WorldWideScience

Sample records for bambino gesu childrens

  1. Pediatric BAHA in Italy: the "Bambino Gesù" Children's Hospital's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Pasquale; Scorpecci, Alessandro; Pacifico, Concettina; Presuttari, Fabio; Bottero, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    The "Bambino Gesù" Children's Hospital offers the largest Italian cohort of children using a BAHA. This paper retrospectively reviews the center's experience with pediatric BAHA from its start in 1995 to December 2009, especially focusing on most debated issues, all the way from candidate selection to functional outcome and complications. A total of 47 children (21 females and 26 males) were implanted. From 1995 to 2000, a two-stage procedure was adopted in 100% (n = 22) cases. From 2001 onwards, one-stage surgery was chosen for 10 patients. Implant loss occurred in two patients (4.2%) after a two-stage surgery. Overall, the local complication rate was not different in the one-stage and in the two-stage group. The functional gain was significantly better with BAHA than conventional bone-conduction hearing aids and there was no significant difference in terms of functional outcome between the seven patients receiving a BAHA at an age younger than 5 years and the rest. The study results suggest that children presenting an indication to auditory rehabilitation with BAHA should be referred to specialized tertiary care centers. Only in such settings, a complete, multidisciplinary approach to associated comorbidities and syndromes is possible, and implantation of children at an age younger than five and one-stage surgery can be conducted safely and effectively.

  2. The work experience of a patient affected by Williams Syndrome: a pilot project at the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Francesca; Macchiaiolo, Marina; Carlevaris, Carla Maria; Bartuli, Andrea

    2017-05-31

    A new approach has been designed at the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital in Rome aimed at increasing empowerment in Williams Syndrome individuals through tutor-assisted work activities. Williams Syndrome is characterized by a combination of distinguishing physical traits, congenital anomalies, intellectual disabilities, and a specific developmental profile.This manuscript describes the case of a Williams Syndrome patient.There are only few papers in the scientific literature describing interventions targeting improvement in the quality of life of adult Williams Syndrome individuals. Therefore, this experience may prove useful to several patients, their families, and the experts helping them.We described an example of intervention aimed at guiding and facilitating a Williams Syndrome patient within a work environment, taking into consideration the peaks and valleys of these individuals' specific abilities.Based on our results, we also stressed the need to promote a set of projects and initiatives aimed at enhancing as much as possible self-sufficiency and psycho-affective balance in Williams Syndrome individuals, in order to protect their dignity and self-esteem.

  3. La leucemia del bambino come causa di disgregazione familiare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Varchetta

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduzione: le patologie del bambino, soprattutto se gravi e durature, possono essere definite come “malattie della famiglia” a causa dell’intensità di assistenza richiesta, delle difficoltà organizzative quotidiane e dello stress causato. Obiettivo: identificare il ruolo di alcuni potenziali fattori di rischio coinvolti nella rottura di famiglie di bambini leucemici.

    Materiali e metodi: mediante l’uso di questionari, sono state studiate, durante l’anno 2002, 150 cartelle cliniche di bambini leucemici dell’ospedale pediatrico “Santobono-Pausillipon”- Dipartimento di Oncologia; 11 casi sono stati esclusi per incompletezza dei dati. Outcome è stata considerata la “separazione familiare.” Sono state analizzate le seguenti variabili: trapianto di midollo osseo, lavoro del padre, della madre e loro età ed educazione, sesso ed età del bambino (CA, numerosità della famiglia, stato socio-economico, probabilità clinica di guarire (CPR, appartenenza ad una associazione. Sono state condotte analisi bivariate e logistiche. Risultati: all’analisi bivariata CA e CPR, entrambi stratificati in tre livelli, sono risultati associati alla separazione. L’Odds Ratio grezzo (OR della separazione familiare con CA di 5/10 anni e bambini di 11 anni o più a confronto con quelli d’età di 0/4 era, rispettivamente, di 8.68 (p=0.02 e di 5.7 (p=0.07. L’OR grezzo della separazione con un CPR medio e un CPR buono confrontato con un CPR basso ha dato rispettivamente 0.35 (p=0.02 e 0.08 (p‹0.001. Un modello logistico che includeva CPR come variabile principale e controllata per CA ha evidenziato che la probabilità di guarigione è media o alta e, dopo aver aggiustato per l’età del bambino, è stato ottenuto un rischio di rottura familiare rispettivamente di 0.29 (p=0.01 e 0.08 (p=0.02.

    Conclusioni: la rottura dell’unità familiare è evento frequente in caso di grave

  4. Il Centro Nascita Montessori. Dal neonato in famiglia al bambino e alla famiglia nel servizio educativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Franceschini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Intervento al Workshop Internazionale “Infanzie e Famiglie in Europa”, del 16 ottobre 2009, presso la Facoltà di Scienze della Formazione, Via Filippo Re, 6 Bologna (Aula Magna. L’intervento illustra i valori fondativi del Centro Nascita Montessori dalle sue origini ai giorni nostri attraverso un percorso che si è allargato nel tempo: dalla focalizzata attenzione e cura al neonato in famiglia o nel brefotrofio fino agli anni ’60 alla cura della crescita del bambino nei servizi educativi e alla cura della relazione con le famiglie dagli anni ‘70 in poi. Tale espansione del campo di interesse e d’indagine operativa ha arricchito il patrimonio di competenze e di conoscenze del C.N.M..

  5. L'inserimento del bambino al nido (Welcoming the Child into Child Care): Perspectives from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Chiara

    1999-01-01

    Describes various approaches taken by Italian child-care programs to facilitate the young child's transition into a child care setting. Discusses the role of teachers as researchers, the role of parents as partners, and the benefits to young children. (KB)

  6. L’impatto della prematurità sulla qualità di vita del bambino

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    Mario Eandi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last years prematurity rates have increased, together with the survival rate among premature subjects. In addition now even infants born at 23 weeks of gestational age can survive. However, some studies demonstrate that premature children are more likely to show late disabilities and to be hospitalised during childhood. In Italy the premature childrens’ care level too often depends on the socio-economic status of the Region: central decisions about assistance until the beginning of teenage are yet to be taken. A strict monitoring of pregnancy and of risk factors predisposing to premature birth as well as a careful management of perinatal period should further improve survival and quality of life of these subjects.

  7. Generation, Transformation and Place in Inga Iwasiów’s Novels Bambino (2008 and Ku słońcu (2010

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    Ursula PHILLIPS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This chapter will discuss two novels by contemporary writer Inga Iwasiów (b. 1963, Bambino (2008 and Ku słońcu [Towards the Sun] (2010, in the context of geopolitical, ideological, social and psycho-cultural transformations as they specifically affect different generations of inhabitants of the Polish city of Szczecin (pre-1945 German Stettin from 1945 until the first decade of the 21st century. Bambino covers the years 1945–1981, but also contains flashbacksto pre-war memory of Stettin and to the suppressed experiences of the new post-war inhabitants, as well as ‘flash-forwards’ to post-1989, post-communist reality; Ku słońcu covers 1981 to the first decade of 2000s. It will show how the novels portray these transformations through the experience primarily of women (but not only — in Bambino, through the main protagonists: Ula (formerly Ulrike, Anna and Marysia, and through that of the hidden narrator Magda (Marysia’s daughter born in the same year as the author, Iwasiów, 1963; and in Ku słońcu, primarily through the experience of Magda herself, as well as through that of two generations of ‘feminist’ academics: Małgorzata and Sylwia (in which it is hard not to perceive the personal experience of the author, though she is at pains to emphasize elsewhere that her work is a collective biography of the city, not so much of herself. The analysis follows Katarzyna Chmielewska’s supposition that contemporary Polish fiction dealing with the past ‘constantly oscillates between memory and genealogy’, and that it raises raw issues not yet addressed by historians; it also derives inspiration from the new ‘postdependency’ studiesproposed by Hanna Gosk and Ryszard Nycz. It also attempts to capture the specific nature of Iwasiów’s use of language, her style of feminism, her method of portraying place, and the connections in her prose between place and memory.

  8. La narrazione nello sviluppo del bambino

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    Dolores Rollo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Narrative in Infant’s Development - Many recent works recall the pioneering work on joint picture book reading of Bruner and Ninio, sharing with the original study the idea that this interactive situation represents an important developmental event, in which the parent can communicate knowledge about things and the way things happen. The narrative format of joint picture book reading has been linked to children’s language development, print concepts, emergent readings, as well as to cognitive, socio-emotional and theory of mind development during the preschool years. In fact, the narrative form refers to a mundane event, with a specific setting in time and place, recounts a central achievement or goal, its motivation, accompanying emotions, as well as a conclusion and evaluation. The purpose of this study is to explore joint book reading as a systemic context in which there are three fundamental components: a book reader, a child and a book. Joint Picture Book, Narrative, Children’s Development, Theory of Mind, Language

  9. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Italian Children with Down Syndrome: Prevalence and Correlation with Obesity-Related Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Diletta; Alisi, Anna; di Camillo, Chiara; Sartorelli, Maria Rita; Crudele, Annalisa; Bartuli, Andrea; Nobili, Valerio; Villani, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    To assess the prevalence of overweight/obesity in a cohort of Italian children with Down syndrome (DS) and to investigate the correlation of both obesity and DS with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We enrolled 280 children with DS (age range 5-18 years), who were referred to the DS outpatient clinic of the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital in Rome. For all children, we collected the clinical history and measured anthropometric variables. Eighty-four of 280 children with DS were selected to undergo liver ultrasound scanning to evaluate the presence of NAFLD. Italian children with DS exhibited a prevalence of 19.64% for overweight and 12.14% for obesity. The prevalence of NAFLD in nonobese (45%) and overweight/obese (82%) children with DS is greater than in the European pediatric nonobese (5.7%) or obese population (33%). Moreover, the severity of liver brightness on ultrasound scan correlated positively with body mass index, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and leptin levels and negatively with adiponectin. We demonstrated that, independently from the obese phenotype, children with DS display a greater risk to develop NAFLD than the general pediatric population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health status of internationally adopted children. The experience of an Italian “GLNBI” paediatric centre

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    Piero Valentini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: according to ISTAT (National Institute of Statistics-Italy, in 2011 20.7% of the foreign population in Italy is composed by children, either coming along with their families or alone, like in international adoptions. Immigrant children have some peculiarities related to their previous living conditions, although there are no significant differences between immigrant and native children’ diseases.

    Methods: in 3.5 years we evaluated every adoptee that reached our university centre, by using GLNBI (Gruppo di Lavoro Nazionale del Bambino Immigrato diagnostic – aiding protocol, in order to assess infectious diseases, nutritional deficiencies, immunization status, intestinal parasitosis or other pathologies; this protocol is actually applied only in research centres.

    Results: we evaluated 358 international adoptees from 4 different Zones of the world; average age at first visit was approximately 5 years. Health certifications concerning vaccination history records were considered “valid” in 59.2% (212/358, 49.5% (105/212 of which had a complete panel of immunization. QuantiFERON®_TB Gold In-Tube (QTF test resulted negative in 94.0% cases (313/333 and positive in 6.0% (20/333. HIV, HCV and Syphilis tests resulted in 0.3% positive test for each serology (1/358. Cysticercosis’ serology was positive in 8.9% (32/358 using immunoenzymatic assay (not confirmed by immunoblotting and Toxocariasis in 13.1% (47/358. Parasitological investigation of faeces were found positive on 42.7% (153/358 children, throat swabs in 11.5% (41/358 children. There were 82.4% (295/358 abnormal blood count, 41.9% (150/358 low ferritin, 89.9% (322/358 endocrine abnormalities and 20.4% (73/358 various pathologies evaluated by specialists.

    Conclusions: pathologies affecting our study group are the same affecting other categories of immigrant children, because they often

  11. Endocarditis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Streptococcus viridians - endocarditis - children; Candida - endocarditis - children; Bacterial endocarditis - children; Infective endocarditis - children; Congenital heart disease - endocarditis - ...

  12. Fra Bartolomeo della Porta detto Fra Bartolomeo, Adorazione del Bambino, National Gallery, London

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    En artikel om et maleri af Fra Bartolomeo i National Gallery i London udlånt til en udstilling i Museo Tosio Martinengo I Brescia i forbindelse med opdagelsen af et fuldstændigt overensstemmende maleri i dette museums magasiner. Hypotesen var at Bresciabilledet var et værkstedsarbejde lavet på...

  13. Children's Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    A new field of children's learning is emerging. This new field differs from the old in recognizing that children's learning includes active as well as passive mechanisms and qualitative as well as quantitative changes. Children's learning involves substantial variability of representations and strategies within individual children as well as…

  14. Funzioni comunicative e mind-mindedness nell’interazione madre-bambino a 16 mesi di età

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longobardi, E.; Rienzi, S.; Spataro, P.; Colonnesi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Communicative functions and mind-mindedness in mother-child interactions at 16 months of age. Summary: The present study analyzed maternal child-directed-speech at 16 months of age, by taking into account five communicative functions (Tutorial, Didactic, Conversation, Control and Asynchronic) and

  15. Pratiche di cura fra relazione e conoscenza: l’approccio montessoriano e l’osservazione del bambino al nido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Gallerani

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Il contributo affronta una possibile analisi inerente al rapporto tra infanzia, famiglia ed istituzione educativa a partire da un’indagine osservativa condotta nella realtà di un nido ad indirizzo montessoriano. Attraverso la rappresentazione della vita quotidiana dei bambini - inseriti al nido aziendale “La Casa del Cedro”, organizzato dal Centro Nascita Montessori (CNM di Roma - viene restituita la valenza euristica dell’approccio montessoriano e il suo inconfondibile contributo all’educazione globale ed estetica, per l’infanzia del tempo presente.

  16. Pancreatitis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007679.htm Pancreatitis - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pancreatitis in children occurs when the pancreas becomes swollen ...

  17. Intussusception - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral infection Englarged lymph node in the intestine Polyp or tumor The reason for the problem is more likely to be found in older children. Intussusception can affect both children and adults. However, ...

  18. Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your child's health includes physical, mental and social well-being. Most parents know the basics of keeping children healthy, like offering ... for children to get regular checkups with their health care provider. These visits are a chance to ...

  19. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizure disorder - children; Convulsion - childhood epilepsy; Medically refractory childhood epilepsy; Anticonvulsant - childhood epilepsy; Antiepileptic drug - childhood epilepsy; AED - childhood epilepsy

  20. Likeable children, uneasy children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Sally Dean

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in small-town schools with children of Muslim background whose families came to Denmark as United Nation refugees, the chapter explores how pedagogical ideologies of school-based peer sociability inflect children’s experiences of ‘being Muslim.’ Danish provincial schools......, with their permanent classes, emphasis on class-based sociability, and particular understandings of what constitutes religion, represent a particular context for children’s school experiences. An analysis of two contrasting cases reveals that participation in peer sociability in and beyond school tends to erase...

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  2. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth ...

  3. uninfected children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To bridge the management gap between nutritional rehabilitation for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and chronic malnutrition, ... Chronically malnourished children with superimposed SAM benefit from the use of RUTF as much as children without ... France), an energy-dense lipid paste made of peanut butter, milk powder ...

  4. Street children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rončević Nevenka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to UNICEF, street child is any child under the age of 18 for whom the street has become home and/or source of income and which is not adequately protected or supervised by adult, responsible person. It has been estimated that there are between 100 and 150 million street children worldwide. Life and work on the street have long term and far-reaching consequences for development and health of these children. By living and working in the street, these children face the highest level of risk. Street children more often suffer from the acute illness, injuries, infection, especially gastrointestinal, acute respiratory infections and sexually transmitted diseases, inadequate nutrition, mental disorders, and drug abuse. They are more often victims of abuse, sexual exploitation, trafficking; they have higher rate of adolescent pregnancy than their peers from poor families. Street children and youth have higher rates of hospitalization and longer hospital stay due to seriousness of illness and delayed health care. Street children/youth are reluctant to seek health care, and when they try, they face many barriers. Street children are invisible to the state and their number in Serbia is unknown. Recently, some non­governmental organizations from Belgrade, Novi Sad and Nis have recognized this problem and tried to offer some help to street children, by opening drop­in centers, but this is not enough. To solve this problem, an engagement of the state and the whole community is necessary, and primary responsibility lies in health, social and educational sector. The best interests of the child must serve as a basic guideline in all activities aimed at improving health, quality of life and rights of children involved in the life and work in the street.

  5. Difficult Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Else

    The purpose of this paper is to put focus on families and children who have had contact to the social service department because of problems related children’s well-being, health or development. Problems that are recognized by the families themselves and by the authorities as problems that put...... the family in a poor position regarding the children’s well-being, health and development, but not so severe that the child is to be placed out of home. The paper concentrates attention on differences between families with and without contact to the social service department for reasons related to the child....... Especially on children and their development in social relations to children at the same age, on how the mothers experience their child and on the parent’s resources concerning health, education and job situation. The paper presents results from the first two data collections (1996 and 1999) in a prospective...

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  7. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  8. Children's Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1992-01-01

    Provides a sampling of citations in the ERIC database on children's rights. Includes human rights education, United Nations' conventions, state takeovers of local school districts, and federal law as it affects student rights. Covers child abuse, corporal punishment, child welfare, and child advocacy. (DK)

  9. Wild Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author, a Forest School Leader with Shropshire Wildlife Trust, shows how nature is the best teacher. She describes a new approach to out-of-classroom learning during which qualified leaders use simple challenges and achievable tasks to encourage child-initiated learning in the great outdoors. At Forest School, children are…

  10. Children's Stereotypes of Overweight Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Helen; Haddock, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the content, favourability and generality of perceptions held about overweight children. The research also addressed whether anti-fat biases change with age and whether they result from a strong association between overweight and bad behaviour, a weak association between overweight and good behaviour or…

  11. in Children

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    Monika Jabłońska-Jesionowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic rhinitis in children may have different causes, both local – with changes being present only in the nasalcavity – or systemic, with nasal congestion as one of the symptoms of a bigger clinical picture.Aim. the aim of this study was to draw attention to a very rare congenital cause of chronic rhinitis in children – which is hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.Material and methods. A 6-month-old boy was admitted to the department of pediatric otolaryngology of Warsaw medicalUniversity due to chronic nasal obstruction present from birth. Clinical investigation included anterior and posterior rhinoscopy and fiberoscopy of nasopharynx. the mri was also performed before admission. Complete blood count, serum iron level,serum thyroid hormones and level of igG, igA, igm were examined to exclude anaemia, ozaena and hypothyroidism. Antinuclear antibodies (AnA and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (AnCA tests were also ordered to exclude granulomatosiswith polyangiitis. next, a mucosal biopsy of the nasal cavity was performed to exclude primary ciliary dyskinesia. Allergic pricktests were also performed.Results. After genetic tests, hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia was diagnosed.Conclusions. 1. every case of chronic nasal congestion in children requires not only adequate treatment, but also thoroughclinical investigation. 2. nasal obstruction may be due to local causes, systemic diseases and genetic disorders. 3. hypohidroticectodermal dysplasia is a very rare genetic disorder that causes severe, even life threatening symptoms, one of which is chronicrhinitis.

  12. Ptosis - infants and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blepharoptosis - children; Congenital ptosis; Eyelid drooping - children; Eyelid drooping - amblyopia; Eyelid drooping - astigmatism ... Ptosis in infants and children is often due to a problem with the muscle that raises the eyelid. A nerve problem in the eyelid can ...

  13. Treating Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children and Adolescents Go Back Treating Children and Adolescents Email Print + Share For the most part, the ... tailored, based upon the child's weight. Children and adolescents are moving through a period of physical and ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  15. Intestinal Polyps (in Children)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these inherited conditions. What are the symptoms of polyps? Children with polyps usually pass blood in the stools. ... to have another colonoscopy. Children that have several polyps, or children whose families have special polyposis syndromes, may need ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is ... this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's ( ...

  17. Divorce: Helping Children Cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alicia S.; McBride, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Examines children's reactions to the divorce process and explores ways in which adults can promote growth and adjustment in children of divorce. Suggests ways in which parents, teachers, and counselors can help children. (RC)

  18. Hodgkin lymphoma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Hodgkin disease - children; Cancer - Hodgkin lymphoma - children; Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma ... of cancer is unknown. But, certain factors may play a role in ... Common early childhood infections also may increase the risk.

  19. Cow's milk and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milk and children; Cow's milk allergy - children; Lactose intolerance - children ... You may have heard that cow's milk should not be given to babies younger than 1 year old. This is because cow's milk doesn't provide enough of ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  4. Characterization and Identification of Natural Terpenic Resins employed in “Madonna con Bambino e Angeli” by Antonello da Messina using Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Mario

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural resins were frequently employed as adhesives or as components of oleo-resinous media in paintings in the past. The identification of vegetable resins is still an open problem. The aim of this paper is to analyze by GC-MS some vegetable resins frequently employed in paintings, such as Venice turpentine, dammar, copal, elemi in order to identify their main component in raw and aged samples. Some molecules are proposed as chemical “markers” to identify these natural resins. Results The results obtained on standards allowed us to successfully analyze sample collected from one work of art: the Madonna with the Infant and Angels by Antonello da Messina (XV century. Conclusion The results obtained confirm that the painting the artist originally used a mixture of linseed oil and natural resin (Venice turpentine as binding medium.

  5. Immunizing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jody Macdonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the complex contexts within which Canadian health professionals engage in immunizing children and focuses on the Canadian practice guidelines and current scientific evidence that direct Canadian health professional competencies. The article begins by presenting two current global vaccine initiatives and links these to immunization in Canada. A selected literature review identifies current best immunization practices. With the purpose of promoting quality improvement, three key Canadian immunization competencies for health professional are highlighted: communication with parents, including those who are experiencing vaccine hesitancy; administration of immunizing agents; and documentation of immunizations. Health professionals are encouraged to reflect on immunization competencies and ensure evidence-based practices underpin vaccine delivery in their primary care settings.

  6. Why Children Misbehave

    OpenAIRE

    Telep, Valya Goodwin, 1955-

    2009-01-01

    This series of lessons was prepared for parents like you - parents who want to do a better job of disciplining their children. The lessons were especially written for parents of preschool children, ages two to six, but some of the discipline methods are appropriate for older children, too. This lesson focuses on why children misbehavior.

  7. Children Solve Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bono, Edward

    A group of children were presented with several tasks, including the invention of a sleep machine and a machine to weigh elephants. The tasks were chosen to involve the children in coping with problems of a distinct character. A study of the children's drawings and interpretations shows that children's thinking ability is not very different from…

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. ... General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  9. Torture in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Jose

    2009-01-01

    This is a review article that studies the problem of torture in children. Torture in children is a significant worldwide problem, but there are no official or reliable independent statistics to measure the magnitude of the problem. The definition of torture in the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment applies to adults and children. The Convention on the Rights of the Child defines children as "every human being below the age of eighteen years". Torture in children happens during peace times and during political violence and war conflicts. The majority of torture victims happen during peace times. The high-risk groups are impoverished children living in the street, children deprived of parental care, children in conflict with the law, and children in detention. During political violence and war the high risk children are the children detained during political violence, child soldiers, children internally displaced in refugee camps, detained children during the war against terrorism and children tortured by peacekeeping forces. The perpetrators of torture in children are the members of the same forces that torture adults, generally the police, civil police, security guards trained by police, prison guards, and military forces. The paper identifies some preventive measure and develops recommendations for action at the local, national and international level.

  10. Tonsillectomies and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children and tonsillectomies ... many parents wonder if it is wise for children to have the tonsils taken out. Tonsillectomy may be recommended if your child has any of the following: Difficulty swallowing Obstructed ...

  11. Children and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Digest for health professionals Children and Dietary Supplements Share: September 2012 © Matthew Lester Research has shown that many children use herbs and other dietary supplements. However, there are little data available on their ...

  12. Healthy Lifestyle: Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health You want your child to eat healthy foods, but do you know which nutrients ... 15, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/nutrition-for-kids/art- ...

  13. Separation anxiety in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001542.htm Separation anxiety in children To use the sharing features on this page, ... to test their independence. To get over separation anxiety, children need to: Feel safe in their home. Trust ...

  14. Children and TV Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese TV Violence and Children No. 13; Updated December 2014 ... violent. Hundreds of studies of the effects of TV violence on children and teenagers have found that ...

  15. Cough in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Cough in children TTR Share | Cough in Children This article has been reviewed by ... MD, FAAAAI As a parent, hearing your child cough may make you feel uneasy. Yet an occasional ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  17. Controversial Books for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, La Vinia Jean

    1979-01-01

    Discusses children's books which have caused controversies pertaining to ethnic stereotyping, labeling, sex instruction, and offensive language, and maintains that controversy is beneficial in that it keeps librarians aware of children's interests. (FM)

  18. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  19. Traveling with children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not suit the child's needs. Small crackers, unsugared cereals, and string cheese make good snacks. Some children can eat fruit without problems. Cookies and sugared cereals make for sticky children. When flying with babies ...

  20. Cold medicines and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000942.htm Cold medicines and children To use the sharing features on ... children younger than age 4. About OTC Cold Medicines Cold medicines do not cure or shorten a ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look ... being recorded. Though nuclear imaging itself causes no pain, children may experience some discomfort from having to ...

  2. Children, Time, and Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkind, David; Rinaldi, Carla; Flemmert Jensen, Anne

    Proceedings from the conference "Children, Time, and Play". Danish University of Education, January 30th 2003.......Proceedings from the conference "Children, Time, and Play". Danish University of Education, January 30th 2003....

  3. Sleepwalking and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... event. It is most often triggered by poor sleep habits. In children, sleepwalking starts between ages 6 and 12. It occurs more often in boys than girls. Children outgrow ... to stick to a bedtime routine may help reduce the problem.

  4. ADHD in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips ADHD in Young Children Use recommended treatment first Language: ... The recommended first treatment for young children with ADHD is underused. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. ... are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does ...

  6. Children and Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese Divorce and Children No. 1; Updated December 2013 One out of every two marriages today ends in divorce and many divorcing families include children. Parents who ...

  7. Screen time and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000355.htm Screen time and children To use the sharing features on ... videos is considered unhealthy screen time. Current Screen Time Guidelines Children under age 2 should have no ...

  8. Exercise and activity - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm Exercise and activity - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Children should have many chances to play, run, bike, and play sports during the day. They should ...

  9. SLOVAK CHILDREN''S LITERATURE IN TRANSLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kniazkova V.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the main milestones of Slovak children's literature and how it is represented in the translation into foreign languages. The work of writers who have contributed to the development of children's literature most of all is analyzed in the article, as well as the work of the translators who have contributed to the promotion of Slovak literature abroad.

  10. Cholecystectomy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ainsworth, Alan Patrick; Axelsen, Anne Reiss; Rasmussen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    It is recommended that children with typical clinical signs of biliary colic should be offered surgery if gallstones are present. The aim of this study was to describe a population of children having undergone cholecystectomy.......It is recommended that children with typical clinical signs of biliary colic should be offered surgery if gallstones are present. The aim of this study was to describe a population of children having undergone cholecystectomy....

  11. Children and grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lie about what is going on. Children are smart. They pick up on dishonesty and will wonder why you are lying. NOT force children who are afraid to go to funerals. Find other ways for your children to remember and honor the deceased. For example, you can light a candle, pray, float a balloon to the ...

  12. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAD - children; Anxiety disorder - children ... The cause of GAD is unknown. Genes may play a role. Children with family members who have an anxiety disorder also may be more likely to have one. Stress may be a factor in developing GAD. Things ...

  13. Children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H B

    1997-01-01

    Limited attention has been directed in the dental literature to the emotional, economic and associated consequences of divorces on children. A general introduction is provided on 1) the numbers of children involved in divorces in different single-parent population groups, with 2) emphasis on the emotional impact of divorce on children and 3) the potential significance for pediatric dental practices.

  14. Colorado Children's Budget 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Beverly; Baker, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget" presents and analyzes investments and spending trends during the past five state fiscal years on services that benefit children. The "Children's Budget" focuses mainly on state investment and spending, with some analysis of federal investments and spending to provide broader context of state…

  15. Children and the Nintendo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Suzanne M.

    The four reports contained in this document examine the effects of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), which entered the lives of many children in the United States in 1986. The first report discusses a study of children's interaction with the game hardware. The study of fourth- and fifth-grade students indicated that children's interaction…

  16. Kidney Cancer in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is Kidney Cancer in Children? Kidney (renal) tumors are very rare in children. Still, the three most common renal tumors found ... treatable and curable. What are the Types of Kidney Cancer in Children? Male urinary tract Medical Illustration Copyright © ...

  17. Children of Different Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva; Bundgaard, Helle

    2007-01-01

    an apparent paradox in daily practice where on the one hand staff attempt to mute differences between children on the assumption that all children are equal and should be treated as such, while on the other hand distinctions are in practice established when children behave in ways considered inappropriate...

  18. Nordic Children's Foodscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Barbro; Mäkelä, Johanna; Roos, Gun

    2009-01-01

    A study of the different food messages that children encounter and their own reflections of these messages was carried out among fifty-nine children from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.The children took photos of their "foodscapes," including school, home, shops, streets, cafés and restauran...

  19. Writing in Preliterate Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Jean Emile; Fayol, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Dictated words and pictures by 48 young French children, aged 3 to 6 years, demonstrated that young children have the capacity to produce graphics that exhibit some of the characteristics of writing. Developmental stages in children's recognition that their own efforts were not true writing were identified. (SLD)

  20. Constipation in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Merit M.; Boluyt, Nicole; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Prevalence of childhood constipation has been estimated at 0.7% to 29.6% in the general population worldwide; most children have no obvious aetiological factors. One third of children with chronic constipation continue to have problems beyond puberty. Half of children with chronic faecal impaction

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  2. Children's participation in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lauritsen, Peter; Danholt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Teledialogue is a combined research and design project aimed at improving communications between social workers and children under their custody living in foster care or youth institutions. While social workers are responsible for the welfare of placed children they are under heavy workload...... and often only communicate with children at biannual meetings - the minimum required by law. The purpose of Teledialogue is to use participatory methods to develop an IT-enabled concept for children and social workers to maintain communication between the biannual meetings. Social workers and children...... are thus the primary participants in this design process. This presentation describes the inclusion and participation of the placed children in Teledialogue. With an outset in Actor-Network Theory (ANT) two points are made: 1) that children were participating in shaping the design long before they were...

  3. Children and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, M

    1989-01-01

    Program developers in India's mass media are turning to the discipline of child development to increase their sensitivity to the special needs and capacities of child audiences. Children are particularly susceptible to having their thoughts, feelings, values, and behavior influenced by media programming. In India, radio is the medium with the greatest opportunity to communicate with children and programming for young people includes educational material, variety programs, quiz shows, drama, and live programs in which children participate. The 1st Children's Film Festival was held in India in 1952 and India participates in the International Center of Films for Children and Young People. Television enjoys popularity among children, illiterates, and the poor, but its potential to create social awareness, change behaviors, and raise the standard of living of the Indian people has not been fully realized. Drama is less able to reach large numbers of children, but offers children the opportunity to participate directly in the portrayal of different characters and emotions. Recently, the tradition of puppetry has been rivived and integrated into India's school curriculum. Finally, India is taking steps to expand the number of books available to children and the Government has established 2 trusts to support the publication of children's literature. Regardless of the form of media, it is important for parents to play a role in ensuring the appropriateness of the programming for the child and processing its content.

  4. Philippines: street children, children at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantoco, F G

    1993-01-01

    Almost 2 million of Manila's 2.5 million children younger than 15 years old live on or below the poverty line. 75,000 of these children live on the streets after having run away from home or being abandoned. They beg, steal, scavenge for food, and sell newspapers, cigarettes, and leis. About 20,000 of the street children prostitute themselves. It is these latter children and adolescents who are at particular risk of HIV infection. Studies in the Philippines indicate that 91% of reported HIV infections are among individuals aged 15-44, the male/female infection ratio is one to one, the transmission rate is 45%, and the most common mode of transmission is through heterosexual intercourse. The high incidence of child sexual abuse and child prostitution in the Philippines would suggest that there are a significant number of children and adolescents under age 15 who are infected with HIV. Caritas Manila has developed an information, education, and communication program for HIV/AIDS prevention focusing upon individuals who have direct influence upon and are in direct contact with people: clergy, religious and civic associations, educators, and social and health workers. Caritas has also to a limited extent reached out directly to populations at risk, while collaborating with human rights advocacy groups and networking with other children-oriented agencies in the interest of providing resources to street children. Efforts must be made to protect the rights of children and provide them with an environment conducive to their growth and development. The author notes how off-duty policemen in Manila help real estate developers forcibly eject the poor from their shelters to clear the way for the construction of new infrastructure without concern for the legal processes and requirements in the humane and peaceful relocation of the homeless poor. Many women and children are hurt and killed in the process. It has also been reported that off-duty policemen in Rio de Janeiro

  5. Children of alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oravecz

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The author briefly interprets the research – results, referring to the phenomenon of children of alcoholics, especially the psychological and psychopathological characteristics of children of alcoholics in adolescence and young adulthood. The author presents a screening study of adolescents. The sample contains 200 high school students at age 18. The aim of the survey was to discover the relationship between alcohol consumption of parents, PTSD - related psychopathological symptoms and reported life quality of their children. The study confirmed the hypothesis about a substantial correlation between high alcohol consumption of parents, higher psychopathological symptom - expression and lower reported life quality score of their children. Higher PTSD-related symptomatology in children of alcoholics is probably resulted by home violence, which is very often present in family of alcoholics. The article also evaluated the results regarding suicide ideation of children of alcoholics, which is definitely more frequent and more intense than in their peers living in non alcohol – dependent families.

  6. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Fever in Infants and ChildrenBecause young children are not ... Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants and Children Fever Fever in Infants and Children Foot Problems Genital ...

  7. Design for children's apps

    OpenAIRE

    MORANTE BONET, MIRIAM; Costa Ferrer, María; Rodríguez Calatayud, María Nuria

    2017-01-01

    Are children under 2 years old exposed to apps? Which ones? How often? What kind of apps would be best suited for small children based on their physical and cognitive development, the evolution of their play patterns and their ability to interact with mobile devices? How to design apps as appropriate as possible for children under 2 years old? These are some of the main questions that are answered through the research presented in this publication. An investigation that demonstra...

  8. Why Are Children Poor?

    OpenAIRE

    Victor R. Fuchs

    1986-01-01

    Data from the 1960, 1970, and 1980 Censuses of Population and the Current Population Surveys of 1980 and 1985 are used to describe and analyze the economic position of children with special emphasis on cross-section differences and variation over time in the incidence of poverty. Between 1959 and 1979 the income available to children tended to follow the same pattern as adult income, but between 1979 and 1984 the trends for children were very unfavorable. Poverty rose, average income fell, an...

  9. Domestic violence against children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihić Biljana D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author is analysing definitions and basic notions related to domestic violence against children, as one of the most serious forms of violence. The special chapter deals with effects of violence against children and causes of domestic violence against them. Also, the author is analysing different forms of social reaction and considering the problem of legal regulation of mandatory reporting domestic violence against children.

  10. Epilepsy surgery in children

    OpenAIRE

    Sita Jayalakshmi; Sudhindra Vooturi; Swapan Gupta; Manas Panigrahi

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In approximately 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with anticonvulsive drugs, and such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and majority are children. Epilepsy surgery in children, who have been carefully chosen, can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90%) reduction in seizures in approximately two-third of children with intractable seizures. In...

  11. Children with pervasive refusal.

    OpenAIRE

    Lask, B; Britten, C; Kroll, L; Magagna, J; Tranter, M

    1991-01-01

    Four children are described with a potentially life threatening condition manifested by profound and pervasive refusal to eat, drink, walk, talk, or care for themselves in any way over a period of several months. The multiplicity and severity of the symptoms in these children do not fit comfortably into any existing diagnostic category. Long term and highly skilled nursing and psychiatric care is required to help these children to recover. The possible causes of this syndrome are discussed.

  12. Domestic violence against children

    OpenAIRE

    Mihić Biljana D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the author is analysing definitions and basic notions related to domestic violence against children, as one of the most serious forms of violence. The special chapter deals with effects of violence against children and causes of domestic violence against them. Also, the author is analysing different forms of social reaction and considering the problem of legal regulation of mandatory reporting domestic violence against children.

  13. Gastrointestinal Polyps in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Chun Wang; Hung-Chang Lee; Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chuen-Bin Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal polyps are common in children. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, endoscopic findings, management, pathology, and recurrence of gastrointestinal polyps in children at Mackay Memorial Hospital. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 50 children with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyps managed at Mackay Memorial Hospital between January 1984 and April 2007. Demographic data; clinical features; polyp size...

  14. Conspicuous firesetting in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, J G

    1981-01-01

    The records of 79 children whose firesetting led to referral to a Children's Hearing (the Scottish equivalent of a juvenile court) were examined. All but one of the children were boys. They had very disturbed backgrounds, with much family disruption and absent or unemployed fathers. Firesetting was predominantly a group activity and the damage caused was extensive. Although the children frequently engaged in other offences, in over 90 per cent there was no recurrence of reported firesetting within the limited period of possible follow-up.

  15. [Kidney injuries in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doletskiĭ, S Ia; korol'kova, I A; Shanidze, V V

    1975-02-01

    Anatomo-topographic features of the kidneys in children mostly condition a great incidence of its damage, compared with adults. One hundred and fifty children with renal injuries were observed, 147 of them with closed injuries and 3 -- with open ones. In 10 cases a trauma of anomalously developed kidneys was noted. 124 children were treated conservatively, 26 children were operated upon, in 16 of them organ-preserving operations were performed, in 10 children -- nephrectomay. Late results were followed up in 51 children in terms from 6 months to 10 years (40 patients were treated conservatively and 11 -- were operated upon). As a result of the conducted control investigation all patients were subdivided into three groups: practically healthy children (25), children with roentgenoradiological changes on the part of the injured kidney but without signs of clinico-laboratory symptomatics (11) children with posttraumatic complications (15). An analysis of late results enabled to revise indications to surgery in an acute period of trauma in behalf of their extension.

  16. Spirometry in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Kana Ram

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory disorders are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in children. Spirometry is a useful investigation for diagnosing and monitoring a variety of paediatric respiratory diseases, but it is underused by primary care physicians and paediatricians treating children with respiratory disease. We now have a better understanding of respiratory physiology in children, and newer computerised spirometry equipment is available with updated regional reference values for the paediatric age group. This review evaluates the current literature for indications, test procedures, quality assessment, and interpretation of spirometry results in children. Spirometry may be useful for asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital or acquired airway malformations and many other respiratory diseases in children. The technique for performing spirometry in children is crucial and is discussed in detail. Most children, including preschool children, can perform acceptable spirometry. Steps for interpreting spirometry results include identification of common errors during the test by applying acceptability and repeatability criteria and then comparing test parameters with reference standards. Spirometry results depict only the pattern of ventilation, which may be normal, obstructive, restrictive, or mixed. The diagnosis should be based on both clinical features and spirometry results. There is a need to encourage primary care physicians and paediatricians treating respiratory diseases in children to use spirometry after adequate training.

  17. Inhalant allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, James W; Veling, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Children with chronic or recurrent upper respiratory inflammatory disease (rhinitis) should be considered for inhalant allergies. Risk factors for inhalant allergies in children include a first-degree relative with allergies, food allergy in infancy, and atopic dermatitis. Although inhalant allergies are rare in infancy, inhalant allergies are common in older children and impair quality of life and productivity. Differentiating between viral and allergic rhinitis can be challenging in children, but the child's age, history, and risk factors can provide helpful information. Allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for asthma, and if one is present, medical consideration of the other is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  19. Preparing Children for Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospital or in the neighborhood. Learn more about: Feeding Tips Children's Special Needs Learn more about your child and ... Cardiac Catheterizations Heart Transplants Preparing Children for Surgery - Feeding Tips - Children's Special Needs Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known ... newborns, infants and older children. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  1. America's Children and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protection Agency Search Search America's Children and the Environment (ACE) Contact Us Share ACE presents key information ... of updates to ACE . America's Children and the Environment (ACE) America's Children and the Environment (ACE) is ...

  2. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  3. Strike Laws, Not Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Heather-Jane

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, a coalition of child advocacy groups, the Canadian Foundation for Children, Youth, and the Law, challenged Section 43 of Canada's criminal code, which permits "reasonable force" in disciplining children. The heavily debated issue turns on judges' varied interpretations. A court decision is expected by year's end. (MLH)

  4. Model Children's Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  5. Allergic rhinosinusitis in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    sent in persistent allergic rhinitis will eventually occur in the mucous mem- branes of the ostiomeatal units in the middle meati leading ultimately to allergic inflammation of the sinuses. The other important factor is that sinusi- tis may also occur as a result of viral infections in these allergic children as it does in normal children.

  6. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also very helpful. Often, a monitor with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  8. Children's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Helping Children in Rural Areas Children's Mental Health Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Mental health in childhood means reaching developmental and emotional milestones, and learning healthy social skills and how to cope when ...

  9. Colorado Children's Budget 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Children's Budget 2010" is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are interested in better understanding how Colorado funds children's programs and services. It attempts to clarify often confusing budget information and describe where the state's investment trends are and where those trends will lead the…

  10. Counseling Abused Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    This guide on counseling abused children was written to help counselors meet the needs of children and adolescents and to provide ways of working with the child's family. Chapter 1 presents an overview of child maltreatment by identifying types of maltreatment (neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation, and emotional abuse or neglect)…

  11. Constipation in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in up to one third of children at some stage during their development.1 Up to 25% of children who are referred ... a daily soft bowel action, which should be maintained for at least three months prior to gradual withdrawal while .... intervention as being effective in treatment.10. So what are the cornerstones of treatment?

  12. Teaching Our Homeless Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, George H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

  13. The Punishment of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, T. F.; Smagina, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of punishment including violence are perceived, first and foremost, as in the nature of family relations. The authors' survey focused on children's interaction with their parents, and the risk of violence is clearly present. Russian sociological research on violence against children within families shows a lack of consensus on what…

  14. Children's Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Sarah, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The federal government makes more than 200 distinct investments in children. These include traditional children's initiatives like education and child abuse and neglect prevention. They also include other investments that improve the lives of kids, like Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly Food Stamps). Following a…

  15. Latchkey Children and Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Karen

    Various agencies are attempting to meet the needs of latchkey children through programs run by parent alliances, community organizations, social service agencies, youth groups, schools, businesses, churches, and private day care centers. Studies of latchkey children during the past 15 years have concentrated on measuring the effects of self-care…

  16. Young Children as Curators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Alice

    2018-01-01

    Literature that addresses young children's learning in galleries and museums typically concentrates on what is already offered and discusses what has proven to be effective, or not, in accommodating their needs. This article offers insight into how objects can be explored with early years children at school, to create greater understanding of…

  17. Children, Divorce and You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Janice M.

    1981-01-01

    An increasing number of children live in single-parent homes due to the rise in the divorce rate. Teachers must become aware of teaching and counseling approaches which will offset the negative effects of divorce on children and minimize the period of adjustment. (JN)

  18. Divorce and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittleson, Mark J.

    The traumatic effect of divorce on young children is discussed, noting the typical changes in behavior evidenced by children in such a situation. Suggestions are made on ways parents can cope with the child's emotional reactions and alleviate the stress that is natural when a marriage dissolves. (JD)

  19. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005). Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered. PMID:24800202

  20. Being Real for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    1995-01-01

    Because ready role models for today's children are media-created superheroes and celebrities of television and film, children need real-life role models who guide them into realistic personal and social pathways. As principal adult contacts, teachers can be such role models. Specific strategies for encouraging teachers in this role are presented.…

  1. Culture and Children's Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; Butterworth, George; Newcombe, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined children's knowledge of cosmology in relation to the shape of the earth and the day-night cycle. Using explicit questioning involving a choice of alternative answers and 3D models, we carried out a comparison of children aged 4-9 years living in Australia and England. Though Australia and England have a close…

  2. Defending America's Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Marian Wright

    1989-01-01

    For imperative moral and practical reasons, our commitment to children must transcend political rhetoric and produce a continuum of programs beginning before birth and sustained until adulthood. Children need defenses against preventable infant mortality, childhood diseases, homelessness, unsafe childcare, and early sex and parenthood. Families…

  3. Children's participation in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström professor m.so., Stig

    2012-01-01

    In (post) modern society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the 10 planning of/and participation in both education...

  4. Children's knowledge about medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna B.; Zimmer, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    of the path analytic model analyzed. Children, aged 7 and 10 years, and their primary caregivers were interviewed during 1992 and 1993. Recruiting was done at summer camps in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and environs, resulting in a convenience sample of 101 children, all white and middle class. Ordinary least...

  5. Horses Helping Children Grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Louise B.; Lindsey, Allison

    2017-01-01

    A review of Animal-Assisted Therapy and related terms such as "Animal-Assisted Activities" is presented as an introduction to the exploration of additional equine applications with children. Animal-Assisted Therapy has been studied, but Animal-Assisted Activities with children facing normal developmental struggles has not received much…

  6. Adopted Children and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care > Adopted Children & Discipline Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Adopted Children & Discipline Page Content Article Body Some parents are hesitant to discipline the child they have adopted. They may set fewer limits than they would for a birth child. They ...

  7. Dengue in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, L.M.; Groot, R. de

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease of expanding geographical range and increasing incidence. The vast majority of dengue cases are children less than 15 years of age. Dengue causes a spectrum of illness from mild fever to severe disease with plasma leakage and shock. Infants and children with

  8. Poliomyelitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Koloskova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of poliomyelitis in children. The history of this disease and the current state of morbidity in Ukraine are considered. The features of the clinical pattern in children are described. Diagnostic criteria and treatment methods are presented.

  9. Gifted Children and Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, John; Karnes, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Divorce is often a contentious process with multiple issues to decide, especially in cases in which there are children involved. Divorce raises several legal issues when considering the well-being of children, including those who are gifted. In this article, the authors discuss these issues which include school choice, child support, and custody…

  10. CHRONIC CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    E.G. Tsymbalova

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses questions of classification, anatomic and physiological peculiarities and pathogenetic aspects of chronic constipations forming in children. The problems of diagnostics of chronic constipation and its treatment with spasmolytics are analyzed.Key words: children, chronic constipation, diagnostics, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (2): 173–179)

  11. Monitoring asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L P; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Mäkelä, Mika J; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D; Szefler, Stanley J; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2015-04-01

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist in various combinations in different individuals, to date there is limited evidence on how to integrate these for optimal monitoring of children with asthma. The aims of this ERS Task Force were to describe the current practise and give an overview of the best available evidence on how to monitor children with asthma. 22 clinical and research experts reviewed the literature. A modified Delphi method and four Task Force meetings were used to reach a consensus. This statement summarises the literature on monitoring children with asthma. Available tools for monitoring children with asthma, such as clinical tools, lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammatory markers, are described as are the ways in which they may be used in children with asthma. Management-related issues, comorbidities and environmental factors are summarised. Despite considerable interest in monitoring asthma in children, for many aspects of monitoring asthma in children there is a substantial lack of evidence. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  12. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Renk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005. Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered.

  13. Children's bone health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. van der Sluis (Inge)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis can be divided in two main parts. In the first part (Chapter 2 to 5) bone mineral density, bone metabolism and body composition in healthy children and young adults have been evaluated, while in the second part (Chapter 6 to 10) these issues were studied in children

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  15. Hypercalcemic Disorders in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokes, Victoria J; Nielsen, Morten F; Hannan, Fadil M

    2017-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is defined as a serum calcium concentration that is greater than 2 standard deviations above the normal mean, which in children may vary with age and sex, reflecting changes in the normal physiology at each developmental stage. Hypercalcemic disorders in children may present...... with hypotonia, poor feeding, vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, lethargy, polyuria, dehydration, failure to thrive and seizures. In severe cases renal failure, pancreatitis and reduced consciousness may also occur and older children and adolescents may present with psychiatric symptoms. The causes...... of hypercalcemia in children can be classified as parathyroid hormone (PTH)-dependent or PTH-independent, and may be congenital or acquired. PTH-independent hypercalcemia, i.e. hypercalcemia associated with a suppressed PTH, is commoner in children than PTH-dependent hypercalcemia. Acquired causes of PTH...

  16. Children with Usher syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mental and behavioral disorders among adults with Usher syndrome have been discussed and reported in some case studies but no research has been reported on children with Usher syndrome. Methods: This article investigates the prevalence and characteristics of mental and behavioral...... disorders among 26 children, 3-17 years of age, with Usher syndrome. Results: Six of the 26 children were diagnosed with a mental or behavioral disorder (1 with schizophrenia and mild mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and severe mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and mild mental retardation......, 1 with mild mental retardation, and 2 with conduct disorder). Another 3 children had had a mental or behavioral disorder previously in their childhood. Conclusion: Even though vision impairment first manifests in late childhood, some children with Usher syndrome seem to develop mental and behavioral...

  17. Pesticides and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garry, Vincent F.

    2004-01-01

    Prevention and control of damage to health, crops, and property by insects, fungi, and noxious weeds are the major goals of pesticide applications. As with use of any biologically active agent, pesticides have unwanted side-effects. In this review, we will examine the thesis that adverse pesticide effects are more likely to occur in children who are at special developmental and behavioral risk. Children's exposures to pesticides in the rural and urban settings and differences in their exposure patterns are discussed. The relative frequency of pesticide poisoning in children is examined. In this connection, most reported acute pesticide poisonings occur in children younger than age 5. The possible epidemiological relationships between parental pesticide use or exposure and the risk of adverse reproductive outcomes and childhood cancer are discussed. The level of consensus among these studies is examined. Current concerns regarding neurobehavioral toxicity and endocrine disruption in juxtaposition to the relative paucity of toxicant mechanism-based studies of children are explored

  18. A Comparative Study of Behavior Problems among Left-Behind Children, Migrant Children and Local Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to estimate the prevalence of behavioral problems among left-behind children, migrant children and local children in China, and to compare the risks of behavioral problems among the three types of children. Data on 4479 children aged 6–16 used in this study were from a survey conducted in China in 2017. The school-age version of the Children Behavior Checklist was used to measure children’s behavioral problems. Descriptive analysis, correlation analysis, and logistic regressions were conducted. The prevalence of behavioral problems was 18.80% and 13.59% for left-behind children and migrant children, respectively, both of which were higher than that of local children. Logistic regression analysis showed that after adjustments for individual and environmental variables, the likelihood of total, internalizing and externalizing behavior problems for left-behind children and migrant children were higher than those for local children; left-behind children had a higher likelihood of internalizing problems than externalizing problems, while migrant children had a higher prevalence of externalizing problems. Left-behind children had a higher prevalence of each specific syndrome than migrant and local children. Both individual and environmental factors were associated with child behavioral problems, and family migration may contribute to the increased risks. Left-behind and migrant children were more vulnerable than local children to behavioral problems.

  19. Informational Books for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Mega Asri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ignorance of reading activity is a result of condition in which people are not accustomed to read because they are not familiar with the culture of writing. It is fueled by the entry of telecommunications technologies and broadcasting, especially children digital native generation. The ability to speak and communicate in children is very influential in the development of social interaction. Besides the language and communication skills are directly related to the process of thinking and developments in the search for solutions to problems in children. Informational books is one medium that can help the development of language and communication skills in children. Informational books can convey knowledge of all the things they want to know the child, about science, about everything that exists and happens around the child to see the writing in a language that has a characteristic and image. The method used is literature study and data collection techniques to conduct a study review of the relevant literature. Informational books children as a means of communication, various forms of media including books have a major influence in shaping attitudes and behavior of children. A wide variety of informational books that has developed its own current trend where its use on children in need of assistance.

  20. Equestrian injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alex G; Wiggins, Alexandra; Chen, Mike K; Kays, David W; Islam, Saleem; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    Equestrian activities are regarded by some as high-risk sports, and our recent experience suggested this to be true. We undertook this study to review our experience with pediatric equestrian injuries. After institutional review board approval, we reviewed emergency department and hospital admissions for children 0 to 18 years, with equestrian trauma, over an 11-year period. There were 164 encounters with 135 girls and 29 boys. Most injuries (82%) occurred after falling or being thrown from the animal, and only 12% occurred during jumping or rodeo competitions. The remaining injuries were secondary to being trampled, kicked, or trapped under the animal. Eighty-seven children required hospital admission. Lacerations and contusions (58%) or orthopedic injuries (31%) were most common in the emergency department cohort. In the admission cohort, injury sites included orthopedic (34%), head (23%), abdomen (21%), and chest (11%). Multiple injuries occurred in 13%. A significant number of children required surgical interventions, including 19 orthopedic procedures, 4 laparotomies, 3 facial reconstructions, and 2 craniotomies. The average length of stay was nearly 4 days, with 60% of the children requiring intensive care admission. There were no deaths. One child was discharged to rehab, the rest were sent home. In our experience, more than one third of the children admitted after sustaining injuries in horse-related sports required surgical interventions. Children participating in equestrian activities are at risk for substantial injury, and pediatric care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion when evaluating these children.

  1. Benign pneumatosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenton, L.Z.; Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Background. In pediatrics, pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is usually due to necrotizing enterocolitis in premature newborns. Beyond infancy, PI is uncommon. ''Benign pneumatosis'' is PI in patients with few or no symptoms that resolves with conservative management. Objective. Our goal was to better characterize benign PI in children. Our investigation focused on identifying underlying risk factors, symptoms at time of diagnosis, management and outcome. Materials and methods. Available medical records and radiographs of children with pneumatosis intestinalis from 1990 to 1998 were reviewed for underlying conditions, symptoms at time of radiographs, management and outcome. Results. Thirty-seven children (mean age 4 years) were included. Thirty-two children had identifiable risk factors. Twenty -five children were immunocompromised by their underlying conditions or therapeutic regimen. Thirty-five children were managed conservatively with resolution of PI. Two patients, however, required surgery and one patient died. Conclusion. Benign pneumatosis does occur in children. The majority have underlying risk factors, most commonly related to immunosuppression. Clinical deterioration is the most useful indicator for surgical intervention. In most patients PI resolves with conservative management. (orig.)

  2. Detention of Immigrant Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Julie M; Griffin, Marsha; Shapiro, Alan J

    2017-05-01

    Immigrant children seeking safe haven in the United States, whether arriving unaccompanied or in family units, face a complicated evaluation and legal process from the point of arrival through permanent resettlement in communities. The conditions in which children are detained and the support services that are available to them are of great concern to pediatricians and other advocates for children. In accordance with internationally accepted rights of the child, immigrant and refugee children should be treated with dignity and respect and should not be exposed to conditions that may harm or traumatize them. The Department of Homeland Security facilities do not meet the basic standards for the care of children in residential settings. The recommendations in this statement call for limited exposure of any child to current Department of Homeland Security facilities (ie, Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities) and for longitudinal evaluation of the health consequences of detention of immigrant children in the United States. From the moment children are in the custody of the United States, they deserve health care that meets guideline-based standards, treatment that mitigates harm or traumatization, and services that support their health and well-being. This policy statement also provides specific recommendations regarding postrelease services once a child is released into communities across the country, including a coordinated system that facilitates access to a medical home and consistent access to education, child care, interpretation services, and legal services. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Onychomycosis in Icelandic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurgeirsson, B; Kristinsson, K G; Jonasson, P S

    2006-08-01

    Onychomycosis is a rare disorder in children. Few studies exist on the incidence or prevalence of onychomycosis in children. To examine the epidemiology of childhood onychomycosis in Iceland during the period 1982-2000. Results from all mycological samples taken from children in Iceland from 1982 to 2000 were examined. Information about the requesting physician, unique social security number, date of birth, sex, results of culture and microscopy were registered. Growth of a dermatophyte was taken as an indication of a case of onychomycosis. During the period 1982-2000 a total of 493 samples from 408 Icelandic children, aged 0-17 years, were examined. Dermatophytes were cultured from 148 (30.0%) samples. During the period 1982-85, the mean annual incidence of positive cultures was 1.65 per 100,000, increasing to 21.30 per 100,000 for the years 1996-2000. Trichophyton rubrum was the dominating organism and was found in 102/148 cases positive for the growth of a dermatophyte. The incidence of positive dermatophyte cultures increased with age and was found in eight children aged 0-4, and in 57 children aged 10-14 years. Onychomycosis is rare in children, but increases with age. It seems that onychomycosis increased during the study period, but it is not clear if this was due to a true increase in the prevalence of onychomycosis or an increased awareness of onychomycosis, or both.

  4. Vesicoureteric reflux in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameela A Kari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to identify the differences between primary and secondary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR and the effect of associated bladder abnormalities on kidney function. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children with VUR who were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2010. The review included results of radiological investigations and kidney function tests. We used Chi-square test for statistical analysis and paired t-test to compare group means for initial and last creatinine levels. Results: Ninety-nine children were included in this study. Twenty (20.2% had primary VUR, 11 had high-grade VUR, while 9 had low-grade reflux. All children with low-grade VUR had normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. Renal scars were present in 72% of the children with high-grade VUR. The mean creatinine levels (initial and last for both groups were normal. Seventy-nine (79.8% children had secondary VUR, which was due to posterior urethral valves (PUV (46.8%, neurogenic bladder caused by meningomyelocele (25.3%, non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNB (21.5%, or neurogenic bladder associated with prune belly syndrome (6.3%. Children with NNB, meningomyelocele and PUV had high creatinine at presentation with no considerable worsening of their kidney functions during the last visit. Renal scars were present in 49.4% of the children with secondary VUR. Conclusion: Children with primary VUR and normal bladder had good-functioning kidneys, while those with secondary VUR associated with abnormal bladder caused by NNB, spina bifida or PUV had abnormal kidney functions. DMSA scans were useful in predicting higher grades of VUR in children with primary reflux.

  5. Hearing Aid and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Fatahi

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop oral communication, hearing impaired infants and young children must be able to hear speech comfortably and consistently. To day children with all degrees of hearing loss may be condidates for some kinds of amlification. As children differ from adults, many Factors should be consider in hearing aid selection, evaluation and fitting. For example the child age when he or she is candidate for custom instruments? Do we consider programmable Hearing aid? Are multi memory instruments appropriate for them? What about directional microphones? What style of hearing aid do we select? In this paper such questions are Answered.

  6. RECURRENT CROUP IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Piskunova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of examination of 1849 children, entering children's infectioushospitalofVladivostokwith the clinical picture of croup of viral etiology. The clinical features of primary and recurrent croup are described. Frequency of recurrent croup inVladivostokis 8%. Children with a recurrent croup had the burdened premorbid background, and also persistent herpetic infections (cytomegalic infection in 42,9% cases, cytomegalic infection in combination with the herpes simplex virus -1. Frequency of croups substantially rose in the period of epidemic of influenza.

  7. Tuberculosis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tania A

    2017-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the leading cause of death worldwide from a single bacterial pathogen. The World Health Organization estimates that annually 1 million children have tuberculosis (TB) disease and many more harbor a latent form. Accurate estimates are hindered by under-recognition and challenges in diagnosis. To date, an accurate diagnostic test to confirm TB in children does not exist. Treatment is lengthy but outcomes are generally favorable with timely initiation. With the End TB Strategy, there is an urgent need for improved diagnostics and treatment to prevent the unnecessary morbidity and mortality from TB in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Testing children for allergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, P A; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M; O'B Hourihane, J

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases are common in childhood and can cause a significant morbidity and impaired quality-of-life of the children and their families. Adequate allergy testing is the prerequisite for optimal care, including allergen avoidance, pharmacotherapy and immunotherapy. Children with persisting...... or recurrent or severe symptoms suggestive for allergy should undergo an appropriate diagnostic work-up, irrespective of their age. Adequate allergy testing may also allow defining allergic trigger in common symptoms. We provide here evidence-based guidance on when and how to test for allergy in children based...

  9. Environmental Design for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mary, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The special issue of the journal, Children in Contemporary Society, contains 17 brief articles on environmental design for young handicapped and normal children. Articles have the following titles: "Introduction", "Environmental Design and Architecture", "Why Is Environmental Design Important to Young Children", "Children's Hospital National…

  10. Cohabitation and Children's Family Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Raley, R.; Wildsmith, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This study estimates how much children's family instability is missed when we do not count transitions into and out of cohabitation, and examines early life course trajectories of children to see whether children who experience maternal cohabitation face more family instability than children who do not. Using data from the 1995 National Survey of…

  11. Children and Grief. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntire, Nancy

    Noting that the death of a loved one brings grief to children as well as adults, this Digest draws on research to examine how children respond to death and the role of parents and teachers in helping children cope with loss. The Digest delineates children's "tasks" during mourning that are essential to their adjustment to loss, such as…

  12. Seeing Children's Pleasure with Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Deb

    2010-01-01

    Children's relationship with food in early childhood programs is often a complex topic. Families have concerns about "picky eaters" and teachers feel pressure to make sure that children eat enough while in their care. Children bring snacks that teachers describe as junk food and believe this negatively impacts children's behavior. Foods marketed…

  13. Sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wormald, R

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the aetiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a paediatric population presenting to the National Centre of Medical Genetics. A retrospective chart review from 1998 to 2006. One hundred and twenty nine children were investigated for SNHL. The average age of diagnosis of hearing loss was 36 months. The degree of hearing loss was mild in 8 children, moderate in 33 children, severe in 31 children and profound in 57 children. Eighty-five children (66%) were diagnosed with a hereditary hearing loss, 11 (8%) children had an acquired hearing loss and no cause found in 33 (26%) children. This is the first report of the causes of hearing loss in Irish children. The mean age of diagnosis in our cohort is high and emphasises the need for a neonatal screening programme. There remains a number of children for whom the cause of hearing loss remains unknown.

  14. Children's Literature on Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, James

    Children's literature is simple discussion of complicated issues. Neutron stars are discussed in several children's books. Using libraries in Chicago, I will review children's books on neutron stars and compare the literature to literature from scientific discussions of neutron stars on sites like the Chandra site, Hubble Space Telescope site and NASA site. The result will be a discussion of problems and issues involved in discussion of neutron stars. Do children's books leave material out? Do children's books discuss recent observations? Do children's books discuss anything discredited or wrong? How many children's books are in resources like World Cat, the Library of Congress catalog, and the Chicago Public Library catalog? Could children's books be useful to present some of your findings or observations or projects? Children's books are useful for both children and scientist as they present simplified discussion of topics, although sometimes issues are simplified too much.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including the: kidneys and bladder. bones. liver and ... PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and ...

  16. Secondhand Smoke and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smoking also is associated with neonatal death from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, the major cause of death ... fluid are the most common cause of children’s hearing loss. When they do not respond to medical treatment, ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine ... supplements and if he or she has any allergies. Also inform your doctor of any recent illnesses ...

  18. Building Resilience in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to succeed in life. That is why Kenneth Ginsburg, M.D., MS Ed, FAAP, a pediatrician specializing ... resilience in children, teens, and young adults. Dr. Ginsburg has identified seven “C”s of resilience, recognizing that “ ...

  19. Children in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløvgaard, Marius; Nielsen, Nina Odgaard; Sørensen, Thomas Lund

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of Greenlandic children's disease pattern and contacts to the health care system are sparse and have focused on the primary health care sector. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify the disease pattern and use of health care facilities of children aged 0-10 in two Greenlandic...... cohorts. METHODS AND DESIGN: In a retrospective, descriptive follow-up of the Ivaaq (The Greenland Child Cohort) and the CLEAR (climate changes, environmental contaminants and reproductive health) birth cohorts (total n=1,000), we reviewed medical records of children aged 6-10 in 2012 with residence...... in Nuuk or Ilulissat (n=332). Data on diseases and health care system contacts were extracted. Diagnoses were validated retrospectively. Primary health care contacts were reviewed for a random sample of 1:6. RESULTS: In 311 children with valid social security number, the total number of health care system...

  20. Headache in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soee, Ann Britt L; Skov, Liselotte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article is to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific multidisciplinary treatment programme for children with headache and to describe the concept and settings of the Children's Headache Clinic in Denmark. Method: All new patients were included and evaluations were conducted...... after six and 12 months. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments were offered by a team of specialists (physicians, headache nurses, a physiotherapist and a psychologist). Patients: The subjects comprised 169 children (mean age 11.7 (range 4-17), 91 females, 78 males), 39% of whom suffered...... from chronic headache (≥15 days/month). All children were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition; 20% had migraine, 34% tension-type headache, 27% mixed headache, 4% medication- overuse headache, and 15% were diagnosed with other types of headaches...

  1. Teaching minority children hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rheinländer, Thilde; Samuelsen, Helle; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Ethnic minority children in Vietnam experience high levels of hygiene- and sanitation-related diseases. Improving hygiene for minority children is therefore vital for improving child health. The study objective was to investigate how kindergarten and home environments influence...... the learning of hygiene of pre-school ethnic minority children in rural Vietnam. Design. Eight months of ethnographic field studies were conducted among four ethnic minority groups living in highland and lowland communities in northern Vietnam. Data included participant observation in four kindergartens and 20...... homes of pre-school children, together with 67 semi-structured interviews with caregivers and five kindergarten staff. Thematic analysis was applied and concepts of social learning provided inputs to the analysis. Findings. This study showed that poor living conditions with lack of basic sanitation...

  2. Giving Medicine to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Articulos en Espanol Giving Medicine to Children Share Tweet ... right medicine and the right amount More in Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas Cosméticos Dispositivos ...

  3. Treating Children as Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... her own style and needs, initially because of birth order and inborn traits, and later because of experiences. ... appropriately for their child's developmental age and needs. Birth order and family size also influence your children's development. ...

  4. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano T. DeMarco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of pediatric stone disease has evolved significantly over the last three decades. Prior to the introduction of shockwave lithotripsy (SWL in the 1980s, open lithotomy was the lone therapy for children with upper tract calculi. Since then, SWL has been the procedure of choice in most pediatric centers for children with large renal calculi. While other therapies such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL were also being advanced around the same time, PNL was generally seen as a suitable therapy in adults because of the concerns for damage in the developing kidney. However, recent advances in endoscopic instrumentation and renal access techniques have led to an increase in its use in the pediatric population, particularly in those children with large upper tract stones. This paper is a review of the literature focusing on the indications, techniques, results, and complications of PNL in children with renal calculi.

  5. Preschool Children with ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    Differences in behavioral, social, and school functioning of 58 preschool-age (3 -5 years) children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 36 normal controls were examined at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA.

  6. Children and IC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as: Calcium gylcerophosphate (Prelief) Yoga Relaxation techniques Pelvic floor physical therapy Oral IC therapies for children with IC include ... Prostatitis Constipation Endometriosis Fibromyalgia Irritable Bowel ... Polysulfate Sodium Bladder Instillations Immunosuppresants ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  8. Children with Learning Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addition in elementary school cannot understand algebra in high school. The child, trying very hard to learn, becomes more and more frustrated, and develops emotional problems such as low self-esteem in the face of repeated failure. Some children ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) ... molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... beforehand, especially if sedation is to be used. Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in ... PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and ...

  11. Pityriasis Versicolor in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Miskeen

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available A six year survey revealed 132 cases of pityriasis versicolor in children below 10 years of age. This constituted 6.70/o of all cases of pityriasis versicol and 24.8 % of cutaneous

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... stool. Your child should also drink plenty of water to help flush the radioactive material from his ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's ( ... with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  14. Healthy Environments for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BY POISONOUS FUMES! ...PLAYTIME ACCIDENTS... NO SWIMMING ...AND DROWNING!! 11 SO, WITH SO MANY DANGERS, WHAT CAN ... BE WELL VENTILATED! AND SMOKERS SHOULD AVOID SMOKING NEAR CHILDREN! WE MUST TAKE CARE TO PREVENT DISEASES ...

  15. Hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gastón

    2012-05-01

    Hypertensive crisis is rare in children and is usually secondary to an underlying disease. There is strong evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the genesis of hypertensive crisis. An important principle in the management of children with hypertensive crisis is to determine if severe hypertension is chronic, acute, or acute-on-chronic. When it is associated with signs of end-organ damage such as encephalopathy, congestive cardiac failure or renal failure, there is an emergent need to lower blood pressures to 25-30% of the original value and then accomplish a gradual reduction in blood pressure. Precipitous drops in blood pressure can result in impairment of perfusion of vital organs. Medications commonly used to treat hypertensive crisis in children are nicardipine, labetalol and sodium nitroprusside. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and recent developments in management of hypertensive crisis in children.

  16. Evacuation of Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larusdottir, Aldis Run

    Saving human lives is the highest priority in case of fire, according to fire codes around the world. Codes state that everyone should be able to escape to safety in case of fire. In order to design buildings that enable this the available safe egress time (ASET) must be held up against...... is to provide new data and information on children’s evacuation, which is a step towards including children in evacuation models and calculations. Little is known about children’s evacuation characteristics in fire compared to other parts of the population. In recent years there has been more focus on children......, indicating that an alarm with audio signal is preferable to a light signal only or no alarm at all. Children’s evacuation cannot be described using adults’ evacuation models throughout. Young children are slower than adults and travel speed increases with age. At the age of 12 years children can be described...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... computer aids in creating the images from the data obtained by the gamma camera. A probe is ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to help ... children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or hand. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and may be asked to wear a gown. ... or hand. Children should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to the exam, but they may be given ...

  1. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... childhood. The pediatrician will most often draw the child's growth curve on a growth chart . Children with growth ... Most cases are not preventable. Review your child's growth chart ... child's growth rate, evaluation by a specialist is recommended.

  2. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007696.htm High blood pressure - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including ...

  4. Parental Investments in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Esping-Andersen, Gösta

    This study examines parental time investment in their children, distinguishing between developmental and non-developmental care. Our analyses centre on three influential determinants: educational background, marital homogamy, and spouses’ relative bargaining power. We find that the emphasis on qu...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to ...

  6. Urinary tract infection - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000505.htm Urinary tract infection - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection is an infection of the urinary tract. This ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... into the kidney (reflux). bone cancer, infections and trauma. gastrointestinal bleeding and motility. tumors and the spread of cancerous cells in the body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid ...

  8. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... months to 1 year. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association recommend scheduling a ... age children and adolescents. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends scheduling regular dental checkups, with the most ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need sedation for the imaging. During this procedure, parents are usually allowed and often encouraged to stay ... discomfort from having to remain still during imaging. Parents are encouraged to stay with their children to ...

  10. Sexual Abuse of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg

    1988-01-01

    Canadian reports and legislation are reviewed to highlight the school's role in prevention and reporting of suspicions of child sexual abuse. The vulnerability of handicapped children and child pornography are two areas of victimization emphasized. (Author/DB)

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be placed into the bladder, which may cause temporary discomfort. It is important that your child ... images are being recorded. Though nuclear imaging itself causes no pain, children may experience some discomfort from ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child is taking as well as vitamins and herbal supplements and if he or she has any ... What are the limitations of Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine procedures can be time consuming. It ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also very helpful. Often, a monitor with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... techniques for a variety of indications, and the functional information gained from nuclear medicine exams is often ...

  14. Talipes equinovarus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timaev M.Kh.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research goal of the review is to present data on etiology, prevalence, classification of different types TEN/ in children. Mechanisms of pathological foot type, indications for conservative and surgical methods of treatment have been analyzed.

  15. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000127.htm Epilepsy in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  16. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ...

  19. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type ...

  20. Consumption and Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Ejrnæs, Mette

    2009-01-01

    supply. We develop two tests of the extreme hypothesis that only changes in family structure matter. We estimate effects of the numbers and ages of children on consumption. These estimates allow us to rationalize all of the increase in consumption without recourse to any of the causal mechanisms. Our...... estimates can be interpreted either as giving upper bounds on the effects of children or as evidence that the other causes are not important....

  1. Polyps in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Adolph, Vincent R.; Bernabe, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Children with polyps usually present with bleeding or pain. Most pediatric intestinal polyps are sporadic and are not associated with malignancy. Polyposis syndromes are also well described in children. Peutz–Jeghers syndrome is the most common hamartomatous polyposis condition. Although the polyps are not thought to be premalignant in most patients, there is an increased risk of other cancers. Familial adenomatous polyposis is also seen in childhood and is associated with a very high risk of...

  2. Children's participation in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lauritsen, Peter; Danholt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Teledialogue is a combined research and design project aimed at improving communications between social workers and children under their custody living in foster care or youth institutions. While social workers are responsible for the welfare of placed children they are under heavy workload...... that children’s participation unfolds throughout the entire project; it shapes funding proposals, research problems and design activities and is, in turn, itself being shaped by these....

  3. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  4. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  5. Illustration in children's literature

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Pascolati

    2017-01-01

    Since the origins of children's literature, the image plays an important role in the construction of the meanings of this literary text, but its participation in the children's book goes from mere coadjuvant to primacy in relation to the written word. In line with the growth of the publishing production of picture books, its presence in the classroom and theoretical-critical reflections about its contribution to literary reading, I develop here some ideas about different roles played by the i...

  6. Snoring in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasneek; Waters, Karen Ann

    2015-09-01

    Chronic snoring (≥4 nights per week) is not benign. Otherwise healthy children with chronic snoring and evidence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy can be referred directly for adenotonsillectomy. Snoring children snoring or without significant medical comorbidities can be managed with a combination of medical and surgical interventions listed herein. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. Symptomatic epilepsy in children

    OpenAIRE

    Еlaginykh E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Research goals were to evaluate the etiological structure of symptomatic epilepsy in children, age structure of period of disease manifestation, average length of latent period among children with different characters of lesions, dependence between frequency of seizures and character of lesion. Material and methods. A total of 180 case-records of patients with symptomatic epilepsy were analyzed by the next criteria: anamnesis, materials of electroencephalogram and neurovisualization. Results....

  8. Sleep disorders in children

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Paul; Dunne, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disorders may affect 20-30% of young children, and include excessive daytime sleepiness, problems getting to sleep (dysomnias), or undesirable phenomena during sleep (parasomnias), such as sleep terrors, and sleepwalking. Children with physical or learning disabilities are at increased risk of sleep disorders. Other risk factors include the child being the first born, having a difficult temperament or having had colic, and increased maternal responsiveness.

  9. Sleep disorders in children

    OpenAIRE

    Bruni, Oliveiero; Novelli, Luana

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disorders may affect between 20% and 30% of young children, and include problems getting to sleep (dyssomnias) or undesirable phenomena during sleep (parasomnias), such as sleep terrors and sleepwalking. Children with physical or learning disabilities are at increased risk of sleep disorders. Other risk factors include the child being the first born, having a difficult temperament or having had colic, and increased maternal responsiveness.

  10. CHILDREN AS TARGET MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    SOMESFALEAN Vasilica

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the reasons that lead marketers to give greater importance to children, how to explain this increased potential that children have on the existing market and strategies that marketers and companies use in order to reach this market. To this end we analyzed a series of articles, studies and research conducted on the subject, with implications in psychology, sociology, but especially in marketing. The results obtained show very interesting issues regard...

  11. Mobile telephony and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karipidis, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the possibility of adverse health effects related to radiofrequency (RF) radiation exposure from mobile phones and their associated base stations. Of particular public concern in this context are children. In its report the Independent Expert Group on Mobile Phones (IEGMP) recommended that the widespread use of mobile phones by children should be discouraged citing that children may be more vulnerable because of their developing nervous system, their greater absorption of energy in the tissue of the head and a longer lifetime of exposure. However, more recently the Health Council of the Netherlands disagreed with the IEGMP and concluded that there is no convincing scientific data to restrict children from using mobile phones. The World Health Organization states that none of there centre views have found that exposure to the RF fields form mobile phones or their base stations causes any adverse health consequence. However there has been limited scientific research specifically focussed on children. Future research will be required to address the issue of mobile telephony and children. Copyright (2004) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  12. To children with love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K T

    1995-01-01

    People debating population growth in India and why adults in India choose to bear so many children seem to either not understand or overlook that people in India like children; the more the better. Indeed, children interest every Indian, with new mothers receiving advice on baby care from all quarters. The child is king in India, spoiled, but generally well-behaved. It could be that children receive so much attention from many loving relatives that they do not need to act out in order to get attention. Having a child is the focus and meaning of married life. Without a child, life loses its color and joy. Moreover, childless couples face the insecurity of not having children to care for them once they grow old. The author notes her failure to observe children who were poorly adjusted and sad because they habitually shared a bed with their parents. As concerned individuals ponder the perils of global population growth, they might consider the merit of the Indian view on the subject.

  13. TUBERCULOSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Esposito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB in children is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic despite it constituting 20% or more of all TB cases in many countries with high TB incidence. Childhood TB is a direct consequence of adult TB but remains overshadowed by adult TB because it is usually smear-negative. Infants and young children are more likely to develop life-threatening forms of TB than older children and adults due to their immature immune systems. Therefore, prompt diagnoses are extremely important although difficult since clinical and radiological signs of TB can be non-specific and variable in children. Despite undeniable advances in identifying definite, probable, or possible TB markers, pediatricians still face many problems when diagnosing TB diagnosis. Moreover, curing TB can be difficult when treatment is delayed and when multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens are the cause of the disease. In these cases, the prognosis in children is particularly poor because MDR-TB treatment and treatment duration remain unclear. New studies of diagnostic tests and optimal treatment in children are urgently needed with the final goal of developing an effective anti-TB vaccine.

  14. Heelys injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, D; Arjandas, M; Lim, K B L; Lee, E H

    2006-05-01

    Heelys, a type of shoes with stealth wheels, are extremely popular among children in Singapore. The widespread availability of cheap imitations has led to a proliferation of young users. Coupled with a total lack of safety equipment and instructions, these shoes can lead to significant injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence and type of injuries sustained by children using Heelys. During a seven-month period from February to August 2004, all children treated at the Paediatric Orthopaedic Department of the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, were asked if the injury was sustained while "heeling". All the patients were reviewed by the authors. A total of 37 patients with significant injuries sustained while "heeling" were identified. Their radiographs and clinical charts were reviewed. The patients and/or their parents were also interviewed to obtain additional information. Upper limb injuries were by far the most common. Distal radius fractures and elbow injuries predominated. None of the children used safety gear. "Heeling" can lead to serious injuries despite the relatively low velocity involved. Children and their parents need to be educated on the use of safety gear.

  15. Children as digital rights agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald, Gitte Bang

    2016-01-01

    the role of the “adult world” is. We need to focus more on the active role that children and adolescents play, according to age, skills and various capacities, in identifying, reflecting upon and acting according to opportunities and challenges in relation to digital media and digital rights (Hartman et al...... 2007). The paper presents a model for analyzing the intersecting levels of children as agents in relation to digital risks and rights: Children as peer-to-peer agents. Children provide mutual practical guidance; experience sharing; advice. re. to risk and harm. Children as advocates/ politicians....... Children participate in youth parliaments; media councils; Safer Internet day; IGF; NGOs, Children as informants. Children contribute to research; media coverage; content providers; reporters (of negative content/ behavior The model is primarily supported by empirical data from the Net Children Go Mobile...

  16. Children at health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, H R

    1992-01-01

    In India, 69% of the children of the working class die, most of whom are child laborers. Economic pressure forces parents to make their children work. Employers want child workers because they can manipulate them and pay them low wages, thereby ensuring their viability. The caste system induces social inequality, inheritance invokes cultural inequality, and patriarchal socialization is responsible for gender inequality, all of which perpetuates exploitation of children by employers. In Sivakasi, an estimated 125,000 children make up the child labor force, comprising 30% of the entire labor force. 75% are from the lowest castes. 90% of child workers are girls because they are more obedient and accept even lower wages than boys, and girls need to save for their dowry. Girls often suffer verbal and physical abuse. Like their parents who were also child workers, child workers are illiterate and work long hours. A small rich elite in Sivakasi controls most of the trading and industrial capital, educational institutions, and voluntary organizations. Employers' agents give parents a loan and use their children's labor as security. Each day, they bring child workers to Sivakasi in factory buses from villages to work at least 12 hour days. They work under hazardous conditions, e.g., working with toxic chemicals. Coughing, sore throat, dizziness, methemoglobinemia, and anemia are common effects of ingestion or inhalation of chlorate dust. Inhalation of sulphur dust causes respiratory infections, eye infections, and chronic lung diseases (e.g., asthma). Fires and explosions are common risks for working children. Factory management seldom undertake fire prevention measures. An extensive survey of the problem of child labor is needed in Sivakasi before systematic planning to protect children could be done. Overall development, especially agricultural development, is needed. Parents, employers, enforcement authorities, trade unions, and social groups need to be sensitized to the

  17. Sleep disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Karen A; Suresh, Sadasivam; Nixon, Gillian M

    2013-10-21

    Sleep disorders are very common in childhood and are often amenable to simple advice and parental education. Questions about sleep should be an integral part of every paediatric consultation. Children with underlying syndromes or complex medical conditions often have multiple sleep issues. Excessive sleepiness in children requires careful history-taking and consideration of specialised investigation. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common condition in childhood with important health implications. The high prevalence of OSA warrants rigorous attempts to identify children at higher risk and manage them appropriately. Adenotonsillectomy is a highly efficacious therapy for paediatric OSA. A current major issue is to improve ways of distinguishing mild from severe OSA before a child undergoes adenotonsillectomy, as those with more severe disease are at increased risk of postoperative complications and should undergo adenotonsillectomy in a tertiary centre. Children with obesity and other comorbid conditions are at increased risk of persisting OSA despite adenotonsillectomy. Topical (nasal) steroids and/or anti-inflammatory agents have a role in the non-surgical treatment of mild OSA. Continuous positive airway pressure and orthodontic interventions are treatment options for treatment of persisting OSA in children.

  18. Trichotillomania in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Novak, Jeroen; Iorizzo, Matilde; Grimalt, Ramon; Oranje, Arnold P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichotillomania is an often underdiagnosed condition. Little is known about trichotillomania in childhood. We aimed to analyze the characteristics of children with trichotillomania to increase information on this condition. Methods A retrospective study of an electronic database was performed in a tertiary children's hospital. Information from patients with trichotillomania was systematically classified under the categories ‘who’, ‘what’, ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘why’, and ‘how’. Results A total of 33 patients had a diagnosis of trichotillomania (28 females, 5 males; peak age between 3 and 4 years). Scalp involvement was most common and nail biting was observed in 5 patients. Only 51.5% of patients had parents who noticed their child's hairpulling. Hair on or under the bed was the most common clue suggesting that hairpulling occurred. Triggering factors identified in 16 children included physical appearance, family-related issues, school-related issues, and concurrent illness. The noninvasive hair pull test was negative in all children. There was a high non-follow-up rate, and treatment outcomes varied. Conclusion A set of 6 specific questions, based on the ‘5Ws and 1H’ principle, facilitates the gathering of important information on children with unexplained nonscarring hair loss and helps clinicians be cognizant of possible outcomes of trichotillomania. This will be especially useful to clinicians who are not familiar with this elusive condition. PMID:27172263

  19. Preputial retraction in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Abhinav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess preputial retractability in children at various ages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty boys attending the hospital were included in the study. Children with hypospadias or history of preputial manipulation were excluded. Preputial anatomy was studied and subjects were classified into five groups as described by Kayaba et al . RESULTS: The prepuce could not be retracted at all so as to make even the external urethral meatus visible in 61.4% children aged 0-6 months while this decreased to only 0.9% in children aged 10-12 years. At the other end of the spectrum, while prepuce could not be fully retracted in any child below 6 months, it could be done in about 60% in the age group of 10-12 years. CONCLUSION Preputial nonseparation is the major cause of preputial nonretraction in the pediatric age group. Prepuce spontaneously separates from the glans as age increases and true phimosis is rare in children. Surgical intervention should be avoided for nonseparation of prepuce.

  20. Playground injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeini, Hassan Sadeghi; Lindqvist, Kent; Jafari, Hamid Reza; Mirlohi, Amir Hossein; Dalal, Koustuv

    2011-06-24

    Rapid urbanization and unplanned population development can be detrimental to the safety of citizens, with children being a particularly vulnerable social group. In this review, we assess childhood playground injuries and suggest safety mechanisms which could be incorporated into playground planning. Inclusion criteria were "children" as the focus group, "playground" as the main field of study, and "unintentional injury" and "safety" as the concepts of study. The keywords used for the PubMed search were "playground", "children", and "injury". Initially we 182 articles. After screening according to inclusion criteria, 86 articles were found, and after reading the abstracts and then the full text, 14 articles were finally included for analysis. The papers reviewed included four case-control studies, three case studies, three descriptive studies, two interventional studies, one retrospective study, one cross-sectional study, and one systematic review. Playground-related fractures were the most common accidents among children, underscoring the importance of safety promotion and injury prevention in playgrounds, lowrisk equipment and playing hours (week days associated with higher risk), implementation of standards, preventing falls and fall-related fractures, and addressing concerns of parents about unsafe neighborhoods. With the exception of one study, all of the reviewed papers had not implemented any practical safety plan. Safe engineering approaches were also ignored. We recommend a systematic safety approach based on the "safety circle" which includes three main areas, ie, equipment, environment, and children.

  1. Marketing foods to children: a comparison of nutrient content between children's and non-children's products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, Amelia; Roberts, Caireen; Madden, Angela M; Rennie, Kirsten L

    2013-12-01

    The predominance of marketing of products high in fat, sugar and/or salt to children has been well documented and implicated in the incidence of obesity. The present study aimed to determine whether foods marketed to children in UK supermarkets are nutritionally similar to the non-children's equivalent, focusing on food categories that may be viewed as healthier options. Nutritional data were collected on yoghurts (n 147), cereal bars (n 145) and ready meals (n 144) from seven major UK supermarkets and categorised as children's or non-children's products based on the characteristics, promotional nature or information on the product packaging. Fat, sugar and salt content was compared per 100 g and per recommended portion size. UK. Per 100 g, children's yoghurts and cereal bars were higher in total sugars, fat and saturated fat than the non-children's; this was significant for all except sugar and total fat in cereal bars. Per portion these differences remained, except for sugars in yoghurts. Conversely children's ready meals were significantly lower in these nutrients per portion than non-children's, but not when expressed per 100 g. Children's yoghurts and ready meals had significantly lower sodium content than non-children's both per portion and per 100 g. Significant differences between the nutritional composition of children's and non-children's products were observed but varied depending on the unit reference. A significant number of products marketed towards children were higher in fat, sugar and salt than those marketed to the general population.

  2. Terrorism, Trauma and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjai, M M; Chandrashekhar, N; Raju, Uma; Jog, S S; Arora, P

    2005-10-01

    Terrorist attacks, armed conflict and all forms of catastrophe, tax our ability to cope, understand and respond to the situation. Children are more vulnerable. 16 children, victims of a terrorist attack in an army residential camp were managed for their physical injuries and evaluated for psychological trauma. All patients recovered from physical injuries, except one baby of two months, who died due to severe chest trauma. 5 children presented with Acute Stress Reaction. 3 recovered well and two, showed persistent poor scholastic performance even after one year. A terrorist attack, not only results in physiscal scars but also causes psychological trauma, which requires emotional support and needs to be followed up on a long term basis.

  3. Spinal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.; Carty, H.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  4. [Cataract surgery in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, S

    2000-01-01

    Cataract extraction in children has improved and became more popular over the past few decades but, due to particular features of children's eyes, still remains controversial--especially regarding the intraocular lens implantation. In contrast to adults, indications for cataract surgery in children are much more difficult to determine. Since subjective visual acuity cannot be obtained, greater reliance must be placed on the morphology and location of the lens opacity, and the behavior of the child. Forced preferential looking and visual evoked potentials can be helpful, but they should not be the only criteria. In management of pediatric cataract, correction of postoperative aphakia is still an incompletely resolved problem. Conventionally, optical correction is achieved by spectacles or contact lenses. The power of both spectacles and contact lenses can be readily adjusted to compensate for ocular growth. The success of both depends significantly on parental compliance and the child's acceptance. Hutchinson reported that 44% children with aphakia stopped wearing glasses or contact lenses 2 months after surgery. Contact lens wearing can also result in a number of corneal complications, including infectious keratitis, corneal vascularization and hypoxic corneal ulceration. IOL implantation is theoretically superior to glasses and contact lenses since it provides almost immediate optical correction which is much more reliable because it does not depend on parental or child's compliance. Still, there are many controversies about IOL implantation in infants and young children like IOL-size, material, IOL power calculation, prevention and management of secondary cataract, as well as long term safety of IOLs in children's eyes. Although short-term anatomic results after cataract extraction and primary IOL implantation in children are excellent and stable, long-term follow-up is necessary to answer questions about the long-term safety of implants in children's eyes. A

  5. Illustration in children's literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Pascolati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the origins of children's literature, the image plays an important role in the construction of the meanings of this literary text, but its participation in the children's book goes from mere coadjuvant to primacy in relation to the written word. In line with the growth of the publishing production of picture books, its presence in the classroom and theoretical-critical reflections about its contribution to literary reading, I develop here some ideas about different roles played by the illustration in children's literature. To do so, I analyze some books in which the images have a preponderant role in the narrative progression, the construction of characters and the revelation of the child's perspective on the world.

  6. Thinking of the children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Universal Children's Day is organized each year by the United Nations Children's Fund to draw attention to the desperate plight of millions of babies and young people throughout the world. The date this year in most countries is 2 October. Despite all the efforts of UNICEF and other agencies including the IAEA, it is estimated that there are still 300 000 000 children who either cannot find enough food to stave off hunger, or who cannot obtain the protein which will keep them healthy and alert. Many advances have been made in helping to make crops more abundant, in developing protein content of foods and in dealing with the diseases arising from malnutrition. Our photograph was taken in Jamaica, where investigations into malnutrition and its effects are being made by the UK Medical Research Council under an IAEA research contract

  7. Environmental Protection Agency, Protecting Children's Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Agency Search Search Contact Us Share Protecting Children's Environmental Health Children are often more vulnerable to pollutants ... during development. Learn more about children's health, the environment, and what you can do. Basic Information Children ...

  8. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  9. Restorative Justice in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Katrin; Jensen, Keith; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-06-29

    An important, and perhaps uniquely human, mechanism for maintaining cooperation against free riders is third-party punishment. Our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, will not punish third parties even though they will do so when personally affected. Until recently, little attention has been paid to how punishment and a sense of justice develop in children. Children respond to norm violations. They are more likely to share with a puppet that helped another individual as opposed to one who behaved harmfully, and they show a preference for seeing a harmful doll rather than a victim punished. By 6 years of age, children will pay a cost to punish fictional and real peers, and the threat of punishment will lead preschoolers to behave more generously. However, little is known about what motivates a sense of justice in children. We gave 3- and 5-year-old children--the youngest ages yet tested--the opportunity to remove items and prevent a puppet from gaining a reward for second- and third-party violations (experiment 1), and we gave 3-year-olds the opportunity to restore items (experiment 2). Children were as likely to engage in third-party interventions as they were when personally affected, yet they did not discriminate among the different sources of harm for the victim. When given a range of options, 3-year-olds chose restoration over removal. It appears that a sense of justice centered on harm caused to victims emerges early in childhood and highlights the value of third-party interventions for human cooperation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary school children\\'s perspectives on common diseases and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Existing school health programmes in Uganda target children above five years for de-worming, oral hygiene and frequent vaccination of girls of reproductive age. Objective:To assess primary school children\\'s perspectives on common diseases they experience and medicines used in order to suggest reforms ...

  11. Connecting Children's Stories to Children's Literature: Meeting Diversity Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Amour, Melissa J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a method for increasing elementary school children's multicultural awareness by sharing their own written stories in the context of multicultural children's literature. Describes how classroom activities can promote multicultural awareness through by allowing children to practice democracy, analyze the circumstances of one's life;…

  12. Profiles of Children: 1970 White House Conference on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    This book of charts of comparative statistics was compiled to help the 1970 White House Conference on Children evaluate past efforts to improve the well-being of America's children. First, it presents data about aspects of the world into which American children are born, such as population, urbanization, income levels, incidence of disease,…

  13. Immigration Enforcement Practices Harm Refugee Children and Citizen-Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Luis H.

    2018-01-01

    Aggressive immigration enforcement hurts the very youngest children. Refugee and U.S.-born children of undocumented immigrants experience many childhood adversities, compromising their development and health. Refugee children flee traumatizing violence in their home countries, face grueling migrations, and are harmed further by being held in…

  14. Impact of the Children's Television Act on Children's Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Sandra; Kotler, Jennifer; Kuhl, Alison; Riboli, Michael

    The impact of the Children's Television Act, which requires broadcasters to provide educational and informational programs for children, was examined by having 141 second through sixth graders watch 16 popular and unpopular television programs and then assess the motivational appeal of, and children's learning from, these programs. Popular and…

  15. LACTASE DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shcherbak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the article is the lactase deficiency in children. The most frequent clinical manifestations — diarrhea and flatulence —are not specific to this pathology. Symptoms, typical for the majority of the diseases nosologies of the digestive system, lack of timely laboratory diagnosis, and, often, lack of pediatricians awareness about the specifics of this disease are the cause of lactase deficiency under-diagnostics. The article describes in detail the physiopathological mechanisms, clinical picture, diagnosis and dietary correction of lactase deficiency, the data concerning the prevalence of this disease are cited.Key words: lactose, lactase deficiency, children, health food.

  16. Hepatic tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, J T

    2001-02-01

    Although they account for only 1% to 4% of solid tumors in children, hepatic tumors and pseudotumors offer a diagnostic challenge to the clinician seeing only an occasional case. Metastatic lesions such as neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, and lymphoma are the most common neoplasm seen in the liver, but 10 distinct primary tumors and pseudotumors of the liver occur with some regularity, and a few others may be seen rarely, including leiomyosarcoma, rhabdoid tumor, and endodermal sinus tumor. Five of these neoplasms--hepatoblastoma, infantile hemangio-endothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tree--occur only in children and are the major focus of the article.

  17. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with an increased number of days lost from school, exacerbations and days in hospital. Furthermore, children with uncontrolled asthma have more frequent contacts with the health-care system. Recent...... have been developed. They are all based on various questionnaires, but their validation has been difficult because we have no golden standard to compare with. It seems as if the tests are most valuable when they suggest that the disease is poorly controlled because a large proportion of children...

  18. Children and chiropractic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Hestbaek, Lise

    2009-01-01

    care profession has convincingly assumed the responsibility of spinal and musculoskeletal health for children. Considering the magnitude of the challenges ahead for both researchers and clinicians, this may be a good opportunity for doctors of chiropractic to take responsibility and engage...... in a determined effort to bring forward evidence-based strategies for prevention of spinal pain and other musculoskeletal problems. Chiropractors may play a significant role in finding and implementing evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies aimed at infants, children, and adolescents....

  19. When cities move children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant Klinker, Charlotte; Schipperijn, Jasper; Toftager, Mette

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel method to assess context-specific physical activity patterns using accelerometer and GPS. The method efficiency is investigated by providing descriptive results on the use of domains and subdomains, and assessing how much of children's and adolescents' daily activity...... time can be classified by these domains and subdomains. Four domains and 11 subdomains were defined as important contexts for child and adolescent behaviour. During weekdays (n=367) and weekend days (n=178) the majority of children and adolescents spent time in active transport, urban green space...

  20. Trichotillomania in Iranian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Tarighati

    1986-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports trichotillomania in eight Iranian children (7 girls and 1 boy .It is rarely seen in children and adolescents. Although some subjects are psychiatrically normal, but some suffer from depressive disorder, neurosis, or personality problems. Separation from key figure, denial of femininity/and inadequate mother-child relationship play important roles either in the etiology of trichotillomania or psychiatric disorders. Finally therapeutic interventi.ons according to the cultural factors were mentioned. Associate Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, Tehran Univer sity. Formerly, chief, Child Psychiatric Dept. Roozbeh Hospital Teheran University, Medical School.

  1. Hematogenous osteomyelitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Halken, S; Damholt, V

    1986-01-01

    In a 10-year period, 31 children, including 9 infants, were treated for hematogenous osteomyelitis. Fifteen children were treated closed and 16 open. Thirteen of 14 positive cultures were Staphylococcus aureus. Three recurrences could possibly have been prevented by a more aggressive primary...... approach. At follow-up after 5 (1-12) years, 3 neonates had developed severe growth disturbances despite optimal initial treatment. Acceptable results were obtained with antibiotic therapy for 6 weeks or more. We recommend ampicillin and a penicillinase-resistant penicillin, unless bacterial resistance...

  2. Optics and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Manuel F M; De Campos, J Ayres; Lira, Madalena; Franco, Sandra; Vazquez-Dorrio, Jose B

    2011-01-01

    Light and Optics are subjects that 'naturally' attracts the interest and sympathy of children even from very early ages. In this communication, we present a series of experiments and support material designed in this hands-on perspective, to be used to introduce the study of light and optics to kindergarten and early basic school students. Our hands-on investigative approach leads the students, aged 4 to 10 years, to observe the experiment and discover themselves, in a critical and active way, different aspects of light and optics. Preparing funny eye catching situations and experiments predispose the children to work, effectively, enjoying themselves while building up their self-confidence.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sedation or anesthesia is to be used. In general, children who have recently been ill will not ... for several hours prior to the exam. In general, children who have recently been ill will not ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to be used. In general, children who have recently been ill will not be sedated or anesthetized. ... to the exam. In general, children who have recently been ill will not be sedated or anesthetized. ...

  5. CONCLUSIONS Urban Children and Adolescents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CONCLUSIONS Urban Children and Adolescents. Increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity and measures of regional (central) adiposity. High prevalence of markers of dysmetabolic state in urban adolescents. ~10% prevalence of dysglycemia in overweight / obese school children.

  6. Helping Grieving Children and Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... renewed grief. Understanding how children and teens view death It is helpful to know how children understand ... or her. Expressing your emotions can encourage your son or daughter to share his or her own ...

  7. Children's knowledge of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; Nobes, Gavin; Panagiotaki, Georgia

    2011-03-01

    Children everywhere are fascinated by the sky, stars and Sun. Emerging evidence from cultures throughout the world suggests that even young children can acquire knowledge of the Earth and its place in the Universe.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body ... children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and ...

  9. Snacks and sweetened drinks - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choosing healthy snacks and drinks for your children can be hard. There are many options. ... Encourage children to drink a lot of water. Avoid sodas, sport drinks, and flavored waters. Stay away from drinks made with sugar or ...

  10. Understanding ADHD: Symptoms in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding ADHD Symptoms In Children Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... hyperactivity, and impulsivity are the key behaviors of ADHD. It is normal for all children to be ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray ... Materials Anesthesia Safety Children and Radiation Safety Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related ...

  12. Parenting School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life. For some children, however, school may cause frustration and stress. Learning disabilities can interfere with the ... money. It may also require parental patience and tolerance as children experiment with different programs before finding ...

  13. Children and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from studies of adults were applied to children. Today, the National Institutes of Health requires that children ... with protecting the public against unfair and deceptive business practices. A key area of its work is ...

  14. Children's experiences of domestic violence

    OpenAIRE

    Callaghan, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the key findings of a two year project focused on children's experiences of domestic violence. It draws on 107 interviews with children in Greece, Italy, Spain and the UK. The paper explores children's capacity to articulate their experiences, and highlights that they are not 'witnesses' to intimate partner violence, but experience it directly and make meaning of it, as members of a family affected by violence. I argue that children need to be recognised as direct victims...

  15. Growth delay in homeless children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierman, A H; Dreyer, B P; Quinn, L; Shulman, S; Courtlandt, C D; Guzzo, R

    1991-11-01

    This study compared the growth of homeless children with National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) standards and with growth of age-matched domiciled children of similar income level. Homeless children (n = 167) had lower height percentiles when compared with domiciled children (n = 167; P less than .001) and when compared with NCHS standards (P less than .001). The weight-height percentiles of homeless children did not differ from NCHS standards; however, domiciled children had higher weight-heights when compared with the homeless (P less than .001) and with NCHS standards (P less than .001). After controlling via regression analysis for the effects of potentially confounding factors that affect growth, it was found that homeless children from larger families and with single mothers accounted for the lower height percentiles observed. After controlling for confounding factors, domiciled children still had increased weight-height percentiles when compared with the homeless group. Duration of homelessness was not associated with decreased height or weight-height among homeless children. Homeless children in this study exhibited a pattern of stunting without wasting which is characteristic of poor children experiencing moderate, chronic nutritional stress. They exhibited a greater degree of nutritional stress than domiciled children at a similar income level and than that reported in other groups of poor children in the United States. Preexisting social factors in the families of homeless children were important in explaining the observed growth abnormalities. Further exploration of the associations between social characteristics of homeless children and their families and the growth of these children is warranted.

  16. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  17. Young Children's Concepts of Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Douglas H.; Swaminathan, Sudha; Hannibal, Mary Anne Zeitler; Sarama, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Investigates, by conducting individual clinical interviews of 97 children ages 3 to 6, the criteria preschool children use to distinguish members of a class of shapes from other figures, emphasizing identification and descriptions of shapes and reasons for these identifications. Concludes that young children initially form schemas on the basis of…

  18. Interpretive Reproduction in Children's Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at children's play from the perspective of interpretive reproduction, emphasizing the way children create their own unique peer cultures, which he defines as a set of routines, artifacts, values, and concerns that children engage in with their playmates. The article focuses on two types of routines in the peer culture of preschool…

  19. Anger communication in deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieffe, C.J.; Meerum Terwogt, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how deaf children express their anger towards peers and with what intentions. Eleven-year-old deaf children (n = 21) and a hearing control group (n = 36) were offered four vignettes describing anger-evoking conflict situations with peers. Children were asked how they

  20. Young Children's Understanding of Denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Keith; Theakston, Anna; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although a fair amount is known about young children's production of negation, little is known about their comprehension. Here, we focus on arguably the most complex basic form, denial, and how young children understand denial, when it is expressed in response to a question with gesture, single word, or sentence. One hundred twenty-six children in…

  1. Children's Responses to Literary Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Mary Vance

    This study undertook to determine (1) whether teaching sixth grade children elements of style would increase their pleasure in listening to "The Hobbit," (2) whether children who learned the most about style would respond the most positively to Tolkien's style, and (3) what children's preferences would be for selected examples of Tolkien's style.…

  2. How Healthy Are Our Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Blum, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The past century has seen vast improvements in our children's health. The infectious diseases that once killed huge numbers of children have largely been conquered. Infant mortality has also fallen markedly, although the United States lags behind other industrialized nations in this and other measures of children's health. Accidents and injuries…

  3. SPECIAL SCHOOL FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    POTTS, ALFRED M.

    MANY CHANGES HAVE OCCURRED IN MIGRANT CHILDREN OVER THE 5 YEARS THE SPECIAL SCHOOL HAS BEEN IN OPERATION. MOST NOTABLE IS THAT THE CHILDREN ARE MUCH CLEANER AND BETTER BEHAVED. THE CHILDREN ARE ISSUED COMBS, TOOTHBRUSHES, TOWELS, AND SOAP. STUDENTS SHOWER THREE TIMES EACH WEEK AND PERFORM A DAILY ROUTINE OF BRUSHING TEETH AND COMBING HAIR. MILK…

  4. Fostering Children's Interests in Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekies, Kristi S.; Sheavly, Marcia Eames

    2007-01-01

    Despite the rapidly growing interest in children's gardens and attention to the positive benefits of gardening for children, little is known about the ways in which young people actually form interests in gardening. Using a sample of 9- and 10-year-old children at a school garden site in New York State, this study examined the ways in which…

  5. Voicing children's critique and utopias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Mia; Lind, Unni

    , designed to accommodate children's participation through graphic illustrations of young children's critique and utopias. The study is informed by a commitment to democratic participation and processes (Reason and Bradbury 2001, Gunnarsson et al. 2016). Ethical guidelines implied dialogues and discussions......, children's voice, critique and utopias, pedagogical work...

  6. The Rebirth of Children's Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    Maintains that recent theoretical and methodological advances have sparked renewed interest in studying children's learning. Describes consistent and interesting findings regarding how children learn and intriguing proposals regarding mechanisms underlying learning. Argues that increasing the focus on children's learning promises practical…

  7. Reported Hyperphagia in Foster Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demb, Janet M.

    1991-01-01

    Foster children (age 0-14, n=190) referred for mental health evaluations were compared to a subsample of 10 children identified as hyperphagic. These children displayed hyperactivity and poor impulse control, interpersonal skills, and communication skills. Mothers exhibited a high incidence of drug/alcohol abuse. Hyperphagia should alert…

  8. Parent Perceptions of Children's Fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; Borgers, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    Examined fears of fifth grade students and ways in which their parents perceived the fears. Responses from 66 students and 47 parents suggest that children have more fears than parents think they have. Children reported concerns over accidents, nuclear war, and death, while parents expected children to have more fears about scary movies, the dark,…

  9. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  10. Salmonella Sepsis in African Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with both Salmonella typhiand non-typhi salmonella. (NTS) is common among children in many African countries. Salmonella typhi predominates among older children and adults with the typical localising features of enteric fever. Nontyphoid salmonellae species are more often reported among children under 5 ...

  11. Children's Classics. Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alice M.

    "Children's Classics," a 1947 article by Alice M. Jordan reprinted from "The Horn Book Magazine," examines the dynamics and appeal of some of the most famous books for young readers, including "Alice in Wonderland,""The Wind in the Willows,""Robinson Crusoe," and "Andersen's Fairy Tales." Paul Hein's annotated bibliography, a revision of Jordan's…

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  13. Chronic Candidiasis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Laura; Dolen, William K

    2017-05-01

    Healthy children may develop candidal infections as the result of exposure to antibiotics or corticosteroids, but chronic candidiasis in children after the newborn period is unusual. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) refers to a group of conditions characterized by recurrent or persistent infections with Candida species, particularly Candida albicans. CMC is a phenotype observed in a spectrum of immunologic disorders, some with endocrinologic and autoimmune features. CMC can arise secondary to inherited or acquired T cell deficiencies, but in children is largely due to inborn errors impairing the dectin pathway and IL-17 immunity. We review the current understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis and discuss the immunologic pathways by which the immune system handles Candida. We highlight the historical and recent knowledge of CMC in children, emphasizing recent insights into basic science aspects of the dectin pathway, IL-17 signaling, consequences of AIRE gene defects, and clinical aspects of inheritance, and features that distinguish the different syndromes. The clinical phenotype of CMC has many underlying genetic causes. Genetic testing is required for definitive diagnosis.

  14. Lawnmower injuries in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Nora

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Power lawnmowers can pose significant danger of injury to both the operator and the bystander, from direct contact with the rotary blades or missile injury. Our objective was to review our experience with paediatric lawnmower-associated trauma, and the safety recommendations available to operators of power lawnmowers. METHODS: The patient cohort comprised paediatric (<16 years of age) patients treated for lawnmower-associated trauma, by the plastic surgery service, between 1996 and 2003. These patients were identified retrospectively. Age at the time of injury, location and extent of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained, treatment instituted and clinical outcome were recorded. Brochures and instruction manuals of six lawnmower manufacturers were reviewed, and safety recommendations noted. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were identified. The majority of injuries occurred from direct contact with the rotary blades (93%); the remaining child sustained a burn injury. Fourteen children (93%) required operative intervention. Seven patients (46%) sustained injuries resulting in amputation, two of whom had major limb amputations. All children, except the burns patient, underwent wound debridement and received antibiotic therapy. Reconstructive methods ranged from primary closure to free tissue transfer. Many patients required multiple procedures. In all instruction manuals, instructions to keep children and pets indoors or out of the yard when mowing were found. CONCLUSIONS: Lawnmower injuries can be devastating, particularly in children. Many victims have lasting deformities as a result of their injuries. Awareness of and stringent adherence to safety precautions during use of power lawnmowers can prevent many of these accidents.

  15. Hydatid Cysts in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HussamHassan

    Hydatid Cysts in Children. Ismail M. Tantawy. Pediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Zagazig University Hospital, Zgazig, Egypt. Background/Purpose: Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by a parasite, echinococcus granulosus, characterized by cystic lesion in the liver, lungs and rarely in other parts of ...

  16. Chiropractic and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Hestbæk, Lise

    2010-01-01

    of problems were identified: the lack of research in general and the lack of research using the appropriate study designs and methodology in particular. Therefore, we discuss the meager research noted in the areas of chiropractic care in children and the clinical consequences this should have...

  17. Acute mastoiditis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthonsen, Kristian; Høstmark, Karianne; Hansen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Conservative treatment of acute otitis media may lead to more complications. This study evaluates changes in incidence, the clinical and microbiological findings, the complications and the outcome of acute mastoiditis in children in a country employing conservative guidelines in treating acute...

  18. INTERSECTIONAL DISCRIMINATION AGAINST CHILDREN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbøl, Camilla Ida

    This paper adds a perspective to existing research on child protection by engaging in a debate on intersectional discrimination and its relationship to child protection. The paper has a twofold objective, (1) to further establish intersectionality as a concept to address discrimination against ch...... children, and (2) to illustrate the importance of addressing intersectionality within rights-based programmes of child protection....

  19. Headaches in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children: Practice healthy behaviors. Behaviors that promote general good health also may help prevent headaches for your child. These lifestyle measures include getting plenty of sleep, staying physically active, eating healthy meals and snacks, drinking four to eight glasses of water daily, ...

  20. Local anaesthesia for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankenmolen, F.W.A.; Baart, J.A.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    Needless to say, children tend to dread local anaesthesia. The dentist may deal with this in various ways. He/she must win the trust of the child, speak in a manner the child understands, use an injection technique that is effective and does not cause the child any pain and know and prevent

  1. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaemia is a worldwide health problem affecting developed and developing countries. Children <5 years of age and women of child-bearing age are the most vulnerable. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) ranked 15th and 14th in the global disability-adjusted life-years in. 1990 and 2010, respectively.[1] Globally, the ...

  2. Chesed Children's Clinic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children are seen by volunteer doctors in private consultation rooms and are dispensed medication from the clinic's primary care pharmacy, as required. Those needing hospitalisation are transferred to local referral hospitals through partnership with a local advanced paramedic who is actively involved in the management ...

  3. Fingertip replantation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautel, G

    2000-11-01

    Despite common unfavorable mechanisms, fingertip replantation is a rewarding procedure in children. Cosmetic final results are usually better than those obtained by local or pedicled flaps. The success rate and the sensory reinnervation are also better than what can be expected in adult patients.

  4. Helping Children Manage Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Maggie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes interventions used to enhance coping and stress management to children and adolescents. Argues that the model of stress upon which the intervention is based dictates the intervention. Implications are discussed of the acceptance of an extended Lazarus/Folkman model for interventions in schools. (CFR)

  5. Children's Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Tips - español (Spanish) PDF National Institute of Nursing Research Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance - English PDF ... a Glance - español (Spanish) PDF National Institute of Nursing Research Palliative Care for Children: Support for the Whole ...

  6. Orbital cellulitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Woods, Charles R; Benjamin, Daniel K; Givner, Laurence B; Shetty, Avinash K

    2006-08-01

    To review the epidemiology and management of orbital cellulitis in children. The medical records of children orbital cellulitis and confirmed by computed tomography scan were reviewed. A literature search for additional studies for systematic review was also conducted. Forty-one children with orbital cellulitis were identified. The mean age was 7.5 years (range, 10 months to 16 years), and 30 (73%) were male (male:female ratio = 2.7). All cases of orbital cellulitis were associated with sinusitis; ethmoid sinusitis was present in 40 (98%) patients. Proptosis and/or ophthalmoplegia was documented in 30 (73%), and 34 (83%) had subperiosteal and/or orbital abscesses. Twenty-nine (71%) had surgical drainage and 12 (29%) received antibiotic therapy only. The mean duration of hospitalization was 5.8 days. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 21 days. Orbital cellulitis occurs throughout childhood and in similar frequency among younger and older children. It is twice as common among males as females. Selected cases of orbital cellulitis, including many with subperiosteal abscess, can be treated successfully without surgical drainage.

  7. Intracerebral hemorrhage in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ihab Zidan

    2012-04-01

    Apr 1, 2012 ... was as follow: good recovery in 14(47%), fair recovery in. 7(23%), poor recovery in 7(23%), and death in two patients. (7%) (Table 4). 4. Discussion. This study focuses on ICH in children. We included all chil- dren presenting with ICH regardless the etiology (traumatic or non-traumatic). This did not match ...

  8. BAD TIMES, SLIMMER CHILDREN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés-Obrero, Cristina; Jiménez-Martín, Sergi; Vall-Castello, Judit

    2016-11-01

    Although the majority of the literature has confirmed that recessions are beneficial for adults' health and babies' outcomes at delivery, this effect should not necessarily be the same for children. In this paper, we study the effect of business cycle conditions on infant underweight, overweight, and obesity. We exploit eight waves of repeated cross-sectional data (1987-2012) of the Spanish National Health Survey for children aged 2-15 and use the regional unemployment rate of the trimester of the interview as a proxy for the business cycle phase at the local level. We find that an increase in the unemployment rate is associated with lower obesity incidence, especially for children under 6 years old and over 12 years old. However, economic shocks also proof to have potentially negative consequences as they increase the prevalence of infant underweight for the same age groups. Moreover, we show that the possible mechanisms through which the cycle is impacting infant obesity is the nutritional composition of the children's diet, as well as, increases in the frequency of exercise. We provide some evidence that suggests that the impact of business cycle conditions on infant weight disorders have little objective health consequences in the short run. However, the potential long-term effects may become important as underweight during childhood is associated with worse outcomes later in life. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Allergic rhinosinusitis in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    inflammatory oede- ma present in persis- tent allergic rhinitis will eventually occur in the mucous mem- branes of the ostiomeatal units in the middle meati leading ultimately to allergic ... most children over the age of 6 months. These are excellent tests .... flax oil or fatty fish is of a high omega 3 and essential amino acid.

  10. Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... services to help you and your child. Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss can affect a child’s ability to develop communication, language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting ...

  11. Discrimination Learning in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochocki, Thomas E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Examined the learning performance of 192 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children on either a two or four choice simultaneous color discrimination task. Compared the use of verbal reinforcement and/or punishment, under conditions of either complete or incomplete instructions. (Author/SDH)

  12. Designing Maps for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Barbara S.

    In 1964 World Book wanted to be able to say that more than 1,000 maps being made for the encyclopedia were designed to be appropriate and useful for children between the ages of nine and fourteen. However, there was virtually no research on which such a program could be based. This paper briefly reviews research projects in this area started in…

  13. Children, mobility, and space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pia; Mikkelsen, Miguel Romero; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the potentials of a mixed methods approach to the study of children’s mobility patterns. The methodology presented here combined ethnographic fieldwork with global positioning system technology and an interactive questionnaire that children completed via mobile phone. This ...

  14. Children's Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news and announcements in our newsletter: Children’s Tumor Foundation 120 Wall Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10005-3904 1-800-323-7938 info@ctf.org © Children's Tumor Foundation - All rights reserved Privacy Policy

  15. Assessing Children's Multiplicative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Chris; Hurrell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Multiplicative thinking is a "big idea" of mathematics that underpins much of the mathematics learned beyond the early primary school years. This paper reports on a current study that utilises an interview tool and a written quiz to gather data about children's multiplicative thinking. The development of the tools and some of the…

  16. Children's Conceptions of Jesus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Karen; Freathy, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a recent study investigating young children's (aged 10-11) conceptions of Jesus in England. The overall picture revealed by the study is that whilst there was a general assent amongst pupils in our sample towards an ethical and humanistic conception of the historical Jesus, there was less of a consensus about…

  17. Sports Injuries in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Timothy N.

    1991-01-01

    A literature review revealed an absence of well-controlled studies concerning the prevention of sports injuries in children. A checklist outlines some causes of the overuse syndrome, including (1) training errors; (2) the nature of playing surfaces; (3) muscle imbalance; (4) anatomic malalignments; (5) construction of shoes; and (6) various…

  18. Prevent Children's Sports Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Lyle J.

    1983-01-01

    Children who actively take part in sports are susceptible to special injury risks because their bodies are still growing. Parents should keep both the child's individual physical and emotional makeup and the demands of the sport in mind when selecting an activity. Proper training methods and equipment are discussed. (PP)

  19. Children and transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2003-12-09

    This issue of the 'Sustainable Transportation Monitor', published by the Centre for Sustainable Transportation located in Mississauga, Ontario, reports on key findings from a project involving children and transportation in the Halton and Peel regions of Ontario, recently completed by the Centre. Excerpts from the report summarized in this issue include data on children's travel in Halton and Peel, and a discussion on possible contribution of transport practices to the growing incidence of obesity among Canadian children. Results of the study indicate that until about age 18, travel by children on schooldays is dominated by the journey to and from school. School bus is the choice of 28 per cent, and passenger car by 23 per cent among 11-to-14- year-olds; the share of travel by car is larger for older young people and also likely larger among 6-to-10-year-olds. Physical inactivity has been highlighted as the contributing factor to excess body weight and obesity in this, and other studies. Data collected for this study corroborates the findings of other studies by showing a positive correlation between obesity and transport energy use in 18 affluent countries, suggesting that a high level of use of motorized transport contributes to inactivity and body weight gain. Several alternate means of transportation, with the potential to combat obesity, are proposed. 46 refs.

  20. Children of Sex Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia; Baird, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Outlines three major differentiating categories of children who were sexually abused by sex rings: level of fear, ability to trust, and disclosure confusion. Addresses denial and resistance regarding child sexual exploitation by a ring among practitioners in the child welfare system. (Author/BB)

  1. Children's Ecology Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussenhop, Martha

    Selected for this listing of children's books are fiction and non-fiction books which add to an understanding of ecology, broadly considered here as the study of the interrelationships of organisms to each other and their environment. General ecology, natural resources, man and his environment, evolution and adaptation, appreciation, survival,…

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... both imaging exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  3. Media Violence and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look ... to make a diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. ... result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the ...

  5. The cost of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Leif Jonas

    , the opportunity cost of two children is estimated to 28-29 per cent of full income, which in monetary units is close to estimated income difference between women employed in the public and private sector. The opportunity cost of fatherhood is generally positive, but only significantly positive for men born...

  6. Atrial Fibrillation in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Atrial Fibrillation in Children Updated:Oct 18,2016 Does your ... arrhythmia. This content was last reviewed July 2016. Atrial Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) ...

  8. Children's Advertisement Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Andrew; Beard, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores primary school children's ability to engage with "the power of the text" by tackling persuasive writing in the form of an advertisement. It is eclectically framed within genre theory and rhetorical studies and makes use of linguistic tools and concepts. The paper argues that writing research has not built upon earlier…

  9. sexually abused children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sexually abused children are anxiety disorders, depression, increased aggression and disturbance in sexual behaviour and gender roles. An American study found significantly higher rates .... counterparts with post-admission disclosure, this difference was not ... sense of psychic loneliness and internal crisis which follows.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related ...

  11. Death, Children, and Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Robin L.

    The books listed in this annotated bibliography are intended to help children understand the reality of death and deal with the mystery and emotions that accompany it. Each entry indicates the genre and reading level of the book and provides a brief description of the attitude toward death that it conveys. The selections include fables, fantasy,…

  12. Abdominal tuberculosis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heda Melinda Nataprawira

    2001-06-01

    supported the diagnosis. There was no positive results of acid fast bacilli and culture done for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric aspirate as well as ascitic fuid. Peritonitis tuberculosis was most commonly diagnosed (80.0%, followed by mesenterial/nodal tuberculosis (20.0%. All of the children followed (60.0% responded well to the drugs therapy.

  13. Children Learning by Themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfurth, Marion A.; Winer, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes Vitrine 2001, an innovative computer-based learning environment at the Quebec Centre for Research in Educational Computing. Highlights program responses to educational software deficiencies; teachers' limitations in providing appropriate pedagogical support; and the need for support materials to help children get the most out of their…

  14. Endogenous uveitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J C

    1979-07-01

    Endogenous uveitis, with its ocular sequalae, accounts for a significant number of blind children in the world today. Even though these children are asymptomatic by ophthalmic history, they usually present with ocular pathology compatible with chronic intraocular inflammation. Although loss of vision is invariably due to cataract formation, fluorescein angiogram, binocular indirect ophthalmoloscopy, and fundus contact lens examination often reveal pathology of the optic nerve and retina, accounting for a significant degree of visual loss. While actual etiologic agents are usually not identified in the majority of children, toxoplasmosis, sarcoidosis, and childhood arthropathies occur with such high frequency that mention is made of these diseases. Conventional surgical procedures for ocular sequalae such as cataract and glaucoma, are known to yield poor results. Corticosteroids administered either topically, periocularly, or systemically appear to be of value in the treatment of these diseases, although control studies have not been done. Efforts to lessen the visual morbidity in these children should begin by a cross-fertilization of information between primary care physicians, pediatricians, and ophthalmologists.

  15. On Children and Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotz, Ignacio L.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the deleterious effects of television on children's behavior, focusing on television as a medium of communication, and not on the quality of its programming. The criticisms include distortion and mediation of reality, interference with creative and social development, unidirectionality, violence, and inducement toward passivity. (ED)

  16. Violence in Children's Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Sue

    A British 12-year-old boy died while imitating the heroic leaps of the cartoon character Batman. Tragic incidents stemming from cartoon imitation such as this one occur with alarming frequency. Still, many people choose to ignore violence in children's cartoons. Even some experts don't recognize that cartoons may be harmful. Researcher Wilbur…

  17. Bruxism in allergic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, M B

    1980-01-01

    A study of bruxism (tooth grinding) was conducted at the University of Miami School of Medicine, at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida, and at the Sleep Disorders Center, Mount Sinai MEdical Center, Miami Beach, Florida. A threefold incidence of this pernicious oral habit in allergic children was disclosed as compared to nonallergic children. Dental literature stresses psychogenic factors, occlusal maladjustments, systemic conditions, and occupational pursuits which do not pertain to most children. Allergy is rarely considered. Nocturnal bruxism may be initiated reflexly by increased negative pressures in the tympanic cavities from intermittent allergic edema of the mucosa of the Eustachian tubes. Embryologic, anatomic, and neurological relationships between the muscles of the eardrum, Eustachian tubes, and jaws have a primordial, common ancestry. Chronic middle ear disturbances may promote reflex action to the jaws by stimulating the trigeminal nuclei in the brain. Sleep studies at Mount Sinai Medical Center on allergic, bruxing children have produced some interesting but incomplete results. We are attempting to develop sophisticated devices for monitoring abnormal tubal function which may be the crux of the bruxism problem.

  18. Social anxiety in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avakyan, Tamara V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of research on social anxiety in orphaned children are presented in this article. The goal of this study was to identify the relationship between depressive states, anxiety states, characteristics of the situation at school, and fear of social evaluation in orphaned children. The differences in these parameters between orphaned children and children living with their families were also studied. The sample consisted of 123 teenagers. The main group comprised 57 orphans from an orphanage near the Moscow region, aged 10 to 16 years old. The control group comprised 66 students from a general school, aged 10 to 15 years old, and all living with their families. Differences were found in the parameters studied. The orphans were characterized by higher levels of social and general anxiety. On the one hand, they strove for the attention and approval of adults, but, on the other hand, they were more worried than their peers who lived with their families about the impression they made on others. They were afraid of receiving a negative evaluation.

  19. DYSLIPIDEMIA FEATURES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Turkinа

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary scientific and practical data about various lipid metabolism disorders (dyslipidemia in children are discussed. Spectra lipids, phospholipids and lipoproteins in blood serum and erythrocyte membranes are presented. Characteristics of dyslipidemia and hypolipidemia, classification of hyperlipidemia, a description of acetonemic vomiting syndrome are given. Basic principles of dyslipidemia treatment as well as therapy of obesity associated with dyslipidemia are described.

  20. DYSLIPIDEMIA FEATURES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Turkinа

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary scientific and practical data about various lipid metabolism disorders (dyslipidemia in children are discussed. Spectra lipids, phospholipids and lipoproteins in blood serum and erythrocyte membranes are presented. Characteristics of dyslipidemia and hypolipidemia, classification of hyperlipidemia, a description of acetonemic vomiting syndrome are given. Basic principles of dyslipidemia treatment as well as therapy of obesity associated with dyslipidemia are described.

  1. Educating Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Frances A.

    Based in part on a study of 20 school systems judged to have outstanding programs of pupil services and special education, the manual presents varying philosophies of education for the handicapped and considers the nature and incidence of handicaps. Special programs and services for handicapped children are described, and information is provided…

  2. Coblation adenotonsillectomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Trinidade, Aaron; Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Supriya, Mrinal; Kubba, Haytham

    2012-09-01

    To determine re-admission rate for post-tonsillectomy pain; the primary and secondary post-tonsillectomy bleeding rate; the percentage requiring control of post-tonsillectomy bleeding in children undergoing coblation tonsillectomy. A descriptive study. Royal Hospital for Sick Children (Yorkhill Hospital) between 2004 and 2006. All patients who underwent tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy by coblation technique. Patients were identified from operation theatre log book and electronic data base of theatre activity. The hospital case notes were reviewed retrospectively to collect data, regarding demographics, indication and type of surgery, grade of operating surgeon, duration of hospital stay, re-attendance and re-admission, and management of complications. A total of 106 children; males (n = 53, 50%), females (n = 53, 50%) with a mean age 6.3 years underwent surgery using coblation technique. Thirty-one percent had a tonsillectomy while 69% underwent an adenotonsillectomy. Of these, 48% had history of recurrent tonsillitis, 43% had obstructive sleep apnoea and 9% suffered predominantly from obstructive symptoms. Eighty-two percent of patients were discharged on the first postoperative day. Only one patient had primary bleeding requiring re-operation. After discharge, 7 patients (6.7%) were re-admitted with secondary bleeding, 3 (2.8%) of whom were taken back to theatre to control the bleeding under general anaesthesia. Coblation tonsillectomy is a useful technique in having a low primary and secondary bleeding rates in children undergoing tonsillectomy and adenotonsillectomy.

  3. How Children Grow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    The discussion of genetic and environmental factors in the growth of children from infancy to adolescence focuses on intrauterine life, the effects of nutrition, hormones, illness, and emotion in the childhood years, and obesity and puberty in adolescents. Described are processes, such as amniocentesis, for monitoring the physiology chemistry of…

  4. Sleep disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Oliveiero; Novelli, Luana

    2010-09-27

    Sleep disorders may affect between 20% and 30% of young children, and include problems getting to sleep (dyssomnias), or undesirable phenomena during sleep (parasomnias), such as sleep terrors and sleepwalking. Children with physical or learning disabilities are at increased risk of sleep disorders. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for dyssomnias in children? What are the effects of treatments for parasomnias in children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 28 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antihistamines; behavioural therapy plus antihistamines, plus benzodiazepines, or plus chloral and derivatives; benzodiazepines alone; exercise; extinction and graduated extinction; 5-hydroxytryptophan; light therapy; melatonin; safety/protective interventions for parasomnias; scheduled waking (for parasomnias); sleep hygiene; and sleep restriction.

  5. Gastrointestinal polyps in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Lee, Hung-Chang; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Chan, Wai-Tao; Jiang, Chuen-Bin

    2009-10-01

    Gastrointestinal polyps are common in children. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, endoscopic findings, management, pathology, and recurrence of gastrointestinal polyps in children at Mackay Memorial Hospital. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 50 children with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyps managed at Mackay Memorial Hospital between January 1984 and April 2007. Demographic data; clinical features; polyp size, number and location; endoscopic findings; management; pathology; and information on recurrences were extracted from the clinical records. The distribution of polyps in the 50 patients included gastric (4 patients), duodenal (2), ileocecal (4) and colorectal polyps (40). All patients with gastric polyps presented with vomiting, and three of the four patients with ileocecal polyps presented with intussusception. The mean age of the 40 patients with colorectal polyps was 6.8 years. The majority of those polyps were in the rectosigmoid colon; 36 patients presented with hematochezia. Solitary polyps were identified in 33 patients and multiple polyps were identified in seven patients. Most of the colorectal polyps were less than 2cm in diameter. Histologically, the most frequent type was juvenile polyp. Gastrointestinal polyps in children are usually benign. Pediatricians treating a child with a gastrointestinal polyp should pay attention to the immediate complications of the polyps, such as intussusception or bleeding, the extraintestinal manifestations and long-term risk for malignancy.

  6. Gastrointestinal Polyps in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Wang

    2009-10-01

    Conclusion: Gastrointestinal polyps in children are usually benign. Pediatricians treating a child with a gastrointestinal polyp should pay attention to the immediate complications of the polyps, such as intussusception or bleeding, the extraintestinal manifestations and long-term risk for malignancy.

  7. Monitoring asthma in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, Marille W.; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L. P.; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Makela, Mika J.; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L.; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Carlsen, Karin C. Lodrup

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist

  8. Homeless Families and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Baker, Linda Schuurmann

    1996-01-01

    Available data on homeless families and children are reviewed, focusing on definitions of homelessness and the most common methods used to estimate the size of the homeless population. Trends in the duration of homelessness and the numbers of families at risk of losing housing are discussed. (SLD)

  9. Children's Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivanova, K. N.; Lebedev, M. V.; Sivak, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    Why do children learn in different ways: some are good students who show interest and zeal, while others are lazy and have to be taught against their will? Why do schools have over- and underachievers? Of course, there are a multitude of reasons. But almost 50 years ago it was shown using large data sets that families with high socioeconomic…

  10. Children in the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Magda Cordell; And Others

    This book of charts documents the current situation of children in the less developed regions of the world. Data on population distribution by age and sex, urban growth, social and economic conditions, life expectancy, mortality, health and disease, nutrition, medical care, education, youth participation in the labor force of selected countries…

  11. Children's First Word Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braine, Martin D. S.

    1976-01-01

    This monograph presents a descriptive analysis of the syntactic patterns in 16 corpora of word combinations from 11 infants learning either English (six children), Samoan, Finnish, Hebrew, or Swedish. The mean utterance lengths range up to about 1.7 morpehmes. There are both reanalyses of corpora in the literature and new corpora. The data…

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your body. Hybrid imaging techniques (PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  13. The Children's House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Lili E.

    2013-01-01

    Lili Peller's "The Children's House" essay begins where Maria Montessori left off in her description of space articulations. Peller does not name Montessori specifically as she always had a desire to become independent in her own right as a neo-Freudian child analyst. But the Haus Der Kinder founded in summer of 1922 suggests a total…

  14. Preschool Children's School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdogan, Serpil; Akgül, Esra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine preschool teachers' perspectives about children's school readiness. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study as a mixed method research. Data, in the quantitative aspects of the research, were collected through the use of "School Readiness Form" developed by Boz (2004)…

  15. Furniture injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin H; Adams, Susan; Holland, Andrew J A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the incidence, type and severity of furniture-related injuries in children in the Sydney region. Retrospective analysis of presentations to the emergency departments of two paediatric tertiary hospitals in Sydney over a 4-year period from January 2000 to December 2003 with furniture-related injuries. Deaths of children because of furniture-related injuries reported to the Coroner, from 2000-2002, were also reviewed. The main outcome measures were circumstances of injury, type and number of injuries, morbidity, and mortality. 52 children presented with furniture-related injuries. The median age was 2.5 years (range 9 months-15 years), with a male-to-female ratio of 3:2. Falling televisions accounted for 22 (42%) of the injuries. Median Injury Severity Score was 1 (range 1-25). One child died. The most common regions injured were the limbs and the head. Thirty-one children (60%) required medical imaging, 28 (54%) required admission to hospital and 6 were allowed home in under 12 h. Of the 22 patients admitted for longer than 12 h, 14% required intensive care. Median length of stay was 1 day (range 0-15 days). Eighteen patients (35%) suffered scarring or long-term limitations as a result of their injuries. From 2000 to 2002 there were four additional deaths in NSW because of furniture-related injuries, two because of a falling television. Furniture-related injuries represent a cause of serious trauma and death in Australian children. There remains a need for the stability and security of televisions and large furniture items to be improved.

  16. Preventing gun injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossen, Eric J; Lewis, Brenna; Hoffman, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    Firearms are involved in the injury and death of a large number of children each year from both intentional and unintentional causes. Gun ownership in homes with children is common, and pediatricians should incorporate evidence-based means to discuss firearms and protect children from gun-related injuries and violence. Safe storage of guns, including unloaded guns locked and stored separately from ammunition, can decrease risks to children, and effective tools are available that pediatricians can use in clinical settings to help decrease children's access to firearms. Furthermore, several community-based interventions led by pediatricians have effectively reduced firearm-related injury risks to children. Educational programs that focus on children's behavior around guns have not proven effective. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2015. All rights reserved.

  17. Eosinophilic colitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Horowska-Ziaja, Sabina; Kajor, Maciej; Więcek, Sabina; Chlebowczyk, Wojciech; Woś, Halina

    2017-02-01

    Eosinophilic colitis, which is a rare form of eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases, occurs as primary and secondary allergic eosinophilic colitis of the gastrointestinal tract infection, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis. The diagnosis is based on a significant amount of eosinophils in the inflammatory infiltrate of the colon wall. To analyze the clinical picture taking into account comorbidities and endoscopic picture in children with eosinophilic colitis. The test group consisted of 43 children, the average age - 12.1 years diagnosed with eosinophilic colitis (according to the Whitington scale) hospitalized in the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Pediatrics of the Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. Testing for food allergies, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, gastrointestinal diseases and parasitic diseases was performed in the group of children and the analysis concerned the intensity of eosinophilic infiltration of the colon mucosa with the severity of clinical symptoms, endoscopic picture, the presence of inflammatory bowel disease, and food allergy. Half of the tested children suffered from isolated eosinophilic colitis but the rest of them had eosinophilic infiltrate with inflammatory bowel disease more often, however, the Crohn's disease. The endoscopic image was uncharacteristic, and grade III in the Whitington scale was predominant in the histopathological examination, in most cases located in the entire large intestine. The higher level of total IgE was found in less than half of the patients and it did not correlate with the severity of eosinophilic infiltration. It was shown that the severity of eosinophilic infiltration correlated with exacerbation of clinical symptoms, endoscopic image, and the presence of inflammatory bowel disease. The higher level of antibodies of ASCA and ANCA was found in approximately 20% of the children with isolated eosinophilic colitis and 63% of children with Crohn's disease

  18. [Insulin resistance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stąpor, Natalia; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the state of reduced tissue sensitivity to insulin. The frequency of this occurrence is increasing dramatically in developed countries. Both, environmental and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Sedentary lifestyle and the excessive calorie intake cause the substantial increase of the fat issue, leading to overweight and obesity. Insulin resistance occurs physiologically during puberty, but it is also a pathological condition predisposing children to develop abnormal glucose tolerance, diabetes, hypertension and polycystic ovary syndrome among girls. More frequent occurrence of metabolic syndrome can be observed among children born small for gestational age (SGA). The article presents the current views on risk factors, etiology, diagnosis and consequences insulin resistance and disorders of glucose tolerance. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  19. Polyps in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Vincent R; Bernabe, Kathryn

    2008-11-01

    Children with polyps usually present with bleeding or pain. Most pediatric intestinal polyps are sporadic and are not associated with malignancy. Polyposis syndromes are also well described in children. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is the most common hamartomatous polyposis condition. Although the polyps are not thought to be premalignant in most patients, there is an increased risk of other cancers. Familial adenomatous polyposis is also seen in childhood and is associated with a very high risk of malignant transformation as well as extracolonic adenomas and malignancy. The diagnosis and management of sporadic juvenile polyps, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis, as well as rarer conditions associated with intestinal polyps are reviewed in this article.

  20. Fabry disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Rasmussen, AK

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, multiorgan disease. The most serious complications involve the kidney, brain and heart. This study aims to assess the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using agalsidase-beta in children with Fabry disease. We carried out a nationwide, descriptive and observational...... retrospective cohort study of 10 children (9-16 years at baseline), who underwent regular systematic investigations for 1-8 years after initiation of ERT with agalsidase-beta (Fabryzyme®, Genzyme). Ophthalmological, echocardiographic abnormalities and hypohidrosis were found at baseline and during the follow......-up period. Serious kidney, heart or brain involvement had not developed at the last follow-up examination. For the majority of the patients improvements were found concerning headache, acroparaesthesias and gastrointestinal pain during the follow-up period. The level of energy and physical activity also...

  1. Children's velo-mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Trine Agervig; Nielsen, Thomas Sick; Olafsson, Anton Stahl

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable mobilities play a dominate role in low carbon futures and cycling is an integral element. Children are heirs of transport cultures and crucial for future sustainable mobility. Moreover cycling is important for children’s independent mobility and geographical experience. Dominating...... approaches in transport research, including cycling, understand travel behaviour individualistic and lack to grasp the relational complexities, which are inevitable when considering children’s mobilities. Furthermore has children’s cycling largely been studied as independent mobility and active school travel....... How cycling is learned and constituted, and how cycling skills are consolidated, extended and turned into a stabilized practice remains unstudied. Drawing on in-depth interview data from the region of Copenhagen, Denmark, among families with children (N=20) the paper provides new insights into how...

  2. Intelligence in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Nader

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial results of an investigation are presented whose primary objective is to adapt and to standardize the neurocognitive assessment battery C.A.S. of Das and Naglieri (1997 in a child sample. The test is an operationalization of a non traditional intelligence model (PASS that considers the intelligent behaviors as a group of four cognitive basic processes (planning, attention, simultaneous and successive processing. The objectives of this work are to obtain the psychometric properties of the instrument and also, to analyze if differences exist according to sex and age. The study type is crosswise - transactional. It was administered the CAS to 150 children residents in Buenos Aires among the ages of 6 to 12 years (population general non consultant and the WISC-III to a sample of 50 children

  3. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marji, S.

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  4. Stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Bahakim, Hassan M.; Kurban, Khadija M.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Nasir, Ali A.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Khoja, Waleed A.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology and clinical features of stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the causes, pathogenesis, and risk factors. The Retrospective Study Group (RSG) included children with stroke who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology, or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period July 1992 to February 2001. The Prospective Study Group (PSG) included those seen between February 2001 and March 2003. During the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, 117 children (61 males and 56 females, aged one month-12 years) were evaluated; the majority (89%) of these were Saudis. The calculated annual hospital frequency rate of stroke was 27.1/100,000 of the pediatric (1month-12 years) population The mean age at onset of the initial stroke in the 104 Saudi children was 27.1 months (SD=39.3 months) median and median was 6 months. Ischemic strokes accounted for the majority of cases (76%). Large-vessel infarcts (LVI, 51.9%) were more common than small-vessel lacunar lesions (SVLL, 19.2%). Five patients (4.8%) had combined LVI and SVLL. Intracranial hemorrhage was less common (18.2%), whereas sinovenous thrombosis was diagnosed in 6 (5.8%) patients. A major risk factor was identified in 94 of 104 (89.4%) Saudi children. Significantly more hematologic disorders and coagulopathies were identified in the PSG compared to the RSG (p=0.001), reflecting a better yield following introduction of more comprehensive hematologic and cogulation laboratory tests during the prospective study period. Hematologic disorders were the most common risk factor (46.2%); presumed perinatal ischemic cerebral injury was risk factor in 23 children (22.1) and infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system in 18 (17.3%). Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying cause in 7 patients (6.7%) and

  5. Choosing children: intergenerational justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyal, Len; McLean, Sheila

    2005-03-01

    In this discussion, we argue that the concept of intergenerational justice, usually used in environmental matters, is applicable to reproductive decisions also. Additionally, we propose that this permits certain reproductive choices to be made prior to conception or during the pregnancy, and that these choices should not be confined to clinical concerns. In particular, we argue that consideration of the interests of future children should be viewed from the perspective of objective well-being. That being the case, decisions about the sex of future offspring can, in terms of intergenerational justice, be legitimate. We do not argue that every reproductive choice is legitimate; for example it would not be legitimate deliberately to choose characteristics that prevent future children from potentially successful participation in social life.

  6. Demystifying Septoplasty in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Septum deviation in children may alter the early physiologic process of breathing, causing obligatory oral breathing and consequently changing craniofacial development and even intellect. Because of these consequences, septoplasty should be performed as early as possible. Materials and Methods The retrospective study reviewed the results of septoplasty in 40 children under 12 years old who had follow-up after surgery for a maximum period of 7 years. The research was submitted to the ethics committee and approved with protocol number 10331912.0.0000.0058. Results Forty patients underwent septoplasty, 39 (97.5% had cauterization of inferior turbinate and associated procedure, 20 (50% had adenotonsillectomy, and 17 (42.5% had adenoidectomy. Conclusion Nasal septum deviation should be corrected early to provide the harmonious growth of the face and to enable normal development of the child, without the occurrence of nasal deformity.

  7. Sleep problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Katrina; Hiscock, Harriet

    2015-12-01

    Childhood sleep problems are common, and frequently reduce the wellbeing and functioning of both child and family. The majority of childhood sleep problems are behavioural in origin. This article outlines the aetiology and features of sleep difficulties in children, from infants to teenagers, and provides a corresponding 'toolkit' of evidence-based behavioural management strategies. Childhood behavioural sleep problems manifest across age groups as various forms of difficulty initiating and/or maintaining sleep. These difficulties are often amenable to home-based behavioural interventions, which can be taught to parents and, de-pending on their developmental stage, the child or adolescent. Sustaining the intervention for sufficient sleep duration can be challenging for families. Community health practitioners play a central role in tailoring the explanation of management strategies to families and children or adolescents. Sleep diaries and education materials from evidence-based websites can assist the practitioner and family in achieving successful diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Ethnicity and children's diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette Ljungdalh; Krasnik, Allan; Holm, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This study explores concerns and dilemmas connected with diet, health and child-feeding in families with ethnic minority background. The aim is to contribute to better targeting of dietary advice to ethnic minority parents in Denmark. Four focus group interviews were carried out with mothers...... of children between 4 months and 2 and a half years who were descendants of Turkish or Pakistani immigrants. The focus groups investigated: (1) everyday feeding practices; (2) values and concerns behind food choice; (3) social and cultural norms influencing feeding and eating practices; (4) experienced...... those related to ethnicity that are sometimes more important in determining food habits. The present study found that child-feeding practices were shaped by two main aims: (1) securing and improving child health; and (2) ensuring multi-cultural eating competence in children. The results confirm...

  9. Idiopathic megarectum in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, P P; Pinfield, A; Stringer, M D

    2001-02-01

    There is scant information about the management of idiopathic megarectum in childhood. Children with idiopathic megarectum referred to a single institution between 1994 and 1998 were identified prospectively. Those with Hirschsprung's disease or an anorectal malformation were excluded. The remaining patient group, 22 boys and 7 girls, had a median age of 8.0 years (range 3.5-14.0 y). Median duration of symptoms prior to referral was 2.0 years (range 0.4-11 y). Chronic soiling was the dominant complaint in 28/29 (97%) cases. 23 children had received regular stimulant laxatives for periods ranging from 1 month to 11 years, and 9 children had been treated with regular enemas. The degree of megarectum assessed by both abdominal palpation and plain radiography was: grade 1 (below umbilical level) n=6; grade 2 (at umbilical level) n=15; and grade 3 (above umbilical level) n=8. Hirschsprung's disease was specifically excluded by rectal biopsy in all cases and no patient had evidence of spinal dysraphism. Three boys with massive megarectums and intractable symptoms were treated by a staged Duhamel sigmoid pull-through with excellent functional results. Fifteen patients (52%) were treated by a single manual evacuation under general anaesthesia followed by a daily Bisacodyl 5-10 mg suppository. After a median follow-up of 16 months, 13 continue to respond well with a daily bowel action and no soiling (4 of the 13 have discontinued treatment and remain well). The remaining 11 patients (38%) have continued conventional treatment with oral laxatives but with limited success. Idiopathic megarectum is poorly described in children. It is more common in boys and is often resistant to laxative therapy alone. After appropriate preparation, treatment with stimulant suppositories can be effective. Surgery has a valuable role in selected patients with a massive megarectum.

  10. Benefits for handicapped children

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of long-term care benefits within the CERN Health Insurance Scheme requires the coordination of the benefits foreseen for handicapped children. Measures were adopted by the Management following the recommendation made by the Standing Concertation Committee on 26 March 2003. A document clarifying these measures is available on the Web at the following address: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/soc/Social_affairs/social_affairs.asp Social Affairs Service 74201

  11. PHARYNGITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Polunina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory disease of the throat — is a widespread pathology in childhood. The complex treatment of pharyngitis often includes solutions for gargling, sprays, tablets for sucking, hard candy or lozenges containing a variety of anti-inflammatory components. Their use reduces the severity of pain and the time treatment, but does not preclude the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for systemic effects. Key words: pharyhgitis, sore throat, treatment, children (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 106–108.

  12. Lead poisoning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapul, Heda; Laraque, Danielle

    2014-08-01

    There is no safe lead level in children. Primary prevention is the most effective way to bring about the complete removal of lead from the environment and eliminate lead poisoning as a public health concern. The National Lead Information Center can be reached via the Internet at www.epa.gov/lead and www.hud.gov/lead, or via phone at 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).

  13. EPILEPSY SURGERY IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    S. Faraji rad; F. Ashrafzadeh; M. Faraji

    2009-01-01

    AbstractObjectiveIn the majority of patients with intractable epilepsy, seizures can be well controlled with appropriate medication. However, current estimates indicate that some of patients with epilepsy are refractory to all forms of medical therapy. The surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy in children has  evolved with advances in technical innovations. These medically intractable patients are candidates for surgical treatment in an attempt to achieve better seizure control. The defi...

  14. Hypercalcemic Disorders in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokes, Victoria J; Nielsen, Morten F; Hannan, Fadil M

    2017-01-01

    with hypotonia, poor feeding, vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, lethargy, polyuria, dehydration, failure to thrive and seizures. In severe cases renal failure, pancreatitis and reduced consciousness may also occur and older children and adolescents may present with psychiatric symptoms. The causes...... caused by parathyroid tumors, which may give rise to primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) or tertiary hyperparathyroidism, which usually arises in association with chronic renal failure and in the treatment of hypophosphatemic rickets. Acquired causes of PTH-dependent hypercalcemia in neonates include...

  15. Dental radiology for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation

  16. Night terrors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feferman, I

    1988-12-01

    Night terrors are a bizarre sleep disorder that affects young children. The child partially awakes during the night agitated, afraid and terrified, and cannot be consoled. These events, which may be related to emotional turmoil, are self-limiting. Psychiatric evaluation is indicated in certain cases, and drug therapy is almost never necessary. Parents should be reassured that night terrors are not dangerous and do not reflect any serious pathology.

  17. Night Terrors in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Feferman, Irv

    1988-01-01

    Night terrors are a bizarre sleep disorder that affects young children. The child partially awakes during the night agitated, afraid and terrified, and cannot be consoled. These events, which may be related to emotional turmoil, are self-limiting. Psychiatric evaluation is indicated in certain cases, and drug therapy is almost never necessary. Parents should be reassured that night terrors are not dangerous and do not reflect any serious pathology.

  18. Appendiceal ascariasis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Wani, Imtiaz; Maqbool, Muddasir; Amin, Abid; Shah, Firdous; Keema, Arshad; Singh, Jang; Kitagawa, Maki; Nazir, Mir

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The propensity of Ascaris lumbricoides to wander leads to varied surgical complications in the abdomen. Wandering A lumbricoides may sometimes reach the vermiform appendix and its presence there may remain silent or incite pathology. Our aim was to study ascariadial appendicitis. METHODS: Over a period of 3 years, we identified children who were found to have appendiceal ascariasis during surgery for different intestinal complications due to ascariasis. We studied the relationship...

  19. Children with Asthma and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yuzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to their physical, mental and psychological development and increases their quality of life. The most recommended sports for the children with asthma are swimming and water sports. Sports like tennis and volleyball are too advised. Choice of sports depends on severity of asthma, child and #8217;s choice and whether or not asthma is kept under control. Nursing approaches for the children with asthma include correction of symptoms, training of children and their families, assistance with disease adaptation, continuing asthma care at home and interventions to make children lead healthy activities of daily life of children. With protective measures to be taken by families and children; children should be encourage for sportive activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 241-244

  20. Gastrointestinal scintigraphy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Milk scans are by far the commonest GI study we perform. All babies regurgitate to a greater or lesser extent and there is no clear distinction between normal and abnormal. In addition gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is not the only cause of regurgitation; regurgitation may be due to abnormal oesophageal transit, GOR or slow gastric emptying. The milk scan can detect and quantify these abnormalities. It may also detect pulmonary aspiration if this occurs during the study period. Short bowel syndrome, soiling and a constipation are the commonest indications for small and large bowel transit studies. Children with feeding difficulties and short bowel syndrome often have a segment at which hold up occurs while most children with soiling have normal or even rapid transit through small and large bowel. Ingestion of caustic substances by young children is a frequent cause of presentation at paediatric emergency centers and about 20% of these patients have significant oesophageal injury requiring ongoing therapy to prevent stricture formation. A 99m Tc sucralfate swallow is an accurate method for assessing the oesophageal injury and may be used to document healing. The methods for labeling sucralfate and performing the scan are simple. Meckel's scans are useful but require careful preparation of the patient and attention to detail. GI bleeding studies with colloid or labeled red blood cells are often requested but I find accurate localization of the bleeding site extremely difficult. (author)

  1. Hypothyroidism in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Karwowska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are crucial for normal development of a child from early foetal life. They have an impact on the development of the central nervous system, both prenatally and up to the age of 3 years, and regulate growth and most metabolic processes. Their importance has led to the introduction of screening for congenital hypothyroidism, which has been conducted in Poland for over 40 years. The diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism necessitates immediate levothyroxine implementation and strict treatment monitoring. Thanks to iodine prophylaxis, children in Poland do not require additional iodine administration. An isolated increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration without clinical signs of hypothyroidism and with negative antithyroid antibodies does not require treatment, but only monitoring of thyroidstimulating hormone levels. Children with positive antithyroid antibodies, genetic syndromes that predispose to hypothyroidism and history of thyroid irradiation require more frequent controls. The recommendations for suspected hypothyroidism presented in this article are based on the European Thyroid Association guidelines from 2014 on the management of subclinical hypothyroidism in children and pregnant women.

  2. Children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, C L

    2001-01-01

    The rapidly changing nature and demographics of divorce in United States within the past 30 years has spawned an epidemic that affects more than one half of the families in the United States. I performed a MEDLINE-assisted review of the medical literature searching with the key words "divorce" and "children." In addition, a Web search was conducted using Webferret with the same key words. The past view of divorce as a short-term family crisis must mature into a longitudinal view of the effects of divorce. Divorce affects children according to their coping mechanisms in their own stages of development. Many problems and concerns previously attributed to divorce have their roots in the period of family interaction before the divorce and in the ongoing conflicts in many families after the divorce itself. Because family physicians are objective observers with whom the family comes into regular contact, they must be able to assist families through the transitions of divorce and to intervene on behalf of the children to help them through this stressful life event with the fewest detrimental effects possible. Counseling, group therapy, and divorce mediation have been assessed as effective tools for intervention.

  3. [Young children and books].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatkine, R; Bonnafé, M; Roy, J; Camus, C; Brandao, C

    1986-01-01

    Children come into contact very early with the written language. The work of Emilia Ferreiro, a student of Piaget, has shown that from early on, well before they can read, they know that the written word has a meaning. Their successive hypotheses show an elaboration which does not occur by chance. Experience shows that babies have a specific interest for a book as an object. They recognize the value of the pictures, as much representations of their mental representations as are words, whereas these two capacities evolve in a complementary fashion. The capacity to be interested by a narrative introduces a new form of organization in the chain of representations, whether they refer to absent or imaginary objects. A good story has a special place among the narratives the child hears, which actually have the specific structures of the written language. The authors of this work report a number of examples of very young children who are put in contact with books. They see in this a new model for mental health work which can be set up by virtue of meetings outside the school rooms, the mental health services, and even of the libraries, by people of different professional skills, in order to loosen the vice of the children's daily routine, and to give the child time to dream with the books, and to draw the adults in to a salutary disorder.

  4. Visual electrophysiology in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Brecelj

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrophysiological assessment of vision in children helps to recognise abnormal development of the visual system when it is still susceptible to medication and eventual correction. Visual electrophysiology provides information about the function of the retina (retinal pigment epithelium, cone and rod receptors, bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells, optic nerve, chiasmal and postchiasmal visual pathway, and visual cortex.Methods: Electroretinograms (ERG and visual evoked potentials (VEP are recorded non-invasively; in infants are recorded simultaneously ERG with skin electrodes, while in older children separately ERG with HK loop electrode in accordance with ISCEV (International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision recommendations.Results: Clinical and electrophysiological changes in children with nystagmus, Leber’s congenital amaurosis, achromatopsia, congenital stationary night blindness, progressive retinal dystrophies, optic nerve hypoplasia, albinism, achiasmia, optic neuritis and visual pathway tumours are presented.Conclusions: Electrophysiological tests can help to indicate the nature and the location of dysfunction in unclear ophthalmological and/or neurological cases.

  5. Biliary Ascariasis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, J; Wazir, M D; Muhammad, Z

    2001-01-01

    Ascariasis is very common in this part of the world. Biliary Ascariasis is rare but is the commonest extra-intestinal complication. This study was conducted At Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, a tertiary care hospital. Five cases of biliary Ascariasis were studied from December 1999 to January 2001. History of passage of worms in stool or vomiting and abdominal pain was taken. After clinical evaluation, Stool Examination, Serum amylase, LFTs, and complete blood picture (CP) were done. Ultrasound abdomen was done as a basic tool for diagnosis. All cases were given Piperazine. Spasmolytics were also given to relax sphincter of oddi to release the worms. Surgical opinions were also taken for each case. About 80% Children were above 10 years of age. One case was 1 1/2 years old. Most common symptom was right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Previous history of passage of worms in stool and vomitus was also present. Two children developed complications of Biliary Ascariasis i.e., Cholecystitis and Portal empyema and responded to antibiotics. All children became symptom free in about 48 hours of treatment. Ultrasound was found to be a reliable, non-invasive, and quick tool for diagnosis and follow up.

  6. Dengue in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Lilly M; de Groot, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease of expanding geographical range and increasing incidence. The vast majority of dengue cases are children less than 15 years of age. Dengue causes a spectrum of illness from mild fever to severe disease with plasma leakage and shock. Infants and children with secondary heterologous dengue infections are most at risk for severe dengue disease. Laboratory diagnosis of dengue can be established within five days of disease onset by direct detection of viral components in serum. After day five, serologic diagnosis provides indirect evidence of dengue. Currently, no effective antiviral agents are available to treat dengue infection. Therefore, treatment remains supportive, with emphasis on close hematological monitoring, recognition of warning signs of severe disease and fluid-replacement therapy and/or blood transfusions when required. Development of a dengue vaccine is considered a high public health priority. A safe and efficacious dengue vaccine would also be important for travelers. This review highlights the current understanding of dengue in children, including its clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, diagnostic tests, management and prevention. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antihistamine use in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Roisin; van der Poel, Lauri-Ann; Thornhill, William; du Toit, George; Shah, Neil; Brough, Helen A

    2015-06-01

    This review provides an overview of the use of antihistamines in children. We discuss types of histamine receptors and their mechanism of action, absorption, onset and duration of action of first-generation and second-generation H(1)-antihistamines, as well as elimination of H(1)-antihistamines which has important implications for dosing in children. The rationale for the use of H(1)-antihistamines is explored for the relief of histamine-mediated symptoms in a variety of allergic conditions including: non-anaphylactic allergic reactions, atopic eczema (AE), allergic rhinitis (AR) and conjunctivitis, chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) and whether they have a role in the management of intermittent and chronic cough, anaphylaxis, food protein-induced gastrointestinal allergy and asthma prevention. Second-generation H(1)-antihistamines are preferable to first-generation H(1)-antihistamines in the management of non-anaphylactic allergic reactions, AR, AE and CSU due to: their better safety profile, including minimal cognitive and antimuscarinic side effects and a longer duration of action. We offer some guidance as to the choices of H(1)-antihistamines available currently and their use in specific clinical settings. H(1)-antihistamine class, availability, licensing, age and dosing administration, recommended indications in allergic conditions and modalities of delivery for the 12 more commonly used H(1)-antihistamines in children are also tabulated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. A Comparison of Social Skills in Turkish Children with Visual Impairments, Children with Intellectual Impairments and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkubat, Ufuk; Ozdemir, Selda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the social skills of five groups of children: children with visual impairments attending inclusive education schools, children with visual impairments attending schools for the blind, children with intellectual impairments attending inclusive education schools, children with intellectual impairments…

  9. Preschool Children's Perceptions of Overweight Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Aurelia, Di Santo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if preschool children perceive overweight children to have more negative characteristics than non-overweight children. Children from 32 to 70 months old (N = 42) listened to four stories about an interaction between two children, in which one child demonstrated socially unacceptable behaviour and one child…

  10. Fractions Learning in Children with Mathematics Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Learning fractions is difficult for children in general and especially difficult for children with mathematics difficulties (MD). Recent research on developmental and individual differences in fraction knowledge of children with MD and typically achieving (TA) children has demonstrated that U.S. children with MD start middle school behind their TA…

  11. Deaf Children's Knowledge of Internal Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elaine; Badger, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Data from 80 deaf children and 190 hearing children, ages 5-15, indicated that there were no intergroup differences on the Draw-a-Person Test; deaf children in successively older age groups knew more internal body parts than younger subjects; and deaf children knew less about internal body parts than hearing children. (Author/JDD)

  12. The advertising and children's audience

    OpenAIRE

    A.S. Teletov; T.Ye. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    The aim of article. The article shows that today more and more citizens supply from advertising. Children's perception of the world is radically different from the adults’ perception. Modern advertising industry affects children's audience more and more. The aim of the article is to analyze the impact of advertising on children's audience with further proposals. The results of the analysis. Some social critics believe that advertising provides new information that helps to be more adaptive...

  13. Oral care of hospitalized children

    OpenAIRE

    Machalová, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis deals with the care of oral cavity for hospitalized children and compares the standards of oral cavity care for children hospitalized in standard pediatric wards with those for children hospitalized in the pediatric bone marrow transplant unit. The thesis provides the anatomical and physiological beckground information on oral care, describes the most common pathological issues, stresses the importance of proper mouth care and explains how to practise oral hygiene and s...

  14. [Family characteristics of stuttering children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simić-Ruzić, Budimirka; Jovanović, Aleksandar A

    2008-01-01

    Stuttering is a functional impairment of speech, which is manifested by conscious, but nonintentionally interrupted, disharmonic and disrhythmic fluctuation of sound varying in frequency and intensity. Aetiology of this disorder has been conceived within the frame of theoretical models, which tend to connect genetic and epigenetic factors. The goal of the paper was to study the characteristics of the family functioning of stuttering children in comparison to the family functioning of children without speech disorder, which confirmed the justification of the introduction of family orientated therapeutic interventions into the therapy spectrum of child stuttering. Seventy-nine nucleus families of 3 to 6-year-old children were examined; of these, 39 families had stuttering children and 40 had children without speech disorder. The assessment of family characteristics was made using the Family Health Scale, an observer-rating scale which according to semistructured interview and operational criteria, measures 6 basic dimensions of family functioning: Emotional State, Communication, Borders, Alliances, Adaptability & Stability, Family Skills. A total score calculated from the basic dimensions, is considered as a global index of family health. Families with stuttering children compared to families with children without speech disorder showed significantly lower scores in all the basic dimension of family functioning, as well as in the total score on the Family Health Scale. Our research results have shown that stuttering children in comparison with children without speech disorder live in families with unfavourable emotional atmosphere, impaired communication and worse control over situational and developmental difficulties, which affect children's development and well-being. In the light of previous research, the application of family therapy modified according to the child's needs is now considered indispensable in the therapeutic approach to stuttering children. The

  15. Cochlear implanted children: Linguistic outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lynce, Sofia; Marques, Sofia; Paço, João; Mineiro, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The present exploratory study aims at exploring expressive linguistics abilities of cochlear-implanted children by testing spontaneous speech samples. For this purpose, Mean Length of Utterance in words will be measured and the productive use of single grammatical morphemes will be analysed. We analysed the spontaneous speech of three deaf Portuguese children with cochlear implants and three normal-hearing children paired case by case, taking into account the chronological age, gender and par...

  16. Forcing preschool children with food

    OpenAIRE

    Šterbenc, Urška

    2015-01-01

    In our thesis we primarily focused on how to get our preschool children to eat healthy without having to force them into it. Most adults have at least one negative childhood eating experience, nonetheless they still use inappropriate principles or techniques when it comes to encouraging their children towards a healthy and balanced diet. Parents often forget they have to set a proper example for their children, since they are known to take up eating habits from their parents. Nowadays, a chil...

  17. International whole body counter intercomparison based on bomab phantom simulating 4 years old child; Partecipazione dell`ENEA alla campagna internazionale di interconfronto wholebody counter con fantoccio simulante un bambino di 4 anni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battisti, P.; Tarroni, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche ``E. Clementel``, Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1995-11-01

    In April 1993 a whole body counter intercomparison campaign, The 1993 Intercomparison/Intercalibration, started. The campaign has been organized by The Canadian National Reference Centre for In-Vivo Monitoring of Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada and The United States Department of Energy and it was based on measurements on a BOMAB type phantom simulating a 4 years old child. The phantom was filled with radioactive tissue substitute resin and an unknown quantity of radioactivity. Each facility was asked to determine the identity and amount of the radionuclide(s), knowing that the specific activity in the 10 BOMAB`s sections was the same. Each facility was also asked to calculate the minimum detectable activity of all the radionuclides detected in the phantom. 35 Facilities from 20 different Countries took part in the initiative. The Institute for Radiation Protection of the Environment Department of ENEA (ENEA AMB IRP) represented Italy. Intercomparison results supplied by ENEA AMB IRP as radionuclides identification, activity data and associated precision, minimum detectable activity levels, can be considered satisfactory and comparable with results supplied by similar-facilities.

  18. L'acquisizione e lo sviluppo del lessico in un bambino bilingue che inizia il processo di verbalizzazione in ritardo (The Acquisition and Development of the Lexicon in a Bilingual Child Who Began the Process of Verbalization Late)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Helen Herbig

    1977-01-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of Italian and English by a child living in Italy, the son of an American mother and Italian father, is discussed by his mother. In particular, the development of his vocabulary is analyzed. (Text is in Italian.) (CFM)

  19. Chemotherapy and Cancer - childrens experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Prytz, Anna; Harnfeldt, Linda

    2006-01-01

    With good knowledge about the disease and the treatment, the fear and worry of children and parents can be reduced. Children may be helped by painting to express their experiences. In order to have a good care, the care-personnel need to see and understand what the children need. It is important to live an as regular life as possible during the disease and its treatment. The aim of this study was to elucidate how children experience chemotherapy in conection with their cancer disease. The met...

  20. Undernourished Children and Milk Lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenov, Benedikte; Briend, André; Sangild, Per T; Thymann, Thomas; Rytter, Maren H; Hother, Anne-Louise; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2016-03-01

    Lactose is an important energy source in young mammals, and in fully breast-fed human infants, it constitutes around 40% of the total daily energy intake. The role of lactose in feeding of undernourished infants and young children is not well described. A narrative review of the potential positive and negative effects of lactose in the treatment of undernourished children. Searches were conducted using PUBMED and Web of Science up to July 2015. Relevant references in the retrieved articles were included. Lactose may exhibit several health benefits in young children, including a prebiotic effect on the gut microbiota and a positive effect on mineral absorption. Studies in piglets suggest there might also be a stimulating effect on growth, relative to other carbohydrates. Lactose intolerance is a potential concern for undernourished children. Most undernourished children seem to tolerate the currently recommended (low lactose level) therapeutic foods well. However, a subgroup of severely undernourished children with secondary lactase deficiency due to severe diarrhea or severe enteropathy may benefit from products with even more restricted lactose content. At limited extra costs, lactose or lactose-containing milk ingredients may have beneficial effects if added to food products for undernourished children. Lactose may be an overlooked beneficial nutrient for young and undernourished children. Research is needed to define the balance between beneficial and detrimental effects of lactose in undernourished children at different ages and with different degrees of diarrhea and intestinal integrity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Obesogenic Diets in European Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Intemann, Timm; Hebestreit, Antje; Reisch, Lucia A.

    2017-01-01

    will stress dietary factors in European children as one major aspect of the complex aetiology of childhood obesity, and offer a broader comment on the role of contemporary food systems. Results: Parental socioeconomic status, children’s media consumption and current arketing strategies employed by the food...... including aggressive food marketing to children, the failure of self-regulation of the food industry, and socioeconomic disadvantages....... industry were associated with a low-quality diet and unhealthy food intake in European children. Conclusion: Present evidence calls for policy interventions to facilitate healthy diets of European children and adolescents. Prevention strategies for childhood obesity should address upstream factors...

  2. Twins or two single children

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Walke

    2002-01-01

    Based on Swedish register data, we compared the influence of a twin birth on the divorce risk with the influence of the sequential birth of two single children. The divorce risk for a woman with a very young child was lower than the risk for women without children or women with children older than 3.5 years. This behaviour was essentially independent of the number of children and whether or not the woman gave birth to twins. The effect of parity was much smaller than the effect of child age. ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  4. Gestures in Prelinguistic Turkish Children with Autism, Down Syndrome, and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toret, Gokhan; Acarlar, Funda

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gesture use in Turkish children with autism, Down syndrome, and typically developing children. Participants included 30 children in three groups: Ten children with Down syndrome, ten children with autism between 24-60 months of age, and ten typically developing children between 12-18 months of age.…

  5. Perceptual causality in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Anne; Allen, Deborah; Linderoth, Carina; Hesketh, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Three experiments considered the development of perceptual causality in children from 3 to 9 years of age (N = 176 in total). Adults tend to see cause and effect even in schematic, two-dimensional motion events: Thus, if square A moves toward B, which moves upon contact, they report that A launches B--physical causality. If B moves before contact, adults report that B tries to escape from A--social or psychological causality. A brief pause between movements eliminates such impressions. Even infants in the first year of life are sensitive to causal structure in both contact and no-contact events, but previous research with talking-age children found poor verbal reports. The present experiments used a picture-based forced-choice task to reduce linguistic demands. Observers saw eight different animations involving squares A and B. Events varied in whether or not these agents made contact; whether or not there was a delay at the closest point; and whether they moved rigidly or with a rhythmic, nonrigid "caterpillar" motion. Participants of all ages assigned events with contact to the physical domain and events without contact to the psychological domain. In addition, participants of all ages chose causality more often for events without delay than with delay, but these events became more distinct over the preschool range. The manipulation of agent motion had only minor and inconsistent effects across studies, even though children of all ages considered only the nonrigid motion to be animal-like. These results agree with the view that perceptual causality is available early in development.

  6. "Value"ing Children Differently? Migrant Children in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Dympna

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers dilemmas around "value" and the "valuing" of children and childhood(s) in schools. I argue that in neo-liberal contexts, processes of children's identity making become aligned with the idea of the corporate citizen--value and worth derived from the capacity to produce, excel, self-regulate as well as…

  7. Written for Children: An Outline of English Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, John Rowe

    Children's prose literature in Britain is surveyed from the 17th century to the present. The main stream of this development is exemplified by an examination of the lives and works of such authors as (1) John Newbery, whose books for children include "Goody Two-Shoes" (1766), (2) Mrs. Sherwood, whose didactic books contain a moral lesson in every…

  8. Raising Multilingual Children: Foreign Language Acquisition and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuhama-Espinosa, Tracey

    This book illustrates how children learn foreign languages and when they can do so with the best results. The most recent studies in linguistics, neurology, education, and psychology are evaluated, and the findings are presented in a recipe format. Parents are encouraged to evaluate the multilingual children in their lives with the use of tools…

  9. [Septic arthritis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, M D; Ullot, R; Rigol, S; Pinyot, J; Obiols, P

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of 15 cases of septic arthritis in children. 13 of these cases corresponded to purulent arthritis, one to tuberculous arthritis and one to brucellar arthritis. All of them received diagnostic punction. Five joints received arthrotomy, by a washed-aspiration system. The antibiotic treatment was given approximately during for six weeks. We had two complications, die to a delayed diagnosis: one coxa valga and one capital femoral necrosis. It is important the insist on a early diagnosis and decompressive arthrotomy, specially in those cases in which the hip is the joint affected.

  10. [Anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    Anemia is one of the most common symptoms in children caused by numerous underlying diseases. In majority of patients, these diseases can be correctly diagnosed through physical examination, history taking, and routine laboratory tests. Bone marrow failure syndromes associated with several genetic diseases are rare causes of anemia in childhood. We reviewed the recent progress of molecular mechanisms in bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC), which are all predicted to involve defective ribosome synthesis. Delineation of the precise role of each gene product in ribosomal biogenesis and hematopoiesis may have both therapeutic and prognostic significance.

  11. DENGUE FEVER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zvereva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently in Russia number of cases of dengue fever in adults grows up, whereas in endemic areas, due to the wide spread of the disease is more common in children, which symptoms has its own characteristics. In the article is reviewed a clinical case of girl living in Moscow who has been returned from the Thailand vacation — the first registered case of dengue fever in childhood. In the article were discussed the problems of diagnostics of the disease, an algorithm for diagnosis of dengue fever.

  12. Playground injuries in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeini H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Sadeghi Naeini1, Kent Lindqvist2, Hamid Reza Jafari3, Amir Hossein Mirlohi4, Koustuv Dalal2,51Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran; 2Division of Social Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 3Environmental Planning Department, Graduate Environment Faculty, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran; 4Apadana Research Center, Isfahan, Iran; 5Division of Public Health Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Skovde, SwedenBackground: Rapid urbanization and unplanned population development can be detrimental to the safety of citizens, with children being a particularly vulnerable social group. In this review, we assess childhood playground injuries and suggest safety mechanisms which could be incorporated into playground planning.Methods: Inclusion criteria were “children” as the focus group, “playground” as the main field of study, and “unintentional injury” and “safety” as the concepts of study. The keywords used for the PubMed search were “playground”, “children”, and “injury”. Initially we accessed 182 articles. After screening according to inclusion criteria, 86 articles were found, and after reading the abstracts and then the full text, 14 articles were finally included for analysis. The papers reviewed included four case-control studies, three case studies, three descriptive studies, two interventional studies, one retrospective study, one cross-sectional study, and one systematic review.Results: Playground-related fractures were the most common accidents among children, underscoring the importance of safety promotion and injury prevention in playgrounds, low-risk equipment and playing hours (week days associated with higher risk, implementation of standards, preventing falls and fall-related fractures, and addressing concerns of parents about unsafe neighborhoods. With the exception of one study, all of the

  13. Evacuation dynamics of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larusdottir, Aldis Run; Dederichs, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to deliver new data and to bring attention to the subject of evacuation of children. Evacuation characteristics such as flow, densities and walking speeds are in focus. Currently literature on evacuation com-prehends mostly studies on adults. Ten Danish daycare centers...... participated in full scale evacuation experiments where the age groups 0-2 years and 3-6 years were analyzed separately. The work had the following overall finding. Flows through doors, walking speeds and densities are age-dependent and differ strongly from the data in existing literature. The results show...

  14. Multiple Sclerosis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    INALOO, Soroor; HAGHBIN, Saideh

    2013-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Haghbin S. Multiple Sclerosis in Children. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Spring;7(2):1-10. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most important immune-mediated demyelinated disease of human which is typically the disease of young adults. A total of 4% to 5% of MS population are pediatric. Pediatric MS is defined as the appearance of MS before the age of sixteen. About 80% of the pediatric cases and nearly all adolescent onset patients present with attacks typical to a...

  15. Children's Environment in ECEC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anette Boye; Laursen, Hanne; Jørgensen, Hanne Hede

    2017-01-01

    in evaluations of physical, psychological and aesthetic environmental dimensions of education. The present study aims to elucidate how professionals and children co-operate in order to develop children’s environments and study the impact of children’s perspectives on pedagogy and children’s processes of ‘bildung...... to a dual concept of ‘bildung’ and navigate towards personal development of the individual child as well as neoliberal management mechanisms with focus on objectives and competencies. They mention space and material conditions, psychological dimensions and, to a lesser extent, aesthetical dimensions...

  16. Neuroblastoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroblastomas have a very heterogenic clinical presentation, ranging from relatively benign forms with the potential of spontaneous regression, to foudroyant malignant forms. Over half of neuroblastomas must be classified as high-risk tumors with a markedly high rate of recurrence. Despite multidisciplinary therapeutic approaches, the survival rate of children with this type of tumor is still below 40%. An ever-growing amount of data from international studies dating from the early 1970s onwards, points to the necessity of re-evaluating the medical approach in establishing the diagnosis and staging, understanding tumor biology and pathology, as well as therapy planning. (orig.) [de

  17. Classroom interventions for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne; Gaastra, Geraldina F.; Tucha, Lara I.; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In a typical classroom, children are instructed to remain seated, perform independent seatwork and follow teachers’ instructions. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find these classroom demands particularly difficult to adhere to because, by definition, children with

  18. Influenza vaccination for children with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2010-01-01

    QUESTION Parents of children with asthma are encouraged by many health organizations to vaccinate their children against seasonal influenza viruses. Is the influenza vaccine efficient in preventing asthma exacerbation? Are current vaccinations safe to administer to children with asthma?

  19. Treatment of Children with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is different. Even normal development, such as when children develop language, motor, and social skills, varies from child ... older children and adults. The brains of young children change and develop rapidly. Studies have found that developing brains can ...

  20. Children of Divorce--A Forgotten Constituency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Eugene T.

    1981-01-01

    Explores the negative effects of divorce on children and suggests that a restructuring of marriage and divorce laws (which would prohibit divorce in marriages with dependent children) might be justified in addressing this injustice against children. (DB)

  1. Children in Japan and multimedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimauchi, Y

    1999-01-01

    Many parents in Japan today are very concerned and have daily problems with their children over the following kind of issues concerning video games, multimedia, and similar devices. 1) Is children's enthusiasm for video games actually harming their growth (physically or mentally)? 2) Is there any way that video games can help children in the future? For example, will playing these games help children learn to use computers or develop their power of thought? 3) Will excessive enthusiasm for TV games undermine our basic lifestyle? Is the time they spend studying at home or playing outside actually decreasing? 4) Will the methods of communication brought about by computers, pagers, and cellular phones weaken human relations among children? 5) Will being immersed in a virtual world created by computers result in a diminished sense of reality? The causes of this uneasiness may be traced to parents' own anxieties and concerns about the exceedingly rapid growth of the "information society" of today, together with the fact that their children are directly caught up in the deluge of this information and multimedia society. The development of media has coincided with the growth of today's adults, but children are immersed in a media-filled environment from the day they are born. In Japan, there are now children who can play video games before even learning to write. No one can predict what kind of adults these children will grow to be in the future, and it is fair to say that the most parents and children in Japan are being tossed about on the waves of this information explosion. At this international symposium, we hope to hear the many views that are held around the world concerning children and multimedia.

  2. When children affect parents: Children's academic performance and parental investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurk Quadlin, Natasha

    2015-07-01

    Sociologists have extensively documented the ways that parent resources predict children's achievement. However, less is known about whether and how children's academic performance shapes parental investment behaviors. I use data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) and longitudinal fixed effects models to examine how changes in teacher assessments are related to changes in the conferral of various parent resources. Overall, I find that the relationship between achievement and investment varies based on the directionality in children's achievement and the type of resource at hand. Children whose performance improves receive a broad range of enrichment resources, while declines in performance are met with corrective educational resources. Results are largely consistent whether language or math assessments are used to predict investment, and also among children whose achievement does not change over time. I discuss these patterns, along with implications for the use of parent resources in education and family research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bowlby's children: the forgotten revolution in Australian children's nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jeanette

    2008-10-01

    Children's hospitals are vastly different today from fifty years ago. Although there have been dramatic changes in treatment and environment, the biggest contrast for patients is the involvement of parents and family in the nursing and care of the children. This change is largely due to the work of two men from Great Britain, Dr John Bowlby and James Robertson, whose research findings changed the way children were nursed to include consideration of their psychological alongside physical needs. This caused a revolution in the nursing of children that spread throughout Australasia. Bowlby and Robertson's work is largely forgotten now, but it forms the basis for the current policy of nursing children within the context of the family. This paper includes excerpts from an Australian oral history collection of twenty-six narratives from former child patients, parents and nurses and the personal papers of Dr Bowlby.

  4. Coeliac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Kirkham, Emily Natasha; Pidgeon, Sarah; Sandmann, Sarah

    2015-08-05

    Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated systemic disorder caused by ingestion of gluten. The condition presents classically with gastrointestinal signs including diarrhoea, bloating, weight loss and abdominal pain, but presentations can include extra-intestinal symptoms such as iron-deficiency anaemia, faltering growth, delayed puberty and mouth ulcers. Some children are at higher risk of developing coeliac disease, for example those with a strong family history, certain genetic disorders and other autoimmune conditions. If coeliac disease is suspected, serological screening with anti-tissue transglutaminase titres should be performed and the diagnosis may be confirmed by small bowel biopsy while the child remains on a normal (gluten-containing) diet. Modified European guidelines recommend that symptomatic children with anti-tissue transglutaminase titres more than ten times the upper limit of normal, and positive human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 status, do not require small bowel biopsy for diagnosis of coeliac disease. Management of the disease involves strict adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet, which should lead to resolution of symptoms and prevention of long-term complications. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the varied presentations of coeliac disease to ensure timely screening and early initiation of a gluten-free diet.

  5. Scaphoid fractures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Scaphoid fractures are rare in childhood. Diagnosis is very difficult to establish because carpal bones are not fully ossified. In suspected cases comparative or delayed radiography is used, as well as computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and bone scintigraphy. Majority of scaphoid fractures are treated conservatively with good results. In case of delayed fracture healing various types of treatment are available. Objective. To determine the mechanism of injury, clinical healing process, types and outcome of treatment of scaphoid fractures in children. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed patients with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone over a ten-year period (2002-2011. The outcome of the treatment of “acute” scaphoid fracture was evaluated using the Mayo Wrist Score. Results. There were in total 34 patients, of mean age 13.8 years, with traumatic closed fracture of the scaphoid bone, whose bone growth was not finished yet. Most common injury mechanism was fall on outstretched arm - 76% of patients. During the examined period 31 children with “acute” fracture underwent conservative treatment, with average immobilization period of 51 days. Six patients were lost to follow-up. In the remaining 25 patients, after completed rehabilitation, functional results determined by the Mayo Wrist Score were excellent. Conclusion. Conservative therapy of “acute” scaphoid fractures is an acceptable treatment option for pediatric patients with excellent functional results.

  6. Nonurological malignancies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    Nonurological malignancies in children include a wide variety of tumors. These tumors include primary tumors of the liver, thyroid, lung, gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and adrenals; soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) like rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and non-RMS; and finally extragonadal germ cell tumors (GCT). This article aims at describing the current thinking in the management of these childhood solid tumors. This is critical in view of the recent advances in the elucidation of the molecular, genetic, and biologic behavior of these tumors and how these factors are getting integrated not only in the staging but also in developing a risk-based approach towards the management of these tumors. Reference was made to recently published literature from the leading pediatric cancer centers of the world to make a sense of things of the most current thinking in this rapidly expanding field. This will provide surgeons and physicians taking care of these children with a working knowledge in this somewhat challenging field. Treatment results vary from center to center depending on access to resources and following different management protocols. Results have improved for these tumors with the advent of newer chemotherapeutic agents, novel delivery methods of radiation therapy (RT), and improvement in surgical technique. Due to the limited number of patients presenting with these tumors, national and international collaboration of data is critical for all and beneficial to individual treatment centers. This has resulted in better results in the past and will definitely result in still better results in the future.

  7. [Chikungunya in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Donald-Ottevanger, M Sigrid; Gravenberch-Ramnandanlall, Charleen I; Zijlmans, C W R Wilco

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya is a rapidly spreading infectious disease throughout the Caribbean, reaching epidemic proportions in Suriname, with more than 1200 registered cases in 2014. Similar to dengue, classic symptoms are high fever, rash and arthralgia. However, the presentation differs in adults and children. At the Academic Hospital Paramaribo in Suriname, three children had different presentations of chikungunya. An 11-year-old girl was referred to the paediatric centre with acute-onset fever of 40.5ºC, painful knees and a rash on face and arms. Koplik spots were visible on the inside of her mouth. A 13-year-old boy attended the ER with acute-onset fever and a state of reduced consciousness. Physical examination revealed hypotension, tachycardia and fever. No rash was observed. A 2.5-month-old baby with fever, vomiting, diarrhoea and a rash was brought to the ER. She was agitated and had signs of meningism. The symptoms resolved quickly in all patients after rehydration and pain medication.

  8. [Disk calcifications in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P; Fauré, C; Denarnaud, L

    1985-05-01

    It is not unusual for intervertebral disk calcifications to be detected in pediatric practice, the 150 or so cases reported in the literature probably representing only a small proportion of lesions actually diagnosed. Case reports of 33 children with intervertebral disk calcifications were analyzed. In the majority of these patients (31 of 33) a diagnosis of "idiopathic" calcifications had been made, the cervical localization of the lesions being related to repeated ORL infections and/or trauma. A pre-existing pathologic factor was found in two cases (one child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis treated by corticoids and one child with Williams and Van Beuren's syndrome). An uncomplicated course was noted in 31 cases, the symptomatology (pain, spinal stiffness and febricula) improving after several days. Complications developed in two cases: one child had very disabling dysphagia due to an anteriorly protruding cervical herniated disc and surgery was necessary; the other child developed cervicobrachial neuralgia due to herniated disc protrusion into the cervical spinal canal, but symptoms regressed within several days although calcifications persisted unaltered. These findings and the course of the rare complications documented in the literature suggest the need for the most conservative treatment possible in cases of disc calcifications in children.

  9. Defibrillation in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Sarah E; Atkins, Dianne L

    2010-01-01

    Defibrillation is the only effective treatment for ventricular fibrillation (VF). Optimal methods for defibrillation in children are derived and extrapolated from adult data. VF occurs as the initial rhythm in 8-20% of pediatric cardiac arrests. This has fostered a new interest in determining the optimal technique for pediatric defibrillation. This review will provide a brief background of the history of defibrillation and a review of the current literature on pediatric defibrillation. The literature search was performed through PubMed, using the MeSH headings of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, defibrillation and electric countershock. The authors’ personal bibliographic files were also searched. Only published articles were chosen. The recommended energy dose has been 2 J/kg for 30 years, but recent reports may indicate that higher dosages may be more effective and safe. In 2005, the European Resuscitation Council recommended 4 J/kg as the initial dose, without escalation for subsequent shocks. Automated external defibrillators are increasingly used for pediatric cardiac arrest, and available reports indicate high success rates. Additional research on pediatric defibrillation is critical in order to be able to provide an equivalent standard of care for children in cardiac arrest and improve outcomes. PMID:20930970

  10. Hydrocephalus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekate, Harold L; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of hydrocephalus in utero, in infants and children is critically dependent on an understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment options for this condition in this age spectrum. For this reason, this chapter deals not only with the imaging modalities used to study hydrocephalus and how they are applied but also reviews key aspects of the pathophysiology and treatment of hydrocephalus in children. Imaging techniques to establish the diagnosis of chronic hydrocephalus fall into two categories: (1) tracer-type techniques that require an injection and observation of the transit of an injected substance through the ventricular system or subarachnoid space and (2) cross-sectional imaging, which allows for direct visualization of a point of obstruction within the ventricular system or subarachnoid space. For cross-sectional imaging, both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography can be used, but MRI is usually preferred. Nomenclature has obscured the description of imaging findings in hydrocephalus. We suggest that most hydrocephalus is obstructive and propose to designate ventriculomegaly, the condition in which the ventricles are large on imaging, but there is no true obstruction to the outflow of cerebrospinal fluid. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Children born of ICSI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, S

    2007-12-01

    Studies on children born as a result of IVF or ICSI present significant methodological differences and have been conducted on highly heterogeneous populations. Regarding perinatal data, there is a consensus of opinion on the increased risk of prematurity, growth retardation and perinatal mortality, even after maternal factors and the presence or absence of multiple pregnancies have been taken into account. There is no significant difference in the studies between ICSI and IVF, which are often not individualised. The results of birth defects following IVF treatment are contradictory in the literature. The risk of birth defects following ICSI can be caused by male infertility (chromosome abnormality rate, microdeletion of the Y chromosome, genetic fingerprint) or by the technique used (no selection of the fertilising spermatozoon, disturbance of the meiotic spindle, risk of introduction of foreign materials, risk of infection). Analysis of the literature is complicated because of methodological biases. Thus, according to the studies, the risks of defects following ICSI are identical or increased compared with those following IVF. In the long term, synthesis of the studies does not allow any certainty regarding the growth of children, their cognitive or psychomotor development, the risk of cancers or epigenetic diseases. The current data is more reassuring than worrying, but the good current studies on child development should be developed in terms of number, cohort size and monitoring period.

  12. Group Counseling for Navy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchum, Nancy Taylor

    1991-01-01

    Conducted six-session group counseling program for Navy children (n=22) enrolled in public schools whose fathers were on deployment. Pretest and posttest scores on the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory suggest that participation in the group counseling unit positively affected self-esteem of Navy children whose fathers were on deployment. Found…

  13. Classic African American Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Jonda C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assert that there are classic African American children's books and to identify a sampling of them. The author presents multiple definitions of the term classic based on the responses of children's literature experts and relevant scholarship. Next, the manner in which data were collected and analyzed in regard to…

  14. Crippling Our Children with Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    Holds that the practice of disciplining children is damaging to their physical, emotional, and social well-being. Describes the democratic and egalitarian parenting model put forth in "Effectiveness Training" as an alternative to adult power based control of children. (Author/GC)

  15. Use of Antibiotics in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to describe the use of systemic antibiotics among children in Denmark. Methods: National data on drug use in Denmark were extracted from the Danish National Prescription Database. We used prescription data for all children in Denmark aged 0 to 11 years from January 1, 2000...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a gown. You may be instructed to withhold food or drink beforehand, especially if sedation or anesthesia is to be used. In general, children who have recently been ill will not be sedated or anesthetized. What is Children's CT? What are some common uses ...

  17. Metamemory in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrant, A; Boucher, J; Blades, M

    1999-01-01

    Five experiments are reported comparing metamemory abilities in children with autism, age- and language-matched mentally retarded children, and language-matched young normal controls. The mean language age of the participants in Experiment 1 was approximately 6 years, in Experiments 2, 3, and 4 approximately 8 years, and in Experiment 5 approximately 9 years. All the children were given one or more false belief tests. Experiment 1 assessed the children's understanding that a task variable (list length) and a person variable (age) will affect their own and others' performances on an immediate auditory-verbal recall task. Experiment 2 assessed the ability to utilize category cues in a picture recall task. Experiments 3 and 4 assessed the ability to verbalize strategies used in a memory span test and in one retrospective and two prospective memory situations. Experiment 5 assessed the children's knowledge and understanding of another person's memory. On the basis of available evidence and theory, we predicted that the children with autism would be impaired on all the metamemory tasks and that impairment would be associated with failure on tests of false belief. Our predictions were not supported. The children with autism were not impaired on any of the metamemory tasks, although they were less likely than controls to make spontaneous use of memory strategies involving other people. Unexpectedly few of the children failed the false belief tasks. These results are discussed in relation to theories concerning primary psychological deficits underlying autism.

  18. KIDMONEY: Children as Big Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Shelly

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how marketers are targeting children as a consumer segment. Highlights include advertising budgets and media, how children spend their money, the more influential role of the child in the family, in-school marketing, controversial advertising on Channel One, marketing on the Internet, and parental control. (AEF)

  19. Stress Management and Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vidisha A.

    2009-01-01

    Stress can affect anyone, and gifted children are no exception. Giftedness can sometimes be the cause of the stress. Perfectionism, sensitivity, and intensity are characteristics of gifted children that may exacerbate stress. Stress can be constructive. Prolonged stress, however, with no time to recover becomes detrimental. Continued stress upsets…

  20. Deleuze's Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey-Moody, Anna Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Children, the image of the child, and the gendered figures of the girl and the boy are thematics that run through the work of Deleuze and feature prominently in his joint writing with Guattari. However, there are many different children in Deleuze's writings. Various child figures do distinct things in Deleuze's work. In this article, I…

  1. Korczak, an Advocate for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Donald; Merrill, Connie

    1994-01-01

    Profiles the life and writings of Janusz Korczak, who lived in Poland from 1878 until his execution by the Nazis in 1942. Korczak was trained as a pediatrician but devoted his life to running an orphanage, advocating children's rights, and educating teacher apprentices and children about the principles of democracy. (LP)

  2. Children's Strategies on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkels, Elza

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an interview study of 104 12-year old children. The aim was to learn more about how children use the Internet, what they find negative on the Internet and what coping strategies they use. The media debate seems to display consensus regarding what threats the Internet poses to young people. However, this study…

  3. Electric Shock Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Electric Shock Injuries in Children Page Content ​When the human body comes into ... can cause anything from minor discomfort to serious injury (even death). Young children, particularly toddlers, experience electric shock most often when ...

  4. Sleep Patterns in Autistic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Eli; Epstein, Rachel; Elroy, Sarit; Iancu, Daisy R.; Zelnik, Nathanel

    1999-01-01

    This study compared data on sleep disturbances of 22 autistic children obtained by questionnaires with data obtained with actigraphy. Questionnaire responses indicated that autistic children had an earlier morning awakening time and multiple and early night arousals; actigraphic monitoring, however, showed their sleep patterns were normal except…

  5. The Children, Not the Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulewicz, Stan

    1981-01-01

    The competitive structure in which most children are taught to play is responsible for problems associated with stress. Athletic performance is important in how the child is perceived by peers and adults. Children who perceive themselves as inadequate at sports often feel low self-confidence and low self-esteem. (JN)

  6. "Barrera": Hope for the Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Charles M.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses recent Supreme Court decisions regarding the provision of ancillary services for nonpublic school children. Argues that programs can be devised that are constitutional and comparable to those provided for public school children, under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title 1, of 1965. (EH)

  7. Stigmatization of Overweight Mexican Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacardi-Gascon, Montserrat; Leon-Reyes, Maria Juana; Jimenez-Cruz, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the weight-based stigmatization of Mexican overweight (OW) and non-OW children by their mothers and peers, who rated both boys and girls with varying physical characteristics. Four hundred and thirty-two fifth and sixth graders and 342 mothers participated in the study. Children were administered a…

  8. Piagetian Conservation in Navajo Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Sandra J.; Ferraro, Douglas P.

    In order to determine the cognitive development of Navajo children in terms of Piagetian conservation of number, mass, and continuous quantity, 168 Navajo children at seven different age levels from 5 to adult were presented with a series of three conservation tasks. The tasks consisted of a standard object and an equivalent object that could be…

  9. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  10. Children's Impressions of Television Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartella, Ellen

    This research study examines the types of social behaviors portrayed by families in various television series and explores children's impressions of the TV family members. Content analysis of nine family-oriented TV series was employed to describe the ranges of behaviors of fathers, mothers and children on television. Eleven shows from each series…

  11. Street Children and Employment Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enos, H.N.; Njoka, M.

    1999-01-01

    Although there is a general realization that there are 'people' in the streets, we often take the phenomenon for granted probably because we wake up and go home only to come to the streets the following morning and still find the people. This situation is however changing with the emergence of 'birth' and increase of street children as we begin to take into consideration the category of people to be routinely found on the streets. The phrase 'street children' refer to the children below the statutory adult age living on or found on the streets. These children derive their livelihood from the streets. While the children on the streets may have a 'home' to go to, the latter are an integral part of the street having nowhere to retire to at the end of the day. The street children live in abject poverty and are exposed to many risks. They suffer from malnutrition and deficiency diseases due to low and poor nutrition intake. The street girls get trapped in teenage prostitution quite early in life. Of concern are the issues related to the working street children. Many street children engage in collecting and selling waste paper, bottles and plastics. They are referred to as 'chokora' because of their work of turning garbage upside down as they look for something useful. Unfortunately they have to sell these wastes to powerful forces including people who underpay and harrass them

  12. Public Policy and Children's Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Aletha C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Advocates the promotion of television programing that serves the diverse needs of children for education, entertainment, aesthetic appreciation, and knowledge; and the protection of children from television content and advertising practices that exploit their special vulnerability. More regulation is needed. (Author/BJV)

  13. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their jobs. If the kidneys stop functioning, a child can develop acute kidney injury—the sudden and temporary loss ... hemolytic uremic syndrome that runs in families Which children are more likely to develop hemolytic uremic syndrome? Children who are more likely ...

  14. COLOUR LEARNING IN RETARDED CHILDREN*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tt has been observed' that mentally retarded children have. :olour preferences, preferring, for example, to pick red and yellow sweets from a multicoloured supply. Among normal nursery-school children the same 2 colours feature in tests for preference, and it has been suggested' that it might be useful to utilize these ...

  15. Tender Topics: Children and Crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Annie L.

    Children's responses to stressful events are discussed in this paper. The paper describes children's feelings about and reactions to death, divorce, hospitalization and parent imprisonment. School phobias are also discussed. Age differences in reactions to these crises are described and discussed in terms of general cognitive development and…

  16. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool

  17. Bioimpedance in Severely Malnourished Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girma Nigatu, Tsinuel

    Worldwide severe acute malnutrition (SAM) affects millions of children and considerably contributes to under-five mortality, mainly in low-income settings. Among children with SAM, deaths occur largely in those with oedema and during early phase of treatment often aggravated by infection. Treatment...

  18. Children's Perceptions of Gender Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christia Spears; Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2004-01-01

    Children (N = 76; ages 5-10 years) participated in a study designed to examine perceptions of gender discrimination. Children were read scenarios in which a teacher determined outcomes for 2 students (1 boy and 1 girl). Contextual information (i.e., teacher's past behavior), the gender of the target of discrimination (i.e., student), and the…

  19. When Do Children Understand "Opposite"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Catherine I; Pexman, Penny M

    2015-08-01

    The aims of the present research were to determine (a) the age at which children with typical development understand the concept of opposite, (b) whether this is related to other cognitive abilities or experiences, and (c) whether there is early implicit understanding of the concept. Children (N = 204) between 3 and 5 years of age were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 experimental conditions in a novel opposite task. Children's language and working memory skills were assessed, and parents provided information about children's access to learning materials about opposites. In the opposite task, 4- and 5-year-olds, but not 3-year-olds, demonstrated acquisition of the concept of opposite. Children demonstrated this understanding only when asked for the "opposite" one, suggesting that antonymy was not made salient by stimulus properties alone. Children's accuracy was not significantly related to their language or working memory skills, to their child care experience, or to whether parents reported having books or games about opposites or playing opposite word games with children. Eye gaze analyses provided no evidence for early implicit understanding of the concept of opposite. Children with typical development have a concept of opposite by 4 years of age.

  20. Children, Youth, and Gun Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, Richard E., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This collection of articles summarizes knowledge and research about how gun violence affects children and youth and discusses which policies hold promise for reducing youth gun violence. The papers are: (1) "Statement of Purpose" (Richard E. Behrman); "Children, Youth, and Gun Violence: Analysis and Recommendations" (Kathleen…

  1. Teaching Plyometric Training to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konukman, Ferman; Jenkins, Andrew; Yilmaz, Ilker; Zorba, Erdal

    2008-01-01

    This article considers the recent arguments by practitioners, researchers, and families on the risks and effectiveness of plyometric training for children. The authors provide practical guidelines and examples of plyometric exercises for children to promote active and healthy lifestyles as well as the development of athletic achievement. By using…

  2. Corporate Mobility: Effects on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Linda K.; Brett, Jeanne M.

    This study investigated the effect of relocation on 309 children of randomly selected employees of 10 Fortune 500 corporations. Even through U.S. corporations transfer over 400,000 households annually, there is little research on the effects of such moves on employees' children. This study tested hypotheses drawn from child development theory…

  3. Features of Diphtheria in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Koloskova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The lecture describes the etiology, epidemiology, classification and clinical features of diphtheria in children, taking into account various sites, covers the issues of diagnosis. Treatment for diphtheria in children is carried as per the order of Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine № 354 dated July 9, 2004 in accordance with the form and severity of the disease.

  4. Behavior Assessment System for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Jonathan; Echandia, Adriana

    1994-01-01

    Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC) is an integrated set of measures for the assessment and identification of school-age children with emotional disturbances and behavioral disorders. This review summarizes the technical qualities of the BASC and critiques its usefulness for practicing school psychologists. Concludes BASC a desirable…

  5. Filipino children's understanding of peace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppenheimer, L.J.T.; Kuipers, I.

    2003-01-01

    This study reports on 10-year-old Filipino children's understanding of peace, war, and strategies to attain peace. In total, 56 children were presented with a semistructured interview consisting of free associations to peace and questions pertaining to the definitions of peace and war and strategies

  6. Tuberculosis in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gabriella S; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2017-04-01

    One million children develop tuberculosis disease each year, and 210,000 die from complications of tuberculosis. Childhood tuberculosis is very different from adult tuberculosis in epidemiology, clinical and radiographic presentation, and treatment. This review highlights the many unique features of childhood tuberculosis, with special emphasis on very young children and adolescents, who are most likely to develop disease after infection has occurred.

  7. Interviews with Selectively Mute Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdal, Heidi; Galloway, David

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of selective mutism usually takes place in a clinic, where the child often refuses to speak to the therapist. The challenge when trying to understand the child's own perspective is to find a medium for communication. Three selectively mute children were interviewed using Raven's Controlled Projection for Children (RCPC). The…

  8. Early Children's Literature and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased longevity is a worldwide phenomenon placing emphasis on the need for preparation for life's later years. Today's children will be the older adults of tomorrow. A resource that can help to educate them about aging and prepare them for the long life ahead is early children's literature (Preschool-Primary). This literature can provide…

  9. Recognizing Posttraumatic Stress in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Terri; Bates, Cory

    1997-01-01

    Children who are exposed to violence may develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To effectively work with children's responses to trauma, school personnel must be familiar with symptoms of PTSD and prepare possible coping strategies. The paper presents examples of affective, cognitive, and behavioral coping strategies that are effective for…

  10. INITIAL ALLERGY PREVENTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Pampura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy prevention is an urgent pediatric issue. Food allergy spread among infants amounts to 6–8%. This review highlights the modern viewpoints on diet prevention of this pathology among children, including by means of the hypoallergic nutritional formulas.Key words: food allergy, prevention, allergies, prebiotics, children.

  11. Socialization and Instrumental Competence in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1970-01-01

    Discusses relationships between parental authority patterns by which children are influenced and the development of socially responsible and independent behavior in young children (especially girls). (NH)

  12. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for ...

  13. Empowering Children to Cope with Teasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the future. It’s important to use developmentally appropriate language and concepts children can understand. For example, preschool age children may learn about differences best by understanding ...

  14. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for Patients Many adult ...

  15. Can the Children's Communication Checklist differentiate between children with autism, children with ADHD, and normal controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Hilde M; Verté, Sylvie; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Roeyers, Herbert; Hartman, Catharina A; Mulder, Erik J; Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A; Sergeant, Joseph A

    2004-11-01

    The Children's Communication Checklist (CCC; Bishop, 1998) is a questionnaire that was developed to measure pragmatic language use and may be completed by parents and teachers. Two studies are reported, which were designed to investigate: (1) whether children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) encounter pragmatic language problems in comparison with normal controls (NC), (2) whether children with ADHD and children with High Functioning Autism (HFA) can be differentiated using the CCC, (3) the usefulness of the CCC for parents and teachers in a clinical and in a research setting, and (4) the role of age in pragmatic language use in ADHD and HFA. In the first study (clinical sample) 50 children with ADHD, 50 children with HFA, and 50 NC were compared to each other using the CCC. In the second study (research sample) CCC data was gathered on 23 children with ADHD (without co-morbid disorders), 42 children with HFA, and 35 NC. Compared to NC, children with HFA showed pragmatic deficits on all CCC scales. Children with ADHD demonstrated deficits compared to NC as well. Moreover, the ADHD and HFA groups differed from each other on most of the scales. Discriminant analyses showed that CCC scales were relevant for case identification in these samples. Furthermore, profiles of impairment seen in children with HFA and ADHD did not vary with age. Pragmatic difficulties do occur in both HFA and ADHD. The present studies indicate that the CCC is a useful instrument to obtain information concerning pragmatic language use in both a clinical and a research setting. Although the information of parents is more tightly linked to the diagnosis, combining the information of both parent and teacher slightly improves case identification.

  16. Children's perceptions of gender discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears Brown, Christia; Bigler, Rebecca S

    2004-09-01

    Children (N = 76; ages 5-10 years) participated in a study designed to examine perceptions of gender discrimination. Children were read scenarios in which a teacher determined outcomes for 2 students (1 boy and 1 girl). Contextual information (i.e., teacher's past behavior), the gender of the target of discrimination (i.e., student), and the gender of the perpetrator (i.e., teacher) were manipulated. Results indicated that older children were more likely than younger children to make attributions to discrimination when contextual information suggested that it was likely. Girls (but not boys) were more likely to view girls than boys as victims of discrimination, and children with egalitarian gender attitudes were more likely to perceive discrimination than were their peers. Copyright 2004 American Psychological Association

  17. Datura stramonium poisoning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, S A; Alo, L A

    2013-01-01

    Although substance abuse is fairly common among adolescents, poisoning from Datura stramonium (a broadleaf annual erect herb with spine-covered seed capsule) is uncommon in children and has not been reported in our locality. We present the case of two children admitted at the Children Emergency Room of a teaching hospital following ingestion of extract of Datura stramonium. They developed neurotoxicity (confusion, agitation, mydriasis, and hallucination) and were managed symptomatically with good outcome. A high index of suspicion and early management of poison in children is imperative if a favorable outcome is expected. Early presentation and the presence of an eyewitness contributed to the very good outcome in these index cases. In this report, we discussed the symptomatology and management of Datura toxicity in children.

  18. VACCINATION OF CHILDREN WITH MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Yu. Kachanov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Children suffering from oncological diseases fall into the group of immunocompromised patients. They are more at risk of severe children’s banal infections. Development of safe and efficient methods for immunological prevention of preventable infections diseases in this group of children is one of priorities for modern medicine. It is also important to properly organise the process of vaccinating the persons surrounding the patient to eliminate the risk of postvaccinal complications in the sick (non-vaccinated child. The article provides a detailed overview of the global experience in vaccinating children with malignant neoplasms. It describes modern principles of immunological prevention in children both being administered the standard anticancer therapy and those have undergone transplantation of hemopoietic stem cells. Key words: children, malignancy, vaccination.(Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:28-34

  19. Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taskesen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 57-69

  20. Acute liver failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in children differs from that observed in adults in both the etiologic spectrum and the clinical picture. Children, particularly very young ones, do not demonstrate classical features of encephalopathy and the definition of ALF has been revised to include patients with advanced coagulopathy, regardless of mental status. A significant number of these children will go on to require transplant or die. Etiologies vary by age with metabolic and infectious diseases prominent in the first year of life and acetaminophen overdose and Wilson's disease occurring in adolescents. In almost 50% of cases, however, the child has an indeterminate cause for ALF. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach and is directed at establishing the etiology where possible and monitoring, anticipating, and managing the multisystem complications that occur in children with ALF. Overall, short-term outcomes are better in children than adults but are dependent upon the degree of encephalopathy and diagnosis.

  1. Mathematics Achievement by Immigrant Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G. Huang

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, I examined academic achievement of immigrant children in the United States, Canada, England, Australia, and New Zealand. Analyzing data from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS, I gauged the performance gaps relating to the generation of immigration and the home language background. I found immigrant children's math and science achievement to be lower than the others only in England, the U.S., and Canada. Non-English language background was found in each country to relate to poor math and science learning and this disadvantage was stronger among native-born children—presumably children of indigenous groups—than among immigrant children. I also examined the school variation in math performance gaps, using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM to each country's data. The patterns in which language- and generation-related math achievement gaps varied between schools are different in the five countries.

  2. Profile of mecasermin for the long-term treatment of growth failure in children and adolescents with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Fintini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Danilo Fintini, Claudia Brufani, Marco CappaEndocrinology Unit, “Bambino Gesù” Children’s Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHI or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 deficiency (IGFD is characterized by deficit of IGF-1 production due to alteration of response of growth hormone (GH receptor to GH. This syndrome is due to mutation of GH receptor or IGF-1 gene and patients affected showed no response to GH therapy. The only treatment is recombinant IGF-1 (mecasermin, which has been available since 1986, but approved in the United States by the US Food and Drug Administration only in 2005 and in Europe by the European Medicines Agency in 2007. To date, few studies are available on long-term treatment with mecasermin in IGFD patients and some of them have a very small number of subjects. In this review we discuss briefly clinical features of severe primary IGFD, laboratory findings, and indications for treatment. Results of long-term therapy with rhIGF1 (mecasermin in patients affected by severe primary IGFD and possible side effects are explained.Keywords: mecasermin, therapy, Laron syndrome, IGF-1

  3. Myocardial dysfunction in malnourished children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faddan Nagla Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Malnourished children suffer several alterations in body composition that could produce cardiac abnormalities. Aim : The aim of the present study was to detect the frequency of myocardial damage in malnourished children as shown by echocardiography and cardiac troponin T (cTnT level. Methods : Forty-five malnourished infants and young children (mean±SD of age was 11.24 ±7.88 months were matched with 25 apparently healthy controls (mean±SD of age was 10.78±6.29 months. Blood sample was taken for complete blood picture, liver and kidney function tests, serum sodium, potassium, calcium levels and cTnT. All the malnourished children were subjected to echocardiographic evaluation. Results : Malnourished children showed a significantly lower left ventricular (LV mass than the control group. The LV systolic functions were significantly impaired in patients with severe malnutrition. The cTnT level was higher than the upper reference limits in 11 (24.44% of the studied malnourished children and all of them had a severe degree of malnutrition. The cTnT level was significantly higher in patients with anemia, sepsis and electrolyte abnormalities and it correlated negatively with LV ejection fraction (EF. Six of the studied children with high cTnT levels (54.5% died within 21 days of treatment while only one case (2.9% with normal level of cTnT died within the same period. Conclusions: LV mass is reduced in malnourished children. Children with severe malnutrition have a significant decrease in LV systolic functions. Elevated cTnT levels in malnourished children has both diagnostic and prognostic significance for cardiomyocyte damage.

  4. Can the Children's Communication Checklist differentiate between children with autism, children with ADHD, and normal controls?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, H.M.; Verte, S.; Osterlaan, J.; Roeyers, H; Hartman, C.A.; Mulder, Erik J.; Berckelaer-Onnes, I.A.; Sergeant, J.A.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, IA

    2004-01-01

    Background:  The Children's Communication Checklist (CCC; Bishop, 1998) is a questionnaire that was developed to measure pragmatic language use and may be completed by parents and teachers. Two studies are reported, which were designed to investigate: (1) whether children with Attention Deficit

  5. Can the "Children's Communication Checklist" Differentiate between Children with Autism, Children with ADHD, and Normal Controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Hilde M.; Verte, Sylvie; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Roeyers, Herbert; Hartman, Catharina A.; Mulder, Erik J.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The Children's Communication Checklist (CCC; Bishop, 1998) is a questionnaire that was developed to measure pragmatic language use and may be completed by parents and teachers. Two studies are reported, which were designed to investigate: (1) whether children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) encounter pragmatic…

  6. The nutritional status of Auckland children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N E; Gorman, D F; Lines, D R

    1977-01-26

    The nutritional status of children (and hence the community) was assessed in the five major races in Auckland by height, weight, and head circumference measurements. Under the age of two years Samoan children were significnatly taller and heavier than Europeans and Maori children. No significant racial differences occurred in children between ages two and 13 years. No racial variation in head circumference between races was noted at any age. More children of lower socio-economic class had weights about the 97th percentile especially in Samoan, Cook Island and Niuean children's groups, suggesting they are particularly vulnerable to obesity. Heal circumference of children of low socio-economic status was smaller than that of other children. Similarly non-breast fed children had smaller heads than breast fed children. This suggests these children may have impaired brain growth.

  7. Austin Children`s Museum ``Go Power`` project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    Go Power, was conceived as an interactive exhibit and related set of activities designed to promote in children and families an understanding and appreciation of energy concepts. Planned in 1990, the project culminated its first phase of activities with colorful, interactive exhibit about the pathways and transformations of energy, on display at the Austin Children`s Museum between February 5th and June 6th, 1993. The project was supported by the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the Lower Colorado River Authority and various local foundations and businesses. This report describes the process, product and outcomes of this project.

  8. Measuring children's food preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Annemarie; Kildegaard, Heidi; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    juices (tangible products), chosen to span the preference spectrum, were hedonically evaluated for appearance and taste. Finally, an actual product choice was performed by having the children choose between two buns and two juices.Results showed that the computer evaluationswith pictures of foods...... provided reproducible information about the children’s visual food preferences, which were in concordance with both hedonic measures and products choices, and can thus be considered valid.......The aim of this study is to investigate if children’s food preferences can be reliable measured by using pictures of foods presented on a computer screen in a conjoint layout.We investigate reproducibility (test–retest) and infer validity by comparison with traditional hedonic evaluations...

  9. Soccer injuries in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Anne [Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Radiology Department, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics. (orig.)

  10. Gender dysphoria and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Chance; McGuinness, Teena M

    2014-08-01

    The age at which gender dysphoria can be diagnosed with enough certainty to justify medical intervention is controversial. The aim of this article is to explore current literature as it relates to the gender reassignment process and diagnostic indicators supporting an appropriate age for intervention. The timing of diagnosis and treatment of gender dysphoria remains the center of debate between the long-term effects of early intervention versus delay of treatment. Limited research is available on gender dysphoria treatment protocols for children. However, preliminary studies suggest that early intervention improves the quality of life in individuals who are transgender. Ongoing research suggests that it may be possible to confirm gender dysphoria at an earlier age. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Vasculitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Despina; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Ozen, Seza; Brogan, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    Primary systemic vasculitides of the young are relatively rare diseases, but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, particularly if there is diagnostic delay. We provide an overview of paediatric vasculitides with emphasis on key differences in vasculitis presentation and management between children and adults. Significant advances in the field of paediatric vasculitis research include the development of classification criteria and disease outcome tools for paediatric disease; inclusion of paediatric patients in international multicentre randomized controlled trials of therapies in vasculitis; and development of rare disease trial designs for therapeutic trials of paediatric vasculitis. The continuation of unmet needs as well as the exploration of potential therapeutic avenues and considerations in the design of future trials are also discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuromuscular blockade in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida João Fernando Lourenço de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs have been widely used to control patients who need to be immobilized for some kind of medical intervention, such as an invasive procedure or synchronism with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this monograph is to review the pharmacology of the NMBAs, to compare the main differences between the neuromuscular junction in neonates, infants, toddlers and adults, and moreover to discuss their indications in critically ill pediatric patients. Continuous improvement of knowledge about NMBAs pharmacology, adverse effects, and the many other remaining unanswered questions about neuromuscular junction and neuromuscular blockade in children is essential for the correct use of these drugs. Therefore, the indication of these agents in pediatrics is determined with extreme judiciousness. Computorized (Medline 1990-2000 and active search of articles were the mechanisms used in this review.

  13. Thermometry in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Batra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of temperature is important for detection of fever and hypothermia in pediatric patients. Ideal temperature-measurement technique should be safe, easy, noninvasive, cost effective, time efficient, and should precisely reflect core body temperature. Pulmonary artery is the closest to hypothalamus and best reflects the core temperature. Other sites used are distal esophagus, urinary bladder and nasopharynx. All these methods are invasive and difficult to use in clinical practice. Amongst the noninvasive methods, rectal thermometry is considered to be the closest to core temperature, but it has its own drawbacks. With the current evidence available, tympanic artery thermometry for children more than 2 years of age and temporal artery thermometry in all age groups are taking precedence over other methods.

  14. Soccer injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics. (orig.)

  15. Warfare and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    In 2007, 136 million children were born in the world, and 9.2 million died before they were 5 years old; 99.8% of these deaths were in developing countries, and 8.2 million were unnecessary. This is 23 000 unnecessary deaths every day. Approximately 0.2 million children die from the direct effects of war every year, and at least twice as many die from the indirect effects. However, most child deaths are caused by common childhood infections in communities that are not affected by war. In 2007, overseas development aid totalled only $104 billion, and world military expenditure totalled US$1339 billion. The 49 poorest countries in the world have a population of 1.3 billion; they spent only $27 per person on health in 2006, but the world spent $201 per person on military activity. The five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council account for 90% of weapons sales to developing countries, yet they are the very countries that have accepted responsibility for ensuring world security. Unfortunately, many governments in both rich and poor countries do not want to limit military spending - the vested interests that support military activity are too powerful. War is immensely harmful, but not primarily because of the horrible injuries, nor the large number of deaths it causes indirectly from infection, malnutrition, and social and political disruption. By far, the greatest harm comes from the diversion of huge amounts of money that could be used for beneficial development into harmful and destructive military activity.

  16. Bowel vaginoplasty in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarin Yogesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe our experience with bowel vaginoplasty done in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study of eight children aged 10 months to 8 years, who underwent bowel vaginoplasty over a period of 5 years (2000-2005. The indications of bowel vaginoplasty included anorectovestibular fistula (ARVF associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome (n=6 and cloaca (n=2. The bowel segment used for vaginoplasty included colon (n=3, ileum (n=2 and duplicated rectum (n=1. In two patients of ARVF associated with uterovaginal agenesis, the distal- most part of ARVF was transected at the level of peritoneal reflection and left as neovagina, whereas the proximal bowel was pulled through at the proposed neo-anal site. All the patients were advised daily home dilatation of the neo vaginal orifice with Hegar′s dilators, for a period of six weeks. RESULTS: Bowel vaginoplasty was done in eight patients. None had any significant per-operative complication. Two patients had abdominal wound dehiscence, requiring secondary suturing. Two patients had mucosal prolapse of the neovagina, which required trimming. One patient died two months after discharge, because of meningitis. Out of the eight patients, seven are in regular follow-up. Six patients have neovagina, cosmetically acceptable to the parents; all have been radiologically proven to have adequate length. One patient had unacceptable perineal appearance with nipple-like vaginal orifice and scarred perineal wound, that merits a revision. None of the patients had vaginal stenosis and excessive mucus discharge, during follow-up visits. Although post surgical results are acceptable to the parents cosmetically, the sexual and psychological outcome is yet to be assessed. Conclusions: Bowel vaginoplasty is a safe and acceptable procedure to treat the pediatric patients of uterovaginal agenesis and cloaca.

  17. Alopecia areata in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Nasreen, S.; Bhatti, R.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the clinical presentations of alopecia areata in children as well as the frequency of associated disorders. Children of either gender suffering from alopecia areata, upto 15 years of age, who fulfilled the selection criteria were included in the study. Only freshly registered cases were studied. Severity of the disease was graded as mild, moderate and severe disease, and other clinical patterns including alopecia totalis, alopecia universalis and ophiasis. Hematological and biochemical profile was evaluated. Chi-square test was applied for statistical analysis in order to determine p-value using the percentages of variables. One hundred and fourteen patients comprising 54 males (47%) and 60 females (53%), aged 4 upto 15 years, the mean age being 9.1 years, were enrolled. Family history of alopecia areata was positive in 11 patients (10%). Fifty nine patients (51%) were of age 6-10 years, 39 patients (35%), aged 11-15 years, and 16 (14%) were of age below 5 years. Mild alopecia areata (41%, p<0.05) was the most common presentation followed by moderate disease (31%, p<0.05), severe alopecia (17%, p <0.05), alopecia totalis (7%, p <0.05), alopecia universalis (2.7%, p=0.05) and ophiasis (1.7%, p=0.05). Nail changes were found in 40 patients (35%, p<0.05). Definite evidence of atopy was obtained in 23 patients (20%, p<0.05). The autoimmune disorders associated with alopecia areata included: hypothyroidism (4.3%), vitiligo (3.5%), psoriasis (1.8%), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE 0.9%), hypoparathyroidism (0.9%) and diabetes mellitus (0.9%). The spectrum of childhood alopecia areata ranges from mild, moderate and severe alopecia, ultimately to alopecia totalis, alopecia universalis and ophiasis. Nail changes as well as atopy and autoimmune disorders are the associated disorders. (author)

  18. Nonurological malignancies in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Parida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nonurological malignancies in children include a wide variety of tumors. These tumors include primary tumors of the liver, thyroid, lung, gastrointestinal tract (GIT, and adrenals; soft tissue sarcomas (STSs like rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS and non-RMS; and finally extragonadal germ cell tumors (GCT. Aims: This article aims at describing the current thinking in the management of these childhood solid tumors. This is critical in view of the recent advances in the elucidation of the molecular, genetic, and biologic behavior of these tumors and how these factors are getting integrated not only in the staging but also in developing a risk-based approach towards the management of these tumors. Materials and Methods: Reference was made to recently published literature from the leading pediatric cancer centers of the world to make a sense of things of the most current thinking in this rapidly expanding field. This will provide surgeons and physicians taking care of these children with a working knowledge in this somewhat challenging field. Conclusions: Treatment results vary from center to center depending on access to resources and following different management protocols. Results have improved for these tumors with the advent of newer chemotherapeutic agents, novel delivery methods of radiation therapy (RT, and improvement in surgical technique. Due to the limited number of patients presenting with these tumors, national and international collaboration of data is critical for all and beneficial to individual treatment centers. This has resulted in better results in the past and will definitely result in still better results in the future.

  19. Mealtime Behaviors of Preschool Children: Comparison of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Children with Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Beth; Crowe, Terry K.; Osbourn, Patricia L.; McClain, Catherine; Skipper, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    This study identified mealtime behaviors of young children (3-6 years old) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and compared these behaviors to children with typical development matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. The parents of children with ASD (n = 24) and children with typical development (n = 24) completed a mealtime survey to assess early…

  20. LUNG FUNCTION TESTING IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Fležar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung function testing in children above five years old is standardised similarly as is in adult population (1. Nevertheless bronchial provocation testing can be more hazardous since the calibre and reactivity of childhood airway is different. We analysed the frequency of different lung function testing procedures and addressed the safety issues of bronchial provocation testing in children.Methods. We analysed lung function testing results in 517 children, older than 5 years, tested in our laboratory in threeyear period. Spirometry was done in every patient, metacholine provocation test was used as a part of diagnostic work-up in suspected asthma. In case of airway obstruction, bronchodilator test with salbutamol was used instead of a metacholine provocation test.Results. The most common procedure in children was spirometry with bronchial provocation test as a part of diagnostic work-up of obstructive syndrome (mostly asthma. 291 children required metacholine test and 153 tests were interpreted as positive. The decline in expiratory flows (forced expiratory flow in first second – FEV1 in positive tests was greater than in adult population as was the dose of metacholine, needed to induce bronchoconstriction. The compliance of children was better than in adults.Conclusions. Lung function testing in children is reliable and safe and can be done in a well-standardised laboratory that follows the regulations of such testing in adults.

  1. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, P.D.; Humphreys, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  2. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Acad. Dept. of Radiol.; Blaser, S.; Armstrong, D.; Chuang, S.; Harwood-Nash, D. [Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Humphreys, R.P. [Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  3. Bilingualism accentuates children's conversational understanding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Siegal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although bilingualism is prevalent throughout the world, little is known about the extent to which it influences children's conversational understanding. Our investigation involved children aged 3-6 years exposed to one or more of four major languages: English, German, Italian, and Japanese. In two experiments, we examined the children's ability to identify responses to questions as violations of conversational maxims (to be informative and avoid redundancy, to speak the truth, be relevant, and be polite. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Experiment 1, with increasing age, children showed greater sensitivity to maxim violations. Children in Italy who were bilingual in German and Italian (with German as the dominant language L1 significantly outperformed Italian monolinguals. In Experiment 2, children in England who were bilingual in English and Japanese (with English as L1 significantly outperformed Japanese monolinguals in Japan with vocabulary age partialled out. CONCLUSIONS: As the monolingual and bilingual groups had a similar family SES background (Experiment 1 and similar family cultural identity (Experiment 2, these results point to a specific role for early bilingualism in accentuating children's developing ability to appreciate effective communicative responses.

  4. Factors of children's school readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence, and parents' education. The sample included 219 children who were 68 to 83 months old and were attending the first year of primary school. Children were differentiated by whether or not they had attended preschool before starting school. Children's intellectual ability was determined using Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM; Raven, Raven, & Court, 1999, language competence using the Lestvice splošnega govornegarazvoja–LJ (LSGR–LJ, Scales of General Language Development; Marjanovič Umek, Kranjc, Fekonja in Bajc, 2004, and school readiness with the Preizkus pripravljenosti za šolo (PPŠ, Test of School Readiness; Toličič, 1986. The results indicate that children's intellectual ability and language competence have a high predictive value for the school readiness — they explained 51% of the variance in children's scores on the PPŠ. Preschool enrollment has a positive effect on school readiness for children whose parents have a low level of education, but not for those whose parents are highly educated.

  5. Bioethics, children, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2018-01-01

    Queer perspectives have typically emerged from sexual minorities as a way of repudiating flawed views of sexuality, mischaracterized relationships, and objectionable social treatment of people with atypical sexuality or gender expression. In this vein, one commentator offers a queer critique of the conceptualization of children in regard to their value for people's identities and relationships. According to this account, children are morally problematic given the values that make them desirable, their displacement of other beings and things entitled to moral protection, not to mention the damaging environmental effects that follow in the wake of population growth. Objectionable views of children are said even to have colonized the view of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans (LGBT) people who - with the enthusiastic endorsement of bioethics - increasingly turn to assisted reproductive treatments to have children. In the face of these outcomes, it is better - according to this account - that people reconsider their interest in children. This account is not, however, ultimately strong enough to override people's interest in having children, relative to the benefits they confer and relative to the benefits conferred on children themselves. It is certainly not strong enough to justify differential treatment of LGBT people in matters of assisted reproductive treatments. Environmental threats in the wake of population growth might be managed in ways other than devaluing children as such. Moreover, this account ultimately damages the interests of LGBT people in matters of access, equity, and children, which outcome is paradoxical, given the origins of queer perspectives as efforts to assert and defend the social interests of sexual and gender minorities. © 2017 The Authors. Bioethics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Speech Databases of Typical Children and Children with SLI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Grill

    Full Text Available The extent of research on children's speech in general and on disordered speech specifically is very limited. In this article, we describe the process of creating databases of children's speech and the possibilities for using such databases, which have been created by the LANNA research group in the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at Czech Technical University in Prague. These databases have been principally compiled for medical research but also for use in other areas, such as linguistics. Two databases were recorded: one for healthy children's speech (recorded in kindergarten and in the first level of elementary school and the other for pathological speech of children with a Specific Language Impairment (recorded at a surgery of speech and language therapists and at the hospital. Both databases were sub-divided according to specific demands of medical research. Their utilization can be exoteric, specifically for linguistic research and pedagogical use as well as for studies of speech-signal processing.

  7. Encouraging children to eat vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Buh, Alenka

    2014-01-01

    It is important for children to maintain a healthy and balanced diet throughout their childhood and youth. Children tend to skip vegetables in their meals as they are not much liked; the tastes of vegetables are also highly specific and each individual has to get used to them by repeated tasting. The aim of this undergraduate thesis was to analyse how often children eat vegetables, which types of vegetables they like and which they do not, to determine if the executed method of pedagogica...

  8. Neuropathic pain management in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hyde, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    There are difficulties in assessing, managing, and evaluating neuropathic pain in dying children, particularly those with neurological impairment. Neuropathic pain in children often presents differently to how it presents in the adult population. Comprehensive assessment as well as pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are crucial to its successful management and frequently require input from an interdisciplinary team. Notwithstanding the need for further research, this paper brings together research papers, reviews, and clinical guidelines to present an exploration of existing evidence regarding care for children with neuropathic pain and their families.

  9. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with interstitial lung diseases in children. It gives an update and the results of the authors’ observations of different forms of interstitial lung diseases. Particular emphasis is placed on hypersensitive pneumonitis as the most common nosological entity among childhood interstitial lung diseases. The authors followed up 186 children with hypersensitive pneumonitis. They present the most important clinical, functional, radiological, and immunological diagnostic signs of this disease and consider its prognosis. In addition, there is evidence for other rare forms of interstitial lung diseases (idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, etc. in children

  10. Family characteristics of stuttering children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić-Ružić Budimirka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Stuttering is a functional impairment of speech, which is manifested by conscious, but nonintentionally interrupted, disharmonic and disrhythmic fluctuation of sound varying in frequency and intensity. Aetiology of this disorder has been conceived within the frame of theoretical models, which tend to connect genetic and epigenetic factors. OBJECTIVE The goal of the paper was to study the characteristics of the family functioning of stuttering children in comparison to the family functioning of children without speech disorder, which confirmed the justification of the introduction of family orientated therapeutic interventions into the therapy spectrum of child stuttering. METHOD Seventy-nine nucleus families of 3 to 6 year-old children were examined; of these, 39 families had stuttering children and 40 had children without speech disorder. The assessment of family characteristics was made using the Family Health Scale, an observer-rating scale which according to semistructured interview and operational criteria, measures 6 basic dimensions of family functioning: Emotional State, Communication, Borders, Alliances, Adaptability & Stability, Family Skills. A total score calculated from the basic dimensions, is considered as a global index of family health. RESULTS Families with stuttering children compared to families with children without speech disorder showed significantly lower scores in all the basic dimension of family functioning, as well as in the total score on the Family Health Scale. CONCLUSION Our research results have shown that stuttering children in comparison with children without speech disorder live in families with unfavorable emotional atmosphere, impaired communication and worse control over situational and developmental difficulties, which affect children's development and well-being. In the light of previous research, the application of family therapy modified according to the child's needs is now considered

  11. Ocular disorders in children in Zaria children's school

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School eye health screening is necessary for the following reasons: • There are 1.4 million blind children in the world and out of which 300,000 are in Africa.[1]. • The children have a lifetime of blindness ahead of them with an estimated 75 million blind years. This is second only to age-related cataract.[2]. • Amblyopia ...

  12. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  13. Making Meaningful: Intention in Children's Art Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Children's art work has often been the subject of study by researchers seeking to gain insight into the role of art making in children's learning and development. However, rarely are children's own explanations of their art making used to inform these studies. Children's perceptions of their own art making are important for research and practice…

  14. Caring for Young Children in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birckmayer, Jennifer; And Others

    Group leaders of 10- to 13-year-olds may use this program guide to help the preteens interact with young children through six discussion meetings and five visits with a preschool child at home. Discussion topics concern (1) the family environment of young children, (2) children's play; (3) children's play areas at home, (4) safety at home, (5)…

  15. 42 CFR 435.117 - Newborn children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Newborn children. 435.117 Section 435.117 Public..., Children Under 8, and Newborn Children § 435.117 Newborn children. (a) The agency must provide Medicaid eligibility to a child born to a woman who has applied for, has been determined eligible and is receiving...

  16. Social Cognition in Children with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Linda; Dewart, Hazel; Brockbank, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of 16 children (ages 9 to 12) with visual impairment to 16 sighted children found visually impaired children had a poorer understanding than did sighted children of characters in stories, as shown by fewer correct justifications based on mental states. Some subgroup patterns concerning congenital impairments and cognitive style were…

  17. Children's Budget 2016. 10th Anniversary Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsif, John, Ed.; Gluck, Elliott, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    Federal spending dedicated to children represents just 7.83 percent of the federal budget in fiscal year 2016, and total spending on children's programs has decreased by five percent in the last two years, according to "Children's Budget 2016." The federal government makes more than 200 distinct investments in children. These include…

  18. What parents prefer and children like

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Edelenbos, Merete

    2007-01-01

    fairly well what children like. Sharing the meal experience with their children and having meal variation options are important benefits for parents. Parents are more concerned about health while children prefer products that look familiar. However, after tasting an unfamiliar product children are less...

  19. Policy Implications of Advertising to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Emilie

    Since its inception the Children's Advertising Review Unit has turned to research in order to better evaluate children's advertisements, to develop guidelines for children's advertisers and to resolve some perplexing questions about certain types of advertising content. Although some work has been done in advertising directed toward children, most…

  20. SOS Children's Friendly Community Historical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaš, Mirko; Lenard, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    SOS Children's Village Croatia is categorized as a children's home whose primary goal is taking care of children without an adequate parental care or parents themselves. Moreover, it aims at providing children, regardless of their racial, national or religious affiliation, with affection and love in a safe family environment. In addition, SOS…