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Sample records for band gap structures

  1. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are ...

  2. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  3. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...

  4. Phononic band gap structures as optimal designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use topology optimization to design phononic band gap structures. We consider 2D structures subjected to periodic loading and obtain the distribution of two materials with high contrast in material properties that gives the minimal vibrational response of the structure. Both in...

  5. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei; Huang, Xiaodong; Jia, Baohua

    2015-12-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  6. Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic band gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Fei; Huang, Xiaodong; Jia, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic band gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic band gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any band gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum band gap between two specified adjacent bands. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the band gaps from the first to the tenth band for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.

  7. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report the use of low dielectric constant materials to form two- dimensional microwave band-gap structures for achieving high gap-to-midgap ratio. The variable parameters chosen are the lattice spacing and the geometric structure. The se- lected geometries are square and triangular and the materials chosen ...

  8. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    in the present paper that such an a priori assumption is not necessary since, in general, just the maximization of the gap between two consecutive natural frequencies leads to significant design periodicity. The aim of this paper is to maximize frequency gaps by shape optimization of transversely vibrating......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded...... or significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown...

  9. Design for maximum band-gaps in beam structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to extend earlier optimum design results for transversely vibrating Bernoulli-Euler beams by determining new optimum band-gap beam structures for (i) different combinations of classical boundary conditions, (ii) much larger values of the orders n and n-1 of adjacent upper and lowe...

  10. Three-dimensional photonic band gaps in woven structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai Ya Chih; Pendry, J B

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the photonic properties of dielectric fibres woven into three-dimensional (3D) structures. Such fibres can be fabricated on the micrometre scale, and hence the gaps are in the far-infrared to the infrared regime. The vector-wave transfer matrix method is applied to evaluate the photonic band structures. We have also employed the constant-frequency dispersion surface scheme to investigate the development of a full band gap. Such a 3D absolute gap is observed in a rectangular lattice, but at a fairly large dielectric constant for the fibres. Ways to improve on this have been suggested. Our study indicates that woven structures are promising materials for realizing the 3D photonic insulator in the infrared regime. (author)

  11. Band gaps in grid structure with periodic local resonator subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2017-09-01

    The grid structure is widely used in architectural and mechanical field for its high strength and saving material. This paper will present a study on an acoustic metamaterial beam (AMB) based on the normal square grid structure with local resonators owning both flexible band gaps and high static stiffness, which have high application potential in vibration control. Firstly, the AMB with variable cross-section frame is analytically modeled by the beam-spring-mass model that is provided by using the extended Hamilton’s principle and Bloch’s theorem. The above model is used for computing the dispersion relation of the designed AMB in terms of the design parameters, and the influences of relevant parameters on band gaps are discussed. Then a two-dimensional finite element model of the AMB is built and analyzed in COMSOL Multiphysics, both the dispersion properties of unit cell and the wave attenuation in a finite AMB have fine agreement with the derived model. The effects of design parameters of the two-dimensional model in band gaps are further examined, and the obtained results can well verify the analytical model. Finally, the wave attenuation performances in three-dimensional AMBs with equal and unequal thickness are presented and discussed.

  12. Optical processes in different types of photonic band gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Mengqin; Ullah, Zakir; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-06-01

    For the first time, we investigate the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in the static and moving electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) through scanning the frequency detunings of the probe field, dressing field and coupling field. Especially, the suppression and enhancement of the four wave mixing band gap signal (FWM BGS) and the probe transmission signal (PTS) can be observed when we scan the dressing field frequency detuning in the FWM BGS system. It is worth noting that the PBG structure and FWM BGS appear at the right of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) position in the case of scanning the frequency detuning of the coupling field in the FWM BGS system, while the PBG structure and FWM BGS appears at the left of the EIT position on the condition of scanning the probe field frequency detuning. Moreover, in the moving PBG structure, we can obtain the nonreciprocity of FWM BGS. Furthermore, we can modulate the intensity, width, location of the FWM BGS and PTS through changing the frequency detunings and intensities of the probe field, dressing field and coupling field, sample length and the frequency difference of coupling fields in EIG. Such scheme could have potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers and quantum information processing.

  13. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate the flexibility and advantages of a non-uniform pseudo-spectral time domain (nu-PSTD) method through studies of the wave propagation characteristics on photonic band-gap (PBG) structures in stratified medium Design/methodology/approach - A nu-PSTD method is proposed...... in solving the Maxwell's equations numerically. It expands the temporal derivatives using the finite differences, while it adopts the Fourier transform (FT) properties to expand the spatial derivatives in Maxwell's equations. In addition, the method makes use of the chain-rule property in calculus together...... with the transformed space technique in order to make the algorithm flexible in terms of non-uniform spatial sampling. Findings - Through the studies of the wave propagation characteristics on PBG structures in stratified medium, it has been found that the proposed method retains excellent accuracy in the occasions...

  14. Transport in bilayer and trilayer graphene: band gap engineering and band structure tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Controlling the stacking order of atomically thin 2D materials offers a powerful tool to control their properties. Linearly dispersed bands become hyperbolic in Bernal (AB) stacked bilayer graphene (BLG). Both Bernal (ABA) and rhombohedral (ABC) stacking occur in trilayer graphene (TLG), producing distinct band structures and electronic properties. A symmetry-breaking electric field perpendicular to the sample plane can further modify the band structures of BLG and TLG. In this talk, I will describe our experimental effort in these directions using dual-gated devices. Using thin HfO2 film deposited by ALD as gate dielectric, we are able to apply large displacement fields D > 6 V/nm and observe the opening and saturation of the field-induced band gap Eg in bilayer and ABC-stacked trilayer graphene, where the conduction in the mid gap changes by more than six decades. Its field and temperature dependence highlights the crucial role played by Coulomb disorder in facilitating hopping conduction and suppressing the effect of Eg in the tens of meV regime. In contrast, mid-gap conduction decreases with increasing D much more rapidly in clean h-BN dual-gated devices. Our studies also show the evolution of the band structure in ABA-stacked TLG, in particular the splitting of the Dirac-like bands in large D field and the signatures of two-band transport at high carrier densities. Comparison to theory reveals the need for more sophisticated treatment of electronic screening beyond self-consistent Hartree calculations to accurately predict the band structures of trilayer graphene and graphenic materials in general.

  15. First Principles Study of Band Structure and Band Gap Engineering in Graphene for Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-20

    vacancy and added impurities in them are investigated using 96 atom slab of graphene . The relaxed structures and charge distribution plots of graphene 24... graphene gets reconstructed. In order to further improve the band gap opening in the graphene we introduced impurity atoms in the vacancies and...distorted Dirac cones at the Fermi point can be a check mark for presence of equal concentration of p-type and n-type impurities in graphene . The

  16. True photonic band-gap mode-control in VCSEL structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, F.; Madsen, M.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect.......Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect....

  17. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - stant and/or magnetic permeability (or in particular impedance) are periodic and the propagation of electromagnetic waves is forbidden at certain frequencies when allowed to pass through these structures. This is similar to the electronic band.

  18. The band gap variation of a two dimensional binary locally resonant structure in thermal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the numerical investigation of thermal effect on band gap dynamical characteristic for a two-dimensional binary structure composed of aluminum plate periodically filled with nitrile rubber cylinder is presented. Initially, the band gap of the binary structure variation trend with increasing temperature is studied by taking the softening effect of thermal stress into account. A breakthrough is made which found the band gap being narrower and shifting to lower frequency in thermal environment. The complete band gap which in higher frequency is more sensitive to temperature that it disappears with temperature increasing. Then some new transformed models are created by changing the height of nitrile rubber cylinder from 1mm to 7mm. Simulations show that transformed model can produce a wider band gap (either flexure or complete band gap. A proper forbidden gap of elastic wave can be utilized in thermal environment although both flexure and complete band gaps become narrower with temperature. Besides that, there is a zero-frequency flat band appearing in the first flexure band, and it becomes broader with temperature increasing. The band gap width decreases trend in thermal environment, as well as the wider band gap induced by the transformed model with higher nitrile rubber cylinder is useful for the design and application of phononic crystal structures in thermal environment.

  19. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandhya; Tuttle, Gary L.; Sigalas, Mihail; McCalmont, Jonathan S.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  20. X-band photonic band-gap accelerator structure breakdown experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roark A. Marsh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz. The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65  MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110  MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100  MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890  kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14  MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  1. Complete flexural vibration band gaps in membrane-like lattice structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Liu Yaozong; Qiu Jing; Wang Gang; Zhao Honggang

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of flexural vibration in the periodical membrane-like lattice structure is studied. The band structure calculated with the plane wave expansion method indicates the existence of complete gaps. The frequency response function of a finite periodic structure is simulated with finite element method. Frequency ranges with vibration attenuation are in good agreement with the gaps found in the band structure. Much larger attenuations are found in the complete gaps comparing to those directional ones. The existence of complete flexural vibration gaps in such a lattice structure provides a new idea for vibration control of thin plates

  2. Photonic band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  3. Design and Additive Manufacturing of 3D Phononic Band Gap Structures Based on Gradient Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Wormser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for gradient based maximization of phononic band gaps. The approach is a geometry projection method combining parametric shape optimization with density based topology optimization. By this approach, we obtain, in a two dimension setting, cellular structures exhibiting relative and normalized band gaps of more than 8 and 1.6, respectively. The controlling parameter is the minimal strut size, which also corresponds with the obtained stiffness of the structure. The resulting design principle is manually interpreted into a three dimensional structure from which cellular metal samples are fabricated by selective electron beam melting. Frequency response diagrams experimentally verify the numerically determined phononic band gaps of the structures. The resulting structures have band gaps down to the audible frequency range, qualifying the structures for an application in noise isolation.

  4. Design and Additive Manufacturing of 3D Phononic Band Gap Structures Based on Gradient Based Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Maximilian; Wein, Fabian; Stingl, Michael; Körner, Carolin

    2017-09-22

    We present a novel approach for gradient based maximization of phononic band gaps. The approach is a geometry projection method combining parametric shape optimization with density based topology optimization. By this approach, we obtain, in a two dimension setting, cellular structures exhibiting relative and normalized band gaps of more than 8 and 1.6, respectively. The controlling parameter is the minimal strut size, which also corresponds with the obtained stiffness of the structure. The resulting design principle is manually interpreted into a three dimensional structure from which cellular metal samples are fabricated by selective electron beam melting. Frequency response diagrams experimentally verify the numerically determined phononic band gaps of the structures. The resulting structures have band gaps down to the audible frequency range, qualifying the structures for an application in noise isolation.

  5. Triple photonic band-gap structure dynamically induced in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jinwei; Bao Qianqian; Wan Rengang; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui

    2011-01-01

    We study a cold atomic sample coherently driven into the five-level triple-Λ configuration for attaining a dynamically controlled triple photonic band-gap structure. Our numerical calculations show that three photonic band gaps with homogeneous reflectivities up to 92% can be induced on demand around the probe resonance by a standing-wave driving field in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence. All these photonic band gaps are severely malformed with probe reflectivities declining rapidly to very low values when spontaneously generated coherence is gradually weakened. The triple photonic band-gap structure can also be attained in a five-level chain-Λ system of cold atoms in the absence of spontaneously generated coherence, which however requires two additional traveling-wave fields to couple relevant levels.

  6. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  7. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  8. Research on the Band Gap Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Microcavity with Local Resonant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional locally resonant phononic crystal with microcavity structure is proposed. The acoustic wave band gap characteristics of this new structure are studied using finite element method. At the same time, the corresponding displacement eigenmodes of the band edges of the lowest band gap and the transmission spectrum are calculated. The results proved that phononic crystals with microcavity structure exhibited complete band gaps in low-frequency range. The eigenfrequency of the lower edge of the first gap is lower than no microcavity structure. However, for no microcavity structure type of quadrilateral phononic crystal plate, the second band gap disappeared and the frequency range of the first band gap is relatively narrow. The main reason for appearing low-frequency band gaps is that the proposed phononic crystal introduced the local resonant microcavity structure. This study provides a good support for engineering application such as low-frequency vibration attenuation and noise control.

  9. Estimation of photonic band gap in the hollow core cylindrical multilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Ritesh Kumar; Singh, Vivek

    2018-04-01

    The propagation characteristic of two hollow core cylindrical multilayer structures having high and low refractive index contrast of cladding regions have been studied and compared at two design wavelengths i.e. 1550 nm and 632.8 nm. With the help of transfer matrix method a relation between the incoming light wave and outgoing light wave has been developed using the boundary matching technique. In high refractive index contrast, small numbers of layers are sufficient to provide perfect band gap in both design wavelengths. The spectral position and width of band gap is highly depending on the optical path of incident light in all considered cases. For sensing application, the sensitivity of waveguide can be obtained either by monitoring the width of photonic band gap or by monitoring the spectral shift of photonic band gap. Change in the width of photonic band gap with the core refractive index is larger in high refractive index contrast of cladding materials. However, in the case of monitoring the spectral shift of band gap, the obtained sensitivity is large for low refractive index contrast of cladding materials and further it increases with increase of design wavelength.

  10. Effects of weak nonlinearity on dispersion relations and frequency band-gaps of periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the behaviour of linear periodic structures can be traced back over 300 years, to Sir Isaac Newton, and still attracts much attention. An essential feature of periodic struc-tures is the presence of frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate....... Determination of band-gaps and the corresponding attenuation levels is an im-portant practical problem. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants, and the method of space-harmonics. However, application....... The present work deals with analytically predicting dynamic responses for nonlinear continuous elastic periodic structures. Specifically, the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion re-lation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending os-cillations are analyzed...

  11. Phononic band gaps and vibrations in one- and two-dimensional mass-spring structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The vibrational response of finite periodic lattice structures subjected to periodic loading is investigated. Special attention is devoted to the response in frequency ranges with gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice. The effects of boundaries, viscous dampin...

  12. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong

    2005-01-01

    in solving the Maxwell's equations numerically. It expands the temporal derivatives using the finite differences, while it adopts the Fourier transform (FT) properties to expand the spatial derivatives in Maxwell's equations. In addition, the method makes use of the chain-rule property in calculus together...... in electromagnetic and microwave applications once the Maxwell's equations are appropriately modeled. Originality/value - The method validates its values and properties through extensive studies on regular and defective 1D PBG structures in stratified medium, and it can be further extended to solving more...

  13. Structural analysis, electronic properties, and band gaps of a graphene nanoribbon: A new 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Devi

    2018-03-01

    Graphene nanoribbon (GNR), a new 2D carbon nanomaterial, has some unique features and special properties that offer a great potential for interconnect, nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronics, and nanophotonics. This paper reports the structural analysis, electronic properties, and band gaps of a GNR considering different chirality combinations obtained using the pz orbital tight binding model. In structural analysis, the analytical expressions for GNRs have been developed and verified using the simulation for the first time. It has been found that the total number of unit cells and carbon atoms within an overall unit cell and molecular structure of a GNR have been changed with the change in their chirality values which are similar to the values calculated using the developed analytical expressions thus validating both the simulation as well as analytical results. Further, the electronic band structures at different chirality values have been shown for the identification of metallic and semiconductor properties of a GNR. It has been concluded that all zigzag edge GNRs are metallic with very small band gaps range whereas all armchair GNRs show both the metallic and semiconductor nature with very small and high band gaps range. Again, the total number of subbands in each electronic band structure is equal to the total number of carbon atoms present in overall unit cell of the corresponding GNR. The semiconductors GNRs can be used as a channel material in field effect transistor suitable for advanced CMOS technology whereas the metallic GNRs could be used for interconnect.

  14. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  15. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...... behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  16. Surface plasmon polariton band gap structures: implications to integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Volkov, V. S.; Østergaard, John Erland

    2001-01-01

    Conventional photonic band gap (PBG) structures are composed of regions with periodic modulation of refractive index that do not allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a certain interval of wavelengths, i.e., that exhibit the PBG effect. The PBG effect is essentially an interference...... phenomenon related to strong multiple scattering of light in periodic media. The interest to the PBG structures has dramatically risen since the possibility of efficient waveguiding around a sharp corner of a line defect in the PBG structure has been pointed out. Given the perspective of integrating various...... PBG-based components within a few hundred micrometers, we realized that other two-dimensional waves, e.g., surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), might be employed for the same purpose. The SPP band gap (SPPBG) has been observed for the textured silver surfaces by performing angular measurements...

  17. Electronic structures and band gaps of chains and sheets based on phenylacetylene units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masakazu; Nozaki, Daijiro; Tachibana, Masamitsu; Yumura, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structures of polymers composed of π-conjugated phenylacetylene (PA) units, m-PA-based and p-PA-based wires, at the extended Hueckel level of theory. It is demonstrated that these conjugated systems should have a variety of electric conductance. All of the one-dimensional (1D) chains and the two-dimensional (2D) sheet based on the m-PA unit are insulators with large band gaps of 2.56 eV because there is no effective orbital interaction with neighboring chains. On the other hand, p-PA-based 1D chains have relatively small band gaps that decrease with an increase in chain width (1.17-1.74 eV) and are semiconductive. The p-PA-based sheet called 'graphyne', a 2D-limit of the p-PA-based 1D chains, shows a small band gap of 0.89 eV. The variety of band electronic structures is discussed in terms of frontier crystal orbitals

  18. Harnessing the bistable composite shells to design a tunable phononic band gap structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanlong

    2018-02-01

    By proposing a system composed of an array of bistable composite shells immersed in air, we develop a new class of periodic structure to control the propagation of sound. Through numerical investigation, we find that the acoustic band gap of this system can be switched on and off by triggering the snap through deformation of the bistable composite shells. The shape of cross section and filling fraction of unit cell can be altered by different number of bistable composite shells, and they have strong impact on the position and width of the band gap. The proposed concept paves the way of using the bistable structures to design a new class of metamaterials that can be enable to manipulate sound.

  19. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, Ekmel; Tuttle, Gary; Michel, Erick; Ho, Kai-Ming; Biswas, Rana; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap.

  20. Band gap widening and quantum tunnelling effects of Ag/MgO/p-Si MOS structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, Norlida; Badar, Nurhanna; Fadilah Chayed, Nor; Firdaus Kasim, Muhd

    2016-10-01

    MgO films of various thicknesses were fabricated via the pulsed laser deposition method. The MgO thin films obtained have the advantage of high quality mirror finish, good densification and of uniform thickness. The MgO thin films have thicknesses of between 43 to 103 nm. They are polycrystalline in nature with oriented growth mainly in the direction of the [200] and [220] crystal planes. It is observed that the band gap of the thin films increases as the thickness decreases due to quantum effects, however, turn-on voltage has the opposite effect. The decrease of the turn-on as well as the tunnelling voltage of the thinner films, despite their larger band gap, is a direct experimental evidence of quantum tunnelling effects in the thin films. This proves that quantum tunnelling is more prominent in low dimensional structures.

  1. Band Gap Opening Induced by the Structural Periodicity in Epitaxial Graphene Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Nair, Maya; Palacio, Irene; Celis, Arlensiú; Zobelli, Alberto; Gloter, Alexandre; Kubsky, Stefan; Turmaud, Jean-Philippe; Conrad, Matthew; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Conrad, Edward H; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Tejeda, Antonio

    2017-04-12

    The epitaxial graphene buffer layer on the Si face of hexagonal SiC shows a promising band gap, of which the precise origin remains to be understood. In this work, we correlate the electronic to the atomic structure of the buffer layer by combining angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM). We show that the band structure in the buffer has an electronic periodicity related to the structural periodicity observed in STM images and published X-ray diffraction. Our HR-STEM measurements show the bonding of the buffer layer to the SiC at specific locations separated by 1.5 nm. This is consistent with the quasi 6 × 6 periodic corrugation observed in the STM images. The distance between buffer C and SiC is 1.9 Å in the bonded regions and up to 2.8 Å in the decoupled regions, corresponding to a 0.9 Å corrugation of the buffer layer. The decoupled regions are sp 2 hybridized. Density functional tight binding (DFTB) calculations demonstrate the presence of a gap at the Dirac point everywhere in the buffer layer, even in the decoupled regions where the buffer layer has an atomic structure close to that of graphene. The surface periodicity also promotes band in the superperiodic Brillouin zone edges as seen by photoemission and confirmed by our calculations.

  2. Complex layered materials and periodic electromagnetic band-gap structures: Concepts, characterizations, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosallaei, Hossein

    The main objective of this dissertation is to characterize and create insight into the electromagnetic performances of two classes of composite structures, namely, complex multi-layered media and periodic Electromagnetic Band-Gap (EBG) structures. The advanced and diversified computational techniques are applied to obtain their unique propagation characteristics and integrate the results into some novel applications. In the first part of this dissertation, the vector wave solution of Maxwell's equations is integrated with the Genetic Algorithm (GA) optimization method to provide a powerful technique for characterizing multi-layered materials, and obtaining their optimal designs. The developed method is successfully applied to determine the optimal composite coatings for Radar Cross Section (RCS) reduction of canonical structures. Both monostatic and bistatic scatterings are explored. A GA with hybrid planar/curved surface implementation is also introduced to efficiently obtain the optimal absorbing materials for curved structures. Furthermore, design optimization of the non-uniform Luneburg and 2-shell spherical lens antennas utilizing modal solution/GA-adaptive-cost function is presented. The lens antennas are effectively optimized for both high gain and suppressed grating lobes. The second part demonstrates the development of an advanced computational engine, which accurately computes the broadband characteristics of challenging periodic electromagnetic band-gap structures. This method utilizes the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique with Periodic Boundary Condition/Perfectly Matched Layer (PBC/PML), which is efficiently integrated with the Prony scheme. The computational technique is successfully applied to characterize and present the unique propagation performances of different classes of periodic structures such as Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS), Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) materials, and Left-Handed (LH) composite media. The results are

  3. Observation of wakefields in a beam-driven photonic band gap accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Wakefield excitation has been experimentally studied in a three-cell X-band standing wave photonic band gap (PBG accelerating structure. Major monopole (TM_{01}- and TM_{02}-like and dipole (TM_{11}- and TM_{12}-like modes were identified and characterized by precisely controlling the position of beam injection. The quality factor Q of the dipole modes was measured to be ∼10  times smaller than that of the accelerating mode. A charge sweep, up to 80 nC, has been performed, equivalent to ∼30  MV/m accelerating field on axis. A variable delay low charge witness bunch following a high charge drive bunch was used to calibrate the gradient in the PBG structure by measuring its maximum energy gain and loss. Experimental results agree well with numerical simulations.

  4. Structural Coloration of Colloidal Fiber by Photonic Band Gap and Resonant Mie Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Zhou, Ning; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-07-01

    Because structural color is fadeless and dye-free, structurally colored materials have attracted great attention in a wide variety of research fields. In this work, we report the use of a novel structural coloration strategy applied to the fabrication of colorful colloidal fibers. The nanostructured fibers with tunable structural colors were massively produced by colloidal electrospinning. Experimental results and theoretical modeling reveal that the homogeneous and noniridescent structural colors of the electrospun fibers are caused by two phenomena: reflection due to the band gap of photonic structure and Mie scattering of the colloidal spheres. Our unprecedented findings show promise in paving way for the development of revolutionary dye-free technology for the coloration of various fibers.

  5. High power experimental studies of hybrid photonic band gap accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JieXi Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the first high power tests of hybrid photonic band gap (PBG accelerator structures. Three hybrid PBG (HPBG structures were designed, built and tested at 17.14 GHz. Each structure had a triangular lattice array with 60 inner sapphire rods and 24 outer copper rods sandwiched between copper disks. The dielectric PBG band gap map allows the unique feature of overmoded operation in a TM_{02} mode, with suppression of both lower order modes, such as the TM_{11} mode, as well as higher order modes. The use of sapphire rods, which have negligible dielectric loss, required inclusion of the dielectric birefringence in the design. The three structures were designed to sequentially reduce the peak surface electric field. Simulations showed relatively high surface fields at the triple point as well as in any gaps between components in the clamped assembly. The third structure used sapphire rods with small pin extensions at each end and obtained the highest gradient of 19  MV/m, corresponding to a surface electric field of 78  MV/m, with a breakdown probability of 5×10^{-1} per pulse per meter for a 100-ns input power pulse. Operation at a gradient above 20  MV/m led to runaway breakdowns with extensive light emission and eventual damage. For all three structures, multipactor light emission was observed at gradients well below the breakdown threshold. This research indicated that multipactor triggered at the triple point limited the operational gradient of the hybrid structure.

  6. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  7. Silicon-based photocells of enhanced spectral sensitivity with nano-sized graded band gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhadyrkhanov, M.K.; Isamov, S.B.; Iliev, K.M. et al.

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of monocrystalline silicon with multiply charged nanoclusters are studied that generate 'silicon clusters', i.e., nano-sized graded band gap structures. Multiply charged nanoclusters of manganese atoms strongly influence the photoelectric properties of monocrystalline silicon and expand the range of spectral sensitivity up to 8 μm; the photoelectric sensitivity reaches ∼10 9 . Conditions occur for the emergence of photo-emf in such a material in the infrared region when hν< E g . The obtained experimental data expand the functional capabilities for the application of silicon with multiply charged impurity atoms. (authors)

  8. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  9. Analytical and Numerical Calculations of Two-Dimensional Dielectric Photonic Band Gap Structures and Cavities for Laser Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Samokhvalova, Ksenia R; Liang Qian, Bao

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric photonic band gap (PBG) structures have many promising applications in laser acceleration. For these applications, accurate determination of fundamental and high order band gaps is critical. We present the results of our recent work on analytical calculations of two-dimensional (2D) PBG structures in rectangular geometry. We compare the analytical results with computer simulation results from the MIT Photonic Band Gap Structure Simulator (PBGSS) code, and discuss the convergence of the computer simulation results to the analytical results. Using the accurate analytical results, we design a mode-selective 2D dielectric cylindrical PBG cavity with the first global band gap in the frequency range of 8.8812 THz to 9.2654 THz. In this frequency range, the TM01-like mode is shown to be well confined.

  10. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Kevin Jerome [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  11. Fabrication and cold test of photonic band gap resonators and accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenya I. Smirnova

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the detailed description of the successful design and cold test of photonic band gap (PBG resonators and traveling-wave accelerator structures. Those tests provided the essential basis for later hot test demonstration of the first PBG accelerator structure at 17.140 GHz [E. I. Smirnova, A. S. Kesar, I. Mastovsky, M. A. Shapiro, and R. J. Temkin, Phys. Rev. Lett., 95, 074801 (2005.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.074801]. The advantage of PBG resonators is that they were built to support only the main, TM_{01}-like, accelerator mode while not confining the higher-order modes (HOM or wakefields. The design of the PBG resonators was based on a triangular lattice of rods, with a missing rod at the center. Following theoretical analysis, the rod radius divided by the rod spacing was held to a value of about 0.15 to avoid supporting HOM. For a single-cell test the PBG structure was fabricated in X-band (11 GHz and brazed. The mode spectrum and Q factor (Q=5 000 agreed well with theory. Excellent HOM suppression was evident from the cold test. A six-cell copper PBG accelerator traveling-wave structure with reduced long-range wakefields was designed and was built by electroforming at Ku-band (17.140 GHz. The structure was tuned by etching the rods. Cold test of the structure yielded excellent agreement with the theoretical design. Successful results of the hot test of the structure demonstrating the acceleration of the electron beam were published in E. I. Smirnova, A. S. Kesar, I. Mastovsky, M. A. Shapiro, and R. J. Temkin, Phys. Rev. Lett., 95, 074801 (2005.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.074801

  12. Photonic band gap structure for a ferroelectric photonic crystal at microwave frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Chen, De-Xin; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-10-10

    In this work, the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in a one-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal (PC) is theoretically investigated. We consider a PC, air/(AB)N/air, in which layer A is a dielectric of MgO and layer B is taken to be a ferroelectric of Ba0.55Sr0.45TiO3 (BSTO). With an extremely high value in the dielectric constant in BSTO, the calculated photonic band structure at microwave frequencies exhibits some interesting features that are significantly different from those in a usual dielectric-dielectric PC. First, the photonic transmission band consists of multiple and nearly discrete transmission peaks. Second, the calculated bandwidth of the PBG is nearly unchanged as the angle of incidence varies in the TE wave. The bandwidth will slightly reduce for the TM mode. Thus, a wide omnidirectional PBG can be obtained. Additionally, the effect of the thickness of the ferroelectric layer on the PBG is much more pronounced compared to the dielectric layer thickness. That is, the increase of ferroelectric thickness can significantly decrease the PBG bandwidth.

  13. A PHOTONIC BAND GAP FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    An optical fibre having a periodicidal cladding structure provididing a photonic band gap structure with superior qualities. The periodical structure being one wherein high index areas are defined and wherein these are separated using a number of methods. One such method is the introduction...... of additional low index elements, another method is providing elongated elements deformed in relation to a circular cross section. Also described is a cladding structure comprising elongated elements of a material having an index of refraction higher than that of the material adjacent thereto. Using...

  14. Computing the band structure and energy gap of penta-graphene by using DFT and G0W0 approximations

    OpenAIRE

    Einollahzadeh, H.; Dariani, R. S.; Fazeli, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the optimum coordinate of the penta-graphene. Penta-graphene is a new stable carbon allotrope which is stronger than graphene. Here, we compare the band gap of penta-graphene with various density functional theory (DFT) methods. We plot the band structure of penta-graphene which calculated with the generalized gradient approximation functional, about Fermi energy.

  15. High power breakdown testing of a photonic band-gap accelerator structure with elliptical rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Munroe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved single-cell photonic band-gap (PBG structure with an inner row of elliptical rods (PBG-E was tested with high power at a 60 Hz repetition rate at X-band (11.424 GHz, achieving a gradient of 128  MV/m at a breakdown probability of 3.6×10^{-3} per pulse per meter at a pulse length of 150 ns. The tested standing-wave structure was a single high-gradient cell with an inner row of elliptical rods and an outer row of round rods; the elliptical rods reduce the peak surface magnetic field by 20% and reduce the temperature rise of the rods during the pulse by several tens of degrees, while maintaining good damping and suppression of high order modes. When compared with a single-cell standing-wave undamped disk-loaded waveguide structure with the same iris geometry under test at the same conditions, the PBG-E structure yielded the same breakdown rate within measurement error. The PBG-E structure showed a greatly reduced breakdown rate compared with earlier tests of a PBG structure with round rods, presumably due to the reduced magnetic fields at the elliptical rods vs the fields at the round rods, as well as use of an improved testing methodology. A post-testing autopsy of the PBG-E structure showed some damage on the surfaces exposed to the highest surface magnetic and electric fields. Despite these changes in surface appearance, no significant change in the breakdown rate was observed in testing. These results demonstrate that PBG structures, when designed with reduced surface magnetic fields and operated to avoid extremely high pulsed heating, can operate at breakdown probabilities comparable to undamped disk-loaded waveguide structures and are thus viable for high-gradient accelerator applications.

  16. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap plasma structure formed by atmospheric pressure plasma inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitski, V. S.; Callegari, Th.; Simonchik, L. V.; Sokoloff, J.; Usachonak, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The ability to use plasma columns of pulse discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure to form a one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure (or electromagnetic crystal) in the X-band waveguide is demonstrated. We show that a plasma electromagnetic crystal attenuates a microwave propagation in the stopband more than by 4 orders of magnitude. In order to obtain an effective control of the transmission spectrum comparable with a metallic regular structure, the electron concentration in plasma inhomogeneities should vary within the range from 1014 cm-3 to 1016 cm-3, while gas temperature and mean electron energy must be in the range of 2000 K and 0.5 eV, respectively, to lower electron collision frequency around 1010 s-1. We analyze in detail the time evolution response of the electromagnetic crystal according to the plasma parameters for the duration of the discharge. The interest of using atmospheric pressure discharges is to increase the microwave breakdown threshold in discharge volumes, whereby it becomes possible to perform dynamic control of high power microwaves.

  17. Dispersive and resonant properties of finite one-dimensional photonic band gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, C. M.; Scalora, Michael; Bloemer, Mark J.; Sibilia, Concita; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Centini, Marco; Bertolotti, Mario

    2000-06-01

    The report is a review of work one-dimensional photonic band gap (PBG) materials, carried out by the Quantum Optics Group at the US Army Aviation and Missile Command during the past few years. This work has benefited from national and international collaborations between academic, industrial, and governmental research organizations. The research effort has benefited from a multifaceted approach that combined innovative, theoretical methods with fabrication techniques in order to address the physics of structures of finite length, i.e., the description of spatio-temporal linear and nonlinear dynamics and boundary conditions. In this work we will review what we consider three major breakthroughs: (a) the discovery of transparent metals; (b) discovery of critical phase matching conditions in PBG structures for second harmonic and nonlinear frequency conversion; (c) development of a PBG true time delay device. Our report addresses linear and nonlinear wave propagation in PBG materials, one-dimensional structures in particular. Most investigators generally address two and three-dimensional structures. We choose one-dimensional systems because in the past they have proven to be quite challenging and have pointed the way to the new physical phenomena that are the subject of this report. In addition, one-dimensional systems can be used as a blueprint for higher dimensional structures, where the work is necessarily much more computationally intensive, and the physics much less transparent as a result.

  18. Low band gap polymers for organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    Low band gap polymer materials and their application in organic photovoltaics (OPV) are reviewed. We detail the synthetic approaches to low band gap polymer materials starting from the early methodologies employing quinoid homopolymer structures to the current state of the art that relies...... in photovoltaic applications and give a tabular overview of rarely applied materials....

  19. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Assali, S.

    2016-07-25

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp exciton α-β-γ lines are observed at 2.140–2.164–2.252 eV, respectively, showing clear differences in lifetime, presence of phonon replicas, and temperature-dependence. The excitonic nature of those peaks is critically discussed, leading to a direct band gap of ∼2.190 eV and to a resonant state associated with the γ-line ∼80 meV above the Γ8C conduction band edge.

  20. Oversized 250 GHz Traveling Wave Tube with a Photonic Band-Gap Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Guy; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2017-10-01

    The challenge in manufacturing traveling wave tubes (TWTs) at high frequencies is that the sizes of the structures scale with, and are much smaller than, the wavelength. We have designed and are building a 250 GHz TWT that uses an oversized structure to overcome fabrication and power handling issues that result from the small dimensions. Using a photonic band-gap (PBG) structure, we succeeded to design the TWT with a beam tunnel diameter of 0.72 mm. The circuit consists of metal plates with the beam tunnel drilled down their center. Twelve posts are protruding on one side of each plate in a triangular array and corresponding sockets are drilled on the other side. The posts of each plate are inserted into the sockets of an adjacent plate, forming a PBG lattice. The vacuum spacing between adjacent plates forms the `PBG cavity''. The full structure is a series of PBG coupled cavities, with microwave power coupling through the beam tunnel. The PBG lattice provides confinement of microwave power in each of the cavities and can be tuned to give the right amount of diffraction per cavity so that no sever is needed to suppress oscillations in the operating mode. CST PIC simulations predict over 38 dB gain with 67 W peak power, using a 30 kV, 310 mA electron beam, 0.6 mm in diameter. Research supported by the AFOSR Program on Plasma and Electro-Energetic Physics and by the NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  1. Artificial Oxide Heterostructures with Tunable Band Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-20

    tunable band gap and band structures in epitaxial grown CaMnO3. The efforts have been devoted to (1) the thin film growth; (2) the tunable optical...plan to pursue a claim for personal or organizational intellectual property? Changes in research objectives (if any): Change in AFOSR Program Officer

  2. Revisiting the coupled-mass system and analogy with a simple band gap structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, L

    2006-01-01

    A great deal of insight can be gained from the analysis of coupled masses connected to springs in order to understand better the origin of band gaps in physical systems. The approach is based on the application of the superposition principle for finding the general solution in simple mechanical systems involving functions, which vary periodically with time. Graphs show that sums of periodic functions oscillating at different frequencies lead to an exchange of energy from one oscillator to another in a simple mechanical system of three objects connected by identical springs. A system of a large number of masses connected to springs having the same spring constant K is then considered and compared with a system in which the spring constants alternate from K to another value G when connecting one mass to another. Using the results found from the mechanical systems, an analogy of charge oscillations excited on both uniform and corrugated surfaces is presented. The results obtained attempt to expand understanding of the origin of the band gap occurring in some systems involving periodic motions

  3. single crystal growth, x-ray structure analysis, optical band gap

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... Hg...Hgand Cl...Cl interactions are stabilizing the structures in 3D pattern. UV-vis absorption spectra illustrate the change in opticalband gap from 3.01eVto 3.42eV on replacing the metal halide group.Raman and Hyper-Raman tensors calculations were performed based on single crystal X-ray data and the ...

  4. Structural, optical and electrical properties of tin oxide thin films for application as a wide band gap semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Riti; Ahmad, Shabir; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher Majid

    2015-08-01

    Tin oxide (SnO) thin films were synthesized using thermal evaporation technique. Ultra pure metallic tin was deposited on glass substrates using thermal evaporator under high vacuum. The thickness of the tin deposited films was kept at 100nm. Subsequently, the as-deposited tin films were annealed under oxygen environment for a period of 3hrs to obtain tin oxide films. To analyse the suitability of the synthesized tin oxide films as a wide band gap semiconductor, various properties were studied. Structural parameters were studied using XRD and SEM-EDX. The optical properties were studied using UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and the electrical parameters were calculated using the Hall-setup. XRD and SEM confirmed the formation of SnO phase. Uniform texture of the film can be seen through the SEM images. Presence of traces of unoxidised Sn has also been confirmed through the XRD spectra. The band gap calculated was around 3.6eV and the optical transparency around 50%. The higher value of band gap and lower value of optical transparency can be attributed to the presence of unoxidised Sn. The values of resistivity and mobility as measured by the Hall setup were 78Ωcm and 2.92cm2/Vs respectively. The reasonable optical and electrical parameters make SnO a suitable candidate for optoelectronic and electronic device applications.

  5. Structural, optical and electrical properties of tin oxide thin films for application as a wide band gap semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Riti; Ahmad, Shabir; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher Majid, E-mail: amsiddiqui@jmi.ac.in [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Tin oxide (SnO) thin films were synthesized using thermal evaporation technique. Ultra pure metallic tin was deposited on glass substrates using thermal evaporator under high vacuum. The thickness of the tin deposited films was kept at 100nm. Subsequently, the as-deposited tin films were annealed under oxygen environment for a period of 3hrs to obtain tin oxide films. To analyse the suitability of the synthesized tin oxide films as a wide band gap semiconductor, various properties were studied. Structural parameters were studied using XRD and SEM-EDX. The optical properties were studied using UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and the electrical parameters were calculated using the Hall-setup. XRD and SEM confirmed the formation of SnO phase. Uniform texture of the film can be seen through the SEM images. Presence of traces of unoxidised Sn has also been confirmed through the XRD spectra. The band gap calculated was around 3.6eV and the optical transparency around 50%. The higher value of band gap and lower value of optical transparency can be attributed to the presence of unoxidised Sn. The values of resistivity and mobility as measured by the Hall setup were 78Ωcm and 2.92cm{sup 2}/Vs respectively. The reasonable optical and electrical parameters make SnO a suitable candidate for optoelectronic and electronic device applications.

  6. Electronic Structures, Bonding Configurations, and Band-Gap-Opening Properties of Graphene Binding with Low-Concentration Fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuhua; Stinespring, Charter D; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    To better understand the effects of low-level fluorine in graphene-based sensors, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals dispersion interactions has been employed to investigate the structure and impact of fluorine defects on the electrical properties of single-layer graphene films. The results show that both graphite-2 H and graphene have zero band gaps. When fluorine bonds to a carbon atom, the carbon atom is pulled slightly above the graphene plane, creating what is referred to as a CF defect. The lowest-binding energy state is found to correspond to two CF defects on nearest neighbor sites, with one fluorine above the carbon plane and the other below the plane. Overall this has the effect of buckling the graphene. The results further show that the addition of fluorine to graphene leads to the formation of an energy band (BF) near the Fermi level, contributed mainly from the 2p orbitals of fluorine with a small contribution from the p orbitals of the carbon. Among the 11 binding configurations studied, our results show that only in two cases does the BF serve as a conduction band and open a band gap of 0.37 eV and 0.24 eV respectively. The binding energy decreases with decreasing fluorine concentration due to the interaction between neighboring fluorine atoms. The obtained results are useful for sensor development and nanoelectronics.

  7. Theoretical aspects of photonic band gap in 1D nano structure of LN: MgLN periodic layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisodia, Namita

    2015-01-01

    By using the transfer matrix method, we have analyzed the photonic band gap properties in a periodic layer of LN:MgLN medium. The Width of alternate layers of LN and MgLN is in the range of hundred nanometers. The birefringent and ferroelectric properties of the medium (i.e ordinary, extraordinary refractive indices and electric dipole moment) is given due considerations in the formulation of photonic band gap. Effect of electronic transition dipole moment of the medium on photonic band gap is also taken into account. We find that photonic band gap can be modified by the variation in the ratio of the width of two medium. We explain our findings by obtaining numerical values and the effect on the photonic band gap due to variation in the ratio of alternate medium is shown graphically

  8. Omnidirectional photonic band gap enlarged by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haifeng [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu Shaobin [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves of Southeast University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210096 (China); Kong Xiangkun; Bian Borui; Dai Yi [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap realized by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure, which is composed of homogeneous unmagnetized plasma and two kinds of isotropic dielectric, is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method. It has been shown that such an omnidirectional photonic band gap originates from Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, and it is insensitive to the incidence angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave. From the numerical results, the frequency range and central frequency of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be tuned by the thickness and density of the plasma but cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order. The bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be notably enlarged. Moreover, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap. It is shown that such new structure Fibonacci quasiperiodic one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals have a superior feature in the enhancement of frequency range of omnidirectional photonic band gap compared with the conventional ternary and conventional Fibonacci quasiperiodic ternary plasma photonic crystals.

  9. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Munroe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM_{01} mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87  MV/m at a breakdown probability of 1.19×10^{-1} per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90  MV/m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89  MV/m at a breakdown probability of 1.09×10^{-1} per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  10. Effect of sputtering power on the structure and optical band gap of SiC thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Du, Zuojuan; Xiao, Jianrong

    2017-11-01

    Amorphous SiC (a-SiC) thin films with a quartz plate as the substrate were prepared under different radio frequency (RF) powers through RF magnetron sputtering. Films structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum. The absorption spectra of the thin films were acquired with UV-visible spectroscopy. Results showed that thin films prepared under different RF powers have different structures. With the increase in power, the maximum peak height, mean roughness, and mean square roughness increase initially and then decrease. The thin films are mainly composed of SiC and SiO2 bonds and contain abundant C. ID/IG increases as power increases. The UV-visible light absorption spectra confirmed that the thin films have strong UV absorption capacity but low absorption capacity in the infrared region. The optical band gap of the thin films ranges between 1.29 and 1.80 eV. With the increase in RF power, the sp3/sp2C hybrid bond in the thin films increases, resulting in a reduction of the optical band gap.

  11. Simulation Analysis of a Strip Dipole Excited Electromagnetic Band-Gap (EBG) Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    ℎ) �1− 1 +1 (sin)2� . (18) The angle 2 can be calculated using Snell’s law of refraction and the angle of incidence: 2...led to a wider 1 dBi realized gain bandwidth. The pattern distortions in the H-plane were also not as prevalent in the wide-gap EBG as they were in...to the dipole lengths would require a trial and error method or optimization, there still is not much of a reason to use a wider gap for the EBG

  12. Fine structure and energy spectrum of exciton in direct band gap cubic semiconductors with degenerate valence bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Toan Thang; Nguyen Ai Viet; Nguyen Que Huong

    1987-06-01

    The influence of the cubic structure on the energy spectrum of direct exciton is investigated, using the new method suggested by Nguyen Van Hieu and co-workers. Explicit expressions of the exciton energy levels 1S, 2S and 2P are derived. A comparison with the experiments and the other theory is done for ZnSe. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  13. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-03

    Nov 3, 2016 ... ... absorption edge in the near ultra-violet region got red-shifted with annealing. The calculated values of optical energy gap of the samples showed a decrease with heat treatment due to the improvement in crystallinity during annealing and hence the subsequent decrease in quantum size effect. Keywords.

  14. The effect of Y3+substitution on the structural, optical band-gap, and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, T E P; Pessoni, H V S; Franco, A

    2017-06-28

    In this study we investigated the structural, optical band-gap, and magnetic properties of CoY x Fe 2-x O 4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized using a combustion reaction method without the need for subsequent heat treatment or the calcing process. The particle size measured from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images confirms the nanostructural character in the range of 16-36 nm. The optical band-gap (E g ) values increase with the Y 3+ ion (x) concentration being 3.30 and 3.58 eV for x = 0 and x = 0.04, respectively. The presence of yttrium in the cobalt ferrite (Y-doped cobalt ferrite) structure affects the magnetic properties. For instance, the saturation magnetization, M s and remanent magnetization, M r , decrease from 69 emu g -1 to 33 and 28 to 12 emu g -1 for x = 0 and x = 0.04, respectively. On the other hand the coercivity, H c , increases from 1100 to 1900 Oe for x = 0 and x = 0.04 at room temperature. Also we found that M s , M r , and H c decreased with increasing temperature up to 773 K. The cubic magnetocrystalline constant, K 1 , determined by using the "law of approach" (LA) to saturation decreases with Y 3+ ion concentration and temperature. K 1 values for x = 0 (x = 0.04) were 3.3 × 10 6 erg cm -3 (2.0 × 10 6 erg cm -3 ) and 0.4 × 10 6 erg cm -3 (0.3 × 10 6 erg cm -3 ) at 300 K and 773 K, respectively. The results were discussed in terms of inter-particle interactions induced by thermal fluctuations, and Co 2+ ion distribution over tetrahedral A-sites and octahedral B-sites of the spinel structure due to Y 3+ ion substitution.

  15. Probing the Electronic Structure and Band Gap Evolution of Titanium Oxide Clusters (TiO2)n- (n=1-10) Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Hua-jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-01-01

    TiO2 is a wide-band gap semiconductor and it is an important material for photocatalysis. Here we report an experimental investigation of the electronic structure of (TiO2)n clusters and how their band gap evolves as a function of size using anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). PES spectra of (TiO2)n- clusters for n = 1-10 have been obtained at 193 (6.424 eV) and 157 nm (7.866 eV). The high photon energy at 157 nm allows the band gap of the TiO2 clusters to be clearly revealed up to n = 10. The band gap is observed to be strongly size-dependent for n 1 appears to be localized in a tricoordinated Ti atom, creating a single Ti3+ site and making these clusters ideal molecular models for mechanistic understanding of TiO2 surface defects and photocatalytic properties

  16. Grain size dependent optical band gap of CdI2 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    direct band gap in conformity with band structure calcula- tions. However, a smaller indirect band gap can also be determined from part of absorption data near the band edge for the purpose of comparison with earlier analyses of absorption data as well as the band structure calcula- tions. The decreasing band gap with film ...

  17. Calculation of wakefields in a 17 GHz beam-driven photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the theoretical analysis and computer simulation of the wakefields in a 17 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG structure for accelerator applications. Using the commercial code CST Particle Studio, the fundamental accelerating mode and dipole modes are excited by passing an 18 MeV electron beam through a seven-cell traveling-wave PBG structure. The characteristics of the longitudinal and transverse wakefields, wake potential spectrum, dipole mode distribution, and their quality factors are calculated and analyzed theoretically. Unlike in conventional disk-loaded waveguide (DLW structures, three dipole modes (TM_{11}-like, TM_{12}-like, and TM_{13}-like are excited in the PBG structure with comparable initial amplitudes. These modes are separated by less than 4 GHz in frequency and are damped quickly due to low radiative Q factors. Simulations verify that a PBG structure provides wakefield damping relative to a DLW structure. Simulations were done with both single-bunch excitation to determine the frequency spectrum of the wakefields and multibunch excitation to compare to wakefield measurements taken at MIT using a 17 GHz bunch train. These simulation results will guide the design of next-generation high-gradient accelerator PBG structures.

  18. Modelling and design of complete photonic band gaps in two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photonic crystal; complete photonic band gap; plane-wave expansion method. PACS Nos 71.20; 42.70.Q. 1. Introduction. Photonic band gap structures/photonic crystals, especially two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, which are dielectric structures periodic on length scale, have recently achieved much attention, as they ...

  19. Band-gap and band-edge engineering of multicomponent garnet scintillators from first principles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yadav, S.K.; Uberuaga, B.P.; Nikl, Martin; Jiang, C.; Stanek, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 5 (2015), "054012-1"-"054012-9" ISSN 2331-7019 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * electronic band gap structure * garnets * band gap engineering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.061, year: 2015

  20. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of vacuum annealing on the structural and optical properties of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn 0.75 Mg 0.25 O alloy. XRD studies revealed that all these films werepolycrystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure and there was no trace of additional phases other than ZnO.

  1. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  2. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of vacuum annealing on the structural and optical properties of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn 0.75 Mg 0.25 O alloy. XRD studies revealed that all these films werepolycrystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure and there was no trace of additional phases other than ZnO.

  3. Photonic band gap effect and structural color from silver nanoparticle gelatin emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Mang Hin; Ma, Rui; Lee, Jeffrey Chi Wai; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Sheng, Ping; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2005-10-01

    We have fabricated planar structures of silver nanoparticles in monochromatic gelatin emulsion with a continuous spacing ranging from 0.15-0.40 micron using a two-beam interference of a single laser source. Our planar holograms display a colorful "rainbow" pattern and photonic bandgaps covering the visible and IR ranges. We model the planar silver nanoparticle-gelatin composite system using an effective medium approach and good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment.

  4. Large sonic band gaps in 12-fold quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun; Zhang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    2002-05-01

    The sonic band-gap structures of 12-fold symmetry quasicrystals consisting of rigid cylinders in air are investigated by using the multiple scattering method. Large full gaps are found in this system owing to its high symmetry. At filling fractions between 0.2 and 0.4, this 12-fold square-triangle tiling is much better for the realization of sonic band gaps than the square or triangular lattice. This makes the 12-fold quasicrystal a promising structure for acoustic-wave band-gap materials.

  5. Thermal stability of the optical band gap and structural order in hot-wire-deposited amorphous silicon

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arendse, CJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available and that the structural disorder increases upon annealing. The increase in the structural disorder results in a broadening of the valence and conduction band tails, thereby pinning the valence and conduction band edges closer together, resulting in a decrease...

  6. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic band gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold fil embedded...... in polymer. Radiation is delivered to and from the PC structures with the help of LR-SPP guides that consist of 8 mm wide and 15 nm thick gold stripes attached to wide film sections (of the same thickness) covered with bumps (diameter ~300 nm, height up to 150 nm on each side of the film). We investigate......, is rather weak, so that the photonic bandgap effect might be expected to take place only for some particular propagation directions. Preliminary experiments on LR-SPP bending and splitting at large angles are reported, and further research directions are discussed....

  7. Effect of elastic strain on the band gaps, band alignment, and electronic structure of epitaxial ASnO3 (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba) films and heterostructures revealed through in situ photoemission, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniecki, John; Yamazaki, Takashi; Aso, Hiroyuki; Imanaka, Yoshihiko; Ricinschi, Dan

    The alkaline earth stannates ASnO3 (A = Ba, Sr, and Ca) are emerging as important materials. Band gaps in stannates are remarkably dependent on volumetric strain with a decrease in volumetric strain of 3 percent in SrSnO3 resulting in an increase in the band gap of 0.35 eV. However, little understanding of volumetric strain dependence on the valence band (VB) electronic structure and band alignments between stannates and other oxides exits. In this talk we will examine the effect of elastic strain on the band gaps, band alignment, and electronic structure of stannate films and heterostructures through in situ photoemission, spectroscopic ellipsometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy with geometric phase analysis, and density functional theory. CaSnO3 (CSO), SrSnO3 (SSO) and La-doped BaSnO3 (BLSO) thin films were grown by pulsed laser epitaxy with strain control via epitaxial buffer layers. While the VB electronic structure is strain dependent VB offsets do not vary significantly with strain, which resulted in ascribing most of the difference in band alignment to the conduction band (CB) edge. Significantly, strain-induced tuning of CB offset differences are as large as 0.6 eV for SSO and may provide a pathway to enhance stannate-based devices.

  8. Pulsed laser deposited BexZn1-xO1-ySy quaternary alloy films: structure, composition, and band gap bowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuzhong; Xu, Maji; Zhang, Mi; Cheng, Hailing; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Qingfeng; Lu, Yinmei; Chen, Jingwen; Chen, Changqing; He, Yunbin

    2018-03-01

    In this work, c-axis preferentially oriented BexZn1-xO1-ySy (BeZnOS) quaternary alloy films were prepared successfully on c-plane sapphire by pulsed laser deposition for the first time. By appropriate adjustment of O2 pressure during the deposition, the grown films exhibited a single-phase hexagonal structure and good crystalline quality. The solid solubility of S in BexZn1-xO1-ySy quaternary alloy was significantly expanded (y ≤ 0.17 or y ≥ 0.35) as a result of simultaneous substitution of cation Zn2+ by smaller Be2+ and anion O2- by bigger S2-. Besides, due to the introduction of BeO with a wide band gap, BeZnOS quaternary films exhibited wider band gaps than the ternary ZnOS films with similar S contents. As the O2 pressure increased from 0.05 Pa to 6 Pa, the band gap of BeZnOS displayed an interesting bowing behavior. The variation range of the band gap was between 3.55 eV and 3.10 eV. The BeZnOS films with a wide band gap show potential applications in fabricating optoelectronic devices such as UV-detectors.

  9. Bands and gaps in Nekrasov partition function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsky, A.; Milekhin, A.; Sopenko, N.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the effective twisted superpotentials of 2d N = (2, 2) theories arising upon the reduction of 4d N = 2 gauge theories on the Ω-deformed cigar-like geometry. We explain field-theoretic origins of the gaps in the spectrum in the corresponding quantum mechanical (QM) systems. We find local 2d descriptions of the physics near these gaps by resumming the non-perturbative part of the twisted superpotential and discuss arising wall-crossing phenomena. The interpretation of the associated phenomena in the classical Liouville theory and in the scattering of two heavy states in AdS3 gravity is suggested. Some comments concerning a possible interpretation of the band structure in QM in terms of the Schwinger monopole-pair production in 4d are presented.

  10. Wide band gap semiconductor templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Stan, Liliana (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); DePaula, Raymond F. (Santa Fe, NM); Usov, Igor O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-12-14

    The present invention relates to a thin film structure based on an epitaxial (111)-oriented rare earth-Group IVB oxide on the cubic (001) MgO terminated surface and the ion-beam-assisted deposition ("IBAD") techniques that are amendable to be over coated by semiconductors with hexagonal crystal structures. The IBAD magnesium oxide ("MgO") technology, in conjunction with certain template materials, is used to fabricate the desired thin film array. Similarly, IBAD MgO with appropriate template layers can be used for semiconductors with cubic type crystal structures.

  11. Conduction bands and invariant energy gaps in alkali bromides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations of the alkali bromides LiBr, NaBr, KBr, RbBr and CsBr are reported. It is shown that the conduction band has primarily bromine character. The size of the band gaps of bromides and alkali halides in general is reinterpreted.

  12. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  13. Pinpointing Gap Minima in Ba(Fe0:94Co0:06)2 via Band Structure Calculations and Electronic Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    structure for the Fe-pnictide superconductors is still rather rudimentary, with several conflicting reports of either nodes, deep gap minima, or fully...2. PACS numbers: 74.25.nd,74.70.Xa,74.20.Pq,71.15.Mb Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictides, identifying the...a substantial interband contribution deriving largely from these same bands. These results support the conjecture based on symmetry in Ref. 6 that

  14. Metallic photonic band-gap materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigalas, M.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.; Soukoulis, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the transmission and absorption of electromagnetic waves propagating in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D periodic metallic photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. For 2D systems, there is substantial difference between the s- and p-polarized waves. The p-polarized waves exhibit behavior similar to the dielectric PBG's. But, the s-polarized waves have a cutoff frequency below which there are no propagating modes. For 3D systems, the results are qualitatively the same for both polarizations but there are important differences related to the topology of the structure. For 3D structures with isolated metallic scatterers (cermet topology), the behavior is similar to that of the dielectric PBG's, while for 3D structures with the metal forming a continuous network (network topology), there is a cutoff frequency below which there are no propagating modes. The systems with the network topology may have some interesting applications for frequencies less than about 1 THz where the absorption can be neglected. We also study the role of the defects in the metallic structures

  15. Band gap engineering strategy via polarization rotation in perovskite ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fenggong; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a strategy to engineer the band gaps of perovskite oxide ferroelectrics, supported by first principles calculations. We find that the band gaps of perovskites can be substantially reduced by as much as 1.2 eV through local rhombohedral-to-tetragonal structural transition. Furthermore, the strong polarization of the rhombohedral perovskite is largely preserved by its tetragonal counterpart. The B-cation off-center displacements and the resulting enhancement of the antibonding character in the conduction band give rise to the wider band gaps of the rhombohedral perovskites. The correlation between the structure, polarization orientation, and electronic structure lays a good foundation for understanding the physics of more complex perovskite solid solutions and provides a route for the design of photovoltaic perovskite ferroelectrics

  16. Band-gap engineering in fluorographene nanoribbons under uniaxial strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan, E-mail: bingbing@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: liqun@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Qunxiang, E-mail: bingbing@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: liqun@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-01-28

    Based on extensive first-principles calculations, we report the structural and electronic properties of fluorinated graphene, i.e., fluorographene nanoribbons (FGNRs) under uniaxial strain. Our results indicate that the FGNRs are semiconductors with wide direct band gaps regardless of their edge structures. Moreover, the band gap of FGNR can be effectively modulated nonlinearly with the applied uniaxial elastic strain, where the band gap value increases first and then reduces when the applied strain changes from −10.0% to 10.0%. This abnormal behavior mainly originates from the electronic structures of valence and conduction band edges, which is quite different from previously reported linear behavior on graphene nanoribbon. Our results imply the great potential applications of FGNRs in the optical electronics.

  17. Structure and red shift of optical band gap in CdO–ZnO nanocomposite synthesized by the sol gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera, Edgar, E-mail: edemova@ing.uchile.cl [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Tupper 2069, Santiago (Chile); Pozo, Ignacio del, E-mail: ignacio.dpf@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Matemáticas y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Av. José Pedro Alessandri 1242, Santiago (Chile); Morel, Mauricio, E-mail: mmorel@ing.uchile.cl [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Tupper 2069, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    The structure and the optical band gap of CdO–ZnO nanocomposites were studied. Characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) analysis confirms that CdO phase is present in the nanocomposites. TEM analysis confirms the formation of spheroidal nanoparticles and nanorods. The particle size was calculated from Debey–Sherrer′s formula and corroborated by TEM images. FTIR spectroscopy shows residual organic materials (aromatic/Olefinic carbon) from nanocomposites surface. CdO content was modified in the nanocomposites in function of polyvinylalcohol (PVA) added. The optical band gap is found to be red shift from 3.21 eV to 3.11 eV with the increase of CdO content. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements reveal the existence of defects in the synthesized CdO–ZnO nanocomposites. - Graphical abstract: Optical properties of ZnO, CdO and ZnO/CdO nanoparticles. Display Omitted - Highlights: • TEM analysis confirms the presence of spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. • The CdO phase is present in the nanocomposites. • The band gap of the CdO–ZnO nanocomposites is slightly red shift with CdO content. • PL emission of CdO–ZnO nanocomposite are associated to structural defects.

  18. Band gap engineering of BC2N for nanoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wei Hong; Hamzah, Afiq; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Ismail, Razali

    2017-12-01

    The BC2N as an example of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN), has the analogous structure as the graphene and boron nitride. It is predicted to have controllable electronic properties. Therefore, the analytical study on the engineer-able band gap of the BC2N is carried out based on the schematic structure of BC2N. The Nearest Neighbour Tight Binding (NNTB) model is employed with the dispersion relation and the density of state (DOS) as the main band gap analysing parameter. The results show that the hopping integrals having the significant effect on the band gap, band structure and DOS of BC2N nanowire (BC2NNW) need to be taken into consideration. The presented model indicates consistent trends with the published computational results around the Dirac points with the extracted band gap of 0.12 eV. Also, it is distinguished that wide energy gap of boron nitride (BN) is successfully narrowed by this carbon doped material which assures the application of BC2N on the nanoelectronics and optoelectronics in the near future.

  19. Band gap tuning of amorphous Al oxides by Zr alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Jones, N. C.; Borca, C. N.

    2016-01-01

    The optical band gap and electronic structure of amorphous Al-Zr mixed oxides, with Zr content ranging from4.8 to 21.9% were determined using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Thelight scattering by the nano-porous structure of alumina at low wavelengths was estima...

  20. Designing Phononic Crystals with Wide and Robust Band Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zian; Chen, Yanyu; Yang, Haoxiang; Wang, Lifeng

    2018-04-01

    Phononic crystals (PnCs) engineered to manipulate and control the propagation of mechanical waves have enabled the design of a range of novel devices, such as waveguides, frequency modulators, and acoustic cloaks, for which wide and robust phononic band gaps are highly preferable. While numerous PnCs have been designed in recent decades, to the best of our knowledge, PnCs that possess simultaneous wide and robust band gaps (to randomness and deformations) have not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that by combining the band-gap formation mechanisms of Bragg scattering and local resonances (the latter one is dominating), PnCs with wide and robust phononic band gaps can be established. The robustness of the phononic band gaps are then discussed from two aspects: robustness to geometric randomness (manufacture defects) and robustness to deformations (mechanical stimuli). Analytical formulations further predict the optimal design parameters, and an uncertainty analysis quantifies the randomness effect of each designing parameter. Moreover, we show that the deformation robustness originates from a local resonance-dominant mechanism together with the suppression of structural instability. Importantly, the proposed PnCs require only a small number of layers of elements (three unit cells) to obtain broad, robust, and strong attenuation bands, which offer great potential in designing flexible and deformable phononic devices.

  1. Designing Phononic Crystals with Wide and Robust Band Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanyu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jia, Zian [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Yang, Haoxiang [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Wang, Lifeng [State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2018-04-16

    Phononic crystals (PnCs) engineered to manipulate and control the propagation of mechanical waves have enabled the design of a range of novel devices, such as waveguides, frequency modulators, and acoustic cloaks, for which wide and robust phononic band gaps are highly preferable. While numerous PnCs have been designed in recent decades, to the best of our knowledge, PnCs that possess simultaneous wide and robust band gaps (to randomness and deformations) have not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that by combining the band-gap formation mechanisms of Bragg scattering and local resonances (the latter one is dominating), PnCs with wide and robust phononic band gaps can be established. The robustness of the phononic band gaps are then discussed from two aspects: robustness to geometric randomness (manufacture defects) and robustness to deformations (mechanical stimuli). Analytical formulations further predict the optimal design parameters, and an uncertainty analysis quantifies the randomness effect of each designing parameter. Moreover, we show that the deformation robustness originates from a local resonance-dominant mechanism together with the suppression of structural instability. Importantly, the proposed PnCs require only a small number of layers of elements (three unit cells) to obtain broad, robust, and strong attenuation bands, which offer great potential in designing flexible and deformable phononic devices.

  2. Study of optical band gap, carbonaceous clusters and structuring in CR-39 and PET polymers irradiated by 100 MeV O 7+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R. C.; Chandra, Subhash; Negi, Ambika; Rana, J. M. S.; Annapoorni, S.; Sonkawade, R. G.; Kulriya, P. K.; Srivastava, A.

    2009-01-01

    Commercially purchased CR-39 and PET polymers were irradiated by 100 MeV O 7+ ions of varying fluences, ranging from 1×10 11 to 1×10 13 ions/cm 2. The effects of swift heavy ions (SHI) on the structural, optical and chemical properties of CR-39 and PET polymers were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The XRD patterns of CR-39 show that the intensity of the peak decreases with increasing ion fluence, which indicates that the semicrystalline structure of polymer changes to amorphous with increasing fluences. The XRD patterns of PET show a slight increase in the intensity of the peaks, indicating an increase in the crystallinity. The UV-visible spectra show the shift in the absorbance edge towards the higher wavelength, indicating the change in band gap. Band gap in PET and CR-39 found to be decrease from 3.87 to 2.91 and 5.3-3.5 eV, respectively. The cluster size also shows a variation in the carbon atoms per cluster that varies from 42 to 96 in CR-39 and from 78 to 139 in PET. The FTIR spectra show an overall reduction in intensity of the typical bands, indicating the degradation of polymers after irradiation.

  3. Band gap tuning of amorphous Al oxides by Zr alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canulescu, S., E-mail: stec@fotonik.dtu.dk; Schou, J. [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Borca, C. N.; Piamonteze, C. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Rechendorff, K.; Nielsen, L. P.; Almtoft, K. P. [Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Alle 29, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Gudla, V. C.; Bordo, K.; Ambat, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs-Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-08-29

    The optical band gap and electronic structure of amorphous Al-Zr mixed oxides with Zr content ranging from 4.8 to 21.9% were determined using vacuum ultraviolet and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The light scattering by the nano-porous structure of alumina at low wavelengths was estimated based on the Mie scattering theory. The dependence of the optical band gap of the Al-Zr mixed oxides on the Zr content deviates from linearity and decreases from 7.3 eV for pure anodized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to 6.45 eV for Al-Zr mixed oxides with a Zr content of 21.9%. With increasing Zr content, the conduction band minimum changes non-linearly as well. Fitting of the energy band gap values resulted in a bowing parameter of ∼2 eV. The band gap bowing of the mixed oxides is assigned to the presence of the Zr d-electron states localized below the conduction band minimum of anodized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  4. Spin-orbit band gaps and destruction of Dirac cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovkin, I. N.

    2017-08-01

    The relativistic band structures of the IV group honeycomb monolayers, from graphene to plumbene (C-Si-Ge-Sn-Pb), have been calculated within DFT in Local Density Approximation (LDA). Basing on the obtained results, we suggest that the spin-orbit coupling leads to opening of the band gaps and therefore will unavoidably cause the destruction of the perfect shape of Dirac cones which is responsible for the existence of the massless Fermions. The applicability of ordinary non-relativistic DFT calculations of bands for graphene-like layered structures is discussed in this regard.

  5. Consideration of the band-gap tunability of BaSi2 by alloying with Ca or Sr based on the electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Yoji; Watanabe, Akio

    2007-01-01

    The electronic structures and total energies of BaSi 2 -SrSi 2 and BaSi 2 -CaSi 2 systems have been calculated using the first-principle pseudopotential method to clarify the band gap tunability of BaSi 2 by alloying with Sr or Ca. From an energetic consideration of the compounds where all the Ba I sites or all the Ba II sites of the BaSi 2 lattice are preferentially replaced by Sr or Ca, it is expected that the Ba I site will be preferentially replaced by Sr rather than the Ba II sites. Compounds where all the Ba II sites are replaced by Sr or all the Ba II or all the Ba I sites are replaced by Ca are energetically unfavorable compared to the undissolved system of BaSi 2 and SrSi 2 or CaSi 2 . The effect of the addition of Sr or Ca into the BaSi 2 lattice on the gap value is different depending on the replaced sites of Ba. The replacement of Ba I site by Sr will broaden the band gap of BaSi 2 , which is consistent with the observed results

  6. Opening complete band gaps in two dimensional locally resonant phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Wang, Longqi

    2018-05-01

    Locally resonant phononic crystals (LRPCs) which have low frequency band gaps attract a growing attention in both scientific and engineering field recently. Wide complete locally resonant band gaps are the goal for researchers. In this paper, complete band gaps are achieved by carefully designing the geometrical properties of the inclusions in two dimensional LRPCs. The band structures and mechanisms of different types of models are investigated by the finite element method. The translational vibration patterns in both the in-plane and out-of-plane directions contribute to the full band gaps. The frequency response of the finite periodic structures demonstrate the attenuation effects in the complete band gaps. Moreover, it is found that the complete band gaps can be further widened and lowered by increasing the height of the inclusions. The tunable properties by changing the geometrical parameters provide a good way to open wide locally resonant band gaps.

  7. Selective femtosecond laser structuring of dielectric thin films with different band gaps: a time-resolved study of ablation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have been increasingly gaining importance for the selective structuring of dielectric thin films in industrial applications. In a variety of works the ablation of thin SiO2 and SiNx films from Si substrates has been investigated with near infrared laser wavelengths with photon energies of about 1.2 eV where both dielectrics are transparent (E_{{gap,SiO2}}≈ 8 eV; E_{{gap,SiN}x}≈ 2.5 eV). In these works it was found that few 100 nm thick SiO2 films are selectively ablated with a "lift-off" initiated by confined laser ablation whereas the SiN_{{x}} films are ablated by a combination of confined and direct laser ablation. In the work at hand, ultrafast pump-probe imaging was applied to compare the laser ablation dynamics of the two thin film systems directly with the uncoated Si substrate—on the same setup and under identical parameters. On the SiO2 sample, results show the pulse absorption in the Si substrate, leading to the confined ablation of the SiO2 layer by the expansion of the substrate. On the SiN_{{x}} sample, direct absorption in the layer is observed leading to its removal by evaporation. The pump-probe measurements combined with reflectivity corrected threshold fluence investigations suggest that melting of the Si substrate is sufficient to initiate the lift-off of an overlaying transparent film—evaporation of the substrate seems not to be necessary.

  8. Analysis of photonic band gap in novel piezoelectric photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malar Kodi, A.; Doni Pon, V.; Joseph Wilson, K. S.

    2018-03-01

    The transmission properties of one-dimensional novel photonic crystal having silver-doped novel piezoelectric superlattice and air as the two constituent layers have been investigated by means of transfer matrix method. By changing the appropriate thickness of the layers and filling factor of nanocomposite system, the variation in the photonic band gap can be studied. It is found that the photonic band gap increases with the filling factor of the metal nanocomposite and with the thickness of the layer. These structures possess unique characteristics enabling one to operate as optical waveguides, selective filters, optical switches, integrated piezoelectric microactuators, etc.

  9. Sub-band-gap laser micromachining of lithium niobate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, F. K.; Müllenborn, Matthias

    1995-01-01

    Laser processing of insulators and semiconductors is usually realized using photon energies exceeding the band-gap energy. This makes laser processing of insulators difficult since high photon energies typically require either a pulsed laser or a frequency-doubled continuous-wave laser. A new...... method is reported which enables us to do laser processing of lithium niobate using sub-band-gap photons. Using high scan speeds, moderate power densities, and sub-band-gap photon energies results in volume removal rates in excess of 106µm3/s. This enables fast micromachining of small piezoelectric...... structures, or simple etching of grooves for precision positioning of optical fibers. ©1995 American Institute of Physics....

  10. Topological Design of Cellular Phononic Band Gap Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang Fan; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei

    2016-03-10

    This paper systematically investigated the topological design of cellular phononic crystals with a maximized gap size between two adjacent bands. Considering that the obtained structures may sustain a certain amount of static loadings, it is desirable to ensure the optimized designs to have a relatively high stiffness. To tackle this issue, we conducted a multiple objective optimization to maximize band gap size and bulk or shear modulus simultaneously with a prescribed volume fraction of solid material so that the resulting structures can be lightweight, as well. In particular, we first conducted the finite element analysis of the phononic band gap crystals and then adapted a very efficient optimization procedure to resolve this problem based on bi-directional evolutionary structure optimization (BESO) algorithm in conjunction with the homogenization method. A number of optimization results for maximizing band gaps with bulk and shear modulus constraints are presented for out-of-plane and in-plane modes. Numerical results showed that the optimized structures are similar to those obtained for composite case, except that additional slim connections are added in the cellular case to support the propagation of shear wave modes and meanwhile to satisfy the prescribed bulk or shear modulus constraints.

  11. Topological Design of Cellular Phononic Band Gap Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fan Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper systematically investigated the topological design of cellular phononic crystals with a maximized gap size between two adjacent bands. Considering that the obtained structures may sustain a certain amount of static loadings, it is desirable to ensure the optimized designs to have a relatively high stiffness. To tackle this issue, we conducted a multiple objective optimization to maximize band gap size and bulk or shear modulus simultaneously with a prescribed volume fraction of solid material so that the resulting structures can be lightweight, as well. In particular, we first conducted the finite element analysis of the phononic band gap crystals and then adapted a very efficient optimization procedure to resolve this problem based on bi-directional evolutionary structure optimization (BESO algorithm in conjunction with the homogenization method. A number of optimization results for maximizing band gaps with bulk and shear modulus constraints are presented for out-of-plane and in-plane modes. Numerical results showed that the optimized structures are similar to those obtained for composite case, except that additional slim connections are added in the cellular case to support the propagation of shear wave modes and meanwhile to satisfy the prescribed bulk or shear modulus constraints.

  12. Ultrawide band gap amorphous oxide semiconductor, Ga–Zn–O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junghwan, E-mail: JH.KIM@lucid.msl.titech.ac.jp [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Miyokawa, Norihiko; Sekiya, Takumi; Ide, Keisuke [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Toda, Yoshitake [Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox SE-6, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox SE-6, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-09-01

    We fabricated amorphous oxide semiconductor films, a-(Ga{sub 1–x}Zn{sub x})O{sub y}, at room temperature on glass, which have widely tunable band gaps (E{sub g}) ranging from 3.47–4.12 eV. The highest electron Hall mobility ~ 7 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} was obtained for E{sub g} = ~ 3.8 eV. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy revealed that the increase in E{sub g} with increasing the Ga content comes mostly from the deepening of the valence band maximum level while the conduction band minimum level remains almost unchanged. These characteristics are explained by their electronic structures. As these films can be fabricated at room temperature on plastic, this achievement extends the applications of flexible electronics to opto-electronic integrated circuits associated with deep ultraviolet region. - Highlights: • Incorporation of H/H{sub 2}O stabilizes the amorphous phase. • Ultrawide band gap (~ 3.8 eV) amorphous oxide semiconductor was fabricated. • The increase in band gap comes mostly from the deepening of the valence band maximum level. • Donor level is more likely aligned to the valence band maximum level.

  13. Photonic band structure computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, D; Frank, M; Busch, K; Wolfle, P

    2001-01-29

    We introduce a novel algorithm for band structure computations based on multigrid methods. In addition, we demonstrate how the results of these band structure calculations may be used to compute group velocities and effective photon masses. The results are of direct relevance to studies of pulse propagation in such materials.

  14. Effect of deposition temperature on the structural, morphological and optical band gap of lead selenide thin films synthesized by chemical bath deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hone, Fekadu Gashaw, E-mail: fekeye@gmail.com [Hawassa University, Department of Physics, Hawassa (Ethiopia); Ampong, Francis Kofi [Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Kumasi (Ghana)

    2016-11-01

    Lead selenide (PbSe) nanocrystalline thin films have been deposited on silica glass substrates by the chemical bath deposition technique. The samples were deposited at the bath temperatures of 60, 75 and 90 °C respectively and characterized by a variety of techniques. The XRD results revealed that the PbSe thin film deposited at 60 °C was amorphous in nature. Films deposited at higher temperatures exhibited sharp and intense diffraction peaks, indicating an improvement in crystallinety. The deposition temperature also had a strong influence on the preferred orientation of the crystallites as well as other structural parameters such as microstrain and dislocation density. From the SEM study it was observed that film deposited at 90 °C had well defined crystallites, uniformly distributed over the entire surface of the substrate. The EDAX study confirmed that the samples deposited at the higher temperature had a better stoichiometric ratio. The optical band gap varied from 2.26 eV to 1.13 eV with increasing deposition temperature. - Highlights: • The crystallinety of the films improved as the deposition temperature increased. • The deposition temperature strongly influenced the preferred orientations. • Microstrain and dislocation density are decreased linearly with deposition temperature. • Band gap decreased from 2.26 eV to 1.13 eV as the deposition temperature increased.

  15. Energy band structure calculations based on screened Hartree-Fock exchange method: Si, AlP, AlAs, GaP, and GaAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Asai, Yoshihiro

    2010-06-14

    The screening effect on the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange term plays a key role in the investigation of solid-state materials by first-principles electronic structure calculations. We recently proposed a novel screened HF exchange potential, in which the inverse of the dielectric constant represents the fraction of the HF exchange term incorporated into the potential. We demonstrated that this approach can be used to reproduce the energy band structure of diamond well [T. Shimazaki and Y. Asai, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164702 (2009)]. In the present paper, we report that the screened HF exchange method is applicable to other semiconductors such as silicon, AlP, AlAs, GaP, and GaAs.

  16. Energy bands and gaps near an impurity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihóková, Eva; Schulman, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 41 (2016), s. 3430-3433 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09876S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : crystal structure * impurity * modeling * energy bands Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.772, year: 2016

  17. Electronic band transformation from indirect gap to direct gap in Si–H compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian-Ning, Ding; Ning-Yi, Yuan; Jun-Xiong, Wang; Biao, Kan; Xiao-Shuang, Chen

    2010-01-01

    The electronic band structures of periodic models for Si–H compounds are investigated by the density functional theory. Our results show that the Si–H compound changes from indirect-gap semiconductor to direct-gap semiconductor with the increase of H content. The density of states, the partial density of states and the atomic charge population are examined in detail to explore the origin of this phenomenon. It is found that the Si–Si bonds are affected by H atoms, which results in the electronic band transformation from indirect gap to direct gap. This is confirmed by the nearest neighbour semi-empirical tight-binding (TB) theory. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. Formation of Degenerate Band Gaps in Layered Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey P. Vinogradov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the review, peculiarities of spectra of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of anisotropic and/or magnetooptic materials are considered. The attention is focused on band gaps of a special type—the so called degenerate band gaps which are degenerate with respect to polarization. Mechanisms of formation and properties of these band gaps are analyzed. Peculiarities of spectra of photonic crystals that arise due to the linkage between band gaps are discussed. Particularly, it is shown that formation of a frozen mode is caused by linkage between Brillouin and degenerate band gaps. Also, existence of the optical Borrmann effect at the boundaries of degenerate band gaps and optical Tamm states at the frequencies of degenerate band gaps are analyzed.

  19. A model for the direct-to-indirect band-gap transition in monolayer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-28

    , within ab-initio electronic structure calculations, that a modest biaxial tensile strain of 3% can drive it into an indirect band-gap semiconductor with the valence band maximum (VBM) shifting from point to point. An analysis ...

  20. Photonic Band Gap Accelerator Demonstration at Ku-Band.

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Evgenya I; Edwards, Randall L; Kesar, Amit S; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Temkin, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the design and cold test of a metal Ku-band PBG accelerator structure. The 17.140 GHz 6-cell PBG accelerator structure with reduced long-range wakefields was designed for the experiment. The copper structure was electroformed and cold-tested. Tuning was performed through chemical etching of the rods. Final cold test measurements were found to be in very good agreement with the design. The structure will be installed on the beam line at the accelerator laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and will be powered with 3 MW of peak power from the Haimson 17.14 GHz klystron. Results of the design, fabrication, cold test and hot test on the Haimson accelerator will be presented.

  1. Engineering the hypersonic phononic band gap of hybrid Bragg stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Dirk; Liaqat, Faroha; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; El Hassouani, Youssef; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Tremel, Wolfgang; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Fytas, George

    2012-06-13

    We report on the full control of phononic band diagrams for periodic stacks of alternating layers of poly(methyl methacrylate) and porous silica combining Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. These structures exhibit large and robust on-axis band gaps determined by the longitudinal sound velocities, densities, and spacing ratio. A facile tuning of the gap width is realized at oblique incidence utilizing the vector nature of the elastic wave propagation. Off-axis propagation involves sagittal waves in the individual layers, allowing access to shear moduli at nanoscale. The full theoretical description discerns the most important features of the hypersonic one-dimensional crystals forward to a detailed understanding, a precondition to engineer dispersion relations in such structures.

  2. Photovoltaic properties of low band gap ferroelectric perovskite oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Paudel, Tula; Dong, Shuai; Tsymbal, Evgeny

    2015-03-01

    Low band gap ferroelectric perovskite oxides are promising for photovoltaic applications due to their high absorption in the visible optical spectrum and a possibility of having large open circuit voltage. Additionally, an intrinsic electric field present in these materials provides a bias for electron-hole separation without requiring p-n junctions as in conventional solar cells. High quality thin films of these compounds can be grown with atomic layer precision allowing control over surface and defect properties. Initial screening based on the electronic band gap and the energy dependent absorption coefficient calculated within density functional theory shows that hexagonal rare-earth manganites and ferrites are promising as photovoltaic absorbers. As a model, we consider hexagonal TbMnO3. This compound has almost ideal band gap of about 1.4 eV, very high ferroelectric Curie temperature, and can be grown epitaxially. Additionally hexagonal TbMnO3 offers possibility of coherent structure with transparent conductor ZnO. We find that the absorption is sufficiently high and dominated by interband transitions between the Mn d-bands. We will present the theoretically calculated photovoltaic efficiency of hexagonal TbMnO3 and explore other ferroelectric perovskite oxides.

  3. Crystal Structure and Band-Gap Engineering of a Semiconducting Coordination Polymer Consisting of Copper(I) Bromide and a Bridging Acceptor Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Takashi; Himoto, Kento; Tanishima, Koki; Fukuda, Sanshiro; Noda, Yusuke; Nakayama, Masanobu; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Maekawa, Masahiko; Kuroda-Sowa, Takayoshi

    2018-03-05

    A new semiconducting 3D coordination polymer, [Cu 2 Br 2 (ttz)] n (1), with an acceptor bridging ligand, 1,2,4,5-tetrazine (ttz), was synthesized. The complex shows large absorption bands extending to the near-IR region, indicating a small band gap in the coordination polymer. This complex shows higher conductivity than those of [CuBr(pyz)] n (2), including pyrazine (pyz) with a higher lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level. We performed density functional theory band calculations using the VASP program to understand the electronic states and conducting paths of the coordination polymer.

  4. Review of wide band-gap semiconductors technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC and gallium nitride (GaN are typical representative of the wide band-gap semiconductor material, which is also known as third-generation semiconductor materials. Compared with the conventional semiconductor silicon (Si or gallium arsenide (GaAs, wide band-gap semiconductor has the wide band gap, high saturated drift velocity, high critical breakdown field and other advantages; it is a highly desirable semiconductor material applied under the case of high-power, high-temperature, high-frequency, anti-radiation environment. These advantages of wide band-gap devices make them a hot spot of semiconductor technology research in various countries. This article describes the research agenda of United States and European in this area, focusing on the recent developments of the wide band-gap technology in the US and Europe, summed up the facing challenge of the wide band-gap technology.

  5. Thermoelectric power factor of La0.9M0.1FeO3 (M = Ca and Ba) system: Structural, band gap and electrical transport evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N.; Kumar, R. Ramesh; Jaiganesh, G.; Sivakumar, K.

    2018-01-01

    The search for thermoelectric materials has been incredibly increased due to the increase in global energy demand. Hence the present work focus on preparation and characterization of thermal transport phenomena of pure and Ba/Ca substituted perovskite LaFeO3 orthoferrite system. The conventional solid state reaction technique is utilized for the preparation of LaFeO3 and La0.9M0.1FeO3 (M = Ca and Ba) compounds. Crystal structure analyses of the prepared samples are analyses using Rietveld refinement process which confirms the orthoferrite crystal structure of all the prepared compounds with induced distortion in position of atoms by the incorporation of substituent atoms. The electronic structure calculations are performed by VASP. As the LaFeO3 compound is a strongly energy correlated system, the Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations are performed by DFT + U (Hubbard function) method. The computed band gap values are compared with the energy gap values calculated from UV-Vis spectral analysis. Electrical conductivity measurement and Arrhenius behavior for the temperature range of room temperature to 650 K are analyzed and the drift increase in conductivity with respect to temperature is due to the thermally activated mobility of charge carriers. Temperature dependent thermopower analysis is also examined using homemade seebeck coefficient measurement system. The calculation of thermoelectric power factor reveals that the Ba substituted LaFeO3 compound show highest power factor value of 3.73 μW/K2 cm at higher temperature and the superior power factor values observed in the Ba substituted compound determine the material's capability in power generating devices based on thermoelectric effect.

  6. Characterization of Structural Defects in Wide Band-Gap Compound Materials for Semiconductor and Opto-Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goue, Ouloide Yannick

    Single crystals of binary and ternary compounds are touted to replace silicon for specialized applications in the semiconductor industry. However, the relative high density of structural defects in those crystals has hampered the performance of devices built on them. In order to enhance the performance of those devices, structurally perfect single crystals must be grown. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the interplay between crystal growth process and crystal quality as well as structural defect types and transport property. To this end, the thesis is divided into two parts. The first part provides a general review of the theory of crystal growth (chapter I), an introduction to the materials being investigated (chapter II and III) and the characterization techniques being used (chapter IV). • In chapter I, a brief description of the theory of crystal growth is provided with an eye towards the driving force behind crystal nucleation and growth along with the kinetic factors affecting crystal growth. The case of crystal growth of silicon carbide (SiC) by physical vapor transport (PVT) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is discussed. The Bridgman, travelling heater method (THM) and physical transport growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is also treated. In chapters II and III, we introduce the compound materials being investigated in this study. While a description of their crystal structure and properties is provided, the issues associated with their growth are discussed. In chapter IV, a description of the characterization techniques used in these studies is presented. These techniques are synchrotron X-ray topography (SXRT), transmission electron microscopy, transmission infrared microscopy (TIM), micro-Raman spectroscopy (muRS) and light microscopy. Extensive treatment of SXRT technique is also provided. In the second part, the experimental results obtained in the course of these studies are presented and discussed. These results are divided into

  7. Band gap engineering and optical properties of tungsten trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yuan; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a good photoanode material for water oxidation but it is not an efficient absorber of sunlight because of its large band gap (2.6 eV). Recently, stable clathrates of WO3 with interstitial N2 molecules were synthesized [1], which are isostructural to monoclinic WO3 but have a substantially smaller bang gap, 1.8 eV. We have studied the structural, electronic, an vibrational properties of N2-WO3 clathrates using ab-initio calculations and analyzed the physical origin of their gap reduction. We also studied the effect of atomic dopants, in particular rare gases. Substantial band gap reduction has been observed, especially in the case of doping with Xe, due to both electronic and structural effects. Absorption spectra have been computed by solving the Bethe-Salpeter Equation [2] to gain a thourough insight into the optical properties of pure and doped tungsten trioxide. [1] Q. Mi, Y. Ping, Y. Li., B.S. Brunschwig, G. Galli, H B. Gray, N S. Lewis (preprint) [2]D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164109 (2010)

  8. Correlation functions and susceptibilities of photonics band gap reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate quantum statistical properties of photonic band gap reservoirs in terms of correlation functions and susceptibilities in time and spectral domains. Typical features are oscillations of the time-dependent correlation functions and susceptibilities. This is because photonic bad gap reservoirs are intrinsically non-Markovian reservoirs. The results help us to understand better how intrinsic quantum-statistical properties of a reservoir influence dynamics of an atom interacting with this reservoir. Boundary conditions influence time and spectral properties of the electromagnetic field. This well-known fact has a great importance in optics and generally in electromagnetism. Specific examples are resonators used in laser technique and cavity electrodynamics. In quantum optics high-Q micro cavities are used for single-atom experiments when an atom can interact in a coherent way with an electromagnetic field which has its mode structure totally different from those in free space. In particular, interaction of an (effectively) two-level atom with a single-mode cavity field was observed in the region of microwaves (with the wavelength about 1 cm). In 1987 Yablonovitch and John independently proposed that certain periodic dielectric structures can present forbidden frequency gaps (or pseudo gaps in partially disordered structures) for transverse modes. Such periodic structures were named 'photonic band structures' or 'photonic crystals', in analogy with electronic crystals which also have a (forbidden) gap for electronic energy. For true photonic crystals the basic property of blocking electromagnetic wave propagation must be fulfilled for all waves within some frequency range, i.e. for all wavevector and polarization directions

  9. Band structures in fractal grading porous phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu; Wang, Bin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a new grading porous structure is introduced based on a Sierpinski triangle routine, and wave propagation in this fractal grading porous phononic crystal is investigated. The influences of fractal hierarchy and porosity on the band structures in fractal graidng porous phononic crystals are clarified. Vibration modes of unit cell at absolute band gap edges are given to manifest formation mechanism of absolute band gaps. The results show that absolute band gaps are easy to form in fractal structures comparatively to the normal ones with the same porosity. Structures with higher fractal hierarchies benefit multiple wider absolute band gaps. This work provides useful guidance in design of fractal porous phononic crystals.

  10. Band-gap measurements of bulk and nanoscale hematite by soft x-ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, B.; Frandsen, Cathrine; Maxey, E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical and photochemical processes at semiconductor surfaces are highly influenced by the size of the band gap, and ability to control the band gap by particle size in nanomaterials is part of their promise. The combination of soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies provides band......-edge to reveal band-edge electronic structure of bulk and nanoscale hematite. Good agreement is found between the hematite band gap derived from optical spectroscopy and the energy separation of the first inflection points in the x-ray absorption and emission onset regions. By applying this method to two sizes...

  11. Hydrogen production by tuning the photonic band gap with the electronic band gap of TiO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, G I N; Wahab, A K; Al-Oufi, M; Jovic, V; Anjum, D H; Sun-Waterhouse, D; Llorca, J; Idriss, H

    2013-10-10

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability.

  12. Hydrogen production by Tuning the Photonic Band Gap with the Electronic Band Gap of TiO2

    KAUST Repository

    Waterhouse, G. I. N.

    2013-10-10

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability.

  13. Soft phononic crystals with deformation-independent band gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pu; Parnell, William J.

    2017-04-01

    Soft phononic crystals have the advantages over their stiff counterparts of being flexible and reconfigurable. Normally, the band gaps of soft phononic crystals will be modified after deformation due to both geometric and constitutive nonlinearity. Indeed these are important properties that can be exploited to tune the dynamic properties of the material. However, in some instances, it may be that one wishes to deform the medium while retaining the band gap structure. A special class of soft phononic crystals is described here with band gaps that are independent or almost-independent of the imposed mechanical deformation, which enables the design of phononic crystals with robust performance. This remarkable behaviour originates from transformation elasticity theory, which leaves the wave equation and the eigenfrequencies invariant after deformation. The necessary condition to achieve such a property is that the Lagrangian elasticity tensor of the hyperelastic material should be constant, i.e. independent of deformation. It is demonstrated that incompressible neo-Hookean materials exhibit such a unique property. Semilinear materials also possess this property under special loading conditions. Phononic crystals composed of these two materials are studied theoretically and the predictions of invariance, or the manner in which the response deviates from invariance, are confirmed via numerical simulation.

  14. Hollow-core photonic band gap fibers for particle acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Noble

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Photonic band gap (PBG dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency passbands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of prototype PBG fibers with dimensions appropriate for speed-of-light TM modes.

  15. Band gap engineering of indium zinc oxide by nitrogen incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.J.; Aguilar-Frutis, M.A.; Alarcón, G.; Falcony, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • IZON thin films were deposited by RF reactive sputtering at room temperature. • The effects of nitrogen on physical properties of IZO were analyzed. • Optical properties of IZON were studied by SE and UV–vis spectroscopy. • Adachi and classical parameters were quantitative and qualitatively congruent. • Nitrogen induces a gradual narrowing band gap from 3.5 to 2.5 eV on IZON films. - Abstract: The effects of nitrogen incorporation in indium zinc oxide films, as grown by RF reactive magnetron sputtering, on the structural, electrical and optical properties were studied. It was determined that the variation of the N 2 /Ar ratio, in the reactive gas flux, was directly proportional to the nitrogen percentage measured in the sample, and the incorporated nitrogen, which substituted oxygen in the films induces changes in the band gap of the films. This phenomenon was observed by measurement of absorption and transmission spectroscopy in conjunction with spectral ellipsometry. To fit the ellipsometry spectra, the classical and Adachi dispersion models were used. The obtained optical parameters presented notable changes related to the increment of the nitrogen in the film. The band gap narrowed from 3.5 to 2.5 eV as the N 2 /Ar ratio was increased. The lowest resistivity obtained for these films was 3.8 × 10 −4 Ω cm with a carrier concentration of 5.1 × 10 20 cm −3

  16. Band gap engineering of indium zinc oxide by nitrogen incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J.J., E-mail: jjosila@hotmail.com [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo la Bufa, Fracc. Progreso, C.P. 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Doctorado Institucional de Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78270 San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Aguilar-Frutis, M.A.; Alarcón, G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Legaría, Calz. Legaría No. 694, Col. Irrigación, C.P. 11500 México D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional campus Zacatenco, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • IZON thin films were deposited by RF reactive sputtering at room temperature. • The effects of nitrogen on physical properties of IZO were analyzed. • Optical properties of IZON were studied by SE and UV–vis spectroscopy. • Adachi and classical parameters were quantitative and qualitatively congruent. • Nitrogen induces a gradual narrowing band gap from 3.5 to 2.5 eV on IZON films. - Abstract: The effects of nitrogen incorporation in indium zinc oxide films, as grown by RF reactive magnetron sputtering, on the structural, electrical and optical properties were studied. It was determined that the variation of the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio, in the reactive gas flux, was directly proportional to the nitrogen percentage measured in the sample, and the incorporated nitrogen, which substituted oxygen in the films induces changes in the band gap of the films. This phenomenon was observed by measurement of absorption and transmission spectroscopy in conjunction with spectral ellipsometry. To fit the ellipsometry spectra, the classical and Adachi dispersion models were used. The obtained optical parameters presented notable changes related to the increment of the nitrogen in the film. The band gap narrowed from 3.5 to 2.5 eV as the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio was increased. The lowest resistivity obtained for these films was 3.8 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm with a carrier concentration of 5.1 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}.

  17. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and their performances were checked numerically. The measurement of transmission and reflection coefficients in the frequency range 10 to 30 GHz was performed using Agilent N5230A microwave vector network analyzer. The numerical simulations are performed using FEMLAB package. 3. Results and discussion.

  18. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The periodic lattice of PTFE–air combination has the dielectric contrast (defined as the ratio between the dielectric constant of the substrate to that of the background, air) of 2.08. At both ends of the microstrip. MBG, two sub-miniature adapter (SMA) coaxial connectors were placed. The measurements as well as theoretical ...

  19. Band Edge Dynamics and Multiexciton Generation in Narrow Band Gap HgTe Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livache, Clément; Goubet, Nicolas; Martinez, Bertille; Jagtap, Amardeep; Qu, Junling; Ithurria, Sandrine; Silly, Mathieu G; Dubertret, Benoit; Lhuillier, Emmanuel

    2018-04-02

    Mercury chalcogenide nanocrystals and especially HgTe appear as an interesting platform for the design of low cost mid-infrared (mid-IR) detectors. Nevertheless, their electronic structure and transport properties remain poorly understood, and some critical aspects such as the carrier relaxation dynamics at the band edge have been pushed under the rug. Some of the previous reports on dynamics are setup-limited, and all of them have been obtained using photon energy far above the band edge. These observations raise two main questions: (i) what are the carrier dynamics at the band edge and (ii) should we expect some additional effect (multiexciton generation (MEG)) as such narrow band gap materials are excited far above the band edge? To answer these questions, we developed a high-bandwidth setup that allows us to understand and compare the carrier dynamics resonantly pumped at the band edge in the mid-IR and far above the band edge. We demonstrate that fast (>50 MHz) photoresponse can be obtained even in the mid-IR and that MEG is occurring in HgTe nanocrystal arrays with a threshold around 3 times the band edge energy. Furthermore, the photoresponse can be effectively tuned in magnitude and sign using a phototransistor configuration.

  20. Large area modules based on low band gap polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    The use of three low band gap polymers in large area roll-to-roll coated modules is demonstrated. The polymers were prepared by a Stille cross coupling polymerization and all had a band gap around 1.6 eV. The polymers were first tested in small area organic photovoltaic devices which showed...

  1. Two-band modeling of narrow band gap and interband tunneling devices

    OpenAIRE

    Söderström, J. R.; Yu, E. T.; Jackson, M. K.; Rajakarunanayake, Y.; McGill, T. C.

    1990-01-01

    A two-band transfer matrix method has been developed to study tunneling currents in narrow gap and interband tunnel structures. This relatively simple model gives good agreement with recently reported experimental results for InAs/AlSb/InAs/AlSb/InAs double-barrier heterostructures and InAs/AlSb/GaSb/AlSb/InAs resonant interband tunneling devices, and should be useful in the design of new interband tunneling devices.

  2. Designing broad phononic band gaps for in-plane modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang Fan; Meng, Fei; Li, Shuo; Jia, Baohua; Zhou, Shiwei; Huang, Xiaodong

    2018-03-01

    Phononic crystals are known as artificial materials that can manipulate the propagation of elastic waves, and one essential feature of phononic crystals is the existence of forbidden frequency range of traveling waves called band gaps. In this paper, we have proposed an easy way to design phononic crystals with large in-plane band gaps. We demonstrated that the gap between two arbitrarily appointed bands of in-plane mode can be formed by employing a certain number of solid or hollow circular rods embedded in a matrix material. Topology optimization has been applied to find the best material distributions within the primitive unit cell with maximal band gap width. Our results reveal that the centroids of optimized rods coincide with the point positions generated by Lloyd's algorithm, which deepens our understandings on the formation mechanism of phononic in-plane band gaps.

  3. Mechanism of photonic band gap, optical properties, tuning and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, A.; Johri, M.

    2006-05-01

    Mechanism of occurrence of Photonic Band Gap (PBG) is presented for 3-D structure using close packed face centered cubic lattice. Concepts and our work, specifically optical properties of 3-D photonic crystal, relative width, filling fraction, effective refractive index, alternative mechanism of photonic band gap scattering strength and dielectric contrast, effect of fluctuations and minimum refractive index contrast, are reported. The temperature tuning and anisotropy of nematic and ferroelectric liquid crystal infiltrated opal for different phase transitions are given. Effective dielectric constant with filling fraction using Maxwell Garnet theory (MG), multiple modified Maxwell Garnet (MMMG) and Effective Medium theory (EM) and results are compared with experiment to understand the occurrence of PBG. Our calculations of Lamb shifts including fluctuations are given and compared with those of literature values. We have also done band structure calculations including anisotropy and compared isotropic characteristic of liquid crystal. A possibility of lowest refractive index contrast useful for the fabrication of PBG is given. Our calculations for relative width as a function of refractive index contrast are reported and comparisons with existing theoretical and experimental optimal values are briefed. Applications of photonic crystals are summarized. The investigations conducted on PBG materials and reported here may pave the way for understanding the challenges in the field of PBG. (author)

  4. Band Gap Engineering of Titania Systems Purposed for Photocatalytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Cameron

    Ab initio computer aided design drastically increases candidate population for highly specified material discovery and selection. These simulations, carried out through a first-principles computational approach, accurately extrapolate material properties and behavior. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2 ) is one such material that stands to gain a great deal from the use of these simulations. In its anatase form, titania (TiO2 ) has been found to exhibit a band gap nearing 3.2 eV. If titania is to become a viable alternative to other contemporary photoactive materials exhibiting band gaps better suited for the solar spectrum, then the band gap must be subsequently reduced. To lower the energy needed for electronic excitation, both transition metals and non-metals have been extensively researched and are currently viable candidates for the continued reduction of titania's band gap. The introduction of multicomponent atomic doping introduces new energy bands which tend to both reduce the band gap and recombination loss. Ta-N, Nb-N, V-N, Cr-N, Mo-N, and W-N substitutions were studied in titania and subsequent energy and band gap calculations show a favorable band gap reduction in the case of passivated systems.

  5. Group IV direct band gap photonics: Methods, Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eGeiger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of direct band gap group IV materials offers a paradigm change for Si-photonics concerning the monolithic implementation of light emitters: The idea is to integrate fully compatible group IV materials with equally favorable optical properties as the chemically incompatible group III-V-based systems. The concept involves either mechanically applied strain on Ge or alloying of Ge with Sn and permits to drastically improve the insufficient radiative efficiency of Ge. The favorable optical properties result from a modified band structure transformed from an indirect to a direct one. The first demonstration of such a direct band gap laser, accomplished in GeSn, exemplifies the capability of this new concept. These systems may permit a qualitative as well as a quantitative expansion of Si-photonics into traditional but also new areas of applications, provided they can be operated energy efficiently, under ambient conditions and integrated with current Si technologies. This review aims to discuss the challenges along this path in terms of fabrication, characterization and fundamental understanding, and will elaborate on evoking opportunities of this new class of group IV-based laser materials.

  6. Band-gap modulation of graphane-like SiC nanoribbons under uniaxial elastic strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ben-Ling, E-mail: jsblgao@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Qing-Qiang [Department of Physics, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221009 (China); Ke, San-Huang, E-mail: shke@tongji.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Structured Materials, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, 3 Heqing Road, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, Ning [Department of Physics, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051 (China); Hu, Guang; Wang, Yanzong; Liang, Feng; Tang, Yalu [Department of Physics, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); Xiong, Shi-Jie [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-01-24

    The band-gap modulation of zigzag and armchair graphane-like SiC nanoribbons (GSiCNs) under uniaxial elastic strain is investigated using the density functional theory. The results show that band gap of both structures all decreases when being compressed or tensed. In compression, both zigzag and armchair GSiCNs are semiconductors with a direct band gap. However, in tension, the armchair GSiCNs undergo a direct-to-indirect band-gap transition but the zigzag GSiCNs still have a direct band gap. These results are also proved by HSE06 method. This implies a potential application of the graphane-like SiC nanoribbons in the future pressure sensor and optical electronics nanodevices.

  7. Size effects in band gap bowing in nitride semiconducting alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2011-01-01

    Chemical and size contributions to the band gap bowing of nitride semiconducting alloys (InxGa1-xN, InxAl1-xN, and AlxGa1-xN) are analyzed. It is shown that the band gap deformation potentials of the binary constituents determine the gap bowing in the ternary alloys. The particularly large gap bo...... bowing in In-containing nitride alloys can be explained by specific properties of InN, which do not follow trends observed in several other binaries....

  8. 17 GHz photonic band gap cavity with improved input coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shapiro

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the theoretical design and cold test of a 17 GHz photonic band gap (PBG cavity with improved coupling from an external rectangular waveguide. The PBG cavity is made of a triangular lattice of metal rods with a defect (missing rod in the center. The TM_{010}-like defect mode was chosen as the operating mode. Experimental results are presented demonstrating that critical coupling into the cavity can be achieved by partial withdrawal or removal of some rods from the lattice, a result that agrees with simulations. A detailed design of the PBG accelerator structure is compared with a conventional (pillbox cavity. One advantage of the PBG cavity is that its resonance frequency is much less perturbed by the input/output coupling structure than in a comparable pillbox cavity. The PBG structure is attractive for future accelerator applications.

  9. Hypersonic modulation of light in three-dimensional photonic and phononic band-gap materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, A V; Tanaka, Y; Pevtsov, A B; Kaplan, S F; Golubev, V G; Tamura, S; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M

    2008-07-18

    The elastic coupling between the a-SiO2 spheres composing opal films brings forth three-dimensional periodic structures which besides a photonic stop band are predicted to also exhibit complete phononic band gaps. The influence of elastic crystal vibrations on the photonic band structure has been studied by injection of coherent hypersonic wave packets generated in a metal transducer by subpicosecond laser pulses. These studies show that light with energies close to the photonic band gap can be efficiently modulated by hypersonic waves.

  10. Optical selection rules and scattering processes in rocksalt wide band gap ZnO

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kunert, HW

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available At sufficiently high pressures, wurtzite structure zinc oxide (W-ZnO) can be transformed to the cubic rocksalt (R-ZnO) structure. The R-ZnO exhibits semiconductor behavior with an indirect wide band gap of inline image. The maximum valence band...

  11. Maximizing the Optical Band Gap in 2D Photonic Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Sigmund, Ole

    Topology optimization is used to find the 2D photonic crystal designs with the largest relative photonic band gaps. Starting points for the topology optimization are found with an exhaustive binary search on a low resolution grid.......Topology optimization is used to find the 2D photonic crystal designs with the largest relative photonic band gaps. Starting points for the topology optimization are found with an exhaustive binary search on a low resolution grid....

  12. Nonideal anion displacement, band gap variation, and valence band splitting in Cu-In-Se compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reena Philip, Rachel; Pradeep, B.

    2005-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of ternary chalcopyrite CuInSe 2 and defect compounds CuIn 3 Se 5 and CuIn 5 Se 8 are prepared in vacuum by three-source coevaporation method. Structural and optical characterizations of the films are done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and optical absorbance spectra measurements. With variation in the composition of CuInSe 2 , a change over from p-type to n-type conductivity is observed (as noted by the hot probe method). The deformation parameters and the anion displacements are calculated from the X-ray diffraction data, and the cation-anion bond lengths are deduced. The dependence of band gap variation on nonideal anion displacement in the ternary compounds and the effect of Se-p-Cu-d repulsion on band gap are studied. The threefold optical structure observed in the fundamental absorption region of the absorption spectra is analysed to extract the valence band splitting parameters. Hopfields quasi-cubic model adapted for chalcopyrites with tetragonal deformation is used to determine the crystal field splittings and spin orbit splittings, and the linear hybridization model is used to calculate the percentage of d-orbital and p-orbital contribution to hybridization in the compounds under consideration

  13. Effect of ferromagnetic exchange field on band gap and spin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Partha Goswami

    2018-02-19

    Feb 19, 2018 ... On account of the strong spin–orbit coupling, the system acts as a. QSH insulator for M = 0. As the exchange field (M) increases, the band-gap narrowing takes place followed by its recovery. The essential features of these curves, apart from the particle–hole symmetry, are (i) opening of an orbital gap due to ...

  14. Relativistic band gaps in one-dimensional disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerk, G.J.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Conditions for the existence of band gaps in a one-dimensional disordered array of δ-function potentials possessing short range order are developed in a relativistic framework. Both Lorentz vector and scalar type potentials are treated. The relationship between the energy gaps and the transmission properties of the array are also discussed. 20 refs., 2 figs

  15. Band gap bowing in quaternary nitride semiconducting alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyka, Isabela; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2011-01-01

    the composition and atomic arrangements are examined using a supercell geometry. An analytical expression for the band gap is derived for the entire range of compositions. The range of (x, y) values for which InxGayAl1−x−yN is lattice matched to GaN, and the ensuing energy gaps, are given. This range of available...

  16. Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap in nanocrystalline Zn ( 1 − x ) Ca x O thin films deposited by sol–gel dip coating technique ... thin films giving 13.03% enhancement in theenergy gap value due to the electronic perturbation caused by cation substitution as well as deterioration in crystallinity.

  17. Limitations to band gap tuning in nitride semiconductor alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2010-01-01

    Relations between the band gaps of nitride alloys and their lattice parameters are presented and limits to tuning of the fundamental gap in nitride semiconductors are set by combining a large number of experimental data with ab initio theoretical calculations. Large band gap bowings obtained...... theoretically for GaxAl1-xN, InxGa1-xN, and InxAl1-xN for uniform as well as clustered arrangements of the cation atoms are considered in the theoretical analysis. It is shown that indium plays a particular role in nitride alloys being responsible for most of the observed effects....

  18. Band gap engineering for graphene by using Na+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, S. J.; Lee, P. R.; Kim, J. G.; Ryu, M. T.; Park, H. M.; Chung, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the noble electronic properties of graphene, its industrial application has been hindered mainly by the absence of a stable means of producing a band gap at the Dirac point (DP). We report a new route to open a band gap (E g ) at DP in a controlled way by depositing positively charged Na + ions on single layer graphene formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface. The doping of low energy Na + ions is found to deplete the π* band of graphene above the DP, and simultaneously shift the DP downward away from Fermi energy indicating the opening of E g . The band gap increases with increasing Na + coverage with a maximum E g ≥0.70 eV. Our core-level data, C 1s, Na 2p, and Si 2p, consistently suggest that Na + ions do not intercalate through graphene, but produce a significant charge asymmetry among the carbon atoms of graphene to cause the opening of a band gap. We thus provide a reliable way of producing and tuning the band gap of graphene by using Na + ions, which may play a vital role in utilizing graphene in future nano-electronic devices.

  19. Hydrogen production by Tuning the Photonic Band Gap with the Electronic Band Gap of TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Wahab, A. K.; Al-Oufi, M.; Jovic, V.; Anjum, D. H.; Sun-Waterhouse, D.; Llorca, J.; Idriss, H.

    2013-01-01

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability. PMID:24108361

  20. Band gaps and cavity modes in dual phononic and photonic strip waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Pennec

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss theoretically the simultaneous existence of phoxonic, i.e., dual phononic and photonic, band gaps in a periodic silicon strip waveguide. The unit-cell of this one-dimensional waveguide contains a hole in the middle and two symmetric stubs on the sides. Indeed, stubs and holes are respectively favorable for creating a phononic and a photonic band gap. Appropriate geometrical parameters allow us to obtain a complete phononic gap together with a photonic gap of a given polarization and symmetry. The insertion of a cavity inside the perfect structure provides simultaneous confinement of acoustic and optical waves suitable to enhance the phonon-photon interaction.

  1. Observation of band gaps in the gigahertz range and deaf bands in a hypersonic aluminum nitride phononic crystal slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorisse, M.; Benchabane, S.; Teissier, G.; Billard, C.; Reinhardt, A.; Laude, V.; Defaÿ, E.; Aïd, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the observation of elastic waves propagating in a two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of air holes drilled in an aluminum nitride membrane. The theoretical band structure indicates the existence of an acoustic band gap centered around 800 MHz with a relative bandwidth of 6.5% that is confirmed by gigahertz optical images of the surface displacement. Further electrical measurements and computation of the transmission reveal a much wider attenuation band that is explained by the deaf character of certain bands resulting from the orthogonality of their polarization with that of the source.

  2. Quantum electrodynamics near a photonic band-gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbing; Houck, Andrew

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts the localization of light around an atom in photonic band-gap (PBG) medium or photonic crystal. Here we report the first experimental realization of the strong coupling between a single artificial atom and an one dimensional PBG medium using superconducting circuits. In the photonic transport measurement, we observe an anomalous Lamb shift and a large band-edge avoided crossing when the artificial atom frequency is tuned across the band-edge. The persistent peak within the band-gap indicates the single photon bound state. Furthermore, we study the resonance fluorescence of this bound state, again demonstrating the breakdown of the Born-Markov approximation near the band-edge. This novel architecture can be directly generalized to study many-body quantum electrodynamics and to construct more complicated spin chain models.

  3. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kady, Ihab Fathy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  4. Robust indirect band gap and anisotropy of optical absorption in B-doped phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Feng; Gao, Peng-Fei; Guo, Lei; Kang, Jun; Fang, Dang-Qi; Zhang, Yang; Xia, Ming-Gang; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2017-12-06

    A traditional doping technique plays an important role in the band structure engineering of two-dimensional nanostructures. Since electron interaction is changed by doping, the optical and electrochemical properties could also be significantly tuned. In this study, density functional theory calculations have been employed to explore the structural stability, and electronic and optical properties of B-doped phosphorene. The results show that all B-doped phosphorenes are stable with a relatively low binding energy. Of particular interest is that these B-doped systems exhibit an indirect band gap, which is distinct from the direct one of pure phosphorene. Despite the different concentrations and configurations of B dopants, such indirect band gaps are robust. The screened hybrid density functional HSE06 predicts that the band gap of B-doped phosphorene is slightly smaller than that of pure phosphorene. Spatial charge distributions at the valence band maximum (VBM) and the conduction band minimum (CBM) are analyzed to understand the features of an indirect band gap. By comparison with pure phosphorene, B-doped phosphorenes exhibit strong anisotropy and intensity of optical absorption. Moreover, B dopants could enhance the stability of Li adsorption on phosphorene with less sacrifice of the Li diffusion rate. Our results suggest that B-doping is an effective way of tuning the band gap, enhancing the intensity of optical absorption and improving the performances of Li adsorption, which could promote potential applications in novel optical devices and lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Anomalous composition dependence of the band gap pressure coefficients in In-containing nitride semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Kamińska, A.; Staszczak, G.

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-induced changes in the electronic band structures of In-containing nitride alloys, InxGa1-xN and InxAl1-xN are examined experimentally as well as by ab initio calculations. It is found that the band gap pressure coefficients, dEg/dp, exhibit very large bowing with x, and calculations...

  6. Band gap of two-dimensional fiber-air photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shu, E-mail: yangshu5678@163.com; Li, Masha

    2016-04-15

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) composed of textile fiber and air is initially discussed in this paper. Textile materials are so called soft materials, which are different from the previous PCs composed of rigid materials. The plain wave expansion method is used to calculate band structure of different PCs by altering component properties or structural parameters. Results show that the dielectric constant of textile fibers, fiber filling ratio and lattice arrangement are effective factors which influence PCs' band gap. Yet lattice constant and fiber diameter make inconspicuous influence on the band gap feature.

  7. Real-structure effects: Band gaps of Mg_xZn_{1-x}O, Cd_xZn_{1-x}O, and n-type ZnO from ab-initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleife, A; Bechstedt, F

    2012-02-15

    Many-body perturbation theory is applied to compute the quasiparticle electronic structures and the optical-absorption spectra (including excitonic effects) for several transparent conducting oxides. We discuss HSE+G{sub 0}W{sub 0} results for band structures, fundamental band gaps, and effective electron masses of MgO, ZnO, CdO, SnO{sub 2}, SnO, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is solved to account for excitonic effects in the calculation of the frequency-dependent absorption coefficients. We show that the HSE+G{sub 0}W{sub 0} approach and the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation are very well-suited to describe the electronic structure and the optical properties of various transparent conducting oxides in good agreement with experiment.

  8. Acoustic band gaps of the woodpile sonic crystal with the simple cubic lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liang-Yu; Chen, Lien-Wen, E-mail: chenlw@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-02

    This study theoretically and experimentally investigates the acoustic band gap of a three-dimensional woodpile sonic crystal. Such crystals are built by blocks or rods that are orthogonally stacked together. The adjacent layers are perpendicular to each other. The woodpile structure is embedded in air background. Their band structures and transmission spectra are calculated using the finite element method with a periodic boundary condition. The dependence of the band gap on the width of the stacked rods is discussed. The deaf bands in the band structure are observed by comparing with the calculated transmission spectra. The experimental transmission spectra for the {Gamma}-X and {Gamma}-X' directions are also presented. The calculated results are compared with the experimental results.

  9. Synthesis, structural, optical band gap and biological studies on iron (III), nickel (II), zinc (II) and mercury (II) complexes of benzyl α-monoxime pyridyl thiosemicarbazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedier, R. A.; Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; El-Gammal, O. A.

    2017-07-01

    New ligand, (E)-2-((E)-2-(hydroxyimino)-1,2-diphenylethylidene)-N-(pyridin-2 yl) hydrazinecarbothioamide (H2DPPT) and its complexes [Fe(DPPT)Cl(H2O)], [Ni(H2DPPT)2Cl2], [Zn(HDPPT)(OAc)] and [Hg(HDPPT)Cl](H2O)4 were isolated and characterized by various of physico-chemical techniques. IR spectra show that H2DPPT coordinates to the metal ions as neutral NN bidentate, mononegative NNS tridentate and binegative NNSN tetradentate, respectively. From the modeling studies, the bond length, bond angle, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moment had been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their investigated complexes. The thermal studies showed the type of water molecules involved in metal complexes Furthermore, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different decomposition steps were calculated using the Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Also, the optical band gap (Eg) has been calculated to elucidate the conductivity of the isolated complexes. The optical transition energy (Eg) is direct and equals 3.34 and 3.44 ev for Ni and Fe complexes, respectively. The ligand and their metal complexes were screened for antibacterial activity against the following bacterial species, Bacillus thuringiensis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa and Escherichia coli. The results revealed that the metal complexes have more potent antibacterial compared with the ligand. Also, the degradation effect of the investigated compounds was tested showing that, Ni complex exhibited powerful and complete degradation effect on DNA.

  10. Complete surface plasmon-polariton band gap and gap-governed waveguiding, bending and splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fengqin; Han, Dezhuan; Hu, Xinhua; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian

    2009-05-01

    We show theoretically that a complete band gap for surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) can exist in a flat metal surface coated with a two-dimensional periodic array of dielectric cylinders. Based on the SPP band gap, gap-governed SPP waveguides, bends and splitters at telecom wavelengths can be achieved by introducing line defects. Numerical simulations show that the proposed SPP waveguides have a very low loss, while SPP bends and splitters can bend and split guided SPPs efficiently. The proposed SPP waveguides, bends and splitters could thus be exploited to construct compact integrated optical circuits in the emerging field of plasmonics.

  11. Band Gap Tuning and Defect Tolerance of Atomically Thin Two- Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    report first-principles calculations for isolated monolayers of the organometallic halide perovskites (C4H9NH3)2MX2Y2, where M = Pb, Ge, Sn and X,Y = Cl, Br, I. The band gaps computed using the GLLB-SC functional are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental photoluminescence data...... for the already synthesized perovskites. Finally, we study the effect of different defects on the band structure. We find that the most common defects only introduce shallow or no states in the band gap, indicating that these atomically thin 2D perovskites are likely to be defect tolerant....

  12. Study of indium nitride and indium oxynitride band gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sparvoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the study of the optical band gap of indium oxynitride (InNO and indium nitride (InN deposited by magnetron reactive sputtering. InNO shows multi-functionality in electrical and photonic applications, transparency in visible range, wide band gap, high resistivity and low leakage current. The deposition processes were performed in a magnetron sputtering system using a four-inches pure In (99.999% target and nitrogen and oxygen as plasma gases. The pressure was kept constant at 1.33 Pa and the RF power (13.56 MHz constant at 250 W. Three-inches diameter silicon wafer with 370 micrometer thickness and resistivity in the range of 10 ohm-centimeter was used as substrate. The thin films were analyzed by UV-Vis-NIR reflectance, photoluminescence (PL and Hall Effect. The band gap was obtained from Tauc analysis of the reflectance spectra and photoluminescence. The band gap was evaluated for both films: for InNO the value was 2.48 eV and for InN, 1.52 eV. The relative quantities obtained from RBS spectra analysis in InNO sample are 48% O, 12% N, 40% In and in InN sample are 8% O, 65% N, 27% In.

  13. The Wide Band-Gap Semiconductors: A Brief Survey | Ottaviani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wide band-gap semiconductors are promising materials in the fields of power electronics, high-energy radiation detection and optoelectronics. They have attracted much attention thanks to their physical properties, allowing them to get better performances than silicon for some specific uses (high temperature, high ...

  14. Strain sensitivity of band gaps of Sn-containing semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hong; Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    Tuning of band gaps of semiconductors is a way to optimize materials for applications within photovoltaics or as photocatalysts. One way to achieve this is through applying strain to the materials. We investigate the effect of strain on a range of Sn-containing semiconductors using density...

  15. Modelling and design of complete photonic band gaps in two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and variation of complete photonic band gap size with the introduction of asymmetry in the constituent dielectric rods with honeycomb lattices in two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhC) using the plane-wave expansion (PWE) method. Two examples, one consisting of elliptical rods ...

  16. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -dimensional photonic crystals with square lattices composed of air holes in dielectric and vice versa i.e., dielectric rods in air, using the plane-wave expansion method are investigated. We then study, how the photonic band gap size is ...

  17. Band gap determination of Ni–Zn ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanocomposites of Ni–Zn with copolymer matrix of aniline and formaldehyde in presence of varying concentrations of zinc ions have been studied at room temperature and normal pressure. The energy band gap of these materials are determined by reflection spectra in the wavelength range 400–850 nm by ...

  18. Effect of ferromagnetic exchange field on band gap and spin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polarisation is found to be electric field tunable as well. Finally, there is anticrossing of non-parabolic bands with opposite spins, the gap closing with same spins, etc. around the Dirac points. A direct electric field control of magnetism at the nanoscale is needed here. The magnetic multiferroics, like B i F e O 3 (BFO), are ...

  19. Modelling and design of complete photonic band gaps in two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 70; Issue 1. Modelling ... Two examples, one consisting of elliptical rods and the other comprising of rectangular rods in honeycomb lattices are considered with a view to estimate the design parameters for maximizing the complete photonic band gap. Further, it has ...

  20. Extremal characterization of band gaps in nonlinear gratings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.; Sopaheluwakan, A.

    In this paper we present an explicit extremal characterization of the edges of the lowest band gap in gratings; we restrict here to the case of TE-modes, but the TM case can be treated similarly. The characterization is valid for linear and Kerr-nonlinear gratings, for smooth as well as for

  1. Photonic band gap materials: design, synthesis, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Unlike semiconductors which facilitate the coherent propagation of electrons, photonic band gap (PBG) materials execute their novel functions through the coherent localization of photons. I review and discuss our recent synthesis of a large scale three-dimensional silicon photonic crystal with a complete photonic band gap near 1.5 microns. When a PBG material is doped with impurity atoms which have an electronic transition that lies within the gap, spontaneous emission of light from the atom is inhibited. Inside the gap, the photon forms a bound state to the atom. Outside the gap, radiative dynamics in the colored vacuum is highly non Markovian. I discuss the influence of these memory effects on laser action. When spontaneous emission is absent, the next order radiative effect (resonance dipole dipole interaction between atoms) must be incorporated leading to anomalous nonlinear optical effects which occur at a much lower threshold than in ordinary vacuum. I describe the collective switching of two-level atoms near a photonic band edge, by external laser field, from a passive state to one exhibiting population inversion. This effect is forbidden in ordinary vacuum. However, in the context of a PBG material, this effect may be utilized for an all-optical transistor. Finally, I discuss the prospects for a phase sensitive, single atom quantum memory device, onto which information may be written by an external laser pulse

  2. Polymorphous band structure model of gapping in the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases of the Mott insulators MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Wang, Zhi; Zunger, Alex

    2018-01-01

    The existence of band gaps in both the antiferromagnetic (AFM) and paramagnetic (PM) phases of the classic NaCl-structure Mott insulators MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO is traditionally viewed and taught as a manifestation of strong correlation whereby insulation results from electrons moving across the lattice forming states with doubly occupied d orbitals on certain atomic sites and empty d orbitals on other sites. Within such theories, the gap of the AFM and PM phases of these oxides emerges even in the absence of spatial symmetry breaking. The need for such a correlated picture is partially based on the known failure of the commonly used band models for the PM phase that assume for such a spin disordered state the macroscopically averaged NaCl structure, where all transition metal (TM) sites are symmetry-equivalent (a monomorphous description), producing a gapless PM state with zero magnetic moments, in sharp conflict with experiment. Here, we seek to understand the minimum theoretical description needed to capture the leading descriptors of ground state Mott insulation in the classic, 3 d monoxide Mott systems—gapping and moment formation in the AFM and PM phase. As noted by previous authors, the spin-ordered AFM phase in these materials already shows in band theory a significant band gap when one doubles the NaCl unit cell by permitting different potentials for transition-metal atoms with different spins. For the spin-disordered PM phase, we allow analogously larger NaCl-type supercells where each TM site can have different spin direction and local bonding environments (i.e., disordered), yet the total spin is zero. Such a polymorphous description has the flexibility to acquire symmetry-breaking energy-lowering patterns that can lift the degeneracy of the d orbitals and develop large on-site magnetic moments without violating the global, averaged NaCl symmetry. Electrons are exchanged between spin-up and spin-down bands to create closed-shell insulating

  3. High-Power Fiber Lasers Using Photonic Band Gap Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Leo; Dowling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    at undesirably low levels, and scattering of light from dopants. In designing a given fiber laser for reduced ASE, care must be taken to maintain a correct fiber structure for eventual scaling to an array of many such lasers such that the interactions among all the members of the array would cause them to operate in phase lock. Hence, the problems associated with improving a single-fiber laser are not entirely separate from the bundling problem, and some designs for individual fiber lasers may be better than others if the fibers are to be incorporated into bundles. Extensive calculations, expected to take about a year, must be performed in order to determine design parameters before construction of prototype individual and fiber lasers can begin. The design effort can be expected to include calculations to optimize overlaps between the electromagnetic modes and the gain media and calculations of responses of PBG materials to electromagnetic fields. Design alternatives and physical responses that may be considered include simple PBG fibers with no intensity-dependent responses, PBG fibers with intensity- dependent band-gap shifting (see figure), and broad-band pumping made possible by use of candidate broad-band pumping media in place of the air or vacuum gaps used in prior PBG fibers.

  4. Investigation on the band gap adjustment of the compound phononic crystal using the insertion of elliptical cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiaguang; Tang, Weiya

    2018-01-01

    This computational study focuses on a kind of two-dimensional steel cylinder/gas square lattice phononic crystal with an elliptical cylinder inserted into the primitive cell. The crystal's energy band structure is calculated using plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The irreducible Brillouin zone (IBZ) is found to have undergone significant changes with the insertion of elliptical cylinder: the energy band extrema deviated from their original positions, and the wave vector's scanning range needs to be expanded in order to obtain reliable energy band structure. Since the elliptical cylinder is less symmetrical than the cylinder, low frequency band gap is more readily formed with the insertion. Greater filling ratio yields wider band gap. The band gap can be tuned within a wide frequency range by varying the orientation of the inserted elliptical cylinder. The band gap can form at a relatively low filling ratio by moving the inserted elliptical cylinder along y-axis.

  5. Band gap reduction in GaNSb alloys due to the anion mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veal, T.D.; Piper, L.F.J.; Jollands, S.; Bennett, B.R.; Jefferson, P.H.; Thomas, P.A.; McConville, C.F.; Murdin, B.N.; Buckle, L.; Smith, G.W.; Ashley, T.

    2005-01-01

    The structural and optoelectronic properties in GaN x Sb 1-x alloys (0≤x x Sb 1-x epilayers are of high crystalline quality and the alloy composition is found to be independent of substrate, for identical growth conditions. The band gap of the GaNSb alloys is found to decrease with increasing nitrogen content from absorption spectroscopy. Strain-induced band-gap shifts, Moss-Burstein effects, and band renormalization were ruled out by XRD and Hall measurements. The band-gap reduction is solely due to the substitution of dilute amounts of highly electronegative nitrogen for antimony, and is greater than observed in GaNAs with the same N content

  6. Graphene-induced band gap renormalization in polythiophene: a many-body perturbation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsusi, F.; Fedorov, I. A.; Gerivani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory at the G0W0 level are employed to study the electronic properties of polythiophene (PT) adsorbed on the graphene surface. Analysis of the charge density difference shows that substrate-adsorbate interaction leads to a strong physisorption and interfacial electric dipole moment formation. The electrostatic potential displays a  -0.19 eV shift in the graphene work function from its initial value of 4.53 eV, as the result of the interaction. The LDA band gap of the polymer does not show any change. However, the band structure exhibits weak orbital hybridizations resulting from slight overlapping between the polymer and graphene states wave functions. The interfacial polarization effects on the band gap and levels alignment are investigated at the G0W0 level and show a notable reduction of PT band gap compared to that of the isolated chain.

  7. Photonic band gap materials: Technology, applications and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johri, M.; Ahmed, Y.A.; Bezboruah, T.

    2006-05-01

    Last century has been the age of Artificial Materials. One material that stands out in this regard is the semiconductor. The revolution in electronic industry in the 20th century was made possible by the ability of semiconductors to microscopically manipulate the flow of electrons. Further advancement in the field made scientists suggest that the new millennium will be the age of photonics in which artificial materials will be synthesized to microscopically manipulate the flow of light. One of these will be Photonic Band Gap material (PBG). PBG are periodic dielectric structures that forbid propagation of electromagnetic waves in a certain frequency range. They are able to engineer most fundamental properties of electromagnetic waves such as the laws of refraction, diffraction, and emission of light from atoms. Such PBG material not only opens up variety of possible applications (in lasers, antennas, millimeter wave devices, efficient solar cells photo-catalytic processes, integrated optical communication etc.) but also give rise to new physics (cavity electrodynamics, localization, disorder, photon-number-state squeezing). Unlike electronic micro-cavity, optical waveguides in a PBG microchip can simultaneously conduct hundreds of wavelength channels of information in a three dimensional circuit path. In this article we have discussed some aspects of PBG materials and their unusual properties, which provided a foundation for novel practical applications ranging from clinical medicine to information technology. (author)

  8. Investigation on the Band Gap and Negative Properties of Concentric Ring Acoustic Metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic characteristics of 2D single-oscillator, dual-oscillator, and triple-oscillator acoustic metamaterials were investigated based on concentric ring structures using the finite element method. For the single-oscillator, dual-oscillator, and triple-oscillator models investigated here, the dipolar resonances of the scatterer always induce negative effective mass density, preventing waves from propagating in the structure, thus forming the band gap. As the number of oscillators increases, relative movements between the oscillators generate coupling effect; this increases the number of dipolar resonance modes, causes negative effective mass density in more frequency ranges, and increases the number of band gaps. It can be seen that the number of oscillators in the cell is closely related to the number of band gaps due to the coupling effect, when the filling rate is of a certain value.

  9. Coupled polaritonic band gaps in the anisotropic piezoelectric superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng-Hua; Jiang, Zheng-Sheng; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Chun-Zhi; Lei, Da-Jun; Huang, Jian-Quan; Qiu, Feng; Yao, Min; Huang, Xiao-Yi

    2018-01-01

    Anisotropic piezoelectric superlattices (APSs) with the periodic arrangement of polarized anisotropic piezoelectric domains in a certain direction are presented, in which the coupled polaritonic band gaps (CPBGs) can be obtained in the whole Brillouin Zone and the maximum relative bandwidth (band-gap sizes divided by their midgap frequencies) of 5.1% can be achieved. The general characteristics of the APSs are similar to those of the phononic crystals composed of two types of materials, with the main difference being the formation mechanism of the CPBGs, which originate from the couplings between lattice vibrations along two different directions and electromagnetic waves rather than from the periodical modulation of density and elastic constants. In addition, there are no lattice mismatches because the APSs are made of the same material. Thus, the APSs can also be extended to the construction of novel acousto-optic devices.

  10. On acoustic band gaps in homogenized piezoelectric phononic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan E.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a composite medium made of weakly piezoelectric inclusions periodically distributed in the matrix which ismade of a different piezoelectricmaterial. Themediumis subject to a periodic excitation with an incidence wave frequency independent of scale ε of the microscopic heterogeneities. Two-scale method of homogenization is applied to obtain the limit homogenized model which describes acoustic wave propagation in the piezoelectric medium when ε → 0. In analogy with the purely elastic composite, the resulting model allows existence of the acoustic band gaps. These are identified for certain frequency ranges whenever the so-called homogenized mass becomes negative. The homogenized model can be used for band gap prediction and for dispersion analysis for low wave numbers. Modeling such composite materials seems to be perspective in the context of Smart Materials design.

  11. Effect of photonic band gap on entanglement dynamics of qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing-Nuo; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We study how the environment of photonic band gap (PBG) materials affects entanglement dynamics of qubits. Entanglement between the single qubit and the PBG environment is investigated through the von Neumann entropy while that for two initially entangled qubits in this PBG reservoir is through concurrence. Dynamics of these measurements are solved in use of the fractional calculus which has been shown appropriate for the systems with non-Markovian dynamics. Entropy dynamics of the single qub...

  12. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (i) PhC composed of square lattice of elliptical air holes in silicon (Si) (n = 3.42) as shown in figure 1a. (ii) PhC ... consist of silicon and air as they provide adequate dielectric contrast for obtaining photonic band gaps. ... periodic with lattice vectors R. The relative permeability µ is taken as 1 and the relative permittivity is ...

  13. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Electronic structures of rutile and anatase polymorph of TiO2 were determined by resonant inelas- tic X-ray scattering measurements and FEFF9.0 calculations. Difference between crystalline structures led to shifts in the rutile Ti d-band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., decrease in band gap. Anatase ...

  14. Finite element method analysis of band gap and transmission of two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals at terahertz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, Elif; Landais, Pascal

    2013-10-20

    Photonic band gap and transmission characteristics of 2D metallic photonic crystals at THz frequencies have been investigated using finite element method (FEM). Photonic crystals composed of metallic rods in air, in square and triangular lattice arrangements, are considered for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. The modes and band gap characteristics of metallic photonic crystal structure are investigated by solving the eigenvalue problem over a unit cell of the lattice using periodic boundary conditions. A photonic band gap diagram of dielectric photonic crystal in square lattice array is also considered and compared with well-known plane wave expansion results verifying our FEM approach. The photonic band gap designs for both dielectric and metallic photonic crystals are consistent with previous studies obtained by different methods. Perfect match is obtained between photonic band gap diagrams and transmission spectra of corresponding lattice structure.

  15. Electronic materials with a wide band gap: recent developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlef Klimm

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of semiconductor electronics is reviewed briefly, beginning with the development of germanium devices (band gap Eg = 0.66 eV after World War II. A tendency towards alternative materials with wider band gaps quickly became apparent, starting with silicon (Eg = 1.12 eV. This improved the signal-to-noise ratio for classical electronic applications. Both semiconductors have a tetrahedral coordination, and by isoelectronic alternative replacement of Ge or Si with carbon or various anions and cations, other semiconductors with wider Eg were obtained. These are transparent to visible light and belong to the group of wide band gap semiconductors. Nowadays, some nitrides, especially GaN and AlN, are the most important materials for optical emission in the ultraviolet and blue regions. Oxide crystals, such as ZnO and β-Ga2O3, offer similarly good electronic properties but still suffer from significant difficulties in obtaining stable and technologically adequate p-type conductivity.

  16. Experimental evidence of locally resonant sonic band gap in two-dimensional phononic stubbed plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudich, Mourad; Senesi, Matteo; Assouar, M. Badreddine; Ruzenne, Massimo; Sun, Jia-Hong; Vincent, Brice; Hou, Zhilin; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2011-10-01

    We provide experimental evidence of the existence of a locally resonant sonic band gap in a two-dimensional stubbed plate. Structures consisting of a periodic arrangement of silicone rubber stubs deposited on a thin aluminium plate were fabricated and characterized. Brillouin spectroscopy analysis is carried out to determine the elastic constants of the used rubber. The constants are then implemented in an efficient finite-element model that predicts the band structure and transmission to identify the theoretical band gap. We measure a complete sonic band gap for the out-of-plane Lamb wave modes propagating in various samples fabricated with different stub heights. Frequency domain measurements of full wave field and transmission are performed through a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. A complete band gap from 1.9 to 2.6 kHz is showed using a sample with 6-mm stub diameter, 5-mm thickness, and 1-cm structure periodicity. Very good agreement between numerical and experimental results is obtained.

  17. Hypersonic band gap in an AlN-TiN bilayer phononic crystal slab

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hemon, S.; Akjouj, A.; Soltani, A.; Pennec, Y.; El Hassouani, Y.; Talbi, A.; Mortet, Vincent; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 6 (2014), , "063101-1"-"063101-5" ISSN 0003-6951 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : band gap * III-V semiconductors * AIN films * photonic bandgap materials * thin film deposition * band structure * surface acoustic waves * bulk materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  18. Band gap engineering via doping: A predictive approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriotis, Antonis N., E-mail: andriot@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, FORTH, P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklio, Crete (Greece); Menon, Madhu, E-mail: super250@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Computational Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    We employ an extension of Harrison's theory at the tight binding level of approximation to develop a predictive approach for band gap engineering involving isovalent doping of wide band gap semiconductors. Our results indicate that reasonably accurate predictions can be achieved at qualitative as well as quantitative levels. The predictive results were checked against ab initio ones obtained at the level of DFT/SGGA + U approximation. The minor disagreements between predicted and ab initio results can be attributed to the electronic processes not incorporated in Harrison's theory. These include processes such as the conduction band anticrossing [Shan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1221 (1999); Walukiewicz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1552 (2000)] and valence band anticrossing [Alberi et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 073202 (2008); Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 162105 (2008); Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 051909 (2007); Phys. Rev. B 75, 045203 (2007)], as well as the multiorbital rehybridization. Another cause of disagreement between the results of our predictive approach and the ab initio ones is shown to be the result of the shift of Fermi energy within the impurity band formed at the edge of the valence band maximum due to rehybridization. The validity of our approach is demonstrated with example applications for the systems GaN{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}, GaP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}, AlSb{sub 1−x}P{sub x}, AlP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}, and InP{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}.

  19. Understanding band gaps of solids in generalized Kohn–Sham theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdew, John P.; Yang, Weitao; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zenghui; Gross, Eberhard K. U.; Scheffler, Matthias; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Zhang, Igor Ying; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Peng, Haowei; Sun, Jianwei; Trushin, Egor; Görling, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental energy gap of a periodic solid distinguishes insulators from metals and characterizes low-energy single-electron excitations. However, the gap in the band structure of the exact multiplicative Kohn–Sham (KS) potential substantially underestimates the fundamental gap, a major limitation of KS density-functional theory. Here, we give a simple proof of a theorem: In generalized KS theory (GKS), the band gap of an extended system equals the fundamental gap for the approximate functional if the GKS potential operator is continuous and the density change is delocalized when an electron or hole is added. Our theorem explains how GKS band gaps from metageneralized gradient approximations (meta-GGAs) and hybrid functionals can be more realistic than those from GGAs or even from the exact KS potential. The theorem also follows from earlier work. The band edges in the GKS one-electron spectrum are also related to measurable energies. A linear chain of hydrogen molecules, solid aluminum arsenide, and solid argon provide numerical illustrations. PMID:28265085

  20. Understanding band gaps of solids in generalized Kohn-Sham theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdew, John P; Yang, Weitao; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zenghui; Gross, Eberhard K U; Scheffler, Matthias; Scuseria, Gustavo E; Henderson, Thomas M; Zhang, Igor Ying; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Peng, Haowei; Sun, Jianwei; Trushin, Egor; Görling, Andreas

    2017-03-14

    The fundamental energy gap of a periodic solid distinguishes insulators from metals and characterizes low-energy single-electron excitations. However, the gap in the band structure of the exact multiplicative Kohn-Sham (KS) potential substantially underestimates the fundamental gap, a major limitation of KS density-functional theory. Here, we give a simple proof of a theorem: In generalized KS theory (GKS), the band gap of an extended system equals the fundamental gap for the approximate functional if the GKS potential operator is continuous and the density change is delocalized when an electron or hole is added. Our theorem explains how GKS band gaps from metageneralized gradient approximations (meta-GGAs) and hybrid functionals can be more realistic than those from GGAs or even from the exact KS potential. The theorem also follows from earlier work. The band edges in the GKS one-electron spectrum are also related to measurable energies. A linear chain of hydrogen molecules, solid aluminum arsenide, and solid argon provide numerical illustrations.

  1. Lattice reconfiguration and phononic band-gap adaptation via origami folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, M.; Li, S.; Wang, K. W.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a framework of utilizing origami folding to redistribute the inclusions of a phononic structure to achieve significant phononic band-gap adaptation. Cylindrical inclusions are attached to the vertices of a Miura-Ori sheet, whose 1 degree-of-freedom rigid folding can enable fundamental reconfigurations in the underlying periodic architecture via switching between different Bravais lattice types. Such a reconfiguration can drastically change the wave propagation behavior in terms of band gap and provide a scalable and practical means for broadband wave tailoring.

  2. Determination of band-structure parameters of Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te narrow-gap semiconductor from infrared Faraday rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizov, F.F.; Lashkarev, G.V.; Martynchuk, E.K.

    1977-01-01

    The temeprature dependences of Faraday rotation in Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te of p type with the hole density 3x10 16 -2.2x10 18 cm -3 are studied in the range 40-370 K and in the spectral interval 4-16 μm. The analysis of interband Faraday rotation confirms a conclusion made by the authors earlier that the g factor for the c band (gsub(c)) is positive, for the v band (gsub(v))-negative and that [gsub(c)] > [gsub(v)]. The temperature dependences of carrier effective masses are investigated on the basis of the two-band model. It is demonstrated that for T < 200 K the Faraday effective mass of holes near the ceiling of the valency band varies in direct proportion to the width of the forbidden band. The temperature increase of the Faraday effective mass of current carriers, which is faster than that of the effective electron mass, is discovered, and this is related to the effect of the heavy hole band

  3. Generalized thermoelastic wave band gaps in phononic crystals without energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Yu, Kaiping; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Haotian

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the thermoelastic wave propagation in the phononic crystals in the context of Green-Nagdhi theory by taking thermoelastic coupling into account. The thermal field is assumed to be steady. Thermoelastic wave band structures of 3D and 2D are derived by using the plane wave expansion method. For the 2D problem, the anti-plane shear mode is not affected by the temperature difference. Thermoelastic wave bands of the in-plane x-y mode are calculated for lead/silicone rubber, aluminium/silicone rubber, and aurum/silicone rubber phononic crystals. The new findings in the numerical results indicate that the thermoelastic wave bands are composed of the pure elastic wave bands and the thermal wave bands, and that the thermal wave bands can serve as the low boundary of the first band gap when the filling ratio is low. In addition, for the lead/silicone rubber phononic crystals the effects of lattice type (square, rectangle, regular triangle, and hexagon) and inclusion shape (circle, oval, and square) on the normalized thermoelastic bandwidth and the upper/lower gap boundaries are analysed and discussed. It is concluded that their effects on the thermoelastic wave band structure are remarkable.

  4. Grain size dependent optical band gap of CdI2 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermally evaporated stoichiometric CdI2 films show good -axis alignment normal to substrate plane for film thickness up to 200 nm. The optical absorption data indicate an allowed direct interband transition across a gap of 3.6 eV in confirmation with earlier band structure calculations. However, part of the absorption ...

  5. Effect of Temperature on Photonic Band Gaps in Semiconductor-Based One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Malik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the temperature and angle of incidence on the photonic band gap (PBG for semiconductor-based photonic crystals has been investigated. The refractive index of semiconductor layers is taken as a function of temperature and wavelength. Three structures have been analyzed by choosing a semiconductor material for one of the two materials in a bilayer structure. The semiconductor material is taken to be ZnS, Si, and Ge with air in first, second, and third structures respectively. The shifting of band gaps with temperature is more pronounced in the third structure than in the first two structures because the change in the refractive index of Ge layers with temperature is more than the change of refractive index of both ZnS and Si layers with temperature. The propagation characteristics of the proposed structures are analyzed by transfer matrix method.

  6. Effect of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene nano-flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene have been investigated by means of density functional theory method. It is generally considered that the band gap increases with increasing coverage of hydrogen atom on the graphene. However, the present study shows that the band gap decreases first with increasing hydrogen coverage and reaches the lowest value at finite coverage (γ = 0.3). Next, the band gap increases to that of insulator with coverage from 0.3 to 1.0. This specific feature of the band gap is reasonably explained by broken symmetry model and the decrease of pi-conjugation. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphene are discussed. - Highlights: • Density functional theory calculations were carried out for hydrogen on graphene • Effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene were examined. • The band gap showed a minimum at a finite coverage. • Mechanism of specific band gap feature was discussed

  7. Quasiparticle self-consistent GW theory of III-V nitride semiconductors: Bands, gap bowing, and effective masses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede; Gorczyca, I.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic band structures of InN, GaN, and a hypothetical ordered InGaN2 compound, all in the wurtzite crystal structure, are calculated using the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation. This approach leads to band gaps which are significantly improved compared to gaps calculated...... on the basis of the local approximation to density functional theory, although generally overestimated by 0.2–0.3 eV in comparison with experimental gap values. Details of the electronic energies and the effective masses including their pressure dependence are compared with available experimental information....... The band gap of InGaN2 is considerably smaller than what would be expected by linear interpolation implying a significant band gap bowing in InGaN alloys....

  8. Six wave mixing process in photonic band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanyong; Rasheed Mahesar, Abdul; Wang, Zhiguo; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Yunzhe; Gong, Rui; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-07-01

    For the first time, we have experimentally and theoretically researched the double dressing effect on the six wave mixing photonic band gap signal (SWM BGS), probe transmission signal (PTS) and fluorescence signal (FLS) in an inverted Y-type four level atomic system. We investigate the characteristics of the SMW BGS, PTS and FLS, which can be controlled by beam, power and detuning. At the same time, the relative phase which is caused by the incident angle of dressing beams plays a vital role in modulating the intensity of the SWM BGS, PTS and FLS. Such a scheme has potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers and quantum information processing.

  9. Behaviour of hydrogen in wide band gap oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-28

    The defect formation energies and atomic geometries of interstitial hydrogen in its different charge states in a number of wide band gap oxides are calculated by the Heyd, Scuseria, Ernzerhof hybrid functional. As in semiconductors, two behaviours are found, it acts either as an amphoteric defect or as a shallow donor. There are large scale lattice relaxations between the different charge states for the case of the amphoteric defect. Interestingly, we find that the +/− transition level does have a good alignment below the vacuum level, as was found previously for tetrahedral semiconductors.

  10. Behaviour of hydrogen in wide band gap oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Robertson, J.

    2014-05-01

    The defect formation energies and atomic geometries of interstitial hydrogen in its different charge states in a number of wide band gap oxides are calculated by the Heyd, Scuseria, Ernzerhof hybrid functional. As in semiconductors, two behaviours are found, it acts either as an amphoteric defect or as a shallow donor. There are large scale lattice relaxations between the different charge states for the case of the amphoteric defect. Interestingly, we find that the +/- transition level does have a good alignment below the vacuum level, as was found previously for tetrahedral semiconductors.

  11. Band gap calculations with Becke-Johnson exchange potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Fabien; Blaha, Peter; Schwarz, Karlheinz

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a simple analytical form for the exchange potential was proposed by Becke and Johnson. This potential, which depends on the kinetic-energy density, was shown to reproduce very well the shape of the exact exchange potential (obtained with the optimized effective potential method) for atoms. Calculations on solids show that the Becke-Johnson potential leads to a better description of band gaps of semiconductors and insulators with respect to the standard local density and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof approximations for the exchange-correlation potential. Comparison is also made with the values obtained with the Engel-Vosko exchange potential which was also developed using the exact exchange potential

  12. The limiting efficiency of band gap graded solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafat, Nadia H. [Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Habib, S.E.D. [Faculty of electronics and communication, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    1998-09-04

    Two fundamental mechanisms limit the maximum attainable efficiency of solar cells, namely the radiative recombination and Auger recombination. We show in this paper that proper band gap grading of the solar cell localizes the Auger recombination around the metallurgical junction. Two beneficial effects result from this Auger recombination localization; first the cell is less sensitive to the surface conditions, and second, the previous estimates for the limiting efficiency of solar cells by Shockley, Tiedje, and Green are revised upwardly. We calculate the optimum bandgap grading profile for several real material systems, including GaInAsP lattice matched to InP, and a-SiGe on a-Si substrate

  13. Influence of humidity on the graphene band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaryan, H.A.; Aroutiounian, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Influences of the humidity on graphene properties are studied and comparisons of graphene and polymer humidity sensors are carried out. Graphene sensors have remarkable response compare to nanoporous polymer membranes. The resistance of polymer sensors is 150 GOhm and decreases in 7.5 times at 60 per cent of the relative humidity. For graphene, resistance drops 4 times starting from ~100 kOhm. This is connected with the extension of graphene band gap. The reason of this is adsorbed water, which can create defects in the lattice or can transfer charge which depends on relative position of HOMO/LUMO of water and Dirac point of graphene

  14. Prediction of large gap flat Chern band in a two-dimensional metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ninghai; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Zhengfei; Liu, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Systems with a flat Chern band have been extensively studied for their potential to realize high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. To experimentally observe the quantum transport properties, a sizable topological gap is highly necessary. Here, taking advantage of the high tunability of two-dimensional (2D) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), whose crystal structures can be easily tuned using different metal atoms and molecular ligands, we propose a design of a 2D MOF [Tl2(C6H4)3, Tl2Ph3] showing nontrivial topological states with an extremely large gap in both the nearly flat Chern band and the Dirac bands. By coordinating π-conjugated thallium ions and benzene rings, crystalline Tl2Ph3 can be formed with Tl and Ph constructing honeycomb and kagome lattices, respectively. The px,y orbitals of Tl on the honeycomb lattice form ideal pxy four-bands, through which a flat Chern band with a spin-orbit coupling (SOC) gap around 140 meV evolves below the Fermi level. This is the largest SOC gap among all the theoretically proposed organic topological insulators so far.

  15. Optimization of Beam Properties with Respect to Maximum Band-Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole

    2004-01-01

    We study numerically the frequency band-gap phenomenon for bending waves in an infinite periodic beam. The outcome of the analysis is then subjected to an optimization problem in order to maximize these band-gaps. The band-gap maximization may be performed with respect to material parameters and ...

  16. Photonic-band-gap gyrotron amplifier with picosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A; Jawla, Sudheer; Lewis, Samantha M; Shapiro, Michael A; Temkin, Richard J

    2017-12-04

    We report the amplification of 250 GHz pulses as short as 260 ps without observation of pulse broadening using a photonic-band-gap circuit gyrotron traveling-wave-amplifier. The gyrotron amplifier operates with a device gain of 38 dB and an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz. The operational bandwidth of the amplifier can be tuned over 16 GHz by adjusting the operating voltage of the electron beam and the magnetic field. The amplifier uses a 30 cm long photonic-band-gap interaction circuit to confine the desired TE 03 -like operating mode while suppressing lower order modes which can result in undesired oscillations. The circuit gain is >55 dB for a beam voltage of 23 kV and a current of 700 mA. These results demonstrate the wide bandwidths and a high gain achievable with gyrotron amplifiers. The amplification of picosecond pulses of variable lengths, 260-800 ps, shows good agreement with the theory using the coupled dispersion relation and the gain-spectrum of the amplifier as measured with quasi-CW input pulses.

  17. Photonic-band-gap gyrotron amplifier with picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Jawla, Sudheer; Lewis, Samantha M.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2017-12-01

    We report the amplification of 250 GHz pulses as short as 260 ps without observation of pulse broadening using a photonic-band-gap circuit gyrotron traveling-wave-amplifier. The gyrotron amplifier operates with a device gain of 38 dB and an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz. The operational bandwidth of the amplifier can be tuned over 16 GHz by adjusting the operating voltage of the electron beam and the magnetic field. The amplifier uses a 30 cm long photonic-band-gap interaction circuit to confine the desired TE03-like operating mode while suppressing lower order modes which can result in undesired oscillations. The circuit gain is >55 dB for a beam voltage of 23 kV and a current of 700 mA. These results demonstrate the wide bandwidths and a high gain achievable with gyrotron amplifiers. The amplification of picosecond pulses of variable lengths, 260-800 ps, shows good agreement with the theory using the coupled dispersion relation and the gain-spectrum of the amplifier as measured with quasi-CW input pulses.

  18. Wide band gap gallium arsenide nanoparticles fabricated using plasma method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, D., E-mail: dvjainnov@gmail.com [Physics Department, Banasthali Vidyapith, Rajasthan-304022 (India); Mangla, O. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Physics Department, Hindu College, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Roy, S. [Physics Department, Daulat Ram College, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, we have reported the fabrication of gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanoparticles on quartz placed at distance of 4.0 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.0 cm, respectively from top of anode. The fabrication has been carried out by highly energetic and high fluence ions of GaAs produced by hot, dense and extremely non-equilibrium plasma in a modified dense plasma focus device. GaAs nanoparticles have mean size of about 23 nm, 16 nm and 14 nm for deposition at a distance of 4.0 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.0 cm, respectively. The nanoparticles are crystalline in nature as evident from X-ray diffraction patterns. The band gap of nanoparticles is found to increase from 1.425 eV to 5.37 eV at 4.0 cm distance, which further increases as distance increases. The wide band gap observed for fabricated GaAs nanoparticles suggest the possible applications of nanoparticles in laser systems.

  19. Band gaps from the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson approach: A systematic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    The semi-local Becke-Johnson (BJ) exchange-correlation potential and its modified form proposed by Tran and Blaha (TB-mBJ) have attracted a lot of interest recently because of the surprisingly accurate band gaps they can deliver for many semiconductors and insulators. In this work, we have investigated the performance of the TB-mBJ potential for the description of electronic band structures in a comprehensive set of semiconductors and insulators. We point out that a perturbative use of the TB-mBJ potential can give overall better results. By investigating a set of IIB-VI and III-V semiconductors, we point out that although the TB-mBJ approach can describe the band gap of these materials quite well, the binding energies of semi-core d-states in these materials deviate strongly from experiment. The difficulty of the TB-mBJ potential to describe the localized states is likely the cause for the fact that the electronic band structures of Cu2O and La2O3 are still poorly described. Based on these observations, we propose to combine the TB-mBJ approach with the Hubbard U correction for localized d/f states, which is able to provide overall good descriptions for both the band gaps and semi-core states binding energies. We further apply the approach to calculate the band gaps of a set of Ti(IV)-oxides, many of which have complicated structures so that the more advanced methods like GW are expensive to treat directly. An overall good agreement with experiment is obtained, which is remarkable considering its little computational efforts compared to GW.

  20. Enhancement of Faraday rotation at photonic-band-gap edge in garnet-based magnetophotonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, A.G.; Fedyanin, A.A.; Aktsipetrov, O.A.; Kobayashi, D.; Uchida, H.; Inoue, M.

    2006-01-01

    Spectral dependences of Faraday rotation angle in one-dimensional garnet-based magnetophotonic crystals are considered. The enhancement of Faraday angle is demonstrated at the photonic band gap (PBG) edge both theoretically and experimentally. It is shown to be associated with the optical field localization in the magnetic layers of the structure. The advantages of magnetophotonic crystals in comparison with traditional magnetic microcavities are discussed. The specially designed microcavity structures optimized for the Faraday effect enhancement at the PBG edge are suggested

  1. Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Engel, Michael; Damasceno, Pablo F; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-07-29

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high-refractive-index disordered materials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials.

  2. Incorporation of ester groups into low band-gap diketopyrrolopyrrole containing polymers for solar cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xiaolian; Zuo, Lijian; Fu, Weifei

    2012-01-01

    To increase the open circuit voltage (VOC) of polymer solar cells based on diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) containing polymers, the weakly electron-withdrawing thiophene-3,4-dicarboxylate unit was introduced into the polymer backbone. Two ester group functionalized DPP containing polymers, PCTDPP...... with a random structure and PDCTDPP with a regular structure, were designed and synthesized by the Stille coupling reaction. The resulting copolymers exhibit broad and strong absorption bands from 350 to 1000 nm with low optical band gaps below 1.40 eV. Through cyclic voltammetry measurements, it is found...

  3. Hofstadter butterflies and magnetically induced band-gap quenching in graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-01-01

    We study graphene antidot lattices (GALs) in magnetic fields. Using a tight-binding model and a recursive Green's function technique that we extend to deal with periodic structures, we calculate Hofstadter butterflies of GALs. We compare the results to those obtained in a simpler gapped graphene...... model. A crucial difference emerges in the behavior of the lowest Landau level, which in a gapped graphene model is independent of magnetic field. In stark contrast to this picture, we find that in GALs the band gap can be completely closed by applying a magnetic field. While our numerical simulations...... can only be performed on structures much smaller than can be experimentally realized, we find that the critical magnetic field for which the gap closes can be directly related to the ratio between the cyclotron radius and the neck width of the GAL. In this way, we obtain a simple scaling law...

  4. Band-Gap Engineering at a Semiconductor-Crystalline Oxide Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghadam, Mohammadreza J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Ahmadi-Majlan, K. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Shen, Xuan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nanjing Univ. (China); Droubay, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowden, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chrysler, M. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Su, Dong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chambers, Scott A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ngai, Joseph [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2015-02-09

    The epitaxial growth of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor devices. Key to electrically coupling crystalline oxides with semiconductors to realize functional behavior is controlling the manner in which their bands align at interfaces. Here we apply principles of band gap engineering traditionally used at heterojunctions between conventional semiconductors to control the band offset between a single crystalline oxide and a semiconductor. Reactive molecular beam epitaxy is used to realize atomically abrupt and structurally coherent interfaces between SrZrxTi1-xO3 and Ge, in which the band gap of the former is enhanced with Zr content x. We present structural, electrical and photoemission characterization of SrZrxTi1-xO33-Ge heterojunctions for x = 0.2 to 0.75 and demonstrate the band offset can be tuned from type-II to type-I. The type-I band offset provides a platform to integrate the dielectric, ferroelectric and ferromagnetic functionalities of oxides with semiconducting devices.

  5. Anisotropic Effective Mass, Optical Property, and Enhanced Band Gap in BN/Phosphorene/BN Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang

    2015-10-28

    Phosphorene is receiving great research interests because of its peculiar physical properties. Nonetheless, the phosphorus has a trouble of degradation due to oxidation. Hereby, we propose that the electrical and optical anisotropic properties can be preserved by encapsulating into hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We found that the h-BN contributed to enhancing the band gap of the phosphorene layer. Comparing the band gap of the pristine phosphorene layer, the band gap of the phosphorene/BN(1ML) system was enhanced by 0.15 eV. It was further enhanced by 0.31 eV in the BN(1ML)/phosphorene/BN(1ML) trilayer structure. However, the band gap was not further enhanced when we increased the thickness of the h-BN layers even up to 4 MLs. Interestingly, the anisotropic effective mass and optical property were still preserved in BN/phosphorene/BN heterostructures. Overall, we predict that the capping of phosphorene by the h-BN layers can be an excellent solution to protect the intrinsic properties of the phosphorene.

  6. Ultrawide band gaps in beams with double-leaf acoustic black hole indentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2017-11-01

    Band gaps in conventional phononic crystals (PCs) are attractive for applications such as vibration control, wave manipulation, and sound absorption. Their practical implementations, however, are hampered by several factors, among which the large number of cells required and their impractically large size to ensure the stopbands at reasonably low frequencies are on the top of the list. This paper reports a type of beam carved inside with two double-leaf acoustic black hole indentations. By incorporating the local resonance effect and the Bragg scattering effect generated by a strengthening stud connecting the two branches of the indentations, ultrawide band gaps are achieved. Increasing the length of the stud or reducing the residual thickness of the indentation allows the tuning of the band gaps to significantly enlarge the band gaps, which can exceed 90% of the entire frequency range of interest. Experimental results show that with only three cells, the proposed beam allows considerable vibration energy attenuation within an ultra-broad frequency range including the low frequency range, which conventional PCs can hardly reach. Meanwhile, the proposed configuration also enhances the structural integrity, thus pointing at promising applications in vibration control and a high performance wave filter design.

  7. Tunable band gaps in graphene/GaN van der Waals heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Le; Kang, Jun; Li, Yan; Li, Jingbo; Yue, Qu

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures consisting of graphene and other two-dimensional materials provide good opportunities for achieving desired electronic and optoelectronic properties. Here, we focus on vdW heterostructures composed of graphene and gallium nitride (GaN). Using density functional theory, we perform a systematic study on the structural and electronic properties of heterostructures consisting of graphene and GaN. Small band gaps are opened up at or near the Γ point of the Brillouin zone for all of the heterostructures. We also investigate the effect of the stacking sequence and electric fields on their electronic properties. Our results show that the tunability of the band gap is sensitive to the stacking sequence in bilayer-graphene-based heterostructures. In particular, in the case of graphene/graphene/GaN, a band gap of up to 334 meV is obtained under a perpendicular electric field. The band gap of bilayer graphene between GaN sheets (GaN/graphene/graphene/GaN) shows similar tunability, and increases to 217 meV with the perpendicular electric field reaching 0.8 V Å  − 1 . (paper)

  8. Modulation of band gap by an applied electric field in BN-based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, M.; Xu, Y. E.; Zhang, Q. X.

    2018-05-01

    First-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on the structural and electronic properties of the SiC/BN van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures under an external electric field (E-field). Our results reveal that the SiC/BN vdW heterostructure has a direct band gap of 2.41 eV in the raw. The results also imply that electrons are likely to transfer from BN to SiC monolayer due to the deeper potential of BN monolayer. It is also observed that, by applying an E-field, ranging from -0.50 to +0.65 V/Å, the band gap decreases from 2.41 eV to zero, which presents a parabola-like relationship around 0.0 V/Å. Through partial density of states (PDOS) plots, it is revealed that, p orbital of Si, C, B, and N atoms are responsible for the significant variations of band gap. These obtained results predict that, the electric field tunable band gap of the SiC/BN vdW heterostructures carries potential applications for nanoelectronics and spintronic device applications.

  9. Band gap engineering of MoS{sub 2} upon compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Suárez, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.lopez@nipslab.org [NiPS Laboratory, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Neri, Igor [NiPS Laboratory, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Perugia, via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Rurali, Riccardo [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB–CSIC) Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-28

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) is a promising candidate for 2D nanoelectronic devices, which shows a direct band-gap for monolayer structure. In this work we study the electronic structure of MoS{sub 2} upon both compressive and tensile strains with first-principles density-functional calculations for different number of layers. The results show that the band-gap can be engineered for experimentally attainable strains (i.e., ±0.15). However, compressive strain can result in bucking that can prevent the use of large compressive strain. We then studied the stability of the compression, calculating the critical strain that results in the on-set of buckling for free-standing nanoribbons of different lengths. The results demonstrate that short structures, or few-layer MoS{sub 2}, show semi-conductor to metal transition upon compressive strain without bucking.

  10. Band gap opening in silicene on MgBr2(0001) induced by Li and Na

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2014-11-12

    Silicene consists of a monolayer of Si atoms in a buckled honeycomb structure and is expected to be well compatible with the current Si-based technology. However, the band gap is strongly influenced by the substrate. In this context, the structural and electronic properties of silicene on MgBr2(0001) modified by Li and Na are investigated by first-principles calculations. Charge transfer from silicene (substrate) to substrate (silicene) is found for substitutional doping (intercalation). As compared to a band gap of 0.01 eV on the pristine substrate, strongly enhanced band gaps of 0.65 eV (substitutional doping) and 0.24 eV (intercalation) are achieved. The band gap increases with the dopant concentration.

  11. Zero permeability and zero permittivity band gaps in 1D metamaterial photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depine, Ricardo A. [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Martinez-Ricci, Maria L. [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Monsoriu, Juan A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: jmonsori@fis.upv.es; Silvestre, Enrique [Departamento de Optica, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Andres, Pedro [Departamento de Optica, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2007-04-30

    We consider layered heterostructures combining ordinary positive index materials and dispersive metamaterials. We show that these structures can exhibit a new type of photonic gap around frequencies where either the magnetic permeability {mu} or the electric permittivity {epsilon} of the metamaterial is zero. Although the interface of a semi-infinite medium with zero refractive index (a condition attained either when {mu}=0 or when {epsilon}=0) is known to give full reflectivity for all incident polarizations, here we show that a gap corresponding to {mu}=0 occurs only for TE polarized waves, whereas a gap corresponding to {epsilon}=0 occurs only for TM polarized waves. These band gaps are scale-length invariant and very robust against disorder, although they may disappear for the particular case of propagation along the stratification direction.

  12. Band-gaps in long Josephson junctions with periodic phase-shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Saeed, E-mail: saeedahmad@uom.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, University of Malakand Chakdara, Dir(L), Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Susanto, Hadi, E-mail: hsusanto@essex.ac.uk [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Wattis, Jonathan A.D. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-04

    We investigate analytically and numerically a long Josephson junction on an infinite domain, having arbitrary periodic phase shift of κ, that is, the so-called 0–κ long Josephson junction. The system is described by a one-dimensional sine-Gordon equation and has relatively recently been proposed as artificial atom lattices. We discuss the existence of periodic solutions of the system and investigate their stability both in the absence and presence of an applied bias current. We find critical values of the phase-discontinuity and the applied bias current beyond which static periodic solutions cease to exist. Due to the periodic discontinuity in the phase, the system admits regions of allowed and forbidden bands. We perturbatively investigate the Arnold tongues that separate the region of allowed and forbidden bands, and discuss the effect of an applied bias current on the band-gap structure. We present numerical simulations to support our analytical results. - Highlights: • A long Josephson junction on an infinite domain having arbitrary periodic phase shift has been proposed as artificial atom lattices recently. • We compute the band-gaps of the system asymptotically. • We show that the phase-shift and applied bias current can be used to control the band structures.

  13. Graphene nanoribbons as low band gap donor materials for organic photovoltaics: quantum chemical aided design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, Silvio; Narita, Akimitsu; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Hernandez, Yenny; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Beljonne, David

    2012-06-26

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are strips of graphene cut along a specific direction that feature peculiar electronic and optical properties owing to lateral confinement effects. We show here by means of (time-dependent) density functional theory calculations that GNRs with properly designed edge structures fulfill the requirements in terms of electronic level alignment with common acceptors (namely, C(60)), solar light harvesting, and singlet-triplet exchange energy to be used as low band gap semiconductors for organic photovoltaics.

  14. Mechanical Properties of a Library of Low-Band-Gap Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roth, Bérenger; Savagatrup, Suchol; de los Santos, Nathaniel V.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of low-band-gap polymers are important for the long-term survivability of roll to-roll processed organic electronic devices. Such devices, e.g., solar cells, displays, and thin-film transistors, must survive the rigors of roll-to-roll coating and also thermal...... the rigidity of the molecular structure, the most deformable films can be surprisingly compliant (modulus >= 150 MPa) and ductile (crack-onset strain...

  15. The Role of Work Function and Band Gap in Resistive Switching Behaviour of ZnTe Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowtu, Srinu; Sangani, L. D. Varma; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2018-02-01

    Resistive switching behavior by engineering the electrode work function and band gap of ZnTe thin films is demonstrated. The device structures Au/ZnTe/Au, Au/ZnTe/Ag, Al/ZnTe/Ag and Pt/ZnTe/Ag were fabricated. ZnTe was deposited by thermal evaporation and the stoichiometry and band gap were controlled by varying the source-substrate distance. Band gap could be varied between 1.0 eV to approximately 4.0 eV with the larger band gap being attributed to the partial oxidation of ZnTe. The transport characteristics reveal that the low-resistance state is ohmic in nature which makes a transition to Poole-Frenkel defect-mediated conductivity in the high-resistance states. The highest R off-to- R on ratio achieved is 109. Interestingly, depending on stoichiometry, both unipolar and bipolar switching can be realized.

  16. Effect of ZnO on the Physical Properties and Optical Band Gap of Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Aziz, Sidek Hj. Abdul; Zakaria, Azmi; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reports on the physical properties and optical band gap of five samples of soda lime silicate (SLS) glass combined with zinc oxide (ZnO) that were prepared by a melting and quenching process. To understand the role of ZnO in this glass structure, the density, molar volume and optical band gaps were investigated. The density and absorption spectra in the Ultra-Violet-Visible (UV-Visible) region were recorded at room temperature. The results show that the densities of the glass samples increased as the ZnO weight percentage increased. The molar volume of the glasses shows the same trend as the density: the molar volume increased as the ZnO content increased. The optical band gaps were calculated from the absorption edge, and it was found that the optical band gap decreased from 3.20 to 2.32 eV as the ZnO concentration increased. PMID:22837711

  17. Research on the effects of geometrical and material uncertainties on the band gap of the undulated beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanlong

    2017-09-01

    Considering uncertain geometrical and material parameters, the lower and upper bounds of the band gap of an undulated beam with periodically arched shape are studied by the Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) and interval analysis based on the Taylor series. Given the random variations of the overall uncertain variables, scatter plots from the MCS are used to analyze the qualitative sensitivities of the band gap respect to these uncertainties. We find that the influence of uncertainty of the geometrical parameter on the band gap of the undulated beam is stronger than that of the material parameter. And this conclusion is also proved by the interval analysis based on the Taylor series. Our methodology can give a strategy to reduce the errors between the design and practical values of the band gaps by improving the accuracy of the specially selected uncertain design variables of the periodical structures.

  18. Formation mechanism of the low-frequency locally resonant band gap in the two-dimensional ternary phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Liu, Yao-Zong; Wen, Ji-Hong; Yu, Dian-Long

    2006-02-01

    The low-frequency band gap and the corresponding vibration modes in two-dimensional ternary locally resonant phononic crystals are restudied successfully with the lumped-mass method. Compared with the work of C. Goffaux and J. Sánchez-Dehesa (Phys. Rev. B 67 14 4301(2003)), it is shown that there exists an error of about 50% in their calculated results of the band structure and one band is missing in their results. Moreover, the in-plane modes shown in their paper are improper, which results in the wrong conclusion on the mechanism of the ternary locally resonant phononic crystals. Based on the lumped-mass method and better description of the vibration modes according to the band gaps, the locally resonant mechanism in forming the subfrequency gaps is thoroughly analysed. The rule used to judge whether a resonant mode in the phononic crystals can result in a corresponding subfrequency gap is also verified in this ternary case.

  19. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-09

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing.

  20. Side-chain tunability of furan-containing low-band-gap polymers provides control of structural order in efficient solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yiu, Alan T.

    2012-02-01

    The solution-processability of conjugated polymers in organic solvents has classically been achieved by modulating the size and branching of alkyl substituents appended to the backbone. However, these substituents impact structural order and charge transport properties in thin-film devices. As a result, a trade-off must be found between material solubility and insulating alkyl content. It was recently shown that the substitution of furan for thiophene in the backbone of the polymer PDPP2FT significantly improves polymer solubility, allowing for the use of shorter branched side chains while maintaining high device efficiency. In this report, we use PDPP2FT to demonstrate that linear alkyl side chains can be used to promote thin-film nanostructural order. In particular, linear side chains are shown to shorten π-π stacking distances between backbones and increase the correlation lengths of both π-π stacking and lamellar spacing, leading to a substantial increase in the efficiency of bulk heterojunction solar cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Tunable quasiparticle band gap in few-layer GaSe/graphene van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Aziza, Zeineb; Pierucci, Debora; Henck, Hugo; Silly, Mathieu G.; David, Christophe; Yoon, Mina; Sirotti, Fausto; Xiao, Kai; Eddrief, Mahmoud; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have recently been the focus of extensive research. By following a similar trend as graphene, other 2D materials, including transition metal dichalcogenides (M X2 ) and metal mono-chalcogenides (MX), show great potential for ultrathin nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in semiconducting MX materials, their electronic properties are highly dependent on the number of layers. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, we demonstrate the tunability of the quasiparticle energy gap of few-layered gallium selenide (GaSe) directly grown on a bilayer graphene substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Our results show that the band gap is about 3.50 ± 0.05 eV for single-tetralayer, 3.00 ±0.05 eV for bi-tetralayer, and 2.30 ±0.05 eV for tri-tetralayer GaSe. This band-gap evolution of GaSe, particularly the shift of the valence band with respect to the Fermi level, was confirmed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and our theoretical calculations. Moreover, we observed a charge transfer in the GaSe/graphene van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure using ARPES. These findings demonstrate the high impact on the GaSe electronic band structure and electronic properties that can be obtained by the control of 2D materials layer thickness and the graphene induced doping.

  2. Effects of phosphorus-doping on energy band-gap, structural, surface, and photocatalytic characteristics of emulsion-based sol-gel derived TiO{sub 2} nano-powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, Ibram, E-mail: ibramganesh@arci.res.in

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Reported a novel route to synthesize high specific surface area P-doped TiO{sub 2} nano-powder photocatalysts. • Established methylene blue dye-sensitization mechanism of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. • Established the effects of methylene blue adsorption on the surface, structural and photocatalytic activity of P-doped TiO{sub 2}. • Established true quantum efficiency determination method for TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis. - Abstract: Different amounts of phosphorus (P)-doped TiO{sub 2} (PDT) nano-powders (P = 0–10 wt.%) were synthesized by following a new emulsion-based sol-gel (EBSG) route and calcined at 400 °C–800 °C for 6 h. These calcined PDT powders were then thoroughly characterized by means of XRD, XPS, SEM, FT-IR, FT-Raman, DRS, BET surface area, zeta-potential, cyclic-voltammetry and photocatalytic evaluation using methylene blue (MB) as a model-pollutant and established the effects of phosphorous doping on structural, surface, band-gap energy, and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO{sub 2} nano-powder formed in EBSG route. The characterization results suggest that the EBSG derived TiO{sub 2} nano-powder after calcination at 400 °C for 6 h is in the form of anatase phase when it was doped with <8 wt.% P, and it is in the amorphous state when doped with >8 wt.% P. Furthermore, these EBSG derived PDT powders own high negative zeta-potentials, high specific surface areas (up to >250 m{sup 2}/g), and suitable band-gap energies (<3.34 eV). Surprisingly, these PDT powders exhibit very high MB adsorption (up to 50%) from its aqueous 0.01 mM, 0.02 mM and 0.03 mM solutions during 30 min stirring in the dark, whereas, the commercial Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2} nano-powder shows no adsorption. Among various photocatalysts investigated in this study, the 1 wt.% P-doped TiO{sub 2} nano-powder formed in EBSG route exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for MB degradation reaction.

  3. Band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying, E-mail: yliu5@bjtu.edu.cn; Liang, Tianshu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals (FPPCs) are studied with the aim to clarify the effect of fractal hierarchy on the band structures. Firstly, one kind of FPPCs based on Sierpinski triangle routine is proposed. Then the influence of the porosity on the elastic wave dispersion in Sierpinski triangle FPPCs is investigated. The sensitivity of the band structures to the fractal hierarchy is discussed in detail. The results show that the increase of the hierarchy increases the sensitivity of ABG (Absolute band gap) central frequency to the porosity. But further increase of the fractal hierarchy weakens this sensitivity. On the same hierarchy, wider ABGs could be opened in Sierpinski equilateral triangle FPPC; whilst, a lower ABG could be opened at lower porosity in Sierpinski right-angled isosceles FPPCs. These results will provide a meaningful guidance in tuning band structures in porous phononic crystals by fractal design.

  4. First-principles study of direct and narrow band gap semiconducting β-CuGaO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Semiconducting oxides have attracted much attention due to their great stability in air or water and the abundance of oxygen. Recent success in synthesizing a metastable phase of CuGaO 2 with direct narrow band gap opens up new applications of semiconducting oxides as absorber layer for photovoltaics. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the thermodynamic and mechanical stabilities as well as the structural and electronic properties of the β-CuGaO 2 phase. Our calculations show that the β-CuGaO 2 structure is dynamically and mechanically stable. The energy band gap is confirmed to be direct at the Γ point of Brillouin zone. The optical absorption occurs right at the band gap edge and the density of states near the valance band maximum is large, inducing an intense absorption of light as observed in experiment. (paper)

  5. Fabrication of Ceramic Layer-by-Layer Infrared Wavelength Photonic Band Gap Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Henry Hao-Chuan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in micron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers.

  6. High throughput light absorber discovery, Part 2: Establishing structure–band gap energy relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suram, Santosh K.; Newhouse, Paul F.; Zhou, Lan; Van Campen, Douglas G.; Mehta, Apurva; Gregoire, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial materials science strategies have accelerated materials development in a variety of fields, and we extend these strategies to enable structure-property mapping for light absorber materials, particularly in high order composition spaces. High throughput optical spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction are combined to identify the optical properties of Bi-V-Fe oxides, leading to the identification of Bi 4 V 1.5 Fe 0.5 O 10.5 as a light absorber with direct band gap near 2.7 eV. Here, the strategic combination of experimental and data analysis techniques includes automated Tauc analysis to estimate band gap energies from the high throughput spectroscopy data, providing an automated platform for identifying new optical materials.

  7. Intrinsic magnetism and spontaneous band gap opening in bilayer silicene and germanene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinquan; Wu, Zhigang

    2017-01-18

    It has been long sought to create magnetism out of simple non-magnetic materials, such as silicon and germanium. Here we show that intrinsic magnetism exists in bilayer silicene and germanene with no need to cut, etch, or dope. Unlike bilayer graphene, strong covalent interlayer bonding formed in bilayer silicene and germanene breaks the original π-bonding network of each layer, leaving the unbonded electrons unpaired and localized to carry magnetic moments. These magnetic moments then couple ferromagnetically within each layer while antiferromagnetically across two layers, giving rise to an infinite magnetic sheet with structural integrity and magnetic homogeneity. Furthermore, this unique magnetic ordering results in fundamental band gaps of 0.55 eV and 0.32 eV for bilayer silicene and germanene, respectively. The integration of intrinsic magnetism and spontaneous band gap opening makes bilayer silicene and germanene attractive for future nanoelectronics as well as spin-based computation and data storage.

  8. Experimental Observation of a Large Low-Frequency Band Gap in a Polymer Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Miniaci

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The quest for large and low-frequency band gaps is one of the principal objectives pursued in a number of engineering applications, ranging from noise absorption to vibration control, and to seismic wave abatement. For this purpose, a plethora of complex architectures (including multiphase materials and multiphysics approaches have been proposed in the past, often involving difficulties in their practical realization. To address the issue of proposing a material design that enables large band gaps using a simple configuration, in this study we propose an easy-to-manufacture design able to open large, low-frequency complete Lamb band gaps exploiting a suitable arrangement of masses and stiffnesses produced by cavities in a monolithic material. The performance of the designed structure is evaluated by numerical simulations and confirmed by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV measurements on an isotropic polyvinyl chloride plate in which a square ring region of cross-like cavities is fabricated. The full wave field reconstruction clearly confirms the ability of even a limited number of unit cell rows of the proposed design to efficiently attenuate Lamb waves. In addition, numerical simulations show that the structure allows to shift the central frequency of the BG through geometrical modifications. The design may be of interest for applications in which large BGs at low frequencies are required.

  9. Optical Characterization of Rare Earth-doped Wide Band Gap Semiconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hommerich, Uwe

    1999-01-01

    ...+) PL intensity under below gap excitation. Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) studies revealed that oxygen/carbon introduces a broad below gap PLE band, which provides an efficient pathway for E(3+) excitation...

  10. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaoka, Takeshi, E-mail: inaoka@phys.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  11. Urbach's rule derived from thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1978-01-01

    The exponential absorption edge (known as Urbach's rule) observed in most materials is interpreted in terms of thermal fluctuations in the band-gap energy. The main contribution to the temperature shift of the band-gap energy is due to the temperature-dependent self-energies of the electrons...... and holes interacting with the phonons. Since the phonon number is fluctuating in thermal equilibrium, the band-gap energy is also fluctuating resulting in an exponential absorption tail below the average band-gap energy. These simple considerations are applied to derive Urbach's rule at high temperatures...

  12. gamma-induced modification on optical band gap of CR-39 SSNTD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    effect of gamma irradiation on optical absorption of nuclear track detectors like CR-39 was studied at different absorbed doses using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS)spectroscopy. the existence of the peaks, their shifting and broadening as a result of gamma irradiation has been discussed. the width of the tail of localized states in the band gap (E u )was evaluated using the Urbach edge method. finally the indirect and direct band gap in pristine and gamma irradiated CR-39 have been determined. the values of indirect band gap have been found to be lower than the corresponding values of direct band gap. a decrease in the optical energy gap with increasing the gamma absorbed dose can be discussed on the basis of gamma-irradiation-induced defects in the CR-39. the correlation between optical band gap and the number of carbon atoms in a cluster with modified Tauc's equation has been discussed in case of CR-39.

  13. Tuning quantum dot luminescence below the bulk band gap using tensile strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Paul J; Yerino, Christopher D; Sun, Meng; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L; Dorogan, Vitaliy G; Mazur, Yuriy; Salamo, Gregory; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2013-06-25

    Self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) grown under biaxial tension could enable novel devices by taking advantage of the strong band gap reduction induced by tensile strain. Tensile SAQDs with low optical transition energies could find application in the technologically important area of mid-infrared optoelectronics. In the case of Ge, biaxial tension can even cause a highly desirable crossover from an indirect- to a direct-gap band structure. However, the inability to grow tensile SAQDs without dislocations has impeded progress in these directions. In this article, we demonstrate a method to grow dislocation-free, tensile SAQDs by employing the unique strain relief mechanisms of (110)-oriented surfaces. As a model system, we show that tensile GaAs SAQDs form spontaneously, controllably, and without dislocations on InAlAs(110) surfaces. The tensile strain reduces the band gap in GaAs SAQDs by ~40%, leading to robust type-I quantum confinement and photoluminescence at energies lower than that of bulk GaAs. This method can be extended to other zinc blende and diamond cubic materials to form novel optoelectronic devices based on tensile SAQDs.

  14. Tuning the electronic band-gap of fluorinated 3C-silicon carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda Durán, Álvaro; Trejo Baños, Alejandro; Pérez, Luis Antonio; Cruz Irisson, Miguel

    The possibility of control and modulation of the electronic properties of silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs) by varying the wire diameter is well known. SiCNWs are particularly interesting and technologically important, due to its electrical and mechanical properties, allowing the development of materials with specific electronic features for the design of stable and robust electronic devices. Tuning the band gap by chemical surface passivation constitutes a way for the modification of the electronic band gap of these nanowires. We present, the structural and electronic properties of fluorinated SiCNWs, grown along the [111] crystallographic direction, which are investigated by first principles. We consider nanowires with six diameters, varying from 0.35 nm to 2.13 nm, and eight random covering schemes including fully hydrogen- and fluorine terminated ones. Gibbs free energy of formation and electronic properties were calculated for the different surface functionalization schemes and diameters considered. The results indicate that the stability and band gap of SiCNWs can be tuned by surface passivation with fluorine atoms This work was supported by CONACYT infrastructure project 252749 and UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT IN106714. A.M. would like to thank for financial support from CONACyT-Retención. Computing resources from proyect SC15-1-IR-27 of DGTIC-UNAM are acknowledged.

  15. Effect of ferromagnetic exchange field on band gap and spin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Partha Goswami

    2018-02-19

    Feb 19, 2018 ... these systems as a function of magnetisation strength. We also discuss the ..... require the discriminant of the quadratic in the variableε to be zero. This yields .... system for graphene in WSe2 at the Dirac point K. The band identification is as follows: spin-up valence band: '− *', spin-up conduction band: '−' ...

  16. High-energy band structure of gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede

    1976-01-01

    The band structure of gold for energies far above the Fermi level has been calculated using the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The calculated f-band edge (Γ6-) lies 15.6 eV above the Fermi level is agreement with recent photoemission work. The band model is applied to interpret...

  17. Spectroscopic properties of PEDOTEHIITN, a novel soluble low band-gap conjugated polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cravino, A; Loi, MA; Scharber, MC; Winder, C; Neugebauer, H; Denk, P; Meng, H; CHEN, Y; Wudl, F; Sariciftci, NS

    2003-01-01

    Polymers with narrow band gap are expected to posses appreciably high RT conductivities, luminescence in the NIR and improved solar energy harvesting properties. Here we report the spectroscopic properties of a soluble and environmentally stable copolymer (PEDOTEHIITN) with a band-gap of ca. 1.1 eV.

  18. Theoretical study of relative width of photonic band gap for the 3-D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of refractive index and relative radius of the photonic band gap for the fcc closed packed 3-D dielectric microstructure are reported and comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions are given. This work is useful for the understanding of photonic crystals and occurrence of the photonic band gap.

  19. Low Band Gap Polymers for Roll-to-Roll Coated Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Hagemann, Ole; Manceau, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    We present the synthesis of a low band gap copolymer based on dithienothiophene and dialkoxybenzothiadiazole (poly(dithienothiophene-co-dialkoxybenzothiadiazole), PDTTDABT). The optical properties of the polymer showed a band gap of 1.6 eV and a sky-blue color in solid films. The polymer...

  20. Wave propagation in ordered, disordered, and nonlinear photonic band gap materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-12-10

    Photonic band gap materials are artificial dielectric structures that give the promise of molding and controlling the flow of optical light the same way semiconductors mold and control the electric current flow. In this dissertation the author studied two areas of photonic band gap materials. The first area is focused on the properties of one-dimensional PBG materials doped with Kerr-type nonlinear material, while, the second area is focused on the mechanisms responsible for the gap formation as well as other properties of two-dimensional PBG materials. He first studied, in Chapter 2, the general adequacy of an approximate structure model in which the nonlinearity is assumed to be concentrated in equally-spaced very thin layers, or 6-functions, while the rest of the space is linear. This model had been used before, but its range of validity and the physical reasons for its limitations were not quite clear yet. He performed an extensive examination of many aspects of the model's nonlinear response and comparison against more realistic models with finite-width nonlinear layers, and found that the d-function model is quite adequate, capturing the essential features in the transmission characteristics. The author found one exception, coming from the deficiency of processing a rigid bottom band edge, i.e. the upper edge of the gaps is always independent of the refraction index contrast. This causes the model to miss-predict that there are no soliton solutions for a positive Kerr-coefficient, something known to be untrue.

  1. A model for the direct-to-indirect band-gap transition in monolayer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    comprising the valence band in the energy window −7 eV to the Fermi energy as well as two bands comprising the conduction band. The ab-initio band structure is shown in black solid line while the tight-binding band structure is shown in red dashed line in the same figure. The description in this minimal tight-binding ...

  2. Hybrid Method for Analyzing the Torsional Vibration of One-Dimensional Phononic-Band-Gap Shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Chen, Tianning; Wu, Jiuhui; Wang, Xiaopeng; Wang, Zhaofeng

    2012-05-01

    A hybrid method combining the transfer-matrix and lumped-mass methods is proposed to study the band gaps of torsional vibration in one-dimensional (1D) phononic band gap (PBG)-like shafts, which periodically arrange local resonant multilayer rings. The present method shows advantages over the transfer-matrix and lumped-mass methods for determining the inertia of rubber rings and fast convergence with less computational requirements. For light local resonators, the torsional band gaps, which were studied in three 1D PBG-like shafts by the hybrid method, agree well with those studied by the finite method. In addition, more precise evaluations of the starting frequency of the band gaps were carried out analytically. The methodology of the approach presented can also be employed to study the band gaps of bending and longitudinal waves.

  3. Instantaneous band gap collapse in VO{sub 2} caused by photocarrier doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Marc; Wegkamp, Daniel; Wolf, Martin; Staehler, Julia [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, Berlin (Germany); Xian, Lede; Cudazzo, Pierluigi [Univ. del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain); European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (France); Gatti, Matteo [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (France); Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); McGahan, Christina L.; Marvel, Robert E.; Haglund, Richard F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Rubio, Angel [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, Berlin (Germany); Univ. del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain); European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (France); MPI for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated the controversially discussed mechanism of the insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) in VO{sub 2} by means of femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (trPES). Our data show that photoexcitation transforms insulating monoclinic VO{sub 2} quasi-instantaneously into a metal without an 80 fs structural bottleneck for the photoinduced electronic phase transition. First-principles many-body perturbation theory calculations reveal an ultrahigh sensitivity of the VO{sub 2} band gap to variations of the dynamically screened Coulomb interaction thus supporting the fully electronically driven isostructural IMT indicated by our trPES results. We conclude that the ultrafast band structure renormalization is caused by photoexcitation of carriers from localized V 3d valence states, strongly changing the screening before significant hot-carrier relaxation or ionic motion has occurred.

  4. Anisotropic lattice expansion of three-dimensional colloidal crystals and its impact on hypersonic phonon band gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songtao; Zhu, Gaohua; Zhang, Jin S; Banerjee, Debasish; Bass, Jay D; Ling, Chen; Yano, Kazuhisa

    2014-05-21

    We report anisotropic expansion of self-assembled colloidal polystyrene-poly(dimethylsiloxane) crystals and its impact on the phonon band structure at hypersonic frequencies. The structural expansion was achieved by a multistep infiltration-polymerization process. Such a process expands the interplanar lattice distance 17% after 8 cycles whereas the in-plane distance remains unaffected. The variation of hypersonic phonon band structure induced by the anisotropic lattice expansion was recorded by Brillouin measurements. In the sample before expansion, a phononic band gap between 3.7 and 4.4 GHz is observed; after 17% structural expansion, the gap is shifted to a lower frequency between 3.5 and 4.0 GHz. This study offers a facile approach to control the macroscopic structure of colloidal crystals with great potential in designing tunable phononic devices.

  5. Doping and band gap control at poly(vinylidene fluoride)/graphene interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jia; Wang, Jian-Lu; Gao, Heng; Tian, Bobo; Gong, Shi-Jing; Duan, Chun-Gang; Chu, Jun-Hao

    2018-05-01

    Using the density-functional first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structures of poly(vinylidene fluoride) PVDF/graphene composite systems. The n- and p-doping of graphene can be flexibly switched by reversing the ferroelectric polarization of PVDF, without scarifying the intrinsic π-electron band dispersions of graphene that are usually undermined by chemical doping. The doping degree is also dependent on the thickness of PVDF layers, which will get saturated when PVDF is thick enough. In PVDF/bilayer graphene (BLG) heterostructure, the doping degree directly determines the local energy gap of the charged BLG. The sandwich structure of PVDF/BLG/PVDF can further enhance the local energy gap as well as keep the electric neutrality of BLG, which will be of great application potentials in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  6. Modulation of Dirac points and band-gaps in graphene via periodic fullerene adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The structural, energetic and electronic properties of periodic graphene nanobud (PGNB with small-diameter fullerenes (C20, C34, C42, and C60 adsorbed have been investigated by first-principles plane wave method. The bond-to-ring cycloaddition is found to be energetically most stable among various configurations and the minimum energy paths of different-sized fullerenes attaching to graphene indicate that smaller fullerene shows lower energy barriers due to its larger surface curvature. For perfectly ordered adsorption, band structures analyses by both density functional theory (DFT and tight binding (TB methods show that the Dirac cone of graphene can be generally preserved despite the sp2 to sp3 bond hybridization change for selected carbon atoms in graphene sheet. However, the position of the Dirac points inside the Brillouin zone has a shift from the hexagonal corner and can be effectively modulated by changing the fullerenes’ concentration. For practical applications, we show that a considerable band gap (∼0.35 eV can be opened by inducing randomness in the orientation of the fullerene adsorption and an effective order parameter is identified that correlates well with the magnitude of the band gap opening.

  7. Stop Band Gap in Periodic Layers of Confined Atomic Vapor/Dielectric Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan-Yuan; Li Li; Lu Yi-Xin; Zhang Yan-Peng; Xu Ke-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A stop band gap is predicted in periodic layers of a confined atomic vapor/dielectric medium. Reflection and transmission profile of the layers over the band gap can be dramatically modified by the confined atoms and the number of layer periods. These gap and line features can be ascribed to the enhanced contribution of slow atoms induced by atom-wall collision, transient behavior of atom-light interaction and Fabry—Pérot effects in a thermal confined atomic system

  8. Degeneracy analysis for a supercell of a photonic crystal and its application to the creation of band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Liang; Zhuang Fie; He Sailing

    2003-01-01

    A method is introduced to analyze the degeneracy properties of the band structure of a photonic crystal by making use of supercells. The band structure associated with a supercell of a photonic crystal has degeneracies at the edge of the Brillouin zone if the photonic crystal has some kind of point group symmetry. The E-polarization and H-polarization cases have the same degeneracies for a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal. Two theorems on degeneracies in the band structure associated with the supercell are given and proved. These degeneracies can be lifted to create photonic band gaps by changing the translation group symmetry of the photonic crystal (the point group symmetry of the photonic crystal may remain unchanged), which consequently changes the transform matrix between the supercell and the smallest unit cell. The existence of photonic band gaps for many known 2D photonic crystals is explained through the degeneracy analysis. Some structures with large band gaps are also found through the present degeneracy analysis

  9. Increased visible-light photocatalytic activity of TiO2 via band gap manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Ashley Marie

    Hydrogen gas is a clean burning fuel that has potential applications in stationary and mobile power generation and energy storage, but is commercially produced from non-renewable fossil natural gas. Using renewable biomass as the hydrocarbon feed instead could provide sustainable and carbon-neutral hydrogen. We focus on photocatalytic oxidation and reforming of methanol over modified titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles to produce hydrogen gas. Methanol is used as a model for biomass sugars. By using a photocatalyst, we aim to circumvent the high energy cost of carrying out endothermic reactions at commercial scale. TiO2 is a semiconductor metal oxide of particular interest in photocatalysis due to its photoactivity under ultraviolet illumination and its stability under catalytic reaction conditions. However, TiO2 primarily absorbs ultraviolet light, with little absorption of visible light. While an effective band gap for absorbance of photons from visible light is 1.7 eV, TiO2 polymorphs rutile and anatase, have band gaps of 3.03 eV and 3.20 eV respectively, which indicate ultraviolet light. As most of incident solar radiation is visible light, we hypothesize that decreasing the band gap of TiO2 will increase the efficiency of TiO2 as a visible-light active photocatalyst. We propose to modify the band gap of TiO2 by manipulating the catalyst structure and composition via metal nanoparticle deposition and heteroatom doping in order to more efficiently utilize solar radiation. Of the metal-modified Degussa P25 TiO2 samples (P25), the copper and nickel modified samples, 1%Cu/P25 and 1%Ni/P25 yielded the lowest band gap of 3.05 eV each. A difference of 0.22 eV from the unmodified P25. Under visible light illumination 1%Ni/P25 and 1%Pt/P25 had the highest conversion of methanol of 9.9% and 9.6%, respectively.

  10. Chemical synthesis of Cd-free wide band gap materials for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankapal, B.R.; Sartale, S.D.; Ennaoui, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin (Germany). Department of Solar Energy Research; Lokhande, C.D. [Shivaji University, Kolhapur (India). Department of Physics

    2004-07-01

    Chemical methods are nowadays very attractive, since they are relatively simple, low cost and convenient for larger area deposition of thin films. In this paper, we outline our work related to the synthesis and characterization of some wide band gap semiconducting material thin films prepared by using solution methods, namely, chemical bath deposition and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). The optimum preparative parameters are given and respective structural, surface morphological, compositional, optical, and electrical properties are described. Some materials we used in solar cells as buffer layers and achieved remarkable results, which are summarized. (author)

  11. Direct space-time observation of pulse tunneling in an electromagnetic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doiron, Serge; Hache, Alain; Winful, Herbert G.

    2007-01-01

    We present space-time-resolved measurements of electromagnetic pulses tunneling through a coaxial electromagnetic band gap structure. The results show that during the tunneling process the field distribution inside the barrier is an exponentially decaying standing wave whose amplitude increases and decreases as it slowly follows the temporal evolution of the input pulse. At no time is a pulse maximum found inside the barrier, and hence the transmitted peak is not the incident peak that has propagated to the exit. The results support the quasistatic interpretation of tunneling dynamics and confirm that the group delay is not the traversal time of the input pulse peak

  12. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict...

  13. Modeling energy band gap of doped TiO2 semiconductor using homogeneously hybridized support vector regression with gravitational search algorithm hyper-parameter optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Taoreed O.; Akande, Kabiru O.; Olatunji, Sunday O.; Aldhafferi, Nahier; Alqahtani, Abdullah

    2017-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) semiconductor is characterized with a wide band gap and attracts a significant attention for several applications that include solar cell carrier transportation and photo-catalysis. The tunable band gap of this semiconductor coupled with low cost, chemical stability and non-toxicity make it indispensable for these applications. Structural distortion always accompany TiO2 band gap tuning through doping and this present work utilizes the resulting structural lattice distortion to estimate band gap of doped TiO2 using support vector regression (SVR) coupled with novel gravitational search algorithm (GSA) for hyper-parameters optimization. In order to fully capture the non-linear relationship between lattice distortion and band gap, two SVR models were homogeneously hybridized and were subsequently optimized using GSA. GSA-HSVR (hybridized SVR) performs better than GSA-SVR model with performance improvement of 57.2% on the basis of root means square error reduction of the testing dataset. Effect of Co doping and Nitrogen-Iodine co-doping on band gap of TiO2 semiconductor was modeled and simulated. The obtained band gap estimates show excellent agreement with the values reported from the experiment. By implementing the models, band gap of doped TiO2 can be estimated with high level of precision and absorption ability of the semiconductor can be extended to visible region of the spectrum for improved properties and efficiency.

  14. Crossing points in the electronic band structure of vanadium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav N. Shrivastava

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic band structures of several models of vanadium oxide are calculated. In the models 1-3, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 4 vanadium atoms. In model 1, a=b=c 2.3574 Å; in model 2, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 2.3574 Å; and in model 3, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 4.7148 Å. In the models 4-6, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 2 vanadium atoms. In model 4, a=b= 4.551 Å and c= 2.851 Å; in model 5, a=b=c= 3.468 Å; and in model 6, a=b=c= 3.171 Å. We have searched for a crossing point in the band structure of all the models. In model 1 there is a point at which five bands appear to meet but the gap is 7.3 meV. In model 2 there is a crossing point between G and F points and there is a point between F and Q with the gap ≈ 3.6608 meV. In model 3, the gap is very small, ~ 10-5 eV. In model 4, the gap is 5.25 meV. In model 5, the gap between Z and G points is 2.035 meV, and in model 6 the gap at Z point is 4.3175 meV. The crossing point in model 2 looks like one line is bent so that the supersymmetry is broken. When pseudopotentials are replaced by a full band calculation, the crossing point changes into a gap of 2.72 x 10-4 eV.

  15. Advanced electron microscopy of wide band-gap semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, M.W.

    2000-10-01

    The microstructure of GaN layers grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates using a novel precursor for deposition of AlN buffer layers has been investigated and compared to layers grown using low temperature GaN buffer layers and state-of-the-art material. It has been shown that the quality of layers grown using the novel precursor is comparable to the state-of-the-art material. TEM analysis has been performed of multiple quantum wells of InGaN grown within GaN epitaxial layers by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy. Elementally sensitive TEM techniques have been used to determine the spatial distribution of In and Ga within these structures. Fluctuations in In sensitive images are observed on the nm-scale. Clear evidence of segregation of In during layer growth has been seen. Models of the In segregation are in good agreement with experimental results. Elementally sensitive techniques have been used to investigate the elemental distributions in TiAl and NiAu contacts to GaN. Annealing of TiAl contacts has been seen to result in the formation of a thin interfacial Ti rich phase, and of N depletion at the surface of the GaN layer to the depth of tens of nm. Annealing NiAu contacts at 700 deg. C was seen to result in the formation of Ga-rich interfacial phases, of both crystalline and amorphous structure. ZnS and ZnCdS layers grown on (001) GaP supplied by the University of Hull have been investigated. ZnS layers were found to contain a high density of inclined stacking faults throughout the layer, originating from the interface with the substrate. Energy sensitive techniques have been used to investigate ZnCdS quantum well structures. The use of a ZnCdS superlattice structure around a ZnCdS quantum well to approximate a reduced barrier was seen to result in less thickness variations than when no barrier was used. (author)

  16. Controllable Synthesis of Band Gap-Tunable and Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Han eSu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD materials are directly governed by their energy gap; thus, the band gap engineering has become an important topic recently. Theoretical and some experimental results have indicated that these monolayer TMD alloys exhibit direct-gap properties and remain stable at room temperature, making them attractive for optoelectronic applications. Here we systematically compared the two approaches of forming MoS2xSe2(1-x monolayer alloys: selenization of MoS2 and sulfurization of MoSe2. The optical energy gap of as-grown CVD MoS2 can be continuously modulated from 1.86 eV (667 nm to 1.57 eV (790 nm controllable by the reaction temperature. Spectroscopic and microscopic evidences show that the Mo-S bonds can be replaced by the Mo-Se bonds in a random and homogeneous manner. By contrast, the replacement of Mo-Se by Mo-S does not randomly occur in the MoSe2 lattice, where the reaction preferentially occurs along the crystalline orientation of MoSe2 and thus the MoSe2/MoS2 biphases are easily observed in the alloys, which makes the optical band gap of these alloys distinctly different. Therefore, the selenization of metal disulfide is preferred and the proposed synthetic strategy opens up a simple route to control the atomic structure as well as optical properties of monolayer TMD alloys.

  17. Low-frequency band gap mechanism of torsional vibration of lightweight elastic metamaterial shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Cai, Anjiang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the low-frequency band gap mechanism of torsional vibration is investigated for a kind of light elastic metamaterial (EM) shafts architecture comprised of a radial double-period element periodically as locally resonant oscillators with low frequency property. The dispersion relations are calculated by a method combining the transfer matrix and a lumped-mass method. The theoretical results agree well with finite method simulations, independent of the density of the hard material ring. The effects of the material parameters on the band gaps are further explored numerically. Our results show that in contrast to the traditional EM shaft, the weight of our proposed EM shaft can be reduced by 27% in the same band gap range while the vibration attenuation is kept unchanged, which is very convenient to instruct the potential engineering applications. Finally, the band edge frequencies of the lower band gaps for this light EM shaft are expressed analytically using physical heuristic models.

  18. A novel theoretical model for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peiji; Li, Weiguo; Zhang, Xianhe; Zhang, Xuyao; Deng, Yong; Kou, Haibo

    2017-10-01

    We report a novel theoretical model without any fitting parameters for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors. This model relates the band gap energy at the elevated temperature to that at the arbitrary reference temperature. As examples, the band gap energies of Si, Ge, AlN, GaN, InP, InAs, ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe and GaAs at temperatures below 400 K are calculated and are in good agreement with the experimental results. Meanwhile, the band gap energies at high temperatures (T  >  400 K) are predicted, which are greater than the experimental results, and the reasonable analysis is carried out as well. Under low temperatures, the effect of lattice expansion on the band gap energy is very small, but it has much influence on the band gap energy at high temperatures. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effect of lattice expansion at high temperatures, and the method considering the effect of lattice expansion has also been given. The model has distinct advantages compared with the widely quoted Varshni’s semi-empirical equation from the aspect of modeling, physical meaning and application. The study provides a convenient method to determine the band gap energy under different temperatures.

  19. Band gap calculations of the semiconductor BNxP1−x using modified Becke–Johnson approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkraouda, M.; Amrane, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Modified Becke–Johnson scheme gives a very accurate band gap. ► We have shown the invalidity of Vegard’s linear rule for BN x P 1−x . ► The band gap changes with alloy concentration are important in band gap engineering. - Abstract: In this work, the electronic properties of BN, BP and BN x P 1−x compounds have been investigated by means of first-principles density-functional total-energy calculation using the all-electron full potential linear augmented plane-wave method (FP-LAPW). The (FP-LAPW) method was used within the density functional theory (DFT) along with the Engel–Vosko and Becke–Johnson exchange correlation potential. The energy bands along high symmetry directions, the density of states and bowing distributions are calculated. The results have been discussed in terms of previously existing experimental and theoretical data, and comparisons with similar compounds have been made. Analysis of band structure suggests direct and pseudo-direct band gaps for both compounds.

  20. Transparent wide band gap crystals follow indirect allowed transition and bipolaron hopping mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feroz A. Mir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we carried out structural, optical and dielectric studies on micro-crystals of Oxypeucedanin (C16H14O5, isolated from the roots of plant Prangos pabularia (Mir et al. (2014 [3,4]. The obtained trend in frequency exponent (s with frequency (ω indicates that the universal dynamic response is followed by this compound. From optical absorption spectroscopy, the optical band gap (Eg was estimated around 3.76 eV and system is showing indirect allowed transition. Using Eg in certain relation of s, a close value of s (as much close obtained by fitting ac conductivity was obtained. This method was further used for other similar systems and again same trend was obtained. So a general conclusion was made that the high transmitting wide band insulators or semiconductors may follow bipolaron hopping transport mechanism.

  1. High-pressure band-gap engineering in lead-free Cs_2AgBiBr_6 double perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yonggang; Yang, Wenge; Pan, Weicheng; Tang, Jiang; Zou, Bo; Quan, Zewei

    2017-01-01

    Novel inorganic lead-free double perovskites with improved stability are regarded as alternatives to state-of-art hybrid lead halide perovskites in photovoltaic devices. The recently discovered Cs_2AgBiBr_6 double perovskite exhibits attractive optical and electronic features, making it promising for various optoelectronic applications. However, its practical performance is hampered by the large band gap. In this work, remarkable band gap narrowing of Cs_2AgBiBr_6 is, for the first time, achieved on inorganic photovoltaic double perovskites through high pressure treatments. Moreover, the narrowed band gap is partially retainable after releasing pressure, promoting its optoelectronic applications. This work not only provides novel insights into the structure-property relationship in lead-free double perovskites, but also offers new strategies for further development of advanced perovskite devices. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Band-gap engineering of functional perovskites through quantum confinement and tunneling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    An optimal band gap that allows for a high solar-to-fuel energy conversion efficiency is one of the key factors to achieve sustainability. We investigate computationally the band gaps and optical spectra of functional perovskites composed of layers of the two cubic perovskite semiconductors BaSnO3...... and BaTaO2N. Starting from an indirect gap of around 3.3 eV for BaSnO3 and a direct gap of 1.8 eV for BaTaO2N, different layerings can be used to design a direct gap of the functional perovskite between 2.3 and 1.2 eV. The variations of the band gap can be understood in terms of quantum confinement...

  3. Direct Band Gap Gallium Antimony Phosphide (GaSbxP1−x) Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    H. B. Russell; A. N. Andriotis; M. Menon; J. B. Jasinski; A. Martinez-Garcia; M. K. Sunkara

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report direct band gap transition for Gallium Phosphide (GaP) when alloyed with just 1?2 at% antimony (Sb) utilizing both density functional theory based computations and experiments. First principles density functional theory calculations of GaSbxP1?x alloys in a 216 atom supercell configuration indicate that an indirect to direct band gap transition occurs at x?=?0.0092 or higher Sb incorporation into GaSbxP1?x. Furthermore, these calculations indicate band edge straddling of the h...

  4. Laser-induced band-gap collapse in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, E. N.; Siegal, Y.; Huang, L.; Mazur, E.

    1995-03-01

    We present experimentally determined values of the dielectric constant of GaAs at photon energies of 2.2 and 4.4 eV following excitation of the sample with 1.9-eV, 70-fs laser pulses spanning a fluence range from 0 to 2.5 kJ/m2. The data show that the response of the dielectric constant to the excitation is dominated by changes in the electronic band structure and not by the optical susceptibility of the excited free carriers. The behavior of the dielectric constant indicates a drop in the average bonding-antibonding splitting of GaAs following the laser-pulse excitation. This drop in the average splitting leads to a collapse of the band gap on a picosecond time scale for excitation at fluences near the damage threshold of 1.0 kJ/m2 and on a subpicosecond time scale at higher excitation fluences. The changes in the electronic band structure result from a combination of electronic screening of the ionic potential as well as structural deformation of the lattice caused by the destabilization of the covalent bonds.

  5. Energy band gap and optical transition of metal ion modified double crossover DNA lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Ha, Taewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Choi, Kyujin; Lee, Junwye; Kim, Byeonghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Park, Sung Ha

    2014-10-22

    We report on the energy band gap and optical transition of a series of divalent metal ion (Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Co(2+)) modified DNA (M-DNA) double crossover (DX) lattices fabricated on fused silica by the substrate-assisted growth (SAG) method. We demonstrate how the degree of coverage of the DX lattices is influenced by the DX monomer concentration and also analyze the band gaps of the M-DNA lattices. The energy band gap of the M-DNA, between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), ranges from 4.67 to 4.98 eV as judged by optical transitions. Relative to the band gap of a pristine DNA molecule (4.69 eV), the band gap of the M-DNA lattices increases with metal ion doping up to a critical concentration and then decreases with further doping. Interestingly, except for the case of Ni(2+), the onset of the second absorption band shifts to a lower energy until a critical concentration and then shifts to a higher energy with further increasing the metal ion concentration, which is consistent with the evolution of electrical transport characteristics. Our results show that controllable metal ion doping is an effective method to tune the band gap energy of DNA-based nanostructures.

  6. Vibrational renormalisation of the electronic band gap in hexagonal and cubic ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Edgar A., E-mail: eae32@cam.ac.uk; Needs, Richard J. [TCM Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Monserrat, Bartomeu [TCM Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Electron-phonon coupling in hexagonal and cubic water ice is studied using first-principles quantum mechanical methods. We consider 29 distinct hexagonal and cubic ice proton-orderings with up to 192 molecules in the simulation cell to account for proton-disorder. We find quantum zero-point vibrational corrections to the minimum electronic band gaps ranging from −1.5 to −1.7 eV, which leads to improved agreement between calculated and experimental band gaps. Anharmonic nuclear vibrations play a negligible role in determining the gaps. Deuterated ice has a smaller band-gap correction at zero-temperature of −1.2 to −1.4 eV. Vibrations reduce the differences between the electronic band gaps of different proton-orderings from around 0.17 eV to less than 0.05 eV, so that the electronic band gaps of hexagonal and cubic ice are almost independent of the proton-ordering when quantum nuclear vibrations are taken into account. The comparatively small reduction in the band gap over the temperature range 0 − 240 K of around 0.1 eV does not depend on the proton ordering, or whether the ice is protiated or deuterated, or hexagonal, or cubic. We explain this in terms of the atomistic origin of the strong electron-phonon coupling in ice.

  7. Accurate prediction of band gaps and optical properties of HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondračka, Pavel; Zajíčková, Lenka; Holec, David; Nečas, David

    2016-01-01

    We report on optical properties of various polymorphs of hafnia predicted within the framework of density functional theory. The full potential linearised augmented plane wave method was employed together with the Tran–Blaha modified Becke–Johnson potential (TB-mBJ) for exchange and local density approximation for correlation. Unit cells of monoclinic, cubic and tetragonal crystalline, and a simulated annealing-based model of amorphous hafnia were fully relaxed with respect to internal positions and lattice parameters. Electronic structures and band gaps for monoclinic, cubic, tetragonal and amorphous hafnia were calculated using three different TB-mBJ parametrisations and the results were critically compared with the available experimental and theoretical reports. Conceptual differences between a straightforward comparison of experimental measurements to a calculated band gap on the one hand and to a whole electronic structure (density of electronic states) on the other hand, were pointed out, suggesting the latter should be used whenever possible. Finally, dielectric functions were calculated at two levels, using the random phase approximation without local field effects and with a more accurate Bethe–Salpether equation (BSE) to account for excitonic effects. We conclude that a satisfactory agreement with experimental data for HfO 2 was obtained only in the latter case. (paper)

  8. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y C; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials.

  9. Calculating the optical properties of defects and surfaces in wide band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The optical properties of a material critically depend on its defects, and understanding that requires substantial and accurate input from theory. This paper describes recent developments in the electronic structure theory of defects in wide band gap materials, where the standard local or semi-local approximations of density functional theory fail. The success of the HSE06 screened hybrid functional is analyzed in case of Group-IV semiconductors and TiO2, and shown that it is the consequence of error compensation between semi-local and non-local exchange, resulting in a proper derivative discontinuity (reproduction of the band gap) and a total energy which is a linear function of the fractional occupation numbers (removing most of the electron self-interaction). This allows the calculation of electronic transitions with accuracy unseen before, as demonstrated on the single-photon emitter NV(-) center in diamond and on polaronic states in TiO2. Having a reliable tool for electronic structure calculations, theory can contribute to the understanding of complicated cases of light-matter interaction. Two examples are considered here: surface termination effects on the blinking and bleaching of the light-emission of the NV(-) center in diamond, and on the efficiency of photocatalytic water-splitting by TiO2. Finally, an outlook is presented for the application of hybrid functionals in other materials, as, e.g., ZnO, Ga2O3 or CuGaS2.

  10. Conductance modulation in Weyl semimetals with tilted energy dispersion without a band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Can; Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Liang, Gengchiau; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the tunneling conductance of Weyl semimetal with tilted energy dispersion by considering electron transmission through a p-n-p junction with one-dimensional electric and magnetic barriers. In the presence of both electric and magnetic barriers, we found that a large conductance gap can be produced with the aid of tilted energy dispersion without a band gap. The origin of this effect is the shift of the electron wave-vector at barrier boundaries caused by (i) the pseudo-magnetic field induced by electrical potential, i.e., a newly discovered feature that is only possible in the materials possessing tilted energy dispersion, (ii) the real magnetic field induced by a ferromagnetic layer deposited on the top of the system. We use a realistic barrier structure applicable in current nanotechnology and analyze the temperature dependence of the tunneling conductance. The new approach presented here may resolve a major problem of possible transistor applications in topological semimetals, i.e., the absence of normal backscattering and gapless band structure.

  11. Two-dimensional silicon crystals with sizable band gaps and ultrahigh carrier mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Zhiwen; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2018-01-18

    Due to their compatibility in the well-developed Si-based semiconductor industry, exploring two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystals with both sizable band gaps and high carrier mobility is important to develop high-performance electronic and optoelectronic devices on the nanoscale. Here, eleven new 2D silicon crystals are reported based on the strategy of mixing 3-fold and 4-fold coordinated silicon atoms in 2D confined phases and first-principles calculations. We establish that these 2D silicon crystals can be obtained by functionalizing silicene with silicon atoms, dimers, or chains, which exhibit lower formation energy than that of silicene. Their dynamic stability and thermal stability are confirmed by phonon calculations and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulation at temperatures up to 700 K. Electronic structure calculations reveal that these 2D silicon crystals are semiconductors with sizable and tunable band gaps, ranging from 1.12 to 1.67 eV, and four of them are direct or quasi-direct band gap semiconductors with strong absorption in the visible-light frequency. The calculated Young's stiffness of 2D silicon crystals ranges from 31 to 88 N m -1 , which are comparable to phosphorene, but remarkably smaller than those of MoS 2 monolayer and graphene. Remarkably, C z -P2/c-Si 12 possesses a negative Poisson's ratio with a maximum value of -0.055. In particular, 2D silicon crystals possess ultrahigh carrier mobility of up to 1.7 × 10 5 and 1.3 × 10 4 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature for electrons and holes, respectively, suitable for high-speed electronic and optoelectronic applications on the nanoscale.

  12. Thermally controlled mid-IR band-gap engineering in all-glass chalcogenide microstructured fibers: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, A.; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.; Sanghera, J.; Shaw, L. B.

    2017-06-01

    Presence of photonic band-gap (PBG) in an all-glass low refractive index (RI) contrast chalcogenide (Ch) microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) is investigated numerically. The effect of external temperature on the position of band-gap is explored to realize potential fiber-based wavelength filters/sensors at functional mid-IR spectral range. The cross-sectional geometry of the MOF is formed by considering a Ch glass to form the overall background cross-section as well as the central fiber core. The core region is surrounded by periodically arranged (hexagonal pattern) smaller holes, which are assumed to be filled up with another Ch glass. Thermally compatible and fabrication suitable, two Ch glasses are chosen, one (higher RI) as background material and the other (of lower RI) to fill up the holes. Two sets of such pairs of thermally compatible Ch-glasses are considered as fiber structural materials with relative RI contrast of ∼12% and ∼24%. For both such low RI contrast hexagonal structures, PBG appears only for suitable finite values of longitudinal wave vector. The structures are suitable to realize band-gap at mid-IR wavelengths and specifically optimized for operation around the ∼2 μm region. Then the temperature sensitivity of band-gaps is investigated to design fiber-based mid-IR wavelength filters/sensors.

  13. Crystal and defect chemistry influences on band gap trends in alkaline earth perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonil; Woodford, William H.; Randall, Clive A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of perovskites with A-site alkaline earth chemistries being Ca, Sr, and Ba, and tetravalent cations including Ce, Zr, and Ti are measured for optical band gap and found to vary systematically with tolerance factor and lattice volume within limits defined by the chemistry of the octahedral site. This paper also focuses on the BaTiO 3 system, considering equilibrated nonstoichiometries, and determines the changes in band gap with respect to Ba/Ti ratios. It was found that the optical band gap changes in the solid solution regime and is invariant in the second phase regions, as would be expected. In the cases of Ba/Ti 1.0 stoichiometries, there is a distinct Urbach tail and the trend with lattice volume no longer holds. It is inferred that the V Ti q prime-2V O partial Schottky complex controls the band gap trend with Ba-rich nonstoichiometries

  14. Molecular design for improved photovoltaic efficiency: band gap and absorption coefficient engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Mondal, Rajib

    2009-01-01

    Removing the adjacent thiophene groups around the acceptor core in low band gap polymers significantly enhances solar cell efficiency through increasing the optical absorption and raising the ionization potential of the polymer. © 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Simultaneous microwave photonic and phononic band gaps in piezoelectric–piezomagnetic superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zheng-hua [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Jiang, Zheng-Sheng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen, Tao [Laboratory of Quantum Information and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lei, Da-Jun [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Yan, Wen-Yan, E-mail: yanwenyan88@126.com [School of Software and Communication Engineering, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China); Qiu, Feng; Huang, Jian-Quan; Deng, Hai-Ming; Yao, Min [Xiangnan University-Gospell Joint Laboratory of Microwave Communication Technology, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000 (China)

    2016-04-29

    A novel phoxonic crystal using the piezoelectric (PMN-PT) and piezomagnetic (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell (PPSUC) is present, in which dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can be obtained simultaneously. Two categories of phononic band gaps, originating from both the Bragg scattering of acoustic waves in periodic structures at the Brillouin zone boundary and the electromagnetic wave-lattice vibration couplings near the Brillouin zone center, can be observed in the phononic band structures. The general characteristics of the microwave photonic band structures are similar to those of pure piezoelectric or piezomagnetic superlattices, with the major discrepancy being the appearance of nearly dispersionless branches within the microwave photonic band gaps, which show an extremely large group velocity delay. Thus, the properties may also be applied to compact acoustic-microwave devices. - Highlights: • Dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can coexist in the PPSUC. • Two categories of phononic band gaps with different mechanism can be obtained. • Nearly dispersionless branches appear in the microwave photonic band gaps.

  16. Soluble low band gap polymers for solar cell applications via oxidative polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    COLLADET, Kristof; Mulhbacher, D.; LUTSEN, Laurence; Schraber, M.; Brabec, C.; CLEIJ, Thomas; GELAN, Jan; VANDERZANDE, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    Mixtures of conjugated polymers and fullerenes command considerable attention for application in organic solar cells. To increase their efficiency, the design of new materials that absorb at longer wavelengths is of substantial interest. We have prepared such low band gap polymers using the donor-acceptor route, which is based on the concept that the interaction between alternating donors and acceptors results in a compressed band gap. Furthermore, for application in photovoltaic devices, suf...

  17. Quasiparticle Band Gaps of Graphene and Graphone on Hexagonal Boron Nitride Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj

    2012-02-01

    Graphene holds great promise for post-silicon electronics; however, it faces two main challenges: opening up a band gap and finding a suitable substrate material. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate provides a potential system to overcome these challenges. While theoretical studies suggested a possibility of a finite band gap of graphene on hBN, recent experimental studies find no band gap. We have studied graphene-hBN system using the first-principles density functional method and the many-body perturbation theory within GW approximation [1]. A Bernal stacked graphene on hBN has a band gap on the order of 0.1 eV, which disappears when graphene is misaligned with respect to hBN. The latter is the likely scenario in realistic devices. In contrast, if graphene supported on hBN is hydrogenated, the resulting system (graphone) exhibits band gaps larger than 2.5 eV. The graphone band gap is due to chemical functionalization and is robust in the presence of misalignment, however, it reduces by about 1 eV due to the polarization effects at the graphone/hBN interface.[4pt] [1] N. Kharche and S. K. Nayak, Nano Lett., DOI: 10.1021/nl202725w, (2011).

  18. Band gap engineering in finite elongated graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions: Tight-binding model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin O. Tayo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple model based on the divide and conquer rule and tight-binding (TB approximation is employed for studying the role of finite size effect on the electronic properties of elongated graphene nanoribbon (GNR heterojunctions. In our model, the GNR heterojunction is divided into three parts: a left (L part, middle (M part, and right (R part. The left part is a GNR of width WL, the middle part is a GNR of width WM, and the right part is a GNR of width WR. We assume that the left and right parts of the GNR heterojunction interact with the middle part only. Under this approximation, the Hamiltonian of the system can be expressed as a block tridiagonal matrix. The matrix elements of the tridiagonal matrix are computed using real space nearest neighbor orthogonal TB approximation. The electronic structure of the GNR heterojunction is analyzed by computing the density of states. We demonstrate that for heterojunctions for which WL = WR, the band gap of the system can be tuned continuously by varying the length of the middle part, thus providing a new approach to band gap engineering in GNRs. Our TB results were compared with calculations employing divide and conquer rule in combination with density functional theory (DFT and were found to agree nicely.

  19. Physical properties of the wide band gap II-IV nitride MgSiN2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Råsander, Mikael; Quirk, James; Moram, Michelle

    The Group II-IV nitride semiconductors are emerging as promising alternatives to III-nitrides in ultraviolet LED applications. These materials have wurtzite-derived orthorhombic crystal structures and can be obtained by substituting pairs of Group III atoms in a III-nitride for a single Group II atom and a single Group IV atom. Here we will focus on MgSiN2, which is the equivalent II-IV nitride to wurtzite AlN. A detailed comparison of the properties obtained by first principles calculations and experiment of these two systems will be performed. It will be shown that MgSiN2 has a large indirect band gap of similar size to the direct band gap of AlN, while having a crystal size which is intermediate between AlN and GaN. MgSiN2 should therefore facilitate better lattice matching during film growth compared to AlN, and therefore constitutes a good candidate material to be used in novel high efficiency UV-LEDs.

  20. Wide-band gap devices in PV systems - opportunities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sintamarean, Nicolae Cristian; Eni, Emanuel-Petre; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    have an important role in the cost reduction. To increase the efficiency of PV systems, most of solutions for PV inverters have moved to three-level (3L) structures reaching typical efficiencies of 98% due to low switching losses of 600V Si IGBT or MOSFET and reduced core losses in the filter......The recent developments in wide band-gap devices based GaN and SiC is showing a high impact on the PV-inverter technology, which is strongly influenced by efficiency, power density and cost. Besides the high efficiency of PV inverters, also the mechanical size, the compactness and simple structure......) three-phase PV-inverter topologies in terms of efficiency, thermal loading distribution and costs. Moreover the above mentioned PV-inverters are built and tested in laboratory in order to validate the obtained results....

  1. Band Gap Tuning via Lattice Contraction and Octahedral Tilting in Perovskite Materials for Photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasanna, Rohit; Gold-Parker, Aryeh; Leijtens, Tomas; Conings, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Tin and lead iodide perovskite semiconductors of the composition AMX_3, where M is a metal and X is a halide, are leading candidates for high efficiency low cost tandem photovoltaics, in part because they have band gaps that can be tuned over a wide range by compositional substitution. We experimentally identify two competing mechanisms through which the A-site cation influences the band gap of 3D metal halide perovskites. Using a smaller A-site cation can distort the perovskite lattice in two distinct ways: by tilting the MX_6 octahedra or by simply contracting the lattice isotropically. The former effect tends to raise the band gap, while the latter tends to decrease it. Lead iodide perovskites show an increase in band gap upon partial substitution of the larger formamidinium with the smaller cesium, due to octahedral tilting. Perovskites based on tin, which is slightly smaller than lead, show the opposite trend: they show no octahedral tilting upon Cs-substitution but only a contraction of the lattice, leading to progressive reduction of the band gap. We outline a strategy to systematically tune the band gap and valence and conduction band positions of metal halide perovskites through control of the cation composition. Using this strategy, we demonstrate solar cells that harvest light in the infrared up to 1040 nm, reaching a stabilized power conversion efficiency of 17.8%, showing promise for improvements of the bottom cell of all-perovskite tandem solar cells. In conclusion, the mechanisms of cation-based band gap tuning we describe are broadly applicable to 3D metal halide perovskites and will be useful in further development of perovskite semiconductors for optoelectronic applications.

  2. Band Gap Tuning via Lattice Contraction and Octahedral Tilting in Perovskite Materials for Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Rohit; Gold-Parker, Aryeh; Leijtens, Tomas; Conings, Bert; Babayigit, Aslihan; Boyen, Hans-Gerd; Toney, Michael F; McGehee, Michael D

    2017-08-16

    Tin and lead iodide perovskite semiconductors of the composition AMX 3 , where M is a metal and X is a halide, are leading candidates for high efficiency low cost tandem photovoltaics, in part because they have band gaps that can be tuned over a wide range by compositional substitution. We experimentally identify two competing mechanisms through which the A-site cation influences the band gap of 3D metal halide perovskites. Using a smaller A-site cation can distort the perovskite lattice in two distinct ways: by tilting the MX 6 octahedra or by simply contracting the lattice isotropically. The former effect tends to raise the band gap, while the latter tends to decrease it. Lead iodide perovskites show an increase in band gap upon partial substitution of the larger formamidinium with the smaller cesium, due to octahedral tilting. Perovskites based on tin, which is slightly smaller than lead, show the opposite trend: they show no octahedral tilting upon Cs-substitution but only a contraction of the lattice, leading to progressive reduction of the band gap. We outline a strategy to systematically tune the band gap and valence and conduction band positions of metal halide perovskites through control of the cation composition. Using this strategy, we demonstrate solar cells that harvest light in the infrared up to 1040 nm, reaching a stabilized power conversion efficiency of 17.8%, showing promise for improvements of the bottom cell of all-perovskite tandem solar cells. The mechanisms of cation-based band gap tuning we describe are broadly applicable to 3D metal halide perovskites and will be useful in further development of perovskite semiconductors for optoelectronic applications.

  3. Asymptotic Analysis of High-Contrast Phononic Crystals and a Criterion for the Band-Gap Opening

    OpenAIRE

    Ammari, H.; Kang, H.; Lee, H.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the band-gap structure of the frequency spectrum for elastic waves in a high-contrast, two-component periodic elastic medium. We consider two-dimensional phononic crystals consisting of a background medium which is perforated by an array of holes periodic along each of the two orthogonal coordinate axes. In this paper we establish a full asymptotic formula for dispersion relations of phononic band structures as the contrast of the shear modulus and that of the density become la...

  4. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Michele; Palummo, Maurizia; Ossicini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  5. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Michele [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Palummo, Maurizia [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (Italy); CNR-INFM-SMC, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ossicini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.ossicini@unimore.it [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy) and Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy) and European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility - ETSF (Italy) and Centro Interdipartimentale ' En and Tech' , Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2012-06-05

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  6. Fabrication of 3-D Photonic Band Gap Crystals Via Colloidal Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girija; Blank, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of photons in a Photonic Crystals, PCs, is like that of electrons in a semiconductor in that, it prohibits light propagation over a band of frequencies, called Photonic Band Gap, PBG. Photons cannot exist in these band gaps like the forbidden bands of electrons. Thus, PCs lend themselves as potential candidates for devices based on the gap phenomenon. The popular research on PCs stem from their ability to confine light with minimal losses. Large scale 3-D PCs with a PBG in the visible or near infra red region will make optical transistors and sharp bent optical fibers. Efforts are directed to use PCs for information processing and it is not long before we can have optical integrated circuits in the place of electronic ones.

  7. Strain-induced band-gap engineering of graphene monoxide and its effect on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H. H.; Rhim, S. H.; Hirschmugl, C. J.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, M.; Weinert, M.; Chen, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations we demonstrate the feasibility of band-gap engineering in two-dimensional crystalline graphene monoxide (GMO), a recently reported graphene-based material with a 1:1 carbon/oxygen ratio. The band gap of GMO, which can be switched between direct and indirect, is tunable over a large range (0-1.35 eV) for accessible strains. Electron and hole transport occurs predominantly along the zigzag and armchair directions (armchair for both) when GMO is a direct- (indirect-) gap semiconductor. A band gap of ˜0.5 eV is also induced in graphene at the K' points for GMO/graphene hybrid systems.

  8. Tunable Band Gap and Conductivity Type of ZnSe/Si Core-Shell Nanowire Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Zeng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of zincblende ZnSe/Si core-shell nanowires (NWs with a diameter of 1.1–2.8 nm are calculated by means of the first principle calculation. Band gaps of both ZnSe-core/Si-shell and Si-core/ZnSe-shell NWs are much smaller than those of pure ZnSe or Si NWs. Band alignment analysis reveals that the small band gaps of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs are caused by the interface state. Fixing the ZnSe core size and enlarging the Si shell would turn the NWs from intrinsic to p-type, then to metallic. However, Fixing the Si core and enlarging the ZnSe shell would not change the band gap significantly. The partial charge distribution diagram shows that the conduction band maximum (CBM is confined in Si, while the valence band maximum (VBM is mainly distributed around the interface. Our findings also show that the band gap and conductivity type of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs can be tuned by the concentration and diameter of the core-shell material, respectively.

  9. Interface relaxation and band gap shift in epitaxial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziming Zhu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that the interface relaxation plays the crucial role for the electronic properties in semiconductor epitaxial layers, there is lack of a clear definition of relationship between interfacial bond-energy variation and interface bond-nature-factor (IBNF in epitaxial layers before and after relaxation. Here we establish an analytical method to shed light on the relationship between the IBNF and the bond-energy change, as well as the relation with band offset in epitaxial layers from the perspective of atomic-bond-relaxation consideration and continuum mechanics. The theoretical predictions are consistent with the available evidences, which provide an atomistic understanding on underlying mechanism of interface effect in epitaxial nanostructures. Thus, it will be helpful for opening up to tailor physical-chemical properties of the epitaxial nanostructures to the desired specifications.

  10. Low frequency torsional vibration gaps in the shaft with locally resonant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Liu Yaozong; Wang Gang; Cai Li; Qiu Jing

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of torsional wave in the shaft with periodically attached local resonators is studied with the transfer matrix theory and the finite element method. The analytical dispersion relation and the complex band structure of such a structure is presented for the first time, which indicates the existence of low frequency gaps. The effect of shaft material on the vibration attenuation in band gap is investigated. The frequency response function of the shaft with finite periodic locally resonant oscillators is simulated with finite element method, which shows large vibration attenuation in the frequency range of the gap as expected. The low frequency torsional gap in shafts provides a new idea for vibration control

  11. Energy Band Structure Studies Of Zinc-Blende GaAs and InAs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Energy band structures, density of states and structural parameters of all the compounds are presented and discussed in context with available theoretical and experimental studies. Our results show that the energy band gaps of the semiconductors are underestimated. But overall our results show reasonable agreement ...

  12. Band gap engineering in BiNbO4 for visible-light photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B. C.; Nisar, J.; Pathak, B.; Kang, T. W.; Ahuja, R.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of anionic mono- (S, N, and C) and co-doping (N-N, C-N, S-C, and S-N) on BiNbO 4 for the visible-light photocatalysis. The maximum band gap reduction of pure BiNbO 4 is possible with the (C-S) co-doping and minimum with N mono-doping. The calculated binding energies show that the co-doped systems are more stable than their mono-doped counterparts. Our optical absorption curves indicate that the mono- (C) and co-anionic doped (N-N and C-S) BiNbO 4 systems are promising materials for visible light photocatalysis.

  13. Transmission and radiation of an accelerating mode in a photonic band-gap fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-K. Ng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A hollow-core photonic band-gap (PBG lattice in a dielectric fiber has been proposed as a high-gradient low-cost particle accelerator operating in the optical regime where the accelerating mode confined to a defect in the PBG fiber can be excited by high-power lasers [X. Lin, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 051301 (2001PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.4.051301]. Developing efficient methods of coupling laser power into these structures requires a thorough examination of the propagating mode and its near and far-field radiation. In this paper, we develop a simulation method using the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P to calculate the radiation of the propagating accelerator mode into free space at the end of the fiber. The far-field radiation will be calculated and the mechanism of coupling power from an experimental laser setup will be discussed.

  14. Large band gap opening between graphene Dirac cones induced by Na adsorption onto an Ir superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagno, Marco; Rusponi, Stefano; Sheverdyaeva, Polina Makarovna; Vlaic, Sergio; Etzkorn, Markus; Pacilé, Daniela; Moras, Paolo; Carbone, Carlo; Brune, Harald

    2012-01-24

    We investigate the effects of Na adsorption on the electronic structure of bare and Ir cluster superlattice-covered epitaxial graphene on Ir(111) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. At Na saturation coverage, a massive charge migration from sodium atoms to graphene raises the graphene Fermi level by ~1.4 eV relative to its neutrality point. We find that Na is adsorbed on top of the graphene layer, and when coadsorbed onto an Ir cluster superlattice, it results in the opening of a large band gap of Δ(Na/Ir/G) = 740 meV, comparable to the one of Ge and with preserved high group velocity of the charge carriers. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  16. The band gap of II-Vi ternary alloys in a tight-binding description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, Daniel; Blanquero, Rafael [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F (Mexico); De Coss, Romeo [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    We present tight-binding calculations for the band gap of II-Vi pseudobinary ternary alloys. We use an sp{sup 3} s* tight-binding Hamiltonian which include spin-orbit coupling. The band gap composition dependence is calculated using a extended version of the virtual crystal approximation, which introduce an empirical correction factor that takes into account the non-linear dependence of the band gap with the composition. The results compare quite well with the experimental data, both for the ternary alloys with wide band gap and for the narrow band gap ones. [Spanish] Presentamos el calculo de la banda de energia prohibida de aleaciones ternarias de compuestos II-VI. El calculo, que incluye interaccion espin-orbita, se hace con el metodo de enlace fuerte, utilizando una base ortogonal de cinco orbitales atomicos por atomo (sp{sup 3} s*), en conjunto con la aproximacion del cristal virtual. En la aproximacion del cristal virtual, incluimos un factor de correccion que toma en cuenta la no linealidad de la banda de energia prohibida como funcion de la concentracion. Con esta correccion nuestros resultados reproducen aceptablemente los datos experimentales hallados en la literatura.

  17. A note on anomalous band-gap variations in semiconductors with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P. K.; Mondal, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt is made to theoretically study the band-gap variations (ΔEg) in semiconductors with temperature following the works, did by Fan and O'Donnell et al. based on thermodynamic functions. The semiconductor band-gap reflects the bonding energy. An increase in temperature changes the chemical bondings, and electrons are promoted from valence band to conduction band. In their analyses, they made several approximations with respect to temperature and other fitting parameters leading to real values of band-gap variations with linear temperature dependences. In the present communication, we have tried to re-analyse the works, specially did by Fan, and derived an analytical model for ΔEg(T). Because, it was based on the second-order perturbation technique of thermodynamic functions. Our analyses are made without any approximations with respect to temperatures and other fitting parameters mentioned in the text, leading to a complex functions followed by an oscillating nature of the variations of ΔEg. In support of the existence of the oscillating energy band-gap variations with temperature in a semiconductor, possible physical explanations are provided to justify the experimental observation for various materials.

  18. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO2 photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Band gap engineering using anion dopants. • Mid band energy level. • Ti 3+ and oxygen vacancies as impurities states. • Valence band tail extension due to doping. • Wider solar light absorption. - Abstract: A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO 2 band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO 2 was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti 3+ impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti 3+ ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO 2 shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO 2 with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO 2 uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO 2 . This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  19. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee, E-mail: sharifahbee@um.edu.my

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Band gap engineering using anion dopants. • Mid band energy level. • Ti{sup 3+} and oxygen vacancies as impurities states. • Valence band tail extension due to doping. • Wider solar light absorption. - Abstract: A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO{sub 2} band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO{sub 2} was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti{sup 3+} impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti{sup 3+} ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO{sub 2} shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO{sub 2} with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO{sub 2} uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO{sub 2}. This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  20. THz Photonic Band-Gap Prisms Fabricated by Fiber Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Stefan F.; Xu, Lipeng; Stecher, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a novel form of polymeric based 3D photonic crystal prisms for THz frequencies which could be fabricated using a standard fiber drawing technique. The structures are modeled and designed using a finite element analyzing technique. Using this simulation software we theoretically study...

  1. Temperature dependence of the fundamental band gap parameters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films of ternary ZnxCd1 xSe were deposited on GaAs (100) substrate using metal- ... blue–green lasers. While some parameters of the quantum well devices can be optimized by an appropriate choice of structural parameters, a detailed ..... the third term is caused by the electron (exciton)–LO phonon interaction.

  2. Band gap tuning of epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3-δ}/Si(001) thin films through strain engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottier, Ryan J.; Steinle, Nathan A.; Currie, Daniel A.; Theodoropoulou, Nikoleta, E-mail: ntheo@txstate.edu [Physics Department, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    We investigate the effect of strain and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) on the crystal and optical properties of oxygen deficient, ultra-thin (4–30 nm) films of SrTiO{sub 3-δ} (STO) grown heteroepitaxially on p-Si(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. We demonstrate that STO band gap tuning can be achieved through strain engineering and show that the energy shift of the direct energy gap transition of SrTiO{sub 3-δ}/Si films has a quantifiable dimensional and doping dependence that correlates well with the changes in crystal structure.

  3. Synthesis of copper quantum dots by chemical reduction method and tailoring of its band gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhash, P. G.; Nair, Swapna S., E-mail: swapna.s.nair@gmail.com [Department of Physics, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod, Kerala - 671 314 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Metallic copper nano particles are synthesized with citric acid and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) as surfactant and chlorides as precursors. The particle size and surface morphology are analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The average size of the nano particle is found to be 3 - 10 nm. The optical absorption characteristics are done by UV-Visible spectrophotometer. From the Tauc plots, the energy band gaps are calculated and because of their smaller size the particles have much higher band gap than the bulk material. The energy band gap is changed from 3.67 eV to 4.27 eV in citric acid coated copper quantum dots and 4.17 eV to 4.52 eV in CTAB coated copper quantum dots.

  4. Synthesis of copper quantum dots by chemical reduction method and tailoring of its band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhash, P. G.; Nair, Swapna S.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic copper nano particles are synthesized with citric acid and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) as surfactant and chlorides as precursors. The particle size and surface morphology are analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The average size of the nano particle is found to be 3 - 10 nm. The optical absorption characteristics are done by UV-Visible spectrophotometer. From the Tauc plots, the energy band gaps are calculated and because of their smaller size the particles have much higher band gap than the bulk material. The energy band gap is changed from 3.67 eV to 4.27 eV in citric acid coated copper quantum dots and 4.17 eV to 4.52 eV in CTAB coated copper quantum dots.

  5. Synthesis of copper quantum dots by chemical reduction method and tailoring of its band gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Prabhash

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metallic copper nano particles are synthesized with citric acid and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant and chlorides as precursors. The particle size and surface morphology are analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The average size of the nano particle is found to be 3 - 10 nm. The optical absorption characteristics are done by UV-Visible spectrophotometer. From the Tauc plots, the energy band gaps are calculated and because of their smaller size the particles have much higher band gap than the bulk material. The energy band gap is changed from 3.67 eV to 4.27 eV in citric acid coated copper quantum dots and 4.17 eV to 4.52 eV in CTAB coated copper quantum dots.

  6. Determination of optical band gap of powder-form nanomaterials with improved accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Ragib; Khan, Md. Ziaur Rahman; Basith, Mohammed Abdul

    2017-10-01

    Accurate determination of a material's optical band gap lies in the precise measurement of its absorption coefficients, either from its absorbance via the Beer-Lambert law or diffuse reflectance spectrum via the Kubelka-Munk function. Absorption coefficients of powder-form nanomaterials calculated from absorbance spectrum do not match those calculated from diffuse reflectance spectrum, implying the inaccuracy of the traditional optical band gap measurement method for such samples. We have modified the Beer-Lambert law and the Kubelka-Munk function with proper approximations for powder-form nanomaterials. Applying the modified method for powder-form nanomaterial samples, both absorbance and diffuse reflectance spectra yield exactly the same absorption coefficients and therefore accurately determine the optical band gap.

  7. Nature of the fundamental band gap in GaNxP1-x alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K. M.; Wu, J.; Ager, J. W. III; Haller, E. E.; Xin, H. P.; Tu, C. W.

    2000-01-01

    The optical properties of GaN x P 1-x alloys (0.007≤x≤0.031) grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy have been studied. An absorption edge appears in GaN x P 1-x at energy below the indirect Γ V -X C transition in GaP, and the absorption edge shifts to lower energy with increasing N concentration. Strong photomodulation signals associated with the absorption edges in GaN x P 1-x indicate that a direct fundamental optical transition is taking place, revealing that the fundamental band gap has changed from indirect to direct. This N-induced transformation from indirect to direct band gap is explained in terms of an interaction between the highly localized nitrogen states and the extended states at the Γ conduction-band minimum. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. Towards a complete photonic band gap in the visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikov, K. P.

    2002-03-01

    The first part of the thesis describes the fabrication and the characterization of face-centered-cubic (fcc) photonic crystals (PCs) of dielectric (core-shell) spheres in a low-dielectric host (air). We demonstrate the synthesis and optical characterization of the PC's building blocks: well-defined core-shell colloidal particles and hollow shells of zinc sulfide (ZnS) and silica (SiO2). The synthesis method allows for the production of monodisperse particles with a tunable core-to-shell size ratio and total radius. By use of the controlled drying method, we demonstrate the fabrication of large planar PCs of well-defined thickness from SiO2, ZnS, and ZnS-core-SiO2-shell colloidal particles. We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, that the relative stop gap width in the (111) fcc crystallographic direction in the case of high-index core and low-index shell spheres is larger than in a PC of homogeneous spheres of either material. The second part of the thesis focuses on the preparation and characterization of photonic materials of different degree of order made of metal colloidal particles. We demonstrate the synthesis and characterization of large (R > 100 nm) silver (Ag) particles. The particles are obtained by reducing silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions in the presence of a protective polymer. The resulting particles are spherical porous aggregates with a low polydispersity (particle level are well described if an effective dielectric constant is used. Depending on the volume fraction and the effective polydispersity, in water these particles form charge-stabilized glasses or crystals. Under illumination with white light, these samples display bright colors. A strong modulation is found in the reflectivity of photonic glasses possessing a short-range order only. The general features in the experimental spectra are found in the theoretical reflectivity spectra for fcc crystals. From our results, it is likely that amorphous metallo

  9. Interactions between graphene oxide and wide band gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, M.; Podborska, A.; Szaciłowski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) and GO@TiO2 nanocomposite have been synthesised by using modified Hummers method and ultrasonics respectively. The materials were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. It was found that the interaction between GO and TiO2 affects the average interlayer spacing in carbonaceous material. The formation of bonds between various oxygen-containing functional groups and surface of titanium dioxide was investigated. One of them formed between the quinone structures (occur in graphene oxide) and titanium atoms exhibited 1.5 bond order. Furthermore the charge-transfer processes in GO@TiO2 composite were observed.

  10. Ultra-small (r1 year) copper oxide quantum dots with wide band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talluri, Bhusankar; Prasad, Edamana; Thomas, Tiju

    2018-01-01

    Practical use of quantum dots (QDs) will rely on processes that enable (i) monodispersity, (ii) scalability, (iii) green approaches to manufacturing them. We demonstrate, a green, rapid, soft chemical, and industrial viable approach for obtaining quasi-spherical, ultra-small (size ∼2.4 ± 0.5 nm), stable (>1 yr), and monodispersed copper oxide QDs (r gap (Eg∼5.3 eV), this substantial band gap increase is currently inexplicable using Brus' equation, and is likely due to surface chemistry of these strongly confined QDs. Capping with triethanolamine (TEA) results in reduction in the average particle diameter from 9 ± 4 nm to 2.4 ± 0.5 nm and an increase of zeta potential (ξ) from +12 ± 2 mV to +31 ± 2 mV. XPS and electron diffraction studies indicate that capped copper oxide QDs which have TEA chemisorbed on its surface are expected to partly stabilize Cu (I) resulting in mixed phase in these QDs. This result is likely to inform efforts that involve achieving monodisperse microstructures and nano-structures, of oxides with a tendency for multivalency.

  11. Effects of High-Pressure High-Temperature Sintering on the Band Gap and Thermoelectric Properties of PbSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Yi; Sun, Zhen-Ya

    2017-11-01

    In this study, PbSe bulk samples were prepared by a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) sintering technique, and the phase compositions, band gaps and thermoelectric properties of the samples were systematically investigated. The sintering pressure exerts a significant influence on the preferential orientation, band gap and thermoelectric properties of PbSe. With increasing pressure, the preferential orientation decreases, mainly due to the decreased crystallinity, while the band gap first decreases and then increases. The electrical conductivity and power factor decrease gradually with increasing pressure, mainly attributed to the decreased carrier concentration and mobility. Consequently, the sample prepared by 2 GPa shows the highest thermoelectric figure-of-merit, ZT, of 0.55 at ˜ 475 K. The ZT of the HPHT-sintered PbSe could be further improved by properly doping or optimizing the HPHT parameters. This study further demonstrates that the sintering pressure could be another degree of freedom to manipulate the band structure and thermoelectric properties of materials.

  12. A new class of large band gap quantum spin hall insulators: 2D fluorinated group-IV binary compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, J E; Pontes, R B; Schmidt, T M; Miwa, R H; Fazzio, A

    2016-05-23

    We predict a new class of large band gap quantum spin Hall insulators, the fluorinated PbX (X = C, Si, Ge and Sn) compounds, that are mechanically stable two-dimensional materials. Based on first principles calculations we find that, while the PbX systems are not topological insulators, all fluorinated PbX (PbXF2) compounds are 2D topological insulators. The quantum spin Hall insulating phase was confirmed by the explicitly calculation of the Z2 invariant. In addition we performed a thorough investigation of the role played by the (i) fluorine saturation, (ii) crystal field, and (iii) spin-orbital coupling in PbXF2. By considering nanoribbon structures, we verify the appearance of a pair of topologically protected Dirac-like edge states connecting the conduction and valence bands. The insulating phase which is a result of the spin orbit interaction, reveals that this new class of two dimensional materials present exceptional nontrivial band gaps, reaching values up to 0.99 eV at the Γ point, and an indirect band gap of 0.77 eV. The topological phase is arisen without any external field, making this system promising for nanoscale applications, using topological properties.

  13. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... The deformed configurations and rotational band structures in =50 Ge and Se nuclei are studied by deformed Hartree–Fock with quadrupole constraint and angular momentum projection. Apart from the `almost' spherical HF solution, a well-deformed configuration occurs at low excitation. A deformed ...

  14. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... Here, we study theoretically the low-lying as well as the excited deformed bands and their electromagnetic properties to search for various structures, spherical and deformed, of the exotic nuclei 82Ge and 84Se by employing the deformed Hartree–Fock (HF) and angular momentum (J) projection method ...

  15. Effect of band gap engineering in anionic-doped TiO2 photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-01-01

    A simple yet promising strategy to modify TiO2 band gap was achieved via dopants incorporation which influences the photo-responsiveness of the photocatalyst. The mesoporous TiO2 was successfully mono-doped and co-doped with nitrogen and fluorine dopants. The results indicate that band gap engineering does not necessarily requires oxygen substitution with nitrogen or/and fluorine, but from the formation of additional mid band and Ti3+ impurities states. The formation of oxygen vacancies as a result of modified color centres and Ti3+ ions facilitates solar light absorption and influences the transfer, migration and trapping of the photo-excited charge carriers. The synergy of dopants in co-doped TiO2 shows better optical properties relative to single N and F doped TiO2 with c.a 0.95 eV band gap reduction. Evidenced from XPS, the synergy between N and F in the co-doped TiO2 uplifts the valence band towards the conduction band. However, the photoluminescence data reveals poorer electrons and holes separation as compared to F-doped TiO2. This observation suggests that efficient solar light harvesting was achievable via N and F co-doping, but excessive defects could act as charge carriers trapping sites.

  16. Fabrication of ceramic layer-by-layer infrared wavelength photonic band gap crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Henry Hao-Chuan

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibiting spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in submicron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers. The goal of this dissertation research is to explore techniques for fabricating 3D ceramic layer-by-layer (LBL) photonic crystals operating in the infrared frequency range, and to characterize the infilling materials properties that affect the fabrication process as well as the structural and optical properties of the crystals. While various approaches have been reported in literature for the fabrication of LBL structure, the uniqueness of this work ties with its cost-efficiency and relatively short process span. Besides, very few works have been reported on fabricating ceramic LBL crystals at mid-IR frequency range so far. The fabrication techniques reported here are mainly based on the concepts of microtransfer molding with the use of polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) as molds/stamps. The infilling materials studied include titanium alkoxide precursors and aqueous suspensions of nanosize titania particles (slurries). Various infilling materials were synthesized to determine viscosities, effects on drying and firing shrinkages, effects on film surface roughness, and their moldability. Crystallization and phase transformation of the materials were also monitored using DTA, TGA and XRD. Mutilayer crystal

  17. Carrier-Induced Band-Gap Variation and Point Defects in Zn3N2 from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yu; Harada, Kou; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Oba, Fumiyasu

    2017-07-01

    The zinc nitride Zn3N2 is composed of inexpensive and earth-abundant Zn and N elements and shows high electron mobility exceeding 100 cm2 V-1 s-1 . Although various technological applications of Zn3N2 have been suggested so far, the synthesis of high-quality Zn3N2 samples, especially single crystals, is still challenging, and therefore its basic properties are not yet well understood. Indeed, the reported band gaps of as-grown Zn3N2 widely scatter from 0.85 to 3.2 eV. In this study, we investigate the large gap variation of Zn3N2 in terms of the Burstein-Moss (BM) effect and point-defect energetics using first-principles calculations. First, we discuss the relation between electron carrier concentration and optical gaps based on the electronic structure obtained using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional. The calculated fundamental band gap is 0.84 eV in a direct-type band structure. Second, thermodynamic stability of Zn3N2 is assessed using the ideal-gas model in conjunction with the rigid-rotor model for gas phases and first-principles phonon calculations for solid phases. Third, carrier generation and compensation by native point defects and unintentionally introduced oxygen and hydrogen impurities are discussed. The results suggest that a significant BM shift occurs mainly due to oxygen substitutions on nitrogen sites and hydrogen interstitials. However, gaps larger than 2.0 eV would not be due to the BM shift because of the Fermi-level pinning caused by acceptorlike zinc vacancies and hydrogen-on-zinc impurities. Furthermore, we discuss details of peculiar defects such as a nitrogen-on-zinc antisite with azidelike atomic and electronic structures.

  18. Determination of density of band-gap states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon suboxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacioglu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Variation of density of gap states of PECVD silicon suboxide films with different oxygen concentrations was evaluated through electrical and optical measurements. Optical transmission and constant photocurrent method (CPM) were used to determine absorption coefficient as a function of photon energy. From these measurements the localized density of states between the valance band mobility edge and Fermi level has been determined. To determine the variation of conduction band edge, steady state photoconductivity (SSPC), photoconductivity response time (PCRT) and transient photoconductivity (TPC) measurements were utilized. Results indicate that the conduction and valance band edges, both, widen monotonically with oxygen content

  19. C3H2 : A wide-band-gap semiconductor with strong optical absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong-Yan; Cuamba, Armindo S.; Geng, Lei; Hao, Lei; Qi, Yu-Min; Ting, C. S.

    2017-10-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we predict a new type of partially hydrogenated graphene system, C3H2 , which turns out to be a semiconductor with a band gap of 3.56 eV. The bands are rather flat at the band edges and thus lead to a large density of states, which further results in strong optical absorption between the valence band and the conduction band. Particularly, it shows strong optical absorption at about 4.5 eV for the light polarized along the lines connecting the nearest unhydrogenated carbon atoms. Thus, the predicted C3H2 system may have potential applications for a polarizer as well as other high-efficiency optical devices in the near ultraviolet region.

  20. Trifluoromethyl-Substituted Large Band-Gap Polytriphenylamines for Polymer Solar Cells with High Open-Circuit Voltages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuwang Yi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two large band-gap polymers (PTPACF and PTPA2CF based on polytriphenylamine derivatives with the introduction of electron-withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups were designed and prepared by Suzuki polycondensation reaction. The chemical structures, thermal, optical and electrochemical properties were characterized in detail. From the UV-visible absorption spectra, the PTPACF and PTPA2CF showed the optical band gaps of 2.01 and 2.07 eV, respectively. The cyclic voltammetry (CV measurement displayed the deep highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO energy levels of −5.33 and −5.38 eV for PTPACF and PTPA2CF, respectively. The hole mobilities, determined by field-effect transistor characterization, were 2.5 × 10−3 and 1.1 × 10−3 cm2 V−1 S−1 for PTPACF and PTPA2CF, respectively. The polymer solar cells (PSCs were tested under the conventional device structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer:PC71BM/PFN/Al. All of the PSCs showed the high open circuit voltages (Vocs with the values approaching 1 V. The PTPACF and PTPA2CF based PSCs gave the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs of 3.24% and 2.40%, respectively. Hence, it is a reliable methodology to develop high-performance large band-gap polymer donors with high Vocs through the feasible side-chain modification.

  1. Band structure, band offsets, substitutional doping, and Schottky barriers of bulk and monolayer InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the electronic structure of the layered semiconductor InSe. We calculate the band structure of the monolayer and bulk material using density functional theory, hybrid functionals, and G W . The band gap of the monolayer InSe is calculated to be 2.4 eV in screened exchange hybrid functional, close to the experimental photoluminescence gap. The electron affinities and band offsets are calculated for vertical stacked-layer heterostructures, and are found to be suitable for tunnel field effect transistors (TFETs) in combination with WS e2 or similar. The valence-band edge of InSe is calculated to lie 5.2 eV below the vacuum level, similar to that for the closed shell systems HfS e2 or SnS e2 . Hence InSe would be suitable to act as a p -type drain in the TFET. The intrinsic defects are calculated. For Se-rich layers, the Se adatom (interstitial) is found to be the most stable defect, whereas for In-rich layers, the Se vacancy is the most stable for the neutral state. Antisites tend to have energies just above those of vacancies. The Se antisite distorts towards a bond-breaking distortion as in the EL2 center of GaAs. Both substitutional donors and acceptors are calculated to be shallow, and effective dopants. They do not reconstruct to form nondoping configurations as occurs in black phosphorus. Finally, the Schottky barriers of metals on InSe are found to be strongly pinned by metal induced gap states (MIGS) at ˜0.5 eV above the valence-band edge. Any interfacial defects would lead to a stronger pinning at a similar energy. Overall, InSe is an effective semiconductor combining the good features of 2D (lack of dangling bonds, etc.) with the good features of 3D (effective doping), which few others achieve.

  2. Acceptor-modulated optical enhancements and band-gap narrowing in ZnO thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hassan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fermi-Dirac distribution for doped semiconductors and Burstein-Moss effect have been correlated first time to figure out the conductivity type of ZnO. Hall Effect in the Van der Pauw configuration has been applied to reconcile our theoretical estimations which evince our assumption. Band-gap narrowing has been found in all p-type samples, whereas blue Burstein-Moss shift has been recorded in the n-type films. Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM analysis shows that both p-type and n-type films have almost same granular-like structure with minor change in average grain size (∼ 6 nm to 10 nm and surface roughness rms value 3 nm for thickness ∼315 nm which points that grain size and surface roughness did not play any significant role in order to modulate the conductivity type of ZnO. X-ray diffraction (XRD, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS have been employed to perform the structural, chemical and elemental analysis. Hexagonal wurtzite structure has been observed in all samples. The introduction of nitrogen reduces the crystallinity of host lattice. 97% transmittance in the visible range with 1.4 × 107 Ω-1cm-1 optical conductivity have been detected. High absorption value in the ultra-violet (UV region reveals that NZOs thin films can be used to fabricate next-generation high-performance UV detectors.

  3. Acceptor-modulated optical enhancements and band-gap narrowing in ZnO thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali; Jin, Yuhua; Irfan, Muhammad; Jiang, Yijian

    2018-03-01

    Fermi-Dirac distribution for doped semiconductors and Burstein-Moss effect have been correlated first time to figure out the conductivity type of ZnO. Hall Effect in the Van der Pauw configuration has been applied to reconcile our theoretical estimations which evince our assumption. Band-gap narrowing has been found in all p-type samples, whereas blue Burstein-Moss shift has been recorded in the n-type films. Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM) analysis shows that both p-type and n-type films have almost same granular-like structure with minor change in average grain size (˜ 6 nm to 10 nm) and surface roughness rms value 3 nm for thickness ˜315 nm which points that grain size and surface roughness did not play any significant role in order to modulate the conductivity type of ZnO. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to perform the structural, chemical and elemental analysis. Hexagonal wurtzite structure has been observed in all samples. The introduction of nitrogen reduces the crystallinity of host lattice. 97% transmittance in the visible range with 1.4 × 107 Ω-1cm-1 optical conductivity have been detected. High absorption value in the ultra-violet (UV) region reveals that NZOs thin films can be used to fabricate next-generation high-performance UV detectors.

  4. BAND GAP EFFECTS IN PERIODIC CHAIN WITH LOCAL LINEAR OR NON-LINEAR OSCILLATORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of waves in periodic systems with alternating properties has been of great interest to engineers and physicists. They exhibit unique dynamic characteristics that enable them to act as filters. Waves can propagate within specific bands of frequencies called pass bands, and attenuate...... within bands of frequencies called stop bands. Stop bands in structures with periodic or random inclusions are located mainly in the high frequency range, as the wave length has to be comparable with the distance between the alternating parts. Wave attenuation is also possible in structures with locally...... attached linear oscillators. The stop band is located around the resonant frequency of the local oscillators, and thus a stop band can be created in the lower frequency range. In this paper, wave propagation in one-dimensional infinite periodic chains with attached linear and non-linear local oscillators...

  5. Controlling emission and propagation of light with photonic band gap crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeganegi Dastgerdi, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    In certain three-dimensional crystals, a frequency range exist for all polarizations for which light is not allowed to propagate in any direction, called the 3D photonic band gap: a frequency range where the density of vacuum fluctuations vanishes in an ideal infinitely large and perfect system. The

  6. On the optical band gap in certain ternary phosphate and TeO2 based glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, H.; Tichý, Ladislav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2011), s. 1277-1281 ISSN 1842-6573 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : optical band gap * heavy metal oxide glasses Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.304, year: 2011 http://oam-rc.inoe.ro/index.php?option=magazine&op=view&idu=1737&catid=69

  7. Theoretical study of relative width of photonic band gap for the 3-D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Calculations for the relative width ´∆ω ω0µ as a function of refractive index and relative radius of the photonic band gap for the fcc closed packed 3-D dielectric microstructure are reported and comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions are given. This work is useful for the understanding of ...

  8. Systematics in band gaps and optical spectra of 3D transition metal compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaanen, J.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the systematics in the transition metal d-d Coulomb interactions and the anion to cation charge transfer energies, and relate these to systematics in observed band gaps. In addition, they discuss the nature of the optical thresholds and their dependence on the cation and anion electronegativity

  9. Grain size dependent optical band gap of CdI2 films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The dependence of band gap on film thickness (> 200 nm) can be explained qualitatively in terms of decreasing grain boundary barrier height ... The CdI2 thin films were grown on glass substrates at room temperature by thermal ... reflections were observed for higher film thicknesses than. 160 nm. This indicates a slight ...

  10. Theoretical study of relative width of photonic band gap for the 3-D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Calculations for the relative width (/0) as a function of refractive index and relative radius of the photonic band gap for the fcc closed packed 3-D dielectric microstructure are reported and comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions are given. This work is useful for the understanding of photonic ...

  11. Uncertainty relations and topological-band insulator transitions in 2D gapped Dirac materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera, E; Calixto, M

    2015-05-08

    Uncertainty relations are studied for a characterization of topological-band insulator transitions in 2D gapped Dirac materials isostructural with graphene. We show that the relative or Kullback-Leibler entropy in position and momentum spaces, and the standard variance-based uncertainty relation give sharp signatures of topological phase transitions in these systems.

  12. Graded band-gap engineering for increased efficiency in CZTS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhati, H.; Djeffal, F.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a potential high efficiency Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4/CdS (CZTS) solar cell design based on graded band-gap engineering that can offer the benefits of improved absorption behavior and reduced recombination effects. Moreover, a new hybrid approach based on analytical modeling and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is proposed to determinate the optimal band-gap profile of the amended CZTS absorber layer to achieve further efficiency enhancement. It is found that the proposed design exhibits superior performance, where a high efficiency of 16.9% is recorded for the optimized solar cell with a relative improvement of 92%, compared with the reference cell efficiency of 8.8%. Likewise, the optimized CZTS solar cell with a graded band-gap enables achieving a higher open circuit voltage of 889 mV, a short-circuit current of 28.5 mA and a fill factor of 66%. Therefore, the optimized CZTS-based solar cell with graded-band gap paradigm pinpoints a new path toward recording high-efficiency thin-film solar cells through enhancing carrier collection and reducing the recombination rate.

  13. Functionally Graded Thermoelectric Material though One Step Band Gap and Dopant Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ellen Marie; Borup, Kasper Andersen; Cederkrantz, Daniel

    gradients. It has previously been shown that a large functionally graded thermoelectric single crystal can be synthesized by the Czochralski method (1). Utilizing element gradients inherent to the Czochralski process we have synthesized a Ge1-xSix:B crystal with a continuously varying x, band gap...

  14. Effect of Al doping on microstructure and optical band gap of ZnO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    % AZO indicating a blue-shift for 1% AZO film. However, for 2% AZO film, a decrease in band gap compared to pure ZnO is observed indicating a red-shift of fundamental absorption edge. Electrical resistance shows an initial decrease with.

  15. Theoretical study of relative width of photonic band gap for the 3-D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conventional systems, there is a need to look into the basics of this field as their qualitative comparison may pave the way to facilitate understanding about occurrence of the photonic band gap (PBG). We are motivated to compute the variations of relative width (∆ω/ω0) as a function of refractive index contrast (na/n b.

  16. H-shaped oligothiophenes with low band gaps and amphoteric redox properties

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Jing

    2010-12-17

    H-shaped bridged oligothiophenes HT-1 and HT-2 were synthesized by two different approaches. Different from normal oligothiophenes, HT-1 and HT-2 showed low band gaps and amphoteric redox behaviors due to intramolecular charge transfer, which is further supported by time-dependent DFT calculations. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. Band gap narrowing and photocatalytic studies of Nd 3+ ion-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of photocatalysts was found to be related to neodymium doping percentage and calcination temperature. Keywords. Band gap narrowing; photocatalytic activity; sol–gel process; tin oxide. 1. Introduction. Dyes are widely used in a variety of industries such as tex- tile, plastic, paper, printing, etc.; consequently they become.

  18. Nature of sub-band gap luminescent eigenmodes in a ZnO nanowire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rühle, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31407659X; van Vugt, L.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338773800; Li, H.-Y.; Keizer, N.A.; Kuipers, L.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829137

    2008-01-01

    The emission spectrum of individual high-quality ZnO nanowires consists of a series of Fabry-Pérot-like eigenmodes that extend far below the band gap of ZnO. Spatially resolved luminescence spectroscopy shows that light is emitted predominantly at both wire ends, with identical spectra reflecting

  19. A novel benzodipyrrolidone-based low band gap polymer for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Wei; Huang, Xiaodong; Yuan, Jianyu

    2013-01-01

    A low band gap polymer PBDPDP-DTP, with alternating benzodipyrrolidone (BDP) unit and dithienopyrrole, was synthesized and characterized. A PCE of 2.60%and a Voc of up to 0.74 V were realized in PSCs, which demonstrated the strong potential of BDP as the electron deficient unit in the design of d...... of donor–acceptor conjugated polymers for PSCs....

  20. Indirect-to-direct band gap transition in relaxed and strained Ge{sub 1−x−y}Si{sub x}Sn{sub y} ternary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attiaoui, Anis; Moutanabbir, Oussama [Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2014-08-14

    Sn-containing group IV semiconductors create the possibility to independently control strain and band gap thus providing a wealth of opportunities to develop an entirely new class of low dimensional systems, heterostructures, and silicon-compatible electronic and optoelectronic devices. With this perspective, this work presents a detailed investigation of the band structure of strained and relaxed Ge{sub 1−x−y}Si{sub x}Sn{sub y} ternary alloys using a semi-empirical second nearest neighbors tight binding method. This method is based on an accurate evaluation of the deformation potential constants of Ge, Si, and α-Sn using a stochastic Monte-Carlo approach as well as a gradient based optimization method. Moreover, a new and efficient differential evolution approach is also developed to accurately reproduce the experimental effective masses and band gaps. Based on this, we elucidated the influence of lattice disorder, strain, and composition on Ge{sub 1−x−y}Si{sub x}Sn{sub y} band gap energy and directness. For 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.4 and 0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2, we found that tensile strain lowers the critical content of Sn needed to achieve a direct band gap semiconductor with the corresponding band gap energies below 0.76 eV. This upper limit decreases to 0.43 eV for direct gap, fully relaxed ternary alloys. The obtained transition to direct band gap is given by y > 0.605 × x + 0.077 and y > 1.364 × x + 0.107 for epitaxially strained and fully relaxed alloys, respectively. The effects of strain, at a fixed composition, on band gap directness were also investigated and discussed.

  1. Uniaxial stress influence on lattice, band gap and optical properties of n-type ZnO: first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Li Pei; Zhang Li-Qiang; Wang Xiao-Liang; Wang Huan; Song Xi-Fu; Xie Fang-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The lattice, the band gap and the optical properties of n-type ZnO under uniaxial stress are investigated by first-principles calculations. The results show that the lattice constants change linearly with stress. Band gaps are broadened linearly as the uniaxial compressive stress increases. The change of band gap for n-type ZnO comes mainly from the contribution of stress in the c-axis direction, and the reason for band gap of n-type ZnO changing with stress is also explained. The calculated results of optical properties reveal that the imaginary part of the dielectric function decreases with the increase of uniaxial compressive stress at low energy. However, when the energy is higher than 4.0 eV, the imaginary part of the dielectric function increases with the increase of stress and a blueshift appears. There are two peaks in the absorption spectrum in an energy range of 4.0–13.0 eV. The stress coefficient of the band gap of n-type ZnO is larger than that of pure ZnO, which supplies the theoretical reference value for the modulation of the band gap of doped ZnO. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  2. Wakefield Band Partitioning in LINAC Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Roger M

    2003-01-01

    In the NLC project multiple bunches of electrons and positrons will be accelerated initially to a centre of mass of 500 GeV and later to 1 TeV or more. In the process of accelerating 192 bunches within a pulse train, wakefields are excited which kick the trailing bunches off axis and can cause luminosity dilution and BBU (Beam Break Up). Several structures to damp the wakefield have been designed and tested at SLAC and KEK and these have been found to successfully damp the wakefield [1]. However, these 2π/3 structures suffered from electrical breakdown and this has prompted us to explore lower group velocity structures operating at higher fundamental mode phase advances. The wakefield partitioning amongst the bands has been found to change markedly with increased phase advance. Here we report on general trends in the kick factor and associated wakefield band partitioning in dipole bands as a function of phase advance of the synchronous mode in linacs. These results are applicable to both TW (travelling wave) and SW (standing wave) structures

  3. Photonic band gap in isotropic hyperuniform disordered solids with low dielectric contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Matsuyama, Kazue; Yadak, Polin; Nahal, Geev; Hashemizad, Seyed; Williamson, Eric; Steinhardt, Paul; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul

    2013-08-26

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a TE-polarization photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D isotropic hyperuniform disordered solid (HUDS) made of dielectric media with a dielectric index contrast of 1.6:1, very low for PBG formation. The solid is composed of a connected network of dielectric walls enclosing air-filled cells. Direct comparison with photonic crystals and quasicrystals permitted us to investigate band-gap properties as a function of increasing rotational isotropy. We present results from numerical simulations proving that the PBG observed experimentally for HUDS at low index contrast has zero density of states. The PBG is associated with the energy difference between complementary resonant modes above and below the gap, with the field predominantly concentrated in the air or in the dielectric. The intrinsic isotropy of HUDS may offer unprecedented flexibilities and freedom in applications (i. e. defect architecture design) not limited by crystalline symmetries.

  4. Inter-band phase fluctuations in macroscopic quantum tunneling of multi-gap superconducting Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hidehiro, E-mail: hd-asai@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ota, Yukihiro [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8587 (Japan); Kawabata, Shiro [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nori, Franco [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We study MQT in Josephson junctions composed of multi-gap superconductors. • We derive a formula of the MQT escape rate for multiple phase differences. • We investigate the effect of inter-band phase fluctuation on MQT. • The MQT escape rate is significantly enhanced by the inter-band phase fluctuation. - Abstract: We theoretically investigate macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a hetero Josephson junction formed by a conventional single-gap superconductor and a multi-gap superconductor. In such Josephson junctions, phase differences for each tunneling channel are defined, and the fluctuation of the relative phase differences appear which is referred to as Josephson–Leggett’s mode. We take into account the effect of the fluctuation in the tunneling process and calculate the MQT escape rate for various junction parameters. We show that the fluctuation of relative phase differences drastically enhances the escape rate.

  5. Band structure peculiarities of magnetic photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Golik, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we studied light diffraction in magneto-photonic crystals (MPC) having large magneto-optical activity and modulation large depth. The case of arbitrary angles between the direction of the external static magnetic field and the normal to the border of the MPC layer is considered. The problem is solved by Ambartsumian's modified layer addition method. It is found that there is a new type of non-reciprocity, namely, the relation R (α) ≠ R (- α) takes place, where R is the reflection coefficient, and α is the incidence angle. It is shown the formation of new photonic band gap (PBG) at oblique incidence of light, which is not selective for the polarization of the incident light, in the case when the external magnetic field is directed along the medium axis. Such a system can be used as: a tunable polarization filter, polarization mirror, circular (elliptical) polarizer, tunable optical diode, etc.

  6. Band Structure and Quantum Confined Stark Effect in InN/GaN superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2012-01-01

    N/GaN(0001) superlattices are investigated, and the variation of the band gap with the thicknesses of the well and the barrier is discussed. Superlattices of the form mInN/nGaN with n ≥ m are simulated using band structure calculations in the Local Density Approximation with a semiempirical correction...... for the gap error. The calculated band gap shows a strong decrease with the thickness (m) of the InN well. In superlattices containing a single layer of InN (m = 1) the band gap increases weakly with the GaN barrier thickness n, reaching a saturation value around 2 eV. In superlattices with n = m and n > 5...

  7. Ab initio calculations of the concentration dependent band gap reduction in dilute nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Phil; Bannow, Lars C.; Fischer, Eric W.; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin; Koch, Stephan W.; Tonner, Ralf

    2018-02-01

    While being of persistent interest for the integration of lattice-matched laser devices with silicon circuits, the electronic structure of dilute nitride III/V-semiconductors has presented a challenge to ab initio computational approaches. The origin of the computational problems is the strong distortion exerted by the N atoms on most host materials. Here, these issues are resolved by combining density functional theory calculations based on the meta-GGA functional presented by Tran and Blaha (TB09) with a supercell approach for the dilute nitride Ga(NAs). Exploring the requirements posed to supercells, it is shown that the distortion field of a single N atom must be allowed to decrease so far that it does not overlap with its periodic images. This also prevents spurious electronic interactions between translational symmetric atoms, allowing us to compute band gaps in very good agreement with experimentally derived reference values. In addition to existing approaches, these results offer a promising ab initio avenue to the electronic structure of dilute nitride semiconductor compounds.

  8. Band gap tuning and room temperature ferromagnetism in Co doped Zinc stannate nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumithra, S., E-mail: ssmithra@gmail.com; Victor Jaya, N.

    2016-07-15

    The effect of Co doping on structural, optical and magnetic behavior of pure and Co doped Zinc stannate (ZTO) nanostructures was investigated. Pure and Co (1%, 3% & 5%) doped Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} compounds were prepared through simple precipitation route. Formation of cubic inverse spinel structure and metal oxide vibrations of the samples were investigated using XRD and FTIR. Co doping influences the crystallite size producing micro strain in ZTO lattice. Poly dispersed rod like shape of the particles was examined by FESEM. Elemental composition of prepared samples was identified by EDAX analysis. Optical Absorption spectra shows significant red shift on increasing the dopant concentration which indicates the reduction in optical band gap. Visible luminescence observed from photoluminescence studies confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and trap sites in the lattice. Magnetization analysis reveals the enhanced ferromagnetic behavior in all Co doped ZTO samples. The amplified ferromagnetic ordering in Co doped ZTO compounds has been explained in terms of defects serving as free spin polarized prophetic carriers.

  9. Towards double-functionalized small diamondoids: selective electronic band-gap tuning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Bibek; Fyta, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Diamondoids are nanoscale diamond-like cage structures with hydrogen terminations, which can occur in various sizes and with a diverse type of modifications. In this work, we focus on the structural alterations and the effect of doping and functionalization on the electronic properties of diamondoids, from the smallest adamantane to heptamantane. The results are based on quantum mechanical calculations. We perform a self-consistent study, starting with doping the smallest diamondoid, adamantane. Boron, nitrogen, silicon, oxygen, and phosphorus are chosen as dopants at sites which have been previously optimized and are also consistent with the literature. At a next step, an amine- and a thiol- group are separately used to functionalize the adamantane molecule. We mainly focus on a double functionalization of diamondoids up to heptamantane using both these atomic groups. The effect of isomeration in the case of tetramantane is also studied. We discuss the higher efficiency of a double-functionalization compared to doping or a single-functionalization of diamondoids in tuning the electronic properties, such as the electronic band-gap, of modified small diamondoids in view of their novel nanotechnological applications. (paper)

  10. Heat Transport as a Probe of Superconducting Gap Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, C.; Shakeripour, H.; Taillefer, L.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the superconducting gap provides important clues on the symmetry of the order parameter and the pairing mechanism. The presence of nodes in the gap function imposed by symmetry implies an unconventional order parameter, other than s-wave. Here we show how measurements of the thermal conductivity at very low temperature can be used to determine whether such nodes are present in a particular superconductor, and shed light on their nature and location. We focus on the residual linear term at T → 0. A finite value in zero magnetic field is strong evidence for symmetry-imposed nodes, and the dependence on impurity scattering can distinguish between a line of nodes or point nodes. Application of a magnetic field probes the low-energy quasiparticle excitations, whether associated with nodes or with a small value of the gap on some part of the Fermi surface, as in a multi-band superconductor. We frame our discussion around archetypal materials: Nb for s-wave, Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6+δ for d-wave, Sr 2 RuO 4 for p-wave, and NbSe 2 for multi-band superconductivity. In that framework, we discuss three heavy-fermion superconductors: CeIrIn 5 , CeCoIn 5 and UPt 3 .

  11. Electronic structure study of wide band gap magnetic semiconductor (La{sub 0.6}Pr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} nanocrystals in paramagnetic and ferromagnetic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, G. D.; Chou, H.; Yang, K. S.; Jhong, D. J.; Chan, W. L. [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Joshi, Amish G. [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kumar, Shiv; Ghosh, A. K. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Chatterjee, Sandip, E-mail: schatterji.app@iitbhu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-04-25

    X-ray circular magnetic dichroism (XMCD), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) techniques were used to study the electronic structure of nanocrystalline (La{sub 0.6}Pr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} near Fermi-level. XMCD results indicate that Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} spins are aligned parallel to each other at 20 K. The low M-H hysteresis curve measured at 5 K confirms ferromagnetic ordering in the (La{sub 0.6}Pr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.65}Ca{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} system. The low temperature valence band XPS indicates that coupling between Mn3d and O2p is enhanced and the electronic states near Fermi-level have been suppressed below T{sub C}. The valence band UPS also confirms the suppression of electronic states near Fermi-level below Curie temperature. UPS near Fermi-edge shows that the electronic states are almost absent below 0.5 eV (at 300 K) and 1 eV (at 115 K). This absence clearly demonstrates the existence of a wide band-gap in the system since, for hole-doped semiconductors, the Fermi-level resides just above the valence band maximum.

  12. Thermo-Structural Response Caused by Structure Gap and Gap Design for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-structural response of solid rocket motor nozzles is widely investigated in the design of modern rockets, and many factors related to the material properties have been considered. However, little work has been done to evaluate the effects of structure gaps on the generation of flame leaks. In this paper, a numerical simulation was performed by the finite element method to study the thermo-structural response of a typical nozzle with consideration of the structure gap. Initial boundary conditions for thermo-structural simulation were defined by a quasi-1D model, and then coupled simulations of different gap size matching modes were conducted. It was found that frictional interface treatment could efficiently reduce the stress level. Based on the defined flame leak criteria, gap size optimization was carried out, and the best gap matching mode was determined for designing the nozzle. Testing experiment indicated that the simulation results from the proposed method agreed well with the experimental results. It is believed that the simulation method is effective for investigating thermo-structural responses, as well as designing proper gaps for solid rocket motor nozzles.

  13. Interplay between six wave mixing photonic band gap signal and second-order nonlinear signal in electromagnetically induced grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Mengqin; Ullah, Zakir; Zhang, Dan; Chen, Haixia; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-21

    For the first time, we experimentally and theoretically research about the second-order nonlinear signal (SNS) including electromagnetically induced absorbing (EIA) and electromagnetically induced gain (EIG), six wave mixing band gap signal (SWM BGS) resulting from photonic band gap structure in an inverted Y-type four level system with the electromagnetically induced grating. The interplay between the SNS and SWM BGS is illustrated clearly for the first time. When we change the frequency detuning to make the SWM BGS and SNS overlap, the SWM BGS is suppressed and the intensity of SNS is strongest near the resonance point. We can control the intensity of the SWM BGS and EIG caused by the classic effect through changing the power of coupling field. And the changes on the EIA generated by the quantum effect are obtained by changing the power of dressing field. Since the SWM BGS is the enhancement of the four wave mixing band gap signal (FWM BGS), when we set FWM BGS as the input and SNS as the modulation role to control the amplification amplitude for the FWM BGS in our scheme, the adjustable optical amplifier can be obtained.

  14. Tuning to the band gap by complex defects engineering: insights from hybrid functional calculations in CuInS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei; Shi, Li-Jie; Zhang, Jian-Min; Liu, Gui-Bin; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Guo, Wei; Yao, Yugui

    2018-01-01

    Tuning band gaps of semiconductors in terms of defect control is essential for the optical and electronic properties of photon emission or photon harvesting devices. By using first-principles calculations, we study the stability condition of bulk CuInS2 and formation energies of point and complex defects in CuInS2 with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. We find that at Cu-rich and In-poor conditions, 2Cui  +  CuIn is the main complex defect, while InCu  +  2VCu is the main complex defect at In-rich and Cu-poor conditions. Such stable complex defects provide the feasibility of tuning band gaps by varying the [Cu]/[In] molar ratios. These results present how the off-stoichiometry CuInS2 crystal structures, and electronic and optical properties can be optimized by tuning the [Cu]/[In] ratio and Fermi level, and highlight the importance of complex defects in achieving better photoelectric performance in CuInS2. Such band gap tuning in terms of complex defect engineering is a general approach and thus applicable to other photo-harvest or light-emission semiconductors.

  15. Stress-Induced Shift of Band Gap in ZnO Nanowires from Finite-Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Lukasz; Mangeri, John; Gao, Pu-Xian; Nakhmanson, Serge

    2017-09-01

    Attractive mechanical, optical, and electronic properties of semiconducting ZnO nanowires make them prime candidates for a variety on energy-harvesting technologies, including photovoltaics and piezoelectric nanogenerators. In order to enhance the efficiency and versatility of such devices, it is paramount to elucidate the connections between the different property realms, i.e., to establish how mechanical distortions can affect the electronic and optical response of the nanowires, depending on their size, shape, and morphology. For example, it was recently demonstrated that band-gap downshifts of up to -0.1 eV can be induced in monolithic ZnO nanowires by an application of tensile strain [see Wei et al., Nano Lett. 12, 4595 (2012), 10.1021/nl301897q]. Here, we conduct mesoscale-level, finite-element-method-based modeling of the coupled elastic and electronic properties of both already-synthesized monolithic ZnO nanowires and yet-to-be-fabricated Zn-ZnO core-shell structures with diameters ranging from 100 to 800 nm. Our investigation suggests that, after an optimization of the size, shape, and mutual crystallographic orientations of the core and shell regions, core-shell nanowires can exhibit downward band-gap shifts of up to -0.3 eV (i.e., approximately 10% of the stress-free ZnO band-gap value) under tensile distortions, which can greatly expand the utility of such nanostructures for optoelectronic applications.

  16. Grain size and lattice parameter's influence on band gap of SnS thin nano-crystalline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Yashika [Department of Electronics, S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi-South Campus, New Delhi 110021 (India); Arun, P., E-mail: arunp92@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Electronics, S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Naudi, A.A.; Walz, M.V. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos, 3101 Oro Verde (Argentina); Albanesi, E.A. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos, 3101 Oro Verde (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Litoral (CONICET-UNL), Guemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2016-08-01

    Tin sulphide nano-crystalline thin films were fabricated on glass and Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) substrates by thermal evaporation method. The crystal structure orientation of the films was found to be dependent on the substrate. Residual stress existed in the films due to these orientations. This stress led to variation in lattice parameter. The nano-crystalline grain size was also found to vary with film thickness. A plot of band-gap with grain size or with lattice parameter showed the existence of a family of curves. This implied that band-gap of SnS films in the preview of the present study depends on two parameters, lattice parameter and grain size. The band-gap relation with grain size is well known in the nano regime. Experimental data fitted well with this relation for the given lattice constants. The manuscript uses theoretical structure calculations for different lattice constants and shows that the experimental data follows the trend. Thus, confirming that the band gap has a two variable dependency. - Highlights: • Tin sulphide films are grown on glass and ITO substrates. • Both substrates give differently oriented films. • The band-gap is found to depend on grain size and lattice parameter. • Using data from literature, E{sub g} is shown to be two parameter function. • Theoretical structure calculations are used to verify results.

  17. Sensitivity of gap symmetry to an incipient band: Application to iron based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vivek; Scalapino, Douglas; Maier, Thomas

    Observation of high temperature superconductivity in iron-based superconductors with a submerged hole band has attracted wide interest. A spin fluctuation mediated pairing mechanism has been proposed as a possible explanation for the high transition temperatures observed in these systems. Here we discuss the importance of the submerged band in the context of the gap symmetry. We show that the incipient band can lead to an attractive pairing interaction and thus have significant effects on the pairing symmetry. We propose a framework to include the effect of the incipient band in the standard multi-orbital spin-fluctuation theories which are widely used for studying various iron-based superconductors. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  18. Band-gap narrowing of TiO2 films induced by N-doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Y.; Morikawa, T.; Ohwaki, T.; Taga, Y.

    2006-01-01

    N-doped TiO 2 films were deposited on n + -GaN/Al 2 O 3 substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering and subsequently crystallized by annealing at 550 o C in flowing N 2 gas. The N-doping concentration was ∼8.8%, as determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Deep-level optical spectroscopy measurements revealed two characteristic deep levels located at 1.18 and 2.48 eV below the conduction band. The 1.18 eV level is probably attributable to the O vacancy state and can be active as an efficient generation-recombination center. Additionally, the 2.48 eV band is newly introduced by the N-doping and contributes to band-gap narrowing by mixing with the O 2p valence band

  19. Expansion of lower-frequency locally resonant band gaps using a double-sided stubbed composite phononic crystals plate with composite stubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Suobin; Chen, Tianning [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Wang, Xiaopeng, E-mail: xpwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Li, Yinggang [Key Laboratory of High Performance Ship Technology of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Chen, Weihua [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2016-06-03

    We studied the expansion of locally resonant complete band gaps in two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) using a double-sided stubbed composite PC plate with composite stubs. Results show that the introduction of the proposed structure gives rise to a significant expansion of the relative bandwidth by a factor of 1.5 and decreases the opening location of the first complete band gap by a factor of 3 compared to the classic double-sided stubbed PC plate with composite stubs. Furthermore, more band gaps appear in the lower-frequency range (0.006). These phenomena can be attributed to the strong coupling between the “analogous rigid mode” of the stub and the anti-symmetric Lamb modes of the plate. The “analogous rigid mode” of the stub is produced by strengthening the localized resonance effect of the composite plates through the double-sided stubs, and is further strengthened through the introduction of composite stubs. The “analogous rigid mode” of the stubs expands the out-of-plane band gap, which overlaps with in-plane band gap in the lower-frequency range. As a result, the complete band gap is expanded and more complete band gaps appear. - Highlights: • Expansion of lower-frequency locally resonant BGs using novel composite phononic crystals plates. • The proposed structure expands the relative bandwidth 1.5 times compared to classic doubled-sided stubbed PC plates. • The opening location of the first complete BG decreases 3 times compared to the classic doubled-sided stubbed PC plates. • The concept “analogous rigid mode” is put forward to explain the expansion of lower-frequency BGs.

  20. Study on the properties of tunable prohibited band gaps for one-dimensional ternary magnetized plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haifeng; Zheng Jianping; Zhu Rongjun

    2012-01-01

    The transfer matrix method was applied to study on the properties of tunable prohibited band gaps for one-dimensional ternary magnetized plasma photonic crystals with TE wave arbitrary incident under ideal conditions. TE wave would be divided into left-handed circularly polarized wave and right-handed circularly polarized wave after propagation through one-dimensional ternary magnetized plasma photonic crystals. The calculated transmission coefficients were used to analyze the effects of parameter of plasma, plasma filling factor, incident angle and relative dielectric constant for dielectric layer on the properties of tunable prohibited band gap. The results illustrate that the width of band gaps can not be broadened by increasing plasma collision frequency, the numbers and width of band gaps can be tuned by changing plasma frequency, plasma filling factor and relative dielectric constant for dielectric layer. The band gaps for right-handed circularly polarized wave can be tuned by the plasma gyro frequency, but band gaps for the left-handed circularly polarized wave can't influenced. Low-frequency region of band gaps will be broadened, while high-frequency region of band gaps will be firstly narrow and then broaden with increasing incident angle. (authors)

  1. Low Band Gap Polymers for Roll-to-Roll Coated Organic Photovoltaics – Design, Synthesis and Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Hagemann, Ole; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and synthesis of 25 new low band gap polymers. The polymers were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy which showed optical band gaps of 2.0–0.9 eV. The polymers which were soluble enough were applied in organic photovoltaics, both small area devices with a spin...

  2. Band structure properties of (BGa)P semiconductors for lattice matched integration on (001) silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Nadir; Sweeney, Stephen [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Hosea, Jeff [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK and Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Liebich, Sven; Zimprich, Martin; Volz, Kerstin; Stolz, Wolfgang [Material Sciences Center and Faculty of Physics, Philipps-University, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Kunert, Bernerdette [NAsP III/V GmbH, Am Knechtacker 19, 35041 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    We report the band structure properties of (BGa)P layers grown on silicon substrate using metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy. Using surface photo-voltage spectroscopy we find that both the direct and indirect band gaps of (BGa)P alloys (strained and unstrained) decrease with Boron content. Our experimental results suggest that the band gap of (BGa)P layers up to 6% Boron is large and suitable to be used as cladding and contact layers in GaP-based quantum well heterostructures on silicon substrates.

  3. Pathway to oxide photovoltaics via band-structure engineering of SnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowei Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available All-oxide photovoltaics could open rapidly scalable manufacturing routes, if only oxide materials with suitable electronic and optical properties were developed. SnO has exceptional doping and transport properties among oxides, but suffers from a strongly indirect band gap. Here, we address this shortcoming by band-structure engineering through isovalent but heterostructural alloying with divalent cations (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Zn. Using first-principles calculations, we show that suitable band gaps and optical properties close to that of direct semiconductors are achievable, while the comparatively small effective masses are preserved in the alloys. Initial thin film synthesis and characterization support the feasibility of the approach.

  4. The LDA+U calculation of electronic band structure of GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahuguna, B. P., E-mail: pk.svnit@gmail.com; Sharma, R. O.; Saini, L. K. [Applied Physics Department, Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Surat-395007 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We present the electronic band structure of bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) using first principle approach. A series of calculations has been performed by applying norm-conserving pseudopotentials and ultrasoft non-norm-conserving pseudopotentials within the density functional theory. These calculations yield too small band gap as compare to experiment. Thus, we use semiemperical approach called local density approximation plus the multi-orbital mean-field Hubbard model (LDA+U), which is quite effective in order to describe the band gap of GaAs.

  5. Pathway to oxide photovoltaics via band-structure engineering of SnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haowei; Bikowski, Andre; Zakutayev, Andriy; Lany, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    All-oxide photovoltaics could open rapidly scalable manufacturing routes, if only oxide materials with suitable electronic and optical properties were developed. SnO has exceptional doping and transport properties among oxides, but suffers from a strongly indirect band gap. Here, we address this shortcoming by band-structure engineering through isovalent but heterostructural alloying with divalent cations (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Zn). Using first-principles calculations, we show that suitable band gaps and optical properties close to that of direct semiconductors are achievable, while the comparatively small effective masses are preserved in the alloys. Initial thin film synthesis and characterization support the feasibility of the approach.

  6. Acoustic beam splitting in a sonic crystal around a directional band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicek Ahmet; Kaya Olgun Adem; Ulug Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Beam splitting upon refraction in a triangular sonic crystal composed of aluminum cylinders in air is experimentally and numerically demonstrated to occur due to finite source size, which facilitates circumvention of a directional band gap. Experiments reveal that two distinct beams emerge at crystal output, in agreement with the numerical results obtained through the finite-element method. Beam splitting occurs at sufficiently-small source sizes comparable to lattice periodicity determined by the spatial gap width in reciprocal space. Split beams propagate in equal amplitude, whereas beam splitting is destructed for oblique incidence above a critical incidence angle

  7. Wide band gap p-type windows by CBD and SILAR methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankapal, B.R.; Goncalves, E.; Ennaoui, A.; Lux-Steiner, M.Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical deposition methods, namely, chemical bath deposition (CBD) and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) have been used to deposit wide band gap p-type CuI and CuSCN thin films at room temperature (25 deg. C) in aqueous medium. Growth of these films requires the use of Cu (I) cations as a copper ions source. This is achieved by complexing Cu (II) ions using Na 2 S 2 O 3 . The anion sources are either KI as iodine or KSCN as thiocyanide ions for CuI and CuSCN films, respectively. The preparative parameters are optimized with the aim to use these p-type materials as windows for solar cells. Different substrates are used, namely: glass, fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass and CuInS 2 (CIS). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for structural, surface morphological and optical studies, and the results are discussed

  8. Wide band gap p-type windows by CBD and SILAR methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankapal, B.R.; Goncalves, E.; Ennaoui, A.; Lux-Steiner, M.Ch

    2004-03-22

    Chemical deposition methods, namely, chemical bath deposition (CBD) and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) have been used to deposit wide band gap p-type CuI and CuSCN thin films at room temperature (25 deg. C) in aqueous medium. Growth of these films requires the use of Cu (I) cations as a copper ions source. This is achieved by complexing Cu (II) ions using Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The anion sources are either KI as iodine or KSCN as thiocyanide ions for CuI and CuSCN films, respectively. The preparative parameters are optimized with the aim to use these p-type materials as windows for solar cells. Different substrates are used, namely: glass, fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass and CuInS{sub 2} (CIS). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for structural, surface morphological and optical studies, and the results are discussed.

  9. Point defects in lines in single crystalline phosphorene: directional migration and tunable band gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuling; Ma, Liang; Wang, Dayong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-10-20

    Extended line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials can play an important role in modulating their electronic properties. During the experimental synthesis of 2D materials, line defects are commonly generated at grain boundaries between domains of different orientations. In this work, twelve types of line-defect structures in single crystalline phosphorene are examined by using first-principles calculations. These line defects are typically formed via migration and aggregation of intrinsic point defects, including the Stone-Wales (SW), single or double vacancy (SV or DV) defects. Our calculated results demonstrate that the migration of point defects in phosphorene is anisotropic, for instance, the lowest migration energy barriers are 1.39 (or 0.40) and 2.58 (or 0.49) eV for SW (or SV) defects in zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. The aggregation of point defects into lines is energetically favorable compared with the separated point defects in phosphorene. In particular, the axis of line defects in phosphorene is direction-selective, depending on the composed point defects. The presence of line defects effectively modulates the electronic properties of phosphorene, rendering the defect-containing phosphorene either metallic or semiconducting with a tunable band gap. Of particular interest is the fact that the SV-based line defect can behave as a metallic wire, suggesting a possibility to fabricate a circuit with subnanometer widths in the semiconducting phosphorene for nanoscale electronic application.

  10. Band gap and polarizability of boro-tellurite glass: Influence of erbium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said Mahraz, Zahra Ashur; Sahar, M. R.; Ghoshal, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the influence of rare earth ions in improving the structural and optical properties of inorganic glasses are the key issues. Er3+-doped zinc boro-tellurite glasses with composition 30B2O3-10ZnO-(60-x) TeO2-xEr2O3 are prepared (x = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mol%) using melt quenching technique. The physical and optical characterizations are measured by density and UV-Vis-IR absorption spectroscopy. The color of the glass changed from light yellow to deep pink due to the introduction of Er3+ ions. The maximum density is found to be ∼4.73 g cm-3 for 1 mol% of Er3+ doping. The variations in the polarizability (6.7-6.8 cm3) and the molar volume (27.987-28.827 cm3 mol-1) with dopant concentration are ascribed to the formation of non-bridging oxygen. This observation is consistent with the alteration of number of bonds per unit volume. The direct and indirect optical band gaps are increased while the phonon cut-off wavelength and Urbach energy decreased with the increase of erbium content. A high density and wide transparency range in VIS-IR area are achieved. Our results on high refractive index (∼2.416) and polarizability suggest that these glasses are potential for photonics, solid state lasers and communications devices.

  11. Surface band structures on Nb(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, B.; Lo, W.; Chien, T.; Leung, T.C.; Lue, C.Y.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    We report the joint studies of experimental and theoretical surface band structures of Nb(001). Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine surface-state dispersions along three high-symmetry axes bar Γ bar M, bar Γ bar X, and bar M bar X in the surface Brillouin zone. Ten surface bands have been identified. The experimental data are compared to self-consistent pseudopotential calculations for the 11-layer Nb(001) slabs that are either bulk terminated or fully relaxed (with a 12% contraction for the first interlayer spacing). The band calculations for a 12% surface-contracted slab are in better agreement with the experimental results than those for a bulk-terminated slab, except for a surface resonance near the Fermi level, which is related to the spin-orbit interaction. The charge profiles for all surface states or resonances have been calculated. Surface contraction effects on the charge-density distribution and the energy position of surface states and resonances will also be discussed

  12. Electrostatic tuning of Kondo effect in a rare-earth-doped wide-band-gap oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-04-29

    As a long-lived theme in solid-state physics, the Kondo effect reflects the many-body physics involving the short-range Coulomb interactions between itinerant electrons and localized spins in metallic materials. Here we show that the Kondo effect is present in ZnO, a prototypical wide-band-gap oxide, doped with a rare-earth element (Gd). The localized 4f electrons of Gd ions do not produce remanent magnetism, but interact strongly with the host electrons, giving rise to a saturating resistance upturn and negative magnetoresistance at low temperatures. Furthermore, the Kondo temperature and resistance can be electrostatically modulated using electric-double-layer gating with liquid ionic electrolyte. Our experiments provide the experimental evidence of tunable Kondo effect in ZnO, underscoring the magnetic interactions between localized and itinerant electrons and the emergent transport behaviors in such doped wide-band-gap oxides.

  13. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta; Tripathi, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively

  14. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh- 160014 (India); Tripathi, S. K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in [Centre of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh- 160014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively.

  15. Band gap narrowing and doping level of heavily doped Germanium nanocrystals deduced from photoconductivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Y.; Gao, Y.; Pi, X. D.; Grandidier, B.; Stiévenard, D.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the photoconductivity of a n+-ZnO/n-Ge NCs/p+-GaAs junction where the active layer consists of heavily n-doped Ge NCs synthesized in the gas phase. Measurement of a significant current at energies smaller than the band gap of GaAs demonstrates the photogeneration of charge carriers by the Ge NCs. From the correlation of the NC size with the absorption threshold, a narrowing of the direct band gap in the Ge NC thin film is obtained and attributed to the heavy doping of the Ge NCs. A remarkably high electrical activation of 15% is found for the incorporated P impurities in the NCs.

  16. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of electron density for na individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closet neighbors reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  17. Polarization field gradient effects in inhomogeneous metal-ferroelectric bilayers: Optical response and band gap tunability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivas C, H., E-mail: hvivasc@unal.edu.co [Grupo de las Propiedades Opticas de los Materiales (POM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 (Colombia); Vargas-Hernandez, C. [Grupo de las Propiedades Opticas de los Materiales (POM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 (Colombia)

    2012-06-15

    Optical constants, reflectivity response and direct band gap energy (E{sub g}{sup d}) were calculated and simulated by developing an electrodynamic-based model for a three medium system, namely vacuum/ferroelectric film/metallic substrate. Depolarization effects due to the contact between the metallic substrate and the FE film, as well as the spatially dependent profile of the dielectric susceptibility {epsilon}(z) enter into the formalism by adapting the phenomenological Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory (LGD). Absorption coefficient is obtained from the Lambert-Beer-Bouguer (LBB) approximation and the direct band gap energy as a function of the characteristic length is calculated by using the general Tauc power law. Numerical simulations lead to range of values for tunable E{sub g}{sup d} from 2.6 to 2.8 eV for characteristic lengths up to 30% the thickness of the film, in concordance with recent reports.

  18. Isotope effect on band gap and radiative transitions properties of boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Hua-Gen; Zhi, Chunyi; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Zhenxian; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Bando, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We have carried out an isotope study on the band gap and radiative transition spectra of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The direct band gap of BNNTs was determined at 5.38 eV, independent of the nanotube size and isotope substitution, by cathodoluminescences (CL) spectra. At lower energies, several radiative transitions were observed, and an isotope effect was revealed. In particular, we confirmed that the rich CL spectra between 3.0 and 4.2 eV reflect a phonon-electron coupling mechanism, which is characterized by a radiative transition at 4.09 eV. The frequency red shift and peak broadening due to isotopic effect have been observed. Our Fourier transform infrared spectra and density functional theory calculations suggest that those radiative transitions in BNNTs could be generated by a replacement of some nitrogen atoms with oxygen.

  19. Optical Band Gap and Thermal Diffusivity of Polypyrrole-Nanoparticles Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A polypyrrole-nanoparticles reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite layer was prepared using electrochemical method. The prepared samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The band gap of nanocomposite layers was calculated from UV-visible spectra and the thermal diffusivity of layers was measured using a photoacoustic technique. As experimental results, the optical band gap was in the range between 3.580 eV and 3.853 eV, and thermal diffusivity was increased with increasing the layer thickness from 2.873 cm2/s to 12.446 cm2/s.

  20. Contributions of oxygen vacancies and titanium interstitials to band-gap states of reduced titania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfeng; Lazzari, Rémi; Chenot, Stéphane; Jupille, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    The spectroscopic fingerprints of the point defects of titanium dioxide remain highly controversial. Seemingly indisputable experiments lead to conflicting conclusions in which oxygen vacancies and titanium interstitials are alternately referred to as the primary origin of the Ti 3 d band-gap states. We report on experiments performed by electron energy loss spectroscopy whose key is the direct annealing of only the very surface of rutile TiO2(110 ) crystals and the simultaneous measurement of its temperature via the Bose-Einstein loss/gain ratio. By surface preparations involving reactions with oxygen and water vapor, in particular, under electron irradiation, vacancy- and interstitial-related band-gap states are singled out. Off-specular measurements reveal that both types of defects contribute to a unique charge distribution that peaks in subsurface layers with a common dispersive behavior.

  1. Theoretical study on the two-band degenerate-gaps superconductors: Application to SrPt3P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Hou, Li-Chao; Zhao, Bin-Peng

    2016-09-01

    We study the magnetic properties of two-band degenerate-gaps superconductors with two-band isotropic Ginzburg-Landau theory. The exact solutions of upper critical field and London penetration depth are obtained, and the calculations reproduce the experimental data of the recently observed superconducting crystal SrPt3P in a broad temperature range. It directly underlies that SrPt3P is a multi-band superconductor with equal gaps in two Fermi surface sheets.

  2. Changing optical band structure with single photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-11-01

    Achieving strong interactions between individual photons enables a wide variety of exciting possibilities in quantum information science and many-body physics. Cold atoms interfaced with nanophotonic structures have emerged as a platform to realize novel forms of nonlinear interactions. In particular, when atoms are coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide, long-range atomic interactions can arise that are mediated by localized atom-photon bound states. We theoretically show that in such a system, the absorption of a single photon can change the band structure for a subsequent photon. This occurs because the first photon affects the atoms in the chain in an alternating fashion, thus leading to an effective period doubling of the system and a new optical band structure for the composite atom-nanophotonic system. We demonstrate how this mechanism can be engineered to realize a single-photon switch, where the first incoming photon switches the system from being highly transmissive to highly reflective, and analyze how signatures can be observed via non-classical correlations of the outgoing photon field.

  3. Band gap tunning in BN-doped graphene systems with high carrier mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2014-02-17

    Using density functional theory, we present a comparative study of the electronic properties of BN-doped graphene monolayer, bilayer, trilayer, and multilayer systems. In addition, we address a superlattice of pristine and BN-doped graphene. Five doping levels between 12.5% and 75% are considered, for which we obtain band gaps from 0.02 eV to 2.43 eV. We demonstrate a low effective mass of the charge carriers.

  4. Effect of solvents on optical band gap of silicon-doped graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tul Ain, Qura; Al-Modlej, Abeer; Alshammari, Abeer; Naeem Anjum, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence on the optical band gap when the same amount of silicon-doped graphene oxide was dissolved in three different solvents namely, distilled water, benzene, and dichloroethane. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy was used to analyse the optical properties of the solutions. Among all these solutions distilled water containing silicon-doped graphene oxide has the smallest optical band gap of 2.9 eV and is considered a semiconductor. Other solutions are not considered as semiconductors as they have optical band gaps greater than 4 eV. It was observed that there is an increase in the value of optical band gap of distilled water, benzene, and dichloroethane solutions indicating a rise in the insulating behaviour. In this experiment, graphene oxide was synthesised from graphite powder by modified Hummer’s method and was then doped with silicon. Synthesis and doping of graphene oxide were confirmed by various characterization techniques. Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy was used for identification of surface functional groups. X-ray diffraction was carried out to confirm the formation of crystalline graphene oxide and silicon doped graphene oxide. In x-ray diffraction pattern, shifting of intensity peak from a 2θ value of 26.5° to 10° confirmed the synthesis of graphene oxide and various intensity peaks at different values of 2θ confirmed doping of graphene oxide with silicon. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated that graphene oxide sheets were decorated with spherical silicon nanoparticles. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed that silicon doped graphene oxide powder contained 63.36% carbon, 34.05% oxygen, and 2.6% silicon.

  5. Band-gap control of GaInP using Sb as a surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurtleff, J.K.; Lee, R.T.; Fetzer, C.M.; Stringfellow, G.B.

    1999-01-01

    The use of surfactants to control specific aspects of the vapor-phase epitaxial growth process is beginning to be studied for both the elemental and III/V semiconductors. To date, most reported surfactant effects for semiconductors relate to the morphology of the growing films. However, semiconductor alloys with CuPt ordering exhibit much more dramatic effects. The change in the CuPt order parameter induced by the surfactant translates into a marked change in the band-gap energy. Previous work concentrated on the effects of the donor tellurium. Te is less than ideal as a surfactant, since the change in band-gap energy is coupled to a large change in the conductivity. This letter presents the results of a study of the effects of an isoelectronic surfactant on the ordering process in GaInP. Sb has been found to act as a surfactant during organometallic vapor-phase epitaxial growth. At an estimated Sb concentration in the solid of 1x10 -4 , order is eliminated, as indicated by the band-gap energy. Surface photoabsorption (SPA) data indicate that the effect is due to a change in the surface reconstruction. Adding Sb leads to attenuation of the peak at 400 nm in the SPA spectrum associated with [bar 110] P dimers. The addition of Sb during the growth cycle has been used to produce a heterostructure with a 135 meV band-gap difference between two layers with the same solid composition. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  6. Optical band gap of Sn0⋅ 2Bi1⋅ 8Te3 thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sn0.2Bi1.8Te3 thin films were grown using the thermal evaporation technique on a (001) face of NaCl crystal as a substrate at room temperature. The optical absorption was measured in the wave number range 500–4000 cm-1. From the optical absorption data the band gap was evaluated and studied as a function of film ...

  7. Thiophene-fused tetracene diimide with low band gap and ambipolar behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Qun

    2011-11-18

    The first tetracene diimide derivative fused with four thiophene rings, TT-TDI, was synthesized by an FeCl3 mediated oxidative cyclodehydrogenation reaction. TT-TDI exhibited a low band gap of 1.52 eV and amphoteric redox behavior. TT-TDI also showed a liquid crystalline property and ambipolar charge transport in thin film field-effect transistors. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Optical band gap energy and ur bach tail of CdS:Pb2+ thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, M.; Juarez, H.; Pacio, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Instituto de Ciencias, Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Av. 14 Sur, Col. Jardines de San Manuel, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Gutierrez, R.; Chaltel, L.; Zamora, M.; Portillo, O. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Laboratorio de Materiales, Apdo. Postal 1067, 72001 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Mathew, X., E-mail: osporti@yahoo.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Energias Renovables, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    Pb S-doped CdS nano materials were successfully synthesized using chemical bath. Transmittance measurements were used to estimate the optical band gap energy. Tailing in the band gap was observed and found to obey Ur bach rule. The diffraction X-ray show that the size of crystallites is in the ∼33 nm to 12 nm range. The peaks belonging to primary phase are identified at 2θ = 26.5 degrees Celsius and 2θ = 26.00 degrees Celsius corresponding to CdS and Pb S respectively. Thus, a shift in maximum intensity peak from 2θ = 26.4 to 28.2 degrees Celsius is clear indication of possible transformation of cubic to hexagonal phase. Also peaks at 2θ = 13.57, 15.9 degrees Celsius correspond to lead perchlorate thiourea. The effects on films thickness and substrate doping on the band gap energy and the width on tail were investigated. Increasing doping give rise to a shift in optical absorption edge ∼0.4 eV. (Author)

  9. Ultrathin high band gap solar cells with improved efficiencies from the world's oldest photovoltaic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Teodor K; Singh, Saurabh; Bishop, Douglas M; Gunawan, Oki; Lee, Yun Seog; Gershon, Talia S; Brew, Kevin W; Antunez, Priscilla D; Haight, Richard

    2017-09-25

    Selenium was used in the first solid state solar cell in 1883 and gave early insights into the photoelectric effect that inspired Einstein's Nobel Prize work; however, the latest efficiency milestone of 5.0% was more than 30 years ago. The recent surge of interest towards high-band gap absorbers for tandem applications led us to reconsider this attractive 1.95 eV material. Here, we show completely redesigned selenium devices with improved back and front interfaces optimized through combinatorial studies and demonstrate record open-circuit voltage (V OC ) of 970 mV and efficiency of 6.5% under 1 Sun. In addition, Se devices are air-stable, non-toxic, and extremely simple to fabricate. The absorber layer is only 100 nm thick, and can be processed at 200 ˚C, allowing temperature compatibility with most bottom substrates or sub-cells. We analyze device limitations and find significant potential for further improvement making selenium an attractive high-band-gap absorber for multi-junction device applications.Wide band gap semiconductors are important for the development of tandem photovoltaics. By introducing buffer layers at the front and rear side of solar cells based on selenium; Todorov et al., reduce interface recombination losses to achieve photoconversion efficiencies of 6.5%.

  10. The strain induced band gap modulation from narrow gap semiconductor to half-metal on Ti2CrGe: A first principles study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Heusler alloy Ti2CrGe is a stable L21 phase with antiferromagnetic ordering. With band-gap energy (∼ 0.18 eV obtained from a first-principles calculation, it belongs to the group of narrow band gap semiconductor. The band-gap energy decreases with increasing lattice compression and disappears until a strain of −5%; moreover, gap contraction only occurs in the spin-down states, leading to half-metallic character at the −5% strain. The Ti1, Ti2, and Cr moments all exhibit linear changes in behavior within strains of −5%– +5%. Nevertheless, the total zero moment is robust for these strains. The imaginary part of the dielectric function for both up and down spin states shows a clear onset energy, indicating a corresponding electronic gap for the two spin channels.

  11. Local strain-induced band gap fluctuations and exciton localization in aged WS2 monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, J.; Kaupmees, R.; Jaaniso, R.; Kiisk, V.; Sildos, I.; Li, B.; Gong, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Optical properties of aged WS2 monolayers grown by CVD method on Si/SiO2 substrates are studied using temperature dependent photoluminescence and reflectance contrast spectroscopy. Aged WS2 monolayers have a typical surface roughness about 0.5 nm and, in addition, a high density of nanoparticles (nanocaps) with the base diameter about 30 nm and average height of 7 nm. The A-exciton of aged monolayer has a peak position at 1.951 eV while in as-grown monolayer the peak is at about 24 meV higher energy at room temperature. This red-shift is explained using local tensile strain concept, where strain value of 2.1% was calculated for these nanocap regions. Strained nanocaps have lower band gap energy and excitons will funnel into these regions. At T=10K a double exciton and trion peaks were revealed. The separation between double peaks is about 20 meV and the origin of higher energy peaks is related to the optical band gap energy fluctuations caused by random distribution of local tensile strain due to increased surface roughness. In addition, a wide defect related exciton band XD was found at about 1.93 eV in all aged monolayers. It is shown that the theory of localized excitons describes well the temperature dependence of peak position and halfwidth of the A-exciton band. The possible origin of nanocaps is also discussed.

  12. Theoretical investigation of the phonon-assisted tunneling in TFET with an indirect band gap semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Gong, J.

    2017-11-01

    There are intense recent interests in quantum tunneling transistor as a way to go beyond the metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors. Phonon-assisted tunneling (PAT) plays the dominating role in tunneling field effect transistors with an indirect band gap semiconductor. In this work, we provide a convenient expression based on Fermi gold rule to study the electron tunneling assisted by phonon from the valence band top to the conduction band bottom. Through the comparison with different phonon modes, the transverse acoustic phonon mode provides the largest contribution to PAT. The results of the transfer matrix model predict slightly higher tunneling current compared to the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation which ignores the effect of the reflection wave. However, the current density calculated by using our method shows that there is about an order of the magnitude lager than Kane's model. Additionally, the temperature enhances the phonon-assisted Zener tunneling current densities. Our results shed some light on understanding the PAT in indirect band gap semiconductors.

  13. Optical Properties and Band Gap of Single- and Few-Layer MoTe2 Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Ozgur Burak; Ruppert, Claudia; Heinz, Tony

    2015-03-01

    Single- and few-layer crystals of exfoliated MoTe2 have been characterized spectroscopically by photoluminescence, Raman scattering, and optical absorption measurements. We find that MoTe2 in the monolayer limit displays strong photoluminescence. On the basis of complementary optical absorption results, we conclude that monolayer MoTe2 is a direct-gap semiconductor with an optical band gap of 1.10 eV. This new monolayer material extends the spectral range of atomically thin direct-gap materials from the visible to the near-infrared. Supported by the NSF through Grant DMR-1124894 for sample preparation and characterization by the O?ce of Naval Research for analysis. C.R. acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  14. Effect of band gap narrowing on GaAs tunnel diode I-V characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebib, A.; Hannanchi, R. [Laboratoire d' énergie et de matériaux, LabEM-LR11ES34-Université de sousse (Tunisia); Beji, L., E-mail: lotbej_fr@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire d' énergie et de matériaux, LabEM-LR11ES34-Université de sousse (Tunisia); EL Jani, B. [Unité de Recherche sur les Hétéro-Epitaxies et Applications, Faculté des Sciences, Université de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-12-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical study of current-voltage characteristics of C/Si-doped GaAs tunnel diode. For the investigation of the experimental data, we take into account the band-gap narrowing (BGN) effect due to heavily-doped sides of the tunnel diode. The BGN of the n- and p-sides of tunnel diode was measured by photoluminescence spectroscopy. The comparison between theoretical results and experimental data reveals that BGN effect enhances tunneling currents and hence should be considered to identify more accurately the different transport mechanisms in the junction. For C/Si-doped GaAs tunnel diode, we found that direct tunneling is the dominant transport mechanism at low voltages. At higher voltages, this mechanism is replaced by the rate-controlling tunneling via gap states in the forbidden gap.

  15. Efficient propagation of TM polarized light in photonic crystal components exhibiting band gaps for TE polarized light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Thorhauge, Morten

    2003-01-01

    D finite-difference-time-domain method. The simulated spectra are in excellent agreement with the experimental results, which show a propagation loss as low as 2.5±4 dB/mm around 1525 nm and bend losses at 2.9±0.2 dB for TM polarized light. We demonstrate a high coupling for TM polarized light......We have investigated the properties of TM polarized light in planar photonic crystal waveguide structures, which exhibit photonic band gaps for TE polarized light. Straight and bent photonic crystal waveguides and couplers have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material and modelled using a 3...

  16. Controllable Absorption and Dispersion Properties of an RF-driven Five-Level Atom in a Double-Band Photonic-Band-Gap Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue

    2011-01-01

    The probe absorption-dispersion spectra of a radio-frequency (RF)-driven five-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal are investigated by considering the isotropic double-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) reservoir. In the model used, the two transitions are, respectively, coupled by the upper and lower bands in such a PBG material, thus leading to some curious phenomena. Numerical simulations are performed for the optical spectra. It is found that when one transition frequency is inside the band gap and the other is outside the gap, there emerge three peaks in the absorption spectra. However, for the case that two transition frequencies lie inside or outside the band gap, the spectra display four absorption profiles. Especially, there appear two sharp peaks in the spectra when both transition frequencies exist inside the band gap. The influences of the intensity and frequency of the RF-driven field on the absorptive and dispersive response are analyzed under different band-edge positions. It is found that a transparency window appears in the absorption spectra and is accompanied by a very steep variation of the dispersion profile by adjusting system parameters. These results show that the absorption-dispersion properties of the system depend strongly on the RF-induced quantum interference and the density of states (DOS) of the PBG reservoir. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  17. Band-Structure of Thallium by the LMTO Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtham, P. M.; Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The relativistic band structure of thallium has been calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method. The positions and extents of the bands were found to follow the Wigner-Seitz rule approximately, and the origin of the dispersion of the bands was established from the canonical s...... and p bands for the HCP structure. Energy bands have been evaluated both with and without spin-orbit coupling which is particularly large in thallium. Energy bands close to the Fermi level were found to be mainly 6p like in character. The 6s states lay below the 6p bands and were separated from them...

  18. Band Structures Analysis Method of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Using Wavelet-Based Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A wavelet-based finite element method (WFEM is developed to calculate the elastic band structures of two-dimensional phononic crystals (2DPCs, which are composed of square lattices of solid cuboids in a solid matrix. In a unit cell, a new model of band-gap calculation of 2DPCs is constructed using plane elastomechanical elements based on a B-spline wavelet on the interval (BSWI. Substituting the periodic boundary conditions (BCs and interface conditions, a linear eigenvalue problem dependent on the Bloch wave vector is derived. Numerical examples show that the proposed method performs well for band structure problems when compared with those calculated by traditional FEM. This study also illustrates that filling fractions, material parameters, and incline angles of a 2DPC structure can cause band-gap width and location changes.

  19. Band-gap engineering and comparative investigation of Ti2Nb10O29 photocatalysts obtained by Various synthetic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Meiling; Zhu, Hekai; Fang, Minghao; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Yan'gai; Wu, Xiaowen

    2018-03-01

    Ti2Nb10O29 photocatalysts were successfully synthesized by three different methods. Ti2Nb10O29 fabricated by the solvothermal method (ST-TNO) exhibited unique microspheres compared to the larger irregular particles observed for the samples annealed in air (Air-TNO) and Ar (Ar-TNO). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that a partial reduction process from Ti4+ into Ti3+ occurs in Ar-TNO, because of the introduction of oxygen defects. Ar-TNO exhibited visible-light absorption with a band gap of 2.85 eV, while the absorption edges of Air-TNO and ST-TNO were approximately 400 nm. Under UV light irradiation (λ < 420 nm), Ar-TNO exhibited a photocatalytic activity 2.1 times greater than that of Air-TNO, corresponding to the highest activity. The results indicated that the preparation method is crucial for determining the band gap and photocatalytic activity of semiconductors. Moreover, the novel semiconductor photocatalyst can be further applied for constructing the heterojunction and designing the band structure.

  20. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices. PMID:25758749

  1. A self-sacrifice template route to iodine modified BiOIO3: band gap engineering and highly boosted visible-light active photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingwen; Huang, Hongwei; Yu, Shixin; Dong, Fan; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-03-21

    The development of high-performance visible-light photocatalysts with a tunable band gap has great significance for enabling wide-band-gap (WBG) semiconductors visible-light sensitive activity and precisely tailoring their optical properties and photocatalytic performance. In this work we demonstrate the continuously adjustable band gap and visible-light photocatalysis activation of WBG BiOIO3via iodine surface modification. The iodine modified BiOIO3 was developed through a facile in situ reduction route by applying BiOIO3 as the self-sacrifice template and glucose as the reducing agent. By manipulating the glucose concentration, the band gap of the as-prepared modified BiOIO3 could be orderly narrowed by generation of the impurity or defect energy level close to the conduction band, thus endowing it with a visible light activity. The photocatalytic assessments uncovered that, in contrast to pristine BiOIO3, the modified BiOIO3 presents significantly boosted photocatalytic properties for the degradation of both liquid and gaseous contaminants, including Rhodamine B (RhB), methyl orange (MO), and ppb-level NO under visible light. Additionally, the band structure evolution as well as photocatalysis mechanism triggered by the iodine surface modification is investigated in detail. This study not only provides a novel iodine surface-modified BiOIO3 for environmental application, but also provides a facile and general way to develop highly efficient visible-light photocatalysts.

  2. TlHgInS 3 : An Indirect-Band-Gap Semiconductor with X-ray Photoconductivity Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao; Malliakas, Christos D.; Han, Fei; Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2015-08-11

    The quaternary compound TlHgInS3 crystallizes in a new structure type of space group, C2/c, with cell parameters a = 13.916(3) angstrom, b = 3.9132(8) angstrom, c = 21.403(4) angstrom, beta = 104.16(3)degrees, V = 1130.1(8) angstrom(3), and rho = 7.241 g/cm(3). The structure is a unique three-dimensional framework with parallel tunnels, which is formed by (1)(infinity)[InS33-] infinite chains bridged by linearly coordinated Hg2+ ions. TlHgInS3 is a semiconductor with a band gap of 1.74 eV and a resistivity of similar to 4.32 G Omega cm. TlHgInS3 single crystals exhibit photocurrent response when exposed to Ag X-rays. The mobility-lifetime product (mu tau) of the electrons and holes estimated from the photocurrent measurements are (mu tau)(e) approximate to 3.6 x 10(-4) cm(2)/V and (mu tau)(h) approximate to 2.0 x 10(-4) cm(2)/V. Electronic structure calculations at the density functional theory level indicate an indirect band gap and a relatively small effective mass for both electrons and holes. Based on the photoconductivity data, TlHgInS3 is a potential material for radiation detection applications.

  3. Theory of non-Markovian decay of a cascade atom in high-Q cavities and photonic band gap materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garraway, B M; Dalton, B J

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of a three-level atom in a cascade configuration with both transitions coupled to a single structured reservoir of quantized field modes is treated using Laplace transform methods applied to the coupled amplitude equations. Results are also obtained from master equations by two different approaches, that is, involving either pseudomodes or quasimodes. Two different types of reservoir are considered, namely a high-Q cavity and a photonic band gap system, in which the respective reservoir structure functions involve Lorentzians. Non-resonant transitions are included in the model. In all cases non-Markovian behaviour for the atomic system can be found, such as oscillatory decay for the high-Q cavity case and population trapping for the photonic band gap case. In the master equation approaches, the atomic system is augmented by a small number of pseudomodes or quasimodes, which in the quasimode approach themselves undergo Markovian relaxation into a flat reservoir of continuum quasimodes. Results from these methods are found to be identical to those from the Laplace transform method including two-photon excitation of the reservoir with both emitting sequences. This shows that complicated non-Markovian decays of an atomic system into structured EM field reservoirs can be described by Markovian models for the atomic system coupled to a small number of pseudomodes or quasimodes

  4. High-pressure band-gap engineering in lead-free Cs{sub 2}AgBiBr{sub 6} double perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qian [Department of Chemistry, Southern University of Science and Technology, SUSTech, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Wang, Yonggang; Yang, Wenge [High Pressure Synergetic Consortium, HPSynC, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States); Pan, Weicheng; Tang, Jiang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, WNLO and School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, HUST, Wuhan (China); Zou, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Quan, Zewei [Department of Chemistry, Southern University of Science and Technology, SUSTech, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China)

    2017-12-11

    Novel inorganic lead-free double perovskites with improved stability are regarded as alternatives to state-of-art hybrid lead halide perovskites in photovoltaic devices. The recently discovered Cs{sub 2}AgBiBr{sub 6} double perovskite exhibits attractive optical and electronic features, making it promising for various optoelectronic applications. However, its practical performance is hampered by the large band gap. In this work, remarkable band gap narrowing of Cs{sub 2}AgBiBr{sub 6} is, for the first time, achieved on inorganic photovoltaic double perovskites through high pressure treatments. Moreover, the narrowed band gap is partially retainable after releasing pressure, promoting its optoelectronic applications. This work not only provides novel insights into the structure-property relationship in lead-free double perovskites, but also offers new strategies for further development of advanced perovskite devices. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Zastrau, U.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  6. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); MacDonald, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zastrau, U. [High-Energy Density Science Group, Hamburg (Germany); Gauthier, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom); Vorberger, J. [Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres, Dresden (Germany); Granados, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  7. Multiple band structures in 70Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Morrow, S. I.; Döring, J.; Tabor, S. L.; Le, K. Q.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Bender, P. C.; Elder, R. M.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Tripathi, Vandana

    2018-02-01

    High-spin states in 70Ge were studied using the 55Mn(18O,p 2 n ) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. Prompt γ -γ coincidences were measured using the Florida State University Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. An investigation of these coincidences resulted in the addition of 31 new transitions and the rearrangement of four others in the 70Ge level scheme, providing a more complete picture of the high-spin decay pattern involving both positive- and negative-parity states with multiple band structures. Spins were assigned based on directional correlation of oriented nuclei ratios, which many times also led to unambiguous parity determinations based on the firm assignments for low-lying states made in previous work. Total Routhian surface calculations, along with the observed trends in the experimental kinematic moment of inertia with rotational frequency, support the multiquasiparticle configurations of the various crossing bands proposed in recent studies. The high-spin excitation spectra predicted by previous shell-model calculations compare favorably with the experimental one determined from this study.

  8. Polycrystalline ZrTe{sub 5} Parameterized as a Narrow Band Gap Semiconductor for Thermoelectric Performance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Samuel A.; Witting, Ian; Aydemir, Umut; Peng, Lintao; Rettie, Alex; Gorai, Prashun; Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Grayson, Matthew A.; Stevanovic, Vladan; Toberer, Eric S.; Snyder, G. Jeffery

    2018-01-24

    The transition-metal pentatellurides HfTe5 and ZrTe5 have been studied for their exotic transport properties with much debate over the transport mechanism, band gap, and cause of the resistivity behavior, including a large low-temperature resistivity peak. Single crystals grown by the chemical-vapor-transport method have shown an n-p transition of the Seebeck coefficient at the same temperature as a peak in the resistivity. We show that behavior similar to that of single crystals can be observed in iodine-doped polycrystalline samples but that undoped polycrystalline samples exhibit drastically different properties: they are p type over the entire temperature range. Additionally, the thermal conductivity for polycrystalline samples is much lower, 1.5 Wm-1 K-1, than previously reported for single crystals. It is found that the polycrystalline ZrTe5 system can be modeled as a simple semiconductor with conduction and valence bands both contributing to transport, separated by a band gap of 20 meV. This model demonstrates to first order that a simple two-band model can explain the transition from n- to p-type behavior and the cause of the anomalous resistivity peak. Combined with the experimental data, the two-band model shows that carrier concentration variation is responsible for differences in behavior between samples. Using the twoband model, the thermoelectric performance at different doping levels is predicted, finding zT =0.2 and 0.1 for p and n type, respectively, at 300 K, and zT= 0.23 and 0.32 for p and n type at 600 K. Given the reasonably high zT that is comparable in magnitude for both n and p type, a thermoelectric device with a single compound used for both legs is feasible.

  9. Electronic band-gap modified passive silicon optical modulator at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Qingming; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-11-13

    The silicon optical modulator is considered to be the workhorse of a revolution in communications. In recent years, the capabilities of externally driven active silicon optical modulators have dramatically improved. Self-driven passive modulators, especially passive silicon modulators, possess advantages in compactness, integration, low-cost, etc. Constrained by a large indirect band-gap and sensitivity-related loss, the passive silicon optical modulator is scarce and has been not advancing, especially at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, a passive silicon optical modulator is fabricated by introducing an impurity band in the electronic band-gap, and its nonlinear optics and applications in the telecommunications-wavelength lasers are investigated. The saturable absorption properties at the wavelength of 1.55 μm was measured and indicates that the sample is quite sensitive to light intensity and has negligible absorption loss. With a passive silicon modulator, pulsed lasers were constructed at wavelengths at 1.34 and 1.42 μm. It is concluded that the sensitive self-driven passive silicon optical modulator is a viable candidate for photonics applications out to 2.5 μm.

  10. Relationship between quantum speed limit time and memory time in a photonic-band-gap environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Wu, Y N; Mo, M L; Zhang, H Z

    2016-12-23

    Non-Markovian effect is found to be able to decrease the quantum speed limit (QSL) time, and hence to enhance the intrinsic speed of quantum evolution. Although a reservoir with larger degree of non-Markovianity may seem like it should cause smaller QSL times, this seemingly intuitive thinking may not always be true. We illustrate this by investigating the QSL time of a qubit that is coupled to a two-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) environment. We show how the QSL time is influenced by the coherent property of the reservoir and the band-gap width. In particular, we find that the decrease of the QSL time is not attributed to the increasing non-Markovianity, while the memory time of the environment can be seen as an essential reflection to the QSL time. So, the QSL time provides a further insight and sharper identification of memory time in a PBG environment. We also discuss a feasible experimental realization of our prediction.

  11. Physical vapor deposition and analysis of copper indium aluminum diselenide thin films for high band gap solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimbodi, Moses Warotua

    CuInSe2 films and related alloys have been used to fabricate the highest efficiency thin film solar cells. Alloying CuInSe2 with CuAlSe2 provides a way to engineer the band gap of the resulting films from 1 to 2.7 eV, thereby providing a pathway for improving device performance. In this work, thin films of CuIn1-xAlxSe 2 obtained by multi-source PVD were characterized and investigated for their potential use as high band gap solar cells. The band gap of the films was varied by controlling the [Al]/[Al + In] ratio. Deposition of these films with varying [Cu]/[Al + In] ratios and thickness (1--4 mum) was carried out at substrate temperatures from 350--530°C. CuIn1-xAlxSe2 based solar cells have been fabricated using the structure glass/Mo/CuIn1-xAl xSe2/CdS/ZnO/grid. The effect of varying the band gap on device performance will be discussed. The highest efficiency obtained in this work is 11% using a film with Eg ≈ 1.3 eV. For high Al content, x > 0.3, device-performance decreases mainly due to poor FF similar to that observed in CuIn1-xGaxSe2 devices and is attributed to poor minority carrier collection. For CuIn1-xAlxSe2 films with x = 1, data is analyzed and presented with respect to [Cu]/[Al] and Se to total metal flux ratio, RSe/RM. Phase analysis shows that the resulting films contain different phases that depend on these parameters. Several of these films also contain concentrations of oxygen varying from 12 to 60 at. % as the [Cu]/[Al] ratio decreases. For RSe/R M > 10, a new structure we label as CuxAlySe z was observed. The oxygen content in all of the films obtained under RSe/RM > 10 vary between 1--3 at. %. Based on the Cu-Se, Al-Se, Cu-Al binary and the Cu2Se-Al2Se 3 pseudo-binary phase diagrams, a phenomenological film growth model is presented showing that the film growth kinetics are controlled by the delivery of Se.

  12. Effects of elastic anisotropy in phononic band-gap plates with two-dimensional lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the effects of elastic anisotropy of constituent materials in square-lattice phononic-crystal plates. Using general elastodynamic calculations and the finite element (FE) method, this study analyses phononic-crystal plates constituted by (1) anisotropic scatterers embedded in an epoxy plate and (2) air holes etched on an anisotropic plate. The full band gaps can be modulated, opened and closed by changing the orientation of the square lattice relative to the crystallographic coordinate system of the anisotropic materials, and the elastic anisotropy varies the dispersion curves of the phononic-crystal plate waves with the rotation of the square lattice. Acoustic power transmission calculations show incident plate mode-dependent spectral gaps, the appearances of which in the frequency spectrum can also be modulated and shifted using elastic anisotropy. The effects of elastic anisotropy demonstrated here enable tailoring frequency band gaps and dispersion curves for functional control of acoustic-wave energy flows in phononic-crystal plates. Applications include acoustic waveguiding, confining, self-collimating and perfect acoustic focusing.

  13. Nickel(II-oxaloyldihydrazone complexes: Characterization, indirect band gap energy and antimicrobial evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman H. Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of oxaloyldihydrazone ligands was prepared essentially by the usual condensation reaction between oxaloyldihydrazide and different aldehydes e.g. salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone and 2-methoxy-benzaldehyde in 1:2 M ratio. The formed compounds were purified to give bis(salicylaldehydeoxaloyldihydrazone (L1, bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydeoxaloyldihydrazone (L2, bis(2-hydroxyacetophenoneoxaloyldihydrazone(L3 and bis(2-methoxy-benzaldehydeoxaloyldihydrazone (L4. All the oxaloyldihydrazones (L1–L4 and their relevant solid nickel(II complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized on the basis of the elemental analyses, spectral (UV–vis, IR, mass and 1H NMR, magnetism and thermal (TG measurements. The dihydrazones coordinate to the metal center forming mononuclear complexes with L1, L3 and L4 in addition to binuclear complex with L2. The metal center prefers tetrahedral stereochemistry upon chelation. The optical indirect band gap energy for all compounds underlies the range of semiconductor materials. The prepared ligands and their metal complexes have been assayed for their antimicrobial activity against fungi as well as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The resulting data indicate the ability of the investigated compounds to inhibit the growth of some micro-organisms, where L2 showed the highest activity among all the compounds. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of L2 against the growth of five micro-organisms was determined which gives better response against Aspergillus fumigatus and Bacillis subtilis compared with some selected standard drugs.

  14. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Banaras [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saifullah [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali-Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan (UI), 81744 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khan, Imad [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan)

    2015-10-25

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX{sub 3} (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures.

  15. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Banaras; Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye; Saifullah; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Khan, Imad; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX 3 (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures

  16. The effect of carbon nanotubes functionalization on the band-gap energy of TiO2-CNT nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Hessam; Shafei, Alireza; Sheibani, Saeed

    2018-01-01

    In this paper the morphology and structure of TiO2-CNT nanocomposite powder obtained by an in situ sol-gel process were investigated. The synthesized nanocomposite powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The effect of functionalizing of CNT on the properties was studied. XRD results showed amorphous structure before calcination. Also, anatase phase TiO2 was formed after calcination at 400 °C. The SEM results indicate different distributions of TiO2 on CNTs. As a result, well dispersed TiO2 microstructure on the surface of CNTs was observed after functionalizing, while compact and large aggregated particles were found without functionalizing. The average thickness of uniform and well-defined coated TiO2 layer was in the range of 30-40 nm. The DRS results have determined the reflective properties and band gap energies of nanocomposite powders and have shown that functionalizing of CNTs caused the change of band-gap energy from 2.98 to 2.87 eV.

  17. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T., E-mail: tfathollahi@aeoi.org.ir; Bananej, A.

    2016-12-16

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In this paper, we have investigated plasma photonic crystals. • Plasma is a kind of dispersive medium with its equivalent refractive index related to the frequency of an incident EM wave. • In this work, our simulations are performed using the Meep implementation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. • For this study, the lattice structures investigated are triangular and square. • Extensive calculations reveal that almost all of these structures represent wide complete band gaps.

  18. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In this paper, we have investigated plasma photonic crystals. • Plasma is a kind of dispersive medium with its equivalent refractive index related to the frequency of an incident EM wave. • In this work, our simulations are performed using the Meep implementation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. • For this study, the lattice structures investigated are triangular and square. • Extensive calculations reveal that almost all of these structures represent wide complete band gaps.

  19. Low-resistant and high transmittance films based on one dimensional metal-dielectric photonic band gap material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-li; Li, Xu-feng; Ma, Jiang-jiang; Ma, Fu-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Wei, Xue-hong

    2017-12-01

    The paper shows the determination of the transmission of one dimensional metal-dielectric photonic band gap materials (1D-MD PBG) theoretically and experimentally. It has been found that the location and bandwidth of transmission can be tailored by initiatively adopting a suitable structure. We proposed a special 1D-MD PBG obtained by magnetron sputtering, in which each layer of metal film is not continuous. These structures have a number of advantages such as high transmittance (55% or better), broad bandwidth (the full width at half of maximum ranges from 400 nm to 780 nm) and high electrical conductivity (the sheet resistance can be lower than 0.98 Ω/square). Meanwhile, it has been also theoretically and experimental indicated that both the light transmittance and electrical conductivity could be improved effectively by using the (pqp)N structure.

  20. Optimizing the configuration of a superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavity to increase the maximum achievable gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenya I. Simakov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a design of a superconducting rf photonic band gap (SRF PBG accelerator cell with specially shaped rods in order to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and improve the effectiveness of the PBG structure for suppression of higher order modes (HOMs. The ability of PBG structures to suppress long-range wakefields is especially beneficial for superconducting electron accelerators for high power free-electron lasers (FELs, which are designed to provide high current continuous duty electron beams. Using PBG structures to reduce the prominent beam-breakup phenomena due to HOMs will allow significantly increased beam-breakup thresholds. As a result, there will be possibilities for increasing the operation frequency of SRF accelerators and for the development of novel compact high-current accelerator modules for the FELs.

  1. Strong Photonic-Band-Gap Effect on the Spontaneous Emission in 3D Lead Halide Perovskite Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Li, Mingzhu; Wang, Kang; Li, Huizeng; Li, Yanan; Li, Chang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yongsheng; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-25

    Stimulated emission in perovskite-embedded polymer opal structures is investigated. A polymer opal structure is filled with a perovskite, and perovskite photonic crystals are prepared. The spontaneous emission of the perovskite embedded in the polymer opal structures exhibits clear signatures of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) via gain modulation. The difference in refractive-index contrast between the perovskite and the polymer opal is large enough for retaining photonic-crystals properties. The photonic band gap has a strong effect on the fluorescence emission intensity and lifetime. The stimulated emission spectrum exhibits a narrow ASE rather than a wide fluorescence peak in the thin film. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Investigation of Patch Antenna Based on Photonic Band-Gap Substrate with Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the patch antenna based on photonic band-gap (PBG substrate with heterostructures were studied numerically by using the method of finite difference time domain (FDTD. The results indicate that, comparing to the conventional patch antennas, the expansion of working frequency band of the new patch antenna can be realized and its radiation efficiency also can be improved notably with the influence of PBG. In addition, for this new kind of patch antenna, its return loss is much less and there are two minimum values for return loss corresponding to the resonant frequency of the two different photonic crystals made of the substrate. Its physical mechanism lies on the PBG which suppresses the surface waves propagating along the surface of the substrate and reflects most of electromagnetic wave energy radiated to the substrate significantly.

  3. On the thickness dependence of both the optical band gap and reversible photodarkening in amorphous Ge-Se films.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutálek, P.; Tichý, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 619, 30 November (2016), s. 336-341 ISSN 0040-6090 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amorphous chalcogenides * thin films * optical band gap Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.879, year: 2016

  4. Do anionic titanium dioxide nano-clusters reach bulk band gap? A density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zheng-Wang; Zhu, Hui

    2010-07-30

    The electronic properties of both neutral and anionic (TiO(2))(n) (n = 1-10) clusters are investigated by extensive density functional theory calculations. The predicted electron detachment energies and excitation gaps of anionic clusters agree well with the original experimental anion photoelectron spectra (APES). It is shown that the old way to analyze APES tends to overestimate vertical excitation gaps (VGA) of large anionic clusters, due to the nature of multiple electronic origins for the higher APES bands. Moreover, the VGA of anionic TiO(2) clusters are evidently smaller than those of neutral clusters, which may also be the case for other metal oxide clusters with high electron affinity. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Liquid-crystal photonic-band-gap materials the tunable electromagnetic vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, K

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate that when an optically birefringent nematic liquid crystal is infiltrated into the void regions of an inverse opal, photonic-band-gap (PBG) material, the resulting composite material exhibits a completely tunable PBG. $9 In particular, the three- dimensional PBG can be completely opened or closed by applying an electric field which rotates the axis of the nematic molecules relative to the inverse opal backbone. Tunable light localization effects may $9 be realized by controlling the orientational disorder in the nematic. (28 refs).

  6. Band gap and density of states of the hydrated C60 fullerene system at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivelino, Roberto; de Brito Mota, F

    2007-06-01

    We examine the electronic properties of the hydrated C60 fullerene under ambient conditions using a sequential Monte Carlo/density functional theory scheme. In this procedure, the average electronic properties of the first hydration shell of C60 equilibrate for ca. 40 uncorrelated configurations of the fullerene aqueous solution. We obtain a systematic red-shift of 0.8 eV in the band gap of the hydrated system, which is mainly attributed to the thermal fluctuations of the aqueous environment.

  7. Surface Plasmon-Induced Band Gap in the Photocurrent Response of Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribal Georges Sabat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 260 nm layer of organic bulk heterojunction blend of the polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and the fullerene [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric (PCBM was spin-coated in between aluminum and gold electrodes, respectively, on top of a laser inscribed azo polymer surface-relief diffraction grating. Angle-dependent surface plasmons (SPs with a large band gap were observed in the normalized photocurrent by the P3HT-PCBM layer as a function of wavelength. The SP-induced photocurrents were also investigated as a function of the grating depth and spacing.

  8. Band gap opening and optical absorption enhancement in graphene using ZnO nanocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshi, M. M.; Aghaei, S. M.; Calizo, I.

    2018-05-01

    Electronic, optical and transport properties of the graphene/ZnO heterostructure have been explored using first-principles density functional theory. The results show that Zn12O12 can open a band gap of 14.5 meV in graphene, increase its optical absorption by 1.67 times covering the visible spectrum which extends to the infra-red (IR) range, and exhibits a slight non-linear I-V characteristic depending on the applied bias. These findings envisage that a graphene/Zn12O12 heterostructure can be appropriate for energy harvesting, photodetection, and photochemical devices.

  9. Effects of symmetry reduction on magnon band gaps in two-dimensional magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu; Tang, Xiaoli; Su, Hua; Bai, Feiming; Jing, Yulan; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2014-02-01

    Effects of symmetry reduction on the magnon band gaps (MBGs) in two-dimensional (2D) magnonic crystals (MCs) were investigated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz equation with the plane wave method. The symmetry reduction is achieved by introducing additional scatterers into each unit cell or by reorienting noncircular scatterers. The numerical results show that the MBGs in a square lattice can be improved by introducing additional scatterers or rotating the square rods. In honeycomb and triangular lattices, the MBGs can be improved only by introducing additional scatterers, however, rotating the square rods is an invalid way to increase the MBGs.

  10. High Photoluminescence Quantum Yield in Band Gap Tunable Bromide Containing Mixed Halide Perovskites

    OpenAIRE

    Carolin M. Sutter-Fella Yanbo Li Matin Amani Joel W. Ager III Francesca M. Toma; Eli Yablonovitch Ian D. Sharp and Ali Javey

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid organic–inorganic halide perovskite based semiconductor materials are attractive for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices because they combine the advantages of suitable optoelectronic attributes and simultaneously low cost solution processability. Here we present a two step low pressure vapor assisted solution process to grow high quality homogeneous CH3NH3PbI3–xBrx perovskite films over the full band gap range of 1.6–2.3 eV. Photoluminescence light in versus light out charac...

  11. Robust band gap and half-metallicity in graphene with triangular perforations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Power, Stephen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    . The inclusion of spin polarization within a mean-field Hubbard approach gives rise to a large overall magnetic moment at each antidot due to the sublattice imbalance imposed by the triangular geometry. Half-metallic behavior arises from the formation of spin-split dispersive states near the Fermi energy...... disorders. Here we study a rectangular array of triangular antidots with zigzag edge geometries and show that their band gap behavior qualitatively differs from the standard behavior which is exhibited, e.g., by rectangular arrays of armchair-edged triangles. In the spin unpolarized case, zigzag......, and furthermore, of exploiting the strong spin dependence of the system for spintronic applications....

  12. Incorporation of Furan into Low Band-Gap Polymers for Efficient Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Woo, Claire H.

    2010-11-10

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of the first examples of furan-containing low band-gap polymers, PDPP2FT and PDPP3F, with substantial power conversion efficiencies in organic solar cells are reported. Inserting furan moieties in the backbone of the conjugated polymers enables the use of relatively small solubilizing side chains because of the significant contribution of the furan rings to overall polymer solubility in common organic solvents. Bulk heterojunction solar cells fabricated from furan-containing polymers and PC71BM as the acceptor showed power conversion efficiencies reaching 5.0%. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Band gap engineering of Cu3FexSn(1-x)S4: A potential absorber material for solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, P.; Yazdani, A.; Shadrokh, Z.; Abdollahi Nejand, B.; Farahani, N.; Seifi, R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, band gap engineering of quaternary chalcogenides with the general formula of Cu2FexSn(1-x)S4 was conducted by substituting Sn atoms with Fe atoms. The morphology and crystalline structure of the synthesized nanostructured powder were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Optical properties of the nanostructured powder were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicate that substitution of Sn atoms with Fe atoms could transfer the tetragonal structure of CTS to tetragonal CFTS structure. The 1.54 eV band gap reached in 80 at.% replacement of Sn atoms with Fe atoms resulting in a tetragonal Cu2FeSnS4 flower-like structure. Moreover, by loading smaller amount of Fe atoms up to 20 at.%, no Fe atoms incorporation in CTS structure was observed.

  14. Tunable PhoXonic Band Gap Materials from Self-Assembly of Block Copoliymers and Colloidal Nanocrystals (NBIT Phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Activities: Hysteric Tunable Photonic Gels and Their Applications Photonic band gap ( PBG ) materials have been of great interest due to their potential...applications in science and technology. Their applications can be further extended when the PBG becomes tunable against various chemical and...electrical stimuli. Recently, it was found that tunable photonic band gap materials can be achieved by incorporating stimuli-responsive smart gels into PBG

  15. Band structure engineering for ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Malte

    2014-01-01

    the same system maps onto a quantum spin-1/2 XY model. Owing to the quantum nature of the pseudospins, geometrical frustration leads to a highly degenerate ground state which can result in exotic valence bond spin-liquid phases. First signatures of an order-by-disorder effect emerge in this regime. A complementary approach to the manipulation of the band structure is investigated in a honeycomb potential. By rotating the quantization field of the system, the statedependent energy offset between the twofold atomic basis of the hexagonal Bravais lattice can be adjusted. This purposeful breaking of inversion symmetry enables the continuous opening of an energy gap at the Dirac points of the honeycomb band structure. In addition, a striking influence of the band gap onto the lifetimes for atoms in the first excited energy band is observed. In the last part of the thesis, both experimental manipulation techniques are discussed with respect to future applications for ultracold quantum gases in non-cubic optical lattices.

  16. Photonic-band-gap architectures for long-lifetime room-temperature polariton condensation in GaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Vasudev, Pranai; John, Sajeev

    2017-10-01

    We describe AlGaAs photonic-crystal architectures that simultaneously realize strong exciton-photon coupling, long polariton lifetime, and room-temperature polariton Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). Strong light trapping, induced by a 3D photonic band gap (PBG), leads to peak field intensity 20 times as large as that in an AlGaAs Fabry-Pérot microcavity and exciton-photon coupling as large as 20 meV (i.e., vacuum Rabi splitting 40 meV). The strong exciton-photon coupling, small polariton effective mass, and long polariton lifetime lead to possible realizations of equilibrium room-temperature BEC. We also consider the influence of polarization degeneracy and symmetry breaking in the ground state on the BEC-onset temperature and condensate fraction. Woodpile and slanted-pore PBG structures that break X-Y symmetry facilitate larger condensate fractions at moderate temperatures. The effects of electronic and photonic disorder are marginal, thanks to the 3D photonic band gap.

  17. A comparative study of solution-processed low- and high-band-gap chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Jin; Moon, Sung Hwan; Min, Byoung Koun; Cho, Yunae; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Gwak, Jihye; Kim, Jihyun

    2014-01-01

    Low-cost and printable chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells were fabricated by a precursor solution-based coating method with a multi-step heat-treatment process (oxidation, sulfurization, and selenization). The high-band-gap (1.57 eV) Cu(In x Ga 1−x )S 2 (CIGS) solar cell showed a high open-circuit voltage of 787 mV, whereas the low-band-gap (1.12 eV) Cu(In x Ga 1−x )(S 1−y Se y ) 2 (CIGSSe) cell exhibited a high short-circuit current density of 32.6 mA cm −2 . The energy conversion efficiencies were 8.28% for CIGS and 8.81% for CIGSSe under standard irradiation conditions. Despite similar efficiencies, the two samples showed notable differences in grain size, surface morphology, and interfacial properties. Low-temperature transport and admittance characteristics of the samples clearly revealed how their structural differences influenced their photovoltaic and electrical properties. Such analyses provide insight into the enhanced solar cell performance of the solution-processed chalcopyrite thin films. (paper)

  18. In Situ Encapsulation of Ultrasmall CuO Quantum Dots with Controlled Band-Gap and Reversible Thermochromism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuzhen; Shah, Zameer Hussain; Wang, Cui; Wang, Jiasheng; Mao, Wenxin; Zhang, Shufen; Lu, Rongwen

    2015-12-09

    Silica encapsulated ultrasmall CuO quantum dots (QDs; CuO@SiO2) were synthesized by reverse microemulsion. The CuO QDs with sizes ranging from 2.0 to 1.0 nm with corresponding band gaps of 1.4 to 2.6 eV were prepared simply by varying the concentration of the Cu(2+) precursor. The samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-vis spectroscopy. The CuO@SiO2 composite displayed reversible thermochromism which resulted from the strong electron-phonon coupling of ultrasmall CuO in the confined space of SiO2 and the enhanced band-gap shift in the visible light region depending on temperature. Besides, the as synthesized CuO@SiO2 was found to be highly stable for reversible thermochromism due to the micropore structure of silica matrix and local confinement of the QDs.

  19. Impact of substrate on performance of band gap engineered graphene field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Durgesh Laxman; Sivasankaran, K.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the graphene field effect transistor (G-FET) to enhance the drain current saturation and to minimize the drain conductance (gd) using numerical simulation. This work focus on suppressing the drain conductance using silicon substrate. We studied the impact of different substrate on the performance of band gap engineered G-FET device. We used a non-equilibrium green function with mode space (NEGF_MS) to model the transport behavior of carriers for 10 nm channel length G-FET device. We compared the drain current saturation of G-FET at higher drain voltage regime on silicon, SiC, and the SiO2 substrate. This paper clearly demonstrates the effect of substrate on an electric field near drain region of G-FET device. It is shown that the substrate of G-FET is not only creating a band gap in graphene, which is important for current saturation and gd minimization, but also selection of suitable substrate can suppress generation of carrier concentration near drain region is also important.

  20. Omnidirectional Photonic Band Gap Using Low Refractive Index Contrast Materials and its Application in Optical Waveguides

    KAUST Repository

    Vidal Faez, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    Researchers have argued for many years that one of the conditions for omnidirectional reflection in a one-dimensional photonic crystal is a strong refractive index contrast between the two constituent dielectric materials. Using numerical simulations and the theory of Anderson localization of light, in this work we demonstrate that an omnidirectional band gap can indeed be created utilizing low refractive index contrast materials when they are arranged in a disordered manner. Moreover, the size of the omnidirectional band gap becomes a controllable parameter, which now depends on the number of layers and not only on the refractive index contrast of the system, as it is widely accepted. This achievement constitutes a major breakthrough in the field since it allows for the development of cheaper and more efficient technologies. Of particular interest is the case of high index contrast one-dimensional photonic crystal fibers, where the propagation losses are mainly due to increased optical scattering from sidewall roughness at the interfaces of high index contrast materials. By using low index contrast materials these losses can be reduced dramatically, while maintaining the confinement capability of the waveguide. This is just one of many applications that could be proven useful for this discovery.

  1. The study of response of wide band gap semiconductor detectors using the Geant4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Riaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy dependence on the intrinsic efficiency, absolute efficiency, full energy peak absolute efficiency and peak-to-total ratio have been studied for various wide band gap semiconductor detectors using the Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations. The detector thickness of 1-4 mm and the area in 16-100 mm2 range were considered in this work. In excellent agreement with earlier work (Rybka et al., [20], the Geant4 simulated values of detector efficiencies have been found to decrease with incident g-ray energy. Both for the detector thickness and the detector area, the increasing trends have been observed for total efficiency as well as for full-energy peak efficiency in 0.1 MeV-50 MeV range. For Cd1-xZnxTe, the detector response remained insensitive to changes in relative proportions of Zn. For various wide band gap detectors studied in this work, the detection efficiency of TlBr was found highest over the entire range of energy, followed by the HgI2, CdTe, and then by CZT.

  2. Esaki Diodes in van der Waals Heterojunctions with Broken-Gap Energy Band Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rusen; Fathipour, Sara; Han, Yimo; Song, Bo; Xiao, Shudong; Li, Mingda; Ma, Nan; Protasenko, Vladimir; Muller, David A; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2015-09-09

    van der Waals (vdW) heterojunctions composed of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials are emerging as a solid-state materials family that exhibits novel physics phenomena that can power a range of electronic and photonic applications. Here, we present the first demonstration of an important building block in vdW solids: room temperature Esaki tunnel diodes. The Esaki diodes were realized in vdW heterostructures made of black phosphorus (BP) and tin diselenide (SnSe2), two layered semiconductors that possess a broken-gap energy band offset. The presence of a thin insulating barrier between BP and SnSe2 enabled the observation of a prominent negative differential resistance (NDR) region in the forward-bias current-voltage characteristics, with a peak to valley ratio of 1.8 at 300 K and 2.8 at 80 K. A weak temperature dependence of the NDR indicates electron tunneling being the dominant transport mechanism, and a theoretical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the broken-gap band alignment is confirmed by the junction photoresponse, and the phosphorus double planes in a single layer of BP are resolved in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the first time. Our results represent a significant advance in the fundamental understanding of vdW heterojunctions and broaden the potential applications of 2D layered materials.

  3. Reflection and transmission of SH waves at a very rough interface and its band gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, Pham Chi; Tuan, Tran Thanh; Tung, Do Xuan; Kieu, Nguyen Thi

    2017-12-01

    This paper deals with the reflection and transmission of SH waves at a very rough interface separating two dissimilar isotropic elastic solids. The interface oscillates between two straight lines. By means of homogenization, the domain containing the very rough interface is replaced by an effective material layer whose elastic constants depend on the thickness variable. The reflection and transmission of SH waves at the very rough interface is then reduced to the ones at a FGM layer. The exact analytical formulas for the reflection and transmission coefficients have been derived. Based on them, the dependence of the reflection and transmission coefficients on the incident angle, the wave frequency, the material constants and the geometry of the rough interface are examined. Remarkably, it has been shown that a very rough interface of comb-type with the comb-tooth width varying periodically can produce band-gaps to SH waves. With this fact, many potential applications can be expected coming from very rough interfaces of comb-type with periodic comb-tooth width. It is also shown that the width and the location of band-gaps depend strongly on the contrast of rigidities of two half-spaces, the amplitude of the variation of the comb-tooth width, the incident angle of SH waves and the number of periods of comb-tooth.

  4. Composition dependence of optical band gap of the Se-Ge-Te far infrared transmitting glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guoxiang, E-mail: guoxiang_8899@163.co [Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University (China) and State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Ningbo 315211 (China); Nie Qiuhua; Wang Xunsi; Dai Shixun; Xu Tiefeng; Shen Xiang [Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University (China); State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zhang Xianghua [Laboratoire des Verres et ceramiques, Universite de Rennes I, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2010-11-01

    A systematic series of Se{sub x}Ge{sub 25-x}Te{sub 75} (x=0, 5, 10, 15, 20 at%) far infrared transmitting glasses were prepared by traditional melt-quenching method. Physical, thermal and optical properties of the glass system were analyzed. The allowed indirect transition of samples was calculated according to the classical Tauc equation. The results show the density increases with the substitution of Ge by Se and a maximum {Tau}{sub g} value of 175 {sup o}C was obtained for the Se{sub 15}Ge{sub 10}Te{sub 75} glass. The energy band gap of Se{sub 15}Ge{sub 10}Te{sub 75} glass is 1.25 eV, possessing the largest metallization criterion value (0.25) and the lowest refractive index (3.16). When the dissolved amount of Se increased from 0 to 15 at%, the values of indirect optical band gap were in the range from 0.573 to 0.679 eV. A wide optical transparent window with a cut-off wavelength beyond 18 {mu}m was shown.

  5. Silver nanoparticles embedded titania nanotube with tunable blue light band gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Yang, Chung-Sung, E-mail: csyang@mail.ncyu.edu.tw

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles embedded titania nanotube (SET) have been successfully prepared by titania nanotubes and silver nanoparticles via a template-free reaction. Powder X-ray diffraction (P-XRD) spectra and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra show that the charge of silver atoms maintains neutral in the formation of silver nanoparticles. The Ag atom of Ag nanoparticles and the oxygen atom of TiO{sub 2} possess a chemical bonding with an ionic character rather than a covalent character. The quantitative microanalysis data collected from X-ray photo-emission (XPS) spectra indicate that the ratio of Ag/Ti in SET is 15.2 ± 2.7%. The cut-off band gap of SET is adjustable from 420 nm (Ag/Ti = 12.5%) to 430 nm (Ag/Ti = 17.8%). - Highlights: • The self-assembly silver nanoparticles are embedded on titania nanotube. • The charge of silver atoms is neutral in the formation of silver nanoparticles. • The quantitative microanalysis data confirm that ratio of Ag/Ti is 15.2 ± 2.7%. • The band gap of SET locates in the desirable blue light region.

  6. Polarization-induced pn diodes in wide-band-gap nanowires with ultraviolet electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Santino D; Kent, Thomas F; Phillips, Patrick J; Mills, Michael J; Rajan, Siddharth; Myers, Roberto C

    2012-02-08

    Almost all electronic devices utilize a pn junction formed by random doping of donor and acceptor impurity atoms. We developed a fundamentally new type of pn junction not formed by impurity-doping, but rather by grading the composition of a semiconductor nanowire resulting in alternating p and n conducting regions due to polarization charge. By linearly grading AlGaN nanowires from 0% to 100% and back to 0% Al, we show the formation of a polarization-induced pn junction even in the absence of any impurity doping. Since electrons and holes are injected from AlN barriers into quantum disk active regions, graded nanowires allow deep ultraviolet LEDs across the AlGaN band-gap range with electroluminescence observed from 3.4 to 5 eV. Polarization-induced p-type conductivity in nanowires is shown to be possible even without supplemental acceptor doping, demonstrating the advantage of polarization engineering in nanowires compared with planar films and providing a strategy for improving conductivity in wide-band-gap semiconductors. As polarization charge is uniform within each unit cell, polarization-induced conductivity without impurity doping provides a solution to the problem of conductivity uniformity in nanowires and nanoelectronics and opens a new field of polarization engineering in nanostructures that may be applied to other polar semiconductors. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  7. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... nuclei, e.g., in 16O (Z = N = 8) [12,13] and 56Ni (Z = N = 28) [14–16], coexisting with the spherical ground configuration. Recently, Hwang et al [2] have observed deformed rotational bands in 82Ge. To our knowledge, these deformed rotational bands have not been studied theoretically so far though there ...

  8. Dirac Cones in Graphene, Interlayer Interaction in Layered Materials, and the Band Gap in MoS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan N. Yakovkin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The 2D outlook of graphene and similar layers has initiated a number of theoretical considerations of electronic structure that are both interesting and exciting, but applying these ideas to real layered systems, in terms of a model 2D system, must be done with extreme care. In the present review, we will discuss the applicability of the 2D concept with examples of peculiarities of electronic structures and interactions in particular layered systems: (i Dirac points and cones in graphene; (ii van der Waals interaction between MoS2 monolayers; and (iii the issue of a 2D screening in estimates of the band gap for MoS2 monolayers.

  9. Theoretical Prediction of an Antimony-Silicon Monolayer (penta-Sb2Si): Band Gap Engineering by Strain Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedi, Hosein; Naseri, Mosayeb; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Elahi, Seyed Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, using a first principles calculation, a two-dimensional structure of silicon-antimony named penta-Sb2Si is predicted. The structural, kinetic, and thermal stabilities of the predicted monolayer are confirmed by the cohesive energy calculation, phonon dispersion analysis, and first principles molecular dynamic simulation, respectively. The electronic properties investigation shows that the pentagonal Sb2Si monolayer is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of about 1.53 eV (2.1 eV) from GGA-PBE (PBE0 hybrid functional) calculations which can be effectively engineered by employing external biaxial compressive and tensile strain. Furthermore, the optical characteristics calculation indicates that the predicted monolayer has considerable optical absorption and reflectivity in the ultraviolet region. The results suggest that a Sb2Si monolayer has very good potential applications in new nano-optoelectronic devices.

  10. Spin-polarized quasi-one-dimensional state with finite band gap on the Bi/InSb(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, J.; Ohtsubo, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Yaji, K.; Harasawa, A.; Komori, F.; Shin, S.; Rault, J. E.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Nurmamat, M.; Yamane, H.; Ideta, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kimura, S.

    2017-11-01

    One-dimensional (1D) electronic states were discovered on the 1D surface atomic structure of Bi fabricated on semiconductor InSb(001) substrates by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The 1D state showed steep, Dirac-cone-like dispersion along the 1D atomic structure with a finite direct band gap opening as large as 150 meV. Moreover, spin-resolved ARPES revealed the spin polarization of the 1D unoccupied states as well as that of the occupied states, the orientation of which inverted depending on the wave-vector direction parallel to the 1D array on the surface. These results reveal that a spin-polarized quasi-1D carrier was realized on the surface of 1D Bi with highly efficient backscattering suppression, showing promise for use in future spintronics and energy-saving devices.

  11. Surface effect on band structure of flexural wave propagating in magneto-elastic phononic crystal nanobeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shunzu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical model is established to study the size-dependent performance of flexural wave propagation in magneto-elastic phononic crystal (PC) nanobeam with surface effect based on Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and Gurtin–Murdoch theory. Considering the magneto-mechanical coupling constitutive relation of magnetostrictive material, the influence of surface effect on band structure is calculated by the plane wave expansion method for PC nanobeam subjected to pre-stress and magnetic field loadings. Through the example of an epoxy/Terfenol-D PC nanobeam, it can be observed that the characteristics of flexural wave band structures are size-dependent, and remarkably affected by surface effect when the dimension of the PC beam reduces to the nanoscale. The edges and width of the band gap with surface effect are higher than those without surface effect, especially for high frequency region. And surface effect gradually reduces with the increasing of bulk layer-to-surface layer thickness ratio until the band gap descends to a constant for the conventional one in the absence of surface effect. The effects of surface elasticity and piezomagneticity on band gap are more prominent than the residual surface stress. In addition, a distinctly nonlinear variation of band gap appears under the combined effects of pre-stress and magnetic field. Moreover, with the varying of filling fraction, multi-peaks of the width of the band gap are obtained and discussed. These results could be helpful for the intelligent regulation of magneto-elastic PC nanobeam and the design of nanobeam-based devices. (paper)

  12. Surface effect on band structure of flexural wave propagating in magneto-elastic phononic crystal nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shunzu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2017-11-01

    A theoretical model is established to study the size-dependent performance of flexural wave propagation in magneto-elastic phononic crystal (PC) nanobeam with surface effect based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Gurtin-Murdoch theory. Considering the magneto-mechanical coupling constitutive relation of magnetostrictive material, the influence of surface effect on band structure is calculated by the plane wave expansion method for PC nanobeam subjected to pre-stress and magnetic field loadings. Through the example of an epoxy/Terfenol-D PC nanobeam, it can be observed that the characteristics of flexural wave band structures are size-dependent, and remarkably affected by surface effect when the dimension of the PC beam reduces to the nanoscale. The edges and width of the band gap with surface effect are higher than those without surface effect, especially for high frequency region. And surface effect gradually reduces with the increasing of bulk layer-to-surface layer thickness ratio until the band gap descends to a constant for the conventional one in the absence of surface effect. The effects of surface elasticity and piezomagneticity on band gap are more prominent than the residual surface stress. In addition, a distinctly nonlinear variation of band gap appears under the combined effects of pre-stress and magnetic field. Moreover, with the varying of filling fraction, multi-peaks of the width of the band gap are obtained and discussed. These results could be helpful for the intelligent regulation of magneto-elastic PC nanobeam and the design of nanobeam-based devices.

  13. Energy band structure tailoring of vertically aligned InAs/GaAsSb quantum dot structure for intermediate-band solar cell application by thermal annealing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chu, Ting-Fu; Huang, Tien-Hao

    2014-12-15

    This study presents an band-alignment tailoring of a vertically aligned InAs/GaAs(Sb) quantum dot (QD) structure and the extension of the carrier lifetime therein by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Arrhenius analysis indicates a larger activation energy and thermal stability that results from the suppression of In-Ga intermixing and preservation of the QD heterostructure in an annealed vertically aligned InAs/GaAsSb QD structure. Power-dependent and time-resolved photoluminescence were utilized to demonstrate the extended carrier lifetime from 4.7 to 9.4 ns and elucidate the mechanisms of the antimony aggregation resulting in a band-alignment tailoring from straddling to staggered gap after the RTA process. The significant extension in the carrier lifetime of the columnar InAs/GaAsSb dot structure make the great potential in improving QD intermediate-band solar cell application.

  14. Theoretical study of time-resolved luminescence in semiconductors. III. Trap states in the band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiberg, Matthias; Hölscher, Torsten; Zahedi-Azad, Setareh; Scheer, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In the third part of this series, we study the influence of trap states in the band gap of semiconductors on the time-resolved luminescence decay (TRL) after a pulsed excitation. The results based on simulations with Synopsys TCAD ® and analytical approximations are given for p-doped Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 as a working example. We show that a single trap can be mostly described by two parameters which are assigned to minority carrier capture and emission. We analyze their influence on the luminescence decay and study the difference between a single trap and an energetic Gaussian trap distribution. It is found that trap states artificially increase the TRL decay and obscure the recombination dynamics. Thus, there is a demand for experimental methods which can reveal the recombination of minority carriers in a TRL experiment without trapping effect. In this regard, a variation of the device temperature, the excitation frequency, the injection level, as well as a bias illumination may be promising approaches. We study these methods, discuss advantages and disadvantages, and show experimental TRL for prove of concept. At the end, we validate our approach of simulating only band-to-band radiative recombination although photoluminescence spectra often exhibit free-to-bound radiative recombination of charge carriers

  15. Engineering an Insulating Ferroelectric Superlattice with a Tunable Band Gap from Metallic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saurabh; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2017-10-01

    The recent discovery of "polar metals" with ferroelectriclike displacements offers the promise of designing ferroelectrics with tunable energy gaps by inducing controlled metal-insulator transitions. Here we employ first-principles calculations to design a metallic polar superlattice from nonpolar metal components and show that controlled intermixing can lead to a true insulating ferroelectric with a tunable band gap. We consider a 2 /2 superlattice made of two centrosymmetric metallic oxides, La0.75 Sr0.25 MnO3 and LaNiO3 , and show that ferroelectriclike displacements are induced. The ferroelectriclike distortion is found to be strongly dependent on the carrier concentration (Sr content). Further, we show that a metal-to-insulator (MI) transition is feasible in this system via disproportionation of the Ni sites. Such a disproportionation and, hence, a MI transition can be driven by intermixing of transition metal ions between Mn and Ni layers. As a result, the energy gap of the resulting ferroelectric can be tuned by varying the degree of intermixing in the experimental fabrication method.

  16. ARPES measurements of SnAs electronic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezotosnyi, P. I.; Dmitrieva, K. A.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu.; Pervakov, K. S.; Tsvetkov, A. Yu.; Martovitski, V. P.; Rybkin, A. G.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    We report experimental study of the electronic band structure of SnAs superconductor with the NaCl type lattice structure by angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The determined band structure, in general, is in a good agreement with the calculated one. However, at odd with the calculated band structure, the experimental data reveals splitting of one of the upper valence bands into three branches along the \\bar K - \\bar Γ - \\bar K and \\bar M - \\bar Γ - \\bar M' symmetry directions. We assume this splitting can be caused by the spin orbit coupling of electrons or a mixed valence of Sn atoms in the compound.

  17. Emulation of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect modes in a photonic crystal with a three-dimensional photonic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinelli, M. L.; Johnson, Steven G.; Fan, Shanhui; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate the construction of two-dimensional- (2D-) like defect modes in a recently proposed 3D photonic crystal structure. These modes, which are confined in all three dimensions by a complete photonic band gap, bear a striking similarity to those in 2D photonic crystals in terms of polarization, field profile, and projected band structures. It is expected that these results will greatly facilitate the observation of widely studied 2D photonic-crystal phenomena in a realistic, 3D physical system

  18. Spin dynamics and magnetic field induced polarization of excitons in ultrathin GaAs/AlAs quantum wells with indirect band gap and type-II band alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamirzaev, T. S.; Rautert, J.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Debus, J.; Gornov, A. Yu.; Glazov, M. M.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Bayer, M.

    2017-07-01

    The exciton spin dynamics are investigated both experimentally and theoretically in two-monolayer-thick GaAs/AlAs quantum wells with an indirect band gap and a type-II band alignment. The magnetic field induced circular polarization of photoluminescence Pc is studied as function of the magnetic field strength and direction as well as sample temperature. The observed nonmonotonic behavior of these functions is provided by the interplay of bright and dark exciton states contributing to the emission. To interpret the experiment, we have developed a kinetic master equation model which accounts for the dynamics of the spin states in this exciton quartet, radiative and nonradiative recombination processes, and redistribution of excitons between these states as result of spin relaxation. The model offers quantitative agreement with experiment and allows us to evaluate, for the studied structure, the heavy-hole g factor, gh h=+3.5 , and the spin relaxation times of electron, τs e=33 μ s , and hole, τs h=3 μ s , bound in the exciton.

  19. A phononic crystal strip based on silicon for support tether applications in silicon-based MEMS resonators and effects of temperature and dopant on its band gap characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Dep Ha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals (PnCs and n-type doped silicon technique have been widely employed in silicon-based MEMS resonators to obtain high quality factor (Q as well as temperature-induced frequency stability. For the PnCs, their band gaps play an important role in the acoustic wave propagation. Also, the temperature and dopant doped into silicon can cause the change in its material properties such as elastic constants, Young’s modulus. Therefore, in order to design the simultaneous high Q and frequency stability silicon-based MEMS resonators by two these techniques, a careful design should study effects of temperature and dopant on the band gap characteristics to examine the acoustic wave propagation in the PnC. Based on these, this paper presents (1 a proposed silicon-based PnC strip structure for support tether applications in low frequency silicon-based MEMS resonators, (2 influences of temperature and dopant on band gap characteristics of the PnC strips. The simulation results show that the largest band gap can achieve up to 33.56 at 57.59 MHz and increase 1280.13 % (also increase 131.89 % for ratio of the widest gaps compared with the counterpart without hole. The band gap properties of the PnC strips is insignificantly effected by temperature and electron doping concentration. Also, the quality factor of two designed length extensional mode MEMS resonators with proposed PnC strip based support tethers is up to 1084.59% and 43846.36% over the same resonators with PnC strip without hole and circled corners, respectively. This theoretical study uses the finite element analysis in COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB softwares as simulation tools. This findings provides a background in combination of PnC and dopant techniques for high performance silicon-based MEMS resonators as well as PnC-based MEMS devices.

  20. Influence of size effect and electron correlation to the energy band gap of CuFeO2 and AgFeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Khuong; Bai, Kewu; Blaha, Peter; Wu, Ping

    2007-03-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure of delafossite type oxides CuFeO2 and AgFeO2 using the Full Potential Linearlized Augmented Plane Wave (FP-LAPW) method within Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof Generalized-Gradient Approximation (PBE-GGA). A metallic state instead of true insulating state is obtained for CuFeO2 and AgFeO2. The insulating state is reproduced when electron correlations have been taken into account. An effective Hubbard parameter for Fe, Ueff=7.86eV, has been derived based on an ab initio constraint calculation. This value is an over estimation for the optical band gaps of CuFeO2 and most probably for AgFeO2 as well. One reasonable Ueff has been derived by comparing between computational and experimental X-Ray emission spectra. The energy band gap of CuFeO2 and AgFeO2 within the PBE-GGA+U is found as charge transfer gap. Theoretical optical band gaps δ0=1.30eV, δ1=2.06eV, and δ2=3.20eV for CuFeO2 are quite compatible with experimental data. For AgFeO2 an optical band gap δ0=1.90eV has been predicted. The size effect is considered as the origin of the increase in optical and energy band gaps of AgFeO2 in comparison with CuFeO2.

  1. New bismuth borophosphate Bi4BPO10: Synthesis, crystal structure, optical and band structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babitsky, Nicolay A.; Leshok, Darya Y.; Mikhaleva, Natalia S.; Kuzubov, Aleksandr A.; Zhereb, Vladimir P.; Kirik, Sergei D.

    2015-01-01

    New bismuth borophosphate Bi 4 BPO 10 was obtained by spontaneous crystallization from the melt of correspondent composition at 804 °C. Crystal structure with orthorhombic lattice parameters: a = 22.5731(3) Å, b = 14.0523(2) Å, c = 5.5149(1) Å, V = 1749.34(4), Z = 8, SG Pcab was determined by X-ray powder diffraction technique. The [Bi 2 O 2 ] 2+ -layers, which are typical for bismuth oxide compounds, transform into cationic endless strips of 4 bismuth atoms width directed along the c-axis in Bi 4 BPO 10 . The strips combining stacks are separated by flat triangle [BO 3 ] 3− -anions within stacks. Neighboring stacks are separated by tetrahedral [PO 4 ] 3− -anions and shifted relatively to each other. Bismuth atoms are placed in 5–7 vertex oxygen irregular polyhedra. Bi 4 BPO 10 is stable up to 812 °C, then melts according to the peritectic law. The absorption spectrum in the range 350–700 nm was obtained and the width of the forbidden band was estimated as 3.46 eV. The band electronic structure of Bi 4 BPO 10 was modeled using DFT approach. The calculated band gap (3.56 eV) is in good agreement with the experimentally obtained data. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • New bismuth borophosphate with composition Bi 4 BPO 10 was synthesized. • The crystal structure was determined by X-ray powder diffraction technique. • Bismuth-oxygen part [Bi 4 O 3 ] 6+ forms endless strips of 4 bismuth atoms width. • Electronic structure was modeled by DFT method. • The calculated band gap (3.56 eV) is very close to the experimental one (3.46 eV)

  2. Nanostructured pyronin Y thin films as a new organic semiconductor: Linear/nonlinear optics, band gap and dielectric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahran, H.Y. [Metallurgical Lab.1, Nanoscience Laboratory for Environmental and Bio-medical Applications (NLEBA), Semiconductor Lab., Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, 11757 Cairo (Egypt); Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Yahia, I.S., E-mail: dr_isyahia@yahoo.com [Metallurgical Lab.1, Nanoscience Laboratory for Environmental and Bio-medical Applications (NLEBA), Semiconductor Lab., Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, 11757 Cairo (Egypt); Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Alamri, F.H. [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-05-15

    Pyronin Y dye (PY) is a kind of xanthene derivatives. Thin films of pyronin Y were deposited onto highly cleaned glass substrates using low-cost/spin coating technique. The structure properties of pyronin Y thin films with different thicknesses were investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscope (AFM). PY thin films for all the studied thicknesses have an amorphous structure supporting the short range order of the grain size. AFM supports the nanostructure with spherical/clusters morphologies of the investigated thin films. The optical constants of pyronin Y thin films for various thicknesses were studied by using UV–vis–NIR spectrophotometer in the wavelength range 350–2500 nm. The transmittance T(λ), reflectance R(λ) spectral and absorbance (abs(λ)) were obtained for all film thicknesses at room temperature and the normal light incident. These films showed a high transmittance in the wide scale wavelengths. For different thicknesses of the studied thin films, the optical band gaps were determined and their values around 2 eV. Real and imaginary dielectric constants, dissipation factor and the nonlinear optical parameters were calculated in the wavelengths to the range 300–2500 nm. The pyronin Y is a new organic semiconductor with a good optical absorption in UV–vis regions and it is suitable for nonlinear optical applications. - Highlights: • Pyronin Y (PY) nanostructured thin films were deposited by using spin coating technique. • XRD/AFM were used to study the structure of PY films. • The optical band gap was calculated on the basis of Tauc's model. • Linear/nonlinear optical parameters are calculated and interpreted via the applied optical theories. • PY thin films is a new organic semiconductor for its application in optoelectronic devices.

  3. Forbidden energy band gap in diluted a-Ge1−xSix:N films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarneros, C.; Rebollo-Plata, B.; Lozada-Morales, R.; Espinosa-Rosales, J.E.; Portillo-Moreno, J.; Zelaya-Angel, O.

    2012-01-01

    By means of electron gun evaporation Ge 1−x Si x :N thin films, in the entire range 0 ≤ x ≤ 1, were prepared on Si (100) and glass substrates. The initial vacuum reached was 6.6 × 10 −4 Pa, then a pressure of 2.7 × 10 −2 Pa of high purity N 2 was introduced into the chamber. The deposition time was 4 min. Crucible-substrate distance was 18 cm. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that all the films were amorphous (a-Ge 1−x Si x :N). The nitrogen concentration was of the order of 1 at% for all the films. From optical absorption spectra data and by using the Tauc method the energy band gap (E g ) was calculated. The Raman spectra only reveal the presence of Si-Si, Ge-Ge, and Si-Ge bonds. Nevertheless, infrared spectra demonstrate the existence of Si-N and Ge-N bonds. The forbidden energy band gap (E g ) as a function of x in the entire range 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 shows two well defined regions: 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.67 and 0.67 ≤ x ≤ 1, due to two different behaviors of the band gap, where for x > 0.67 exists an abruptly change of E g (x). In this case E g (x) versus x is different to the variation of E g in a-Ge 1−x Si x and a-Ge 1−x Si x :H. This fact can be related to the formation of Ge 3 N 4 and GeSi 2 N 4 when x ≤ 0.67, and to the formation of Si 3 N 4 and GeSi 2 N 4 for 0.67 ≤ x. - Highlights: ► Nitrogen doped amorphous Ge 1-x Si x thin films are grown by electron gun technique. ► Nitrogen atoms on E g of the a-Ge 1-x Si x films in the 0 £ x £ 1 range are analyzed. ► Variation in 0 £ x £ 1 range shows a warped change of E g in 1.0 – 3.6 eV range. ► The change in E g (x) behavior when x ∼ 0.67 was associated with Ge 2 SiN 4 presence.

  4. Low-frequency photonic band structures in graphene-like triangular metallic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang

    2016-11-01

    We study the low frequency photonic band structures in triangular metallic lattice, displaying Dirac points in the frequency spectrum, and constructed upon the lowest order regular polygonal tiles. We show that, in spite of the unfavourable geometrical conditions intrinsic to the structure symmetry, the lowest frequency photonic bands are formed by resonance modes sustained by local structure patterns, with the corresponding electric fields following a triangular distribution at low structure filling rate and a honeycomb distribution at high filling rate. For both cases, the lowest photonic bands, and thus the plasma gap, can be described in the framework of a tight binding model, and analysed in terms of local resonance modes and their mutual correlations. At high filling rate, the Dirac points and their movement following the structure deformation are described in the same framework, in relation with local structure patterns and their variations, as well as the particularity of the metallic lattice that enhances the topological anisotropy.

  5. Energy Band Gap, Intrinsic Carrier Concentration and Fermi Level of CdTe Bulk Crystal between 304 K and 1067 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Optical transmission measurements were performed on CdTe bulk single crystal. It was found that when a sliced and polished CdTe wafer was used, a white film started to develop when the sample was heated above 530 K and the sample became opaque. Therefore, a bulk crystal of CdTe was first grown in the window area by physical vapor transport; the optical transmission was then measured and from which the energy band gap was derived between 304 and 1067 K. The band gaps of CdTe can be fit well as a function of temperature using the Varshini expression: Eg (e V) = 1.5860 - 5.9117xl0(exp -4) T(sup 2)/(T + 160). Using the band gap data, the high temperature electron-hole equilibrium was calculated numerically by assuming the Kane's conduction band structure and a heavy-hole parabolic valance band. The calculated intrinsic carrier concentrations agree well with the experimental data reported previously. The calculated intrinsic Fermi levels between 270 and 1200 K were also presented.

  6. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  7. Penta-SiC5 monolayer: A novel quasi-planar indirect semiconductor with a tunable wide band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mosayeb

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, by using of the first principles calculations in the framework of the density functional theory, we systematically investigated the structure, stability, electronic and optical properties of a novel two-dimensional pentagonal monolayer semiconductors namely penta-SiC5 monolayer. Comparing elemental silicon, diamond, and previously reported 2D carbon allotropes, our calculation shows that the predicted penta-SiC5 monolayer has a metastable nature. The calculated results indicate that the predicted monolayer is an indirect semiconductor with a wide band gap of about 2.82 eV by using Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) hybrid functional level of theory which can be effectively tuned by external biaxial strains. The obtained exceptional electronic properties suggest penta-SiC5 monolayer as promising candidates for application in new electronic devices in nano scale.

  8. Optical properties of CuSe thin films - band gap determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Milica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper selenide thin films of three different thicknesses have been prepared by vacuum evaporation method on a glass substrate at room temperature. The optical properties of the films were investigated by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Surface morphology was investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Copper selenide exhibits both direct and indirect transitions. The band gap for direct transition is found to be ~2.7 eV and that for indirect transition it is ~1.70 eV. Photoluminescence spectra of copper selenide thin films have also been analyzed, which show emission peaks at 530, 550, and 760 nm. The latter corresponds to indirect transition in investigated material. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45003

  9. Scaling Universality between Band Gap and Exciton Binding Energy of Two-Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zeyu; Liu, Zhirong; Li, Yuanchang; Duan, Wenhui

    2017-06-01

    Using first-principles G W Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations and the k .p theory, we unambiguously show that for two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, there exists a robust linear scaling law between the quasiparticle band gap (Eg) and the exciton binding energy (Eb), namely, Eb≈Eg/4 , regardless of their lattice configuration, bonding characteristic, as well as the topological property. Such a parameter-free universality is never observed in their three-dimensional counterparts. By deriving a simple expression for the 2D polarizability merely with respect to Eg, and adopting the screened hydrogen model for Eb, the linear scaling law can be deduced analytically. This work provides an opportunity to better understand the fantastic consequence of the 2D nature for materials, and thus offers valuable guidance for their property modulation and performance control.

  10. Low-energy electronic excitations and band-gap renormalization in CuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödl, Claudia; Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Sottile, Francesco; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Ablett, James M.; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Sirotti, Fausto; Verbeni, Roberto; Al-Zein, Ali; Reining, Lucia; Huotari, Simo

    2017-05-01

    Combining nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments with state-of-the-art ab initio many-body calculations, we investigate the electronic screening mechanisms in strongly correlated CuO in a large range of energy and momentum transfers. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment, including the low-energy charge excitations, allows us to use the calculated dynamical screening as a safe building block for many-body perturbation theory and to elucidate the crucial role played by d -d excitations in renormalizing the band gap of CuO. In this way we can dissect the contributions of different excitations to the electronic self-energy which is illuminating concerning both the general theory and this prototypical material.

  11. Band gap-tunable potassium doped graphitic carbon nitride with enhanced mineralization ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaozheng; Li, Fayun; Fan, Zhiping; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Yanfeng; Lv, Zhenbo

    2015-01-21

    Band gap-tunable potassium doped graphitic carbon nitride with enhanced mineralization ability was prepared using dicyandiamide monomer and potassium hydrate as precursors. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The CB and VB potentials of graphitic carbon nitride could be tuned from -1.09 and +1.56 eV to -0.31 and +2.21 eV by controlling the K concentration. Besides, the addition of potassium inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride, enhanced the surface area and increased the separation rate for photogenerated electrons and holes. The visible-light-driven Rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation and mineralization performances were significantly improved after potassium doping. A possible influence mechanism of the potassium concentration on the photocatalytic performance was proposed.

  12. The Narrowest Band Gap Ever Observed in Molecular Ferroelectrics: Hexane-1,6-diammonium Pentaiodobismuth(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-Yue; Wei, Zhenhong; Li, Peng-Fei; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Ye, Heng-Yun; Cai, Hu; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2018-01-08

    Narrow band gaps and excellent ferroelectricity are intrinsically paradoxical in ferroelectrics as the leakage current caused by an increase in the number of thermally excited carriers will lead to a deterioration of ferroelectricity. A new molecular ferroelectric, hexane-1,6-diammonium pentaiodobismuth (HDA-BiI 5 ), was now developed through band gap engineering of organic-inorganic hybrid materials. It features an intrinsic band gap of 1.89 eV, and thus represents the first molecular ferroelectric with a band gap of less than 2.0 eV. Simultaneously, low-temperature solution processing was successfully applied to fabricate high-quality ferroelectric thin films based on HDA-BiI 5 , for which high-precision controllable domain flips were realized. Owing to its narrow band gap and excellent ferroelectricity, HDA-BiI 5 can be considered as a milestone in the exploitation of molecular ferroelectrics, with promising applications in high-density data storage and photovoltaic conversion. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Band structure engineered layered metals for low-loss plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Morten Niklas; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    dichalcogenide TaS2, due to an extraordinarily small density of states for scattering in the near-IR originating from their special electronic band structure. On the basis of this observation, we propose a new class of band structure engineered van der Waals layered metals composed of hexagonal transition metal...

  14. Use of metal oxide nanoparticle band gap to develop a predictive paradigm for oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre E

    2012-05-22

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (E(c)) levels with the cellular redox potential (-4.12 to -4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co(3)O(4), Cr(2)O(3), Ni(2)O(3), Mn(2)O(3), and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single-parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of C57 BL/6 mice. Co(3)O(4), Ni(2)O(3), Mn(2)O(3), and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by E(c) levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. These results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials.

  15. Band warping, band non-parabolicity, and Dirac points in electronic and lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resca, Lorenzo; Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-10-01

    We illustrate at a fundamental level the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. We point out a robust presence of pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a p-type tight-binding approximation. We analyze two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices with implications that are expected to generalize to more complex structures. Band warping is shown to arise at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, which allows the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions, hence band degeneracy, at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band warping is incompatible with a multi-dimensional Taylor series expansion, whereas band non-parabolicities are associated with multi-dimensional Taylor series expansions to all orders. Still band non-parabolicities may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Remarkably, while still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two p-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively to each other, until these conical intersections merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, even though our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more

  16. Crystal orientation dependent optical transmittance and band gap of Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3-BaTiO3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chongjun; Deng, Chenguang; Wang, Jiming; Gu, Xiaorong; Wu, Tong; Zhu, Kongjun; Liu, Youwen

    2016-02-01

    Optical transmittance spectra of lead-free ferroelectric (1-x)Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3-xBaTiO3 (NBT-xBT) single crystals poled along different directions have been studied comprehensively. After poled along [001] direction, the transmittance of tetragonal NBT-8%BT crystal is about 70%, which is much higher than that of NBT-2%BT crystal with rhombohedral structure and NBT-5%BT crystal with morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) composition. However, after poled [111] direction, the transmittance of tetragonal NBT-8%BT crystal is the smallest among them. These properties are manifest in view of the crystal structure. Both direct and indirect optical energy band gaps, as well phonon energies were obtained from absorption coefficient spectra by Tauc equations. The band gaps of [001]-poled NBT-xBT crystals increase with BT content, yet the [111]-poled crystals have opposite trends.

  17. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Sung [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Taewon [Energy lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongho, E-mail: dhlee0333@gmail.com; Nam, Junggyu [PV Development Team, Energy Solution Business Division, Samsung SDI, 467 Beonyeong-ro, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 331-330 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Jae [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Gaesin-dong, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog, E-mail: bdchoi@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-29

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})(Se{sub 1−y}S{sub y}){sub 2} of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth.

  18. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Sung; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su; Song, Taewon; Lee, Dongho; Nam, Junggyu; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In 1−x ,Ga x )(Se 1−y S y ) 2 of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth

  19. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  20. Band-structure calculations for the 3d transition metal oxides in GW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    Many-body GW calculations have emerged as a standard for the prediction of band gaps, band structures, and optical properties for main-group semiconductors and insulators, but it is not well established how predictive the GW method is in general for transition metal (TM) compounds. Surveying the series of 3d oxides within a typical GW approach using the random-phase approximation reveals mixed results, including cases where the calculated band gap is either too small or too large, depending on the oxidation states of the TM (e.g., FeO/Fe2O3, Cu2O/CuO). The problem appears to originate mostly from a too high average d-orbital energy, whereas the splitting between occupied and unoccupied d symmetries seems to be reasonably accurate. It is shown that augmenting the GW self-energy by an attractive (negative) and occupation-independent on-site potential for the TM d orbitals with a single parameter per TM cation can reconcile the band gaps for different oxide stoichiometries and TM oxidation states. In Cu2O, which is considered here in more detail, standard GW based on wave functions from initial density or hybrid functional calculations yields an unphysical prediction with an incorrect ordering of the conduction bands, even when the magnitude of the band gap is in apparent agreement with experiment. The correct band ordering is restored either by applying the d-state potential or by iterating the wave functions to self-consistency, which both have the effect of lowering the Cu-d orbital energy. While it remains to be determined which improvements over standard GW implementations are needed to achieve an accurate ab initio description for a wide range of transition metal compounds, the application of the empirical on-site potential serves to mitigate the problems specifically related to d states in GW calculations.