectly linear amplifiers, by multiplication with the inverse fourth power of the quality factor, as was first done by us for quartz in 1979.

  13. Tunnel diode amplifiers and their background noise as a function of the polarization point, the temperature, and the bandwidth; Amplificateurs a diode tunnel et leur bruit de fond, en fonction du point de polarisation, de la temperature et de la bande passante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozveaminian, K. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The author presents mathematical and graphical methods for the study of the stability of tunnel diode circuits. He gives an application to the realization of three amplifiers. Then he describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise of these amplifiers and of its variations with the bias, the temperature and the bandwidth. (author) [French] L'auteur presente deux methodes, l'une theorique l'autre graphique, pour l'etude de la stabilite des circuits a diode tunnel, dont il fait une application a la realisation de trois amplificateurs. Il effectue ensuite une etude theorique et experimentale du bruit de fond de ces amplificateurs, en fonction du point de polarisation, de la temperature et de la bande passante. (auteur)

  14. Speech production in amplitude-modulated noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, Ewen N; Raufer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Lombard effect refers to the phenomenon where talkers automatically increase their level of speech in a noisy environment. While many studies have characterized how the Lombard effect influences different measures of speech production (e.g., F0, spectral tilt, etc.), few have investigated...... the consequences of temporally fluctuating noise. In the present study, 20 talkers produced speech in a variety of noise conditions, including both steady-state and amplitude-modulated white noise. While listening to noise over headphones, talkers produced randomly generated five word sentences. Similar...... to previous studies, talkers raised the level of their voice in steady-state noise. While talkers also increased the level of their voice in amplitude-modulated noise, the increase was not as large as that observed in steady-state noise. Importantly, for the 2 and 4 Hz amplitude-modulated noise conditions...

  15. Interaction of tamoxifen and noise-induced damage to the cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Jagan A; Siegel, Jonathan H

    2011-12-01

    Tamoxifen has been used extensively in the treatment of breast cancer and other neoplasms. In addition to its well-known action on estrogen receptors it is also known to acutely block chloride channels that participate in cell volume regulation. Tamoxifen's role in preventing cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) swelling in vitro suggested that OHC swelling noted following noise exposure could potentially be a therapeutic target for tamoxifen in its role as a chloride channel blocker to help prevent noise-induced hearing loss. To investigate this possibility, the effects of exposure to tamoxifen on physiologic measures of cochlear function in the presence and absence of subsequent noise exposure were studied. Male Mongolian gerbils (2-4 months old) were randomly assigned to different groups. Tamoxifen at ∼10 mg/kg was administered to one of the groups. Five hours later they were exposed to a one-third octave band of noise centered at 8 kHz in a sound-isolation chamber for 30 min at 108 dB SPL. Compound action potential (CAP) thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) levels were measured 30-35 days following noise exposure. Tamoxifen administration did not produce any changes in CAP thresholds and DPOAE levels when administered by itself in the absence of noise. Tamoxifen causes a significant increase in CAP thresholds from 8 to 15 kHz following noise exposure compared to CAP thresholds in animals exposed to noise alone. No significant differences were seen in the DPOAE levels in the f(2) = 8-15 kHz frequency range where maximum noise-induced increases in CAP thresholds were seen. Contrary to our original expectation, it is concluded that tamoxifen potentiates the degree of damage to the cochlea resulting from noise exposure.

  16. Aerodynamic noise from wind turbines. Experiments with modification of full scale rotors, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobsen, J.; Andersen, B.

    1996-10-01

    Two series of measurements have been made where the noise from a wind turbine is measured during different modifications of its rotor. One series dealt with different shapes of trailing edge, while the other focused on the tip design. The investigations form a succession of earlier work and basically the same measurement technique was used. In the present investigation the pitch setting of the wind turbine was varied so that the significance of this parameter could be quantified as well. Measurement were made simultaneously of noise in the downwind direction and of the wind speed at 10 m height upwind of the wind turbine, both averaged over 1-minute periods. Regression analysis was made between the wind speed and the noise level in each 1/3-octave band in the range 50 Hz - 10 kHz. Intermittent background noise was omitted during the data collection, and stationary and wind-induced background noise was corrected for. The investigations of trailing edge noise gave no clear indication of an optimum trailing edge sharpness. The characteristic narrowband noise from trailing edge bluntness was demonstrated, and its dependence on trailing edge thickness, wind speed, and pitch setting was determined. The noise level of the narrowband has a `reverse` wind speed dependence; it decreases with increasing wind speed (and increasing angle of attack). In the tip noise investigation three tip shapes were tested, the original thick square tips with slightly rounded edges, an elliptically rounded thin tip shape, and an Ogee tip designed after the most quiet tip tested in the previous project. The round tip was slightly more noisy than the square tip, and the Ogee tip gave rise to a broadband noise around 2 kHz where the wind speed dependence was again `reversed`. (EG)

  17. Underwater Ambient Noise in a Baleen Whale Migratory Habitat Off the Azores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Romagosa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of underwater noise is of particular interest given the increase in noise-generating human activities and the potential negative effects on marine mammals which depend on sound for many vital processes. The Azores archipelago is an important migratory and feeding habitat for blue (Balaenoptera musculus, fin (Balaenoptera physalus and sei whales (Balaenoptera borealis en route to summering grounds in northern Atlantic waters. High levels of low frequency noise in this area could displace whales or interfere with foraging behavior, impacting energy intake during a critical stage of their annual cycle. In this study, bottom-mounted Ecological Acoustic Recorders were deployed at three Azorean seamounts (Condor, Açores, and Gigante to measure temporal variations in background noise levels and ship noise in the 18–1,000 Hz frequency band, used by baleen whales to emit and receive sounds. Monthly average noise levels ranged from 90.3 dB re 1 μPa (Açores seamount to 103.1 dB re 1 μPa (Condor seamount and local ship noise was present up to 13% of the recording time in Condor. At this location, average contribution of local boat noise to background noise levels is almost 10 dB higher than wind contribution, which might temporally affect detection ranges for baleen whale calls and difficult communication at long ranges. Given the low time percentatge with noise levels above 120 dB re 1 μPa found here (3.3% at Condor, we woud expect limited behavioral responses to ships from baleen whales. Sound pressure levels measured in the Azores are lower than those reported for the Mediterranean basin and the Strait of Gibraltar. However, the currently unknown effects of baleen whale vocalization masking and the increasing presence of boats at the monitored sites underline the need for continuous monitoring to understand any long-term impacts on whales.

  18. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chi; Yao Suying; Xu Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS),a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle.Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors,the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel.Then,the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived.It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region.In this model,photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance,but dark current shot noise does.According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator,the total noise can be reduced.These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS.

  19. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona acquired during the Cassini 2001 superior conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-frequency Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) carrier signal data have been acquired during the superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft June 2001, using the NASA Deep Space Network's facilities located in Goldstone, California. The solar elongation angle of the observations varied from -4.1 degrees (-16 solar radii) to -0.6 degrees (-2.3 solar radii). The observed coronal and solar effects on the signals include spectral broadening, amplitude scintillation, phase scintillation, and increased noise. The measurements were generally consistent with existing solar models, except during solar transient events when the signatures of the measurements were observed to increase significantly above the quiet background levels. This is the second solar conjunction of Cassini for which simultaneous X/Ka data were acquired. Both solar conjunctions, conducted in May 2000 and June 2001, occurred near the peak of the current 11 year solar cycle.

  20. Noise-based Stego-ECC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahardjo Budi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of inserting noise into stream of ciphered text is proposed. The goal of inserting noise is to increase the level of uncertainty, thus making it harder for an attacker to detect data and noise. This form of steganography is implemented using Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC. The process of embedding the noise to the message in the encryption process and removing the noise from the message in the decryption process is proposed in this work by modifying ElGamal to allow auto detection of data and noise.

  1. [Health effects of environmental noise exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röösli, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In the EU 27 countries about 100 million persons are exposed to road traffic noise above 55 dB (LDEN) according to the European Environment Agency. Exposure to railway noise affects 16 million individuals, aircraft noise 4 million and industry noise 1 million persons. Although the proportion of people reporting to be annoyed by noise exposure is substantial, health effects of noise is rarely an issue in general practitioners' consultations. According to stress models chronic noise exposure results in an increased allostatic load by direct physiological responses as well as psychological stress responses including sleep disturbances. In relation to acute and chronic noise exposure an increase of blood pressure was observed in epidemiological studies. An association between ischemic heart diseases and noise exposure was observed in various studies. However, the data is less consistent for other cardiovascular diseases and for cognitive effects in children. The association between metabolic syndrome and noise has rarely been investigated so far. Recently an association between road traffic noise and diabetes was observed in a Danish cohort study. Given the plausibility for a noise effect, general practitioners should consider noise exposure in patients with increased cardiometabolic risk.

  2. Selectable polarization at X-band. [Deep Space Network modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartop, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The X-band feeds in the Deep Space Network were upgraded to include selectable polarization in time for the Voyager missions to the outer planets. The modified antenna feed has the following major items added: two circular waveguide rotary joints, drive motor and gear reducer, gear assembly, two microswitches, and a polarization control junction box. The overall length of the feed remains the same because circular waveguide spacing sections were designed into the original feed to readily permit such modifications. There is no significant increase in antenna noise temperature compared to the original feed.

  3. Amniotic constriction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of function of an arm or a leg. Congenital bands affecting the hand often cause the most problems. Alternative Names Pseudo-ainhum; Streeter dysplasia; Amniotic band sequence; Amniotic constriction bands; Constriction band ...

  4. Multi-Channel Noise Reduced Visual Evoked Potential Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Ramaswamy; Raveendran, Paramesran; Nishida, Shogo

    In this paper, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is used to reduce noise from multi-channel Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) signals. PCA is applied to reduce noise from multi-channel VEP signals because VEP signals are more correlated from one channel to another as compared to noise during visual perception. Emulated VEP signals contaminated with noise are used to show the noise reduction ability of PCA. These noise reduced VEP signals are analysed in the gamma spectral band to classify alcoholics and non-alcoholics with a Fuzzy ARTMAP (FA) neural network. A zero phase Butterworth digital filter is used to extract gamma band power in spectral range of 30 to 50 Hz from these noise reduced VEP signals. The results using 800 VEP signals give an average FA classification of 92.50 % with the application of PCA and 83.33 % without the application of PCA.

  5. Noise Filtering in Communication with Chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, E. Jr. [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Hayes, S. [Nonlinear Devices Corporation, 8701 Georgia Avenue Suite 501, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 (United States); Grebogi, C. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Potsdam, PF 601553, D-14415 Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    A method, based on fundamental properties of chaotic dynamics, is devised for filtering {ital in-band} noise of an incoming signal generated by a chaotic oscillator. Initially the 2xmod1 map is used to illustrate the procedure and then the method is applied to recover the message encoded in a realistic chaotic signal, after the transmitted signal has been contaminated with noise. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Modelling of the Noise Spectra of Axial Flow Fans in a Free Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. F.; Su, S. G.; Shah, H. S.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents a semi-empirical formula for predicting the noise spectra of axial flow fans in a free field. The basic assumption made in deriving this formula is that sound radiation from an axial flow fan in a free field is primarily due to the fluctuating pressure exerted on the fan blade surface. This fluctuating pressure is correlated to the lift force per unit length acting on the fan blade, and is subsequently approximated by pressure pulses that decay both in space and time. Accordingly, the radiated acoustic pressure is expressed in terms of superposition of contributions from these pressure pulses, and the line spectrum is obtained by taking a Fourier series expansion. To simulate the narrow and broad band sound spectra, a normal distribution-like shape function is designed which divides the frequency into consecutive bands centered at the blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The amplitude of this shape function at the center frequency of each band is unity but decays exponentially. The decay rate decreases with an increase in the number of bands. Thus, at high frequencies the narrow bands merge to form broad band-like spectra. The noise spectra thus obtained are compared with the measured ones from four different types of axial flow fans running under various conditions, and a favorable agreement in each case is obtained.

  7. Study on noise of precision panel saw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUWan-yi; QIYing-jie; ZHANGZhao-hao; QIXiao-jie

    2003-01-01

    According to ZBJ65015-89 standard about noise level testing method of woodworking toot, the noise testing for MJg0# and MJCl125 precision panel saws was conducted by using model ND2 precision soundqevel apparatus and double frequency wave filter. The testing results showed that the unloaded running noise source of precision panel saw was mainly from main saw blade and its aeromechanic noise was the largest. The rotating speed was determined as an important factor to impact dynamic characters of precision panel saw as the unloaded running noise increased along with speed increasing. For reducing noise of precision panel saw, the first important way is to reduce the aeromechanic noise produced by main saw blade rotating at high speed; based on assuring the processing precision, choosing tow speed is a better way to drop dawn noise; from the view of design, the diameter of clamping lid is better of half of outer diameter of main saw blade.

  8. Noise can speed convergence in Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzke, Brandon; Kosko, Bart

    2011-10-01

    A new theorem shows that noise can speed convergence to equilibrium in discrete finite-state Markov chains. The noise applies to the state density and helps the Markov chain explore improbable regions of the state space. The theorem ensures that a stochastic-resonance noise benefit exists for states that obey a vector-norm inequality. Such noise leads to faster convergence because the noise reduces the norm components. A corollary shows that a noise benefit still occurs if the system states obey an alternate norm inequality. This leads to a noise-benefit algorithm that requires knowledge of the steady state. An alternative blind algorithm uses only past state information to achieve a weaker noise benefit. Simulations illustrate the predicted noise benefits in three well-known Markov models. The first model is a two-parameter Ehrenfest diffusion model that shows how noise benefits can occur in the class of birth-death processes. The second model is a Wright-Fisher model of genotype drift in population genetics. The third model is a chemical reaction network of zeolite crystallization. A fourth simulation shows a convergence rate increase of 64% for states that satisfy the theorem and an increase of 53% for states that satisfy the corollary. A final simulation shows that even suboptimal noise can speed convergence if the noise applies over successive time cycles. Noise benefits tend to be sharpest in Markov models that do not converge quickly and that do not have strong absorbing states.

  9. Electric-Field Noise above a Thin Dielectric Layer on Metal Electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kumph, Muir; Rabl, Peter; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The electric-field noise above a layered structure composed of a planar metal electrode covered by a thin dielectric is evaluated and it is found that the dielectric film considerably increases the noise level, in proportion to its thickness. Importantly, even a thin (mono) layer of a low-loss dielectric can enhance the noise level by several orders of magnitude compared to the noise above a bare metal. Close to this layered surface, the power spectral density of the electric field varies with the inverse fourth power of the distance to the surface, rather than with the inverse square, as it would above a bare metal surface. Furthermore, compared to a clean metal, where the noise spectrum does not vary with frequency (in the radio-wave and microwave bands), the dielectric layer can generate electric-field noise which scales in inverse proportion to the frequency. For various realistic scenarios, the noise levels predicted from this model are comparable to those observed in trapped-ion experiments. Thus, these...

  10. First observations of anthropogenic underwater noise in a large multi-use lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bolgan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last fifty years, anthropogenic noise has increased dramatically in aquatic environments and is now recognised as a chronic form of pollution in coastal waters. However, this form of pollution has been largely neglected in inland water bodies. To date, very few studies have investigated the noise spectra in freshwater environments and at present no legislation exists to protect freshwater organisms from anthropogenic noise. The present study represents the first assessment of anthropogenic noise pollution in a large multi-use lake by characterising noise levels of the main ferry landings of the lake of Windermere, UK using Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM. During November 2014, acoustic samples (10 min long were collected from such areas using a calibrated omni-directional hydrophone and their spectral content was analysed in 1/3 octave bands (dB re 1 µPa. Results indicate that the current noise levels in Windermere warrant further investigation as a potential threat to the fish community which occurs in this already delicate and pressured habitat. Based on results obtained, it is recommended that further studies focus on a wider geographical and temporal range in order to start to fill the knowledge and legislative gaps regarding anthropogenic noise monitoring in fresh waters. 

  11. High power and ultra-low-noise photodetector for squeezed-light enhanced gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Hartmut; Weinert, Michael; Adhikari, Rana X; Affeldt, Christoph; Kringel, Volker; Leong, Jonathan; Lough, James; Lück, Harald; Schreiber, Emil; Strain, Kenneth A; Vahlbruch, Henning; Wittel, Holger

    2016-09-05

    Current laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors employ a self-homodyne readout scheme where a comparatively large light power (5-50 mW) is detected per photosensitive element. For best sensitivity to gravitational waves, signal levels as low as the quantum shot noise have to be measured as accurately as possible. The electronic noise of the detection circuit can produce a relevant limit to this accuracy, in particular when squeezed states of light are used to reduce the quantum noise. We present a new electronic circuit design reducing the electronic noise of the photodetection circuit in the audio band. In the application of this circuit at the gravitational-wave detector GEO 600 the shot-noise to electronic noise ratio was permanently improved by a factor of more than 4 above 1 kHz, while the dynamic range was improved by a factor of 7. The noise equivalent photocurrent of the implemented photodetector and circuit is about 5μA/Hz above 1 kHz with a maximum detectable photocurrent of 20 mA. With the new circuit, the observed squeezing level in GEO 600 increased by 0.2 dB. The new circuit also creates headroom for higher laser power and more squeezing to be observed in the future in GEO 600 and is applicable to other optics experiments.

  12. Combined sensor noise-immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir A. Shchurov; Alexander V. Shchurov

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents statistical analysis of combined sensor noise-immunity while recording fluctuating tone against underwater dynamic noise background. The experimental data used for the analysis have been collected by a pair of four-component combined sensors centered at two depths, 150 and 300 m in deep water. Expressions for combined sensor signalto-noise ratio (SNR) for cross-spectral levels of signal and noise for both wide and narrow frequency bands have been derived. A combined sensor gain has been introduced in terms of ordinary single-point coherence function between acoustic pressure and particle velocity in acoustic wave. The estimates obtained experimentally evidence that SNR for a combined sensor with multiplicative data processing may exceed SNR for a hydrophone-based sensor by 15 to 16 dB at most for the horizontal channel of the combined sensor, and by 30 dB at most for the vertical channel (when opposite energy flows of signal and noise compensate one another).

  13. Spatiotemporal analysis of the appearance of gamma-band Microstates in resting state MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Matthew; Prior, Fred W; Larson-Prior, Linda J

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal analysis of EEG signal has revealed a rich set of methods to quantify neuronal activity using spatially global topographic templates, called Microstates. These methods complement more traditional spectral analysis, which uses band limited source data to determine defining differences in band power and peak characteristics. The high sampling rate and increased resistance to high frequency noise of MEG data offers an opportunity to explore the utility of spatiotemporal analysis over a wider spectrum than in EEG. In this work, we explore the utility of representing band limited MEG source data using established microstate techniques, especially in gamma frequency bands - a range yet unexplored using these techniques. We develop methods for gauging the goodness-of-fit achieved by resultant microstate templates and demonstrate sensor-level dispersion characteristics across wide-band signals as well as across signals filtered by canonical bands. These analyses reveal that, while high-frequency-band derived microstate templates are visually lawful, they fail to exhibit important explained variance and dispersion characteristics present in low- and full-band data necessary to meet the requirements of a microstate model.

  14. Noise Effects on Synchronized Globally Coupled Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, Esteban; Sánchez, Angel

    1998-01-01

    The synchronized phase of globally coupled identical nonlinear oscillators subject to noise fluctuations is studied by means of a new analytical approach able to tackle general couplings, nonlinearities, and noise temporal correlations. Our results show that the interplay between coupling and noise modi es the e ective frequency of the system in a nontrivial way. Whereas for linear couplings the e ect of noise is always to increase the e ective frequency, for nonlinear coupling...

  15. Modeling and experimental studies of a side band power re-injection locked magnetron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi; Yuan, Ping; Zhu, Hua-Cheng; Huang, Ka-Ma; Yang, Yang

    2016-12-01

    A side band power re-injection locked (SBPRIL) magnetron is presented in this paper. A tuning stub is placed between the external injection locked (EIL) magnetron and the circulator. Side band power of the EIL magnetron is reflected back to the magnetron. The reflected side band power is reused and pulled back to the central frequency. A phase-locking model is developed from circuit theory to explain the process of reuse of side band power in SBPRIL magnetron. Theoretical analysis proves that the side band power is pulled back to the central frequency of the SBPRIL magnetron, then the amplitude of the RF voltage increases and the phase noise performance is improved. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of a 10-vane continuous wave (CW) magnetron model is presented. Computer simulation predicts that the frequency spectrum’s peak of the SBPRIL magnetron has an increase of 3.25 dB compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise performance at the side band offset reduces 12.05 dB for the SBPRIL magnetron. Besides, the SBPRIL magnetron experiment is presented. Experimental results show that the spectrum peak rises by 14.29% for SBPRIL magnetron compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise reduces more than 25 dB at 45-kHz offset compared with the free running magnetron. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328902) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61501311).

  16. Process for increasing the signal to noise ratio in inspection of metallic tubes by eddy currents; Procede permettant de reduire le bruit de fond au cours du controle de tubes metalliques par courant de Foucault et tubes realises par ce procede

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buret, J.L.; Vuillaume, D.

    1995-02-10

    The process for increasing the signal to noise ratio in inspection of metallic tubes which have been cold pigger rolled consists to subject the tube to one or more drawing passes to reduce its external diameter.

  17. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter

    2007-01-01

    of EPO upon damage to the central nervous system and the retina. This paper reports three separate trials, conducted to investigate the hypothesis that noise-induced hearing loss is prevented or reduced by erythropoietin. The trials employed three different modes of drug application, different...... administration time windows and different rodent species. In trial 1, guinea pigs were exposed to 110dB SPL, 4-20kHz wide band noise (WBN) for 8h. EPO was administered to the round window membrane 24h after noise exposure, either sustained by pump for a week or by single dose middle ear instillation. In trial 2...

  18. Investigation of Noise in Electronic Ultrasonic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulius Adomavičius

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Noise models in ultrasonic control system have been investigated. Ultrasonic system channel consist of exciting generator, ultrasonic transducer, amplitude limiter, amplifier, low band filter and A/D converter. The ultrasonic transducers have been described as Von Hippel model, Van Dyke model or improved Van Dyke model. Advantages and disadvantages of these models are discussed in this paper. Noise models of amplitude limiter and linear operational amplifier are presented. The summary results of calculated noise spectral density of ultrasonic system channel have been presented.Article in Lithuanian

  19. Colored Noise Prediction Based on Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Fei; Zhang Xiaohui

    2003-01-01

    A method for predicting colored noise by introducing prediction of nonhnear time series is presented By adopting three kinds of neural networks prediction models, the colored noise prediction is studied through changing the filter bandwidth for stochastic noise and the sampling rate for colored noise The results show that colored noise can be predicted The prediction error decreases with the increasing of the sampling rate or the narrowing of the filter bandwidth. If the parameters are selected properly, the prediction precision can meet the requirement of engineering implementation. The results offer a new reference way for increasing the ability for detecting weak signal in signal processing system

  20. Spectra for the product of Gaussian noises

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, L B; Gingl, Z; Granqvist, C G

    2012-01-01

    Products of Gaussian noises often emerge as the result of non-linear detection techniques or as a parasitic effect, and their proper handling is important in many practical applications, including in fluctuation-enhanced sensing, indoor air or environmental quality monitoring, etc. We use Rice's random phase oscillator formalism to calculate the power density spectra variance for the product of two Gaussian band-limited white noises with zero-mean and the same bandwidth W. The ensuing noise spectrum is found to decrease linearly from zero frequency to 2W, and it is zero for frequencies greater than 2W. Analogous calculations performed for the square of a single Gaussian noise confirm earlier results. The spectrum at non-zero frequencies, and the variance of the square of a noise, is amplified by a factor two as a consequence of correlation effects between frequency products. Our analytic results is corroborated by computer simulations.

  1. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  2. Teratogenic effects of noise in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, M.; Takigawa, H.

    1989-07-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the hazardous effects of noise on embryonic development. The experiment was composed of two parts; one was the observation of the effect due to noise alone, and the other was the observation of the combined effect of noise and known teratogens. ICR mice were exposed to a wide octave-band noise at 100 dB(C) for 6 hours a day in three ways: the first group was exposed to a continuous noise only on day 7 of pregnancy (group "N"), the second was exposed to an intermittent noise (15 min ON/15 min OFF) only on day 7 of pregnancy (group "IN"), and the third was exposed daily to a continuous noise during days 7-12 of pregnancy (group "RN"). Cadmium sulfate or trypan blue was applied as a teratogen, and was administered intraperitoneously on day 7 of pregnancy. On day 18 of pregnancy, mice were sacrificed and the developmental status and external malformations of their fetuses were examined. Each type of noise exposure did not significantly induce embryolethality and fetal growth retardation. However, teratogenicity was observed in groups "N" and "IN". Combined effects of teratogen and noise did not show clear-cut interactions.

  3. Occupational noise management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-06-15

    Occupational noise is a frequently encountered on-the-job health hazard. This guide presented the responsibilities and regulatory requirements related to business activities where noise above 80 decibels is present. The guide provided a definition of noise and discussed noise hazards, types of noise, and on-the-job noise exposure. A risk assessment to noise in the work environment was also discussed. A guide to a hearing conservation program was also included. The main purpose of a hearing conservation program is the prevention of noise induced hearing loss for employees exposed to occupational noise. The components of such a program were outlined, with particular reference to noise monitoring; noise exposure control; worker education and training; hearing (audiometric) testing; and annual program review and record keeping. It was concluded that in terms of record keeping, it can be very helpful to file noise exposure assessments, particularly personal exposure measurements, with hearing test records to facilitate for future reference. refs., appendices.

  4. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Noise and Hearing Protection Noise and Hearing Protection Patient ... it is. How can I tell if a noise is dangerous? People differ in their sensitivity to ...

  5. Noise in eukaryotic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, William J.; KÆrn, Mads; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells has been described as quantal, with pulses of messenger RNA produced in a probabilistic manner. This description reflects the inherently stochastic nature of gene expression, known to be a major factor in the heterogeneous response of individual cells within a clonal population to an inducing stimulus. Here we show in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that stochasticity (noise) arising from transcription contributes significantly to the level of heterogeneity within a eukaryotic clonal population, in contrast to observations in prokaryotes, and that such noise can be modulated at the translational level. We use a stochastic model of transcription initiation specific to eukaryotes to show that pulsatile mRNA production, through reinitiation, is crucial for the dependence of noise on transcriptional efficiency, highlighting a key difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic sources of noise. Furthermore, we explore the propagation of noise in a gene cascade network and demonstrate experimentally that increased noise in the transcription of a regulatory protein leads to increased cell-cell variability in the target gene output, resulting in prolonged bistable expression states. This result has implications for the role of noise in phenotypic variation and cellular differentiation.

  6. Noise, sleep and poor health: Modeling the relationship between road traffic noise and cardiovascular problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhri, Aslak; Aasvang, Gunn Marit

    2010-10-01

    Several adverse effects have been associated with exposure to traffic noise. Studies supporting a noise-stress-health model have suggested links between noise level and increased noradrenalin concentrations in urine, hypertension and myocardial infarction. Among the more commonly documented effects, sleep disturbances have been regarded as being the most serious. Both noise annoyance and sleep disturbance have been proposed as important mediators of the impact of noise on health. The present paper investigates the relationships among long-term noise exposure, annoyance, sleeping problems and subjective health complaints by the use of a structural equation model. Further, it aims at giving insight into how noise sensitivity is related to sleep disturbances from road traffic noise. Finally, it examines whether any effect of noise exposure or response to noise can be detected on prevalence of cardiovascular problems, when information on sleep disturbances is included in a model. Data from a questionnaire survey conducted among a population sample in Oslo (N=2786) are combined with nighttime noise levels calculated from outside each respondents dwelling, at the bedroom façade. The results of the analysis showed significant relationships between noise annoyance at night and sleeping problems. The model also showed strong links among pseudoneurological complaints, annoyance and sleeping problems, thus pointing to the importance of including information on psychosomatic disorders and mild psychological problems in future studies looking at potential health effects of noise. The analysis showed no relationship between neither noise exposure nor response to noise and cardiovascular problems.

  7. Noise Measurement and Frequency Analysis of Commercially Available Noisy Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise measurement and frequency analysis of commercially available noisy toys were the main purposes of the study. Materials and Methods: 181 noisy toys commonly found in toy stores in different zones of Tehran were selected and categorized into 10 groups. Noise measurement were done at 2, 25, and 50 cm from toys in dBA. The noisiest toy of each group was frequency analyzed in octave bands. Results: The highest and the lowest intensity levels belonged to the gun (mean=112 dBA and range of 100-127 dBA and to the rattle-box (mean=84 dBA and range of 74-95 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity levels significantly decreased with increasing distance except for two toys. Noise frequency analysis indicated energy in effective hearing frequencies. Most of the toys energies were in the middle and high frequency region. Conclusion: As intensity level of the toys is considerable, mostly more than 90 dBA, and also their energy exist in the middle and high frequency region, toys should be considered as a cause of the hearing impairment.

  8. Efficient computational noise in GLSL

    CERN Document Server

    McEwan, Ian; Gustavson, Stefan; Richardson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We present GLSL implementations of Perlin noise and Perlin simplex noise that run fast enough for practical consideration on current generation GPU hardware. The key benefits are that the functions are purely computational, i.e. they use neither textures nor lookup tables, and that they are implemented in GLSL version 1.20, which means they are compatible with all current GLSL-capable platforms, including OpenGL ES 2.0 and WebGL 1.0. Their performance is on par with previously presented GPU implementations of noise, they are very convenient to use, and they scale well with increasing parallelism in present and upcoming GPU architectures.

  9. HYBASE : HYperspectral BAnd SElection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2009-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to assess the minimum number of spe

  10. 高速铁路桥梁结构噪声的全频段预测研究(Ⅱ):试验验证%Prediction of Structure-borne Noises of High-speed Railway Bridges in Whole Frequency Bands(Part Ⅱ):Field Test Verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张迅; 李小珍; 刘全民; 张志俊; 李亚东

    2013-01-01

    In the companion paper,a prediction method of structure-borne noises of high-speed railway bridges in whole frequency bands was put forward on the basis of the theories of the boundary element method(BEM)and statistical energy analysis(SEA) of train-track-bridge spatial coupling vibration and steady-state acoustic radiation. In this paper,a 32 m simply supported concrete box girder was selected for case study and field test results were compared with computed values to verify the reliability of the theoretical model. The analysis results indicate as follows; Structure-borne noises of the concrete box-girder appear mainly below 200 Hz and attenuate slowly in the direction perpendicular to the railway line;the maximum sound pressure level(SPL) lies in the the frequency band with the central frequency of 50 Hz,and it demonstrates the obvious tonal characteristic at some speeds ;acoustic resonance at extension joints appears in the frequency band with the central freuqueney of 315 Hz and at remarkable degrees,how.ever its attenuation rate is fast in the direction perpendicular to the railway line. When measures are taken to conduct noise abatement, it is better to start from the frequency with the maximum SPL,which would be more effective.%前1篇系列文章(《铁道学报》2013年第1期,作者:李小珍,等)基于车线-桥空间耦合振动和稳态声辐射的边界元法、统计能量法理论,提出高速铁路桥梁结构噪声的全频段预测方法.本文以32 m双线混凝土简支箱梁为例,将数值仿真分析与现场试验结果进行对比,验证理论模型的可靠性.分析结果表明:该箱梁的结构噪声主要出现在200 Hz以下,沿垂直于线路方向的传播较远;噪声峰值出现在中心频率50 Hz的频带,且在某些速度下具有明显的有调性;梁缝处的共鸣声较大,出现在中心频率315 Hz的频带,沿垂直于线路方向的衰减较快.进行降噪处理时,可优先从噪声峰值频率入手,降低峰

  11. Ka Band Phase Locked Loop Oscillator Dielectric Resonator Oscillator for Satellite EHF Band Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Ka Band PLL DRO having a fundamental oscillation frequency of 19.250 GHz, used as local oscillator in the low-noise block of a down converter (LNB for an EHF band receiver. Apposite circuital models have been created to describe the behaviour of the dielectric resonator and of the active component used in the oscillator core. The DRO characterization and measurements have shown very good agreement with simulation results. A good phase noise performance is obtained by using a very high Q dielectric resonator.

  12. Noise propagation characteristics of underground equipment in coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Gen-yin; WEI Zhi-yong; XU Ming; ZHU Yan-yan

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the survey of underground noise in Jinggezhuang and Donghuantuo mines,Kailuan Group,noise radiation intensity,noise propagation properties and noise frequency-spectrum characteristics of underground equipment were studied at different work conditions.The result indicates that the noise source intensity surpasses the noise limit requirement of 85 dBA completely.Nearly 70% noise sources exceed the noise limit of 90 dBA,and some are over 100 dBA.Noise attenuation in semi-free field environment on the ground is significantly different from underground far-field environment of noise source in coal mines.Noise of these regions,where staffs are long and highly concentrated,exceeds 85 dBA,the basic noise limit.The noise frequency-spectrum presents the wideband characteristics.Especially in the main frequency of the language communication 500,1 000 and 2 000 Hz,the octave band of noise performs obviously.

  13. Ambient noise spectral properties in the north area of Xisha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DA Lianglong; WANG Chao; HAN Mei; ZHANG Lin

    2014-01-01

    Ambient noise is very important in the prediction system of a sonar performance, because it determines the detection ranges always in a passive sonar and usually in an active sonar. In the uncertainty issue for the so-nar performance, it is necessary to know this factor’s statistical characteristics that are only obtained by data processing from the underwater ambient noise measurements. Broad-band ambient noise signals from 16 hydrophones were amplified and recorded for 2 min every 1 h. The results show that the ambient noise is essentially depth independent. The cross correlation of the ambient noise levels (1, 6 and 12 h average) with a wind speed is presented. It was found that the correlation is excellent on the upper frequency band and the noise levels correlate better with high wind speed than with low wind speed.

  14. Examining nocturnal railway noise and aircraft noise in the field: sleep, psychomotor performance, and annoyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, Eva-Maria; Pennig, Sibylle; Rolny, Vinzent; Quehl, Julia; Mueller, Uwe; Maaß, Hartmut; Basner, Mathias

    2012-05-01

    Traffic noise is interfering during day- and nighttime causing distress and adverse physiological reactions in large parts of the population. Railway noise proved less annoying than aircraft noise in surveys which were the bases for a so called 5 dB railway bonus regarding noise protection in many European countries. The present field study investigated railway noise-induced awakenings during sleep, nighttime annoyance and the impact on performance the following day. Comparing these results with those from a field study on aircraft noise allowed for a ranking of traffic modes concerning physiological and psychological reactions. 33 participants (mean age 36.2 years ± 10.3 (SD); 22 females) living alongside railway tracks around Cologne/Bonn (Germany) were polysomnographically investigated. These data were pooled with data from a field study on aircraft noise (61 subjects) directly comparing the effects of railway and aircraft noise in one random subject effects logistic regression model. Annoyance was rated in the morning evaluating the previous night. Probability of sleep stage changes to wake/S1 from railway noise increased significantly from 6.5% at 35 dB(A) to 20.5% at 80 dB(A) LAFmax. Rise time of noise events had a significant impact on awakening probability. Nocturnal railway noise led to significantly higher awakening probabilities than aircraft noise, partly explained by the different rise times, whereas the order was inversed for annoyance. Freight train noise compared to passenger train noise proved to have the most impact on awakening probability. Nocturnal railway noise had no effect on psychomotor vigilance. Nocturnal freight train noise exposure in Germany was associated with increased awakening probabilities exceeding those for aircraft noise and contrasting the findings of many annoyance surveys and annoyance ratings of our study. During nighttime a bonus for railway noise seems not appropriate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combustion and Engine-Core Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihme, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of advanced low-emission aircraft engine technologies and the reduction of noise from airframe, fan, and jet exhaust have made noise contributions from an engine core increasingly important. Therefore, meeting future ambitious noise-reduction goals requires the consideration of engine-core noise. This article reviews progress on the fundamental understanding, experimental analysis, and modeling of engine-core noise; addresses limitations of current techniques; and identifies opportunities for future research. After identifying core-noise contributions from the combustor, turbomachinery, nozzles, and jet exhaust, they are examined in detail. Contributions from direct combustion noise, originating from unsteady combustion, and indirect combustion noise, resulting from the interaction of flow-field perturbations with mean-flow variations in turbine stages and nozzles, are analyzed. A new indirect noise-source contribution arising from mixture inhomogeneities is identified by extending the theory. Although typically omitted in core-noise analysis, the impact of mean-flow variations and nozzle-upstream perturbations on the jet-noise modulation is examined, providing potential avenues for future core-noise mitigation.

  16. Underwater noise levels in UK waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D.; Brookes, Kate L.; Faulkner, Rebecca C.; Bicknell, Anthony W. J.; Godley, Brendan J.; Witt, Matthew J.

    2016-11-01

    Underwater noise from human activities appears to be rising, with ramifications for acoustically sensitive marine organisms and the functioning of marine ecosystems. Policymakers are beginning to address the risk of ecological impact, but are constrained by a lack of data on current and historic noise levels. Here, we present the first nationally coordinated effort to quantify underwater noise levels, in support of UK policy objectives under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Field measurements were made during 2013-2014 at twelve sites around the UK. Median noise levels ranged from 81.5-95.5 dB re 1 μPa for one-third octave bands from 63-500 Hz. Noise exposure varied considerably, with little anthropogenic influence at the Celtic Sea site, to several North Sea sites with persistent vessel noise. Comparison of acoustic metrics found that the RMS level (conventionally used to represent the mean) was highly skewed by outliers, exceeding the 97th percentile at some frequencies. We conclude that environmental indicators of anthropogenic noise should instead use percentiles, to ensure statistical robustness. Power analysis indicated that at least three decades of continuous monitoring would be required to detect trends of similar magnitude to historic rises in noise levels observed in the Northeast Pacific.

  17. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English, which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  18. Can Noise Kill People?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲娣

    2007-01-01

    Someone is singing next door,but you feel unhappy because her singing is just making a noise.We know that too much noise makes people feel terrible. Scientists are still trying to find out more about noise,but already it is known that a noise of over 85 decibels can make some people tired and anxious.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso; Babisch, Wolfgang; Basner, Mathias

    2014-04-01

    The role of noise as an environmental pollutant and its impact on health are being increasingly recognized. Beyond its effects on the auditory system, noise causes annoyance and disturbs sleep, and it impairs cognitive performance. Furthermore, evidence from epidemiologic studies demonstrates that environmental noise is associated with an increased incidence of arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Both observational and experimental studies indicate that in particular night-time noise can cause disruptions of sleep structure, vegetative arousals (e.g. increases of blood pressure and heart rate) and increases in stress hormone levels and oxidative stress, which in turn may result in endothelial dysfunction and arterial hypertension. This review focuses on the cardiovascular consequences of environmental noise exposure and stresses the importance of noise mitigation strategies for public health.

  20. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  1. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  2. Noise exposure in oil mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Noise of machines in various agro-based industries was found to be the major occupational hazard for the workers of industries. The predominant noise sources need to be identified and the causes of high noise need to be studied to undertake the appropriate measures to reduce the noise level in one of the major agro-based industries, oil mills. Aims: To identify the predominant noise sources in the workrooms of oil mills. To study the causes of noise in oil mills. To measure the extent of noise exposure of oil mill workers. To examine the response of workers towards noise, so that appropriate measures can be undertaken to minimize the noise exposure. Settings and Design: A noise survey was conducted in the three renowned oil mills of north-eastern region of India. Materials and Methods: Information like output capacity, size of power source, maintenance condition of the machines and workroom configurations of the oil mills was collected by personal observations and enquiry with the owner of the mill. Using a Sound Level Meter (SLM (Model-824, Larson and Davis, USA, equivalent SPL was measured at operator′s ear level in the working zone of the workers near each machine of the mills. In order to study the variation of SPL in the workrooms of the oil mill throughout its operation, equivalent SPL was measured at two appropriate locations of working zone of the workers in each mill. For conducting the noise survey, the guidelines of Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS were followed. Grid points were marked on the floor of the workroom of the oil mill at a spacing of 1 m x 1 m. SPL at grid points were measured at about 1.5 m above the floor. The direction of the SLM was towards the nearby noisy source. To increase accuracy, two replications were taken at each grid point. All the data were recorded for 30 sec. At the end of the experiment, data were downloaded to a personal computer. With the help of utility software of

  3. Occupational noise exposure and the risk of hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Zara A; Bonde, Jens Peter; Christensen, Kent L;

    2013-01-01

    Noise may increase the risk of hypertension, but findings are inconsistent with respect to both community and occupational noise exposure. We used a large sample of noise-exposed industrial trades to analyze the association of occupational noise exposure and the risk of hypertension....

  4. Side Information and Noise Learning for Distributed Video Coding using Optical Flow and Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Rakêt, Lars Lau; Huang, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) coding and proposes using optical flow to improve side information generation and clustering to improve noise modeling. The optical flow technique is exploited at the decoder side to compensate weaknesses of block based methods, when using motion-compensation to generate......Distributed video coding (DVC) is a coding paradigm which exploits the source statistics at the decoder side to reduce the complexity at the encoder. The coding efficiency of DVC critically depends on the quality of side information generation and accuracy of noise modeling. This paper considers...... side information frames. Clustering is introduced to capture cross band correlation and increase local adaptivity in the noise modeling. This paper also proposes techniques to learn from previously decoded (WZ) frames. Different techniques are combined by calculating a number of candidate soft side...

  5. Noise environment reduction foam spheres in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, Terry; Kern, Dennis; Badilla, Gloria

    1989-01-01

    The advent of lightweight fairings for new spacecraft and the increased thrust of new launch vehicles have intensified the need for better techniques for predicting and for reducing the low frequency noise environment of spacecraft at liftoff. This paper presents a VAPEPS (VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System) parametrical analysis of the noise reduction of spacecraft fairings and explores a novel technique for increasing the low frequency noise reduction of lightweight fairing by approximately 10 dB.

  6. Mechanics of underwater noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Donald

    1976-01-01

    Mechanics of Underwater Noise elucidates the basic mechanisms by which noise is generated, transmitted by structures and radiated into the sea. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with a description of noise, decibels and levels, significance of spectra, and passive sonar equation. Subsequent chapters discuss sound waves in liquids; acoustic radiation fundamentals; wind-generated ocean ambient noise; vibration isolation and structural damping; and radiation by plate flexural vibrations. Other chapters address cavitation, propeller cavitation noise, radiation by fluctuating-force (dipo

  7. Noise reduction of spiral ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapka, Wojciech; Cempel, Czesław

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents noise reduction (NR) of spiral ducts as a result of computational modeling of acoustic wave propagation. Three-dimensional models were created with the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics version 3.3. Nine models of spiral ducts with 1-9 spiral leads were considered. Time-harmonic analysis was used to predict NR, which was shown in spectral and interval frequency bands. Spiral duct performance can be seen as a comparison of NR before and after a change from a circular to a spiral duct.

  8. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas; Møller Petersen, Claus

    2012-04-01

    Noise generated by the audience during musical performances is audible and sometimes disturbing. In this study, an attempt to estimate such audience noise was carried out. From the recordings of performances in five performance spaces (four concert halls and one opera house), probability density functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L(90) of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended.

  9. Noise from high speed maglev systems: Noise sources, noise criteria, preliminary design guidelines for noise control, and recommendations for acoustical test facility for maglev research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C. E.; Abbot, P.; Dyer, I.

    1993-01-01

    Noise levels from magnetically-levitated trains (maglev) at very high speed may be high enough to cause environmental noise impact in residential areas. Aeroacoustic sources dominate the sound at high speeds and guideway vibrations generate noticeable sound at low speed. In addition to high noise levels, the startle effect as a result of sudden onset of sound from a rapidly moving nearby maglev vehicle may lead to increased annoyance to neighbors of a maglev system. The report provides a base for determining the noise consequences and potential mitigation for a high speed maglev system in populated areas of the United States. Four areas are included in the study: (1) definition of noise sources; (2) development of noise criteria; (3) development of design guidelines; and (4) recommendations for a noise testing facility.

  10. Noise-based communication and computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, Laszlo B

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the speed-error-heat triangle and related problems with rapidly increasing energy dissipation and error rate during miniaturization. These and the independently growing need of unconditional data security have provoked non-conventional approaches in the physics of informatics. Noise-based informatics is a potentially promising possibility which is the way how biological brains process the information. Recently, it has been shown that thermal noise and its electronically enhanced versions (Johnson-like noises) can be utilized as information carrier with peculiar properties. Relevant examples are Zero power (stealth) communication, Unconditionally secure communication with Johnson(-like) noise and Kirchhoff loop and Noise-driven computing. The zero power communication utilizes the equilibrium background noise in the channel to transfer information. The unconditionally secure communication is based on the properties of Johnson(-like) noise and those of a simple Kirchhoff's loop. The scheme utilizes on...

  11. A filterless, visible-blind, narrow-band, and near-infrared photodetector with a gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Zhang, Yang; Bai, Yang; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Wang, Qi; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    In many applications of near-infrared (NIR) light detection, a band-pass filter is needed to exclude the noise caused by visible light. Here, we demonstrate a filterless, visible-blind, narrow-band NIR photodetector with a full-width at half-maximum of 4 μm) nanocomposite absorbing layers made of polymer-fullerene:lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dots (QDs). The PbS QDs yield a photoconductive gain due to their hole-trapping effect, which effectively enhances both the responsivity and the visible rejection ratio of the external quantum efficiency by >10 fold compared to those without PbS QDs. Encouragingly, the inclusion of the PbS QDs does not increase the device noise. We directly measured a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 6.1 pW cm-2 at 890 nm, and a large linear dynamic range (LDR) over 11 orders of magnitude. The highly sensitive visible-blind NIR narrow-band photodetectors may find applications in biomedical engineering.

  12. A Partial Double-Pass S-Band Erbium-Doped Fibre Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sulaiman Wadi Harun; Nor Kamilah Saat; Harith Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    @@ An efficient and low noise short wavelength band erbium-doped fibre amplifier (S-band EDFA) is proposed and demonstrated using double-pass configuration. This amplifier provides a gain of 1500 nm signal as high as 26.9 dB,which is 9.6 dB higher than the two-stage single-pass amplifier. The corresponding noise figure obtained is 7.5 dB,which is of the same level as in the single-pass amplifier and more than 2dB lower than the previously reported double-pass amplifier [IEICE Electron. Express 2 (2005) 182]. The gain enhancement is due to the double pass-propagation of the test signal in the second stage, which increases the effective erbium-doped fibre (EDF)length. The low noise is attributed to the optical circulator between EDFs, which prevents the backward amplified spontaneous emission from propagating into the input part of the amplifier. The proposed amplifier is expected to play an important role in the development of a practical S-band EDFA.

  13. Active noise control: a review of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R T; Vining, W D

    1992-11-01

    Active noise control (ANC) is the application of the principle of the superposition of waves to noise attenuation problems. Much progress has been made toward applying ANC to narrow-band, low-frequency noise in confined spaces. During this same period, the application of ANC to broad-band noise or noise in three-dimensional spaces has seen little progress because of the recent quantification of serious physical limitations, most importantly, noncausality, stability, spatial mismatch, and the infinite gain controller requirement. ANC employs superposition to induce destructive interference to affect the attenuation of noise. ANC was believed to utilize the mechanism of phase cancellation to achieve the desired attenuation. However, current literature points to other mechanisms that may be operating in ANC. Categories of ANC are one-dimensional field and duct noise, enclosed spaces and interior noise, noise in three-dimensional spaces, and personal hearing protection. Development of active noise control stems from potential advantages in cost, size, and effectiveness. There are two approaches to ANC. In the first, the original sound is processed and injected back into the sound field in antiphase. The second approach is to synthesize a cancelling waveform. ANC of turbulent flow in pipes and ducts is the largest area in the field. Much work into the actual mechanism involved and the causal versus noncausal aspects of system controllers has been done. Fan and propeller noise can be divided into two categories: noise generated directly as the blade passing tones and noise generated as a result of blade tip turbulence inducing vibration in structures. Three-dimensional spaces present a noise environment where physical limitations are magnified and the infinite gain controller requirement is confronted. Personal hearing protection has been shown to be best suited to the control of periodic, low-frequency noise.

  14. Neural Control Adaptation to Motor Noise Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hasson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic muscular co-activation can compensate for movement variability induced by motor noise at the expense of increased energetic costs. Greater antagonistic co-activation is commonly observed in older adults, which could be an adaptation to increased motor noise. The present study tested this hypothesis by manipulating motor noise in twelve young subjects while they practiced a goal-directed task using a myoelectric virtual arm, which was controlled by their biceps and triceps muscle activity. Motor noise was increased by increasing the coefficient of variation of the myoelectric signals. As hypothesized, subjects adapted by increasing antagonistic co-activation, and this was associated with reduced noise-induced performance decrements. A second hypothesis was that a virtual decrease in motor noise, achieved by smoothing the myoelectric signals, would have the opposite effect: co-activation would decrease and motor performance would improve. However, the results showed that a decrease in noise made performance worse instead of better, with no change in co-activation. Overall, these findings suggest that the nervous system adapts to virtual increases in motor noise by increasing antagonistic co-activation, and this preserves motor performance. Reducing noise may have failed to benefit performance due to characteristics of the filtering process itself, e.g. delays are introduced and muscle activity bursts are attenuated. The observed adaptations to increased noise may explain in part why older adults and many patient populations have greater antagonistic co-activation, which could represent an adaptation to increased motor noise, along with a desire for increased joint stability.

  15. Study on low-phase-noise optoelectronic oscillator and high-sensitivity phase noise measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun; Liu, An-min; Guo, Jian

    2013-08-01

    An analytic model for an injection-locked dual-loop optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) is proposed and verified by experiments in this paper. Based on this theoretical model, the effect of injection power on the single-sideband phase noise of the OEO is analyzed, and results suggest that moderate injection is one key factor for a balance between phase noise and spur for OEO. In order to measure superlow phase noise of OEOs, a cross-correlation measurement system based on the fiber delay line is built, in which high linear photodetector and low-phase-noise amplifier are used to improve systematic sensitivity. The cross-correlation measurement system is validated by experiments, and its noise floor for the X band is about -130 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -168 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz after a cross correlation of 200 times.

  16. RESULTS of the "ELIMINATING NOISE" campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    From 4 to 6 August, CERN’s nurses conducted a screening campaign entitled "Eliminating noise". This campaign was especially aimed at young people exposed to noise during their leisure hours (playing in a band, listening to MP3 players, attending concerts, etc.). In all, 166 people attended the infirmary, where they were able to receive personalised advice, documentation and, above all, a hearing test (audiogram). While the high attendance of people in the younger age category (18-30) was a success, their audiogram data were a cause for concern, with 24.5% showing abnormal results, hearing deficiencies which, we should remind you, are irreversible. It should be noted that such conditions are almost exclusively caused by noise exposure in a non-professional environment (leisure activities, music, etc.). This latest campaign confirms the harmful effects of noise on people’s hearing due to the absence or insufficiency of protective equipment during music-related activities; this further unde...

  17. RESULTS of the "ELIMINATING NOISE" campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    From 4 to 6 August, CERN’s nurses conducted a screening campaign entitled "Eliminating noise". This campaign was especially aimed at young people exposed to noise during their leisure hours (playing in a band, listening to MP3 players, attending concerts, etc.). In all, 166 people attended the Infirmary, where they were able to receive personalised advice, documentation and, above all, a hearing test (audiogram). While the high attendance of people in the younger age category (18-30) was a success, their audiogram data were a cause for concern, with 24.5% showing abnormal results, hearing deficiencies which, we should remind you, are irreversible. It should be noted that such conditions are almost exclusively caused by noise exposure in a non-professional environment (leisure activities, music, etc.). This latest campaign confirms the harmful effects of noise on people’s hearing due to the absence or insufficiency of protective equipment during music-related activities; this further unde...

  18. Noise Gain Features of Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii S. Felinskyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation dynamics of the optical noise in a silica single mode fiber (SMF as function of the pump power variation in the counter pumped fiber Raman amplifier (FRA is experimentally studied. The ratio between the power of amplified spontaneous emission and the power of incoherent optical noise is quantitatively determined by detailed analysis of experimental data in the pump powers range of 100–300 mW within the full band of Stokes frequencies, including FRA working wavelengths over the C + L transparency windows. It is found out the maximum of Raman gain coefficient for optical noise does not exceed ~60% of corresponding peak at the gain profile maximum of coherent signal. It is shown that the real FRA noise figure may be considerably less than 3 dB over a wide wavelength range (100 nm at a pump power of several hundreds of mW.

  19. The effect of human activity noise on the acoustic quality in open plan office

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlbæk, Tania Stenholt; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    A disadvantage of open plan offices is the noise annoyance. Noise problems in open plan offices have been dealt with in several studies, and standards have been set up. Still, what has not been taken into account is the effect of human activity noise on acoustic conditions. In this study, measure...... D2,S have an impact on the variation in the activity noise. At 1 kHz, the technical background noise influences human activity noise positively. In both octave bands, the human activity noise level varies significantly with the office type, from a call center to a lawyer’s office....

  20. The Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experiment (MGS/KaBLE-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4-GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-m-diameter parabolic antenna on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) research and development (R&D) 34-meter a ntenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. This Ka-band link experiment (KaBLE-II) allows the performances of the Ka-band and X-band signals to be compared under nearly identical conditions. The two signals have been regularly tracked during the past 2 years. This article presents carrier-signal-level data (P_c/N_o) for both X-band and Ka-band acquired over a wide range of station elevation angles, weather conditions, and solar elongation angles. The cruise phase of the mission covered the period from launch (November 7, 1996) to Mars orbit capture (September 12, 1997). Since September 12, 1997, MGS has been in orbit around Mars. The measurements confirm that Ka-band could increase data capacity by at least a factor of three (5 dB) as compared with X-band. During May 1998, the solar corona experiment, in which the effects of solar plasma on the X-band and Ka-band links were studied, was conducted. In addition, frequency and difference frequency (f_x - f_(Ka)/3.8), ranging, and telemetry data results are presented. MGS/KaBLE-II measured signal strengths (for 54 percent of the experiments conducted) that were in reasonable agreement with predicted values based on preflight knowledge, and frequency residuals that agreed between bands and whose statistics were consistent with expected noise sources. For passes in which measured signal strengths disagreed with predicted values, the problems were traced to known deficiencies, for example, equipment operating under certain conditions, such as a cold Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA

  1. Traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzaki, Masayuki; Yamaura, Yuichi; Francis, Clinton D.; Nakamura, Futoshi

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic noise has been increasing globally. Laboratory experiments suggest that noise disrupts foraging behavior across a range of species, but to reveal the full impacts of noise, we must examine the impacts of noise on foraging behavior among species in the wild. Owls are widespread nocturnal top predators and use prey rustling sounds for localizing prey when hunting. We conducted field experiments to examine the effect of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey. Results suggest that foraging efficiency declines with increasing traffic noise levels due to acoustic masking and/or distraction and aversion to traffic noise. Moreover, we estimate that effects of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey reach >120 m from a road, which is larger than the distance estimated from captive studies with bats. Our study provides the first evidence that noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild animals, and highlights the possible pervasive impacts of noise.

  2. Inter-Band Radiometric Comparison and Calibration of ASTER Visible and Near-Infrared Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Obata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates inter-band radiometric consistency across the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER visible and near-infrared (VNIR bands and develops an inter-band calibration algorithm to improve radiometric consistency. Inter-band radiometric comparison of current ASTER data shows a root mean square error (RMSE of 3.8%–5.7% among radiance outputs of spectral bands due primarily to differences between calibration strategies of the NIR band for nadir-looking (Band 3N and the other two bands (green and red bands, corresponding to Bands 1 and 2. An algorithm for radiometric calibration of Bands 2 and 3N with reference to Band 1 is developed based on the band translation technique and is used to obtain new radiometric calibration coefficients (RCCs for sensor sensitivity degradation. The systematic errors between radiance outputs are decreased by applying the derived RCCs, which result in reducing the RMSE from 3.8%–5.7% to 2.2%–2.9%. The remaining errors are approximately equal to or smaller than the intrinsic uncertainties of inter-band calibration derived by sensitivity analysis. Improvement of the radiometric consistency would increase the accuracy of band algebra (e.g., vegetation indices and its application. The algorithm can be used to evaluate inter-band radiometric consistency, as well as for the calibration of other sensors.

  3. Anthropogenic noise changes arthropod abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkley, Jessie P; McClure, Christopher J W; Kawahara, Akito Y; Francis, Clinton D; Barber, Jesse R

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic noise is a widespread and growing form of sensory pollution associated with the expansion of human infrastructure. One specific source of constant and intense noise is that produced by compressors used for the extraction and transportation of natural gas. Terrestrial arthropods play a central role in many ecosystems, and given that numerous species rely upon airborne sounds and substrate-borne vibrations in their life histories, we predicted that increased background sound levels or the presence of compressor noise would influence their distributions. In the second largest natural gas field in the United States (San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA), we assessed differences in the abundances of terrestrial arthropod families and community structure as a function of compressor noise and background sound level. Using pitfall traps, we simultaneously sampled five sites adjacent to well pads that possessed operating compressors, and five alternate, quieter well pad sites that lacked compressors, but were otherwise similar. We found a negative association between sites with compressor noise or higher levels of background sound and the abundance of five arthropod families and one genus, a positive relationship between loud sites and the abundance of one family, and no relationship between noise level or compressor presence and abundance for six families and two genera. Despite these changes, we found no evidence of community turnover as a function of background sound level or site type (compressor and noncompressor). Our results indicate that anthropogenic noise differentially affects the abundances of some arthropod families. These preliminary findings point to a need to determine the direct and indirect mechanisms driving these observed responses. Given the diverse and important ecological functions provided by arthropods, changes in abundances could have ecological implications. Therefore, we recommend the consideration of arthropods in the environmental

  4. Noise in two-color electronic distance meter measurements revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J.

    2004-01-01

    Frequent, high-precision geodetic data have temporally correlated errors. Temporal correlations directly affect both the estimate of rate and its standard error; the rate of deformation is a key product from geodetic measurements made in tectonically active areas. Various models of temporally correlated errors are developed and these provide relations between the power spectral density and the data covariance matrix. These relations are applied to two-color electronic distance meter (EDM) measurements made frequently in California over the past 15-20 years. Previous analysis indicated that these data have significant random walk error. Analysis using the noise models developed here indicates that the random walk model is valid for about 30% of the data. A second 30% of the data can be better modeled with power law noise with a spectral index between 1 and 2, while another 30% of the data can be modeled with a combination of band-pass-filtered plus random walk noise. The remaining 10% of the data can be best modeled as a combination of band-pass-filtered plus power law noise. This band-pass-filtered noise is a product of an annual cycle that leaks into adjacent frequency bands. For time spans of more than 1 year these more complex noise models indicate that the precision in rate estimates is better than that inferred by just the simpler, random walk model of noise.

  5. DESIGN OF LOW NOISE AMPLIFIER FOR UWB RADIO RECEIVER.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpana Adsul

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An Ultra Wide Band CMOS Low Noise Amplifier (LNA design is presented in this paper. Due to low power consumption and extremely high data rates the UWB system is bound to be popular in the end user market. The LNA is the first stage after antenna in an UWB transceiver. The LNA is accountable for providing enough gain to the signal with the bare minimum distortion. In this work we have designed and evaluated the performance of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS low noise amplifier (LNA for 3.1-10.6 GHZ frequency band. Agilent's ADS tool has been used to simulate the designed LNA and is proved to have better noise figure as well as input matching. The designed LNA provides the low S11, S22, and noise figure. The gain achieved is 6dB and the response over the band of interest is almost flat.

  6. HIGH-ACCURACY BAND TO BAND REGISTRATION METHOD FOR MULTI-SPECTRAL IMAGES OF HJ-1A/B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Hao; Liu Tuanjie; Zhao Haiqing

    2012-01-01

    Band-to-band registration accuracy is an important parameter of multispectral data.A novel band-to-band registration approach with high precision is proposed for the multi-spectral images of HJ-1A/B.Firstly,the main causes resulted in misregistration are analyzed,and a high-order polynomial model is proposed.Secondly,a phase fringe filtering technique is employed to Phase Correlation Method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD-PCM) for reducing the noise in phase difference matrix.Then,experiments are carried out to build nonlinear registration models,and images of green band and red band are aligned to blue band with an accuracy of 0.1 pixels,while near infrared band with an accuracy of 0.2 pixels.

  7. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  8. A Cryogenic SiGe Low-noise Amplifier Optimized for Phased-array Feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Wavley M., III; Morgan, Matthew A.

    2017-08-01

    The growing number of phased-array feeds (PAF) being built for radio astronomy demonstrates an increasing need for low-noise amplifiers (LNA), which are designed for repeatability, low noise, and ease of manufacture. Specific design features that help to achieve these goals include the use of unpackaged transistors (for cryogenic operation); single-polarity biasing; straight plug-in radio frequency (RF) interfaces to facilitate installation and re-work; and the use of off-the-shelf components. The focal L-band array for the Green Bank Telescope (FLAG) is a cooperative effort by Brigham Young University and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory using warm dipole antennae and cryogenic Silicon Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (SiGe HBT) LNAs. These LNAs have an in band gain average of 38 dB and 4.85 Kelvin average noise temperature. Although the FLAG instrument was the driving instrument behind this development, most of the key features of the design and the advantages they offer apply broadly to other array feeds, including independent-beam and phased, and for many antenna types such as horn, dipole, Vivaldi, connected-bowtie, etc. This paper focuses on the unique requirements array feeds have for low-noise amplifiers and how amplifier manufacturing can accommodate these needs.

  9. A detailed study on the effects of noise on speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbelboer, Finn; Houtgast, Tammo

    2007-11-01

    A wavelet representation of speech was used to display the instantaneous amplitude and phase within 14 octave frequency bands, representing the envelope and the carrier within each band. Adding stationary noise alters the wavelet pattern, which can be understood as a combination of three simultaneously occurring subeffects: two effects on the wavelet levels (one systematic and one stochastic) and one effect on the wavelet phases. Specific types of signal processing were applied to speech, which allowed each effect to be either included or excluded. The impact of each effect (and of combinations) on speech intelligibility was measured with CVC's. It appeared that the systematic level effect (i.e., the increase of each speech wavelet intensity with the mean noise intensity) has the most degrading effect on speech intelligibility, which is in accordance with measures such as the modulation transfer function and the speech transmission index. However, also the introduction of stochastic level fluctuations and disturbance of the carrier phase seriously contribute to reduced intelligibility in noise. It is argued that these stochastic effects are responsible for the limited success of spectral subtraction as a means to improve speech intelligibility. Results can provide clues for effective noise suppression with respect to intelligibility.

  10. Reduction of Bumblebee Noise Generated by GSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Su Kyi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research work presents a method for reducing a bumblebee noise generated by a GSM system. Global smart phone penetration has been very swift and 2nd generation, 3rd generation and 4th generation communication technology are commercially used in the world. GSM technology uses a channel access method that combines frequency division multiple access (FDMA and time division multiple access (TDMA. There are four commercial frequency bands. GSM technology has a burst structure by a TDMA method. And hence, the GSM technology has a disadvantage; radiation noise is generated from an antenna propagation signal of the smart phone, and consequently, the voice quality of the smart phone is degraded. This noise is commonly known as bumblebee noise, buzz noise or TDMA noise. There have been several studies to reduce the noise since a release of GSM technology in a commercial market. Those studies mainly focused on designing infinite impulse response (IIR notch filters by the signal processing technology or on data burst transmission schemes.

  11. Noise in the Sea and Its Impacts on Marine Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Peng; Xinguo Zhao; Guangxu Liu

    2015-01-01

    With the growing utilization and exploration of the ocean, anthropogenic noise increases significantly and gives rise to a new kind of pollution: noise pollution. In this review, the source and the characteristics of noise in the sea, the significance of sound to marine organisms, and the impacts of noise on marine organisms are summarized. In general, the studies about the impact of noise on marine organisms are mainly on adult fish and mammals, which account for more than 50% and 20% of all...

  12. The Protective Effect of Conditioning on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Is Frequency-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Pourbakht

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the extent of temporary threshold shift (TTS and hair cell loss following high level 4 kHz noise exposure with those preconditioned with moderate level 1 and 4 kHz octave band noise. Fifteen Male albino guinea pigs (300- 350 g in weight were randomly allocated into three groups: those exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL (group 1, n=5; those conditioned with 1 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, then exposed to noise (group 2, n=5; those conditioned with 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, then exposed to noise (group 3, n=5. An hour and one week after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated by auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR and then animals were euthanized for histological evaluation. We found that TTS and cochlear damage caused by noise exposure were significantly reduced by 1 kHz and 4 kHz conditioning (P<0.001. We also showed that 4 kHz protocol attenuates noise- induced TTS but no significant TTS reduction occurred by 1 kHz conditioning. Both protocol protected noise-induced cochlear damage. We concluded that lower tone conditioning could not protect against higher tone temporary noise-induced hearing loss, thus conditioning is a local acting and frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  13. High signal-to-noise ratio quantum well bolometer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmar, Stanley; Höglund, Linda; Andersson, Jan; Vieider, Christian; Savage, Susan; Ericsson, Per

    2006-09-01

    Novel single crystalline high-performance temperature sensing materials (quantum well structures) have been developed for the manufacturing of uncooled infrared bolometers. SiGe/Si and AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells are grown epitaxially on standard Si and GaAs substrates respectively. The former use holes as charge carriers utilizing the discontinuities in the valence band structure, whereas the latter operate in a similar manner with electrons in the conduction band. By optimizing parameters such as the barrier height (by variation of the germanium/aluminium content respectively) and the fermi level E f (by variation of the quantum well width and doping level) these materials provide the potential to engineer layer structures with a very high temperature coefficient of resistance, TCR, as compared with conventional thin film materials such as vanadium oxide and amorphous silicon. In addition, the high quality crystalline material promises very low 1/f-noise characteristics promoting an outstanding signal to noise ratio and well defined and uniform material properties, A comparison between the two (SiGe/Si and AlGaAs/GaAs) quantum well structures and their fundamental theoretical limits are discussed and compared to experimental results. A TCR of 2.0%/K and 4.5%/K have been obtained experimentally for SiGe/Si and AlGaAs/GaAs respectively. The noise level for both materials is measured as being several orders of magnitude lower than that of a-Si and VOx. These uncooled thermistor materials can be hybridized with read out circuits by using conventional flip-chip assembly or wafer level adhesion bonding. The increased bolometer performance so obtained can either be exploited for increasing the imaging system performance, i. e. obtaining a low NETD, or to reduce the vacuum packaging requirements for low cost applications (e.g. automotive).

  14. The cost of hypertension-related ill-health attributable to environmental noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Helen Harding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension (HT is associated with environmental noise exposure and is a risk factor for a range of health outcomes. The study aims were to identify key HT related health outcomes and to quantify and monetize the impact on health outcomes attributable to environmental noise-related HT. A reiterative literature review identified key HT related health outcomes and their quantitative links with HT. The health impact of increases in environmental noise above recommended daytime noise levels (55 dB[A] were quantified in terms of quality adjusted life years and then monetized. A case study evaluated the cost of environmental noise, using published data on health risks and the number of people exposed to various bands of environmental noise levels in the United Kingdom (UK. Three health outcomes were selected based on the strength of evidence linking them with HT and their current impact on society: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI, stroke and dementia. In the UK population, an additional 542 cases of HT-related AMI, 788 cases of stroke and 1169 cases of dementia were expected per year due to daytime noise levels ≥55 dB(A. The cost of these additional cases was valued at around £1.09 billion, with dementia accounting for 44%. The methodology is dependent on the availability and quality of published data and the resulting valuations reflect these limitations. The estimated intangible cost provides an insight into the scale of the health impacts and conversely the benefits that the implementation of policies to manage environmental noise may confer.

  15. The cost of hypertension-related ill-health attributable to environmental noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Anne-Helen; Frost, Gillian A; Tan, Emma; Tsuchiya, Aki; Mason, Howard M

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension (HT) is associated with environmental noise exposure and is a risk factor for a range of health outcomes. The study aims were to identify key HT related health outcomes and to quantify and monetize the impact on health outcomes attributable to environmental noise-related HT. A reiterative literature review identified key HT related health outcomes and their quantitative links with HT. The health impact of increases in environmental noise above recommended daytime noise levels (55 dB[A]) were quantified in terms of quality adjusted life years and then monetized. A case study evaluated the cost of environmental noise, using published data on health risks and the number of people exposed to various bands of environmental noise levels in the United Kingdom (UK). Three health outcomes were selected based on the strength of evidence linking them with HT and their current impact on society: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and dementia. In the UK population, an additional 542 cases of HT-related AMI, 788 cases of stroke and 1169 cases of dementia were expected per year due to daytime noise levels ≥55 dB(A). The cost of these additional cases was valued at around £1.09 billion, with dementia accounting for 44%. The methodology is dependent on the availability and quality of published data and the resulting valuations reflect these limitations. The estimated intangible cost provides an insight into the scale of the health impacts and conversely the benefits that the implementation of policies to manage environmental noise may confer.

  16. An RF tag communication system model for noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qihe; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2008-04-01

    RF (radio-frequency) tags have drawn increasing research interest because of their great potential uses in many radio frequency identification applications. They can also be configured to work with radar as a communication channel by receiving radar acquisition signals, suitably coding these, and retransmitting them back to the radar. This paper proposes a system model for the communication between a noise radar and multiple RF tags. The radar interrogates the RF tags in a region of interest by sending ultrawideband noise signals. Upon receiving the radar's signal, all the tags within the radar's range wake up, and respond to the radar with simple messages. The RF tag filters the radar signal to a unique spectral band, which represents its identification information, and different RF tags occupy different non-overlapping bands of the spectrum of the radar signal. Tag messages are modulated onto the waveform through taps of weighted delays. The radar decodes the RF tag identifications and corresponding messages by cross-correlating the RF tag returned signals with the replica of the radar transmitted signal. Calculations and simulation results both show that the proposed system is capable of communicating simple messages between RF tags and radar.

  17. Prediction and analysis of infra and low-frequency noise of upwind horizontal axis wind turbine using statistical wind speed model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gwang-Se; Cheong, Cheolung

    2014-12-01

    Despite increasing concern about low-frequency noise of modern large horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs), few studies have focused on its origin or its prediction methods. In this paper, infra- and low-frequency (the ILF) wind turbine noise are closely examined and an efficient method is developed for its prediction. Although most previous studies have assumed that the ILF noise consists primarily of blade passing frequency (BPF) noise components, these tonal noise components are seldom identified in the measured noise spectrum, except for the case of downwind wind turbines. In reality, since modern HAWTs are very large, during rotation, a single blade of the turbine experiences inflow with variation in wind speed in time as well as in space, breaking periodic perturbations of the BPF. Consequently, this transforms acoustic contributions at the BPF harmonics into broadband noise components. In this study, the ILF noise of wind turbines is predicted by combining Lowson's acoustic analogy with the stochastic wind model, which is employed to reproduce realistic wind speed conditions. In order to predict the effects of these wind conditions on pressure variation on the blade surface, unsteadiness in the incident wind speed is incorporated into the XFOIL code by varying incident flow velocities on each blade section, which depend on the azimuthal locations of the rotating blade. The calculated surface pressure distribution is subsequently used to predict acoustic pressure at an observing location by using Lowson's analogy. These predictions are compared with measured data, which ensures that the present method can reproduce the broadband characteristics of the measured low-frequency noise spectrum. Further investigations are carried out to characterize the IFL noise in terms of pressure loading on blade surface, narrow-band noise spectrum and noise maps around the turbine.

  18. Prediction and analysis of infra and low-frequency noise of upwind horizontal axis wind turbine using statistical wind speed model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-Se Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing concern about low-frequency noise of modern large horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs, few studies have focused on its origin or its prediction methods. In this paper, infra- and low-frequency (the ILF wind turbine noise are closely examined and an efficient method is developed for its prediction. Although most previous studies have assumed that the ILF noise consists primarily of blade passing frequency (BPF noise components, these tonal noise components are seldom identified in the measured noise spectrum, except for the case of downwind wind turbines. In reality, since modern HAWTs are very large, during rotation, a single blade of the turbine experiences inflow with variation in wind speed in time as well as in space, breaking periodic perturbations of the BPF. Consequently, this transforms acoustic contributions at the BPF harmonics into broadband noise components. In this study, the ILF noise of wind turbines is predicted by combining Lowson’s acoustic analogy with the stochastic wind model, which is employed to reproduce realistic wind speed conditions. In order to predict the effects of these wind conditions on pressure variation on the blade surface, unsteadiness in the incident wind speed is incorporated into the XFOIL code by varying incident flow velocities on each blade section, which depend on the azimuthal locations of the rotating blade. The calculated surface pressure distribution is subsequently used to predict acoustic pressure at an observing location by using Lowson’s analogy. These predictions are compared with measured data, which ensures that the present method can reproduce the broadband characteristics of the measured low-frequency noise spectrum. Further investigations are carried out to characterize the IFL noise in terms of pressure loading on blade surface, narrow-band noise spectrum and noise maps around the turbine.

  19. Signal and Noise in 3D Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Signal and Noise in 3D Environments Michael B. Porter...complicated 3D environments . I have also been doing a great deal of work in modeling the noise field (the ocean soundscape) due to various sources...we have emphasized the propagation of ‘signals’. We have become increasingly interested in modeling ‘ noise ’ which can illuminate the ocean environment

  20. Effects of background noise on inter-trial phase coherence and auditory N1-P2 responses to speech stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Tess K; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of a speech-babble background noise on inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC, also referred to as phase locking value (PLV)) and auditory event-related responses (AERP) to speech sounds. Specifically, we analyzed EEG data from 11 normal hearing subjects to examine whether ITPC can predict noise-induced variations in the obligatory N1-P2 complex response. N1-P2 amplitude and latency data were obtained for the /bu/syllable in quiet and noise listening conditions. ITPC data in delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands were calculated for the N1-P2 responses in the two passive listening conditions. Consistent with previous studies, background noise produced significant amplitude reduction and latency increase in N1 and P2, which were accompanied by significant ITPC decreases in all the three frequency bands. Correlation analyses further revealed that variations in ITPC were able to predict the amplitude and latency variations in N1-P2. The results suggest that trial-by-trial analysis of cortical neural synchrony is a valuable tool in understanding the modulatory effects of background noise on AERP measures.

  1. Analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise from VS45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundabin, P. [Renewable Energy Systems Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the analysis of acoustic data taken from the VS45 at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog. The aim was to investigate the dependence of aerodynamic noise on tip speed and angle of attack. In particular, the dependence of noise in individual third octave bands on these variable is examined. The analysis is divided into 3 sections: data selection, data checks and analysis of broadband nacelle noise; analysis of broadband aerodynamic noise and its sensitivity to tip speed and angle of attack. (LN)

  2. Radar signature acquisition using an indigenously designed noise radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.; Thayaparan, T.

    2011-06-01

    A new design of a noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar signature of various targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 30 GHz. The noise radar signature measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-3000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used. The measured results of the target signatures were verified with the simulation results.

  3. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  4. Large refinery and petrochemical plant furnaces and heaters : low frequency noise measurement and noise source order-ranking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Frank, HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp. Calgary AB

    2007-07-01

    Large furnaces and process heaters at refineries, gas plants, and petrochemical plants produce a low-frequency tonal noise from combustion roar. They can also produce mid-frequency broadband noise from induced draft fans. The common noise generating mechanisms are turbulence, flow instability, pressure drop, mechanical friction, and component vibration. Some of these energy facilities have multiple furnaces and heaters. As such, a noise source order-ranking assessment is typically performed to determine which plant equipment is responsible for the highest sound level contributions at nearby residence locations. The order-ranking is useful in determining which noise sources may require acoustical treatment to reduce the overall sound level at each residence. These results would form the basis for evaluating the effect of noise mitigating strategies for each source, and for estimating the associated costs for each noise control scenario. The noise model results can also be used to order-rank the equipment noise sources in terms of their frequency-dependant octave band. Experience has shown that large furnaces and heaters usually rank very high in terms of predominant contributors. The combustion roar noise generating mechanism is largely responsible for the predominant amount of acoustical energy. Although some degree of noise reduction can be achieved through burner design, it was shown that noise control engineering largely occurs at the furnace and heater manufacturing or plant retrofit level. This paper presented the results of one refinery with 19 older style furnaces and heaters. 1 tab., 7 figs.

  5. Transitions in a Logistic Growth Model Induced by Noise Coupling and Noise Color

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jin; ZHU Shi-Qun

    2006-01-01

    With unified colored noise approximation, the logistic growth model is used to analyze cancer cell population when colored noise is included. It is found that both the coupling between noise terms and the noise color can induce continuous first-order-like and re-entrance-like phase transitions in the system. The coupling and the noise color can also increase tumor cell growth for small number of cell mass and repress tumor cell growth for large number of cell mass. It is shown that the approximate analytic expressions are consistent with the numerical simulations.

  6. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  7. A Tool for Low Noise Procedures Design and Community Noise Impact Assessment: The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, David A.; Page, Juliet A.

    2002-01-01

    To improve aircraft noise impact modeling capabilities and to provide a tool to aid in the development of low noise terminal area operations for rotorcraft and tiltrotors, the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center and Wyle Laboratories. RNM is a simulation program that predicts how sound will propagate through the atmosphere and accumulate at receiver locations located on flat ground or varying terrain, for single and multiple vehicle flight operations. At the core of RNM are the vehicle noise sources, input as sound hemispheres. As the vehicle "flies" along its prescribed flight trajectory, the source sound propagation is simulated and accumulated at the receiver locations (single points of interest or multiple grid points) in a systematic time-based manner. These sound signals at the receiver locations may then be analyzed to obtain single event footprints, integrated noise contours, time histories, or numerous other features. RNM may also be used to generate spectral time history data over a ground mesh for the creation of single event sound animation videos. Acoustic properties of the noise source(s) are defined in terms of sound hemispheres that may be obtained from theoretical predictions, wind tunnel experimental results, flight test measurements, or a combination of the three. The sound hemispheres may contain broadband data (source levels as a function of one-third octave band) and pure-tone data (in the form of specific frequency sound pressure levels and phase). A PC executable version of RNM is publicly available and has been adopted by a number of organizations for Environmental Impact Assessment studies of rotorcraft noise. This paper provides a review of the required input data, the theoretical framework of RNM's propagation model and the output results. Code validation results are provided from a NATO helicopter noise flight test as well as a tiltrotor flight test program that used the RNM as a tool to aid in

  8. Knot strength of nylon-band cerclage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, B M; Wilson, J W

    1989-12-01

    Nylon bands of five sizes were tested to failure using a splint circular jaw mounted on a tensile testing machine. Four treatment groups of each of the five sizes were tested: as supplied by the manufacturer, ethylene oxide sterilized, autoclave sterilized, and saline-soaked. Comparisons were made between groups and to previously reported results of similar testing of stainless steel wire of three sizes. All the bands failed at the lock mechanism. Knot strength increased with increased size of nylon band. There was no difference between untreated and ethylene oxide sterilized bands, whereas bands subjected to autoclaving or saline soaking failed at less force. The knot strength of all the treatment groups in the three smaller sizes of bands was less than twist-knotted 0.8-mm wire cerclage; and when soaked in saline for 24 hours, the knot strength of the two largest size bands dropped to less than 1.2-mm twist-knotted wire.

  9. Cusp-latitude Pc3 spectra: band-limited and power-law components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ponomarenko

    Full Text Available This work attempts to fill a gap in comparative studies of upstream-generated Pc3–4 waves and broad band ULF noise observed at cusp latitudes. We performed a statistical analysis of the spectral properties of three years of cusp-latitude ground magnetometer data, finding that the average daytime Pc3–4 spectra are characterized by two principal components: an upstream-related band-limited enhancement (‘signal’ and a power-law background (‘noise’ with S(f a  f -4 . Based on this information we developed an algorithm allowing for the deconvolution of these two components in the spectral domain. The frequency of the signal enhancement increases linearly with IMF magnitude as f [mHz] ~ 4.4 | BIMF | [nT], and its power maximizes around IMF cone angles qxB ~ 20 and 160° and at 10:30–11:00 MLT. Both spectral components exhibit similar semiannual variations with equinoctial maxima. The back-ground noise power grows with increasing southward Bz and remains nearly constant for northward Bz . Its diurnal variation resembles that of Pc5 field-line resonance power, with a maximum near 09:00 MLT. Both the band-limited signal and broad band noise components show power-law growth with solar wind velocity a V 5.71sw and a V 4.12sw, respectively. Thus, the effective signal-to-noise ratio increases with in-creasing Vsw. The observations suggest that the noise generation is associated with reconnection processes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers; MHD waves and instabilities; solar wind magnetosphere interactions

  10. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  11. Introductory guide to noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferreira, T.M

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference between sound and noise varies from one human being to another. Noise, then, is simply unwanted sound and to understand how it can be combatted we must know more about its nature. A guide of acceptable levels of noise are investigated....

  12. Restoration for Noise Removal in Quantum Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-09-01

    Quantum computation has become increasingly attractive in the past few decades due to its extraordinary performance. As a result, some studies focusing on image representation and processing via quantum mechanics have been done. However, few of them have considered the quantum operations for images restoration. To address this problem, three noise removal algorithms are proposed in this paper based on the novel enhanced quantum representation model, oriented to two kinds of noise pollution (Salt-and-Pepper noise and Gaussian noise). For the first algorithm Q-Mean, it is designed to remove the Salt-and-Pepper noise. The noise points are extracted through comparisons with the adjacent pixel values, after which the restoration operation is finished by mean filtering. As for the second method Q-Gauss, a special mask is applied to weaken the Gaussian noise pollution. The third algorithm Q-Adapt is effective for the source image containing unknown noise. The type of noise can be judged through the quantum statistic operations for the color value of the whole image, and then different noise removal algorithms are used to conduct image restoration respectively. Performance analysis reveals that our methods can offer high restoration quality and achieve significant speedup through inherent parallelism of quantum computation.

  13. The Low Noise Limit in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy D Dar

    Full Text Available Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. These results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1 a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2 high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of noise at moderate intensities on extra-auditory system in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura Gannouni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise has long been realized as an environmental stress causing physiological, psychological and behavioral changes in humans. The aim of the present study was to determinate the effect of chronic noise at moderate intensities on both glandular and cardiac function and oxidative status. Our problem comes from working conditions in call centers where operators are responsible for making simple and repetitive tasks. One wishes to ascertain the effects of moderate sound levels on rats exposed to the same noise levels during similar periods to those experienced by call center operators. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 70 and 85 dB(A to an octave-band noise (8-16 kHz 6 h/day for 3 month. Corticosterone levels, oxidative status and functional exploration of adrenal and thyroid glands and cardiac tissue were determined. Exposure to long-term noise for different intensities (70 and 85 dB(A resulted in increased corticosterone levels, affected various parameters of the endocrine glands and cardiac function. Markers of oxidative stress (catalase, superoxide dismutase and lipid peroxidation were increased. These results imply that long-term exposure to noise even at moderate levels may enhance physiological function related to neuroendocrine modulation and oxidative imbalance. In these data, the physiological changes occur during the different sounds suggests the concept of allostatic load or homeostatic response of the body.

  15. Deep-Space Ka-Band Link Priority Data Protection: Pre-Emptive Retransmission vs. Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the performance of two preemptive retransmission schemes for protection of priority data over deep-space Ka-band links is evaluated. The first scheme merges the correctly received bit from each transmission to create the most complete set of priority data for each pass (bit merge). The second scheme (symbol combining) combines the soft symbols received from each transmission of the priority data to increase the priority data's signal to noise ratio (SNR), thus increasing the liklihood of the correct reception.

  16. Voltage fluctuations in neurons: signal or noise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Yosef; Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    , we discuss noise-free neuronal signaling and detrimental and beneficial forms of noise in large-scale functional neural networks. Evidence that noise and variability in some cases go hand in hand with behavioral variability and increase behavioral choice, richness, and adaptability opens new avenues...... that allows and facilitates complex adaptive behavior in an unpredictable world. Here we review the growing experimental evidence that functional network activity is associated with intense fluctuations in membrane potential and spike timing. We trace origins and consequences of noise and variability. Finally...

  17. Using entanglement against noise in quantum metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafal; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2014-12-19

    We analyze the role of entanglement among probes and with external ancillas in quantum metrology. In the absence of noise, it is known that unentangled sequential strategies can achieve the same Heisenberg scaling of entangled strategies and that external ancillas are useless. This changes in the presence of noise; here we prove that entangled strategies can have higher precision than unentangled ones and that the addition of passive external ancillas can also increase the precision. We analyze some specific noise models and use the results to conjecture a general hierarchy for quantum metrology strategies in the presence of noise.

  18. Aviation Noise Impacts: State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Clark, Charlotte; Hansell, Anna; Hileman, James I.; Janssen, Sabine; Shepherd, Kevin; Sparrow, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Noise is defined as “unwanted sound.” Aircraft noise is one, if not the most detrimental environmental effect of aviation. It can cause community annoyance, disrupt sleep, adversely affect academic performance of children, and could increase the risk for cardiovascular disease of people living in the vicinity of airports. In some airports, noise constrains air traffic growth. This consensus paper was prepared by the Impacts of Science Group of the Committee for Aviation Environmental Protection of the International Civil Aviation Organization and summarizes the state of the science of noise effects research in the areas of noise measurement and prediction, community annoyance, children’s learning, sleep disturbance, and health. It also briefly discusses civilian supersonic aircraft as a future source of aviation noise.

  19. Noise in Advanced Electronic Devices and Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, M. Jamal; Marinov, O.

    2005-08-01

    State-of-the-art low-frequency and high-frequency noise performance and modeling in modern semiconductor devices and circuits are discussed. The increase of noise-to-DC current ratio may compromise the circuit applications in near future. The low-frequency noise (LFN) tends to a log-normal distribution. Since the random-telegraph-signal (RTS) noise is pronounced in submicron devices, then new techniques being used to characterize of multilevel RTS are discussed. High-frequency noise modeling and sample experimental results are presented, including the important effect of gate-tunneling current for future devices. For the RF circuits, we discuss the phase noise in voltage-controlled oscillators (VCO) based on ring oscillators and LC-tank VCOs with and without automatic amplitude control. Finally, the effects of hot-carrier stress on the performance of a VCO is presented and discussed.

  20. Adaptive Noise Reduction System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Ropuš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is an all-present environment pollutant, considered to be one of the greatest contemporary pollutants. World-wide, co-ordinated actions are conducted in order to develop systems which minimise the noise influence onto society.In this article we argue that novel approach to suppression of influence of noise is useful. Furthermore, we argue that the efficient approach is formulation of the efficient, broadly applicable, ubiquituous, adaptive noise-protection system. The approach combines the natural noise-protection form based on plants with the artificially formed coatings.Elements of the system are discussed, its formation and maintenance analysed and perspectives conjectured.

  1. Vienna international airport noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidelinde Jelinek-Nigitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: On the topic of sustainable aviation a study was carried out to measure the difference between the actual change in air traffic noise and the airport’s residents’ perception of the noise change at Vienna International Airport. Therefore, a questionnaire was developed in cooperation with the airport and an online survey was conducted. Design/methodology/approach: For the survey of the opinion of the affected population of the surrounding communities, a web based online questionnaire is created and distributed via various channels including e-mail, and online forums. After the basic structure of the questionnaire had been defined, the questions were developed in cooperation with employees form the environmental department of VIE, who had a sustainable influence on the questions’ order and formulation. As the survey was supposed to be answered by residents around VIE. Findings: Results of the online study show that only parts of the participants are affected by air traffic noise at VIE. Even less experienced a significant change over the last five years. About one third of the participants stated that they are affected by air traffic noise in one way or another. The majority of these people live in Lower Austria, the federal state in which the airport is located. The participants obviously judge air traffic noise during day time more importantly than air traffic noise at night. Research limitations/implications: Due to the low number of returns, no statistically relevant conclusions can be drawn, the results of the survey can be used to make some general statements. Originality/value: Economic growth and deregulation lead to growing aircraft operations. Vienna International Airport with its approximately 260,000 flight movements per year is the biggest airport in Austria and a major hub in Europe. The combination of constantly growing air transport and the resulting noise exposure, as well as the steadily increasing

  2. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...

  3. Research on Emerging and Descending Aircraft Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bartkevičiūtė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Along with an increase in the aircraft engine power and growth in air traffic, noise level at airports and their surrounding environs significantly increases. Aircraft noise is high level noise spreading within large radius and intensively irritating the human body. Air transport is one of the main sources of noise having a particularly strong negative impact on the environment. The article deals with activities and noises taking place in the largest nationwide Vilnius International Airport.The level of noise and its dispersion was evaluated conducting research on the noise generated by emerging and descending aircrafts in National Vilnius Airport. Investigation was carried out at 2 measuring points located in a residential area. There are different types of aircrafts causing different sound levels. It has been estimated the largest exceedances that occur when an aircraft is approaching. In this case, the noisiest types of aircrafts are B733, B738 and AT72. The sound level varies from 70 to 85 dBA. The quietest aircrafts are RJ1H and F70. When taking off, the equivalent of the maximum sound level value of these aircrafts does not exceed the authorized limits. The paper describes the causes of noise in aircrafts, the sources of origin and the impact of noise on humans and the environment.Article in Lithuanian

  4. Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    the E-field and tunneling at the source- pocket junction you form a parasitic NPN + transistor and the injection mechanism of carriers into the...hypothesis that the 1000 ° C, 5s anneal split lead to a very wide pocket and the accidental formation of a NPN + transistor , while the 1000 ° C, 1s anneal...Low Power Band to Band Tunnel Transistors Anupama Bowonder Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley

  5. Noise Reduction in the SSNPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M.; Roquemore, L.; Darrow, D.; Liu, D.

    2004-11-01

    A solid-state neutral particle analyzer (SSNPA) is being used to detect the escape of neutral particles on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The SSNPA has four channels, which view the horizontal midplane of NSTX. The output amplitude of the SSNPA is proportional to radiation energy. Neutral particles with energies up to 100 keV will be observed. The SSNPA is used to link changes in neutral particle flux with plasma events. The noise level associated with standard NIM electronics prevents this. Two solutions are proposed to fix this problem: 1) Increase the signal to noise ratio (S/N) in the system or 2) Ultra-fast digitization (UFD) of the signal. New electronics are being tested to increase the S/N. A close-coupled preamp/amplifier increase the gain by ˜1000, which increases the signal before noise is introduced. Ground loop problems are also being addressed. This system is presently being tested on NSTX. With UFD, the preamplifier will be connected to the digitizer and post-shot analysis will separate the signal from the noise using of PHA software. The above solutions will be discussed.

  6. Low-noise amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Gulkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of signal and noise processing device is considered in this article. It contains two channels: the main channel (MC contains the mixture of signal and noise, and compensation channel (CC that extracts just a noise from the mixture. The feature of the processing circuit is that the mixture samples are formed by short impulses at the moments of passing signal through zero. Further antiphase noise is set in the channels, adder by which the noise is removed from mixture is set on the cannels output. Study of the described device was carried out for simulated AM signal and white Gaussian noise in simulation environment Matlab. The results are shown, that device reduces noise by 16 dB of power.

  7. Stochastic noise in splicing machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Melamud, Eugene; Moult, John

    2009-01-01

    The number of known alternative human isoforms has been increasing steadily with the amount of available transcription data. To date, over 100 000 isoforms have been detected in EST libraries, and at least 75% of human genes have at least one alternative isoform. In this paper, we propose that most alternative splicing events are the result of noise in the splicing process. We show that the number of isoforms and their abundance can be predicted by a simple stochastic noise model that takes i...

  8. The Hannover thermal noise experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhardt, V; Ribichini, L; Lueck, H; Danzmann, K [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute) and University of Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2004-03-07

    To analyse the thermal noise of the pendulum mode of a suspended mirror, we interferometrically detect the differential movement of two mirrors suspended as multiple-stage pendulums. We present the set-up of this experiment and the current sensitivity, and also the different steps that we took in the past to increase the sensitivity, which include an auto alignment of the laser beam into the resonator eigenmode, changes of the seismic isolation system to more damping stages and higher moments of inertia and an intensive noise hunting.

  9. Noise from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Sciences

    2002-02-01

    A rapid growth of installed wind power capacity is expected in the next few years. However, the siting of wind turbines on a large scale raises concerns about their environmental impact, notably with respect to noise. To this end, variable speed wind turbines offer a promising solution for applications in densely populated areas like the European countries, as this design would enable an efficient utilisation of the masking effect due to ambient noise. In rural and recreational areas where wind turbines are sited, the ambient noise originates from the action of wind on the vegetation and about the listener's ear (pseudo-noise). It shows a wind speed dependence similar to that of the noise from a variable speed wind turbine and can therefore mask the latter for a wide range of conditions. However, a problem inherent to the design of these machines is their proclivity to pure tone generation, because of the enhanced difficulty of avoiding structural resonances in the mechanical parts. Pure tones are deemed highly annoying and are severely regulated by most noise policies. In relation to this problem, the vibration transmission of structure-borne sound to the tower of the turbine is investigated, in particular when the tower is stiffened at its upper end. Furthermore, since noise annoyance due to wind turbine is mostly a masking issue, the wind-related sources of ambient noise are studied and their masking potentials assessed. With this aim, prediction models for wind-induced vegetation noise and pseudo-noise have been developed. Finally, closely related to the effect of masking, is the difficulty, regularly encountered by local authorities and wind farm developers, to measure noise immission from wind turbines. A new measurement technique has thus been developed in the course of this work. Through improving the signal-to-noise ratio between wind turbine noise and ambient noise, the new technique yields more accurate measurement results.

  10. Single-station monitoring of volcanoes using seismic ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plaen, Raphael S. M.; Lecocq, Thomas; Caudron, Corentin; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Francis, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Seismic ambient noise cross correlation is increasingly used to monitor volcanic activity. However, this method is usually limited to volcanoes equipped with large and dense networks of broadband stations. The single-station approach may provide a powerful and reliable alternative to the classical "cross-station" approach when measuring variation of seismic velocities. We implemented it on the Piton de la Fournaise in Reunion Island, a very active volcano with a remarkable multidisciplinary continuous monitoring. Over the past decade, this volcano has been increasingly studied using the traditional cross-correlation technique and therefore represents a unique laboratory to validate our approach. Our results, tested on stations located up to 3.5 km from the eruptive site, performed as well as the classical approach to detect the volcanic eruption in the 1-2 Hz frequency band. This opens new perspectives to successfully forecast volcanic activity at volcanoes equipped with a single three-component seismometer.

  11. Correlations in a Band Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentef, Michael; Kunes, Jan; Kampf, Arno P.; Werner, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Using DMFT we find a discontinuous band-to-Mott insulator transition upon an increase in the local Coulomb repulsion in a covalent band insulator [1,2], defined as a band insulator with partially filled local orbitals. The corresponding band gap is a hybridization gap arising from a particular pattern of hopping integrals. Similar characteristics apply to materials such as FeSi, FeSb2 or CoTiSb [3], some of which exhibit temperature dependent magnetic and transport properties reminiscent of Kondo insulators. Both charge and spin gaps in the covalent band insulator shrink with increasing Coulomb repulsion. At moderate interaction strengths the gap renormalization is well described by a renormalization factor analogous to the quasiparticle weight in a Fermi liquid. [4pt] [1] M. Sentef, J. Kunes, P. Werner, and A.P. Kampf, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155116 (2009) [0pt] [2] A.P. Kampf, M. Kollar, J. Kunes, M. Sentef, and D. Vollhardt, arXiv:0910.5126

  12. Intelligibility of speech in noise at high presentation levels: effects of hearing loss and frequency region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Van; Cord, Mary T

    2007-08-01

    These experiments examined how high presentation levels influence speech recognition for high- and low-frequency stimuli in noise. Normally hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners were tested. In Experiment 1, high- and low-frequency bandwidths yielding 70%-correct word recognition in quiet were determined at levels associated with broadband speech at 75 dB SPL. In Experiment 2, broadband and band-limited sentences (based on passbands measured in Experiment 1) were presented at this level in speech-shaped noise filtered to the same frequency bandwidths as targets. Noise levels were adjusted to produce approximately 30%-correct word recognition. Frequency bandwidths and signal-to-noise ratios supporting criterion performance in Experiment 2 were tested at 75, 87.5, and 100 dB SPL in Experiment 3. Performance tended to decrease as levels increased. For NH listeners, this "rollover" effect was greater for high-frequency and broadband materials than for low-frequency stimuli. For HI listeners, the 75- to 87.5-dB increase improved signal audibility for high-frequency stimuli and rollover was not observed. However, the 87.5- to 100-dB increase produced qualitatively similar results for both groups: scores decreased most for high-frequency stimuli and least for low-frequency materials. Predictions of speech intelligibility by quantitative methods such as the Speech Intelligibility Index may be improved if rollover effects are modeled as frequency dependent.

  13. Pre-Launch Noise Characterization of the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM Plus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedelty, J. A.; Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.; Seiferth, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    A noise characterization of the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument was performed as part of a near-real time performance assessment and health monitoring program. Perl'ormance data for the integrated Landsat-7 spacecraft and ETM+ were collected before, during, and after the spacecraft thermal vacuum testing program at the Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (LMMS) facilities in Valley Forge, PA. The Landsat-7 spacecraft and ETM+ instrument were successfully launched on April 15, 1999. The spacecraft and ETM+ are now nearing the end of the on orbit engineering checkout phase, and Landsat-7 is expected to be declared operational on or about July 15, 1999. A preliminary post-launch noise characterization was performed and compared with the pre-launch characterization. In general the overall noise levels in the ETM+ are at or below the specification levels. Coherent noise is seen in most bands, but is only operationally significant when imaging in (he panchromatic band (band 8). This coherent noise has an amplitude as high as approximately 3 DN (peak-to-peak, high gain) at the Nyquist rate of 104 kHz, and causes the noise levels in panchromatic band images at times to exceed the total noise specification by up to approximately 10%. However, this 104 kHz noise is now much weaker than it was prior to the successful repair of the ETM+ power supplies that was completed in May 1998. Weak and stable coherent noise at approximately 5 kHz is seen in all bands in the prime focal plane (bands 1-4 and 8) with the prime (side A) electronics. Very strong coherent noise at approximately 20 kHz is seen in a few detectors of bands 1 and 8, but this noise is almost entirely in the turn-around region between scans when the ETM+ is not imaging the Earth. Strong coherent noise was seen in 2 detectors of band 5 during some of the pre-launch testing; however, this noise seems to be temperature dependent, and has not been seen in the current on orbit environment. Strong

  14. Hybrid Analysis of Engine Core Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Core noise, or the noise generated within an aircraft engine, is becoming an increasing concern for the aviation industry as other noise sources are progressively reduced. The prediction of core noise generation and propagation is especially challenging for computationalists since it involves extensive multiphysics including chemical reaction and moving blades in addition to the aerothermochemical effects of heated jets. In this work, a representative engine flow path is constructed using experimentally verified geometries to simulate the physics of core noise. A combustor, single-stage turbine, nozzle and jet are modeled in separate calculations using appropriate high fidelity techniques including LES, actuator disk theory and Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings surfaces. A one way coupling procedure is developed for passing fluctuations downstream through the flowpath. This method effectively isolates the core noise from other acoustic sources, enables straightforward study of the interaction between core noise and jet exhaust, and allows for simple distinction between direct and indirect noise. The impact of core noise on the farfield jet acoustics is studied extensively and the relative efficiency of different disturbance types and shapes is examined in detail.

  15. Pump Cavitation Noise Estimation from Acceleration Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Hwan; Ha, Che Woong [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The cavitation noise can be measured directly by using pressure sensing devices. However, penetration of pipes or pump casings is inevitable to install the devices. This increases the risk of leaks. In an effort to reduce that risk, a cavitation noise estimation model based on vibration signals has been proposed. In the present study, the applicability of cavitation noise estimation methods including the previously proposed model is investigated. In order to assess the severity of cavitation, the cavitation noise estimation is necessary. In the present study, the cavitation noise is estimated by using acceleration signals measured outside of pumps and the theory of the statistical energy analysis. The applicability and limit of the cavitation noise estimation from the acceleration signals are examined by comparing the cavitation noise obtained from the pressure signal. The results suggest that the acoustic cavitation inception can be detected by the cavitation noise estimation from acceleration signals. The accuracy of the cavitation noise estimates is highly dependent on the locations of the pump casing that accelerometers attached on and the cut-off frequency of high pass filtering.

  16. Charge Noise in Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Ralph L.; Thodkar, Kishan; Sessolo, Michele; Bolink, Henk J.; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are increasingly studied as transducers in sensing applications. While much emphasis has been placed on analyzing and maximizing the OECT signal, noise has been mostly ignored, although it determines the resolution of the sensor. The major contribution to the noise in sensing devices is the 1 /f noise, dominant at low frequency. In this work, we demonstrate that the 1 /f noise in OECTs follows a charge-noise model, which reveals that the noise is due to charge fluctuations in proximity or within the bulk of the channel material. We present the noise scaling behavior with gate voltage, channel dimensions, and polymer thickness. Our results suggest the use of large area channels in order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for biochemical and electrostatic sensing applications. A comparison with the literature shows that the magnitude of the noise in OECTs is similar to that observed in graphene transistors, and only slightly higher than that found in carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowire devices. In a model ion-sensing experiment with OECTs, we estimate crucial parameters such as the characteristic SNR and the corresponding limit of detection.

  17. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    sawmill noise on the metropolis was developed. the metropolis was ... INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION ... auditory fatigue and hearing loss, and indirect n auditory effects such as speech interfere annoyance .... acoustic environment for workers [29]. In particular, ..... and corn mills”, African Journal of Health Science,. Vol.

  18. Variability in ambient noise levels and call parameters of North Atlantic right whales in three habitat areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan E; Urazghildiiev, Ildar; Clark, Christopher W

    2009-02-01

    The North Atlantic right whale inhabits the coastal waters off the east coasts of the United States and Canada, areas characterized by high levels of shipping and fishing activities. Acoustic communication plays an important role in the social behavior of these whales and increases in low-frequency noise may be leading to changes in their calling behavior. This study characterizes the ambient noise levels, including both natural and anthropogenic sources, and right whale upcall parameters in three right whale habitat areas. Continuous recordings were made seasonally using autonomous bottom-mounted recorders in the Bay of Fundy, Canada (2004, 2005), Cape Cod Bay, (2005, 2006), and off the coast of Georgia (2004-2005, 2006-2007). Consistent interannual trends in noise parameters were found for each habitat area, with both the band level and spectrum level measurements higher in the Bay of Fundy than in the other areas. Measured call parameters varied between habitats and between years within the same habitat area, indicating that habitat area and noise levels alone are not sufficient to predict variability in call parameters. These results suggest that right whales may be responding to the peak frequency of noise, rather than the absolute noise level in their environment.

  19. Design and optimization of a noise reduction system for infrasonic measurements using elements with low acoustic impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro, Benoit; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2005-04-01

    The implementation of the infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the enforcement of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) increases the effort in the design of suitable noise reducer systems. In this paper we present a new design consisting of low impedance elements. The dimensioning and the optimization of this discrete mechanical system are based on numerical simulations, including a complete electroacoustical modeling and a realistic wind-noise model. The frequency response and the noise reduction obtained for a given wind speed are compared to statistical noise measurements in the [0.02-4] Hz frequency band. The effects of the constructive parameters-the length of the pipes, inner diameters, summing volume, and number of air inlets-are investigated through a parametric study. The studied system consists of 32 air inlets distributed along an overall diameter of 16 m. Its frequency response is flat up to 4 Hz. For a 2 m/s wind speed, the maximal noise reduction obtained is 15 dB between 0.5 and 4 Hz. At lower frequencies, the noise reduction is improved by the use of a system of larger diameter. The main drawback is the high-frequency limitation introduced by acoustical resonances inside the pipes.

  20. Determination of noise pollution propagated from agricultural tractors and its driver’s noise exposure level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of agricultural machineries such as tractor has been yielded a considerable development in different agricultural activities and productions. However, noticeable health problems such as noise pollution impact the users of these off-road vehicles. The purpose of this study was to determine the noise level induced by agricultural tractors and to evaluate the driver’s noise exposure level. .Material and Method: The sound pressure levels of three brands of tractor include John Deere, Ferguson and Romani were measured by sound level meter model Tes-1358. The characteristics of place for measuring tractors noise pollution were determined based on the ISO standard No 7216, 5131. The acquired data was analyzed using spss16 software. .Result: The results showed that the highest and the lowest noise level around the tractors were 83.8 dB (A and 73.9 dB (A for the John Deere and Romani, respectively. The effect of different transmission gears on the noise level of tractors was not statistically significant Pvalue>0.05. While, the effect of the tractor engine speeds on the noise level was statistically significant Pvalue<0.01. The exposure time of the most of drivers was frequently about 8 hour or more In this regards, the exposure levels of the tractor’s drivers to noise measured between 85-90 dB (A were higher than the Iranian occupational exposure limit (85 dB (A.Moreover, mean noise reduction rate of exsisting room which was used upon the typical tractor’s body was 9.5 dB in one octave band. .Conclusion: Application of standard cockpit and expansion mufflers can effectively reduce noise pollution emission and driver’s occupational exposure. Moreover, regular preventive maintenance and effective hearing conservation program including annual audiometry, hearing protection device, occupational health training for drivers must be implemented.

  1. Metaphyseal bands in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta are undergoing pamidronate therapy to prevent the incidence of fragility fractures. The authors herein report a child aged 3 years who received five cycles of pamidronate, resulting in metaphyseal bands, known as "zebra lines."

  2. Ka- and W-band PM-HFET DRO's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, J.; Guettich, U.

    1993-06-01

    Dielectric resonator stabilized oscillators have been designed, fabricated, and investigated. The oscillators consist of microstrip matching and biasing circuits on alumina substrate, a dielectric resonator puck, and a low-noise quarter-micron InGaAs-GaAs pseudomorphic (PM) HFET as the active device. At 37 GHz and 81 GHz, output powers of 10 dBm and 0 dBm have been measured. The phase noise of the Ka-band and W-band oscillators has been determined to be -97 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz and -90 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz off carrier, respectively.

  3. Noise pollution has limited effects on nocturnal vigilance in peahens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Fredrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Natural environments are increasingly exposed to high levels of noise pollution. Noise pollution can alter the behavior of animals but we know little about its effects on antipredator behavior. We therefore investigated the impact of noise pollution on vigilance behavior and roost selection in an avian species, peafowl (Pavo cristatus), that inhabits urban environments. Captive peahens were exposed to noise pollution at night and their vigilance levels and roost selections were monitored. The vigilance levels of peahens were unaffected by exposure to noise pollution within trials. Furthermore, the peahens exhibited no preference for roosting farther or closer to noise pollution. Interestingly, predators often avoided the experimental area during nights with noise pollution, which could explain why vigilance rates were higher overall during control compared to noise trials. The results suggest that peahens’ perception of risk is not drastically impacted by noise pollution but longer-term studies will be necessary to assess any chronic effects. PMID:27703863

  4. Adaptive noise cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, N

    1999-01-01

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique.

  5. Noise as a Health Hazard for Children, Time to Make a Noise about it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Neha; Batra, Prerna; Gupta, Piyush

    2016-02-01

    Noise, a modern day curse of advancing infrastructure and technology, has emerged as an important public health problem. Exposure to noise during pregnancy may result in high-frequency hearing loss in newborns, growth retardation, cochlear damage, prematurity and birth defects. Newborns exposed to sound above 45 decibels may experience increase in blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate; decreased oxygen saturation; and increased caloric consumption. Noise exposure in older children may result in learning disabilities, attention difficulties, insulin resistance, hypertension, stress ulcers and cardiovascular diseases. Sudden exposure to loud noise can lead to rupture of eardrum. The damaging effects of noise pollution are more noticeable in large metropolitan cities, the hubs of urban settlements and industrial growth. Another concern is noise pollution inside the hospitals (particularly intensive care areas) that can lead to serious health consequences both for caregivers and for children. The issue needs to be addressed by both researchers and policy makers on an urgent basis.

  6. Self-reported sleep disturbances due to railway noise: exposure-response relationships for nighttime equivalent and maximum noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Moum, Torbjorn; Engdahl, Bo

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study self-reported sleep disturbances due to railway noise with respect to nighttime equivalent noise level (L(p,A,eq,night)) and maximum noise level (L(p,A,max)). A sample of 1349 people in and around Oslo in Norway exposed to railway noise was studied in a cross-sectional survey to obtain data on sleep disturbances, sleep problems due to noise, and personal characteristics including noise sensitivity. Individual noise exposure levels were determined outside of the bedroom facade, the most-exposed facade, and inside the respondents' bedrooms. The exposure-response relationships were analyzed by using logistic regression models, controlling for possible modifying factors including the number of noise events (train pass-by frequency). L(p,A,eq,night) and L(p,A,max) were significantly correlated, and the proportion of reported noise-induced sleep problems increased as both L(p,A,eq,night) and L(p,A,max) increased. Noise sensitivity, type of bedroom window, and pass-by frequency were significant factors affecting noise-induced sleep disturbances, in addition to the noise exposure level. Because about half of the study population did not use a bedroom at the most-exposed side of the house, the exposure-response curve obtained by using noise levels for the most-exposed facade underestimated noise-induced sleep disturbance for those who actually have their bedroom at the most-exposed facade.

  7. Noise optimization of the source follower of a CMOS pixel using BSIM3 noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Swaraj; Meynants, Guy; Raskin, Gert; De Ridder, J.; Van Winckel, H.

    2016-07-01

    CMOS imagers are becoming increasingly popular in astronomy. A very low noise level is required to observe extremely faint targets and to get high-precision flux measurements. Although CMOS technology offers many advantages over CCDs, a major bottleneck is still the read noise. To move from an industrial CMOS sensor to one suitable for scientific applications, an improved design that optimizes the noise level is essential. Here, we study the 1/f and thermal noise performance of the source follower (SF) of a CMOS pixel in detail. We identify the relevant design parameters, and analytically study their impact on the noise level using the BSIM3v3 noise model with an enhanced model of gate capacitance. Our detailed analysis shows that the dependence of the 1/f noise on the geometrical size of the source follower is not limited to minimum channel length, compared to the classical approach to achieve the minimum 1/f noise. We derive the optimal gate dimensions (the width and the length) of the source follower that minimize the 1/f noise, and validate our results using numerical simulations. By considering the thermal noise or white noise along with 1/f noise, the total input noise of the source follower depends on the capacitor ratio CG/CFD and the drain current (Id). Here, CG is the total gate capacitance of the source follower and CFD is the total floating diffusion capacitor at the input of the source follower. We demonstrate that the optimum gate capacitance (CG) depends on the chosen bias current but ranges from CFD/3 to CFD to achieve the minimum total noise of the source follower. Numerical calculation and circuit simulation with 180nm CMOS technology are performed to validate our results.

  8. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  9. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the inte...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  10. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...... to lighting conditions. Results show that the localisation accuracy of facial features is considerably increased using this appearance representation under diffuse and directional lighting and at multiple scales....

  11. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  12. The 30 GHz communications satellite low noise receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffek, L. J.; Smith, D. W.

    1983-10-01

    A Ka-band low noise front end in proof of concept (POC) model form for ultimate spaceborne communications receiver deployment was developed. The low noise receiver consists of a 27.5 to 30.0 GHz image enhanced mixer integrated with a 3.7 to 6.2 GHz FET low noise IF amplifier and driven by a self contained 23.8 GHz phase locked local oscillator source. The measured level of receiver performance over the 27.3 to 30.0 GHz RF/3.7 to 6.2 GHz IF band includes 5.5 to 6.5 dB (typ) SSB noise figure, 20.5 + or - 1.5 dB conversion gain and +23 dBm minimum third order two tone intermodulation output intercept point.

  13. Internal noise estimates correlate with autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilidaite, Greta; Yu, Miaomiao; Baker, Daniel H

    2017-08-01

    Previous neuroimaging research has reported increased internal (neural) noise in sensory systems of autistic individuals. However, it is unclear if this difference has behavioural or perceptual consequences, as previous attempts at measuring internal noise in ASD psychophysically have been indirect. Here, we use a "gold standard" psychophysical double-pass paradigm to investigate the relationship between internal noise and autistic traits in the neurotypical population (n = 43). We measured internal noise in three tasks (contrast perception, facial expression intensity perception, and number summation) to estimate a global internal noise factor using principal components analysis. This global internal noise was positively correlated with autistic traits (rs  = 0.32, P = 0.035). This suggests that increased internal noise is associated with the ASD phenotype even in subclinical populations. The finding is discussed in relation to the neural and genetic basis of internal noise in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1384-1391. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ka Band Phase Locked Loop Oscillator Dielectric Resonator Oscillator for Satellite EHF Band Receiver

    OpenAIRE

    Coco, S; Di Maggio, F.; A. Laudani; I. Pomona

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Ka Band PLL DRO having a fundamental oscillation frequency of 19.250 GHz, used as local oscillator in the low-noise block of a down converter (LNB) for an EHF band receiver. Apposite circuital models have been created to describe the behaviour of the dielectric resonator and of the active component used in the oscillator core. The DRO characterization and measurements have shown very good agreement with simulation results. A good phase nois...

  15. Spin-noise correlations and spin-noise exchange driven by low-field spin-exchange collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellis, A. T.; Loulakis, M.; Kominis, I. K.

    2014-09-01

    The physics of spin-exchange collisions have fueled several discoveries in fundamental physics and numerous applications in medical imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance. We report on the experimental observation and theoretical justification of spin-noise exchange, the transfer of spin noise from one atomic species to another. The signature of spin-noise exchange is an increase of the total spin-noise power at low magnetic fields, on the order of 1 mG, where the two-species spin-noise resonances overlap. The underlying physical mechanism is the two-species spin-noise correlation induced by spin-exchange collisions.

  16. BayesLine: Bayesian Inference for Spectral Estimation of Gravitational Wave Detector Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Littenberg, Tyson B

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational wave data from ground-based detectors is dominated by instrument noise. Signals will be comparatively weak, and our understanding of the noise will influence detection confidence and signal characterization. Mis-modeled noise can produce large systematic biases in both model selection and parameter estimation. Here we introduce a multi-component, variable dimension, parameterized model to describe the Gaussian-noise power spectrum for data from ground-based gravitational wave interferometers. Called BayesLine, the algorithm models the noise power spectral density using cubic splines for smoothly varying broad-band noise and Lorentzians for narrow-band line features in the spectrum. We describe the algorithm and demonstrate its performance on data from the fifth and sixth LIGO science runs. Once fully integrated into LIGO/Virgo data analysis software, BayesLine will produce accurate spectral estimation and provide a means for marginalizing inferences drawn from the data over all plausible noise s...

  17. Near noise field characteristics of Nike rocket motors for application to space vehicle payload acoustic qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. A.; Bruton, D.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a series of noise measurements that were made under controlled conditions during the static firing of two Nike solid propellant rocket motors are presented. The usefulness of these motors as sources for general spacecraft noise testing was assessed, and the noise expected in the cargo bay of the orbiter was reproduced. Brief descriptions of the Nike motor, the general procedures utilized for the noise tests, and representative noise data including overall sound pressure levels, one third octave band spectra, and octave band spectra were reviewed. Data are presented on two motors of different ages in order to show the similarity between noise measurements made on motors having different loading dates. The measured noise from these tests is then compared to that estimated for the space shuttle orbiter cargo bay.

  18. Experimental Results of the Sensitivity of a Low Noise Aperture Array Tile for the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Woestenburg, E E M; Ivashina, M V

    2011-01-01

    Aperture arrays have been studied extensively for application in the next generation of large radio telescopes for astronomy, requiring extremely low noise performance. Prototype array systems need to demonstrate the low noise potential of aperture array technology. This paper presents noise measurements for an Aperture Array tile of 144 dual-polarized tapered slot antenna (TSA) elements, originally built and characterized for use as a Phased Array Feed for application in an L-band radio astronomical receiving system. The system noise budget is given and the dependency of the measured noise temperatures on the beam steering is discussed. A comparison is made of the measurement results with simulations of the noise behavior using a system noise model. This model includes the effect of receiver noise coupling, resulting from a changing active reflection coefficient and array noise contribution as a function of beam steering. Measurement results clearly demonstrate the validity of the model and thus the concept ...

  19. The influences of low frequency noise on mental performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hatami

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Although the evolution of industrial systems toward digital technologies decreased the exposure to high levels of noise, it has created some problems encountered with low level and provoking noise (low frequency noise. In the present work, the mental performance of students exposed to low frequency and reference noises at low and high levels (45 & 65 dB were studied. Additionally, other factors such as annoyance, sensitivity to low frequency noise and hearing status of participants were considered.Materials and Methods: After generating low frequency and reference noises required for the study, a pilot study was conducted. Then, 54 students participated in the main study after preliminary tests. Their mental performances were evaluated with standard psychological tests while they were exposed to low frequency and reference noises at 45 and 65 dBA.Results: The results showed that noise annoyance and low frequency noise sensitivity do not have a significant correlation with age and sex. The results also revealed that, low frequency noise at 65 dB can decrease concentration (P=0.003 and increase response time (P=0.039 of performance in comparison with low frequency noise at 45 dB. On the other hand, reference noise at 65 dB can increase speed (P<0.001 of performance in comparison with reference noise at 45 dB.Conclusion: Low frequency noise can reduce the mental performance and increase its response time.Key words: Low Frequency Noise, Reference Noise, Noise Annoyance, Mental PerformanceJ Mazand Univ Med Sci 2008; 18(63: 55-65(Persian

  20. Full-Band Quasi-Harmonic Analysis and Synthesis of Musical Instrument Sounds with Adaptive Sinusoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Caetano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sinusoids are widely used to represent the oscillatory modes of musical instrument sounds in both analysis and synthesis. However, musical instrument sounds feature transients and instrumental noise that are poorly modeled with quasi-stationary sinusoids, requiring spectral decomposition and further dedicated modeling. In this work, we propose a full-band representation that fits sinusoids across the entire spectrum. We use the extended adaptive Quasi-Harmonic Model (eaQHM to iteratively estimate amplitude- and frequency-modulated (AM–FM sinusoids able to capture challenging features such as sharp attacks, transients, and instrumental noise. We use the signal-to-reconstruction-error ratio (SRER as the objective measure for the analysis and synthesis of 89 musical instrument sounds from different instrumental families. We compare against quasi-stationary sinusoids and exponentially damped sinusoids. First, we show that the SRER increases with adaptation in eaQHM. Then, we show that full-band modeling with eaQHM captures partials at the higher frequency end of the spectrum that are neglected by spectral decomposition. Finally, we demonstrate that a frame size equal to three periods of the fundamental frequency results in the highest SRER with AM–FM sinusoids from eaQHM. A listening test confirmed that the musical instrument sounds resynthesized from full-band analysis with eaQHM are virtually perceptually indistinguishable from the original recordings.

  1. Time-shared channel identification for adaptive noise cancellation in breath sound extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng HAN; Hong WANG; Leyi WANG; Gang George YIN

    2004-01-01

    Noise artifacts are one of the key obstacles in applying continuous monitoring and computer-assisted analysis of lung sounds.Traditional adaptive noise cancellation (ANC) methodologies work reasonably well when signal and noise are stationary and independent.Clinical lung sound auscultation encounters an acoustic environment in which breath sounds are not stationary and often correlate with noise.Consequently,capability of ANC becomes significantly compromised.This paper introduces a new methodology for extracting authentic lung sounds from noise-corrupted measurements.Unlike traditional noise cancellation methods that rely on either frequency band separation or signal/noise independence to achieve noise reduction,this methodology combines the traditional noise canceling methods with the unique feature of time-split stages in breathing sounds.By employing a multi-sensor system,the method first employs a high-pass filter to eliminate the off-band noise,and then performs time-shared blind identification and noise cancellation with recursion from breathing cycle to cycle.Since no frequency separation or signal/noise independence is required,this method potentially has a robust and reliable capability of noise reduction,complementing the traditional methods.

  2. Out-of-band and adjacent-channel interference reduction by analog nonlinear filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Alexei V.; Davidchack, Ruslan L.; Smith, Jeffrey E.

    2015-12-01

    In a perfect world, we would have `brick wall' filters, no-distortion amplifiers and mixers, and well-coordinated spectrum operations. The real world, however, is prone to various types of unintentional and intentional interference of technogenic (man-made) origin that can disrupt critical communication systems. In this paper, we introduce a methodology for mitigating technogenic interference in communication channels by analog nonlinear filters, with an emphasis on the mitigation of out-of-band and adjacent-channel interference. Interference induced in a communications receiver by external transmitters can be viewed as wide-band non-Gaussian noise affecting a narrower-band signal of interest. This noise may contain a strong component within the receiver passband, which may dominate over the thermal noise. While the total wide-band interference seen by the receiver may or may not be impulsive, we demonstrate that the interfering component due to power emitted by the transmitter into the receiver channel is likely to appear impulsive under a wide range of conditions. We give an example of mechanisms of impulsive interference in digital communication systems resulting from the nonsmooth nature of any physically realizable modulation scheme for transmission of a digital (discontinuous) message. We show that impulsive interference can be effectively mitigated by nonlinear differential limiters (NDLs). An NDL can be configured to behave linearly when the input signal does not contain outliers. When outliers are encountered, the nonlinear response of the NDL limits the magnitude of the respective outliers in the output signal. The signal quality is improved in excess of that achievable by the respective linear filter, increasing the capacity of a communications channel. The behavior of an NDL, and its degree of nonlinearity, is controlled by a single parameter in a manner that enables significantly better overall suppression of the noise-containing impulsive components

  3. Noise and Health: How does noise affect us?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Noise annoyance is a primary indication that noise is a problem, and by itself noise annoyance means that the quality of life is adversely affected. Results from noise annoyance research are presented that make possible a detailed evaluation of noise exposures with respect to the annoyance induced.

  4. Diffusion of Active Particles Subject both to Additive and Multiplicative Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-Hua; YANG Ming; WU Da-Jin

    2011-01-01

    We consider a Langevin equation of active Brownian motion which contains a multiplicative as well as an additive noise term.We study the dependences of the effective diffusion coefficient Deff on both the additive and multiplicative noises.It is found that for fixed small additive noise intensity Deff varies non-monotonously with multiplicative noise intensity, with a minimum at a moderate value of multiplicative noise, and Deff increases monotonously, however, with the multiplicative noise intensity for relatively strong additive noise; for fixed multiplicative noise intensity Deff decreases with growing additive noise intensity until it approaches a constant.An explanation is also given of the different behavior of Deff as additive and multiplicative noises approach infinity,respectively.%@@ We consider a Langevin equation of active Brownian motion which contains a multiplicative as well as an additive noise term.We study the dependences of the effective diffusion coefficient Deff on both the additive and multiplicative noises.It is found that for fixed small additive noise intensity Deff varies non-monotonously with multiplicative noise intensity, with a minimum at a moderate value of multiplicative noise, and Deff increases monotonously, however, with the multiplicative noise intensity for relatively strong additive noise; for fixed multiplicative noise intensity Deff decreases with growing additive noise intensity until it approaches a constant.An explanation is also given of the different behavior of Deff as additive and multiplicative noises approach infinity, respectively.

  5. On the Analysis of Wind-Induced Noise in Seismological Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Friederike F.; Ritter, Joachim R. R.; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric processes, ranging from microscale turbulence to severe storms on the synoptic scale, impact the continuous ground motion of the earth and have the potential to induce strong broad-band noise in seismological recordings. We designed a target-oriented experiment to quantify the influence of wind on ground motion velocity in the Dead Sea valley. For the period from March 2014 to February 2015, a seismological array, consisting of 15 three-component short-period and broad-band stations, was operated near Madaba, Jordan, complemented by one meteorological tower providing synchronized, continuous three-component measurements of wind speed. Results reveal a pronounced, predominantly linear increase of the logarithmic power of ground motion velocity with rising mean horizontal wind speed at all recording stations. Measurements in rough, mountainous terrain further identify a strong dependency of wind-induced noise on surface characteristics, such as topography and, therefore, demonstrate the necessity to consider wind direction as well. To assess the noise level of seismological recordings with respect to a dynamically changing wind field, we develop a methodology to account for the dependency of power spectral density of ground motion velocity on wind speed and wind direction for long, statistically significant periods. We further introduce the quantitative measure of the ground motion susceptibility to estimate the vulnerability of seismological recordings to the presence of wind.

  6. Auditory and non-auditory effects of noise on health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basner, M.; Babisch, W.; Davis, A.; Brink, M.; Clark, C.; Janssen, S.A.; Stansfeld, S.

    2013-01-01

    Noise is pervasive in everyday life and can cause both auditory and non-auditory health eff ects. Noise-induced hearing loss remains highly prevalent in occupational settings, and is increasingly caused by social noise exposure (eg, through personal music players). Our understanding of molecular mec

  7. Characterization of ships as sources of underwater noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F.

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the possible impact of anthropogenic underwater noise on marine life [1]. One of the concerns is the increasing contribution of shipping noise, with the growing number and size of commercial ships. Traditionally, underwater radiated noise control was only of interest f

  8. Auditory and non-auditory effects of noise on health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basner, M.; Babisch, W.; Davis, A.; Brink, M.; Clark, C.; Janssen, S.A.; Stansfeld, S.

    2013-01-01

    Noise is pervasive in everyday life and can cause both auditory and non-auditory health eff ects. Noise-induced hearing loss remains highly prevalent in occupational settings, and is increasingly caused by social noise exposure (eg, through personal music players). Our understanding of molecular

  9. The role of noise sensitivity in the noise-response relation: A comparison of three international airport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kamp, Irene; Job, R. F. Soames; Hatfield, Julie; Haines, Mary; Stellato, Rebecca K.; Stansfeld, Stephen A.

    2004-12-01

    In order to examine the role of noise sensitivity in response to environmental noise, this paper presents detailed comparisons of socio-acoustic studies conducted around international airports in Amsterdam, Sydney, and London. Earlier findings that noise sensitivity moderates the effect of noise on annoyance were examined to see if they could be replicated in each of the datasets, independent of the technique of measuring noise sensitivity. The relation between exposure to aircraft noise and noise annoyance was studied separately for groups of individuals with low, medium, and high noise sensitivity, with statistical adjustment for relevant confounders. Results support the previous findings that noise sensitivity is an independent predictor of annoyance and adds to the prediction of noise annoyance afforded by noise exposure level by up to 26% of explained variance. There is no evidence of a moderating effect, whereby the covariation between noise exposure level and annoyance is weak for people who score at the extreme high or low end of the sensitivity scale, and strong for people who score in the middle of the sensitivity scale. Generally, noise sensitivity appears to increase annoyance independently of the level of noise exposure after adjustment for relevant confounders. These findings were consistent across the three datasets. .

  10. Mediality is Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    This PhD is concerned with the use of noise as a material within media arts practice, especially in ‘post-digital’ contexts such as glitch electronica, glitch art and uses of old media. It examines the relationship between informational culture and noise, exploring the ways in which the structuring...

  11. Sounding Off about Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpton, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise in a community college library can be part of the nature of the environment. It can also become a huge distraction for those who see the library as their sanctuary for quiet study and review of resources. This article describes the steps that should be taken by library staff in order to be proactive about noise and the library environment,…

  12. Effects of traffic noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlob, D.

    1986-02-01

    One of the main sources of noise is road traffic. In 1984 there were over 25 million cars, 1.2 million lorries, 1.3 million motor cycles and 1.6 million mopeds using our roads. Opinion polls showed that 21% of the population felt that they were affected by traffic noise as a nuisance factor. An outline of the effects of this noise on the affected population is given, illustrated by diagrams. Details about noise emissions (drive-past level) of the different types of vehicles in city traffic are stated and the effects of noise described. The author goes into the nuisance effect (noise is not a physical factor, but a psychosocial one), changes in behaviour (ways of speaking, reduction of stress on households in proportion to rising income and higher educational levels) and the consequences for health (the reaction of the body to noise is primarily a consequence of the psychosomatic organisation of ow bodies). In conclusion, the author deals with the subjective efficiency of noise protection measures. (HWJ).

  13. Speech communications in noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  14. Asymmetric localization in disordered Landau bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nita, M [Institute of Physics and Technology of Materials, PO Box MG7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Aldea, A [Institute of Physics and Technology of Materials, PO Box MG7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Zittartz, J [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Cologne University, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2007-06-06

    We show that, due to band mixing, the eigenstate localization within the disordered Landau bands gets an asymmetric structure: the degree of localization increases in the lower part of the band and decreases in the upper one. The calculation is performed for a two-dimensional lattice with the Anderson disorder potential and we prove that this effect is related to the upper shift of the extended states within the band and is enhanced by the disorder strength. The asymmetric localization and the energy shift disappear when the interband coupling is switched off.

  15. Noise controlled pattern for- mation in subexcitable media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The numerical simulation on a reaction-diffu- sion system indicates that different patterns can be obtained by tuning the strength of parameter noise in subexcitable media. With the increase of noise intensity, the waves sustained by noise are not broken up as usual, they evolve orderly, and the period of the waves decreases, the survival time of waves varies. The time interval of inputting noise also influences the process of pattern formation and the survival time of waves.

  16. Shot noise in radiobiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datesman, A

    2016-11-01

    As a model for human tissue, this report considers the rate of free radical generation in a dilute solution of water in which a beta-emitting radionuclide is uniformly dispersed. Each decay dissipates a discrete quantity of energy, creating a large number of free radicals in a short time within a small volume determined by the beta particle range. Representing the instantaneous dissipated power as a train of randomly-spaced pulses, the time-averaged dissipated power p¯ and rate of free radical generation g¯ are derived. The analogous result in the theory of electrical circuits is known as the shot noise theorem. The reference dose of X-rays Dref producing an identical rate of free radical generation and level of oxidative stress is shown a) to increase with the square root of the absorbed dose, D, and b) to be far larger than D. This finding may have important consequences for public health in cases where the level of shot noise exceeds some noise floor corresponding to equilibrium biological processes. An estimate of this noise floor is made using the example of potassium-40, a beta-emitting radioisotope universally present in living tissue.

  17. Noise in Coevolving Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonova, Marina; Miguel, Maxi San

    2014-01-01

    Coupling dynamics of the states of the nodes of a network to the dynamics of the network topology leads to generic absorbing and fragmentation transitions. The coevolving voter model is a typical system that exhibits such transitions at some critical rewiring. We study the robustness of these transitions under two distinct ways of introducing noise. Noise affecting all the nodes destroys the absorbing-fragmentation transition, giving rise in finite-size systems to two regimes: bimodal magnetisation and dynamic fragmentation. Noise Targeting a fraction of nodes preserves the transitions but introduces shattered fragmentation with its characteristic fraction of isolated nodes and one or two giant components. Both the lack of absorbing state for homogenous noise and the shift in the absorbing transition to higher rewiring for targeted noise are supported by analytical approximations.

  18. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  19. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  20. K-Band Latching Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  1. K-band latching switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-05-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  2. Link adaptation in unlicensed radio bands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, Jaap C.; Schutter, George B.W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new collaborative mechanism for efficient coordination of radio communication devices, in particular addressing the unlicensed ISM band at 2.4 GHz. As the traffic in the ISM band is increasing tremendously, the potential for interference between uncoordinated devices is becomin

  3. Detection, parameter estimation and imaging of maneuvering target in wide-band signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YaChao; XING MengDao; ZHANG Long; BAO Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio may be increased by the cross-range coherence integration so as to detect the moving target in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) condition. But, the radial velocity, acceleration and the change of acceleration due to the maneuvering motion of target may induce serious range migration and crose-range high-order phase terms leading to the unfocused cross-range image, the reduction of signal-noise ratio and the invalidation of target detection. Therefore, in order to solve these problems,this paper proposes a new method based on the adjacent correlation and scale transform methods for detection, parameters estimation and imaging of maneuvering targets in wide-band signal. This method can align the range and remove the cross-range high-order phase terms induced by the radial motion of target, enabling us to detect the target and estimate its moving parameters better. Finally, the simulated target is used to confirm that the method proposed by this paper can perfectly detect the maneuvering target in low signal-to-noise ratio condition, estimate its motion parameters and obtain an ISAR image of target.

  4. Progressive Band Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  5. Resolved target detection in clutter using correlated, dual-band imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotts, Larry B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper develops a log-likelihood ratio test statistic for resolved target detection in dual-band imagery because the previous work indicates that most of the processing gains come from processing just two bands. Simple, closed-form equations for the closed-form probabilities of false alarm and detection are given. A computer simulation validates the theory. A constant false alarm rate version of the theory is applied to real available multiband data with quasi-resolved target sets and fixed clutter noise. The results show very reasonable performance in target detectability using three sets of correlated dual-band images. Finally, this paper shows that the resolved target detection problem depends on the weighted difference between the dual-band target contrasts. The theoretical development reaffirms that the signal-to-noise ratio or contrast-to-noise ratio is approximately the weighted difference squared, divided by the normalized total image noise variance.

  6. Simultaneous fat suppression and band reduction with large-angle multiple-acquisition balanced steady-state free precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Brady; Hargreaves, Brian A; Cukur, Tolga; Morrell, Glen R; Gold, Garry E; Bangerter, Neal K

    2012-04-01

    Balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) MRI is a rapid and signal-to-noise ratio-efficient imaging method, but suffers from characteristic bands of signal loss in regions of large field inhomogeneity. Several methods have been developed to reduce the severity of these banding artifacts, typically involving the acquisition of multiple bSSFP datasets (and the accompanying increase in scan time). Fat suppression with bSSFP is also challenging; most existing methods require an additional increase in scan time, and some are incompatible with bSSFP band-reduction techniques. This work was motivated by the need for both robust fat suppression and band reduction in the presence of field inhomogeneity when using bSSFP for flow-independent peripheral angiography. The large flip angles used in this application to improve vessel conspicuity and contrast lead to specific absorption rate considerations, longer repetition times, and increased severity of banding artifacts. In this work, a novel method that simultaneously suppresses fat and reduces bSSFP banding artifact with the acquisition of only two phase-cycled bSSFP datasets is presented. A weighted sum of the two bSSFP acquisitions is taken on a voxel-by-voxel basis, effectively synthesizing an off-resonance profile at each voxel that puts fat in the stop band while keeping water in the pass band. The technique exploits the near-sinusoidal shape of the bSSFP off-resonance spectrum for many tissues at large (>50°) flip angles.

  7. Noise control zone for a periodic ducted Helmholtz resonator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenzhi; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the dispersion characteristics of sound wave propagation in a periodic ducted Helmholtz resonator (HR) system. The predicted result fits well with a numerical simulation using a finite element method. This study indicates that for the same system, no matter how many HRs are connected or what the periodic distance is, the area under average transmission loss T L¯ curves is always the same. The broader the noise attenuation band, the lower the peak attenuation amplitude. A noise control zone compromising the attenuation bandwidth or peak amplitude is proposed for noise control optimization.

  8. Structural Evolution of a Warm Frontal Precipitation Band During GCPEx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Brian A.; Naeger, Aaron; Molthan, Andrew; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A warm frontal precipitation band developed over a few hours 50-100 km to the north of a surface warm front. The 3-km WRF was able to realistically simulate band development, although the model is somewhat too weak. Band genesis was associated with weak frontogenesis (deformation) in the presence of weak potential and conditional instability feeding into the band region, while it was closer to moist neutral within the band. As the band matured, frontogenesis increased, while the stability gradually increased in the banding region. Cloud top generating cells were prevalent, but not in WRF (too stable). The band decayed as the stability increased upstream and the frontogenesis (deformation) with the warm front weakened. The WRF may have been too weak and short-lived with the band because too stable and forcing too weak (some micro issues as well).

  9. Noise Effects on Oscillator Network of Transcription Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-Ju; AI Bao-Quan; LIU Guo-Tao; LIU Liang-Gang

    2002-01-01

    Based on the model describing the regulation of the PRM operator region of λ phage proposed by Jeff Hastyet al., we study the noise effects on the oscillator network. We find that the additive noise cannot change the period andthe amplitude of the relaxation oscillator, but in the multiplicative case, the period of the relaxation oscillator increasesto a constant value with the increase of the strength of noise, and the amplitude of the relaxation oscillator also showsincreases with the increase of the strength of noise. This novel results suggest that an external multiplicative noise sourcecould be used to control gene expression.

  10. The Analysis of Wind Seismic Noise and Algorithms of its Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislov, K. V.; Gravirov, V. V.; Labuncov, M.

    2010-12-01

    Main barrier on a way of increase quality of seismic observations is the noise oscillations of a ground owing to influence of parameters variations of an environment, which is exhibited in the broad band record. For a reduction of noise influences changes any of an environment parameter, its variations are noted. It serves for hardware or program compensation of the noise. Nowadays the numerous ways are developed for a noise level reduction made by changes of temperature, magnetic field and atmospheric pressure. It is not so difficult to conduct record-keeping of influence of ground waters level and snow coverage on long and super long periods also. Wind is high-power factor for noise producing. It was multiply noted in the scientific literature. The wind is connected to pressure, but it is not the same. The apart from of a gradient of pressure, on a field of a wind in a surface layer renders influence of the Coriolis force and friction about a surface of ground. Any obstacle, from small-scale (building, trees, wood bands and so on) up to large-scale (range of mountains), standing on a way of air flow, distorts a field of a wind. Therefore, there are zones of a wind strengthening, zone of wind shadow. It forms exposed to the wind and lee-side vortexes. The speed and the direction of the wind are influenced also by non-irregularity of vertical distribution temperature, which makes horizontal flows of an air influencing to underlying layers known as the phenomenon of turbulent viscosity. The wind has a character of a laminar flow only at low speeds. The vortexes formed by strengthening of the wind act quasi-periodic on an underlying surface, the force and period of these effects, including wind impacts in obstacles, grow with strengthening of a wind. It is size the same order, as acceleration created in atmosphere by barometric gradients. A very complex picture of seismic noise for each seismic station is created by outcome of air friction about the earth surface and

  11. HEARING LOSS RESULTING FROM NOISE EXPOSURE IN TEXTILE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Akbarkhanzadeh

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurement and analysis of noise level in various frequency bands was carried out in a textile factory. It was shown that the noise level in various working places, particularly in the weaving workshop, was quite excessive comparing to the standards and so, it may very likely result in producing hearing loss in the workers. To determine the hearing loss of the workers due to excessive noise, 136 weavers were randomly selected and examined. However, the number of samples was not large enough to give reliable results. It was concluded that the intensive noise level in the weaving workshops may have produced considerable hearing loss in the workers. Large the expo­sure to noise, more the hearing loss was observed.

  12. Structural noise tolerance of photonic crystal optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odontsengel, Nyam-Erdene; Cai, DongSheng; Cole, James B.

    2016-12-01

    Using nonstandard (NS) finite difference time domain (FDTD) scheme to perform 2D electromagnetic (EM) simulations, we investigate how the optical properties of 2D photonic crystals (PCs) are affected by various different kinds of structural noises in the PC lattice. While the transmission spectrum is strongly affected by noises, the position and the depth of the band gap in the transmission spectrum are remarkably robust. It is shown that rather coarse numerical grids can be used to evaluate various PC structures in NS-FDTD EM simulations. The combination of noises affects transmission spectrum in the same way as the most influential individual noise. It is shown that reducing the most influential individual noise is a very efficient method to make PC more accurate.

  13. Development of a Voice Activity Controlled Noise Canceller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Hussain

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a variable threshold voice activity detector (VAD is developed to control the operation of a two-sensor adaptive noise canceller (ANC. The VAD prohibits the reference input of the ANC from containing some strength of actual speech signal during adaptation periods. The novelty of this approach resides in using the residual output from the noise canceller to control the decisions made by the VAD. Thresholds of full-band energy and zero-crossing features are adjusted according to the residual output of the adaptive filter. Performance evaluation of the proposed approach is quoted in terms of signal to noise ratio improvements as well mean square error (MSE convergence of the ANC. The new approach showed an improved noise cancellation performance when tested under several types of environmental noise. Furthermore, the computational power of the adaptive process is reduced since the output of the adaptive filter is efficiently calculated only during non-speech periods.

  14. Light weight polarized polypropylene foam for noise shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelfer, Travis J.; Warne, Derik S.; Korde, Umesh A.

    2009-03-01

    The high levels of noise generated during launch can destroy sensitive equipment on space craft. Passive damping systems, like acoustic blankets, work to reduce the high frequency noise but do little to the low frequency noise (foams with high piezoelectric coupling constants are being used as new types of actuators and sensors. Further impedance control through the inverse piezoelectric effect will lead to a new "semi-active" approach that will reduce low frequency noise levels. Combining layers of conventional nonpiezoelectric foam and ferroelectret materials with a multiple loop feedback system will give a total damping effect that is adaptable over a wide band of low frequencies. This paper covers the manufacturing methods that were used to make polarized polypropylene foam, to test the foam for its polarized response and its noise shielding ability.

  15. Noise analysis of ring blowers; Ring blow no soon kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, S.; Miyazawa, M. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-11-10

    The Ring Blower (a commercial product name of a vortex flow blower developed and marketed by Fuji Electric) consists integratedly of a blower, a motor and a silencer. The blower has an impeller attached with 40 to 52 forward-inclined blades, and is small in size capable of outputting high wind pressure. This paper describes the noise analyzing technology used in developing the low-noise Ring Blower, mainly referring to practical applications. A spectral analysis revealed that the noise is composed of rotor blade rotation noise forming several peaks and turbulent noise showing gently-sloping distribution over a wide range of frequency band. Vibration of outer walls of a casing would generate noise which propagates as a sound wave. For such vibration noise as this noise which spreads out into endless space, a BEM analysis is an effective tool. For analyzing flows to optimize blade shapes and analyzing sound pressure distribution in a silencer, an FEM analysis is effective. As a result of applying these technologies, noise has been reduced by over 10 dB from that in conventional products. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Quasi-optical attenuators for ALMA band 10 receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A.; Fujii, Y.; Kaneko, K.; Uzawa, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Simple quasi-optical attenuators based on beam truncation have been designed, fabricated and tried on ALMA band 10 receivers (787-950 GHz) with optimal results. The design is based on physical-optics simulations considering effects of diffraction. The use of these attenuators allows flexibility in the design of the local oscillator (LO) quasi-optical injection scheme depending on the specific performance of components for each of the 73 ALMA band 10 receivers. In particular, they have proven very effective to keep system noise within the stringent ALMA requirements (230 K at 80% of 787-950 GHz band).

  17. DSS-13 S-/X-band microwave feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshadi, F.

    1994-05-01

    The configuration, detail design, and performance of the dual S-/X-band microwave feed system for the new DSN beam-waveguide antenna, Deep Space Station (DSS) 13, are reported. By using existing spare components, reducing fabrication cost of new components by simplifying their design, and using new fabrication techniques and material, this DSS-13 feed system was implemented successfully with a small budget and a very tight schedule. Measured noise temperature gains of the feed system are 17.5 K for S-band (2200-2300 MHz) and 24.0 K for X-band (8200-8600 MHz), which agree very closely with the predicted performance.

  18. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Worker ... noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Read and comment ...

  19. Noise Pollution Prevention in Wind Turbines: Status and Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Naterer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The global push towards sustainability has led to increased interest in alternative power sources other than coal and fossil fuels. One of these sustainable sources is to harness energy from the wind through wind turbines. However, a significant hindrance preventing the widespread use of wind turbines is the noise they produce. This study reviews recent advances in the area of noise pollution from wind turbines. To date, there have been many different noise control studies. While there are many different sources of noise, the main one is aerodynamic noise. The largest contributor to aerodynamic noise comes from the trailing edge of wind turbine blades. The aim of this paper is to critically analyse and compare the different methods currently being implemented and investigated to reduce noise production from wind turbines, with a focus on the noise generated from the trailing edge.

  20. ANALYSIS OF INTERNALLY GENERATED NOISE OF BIOELECTRIC AMPLIFIERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mashhour Mustafa; Bani Amer

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with internally generated noise of bioelectric amplifiers that are usually used for processing of bioelectric events. The main purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for analysis of the effects of internal noise generated by the active circuits and to evaluate the output noise of the author's new designed bioelectric amplifier that caused by internal effects to the amplifier circuit itself in order to compare it with the noise generated by conventional amplifiers. The obtained analysis results of internally generated noise showed that the total output noise of bioelectric active circuits does not increase when some of their resistors have a larger value. This behavior is caused by the different transfer functions for the signal and the respective noise sources associated with these resistors. Moreover, the new designed bioelectric amplifier has an output noise less than that for conventional amplifiers. The obtained analysis results were also experimentally verified and the final conclusions were drawn.

  1. Calibration of Hurricane Imaging Radiometer C-Band Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayak K.; Cecil, Daniel J.; James, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    The laboratory calibration of airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer's C-Band multi-frequency receivers is described here. The method used to obtain the values of receiver frontend loss, internal cold load brightness temperature and injected noise diode temperature is presented along with the expected RMS uncertainty in the final calibration.

  2. Highly Efficient L-Band Fibre -DFB Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libin Fu; Morten Ibsen; David J. Richardson; David N. Payne

    2003-01-01

    A more than 12 mW highly efficient fibre-DFB laser operating at 1618.3 nm is fabricated and characterised. Its high-power, low-noise and single-polarisation characteristics make it very suitable WDM-source for L-band transmission.

  3. Criteria for environmental noise assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hadzi-Nikolova, Marija; Mirakovski, Dejan; Doneva, Nikolinka

    2015-01-01

    The noise assessment generally refers to the assessment of noise impact from a specific source, such as noise originating from certain industrial plants, road traffic, and this is not always an easy task. Practically in every surrounding, a number of different sources contribute to the ambiental noise at a certain point. Standardization of noise level includes recommendations for noise level prescribed by legislation, which are enabling stay in the environment without danger to human heal...

  4. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  5. Thermal Shot Noise through Boundary Roughness of Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Attia A. Awadalla; Adel H. Phillips

    2011-01-01

    Thermal shot noise, thermal voltage and thermo power are studied through a carbon nanotube quantum dot coupled to two leads with random roughness of amplitude on each of the two boundaries, under the effect of microwave field, and magnetic Held. The expressions for the thermal shot noise and thermal energy are deduced when the barrier strength and contact area are taken into consideration. A model for such mesoscopic devices is proposed as a carbon nanotube quantum dot coupled to two leads with random roughness of amplitude on each of the two boundaries. The results show oscillatory behaviors of the dependence of the thermal shot noise on the studied parameters. The thermopower oscillates with the variation of the contact area, and the peak heights decrease linearly with the contact area and increases with temperature. This trend of behavior is due to the interplay of the induced microwave photons and the tunneling rate through the side bands. This research is important for using a model as a high-frequency shot noise detector and the thermopower is sensitive to the energy dependence of the conductance.

  6. A new VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems. [voice operated keying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. F.; Morgan, W. C.; Shack, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    A VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems is described which is based on the separation of voice signals into contiguous frequency-band components with the aid of an adaptive VOX in each band. It is shown that this processing scheme can effectively reduce both wideband and narrowband quasi-periodic noise since the threshold levels readjust themselves to suppress noise that exceeds speech components in each band. Results are reported for tests of the adaptive VOX, and it is noted that improvements can still be made in such areas as the elimination of noise pulses, phoneme reproduction at high-noise levels, and the elimination of distortion introduced by phase delay.

  7. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  8. Gain flattened L-band EDFA based on upgraded C-band EDFA using forward ASE pumping in an EDF section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buxens Azcoaga, Alvaro Juan; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov; Clausen, Anders;

    2000-01-01

    A novel method is presented for implementing an L-band erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) making use of forward amplified spontaneous emission pumping, from a commercially available c-band EDFA, in an erbium doped fibre. Tuning of the length of erbium doped fibre enables a flat gain characteristic...... to be obtained with a low noise figure over the entire L-band window....

  9. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  10. Interior Noise Prediction of the Automobile Based on Hybrid FE-SEA Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, S. M; Wang, D. F; Zan, J. M

    2011-01-01

    In order to predict the interior noise of the automobile in the low and middle frequency band in the design and development stage, the hybrid FE-SEA model of an automobile was created using hybrid FE-SEA method...

  11. Ground Bounce Noise Reduction in Vlsi Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kumar Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available : Scaling of devices in CMOS technology leads to increase in parameter like Ground bounce noise, Leakage current, average power dissipation and short channel effect. FinFET are the promising substitute to replace CMOS. Ground bounce noise is produced when power gating circuit goes from SLEEP to ACTIVE mode transition. FinFET based designs are compared with MOSFET based designs on basis of different parameter like Ground bounce noise, leakage current and average power dissipation. HSPICE is the software tool used for simulation and circuit design.

  12. Density of States for Warped Energy Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.; Fornari, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Warping of energy bands can affect the density of states (DOS) in ways that can be large or subtle. Despite their potential for significant practical impacts on materials properties, these effects have not been rigorously demonstrated previously. Here we rectify this using an angular effective mass formalism that we have developed. To clarify the often confusing terminology in this field, “band warping” is precisely defined as pertaining to any multivariate energy function E(k) that does not admit a second-order differential at an isolated critical point in k-space, which we clearly distinguish from band non-parabolicity. We further describe band “corrugation” as a qualitative form of band warping that increasingly deviates from being twice differentiable at an isolated critical point. These features affect the density-of-states and other parameters ascribed to band warping in various ways. We demonstrate these effects, providing explicit calculations of DOS and their effective masses for warped energy dispersions originally derived by Kittel and others. Other physical and mathematical examples are provided to demonstrate fundamental distinctions that must be drawn between DOS contributions that originate from band warping and contributions that derive from band non-parabolicity. For some non-degenerate bands in thermoelectric materials, this may have profound consequences of practical interest.

  13. NOISE-INDUCED TOUGHENING EFFECT IN WISTAR RATS: ENHANCED AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES ARE RELATED TO CALRETININ AND NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE UPREGULATION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos eAlvarado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this toughening effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with ‘toughening’ and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1h every 72h, 4 times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signalling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol.

  14. Electronic crosstalk in Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wang, Menghua

    2015-09-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a legacy Earth remote sensing instrument in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS). The first MODIS instrument was launched in December 1999 on board the Terra spacecraft. MODIS has 36 bands, among which bands 20-25 and bands 27-36 are thermal emissive bands covering a wavelength range from 3.7μm to 14.2μm. It has been found that there are severe contaminations in Terra bands 27-30 (6.7 μm - 9.73 μm) due to crosstalk of signals among themselves. The crosstalk effect induces strong striping artifacts in the Earth View (EV) images and causes large long-term drifts in the EV brightness temperature (BT) in these bands. An algorithm using a linear approximation derived from on-orbit lunar observations has been developed to correct the crosstalk effect for them. It was demonstrated that the crosstalk correction can substantially reduce the striping noise in the EV images and significantly remove the long-term drifts in the EV BT in the Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) water vapor channels (bands 27-28). In this paper, the crosstalk correction algorithm previously developed is applied to correct the crosstalk effect in the remaining LWIR bands 29 and 30. The crosstalk correction successfully reduces the striping artifact in the EV images and removes long-term drifts in the EV BT in bands 29-30 as was done similarly for bands 27-28. The crosstalk correction algorithm can thus substantially improve both the image quality and the radiometric accuracy of the Level 1B (L1B) products of the LWIR PV bands, bands 27-30. From this study it is also understood that other Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands are contaminated by the crosstalk effect and that the algorithm can be applied to these bands for crosstalk correction.

  15. Mean First-Passage Time of a Bistable Kinetic Model Driven by Multiplicative Coloured Noise and Additive White Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢崇伟; 梅冬成

    2003-01-01

    We study the transient properties of a bistable kinetic system driven by correlated noises for the cases of multiplicative coloured noise and additive white noise. The mean first-passage time (MFPT) of the system is calculated.From numerical computations we find that: (i) The MFPT of the bistable system are affected by the correlation time of multiplicative coloured noise τ and the cross-correlation strength between noises λ and, τ and λ play the same roles in the MFPT. (ii) The MFPT corresponding to weakly correlated noises and strongly correlated noises exhibits the very different behaviour and there is a one-peak structure in the MFPT for strongly correlated noises. The peak grows highly as τ increases, which means that the noisy colour causes the suppression effect of the escape rate to become more pronounced.

  16. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity. Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF. We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  17. Distributed Absorber for Noise and Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Azoulay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to a wide-band frequency passive vibration attenuation is introduced in this paper. This aims to suppress noise and vibration of extended multimode objects like plates, panels and shells. The absorber is arranged in the form of a single-layer assembly of small inertial bodies (balls being distributed and moulded within the light visco-elastic media (e.g. silicone resin. The absorber as a whole is embedded into object face covering the critical patches of the system surface. For the purpose of characterization, the authors introduced the complex frequency response function relating the volume velocity produced by the vibrating object surface (response stimulated by a point-wise force (stimulus applied to a particular point. The simulation and optimization of the main frequency characteristics has been performed using a full scale 3-dimensional Finite Element model. These revealed some new dynamic features of absorber's structures, which can contribute to vibration attenuation. A full-scale physical experimentation with synthesised absorber's structures confirmed the main results of simulation and has shown significant noise reduction over a staggering 0–20 kHz frequency band. This was achieved with a negligible weight and volume penalty due to the addition of the absorber. The results can find multiple applications in noise and vibration control of different structures. Some examples of such applications are presented.

  18. Shuttle Ku-band and S-band communications implementation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, J. G.; Huth, G. K.; Nilsen, P. W.; Polydoros, A.; Simon, M. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1980-05-01

    Various aspects of the shuttle orbiter S-band network communication system, the S-band payload communication system, and the Ku-band communication system are considered. A method is proposed for obtaining more accurate S-band antenna patterns of the actual shuttle orbiter vehicle during flight because the preliminary antenna patterns using mock-ups are not realistic that they do not include the effects of additional appendages such as wings and tail structures. The Ku-band communication system is discussed especially the TDRS antenna pointing accuracy with respect to the orbiter and the modifications required and resulting performance characteristics of the convolutionally encoded high data rate return link to maintain bit synchronizer lock on the ground. The TDRS user constraints on data bit clock jitter and data asymmetry on unbalanced QPSK with noisy phase references are included. The S-band payload communication system study is outlined including the advantages and experimental results of a peak regulator design built and evaluated by Axiomatrix for the bent-pipe link versus the existing RMS-type regulator. The nominal sweep rate for the deep-space transponder of 250 Hz/s, and effects of phase noise on the performance of a communication system are analyzed.

  19. JP-8 jet fuel can promote auditory impairment resulting from subsequent noise exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Laurence D; Gearhart, Caroline; Fulton, Sherry; Campbell, Jerry; Fisher, Jeffrey; Na, Kwangsam; Cocker, David; Nelson-Miller, Alisa; Moon, Patrick; Pouyatos, Benoit

    2007-08-01

    We report on the transient and persistent effects of JP-8 jet fuel exposure on auditory function in rats. JP-8 has become the standard jet fuel utilized in the United States and North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries for military use and it is closely related to Jet A fuel, which is used in U.S. domestic aviation. Rats received JP-8 fuel (1000 mg/m(3)) by nose-only inhalation for 4 h and half of them were immediately subjected to an octave band of noise ranging between 97 and 105 dB in different experiments. The noise by itself produces a small, but permanent auditory impairment. The current permissible exposure level for JP-8 is 350 mg/m(3). Additionally, a positive control group received only noise exposure, and a fourth group consisted of untreated control subjects. Exposures occurred either on 1 day or repeatedly on 5 successive days. Impairments in auditory function were assessed using distortion product otoacoustic emissions and compound action potential testing. In other rats, tissues were harvested following JP-8 exposure for assessment of hydrocarbon levels or glutathione (GSH) levels. A single JP-8 exposure by itself at 1000 mg/m(3) did not disrupt auditory function. However, exposure to JP-8 and noise produced an additive disruption in outer hair cell function. Repeated 5-day JP-8 exposure at 1000 mg/m(3) for 4 h produced impairment of outer hair cell function that was most evident at the first postexposure assessment time. Partial though not complete recovery was observed over a 4-week postexposure period. The adverse effects of repeated JP-8 exposures on auditory function were inconsistent, but combined treatment with JP-8 + noise yielded greater impairment of auditory function, and hair cell loss than did noise by itself. Qualitative comparison of outer hair cell loss suggests an increase in outer hair cell death among rats treated with JP-8 + noise for 5 days as compared to noise alone. In most instances, hydrocarbon constituents of the fuel

  20. Diet after gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helps people who have a gastric band stay satisfied longer. This includes things like salad with grilled ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...