WorldWideScience

Sample records for balloon-borne imaging calorimeter

  1. Precise Pointing and Stabilization Performance for the Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT): 2015 Test Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Romualdez, L J; Damaren, C J; Galloway, M N; Hartley, J W; Li, L; Massey, R J; Netterfield, C B

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-borne astronomy offers an attractive option for experiments that require precise pointing and attitude stabilization, due to a large reduction in the atmospheric interference observed by ground-based systems as well as the low-cost and short development time-scale compared to space-borne systems. The Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT) is an instrument designed to meet the technological requirements of high precision astronomical missions and is a precursor to the development of a facility class instrument with capabilities similar to the Hubble Space Telescope. The attitude determination and control systems (ADCS) for BIT, the design, implementation, and analysis of which are the focus of this paper, compensate for compound pendulation effects and other sub-orbital disturbances in the stratosphere to within 1-2$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (rms), while back-end optics provide further image stabilization down to 0.05$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (not discussed here). During the inaugural test flight from Timmins, Canada in S...

  2. The nuclear compton telescope: A balloon-borne soft γ-ray spectrometer, polarimeter, and imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, S. E.; Jean, P.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; von Ballmoos, P.; Madden, N. W.; Luke, P. N.; Amman, M.; Burks, M. T.; Hull, E. L.; Craig, W.; Ziock, K.

    2001-10-01

    Our collaboration has begun the design and development of a prototype high resolution Compton telescope utilizing 3-D imaging germanium detectors. The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray (0.2-15 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. NCT is a prototype design for the Advanced Compton Telescope, to study gamma-ray radiation with very high spectral resolution, moderate angular resolution, and high sensitivity. The instrument has a novel, ultra-compact design optimized for studying nuclear line emission in the critical 0.5-2 MeV range, and polarization in the 0.2-0.5 MeV range. We have proposed to develop and fly NCT on a conventional US balloon flight in Summer of 2004. This first flight will perform gamma-ray polarization measurements the Crab nebula, Crab pulsar, and Cyg X-1, and 26Al emission from the Cygnus Region. This flight will critically test the novel instrument technologies and analysis techniques we have developed for high resolution Compton telescopes, and qualify the payload to begin a series of ~10-day long duration ballon flights from Alice Springs, Australia starting in Spring 2005. .

  3. In Situ Balloon-Borne Ice Particle Imaging in High-Latitude Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation, creating a cooling effect. At the same time, these clouds absorb the infrared radiation from the Earth, creating a greenhouse effect. The net effect, crucial for radiative transfer, depends on the cirrus microphysical properties, such as particle size distributions and particle shapes. Knowledge of these cloud properties is also needed for calibrating and validating passive and active remote sensors. Ice particles of sizes below 100 µm are inherently difficult to measure with aircraft-mounted probes due to issues with resolution, sizing, and size-dependent sampling volume. Furthermore, artefacts are produced by shattering of particles on the leading surfaces of the aircraft probes when particles several hundred microns or larger are present. Here, we report on a series of balloon-borne in situ measurements that were carried out at a high-latitude location, Kiruna in northern Sweden (68N 21E). The method used here avoids these issues experienced with the aircraft probes. Furthermore, with a balloon-borne instrument, data are collected as vertical profiles, more useful for calibrating or evaluating remote sensing measurements than data collected along horizontal traverses. Particles are collected on an oil-coated film at a sampling speed given directly by the ascending rate of the balloon, 4 m s-1. The collecting film is advanced uniformly inside the instrument so that an always unused section of the film is exposed to ice particles, which are measured by imaging shortly after sampling. The high optical resolution of about 4 µm together with a pixel resolution of 1.65 µm allows particle detection at sizes of 10 µm and larger. For particles that are 20 µm (12 pixel) in size or larger, the shape can be recognized. The sampling volume, 130 cm3 s-1, is well defined and independent of particle size. With the encountered number concentrations of between 4 and 400 L-1, this required about 90- to 4-s sampling times to

  4. The Filter Imager SuFI and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution System ISLiD of the Sunrise Balloon-Borne Observatory: Instrument Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandorfer, A.; Grauf, B.; Barthol, P.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Chares, B.; Deutsch, W.; Ebert, S.; Feller, A.; Germerott, D.; Heerlein, K.; Heinrichs, J.; Hirche, D.; Hirzberger, J.; Kolleck, M.; Meller, R.; Müller, R.; Schäfer, R.; Tomasch, G.; Knölker, M.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T.; Feger, B.; Heidecke, F.; Soltau, D.; Tischenberg, A.; Fischer, A.; Title, A.; Anwand, H.; Schmidt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution (ISLiD) unit onboard the Sunrise balloon borne solar observatory. This contribution provides the necessary information which is relevant to understand the instruments' working principles, the relevant technical data, and the necessary information about calibration issues directly related to the science data.

  5. The Filter Imager SuFI and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution System ISLiD of the Sunrise Balloon-Borne Observatory: Instrument Description

    OpenAIRE

    Gandorfer, A.; Grauf, B.; Barthol, P.; Riethmüller, T.; Solanki, S.; Chares, B.; Deutsch, W.; Ebert, S.; Feller, A; Germerott, D.; Heerlein, K.; Heinrichs, J.; Hirche, D.; Hirzberger, J.; Kolleck, M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design of the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution (ISLiD) unit onboard the Sunrise balloon borne solar observatory. This contribution provides the necessary information which is relevant to understand the instruments’ working principles, the relevant technical data, and the necessary information about calibration issues directly related to the science data.

  6. The Filter Imager SuFI and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution System ISLiD of the Sunrise Balloon-Borne Observatory: Instrument Description

    CERN Document Server

    Gandorfer, A; Barthol, P; Riethmueller, T L; Solanki, S K; Chares, B; Deutsch, W; Ebert, S; Feller, A; Germerott, D; Heerlein, K; Heinrichs, J; Hirche, D; Hirzberger, J; Kolleck, M; Meller, R; Mueller, R; Schaefer, R; Tomasch, G; Knoelker, M; Pillet, V Martinez; Bonet, J A; Schmidt, W; Berkefeld, T; Feger, B; Heidecke, F; Soltau, D; Tischenberg, A; Fischer, A; Title, A; Anwand, H; Schmidt, E

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design of the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) and the Image Stabilization and Light Distribution (ISLiD) unit onboard the Sunrise balloon borne solar observatory. This contribution provides the necessary information which is relevant to understand the instruments working principles, the relevant technical data, and the necessary information about calibration issues directly related to the science data.

  7. Far-infrared solar images taken from a balloon-borne platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review on far-infrared brightness-temperature maps of the solar atmosphere is presented. They were taken with the aid of a 60 cm-diameter balloon-borne telescope at a height of 39 km in France. Three bandpass filters at the wavelengths 50 μm, 80 μm and 200 μm of 6 to 10% bandwidth were applied. The filters as well as the Au-doped Ge bolometer were cooled by liquid He. An observation on 30.4.83 represents the active Sun, while one on 28.9.84 shows the quiet Sun. The observations at the three wavelengths correspond to three different heights in the solar atmosphere at the transition of the photosphere and chromosphere. Over active regions, average temperature enhancements of 75 K to 250 K are observed relative to the inactive regions depending of the height in the solar atmosphere. (author). 7 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  8. The Ultraviolet Filter Imager (SuFI) onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory: Instrument description and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandorfer, Achim; Barthol, Peter; Feller, Alex; Grauf, Bianca; Hirzberger, Johann; Riethmueller, Tino; Solanki, Sami K.; Berkefeld, Thomas; Knoelker, Michael; Martinez Pillet, Valentin; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Title, Alan

    We describe the design of the near UV filter imager SuFi onboard Sunrise, which was successfully flown in the stratosphere in June 2009. During its five days flight SuFI captured the highest contrast images of solar granulation ever. SuFI is a diffraction limited filter imager with an effective focal length of 121m, working in 5 distinct wavelength bands between 210nm and 397nm. It is based on a two mirror modified Schwarzschild microscope, which is integral part of the central Image stabilization and light Distribution unit (ISLiD) of Sunrise, which acts as the reimaging optics between the 1m telescope and the science instruments. The key technical features of the instrument are presented under the view of the specific demands of balloon-borne optical systems. First results obtained with the instrument are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  9. Balloon-Borne Hard X-Ray Imaging and Future Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, J E

    1997-01-01

    Several payloads for hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging with coded aperture telescopes have been developed for balloon flight observations of cosmic x-ray sources. We briefly review the characteristics of these, particularly the EXITE2 system. The recent NASA program to develop an extended long duration (100d) balloon flight capability employing super-pressure balloons would allow a qualitatively new hard x-ray imaging experiment: the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope-Long Integration Time Experiment (EXIST-LITE). The longer continuous viewing times (per source) available from an LDB platform than from low earth orbit would enable both surveys and objectives complementary to the EXIST mission proposed for a MIDEX satellite. We summarize the scientific objectives of EXIST-LITE, a possible instrumentation approach incorporating a large area array of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors, and our program for the development and balloon flight testing of relatively thick (5mm) CZT detector arrays.

  10. SMILE-II: Balloon-Borne Telescope for Background-Suppressed Soft Gamma-Ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, T.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Parker, J. D.; Mizumoto, T.; Sonoda, S.; Mizumura, Y.; Tomono, D.; Nakamura, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Komura, S.; Sato, Y.; Nakamura, S.; Miuchi, K.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.; Iwaki, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ikeno, M.; Uchida, T.

    We have developed an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) for an all-sky survey at the MeV gamma-ray band. The ETCC consists of a gaseous tracker and a position sensitive scintillation camera to measure the momentum of the Compton-recoil electron and the scattering gamma ray so that we can reconstruct the energy and momentum of the incident gamma ray photon by photon. Also the ETCC has strong background rejection methods using tracking information such as the dE/dx particle identification and theCompton kinematics test. To confirm feasibility of observing celestial objects in space, we performed a balloon experiment to successfully observe the diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays, which confirmed the effectiveness of the background rejection capability. Based on the first balloon experiment result, we are developing a large ETCC and plan to launch it for the test of the imaging property. The performance of the SMILE-II ETCC is simulated and then it will obtain an effective area of 1.1 cm2 for 200 keV by improving the electron track reconstruction efficiency by a factor of about 10, which results in the detection of Crab nebula at >5σ level for several-hour observation in the middle latitude with an altitude of 40 km.

  11. The balloon-borne electron telescope with scintillating fibers (BETS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a new detector system developed for high-altitude balloon flights to observe the cosmic-ray electrons above 10 GeV. The Balloon borne Electron Telescope with Scintillating (BETS) fibers instrument is an imaging calorimeter which is capable of selecting electrons against the large background of protons. The calorimeter is composed of a sandwich of scintillating optical-fiber belts and lead plates with a combination of three plastic scintillators for shower trigger. The total thickness of lead is 40 mm (∼ 7.1 r.l.) and the number of fiber belts is nine. In each belt, alternating layers are oriented in orthogonal (x and y) directions. Two sets of an intensified CCD camera are adopted for read-out of the scintillating fibers in the x and y direction, respectively. The accelerator beam tests were carried out to study the performance of detector for electrons in 1996 and for protons in 1997 at CERN-SPS. The instrument was successfully flown aboard high-altitude balloon in 1997 and 1998. It is demonstrated by the flight data that a reliable identification of the electron component has been achieved in 10-100 GeV and the energy spectrum has been obtained

  12. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penacchioni, A. V., E-mail: ana.penacchioni@inpe.br; Braga, J., E-mail: joao.braga@inpe.br; Castro, M. A., E-mail: manuel.castro@inpe.br; Sacahui, J. R., E-mail: rodrigo.sacahui@inpe.br; D’Amico, F., E-mail: flavio.damico@inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) São José dos Campos (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modelled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre (CG) region during balloon flights in Brazil (∼ −23° of latitude and an altitude of ∼40 km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the GC: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  13. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro Avila, M. A.; Amico, F. D.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modelled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre (GC) region during balloon flights in Brazil (∽ -23° of latitude and ∽ 40 km of altitude) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the GC region: IE 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  14. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Penacchioni, A V; Castro, M A; D'Amico, F

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modeled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galatic Centre region during balloon flights in Brazil ($\\sim -23^{\\circ}$ of latitude and an altitude of $\\sim 40 \\thinspace$ km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the Galactic Centre region: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  15. Planetary Science with Balloon-Borne Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, Tibor; Cheng, Andy; Hibbitts, Karl; Young, Eliot

    2015-01-01

    of the residual motion from the gondola that was not addressed by the gondolas coarse pointing systems. The mission met its primary science and engineering objectives. The results of the BOPPS mission will feed into the body of science knowledge but also feed into future planning for more science from balloon-borne platforms. A notional platform called Gondola for High-Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) has been explored and this concept platform can address a number of important decadal questions. This paper provides a summary of the assessment of potential balloon borne observations for planetary science purposes including where potential science contributions can be expected, the necessary performance characteristics of the platform, and other features required or desired. The BOPPS mission is summarized including descriptions of the main elements and key science and engineering results. The paper then briefly describes GHAPS, and the salient features that can make it a valuable tool for future planetary observations.

  16. Attitude determination for balloon-borne experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gandilo, N N; Amiri, M; Angile, F E; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Dore, O P; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Fukui, Y; Galitzki, N; Gambrel, A E; Golwala, S; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hilton, G C; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Matthews, T G; Megerian, K G; Moncelsi, L; Morford, T A; Mroczkowski, T K; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; O'Brient, R; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Thomas, N E; Trangsrud, A; Truch, M D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Ward-Thompson, D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

    2014-01-01

    An attitude determination system for balloon-borne experiments is presented. The system provides pointing information in azimuth and elevation for instruments flying on stratospheric balloons over Antarctica. In-flight attitude is given by the real-time combination of readings from star cameras, a magnetometer, sun sensors, GPS, gyroscopes, tilt sensors and an elevation encoder. Post-flight attitude reconstruction is determined from star camera solutions, interpolated by the gyroscopes using an extended Kalman Filter. The multi-sensor system was employed by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol), an experiment that measures polarized thermal emission from interstellar dust clouds. A similar system was designed for the upcoming flight of SPIDER, a Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment. The pointing requirements for these experiments are discussed, as well as the challenges in designing attitude reconstruction systems for high altitude balloon flights. ...

  17. Pointing System for the Balloon-Borne Astronomical Payloads

    CERN Document Server

    Nirmal, K; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Suresh, Ambily; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a light-weight, fully autonomous 2-axis pointing and stabilization system designed for balloon-borne astronomical payloads. The system is developed using off-the-shelf components such as Arduino Uno controller, HMC 5883L magnetometer, MPU-9150 Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and iWave GPS receiver unit. It is a compact and rugged system which can also be used to take images/video in a moving vehicle, or in areal photography. The system performance is evaluated from the ground, as well as in conditions simulated to imitate the actual flight by using a tethered launch.

  18. Beam tests of the balloon-borne ATIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ganel, O; Ahn, H S; Ampe, J; Bashindzhagian, G L; Case, G; Chang, H; Ellison, S; Fazely, A; Gould, R; Granger, D; Gunasingha, R M; Guzik, T G; Han, Y J; Isbert, J; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, S K; Kwon, Y; Panasyuk, M Y; Panov, A; Price, B; Samsonov, G; Schmidt, W K H; Sen, M; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Sokolskaya, N; Stewart, M; Voronin, A; Wagner, D; Wang, J Z; Wefel, J P; Wu, J; Zatsepin, V

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurements from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide information about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATIC's design centers on an 18 radiation length (X0) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75λint graphite target. In September 1999, the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000–January 2001 and again in December 2002–January 2003, ATIC flew on the first two of a series of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 to 375 G...

  19. Prototype TIGRE Compton γ-ray balloon-borne telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, D.; O'Neill, T. J.; Akyüz, A.; Samimi, J.; Zych, A. D.

    2004-02-01

    A prototype balloon-borne telescope is being constructed for γ-ray observations in the MeV energy range. The Tracking and Imaging Gamma-Ray Experiment (TIGRE) uses multi-layers of thin silicon detectors to track and measure the energy losses of Compton recoil electrons. When combined with the direction and energy of the Compton scattered γ-ray a unique incident direction for each photon event is determined. This facilitates background rejection, improved sensitivity and image reconstruction. The converter/tracker also serves as an electron-positron pair detector for γ-rays up to 100 MeV. The initial continental US flight will be used to determine the sub-orbital atmospheric backgrounds and search for polarized γ-emission for the Crab pulsar. Longer southern hemisphere flights with an enhanced instrument will map out the 26Al emissions from the galactic center region.

  20. The Debris Disk Explorer: a balloon-borne coronagraph for observing debris disks

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts Jr., Lewis C.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk struct...

  1. The balloon-borne large-aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry: BLAST-Pol

    OpenAIRE

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angile, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; David H. Hughes; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Marsden, Galen; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol) is a suborbital mapping experiment designed to study the role played by magnetic fields in the star formation process. BLAST-Pol is the reconstructed BLAST telescope, with the addition of linear polarization capability. Using a 1.8 m Cassegrain telescope, BLAST-Pol images the sky onto a focal plane that consists of 280 bolometric detectors in three arrays, observing simultaneously at 250, 350, and 500 um. The...

  2. A Balloon-borne Telescope for Planetary Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Taguchi, Makoto; Yoshida, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakano, Toshihiko; Fujimura, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Mutsumi

    2012-07-01

    This presentation reports the development status of the balloon-borne telescope(BBT) for planetary observations which is scheduled to launch in August 2012. The BBT flies in the stratosphere where the atmosphere is as 1/100 thin as that around the ground, and is higher than the ozone layer. The telescope can receive star light with the band from NIR to UV through less atmospheric distortions. Our project aims to take images of target planets from the BBT in such advantageous environment, and to observe atmospheric phenomena in other planets. As the technology demonstration, a prototype flight system with a 30cm diameter telescope was launched in 2009 in Japan. The second demonstration with an improved system is scheduled to launch in this August. With the improved flight system, the BBT is expected to take images of Venus with the resolution of as high as 0.2 arc-seconds in a few hours. Eventually, the BBT is planned to launch into the polar jet stream and to observe target planets in a few hundreds hours. For the following flight observation, the successor flight system is already being developed. In this presentation, the target planets and its science which the project aims are briefly introduced. And also the development status of the flight system for the next launch is introduced.

  3. Balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Satoru; Group, for the Emulsion Gamma-ray Telescope

    2010-01-01

    By detecting the beginning of electron pairs with nuclear emulsion, precise gamma-ray direction and gamma-ray polarization can be detected. With recent advancement in emulsion scanning system, emulsion analyzing capability is becoming powerful. Now we are developing the balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion. Overview and status of our telescope is described.

  4. A balloon borne telescope for planetary observations with a fine pointing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Yasuhiro; Onishi, Tomoya; Battazzo, Steve; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Kazuya; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Taguchi, Makoto

    A balloon borne telescope is one of the effective observation methods for planets under space environment. A telescope is carried up to the stratosphere at an altitude of higher than 32 km where the air density is as thin as 1/100 of that at the ground. The thin atmosphere gives a telescope better observation conditions: fine seeing, stable weather, and high transmittance especially in the infrared region. Moreover there is a chance that a planet can be continuously seen for a window longer than 24 hours from the polar stratosphere. The authors have been developing a balloon borne telescope system for years to take finer images of planets in the solar system., The first object is Venus, of which atmospheric motions are derived by tracking the changes of cloud patterns with bands of UV, visible and NIR. Highly precise pointing control within the error of sub-arcseconds is required so that the balloon borne telescope achieves its diffraction-limited spatial resolution. The flight system is equipped with a three-stage attitude and pointing control system in order to realize the desired pointing control precision. In 2009, the flight system was built and tested in various ground tests and an actual balloon flight. Although the balloon experiment failed due to trouble with an onboard computer, the ground tests before the flight operation have verified that the pointing control system can achieve pointing error of less than 0.2 arcseconds. The balloon borne telescope is being redesigned for a sequential observation of Venus, Mars and Jupiter in the summer of 2011. This flight will be a step for a long-duration observation in the polar stratosphere. Additionally, an observation of the sodium tail of Mercury with a small telescope and a wide field of view has been under consideration. Mercury has very thin atmosphere called a surface-bounded exosphere. Past observations by spacecraft and ground-based telescopes revealed that one of the atmospheric components, gaseous

  5. Balloon-borne video cassette recorders for digital data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-speed, high-capacity digital data storage system has been developed for a new balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope. The system incorporates sophisticated, yet easy to use and economical consumer products: the portable video cassette recorder (VCR) and a relatively newer item - the digital audio processor. The in-flight recording system employs eight VCRs and will provide a continuous data storage rate of 1.4 megabits/sec throughout a 40 hour balloon flight. Data storage capacity is 25 gigabytes and power consumption is only 10 watts

  6. European activities in balloon-borne infrared astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared and submillimeter astronomy contributes essentially to the understanding of basic astrophysical processes (e.g. formation and evolution of stars and galaxies, origin of the universe). Atmospheric emission and absorption place severe constraints on the wavelength range and sensitivity of corresponding ground-based measurements. Since no infrared astronomical satellite is in operation yet, balloon-borne instruments are the ones with the highest sensitivity. Approximately ten European groups are active in this field and have produced important scientific results within the last ten years. Their work can be divided into four groups: investigation of the solar system; stellar evolution; galactic evolution and origin of the universe. (Auth.)

  7. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorf, M.; H. Bösch; Butz, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Engel, A.; Goutail, F.; Grunow, K.; Hendrick, F.; Hrechanyy, S.; B. Naujokat; J.-P. Pommereau; Van Roozendael, M.; C. Sioris; F. Stroh

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, results of four stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM). Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) satellite instrument. The balloon observations include (a) balloon-borne in situ ...

  8. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorf, M.; H. Bösch; B. Naujokat; Pommereau, J. P.; Van Roozendael, M.; C. Sioris; F. Stroh; Weidner, F.; K. Pfeilsticker; Butz, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Engel, A.; Goutail, F.; Grunow, K.

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, results of four stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM). Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) satellite instrument. The balloon observations include ( a) balloon-borne in situ...

  9. GRAINE project: The first balloon-borne, emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Kamada, Keiki; Mizutani, Saki; Nakagawa, Ryo; Ozaki, Keita; Rokujo, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    The GRAINE project (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) has been developed for the observation of cosmic γ-rays in the energy range 10 MeV-100 GeV with a precise (0.08°} at 1-2 GeV), polarization-sensitive, large-aperture-area (˜10 m^2) emulsion telescope by repeated long-duration balloon flights. In 2011, the first balloon-borne experiment was successfully performed with a 12.5 × 10cm^2 aperture area and 4.6 hour flight duration for a feasibility and performance test. Systematic detection, energy reconstruction, and timestamping of γ-ray events were performed across the whole area of the emulsion film, up to 45° incident zenith angle, down to 50 MeV γ-ray energy, with 97% detection reliability, 0.2 sec timestamp accuracy, and 98% timestamp reliability. A γ-ray data checking and calibration method was created using the γ-rays produced in the converter. We measured the atmospheric γ-ray flux in the energy range 50-300 MeV and obtained a first understanding of the cosmic γ-ray background. By combining the attitude data, we established a procedure for determining the γ-ray arrival direction in celestial coordinates. The first flight of the balloon-borne emulsion telescope confirmed its potential as a high-performance cosmic γ-ray detector.

  10. The Balloon-Borne Exoplanet Experiment (EchoBeach)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, E.

    2013-09-01

    The Balloon-Borne Exoplanet Experiment (EchoBeach) is a proposed sub-orbital spectroscopic instrument. Its primary scientific goal is to detect and characterize the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets in the Mid-IR part of the electromagnetic spectrum from 4 to 20 μm using a 1.6m diameter telescope. It is in this wavelength range where the contrast between the star and planet emission grows exponentially, and this spectral region is key to answering important questions about the existence and composition of exp-atmospheres. Due to the Earth atmospheric absorption and emission, bservations at these wavelength are impossible from the ground or even at aircraft altitudes, but become available to balloon-born instrumentation flying in the upper stratosphere. At present we have high fidelity Mid-IR spectra of just two exoplanets of any type. EchoBeach can greatly improve on this by observing a multitude of transiting exoplanets, well in advance of any planned space-mission.

  11. A balloon-borne microwave limb sounder for stratospheric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The balloon-borne microwave limb sounder (BMLS) measures atmospheric thermal emission from millimeter wavelength spectral lines to determine vertical profiles of stratospheric species. The instrument flown to date operates at 205 GHz to measure C10, O3, and H2O2. A 63 GHz radiometer will be added to test the technique for determining tangent point pressure from the MLS experiment on the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS). Many additional species could also be measured by the BMLS. A radiometer at 270 GHz would provide measurements of HO2, NO2, HNO3, N2O, 16O18O16O, and HCN. With this addition, the BMLS can test the current theory of O3 photochemical balance in the upper stratosphere

  12. Collection of Stratospheric Samples using Balloon-Borne Payload System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Sreejith, A. G.; Kumble, Sheshashayi; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Kj, Nirmal; Suresh, Ambily; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere at stratospheric altitudes contains dust particles from soil lifted by weather, volcanic dust, man-made aerosols, IDP (Interplanetary Dust Particles) - remnants of comets and asteroids, and even interstellar dust. Satellite observations suggest that approximately 100--300 tons of cosmic dust enter Earth's atmosphere every day. However, very little is known about the microbial life in the upper atmosphere, where conditions are very much similar to that on Mars and possibly on some exoplanets. Stratosphere provides a good opportunity to study the existence or survival of biological life in these conditions. Despite the importance of this topic to astrobiology, stratospheric microbial diversity/survival remains largely unexplored, probably due to significant difficulties in the access and ensuring the absence of contamination of the samples. To conduct a detailed study into this, we are developing the balloon-borne payload system SAMPLE (Stratospheric Altitude Microbiology Probe for Life Existence) to collect dust samples from stratosphere and bring them in an hygienic and uncontaminated manner to a suitable laboratory environment, where further study will be conducted to establish the possibility of microbial life in the upper atmosphere. This balloon-borne payload system will rise through the atmosphere till it reaches an altitude of about 25-30 km above sea level. The payload consists of detachable pre-sterilized sampling chambers designed to collect and contain the dust samples and get them back to the surface without contamination during the flight, a microprocessor and a controller which will determine the altitude of the payload system to actively monitor the opening and closing of the sample collection chambers. For contamination control, we will have two extra chambers, one of which will fly but not open, and one will remain closed on the ground. Other onboard devices include environmental sensors, GPS tracking devices, cameras to monitor

  13. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Pascale, E; Bock, J J; Chapin, E L; Chung, J; Devlin, M J; Dicker, S; Griffin, M; Gundersen, J O; Halpern, M; Hargrave, P C; Hughes, D H; Klein, J; MacTavish, C J; Marsden, G; Martin, P G; Martin, T G; Mauskopf, P; Netterfield, C B; Olmi, L; Patanchon, G; Rex, M; Scott, D; Semisch, C; Thomas, N; Truch, M D P; Tucker, C; Tucker, G S; Viero, M P; Wiebe, D V

    2007-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital survey-experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between 3 arrays, observes simultaneously in broad-band (30%) spectral-windows at 250, 350, and 500 micron. The optical design is based on a 2m diameter Cassegrain telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 micron. The gondola pointing system enables raster-like maps of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of ~30" post-flight pointing reconstruction to ~<5" rms is also achieved. The on-board telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a pre-selected set of maps, with the option of manual intervention. In this paper we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. Since a test-flight in ...

  14. Precision Attitude Control for the BETTII Balloon-Borne Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Rinehart. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared interferometer to fly on a high altitude balloon. Operating at wavelengths of 30-90 microns, BETTII will obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets at angular resolutions down to less than half an arcsecond, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. This requires attitude control at a level ofless than a tenth of an arcsecond, a great challenge for a lightweight balloon-borne system. We have designed a precision attitude determination system to provide gondola attitude knowledge at a level of 2 milliarcseconds at rates up to 100Hz, with accurate absolute attitude determination at the half arcsecond level at rates of up to 10Hz. A mUlti-stage control system involving rigid body motion and tip-tilt-piston correction provides precision pointing stability to the level required for the far-infrared instrument to perform its spatial/spectral interferometry in an open-loop control. We present key aspects of the design of the attitude determination and control and its development status.

  15. The balloon-borne exoplanet spectroscopy experiment (BETSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, E.

    2015-10-01

    The balloon-borne exoplanet spectroscopy experiment (BETSE) is a proposed balloon spectrometer operating in the 1-5 μm band with spectral resolution of R = 100. Using a 50 cm diameter telescope, BETSE is desgnied to have sufficient sensitivity and control of systematics to measure the atmospheric spectra of representative sample of known hot Jupiters, few warm Neptunes, and some of the exoplanets TESS will soon begin to discover. This would for the first time allow us to place strict observational constraints on the nature of exo-atmospheres and on models of planetary formation. In a LDB flight from Antarctica, BETSE would be able to characterize the atmospheres of 20 planets. If a ULDB flight is available, the combination of a longer flight and night time operations would enable BETSE to ground-breakingly characterize the atmospheres of more than 40 planets. Prior to an LDB or ULDB flight, BETSE would be tested in a 24 hr flight from Fort Sumner, NM, in order to test all subsystems, also observing more than 4 planets with SNR greater than 5.

  16. EBEX: A balloon-borne CMB polarization experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Reichborn-Kjennerud, Britt; Ade, Peter; Aubin, Françcois; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bao, Chaoyun; Borrill, Julian; Cantalupo, Christopher; Chapman, Daniel; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Grain, Julien; Grainger, William; Hanany, Shaul; Hillbrand, Seth; Hubmayr, Johannes; Jaffe, Andrew; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Terry; Kisner, Theodore; Klein, Jeff; Korotkov, Andrei; Leach, Sam; Lee, Adrian; Levinson, Lorne; Limon, Michele; MacDermid, Kevin; Matsumura, Tomotake; Meng, Xiaofan; Miller, Amber; Milligan, Michael; Pascale, Enzo; Polsgrove, Daniel; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Raach, Kate; Sagiv, Ilan; Smecher, Graeme; Stivoli, Federico; Stompor, Radek; Tran, Huan; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory S; Vinokurov, Yury; Yadav, Amit; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zilic, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    EBEX is a NASA-funded balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Observations will be made using 1432 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometric detectors read out with frequency multiplexed SQuIDs. EBEX will observe in three frequency bands centered at 150, 250, and 410 GHz, with 768, 384, and 280 detectors in each band, respectively. This broad frequency coverage is designed to provide valuable information about polarized foreground signals from dust. The polarized sky signals will be modulated with an achromatic half wave plate (AHWP) rotating on a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) and analyzed with a fixed wire grid polarizer. EBEX will observe a patch covering ~1% of the sky with 8' resolution, allowing for observation of the angular power spectrum from \\ell = 20 to 1000. This will allow EBEX to search for both the primordial B-mode signal predicted by inflation and the anticipated lensing B-mode signal. Calculations to predict EBEX constrain...

  17. Demonstration of a Balloon Borne Arc-Second Pointer Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeese, Keith D.; Ward, Philip R.

    2006-01-01

    Many designs for utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments have been proposed throughout the years. A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range. This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement. The test results of a demonstration prototype of the design with similar ability are also presented. Discussion of a high fidelity controller simulation for design analysis is presented. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is utilized for coarse and fine pointing. Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system, with extensive flight history, residing above the gondola structure. A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing, providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target. Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors, eliminating backlash problems. An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided. A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static friction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. Results from a linear analysis of the total system and the high fidelity simulation are given. Results from a generalized demonstration prototype are presented. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware was used to demonstrate the efficacy and performance of the pointer design for a mock instrument. Sub-arcsecond pointing ability from a ground hang test setup

  18. The Debris Disk Explorer: a balloon-borne coronagraph for observing debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Lewis C; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk structure, and explore the physics and history of debris disks by characterizing the size and composition of disk dust. The DDX instrument is a 0.75-m diameter off-axis telescope and a coronagraph carried by a stratospheric balloon. DDX will take high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a month-long science flight launched from New Zealand. The long flight will fully explore the set of known de...

  19. Development of new-type nuclear emulsion for a balloon-borne emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports a new-type of nuclear emulsion that improves the track-finding efficiency of charged particle detection. The emulsion is applied to the GRAINE project, a balloon-borne experiment that observes cosmic γ-rays through an emulsion γ-ray telescope. The new emulsion film dramatically improves the detection efficiency for γ-rays. The nuclear emulsion gel and films for the second GRAINE balloon-borne experiment (GRAINE-2015) were fully self-produced by ourselves. New handling methods for the novel emulsion film have also been developed. Over time, the stored films gradually become desensitized to minimum ionizing particles, but the original sensitivity can be restored by a resetting process. Moreover, the fading of latent images can be arrested by a drying process. To sensitize the new-type films and avoid their fading, emulsion preprocessing was applied immediately prior to GRAINE-2015. A balloon flight with the emulsion γ-ray telescope was successfully completed in Australia on 12th May 2015. By scanning with automated optical microscopes and analyzing the penetrated tracks, we confirmed the high track-finding efficiency (97%) of the mounted films. The analysis of γ-ray event detection, aims at detecting Vela pulsar, is in progress

  20. The balloon-borne large-aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry: BLAST-Pol

    CERN Document Server

    Fissel, Laura M; Angile, Francesco E; Benton, Steven J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Gandilo, Natalie N; Gundersen, Joshua O; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L; Marsden, Galen; Matthews, Tristan G; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K; Netterfield, C Barth; Novak, Giles; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A; Soler, Juan Diego; Thomas, Nicholas E; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole E; Tucker, Gregory S; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Wiebe, Donald V

    2010-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol) is a suborbital mapping experiment designed to study the role played by magnetic fields in the star formation process. BLAST-Pol is the reconstructed BLAST telescope, with the addition of linear polarization capability. Using a 1.8 m Cassegrain telescope, BLAST-Pol images the sky onto a focal plane that consists of 280 bolometric detectors in three arrays, observing simultaneously at 250, 350, and 500 um. The diffraction-limited optical system provides a resolution of 30'' at 250 um. The polarimeter consists of photolithographic polarizing grids mounted in front of each bolometer/detector array. A rotating 4 K achromatic half-wave plate provides additional polarization modulation. With its unprecedented mapping speed and resolution, BLAST-Pol will produce three-color polarization maps for a large number of molecular clouds. The instrument provides a much needed bridge in spatial coverage between larger-scale, coarse resolutio...

  1. Design and construction of a carbon fiber gondola for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, J D; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, C; Contaldi, C C; Crill, B P; Doré, O P; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Gambrel, A E; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hilton, G C; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Megerian, K G; Moncelsi, L; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; O'Brient, R; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Shariff, J A; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the light-weight carbon fiber and aluminum gondola designed for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope. SPIDER is designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and control of systematics in search of the imprint of inflation: a period of exponential expansion in the early Universe. The requirements of this balloon-borne instrument put tight constrains on the mass budget of the payload. The SPIDER gondola is designed to house the experiment and guarantee its operational and structural integrity during its balloon-borne flight, while using less than 10% of the total mass of the payload. We present a construction method for the gondola based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes with aluminum inserts and aluminum multi-tube joints. We describe the validation of the model through Finite Element Analysis and mechanical tests.

  2. Thermal design and performance of the balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry BLASTPol

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, J D; Angilè, F E; Benton, S J; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Fissel, L M; Fukui, Y; Galitzki, N; Gandilo, N N; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Matthews, T G; Moncelsi, L; Mroczkowski, A; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Thomas, N E; Truch, M D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Ward-Thompson, D

    2014-01-01

    We present the thermal model of the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). This instrument was successfully flown in two circumpolar flights from McMurdo, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. During these two flights, BLASTPol obtained unprecedented information about the magnetic field in molecular clouds through the measurement of the polarized thermal emission of interstellar dust grains. The thermal design of the experiment addresses the stability and control of the payload necessary for this kind of measurement. We describe the thermal modeling of the payload including the sun-shielding strategy. We present the in-flight thermal performance of the instrument and compare the predictions of the model with the temperatures registered during the flight. We describe the difficulties of modeling the thermal behavior of the balloon-borne platform and establish landmarks that can be used in the design of future balloon-borne instruments.

  3. Proceedings of the 3rd workshop on balloon-borne experiments with superconducting magnet spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Third Work Shop on Balloon Borne Experiment with a Superconducting Magnet Spectrometer was held at National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba, Japan on February 24 - 25, 1992. The main effort for this workshop was focused on the progress of the BESS (Balloon Borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer) experiment and on the scope for scientific investigation with the BESS detector. The progress was reviewed and further investigation was discussed for the BESS further scientific collaboration among Univ. of Tokyo, Kobe University, KEK, ISAS and NMSU. (J.P.N.)

  4. Balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion : overview and status

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Shigeki; Hamada, Kaname; Hara, Toshio; Iyono, Atsushi; Kawada, Jiro; Kazuyama, Masashi; Kodama, Koichi; Komatsu, Masahiro; Koshiba, Shinichiro; Kubota, Hirotaka; Miyamoto, Seigo; Miyanishi, Motoaki; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Naka, Tatsuhiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Niwa, Kimio; Nonoyama, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Keita; Rokujo, Hiroki; Sako, Takashi; Sato, Osamu; Sato, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Atsumu; Suzuki, Kazuya; Takahashi, Satoru; Tezuka, Ikuo; Yoshida, Junya; Yoshioka, Teppei

    2012-01-01

    Detecting the first electron pairs with nuclear emulsion allows a precise measurement of the direction of incident gamma-rays as well as their polarization. With recent innovations in emulsion scanning, emulsion analyzing capability is becoming increasingly powerful. Presently, we are developing a balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope using nuclear emulsion. An overview and a status of our telescope is given.

  5. A review of infrared and submillimeter astronomy with balloon-borne telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared and submillimeter astronomical observations performed with balloon-borne instruments have produced major contributions to the understanding of many areas of astrophysics. A review of recent results obtained on the cosmic background radiation, galactic structure, star formation processes, the outer planets and the solar atmosphere are presented. (author)

  6. BOOMERANG A Balloon-borne Millimeter Wave Telescope and Total Power Receiver for Mapping Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Crill, B P; Artusa, D R; Bhatia, R S; Bock, J J; Boscaleri, A; Cardoni, P; Church, S E; Coble, K; De Bernardis, P; De Troia, G; Farese, P; Ganga, K; Giacometti, M; Haynes, C V; Hivon, E; Hristov, V V; Iacoangeli, A; Jones, W C; Lange, A E; Martinis, L; Masi, S; Mason, P V; Mauskopf, P D; Miglio, L; Montroy, T; Netterfield, C B; Paine, C G; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Pongetti, F; Romeo, G; Ruhl, J E; Scaramuzzi, F; Sforza, D M; Turner, A D

    2002-01-01

    We describe BOOMERANG; a balloon-borne microwave telescope designed to map the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at a resolution of 10' from the Long Duration Balloon (LDB) platform. The millimeter-wave receiver employs new technology in bolometers, readout electronics, cold re-imaging optics, millimeter-wave filters, and cryogenics to obtain high sensitivity to CMB anisotropy. Sixteen detectors observe in 4 spectral bands centered at 90, 150, 240 and 410 GHz. The wide frequency coverage, the long duration flight, the optical design and the observing strategy provide strong rejection of systematic effects. We report the flight performance of the instrument during a 10.5 day stratospheric balloon flight launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica that mapped ~2000 square degrees of the sky.

  7. The BALLOON-borne and PAMELA experiments for the study of the antimatter component in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spillantini, Piero E-mail: piero.spillantini@fi.infn.it

    2004-01-01

    The PAMELA experiment is based on a satellite-borne equipment actually in the final integration phase. It will be installed on board of the Russian satellite Resurs DK1 and launched in a quasi-polar orbit from the Baikonur cosmodrom at the beginning of next year. PAMELA will measure the antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays with high statistics and in a large energy range (80 MeV-190 GeV for antiprotons and 50 MeV-270 GeV for positrons), extending to never investigated energies the measurements of several balloon borne experiments performed by the same PAMELA collaboration in last decade. This will make achievable sensitive tests of cosmic ray propagation models in the Galaxy and the search, in an energy range never investigated before, of possible structures in the fluxes. These structures, related to the presence of primary antiparticle sources, could be signals of 'new physics', connected with open problems like dark matter existence and matter/antimatter symmetry in the Universe. The detector consists of a very precise magnetic spectrometer, several scintillation counter hodoscopes to measure the energy losses and times of flight, and a high granularity and deep Si-W calorimeter, augmented by a very compact transition radiation detector and a He3 neutron detector hodoscope, and protected around and on the top by an anticoincidence system.

  8. GRAPE - A Balloon-Borne Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Macri, J R; McConnell, M L; Narita, T; Ryan, J M

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the development status of GRAPE (the Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment), a hard X-ray Compton Polarimeter. The purpose of GRAPE is to measure the polarization of hard X-rays in the 50-300 keV energy range. We are particularly interested in X-rays that are emitted from solar flares and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), although GRAPE could also be employed in the study of other astrophysical sources. Accurately measuring the polarization of the emitted radiation will lead to a better understating of both emission mechanisms and source geometries. The GRAPE design consists of an array of plastic scintillators surrounding a central high-Z crystal scintillator. The azimuthal distribution of photon scatters from the plastic array into the central calorimeter provides a measure of the polarization fraction and polarization angle of the incident radiation. The design of the detector provides sensitivity over a large field-of-view (>pi steradian). The design facilitates the fabrication of large area arrays w...

  9. Balloon-borne near-infrared multicolor photometry of late-type stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 15-cm balloon-borne astronomical telescope (BAT-1) was constructed, and four-color near-infrared photometry of five M-type stars (α Sco, α Her, delta Vir, delta Oph, and σ Lib) and α Boo (K2IIIp) was carried out in its third fight during the night of May 29-30, 1976. The nearinfrared energy fluxes of the five M-type stars were derived for the pass bands of J(1.28 μm), H(1.59 μm), Ω(1.87 μm), and K(2.22 μm). The potential advantages of balloon-borne multicolor photometry by the BAT-1 are briefly discussed. (author)

  10. The Cosmic Foreground Explorer (COFE): A balloon-borne microwave polarimeter to characterize polarized foregrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardi, Rodrigo; Williams, Brian; Bersanelli, Marco; Ferreira, Ivan; Lubin, Philip M.; Meinhold, Peter R.; O'Neill, Hugh,; Stebor, Nathan C.; Villa, Fabrizio; Villela, Thyrso; Wuensche, Carlos A.

    2007-01-01

    The COsmic Foreground Explorer (COFE) is a balloon-borne microwave polarime- ter designed to measure the low-frequency and low-l characteristics of dominant diffuse polarized foregrounds. Short duration balloon flights from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres will allow the telescope to cover up to 80% of the sky with an expected sensitivity per pixel better than 100 $\\mu K / deg^2$ from 10 GHz to 20 GHz. This is an important effort toward characterizing the polarized foregrounds for future...

  11. Fine tracking system for balloon-borne telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, M; Lorenzetti, D

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a study along with a first prototype of a high precision system (? 1 arcsec) for pointing and tracking light (near-infrared) telescopes on board stratospheric balloons. Such a system is essentially composed by a star sensor and by a star tracker, able to recognize the field and to adequately track the telescope, respectively. We present the software aimed at processing the star sensor image and the predictive algorithm that allows the fine tracking of the source at a sub-pixel level. The laboratory tests of the system are described and its performance is analyzed. We demonstrate how such a device, when used at the focal plane of enough large telescopes (2-4m, F/10), is capable to provide (sub-)arcsec diffraction limited images in the near infrared bands.

  12. Fine tracking system for balloon-borne telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, M.; Pedichini, F.; Lorenzetti, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a study along with a first prototype of a high precision system (? 1 arcsec) for pointing and tracking light (near-infrared) telescopes on board stratospheric balloons. Such a system is essentially composed by a star sensor and by a star tracker, able to recognize the field and to adequately track the telescope, respectively. We present the software aimed at processing the star sensor image and the predictive algorithm that allows the fine tracking of the source at a...

  13. Background Measurements from Balloon-Borne CZT Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, J A; Grindlay, J E; Bloser, P F; Stahle, C K; Parker, B; Barthelmy, S D; Jenkins, Johnathan A; Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bloser, Peter F.; Stahle, Carl; Parker, Brad; Barthelmy, Scott

    2002-01-01

    We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CZT detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10mm x 10mm x 5mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 $\\times$ 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman material. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40deg field-of-view collimator (comprisinga graded passive shield and plastic scintillator) used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previous detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental back...

  14. The design and development of a high-resolution visible-to-near-UV telescope for balloon-borne astronomy: SuperBIT

    CERN Document Server

    Romualdez, L Javier; Clark, Paul; Damaren, Christopher J; Eifler, Tim; Fraisse, Aurelien A; Galloway, Mathew N; Hartley, John W; Jones, William C; Li, Lun; Lipton, Leeav; Luu, Thuy Vy T; Massey, Richard J; Netterfield, C Barth; Padilla, Ivan; Rhodes, Jason D; Schmoll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-borne astronomy is unique in that it allows for a level of image stability, resolution, and optical backgrounds that are comparable to space-borne systems due to greatly reduced atmospheric interference, but at a fraction of the cost and over a significantly reduced development time-scale. Instruments operating within visible-to-near-UV bands ($300$ - $900$ um) can achieve a theoretical diffraction limited resolution of $0.01"$ from the stratosphere ($35$ - $40$ km altitude) without the need for extensive adaptive optical systems required by ground-based systems. The {\\it Superpressure Balloon-borne Imaging Telescope} ("SuperBIT") is a wide-field imager designed to achieve 0.02$"$ stability over a 0.5$^\\circ$ field-of-view, for deep single exposures of up to 5 minutes. SuperBIT is thus well-suited for many astronomical observations, from solar or extrasolar planetary observations, to resolved stellar populations and distant galaxies (whether to study their morphology, evolution, or gravitational lensi...

  15. Far-infared spectroscopic observations with a Balloon-Borne infrared telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first observations of far-infrared celestial objects using the 50-cm Balloon-Borne Infrared Telescope were made in Alice Springs, Australia. Far-infrared spectrophotometric data between 45 and 115 μm were taken for the Orion-KL region, Saturn and a southern H II region RCW 38. The data including high excitation transition lines of CO for Orion-KL, O III lines for RCW 38 and a PH3 absorption feature of Saturn will be presented. (author)

  16. Project of Antarctic Balloon-Borne Measurements of the CR spectrum above 1020 EV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, R. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Chernov, D. V.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Sysojeva, T. I.

    Relatively simple detector SPHERE (spherical mirror ˜ 1.5m2 and retina of 100 pixels) is presented for the Antarctic balloon-borne measurements of the CR spectrum. Long time winter flight make it possible to measure the spectrum above 1020 eV . Comparison with satellite and ISS projects of the nearest future show that the efficiency of this detector is sufficiently high. The energy threshold is less (˜ 1018 eV ). The accuracy of the energy definition is high as two methods are together the measurement of the EAS fluorescence track in the atmosphere and the measurement of the full flux of the EAS Cherenkov light.

  17. The TopHat experiment: A balloon-borne instrument for mapping millimeter and submillimeter emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silverberg, R.F.; Cheng, E.S.; Aguirre, J.E.;

    2005-01-01

    The TopHat experiment was designed to measure the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on angular scales from 0.degrees 3 to 30 degrees and the thermal emission from both Galactic and extragalactic dust. The balloon-borne instrument had five spectral bands spanning frequencies...... from 175 to 630 GHz. The telescope was a compact, 1 m, on-axis Cassegrain telescope designed to scan the sky at a fixed elevation of 78 degrees. The radiometer used cryogenic bolometers coupled to a single feed horn via a dichroic filter system. The observing strategy was intended to efficiently cover...

  18. PoGOLino: a scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of $65^\\circ$), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  19. PoGOLino: A scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, Merlin, E-mail: merlin@particle.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Chauvin, Maxime [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Fukazawa, Yasushi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito [Tokuyama Corporation, Shunan, Yamaguchi (Japan); Jackson, Miranda [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kamae, Tune [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Kawaguchi, Noriaki [Tokuyama Corporation, Shunan, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kawano, Takafumi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kiss, Mózsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Takahashi, Hiromitsu [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-01-11

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of 65°), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  20. The Cosmic Foreground Explorer (COFE): A balloon-borne microwave polarimeter to characterize polarized foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Leonardi, Rodrigo; Bersanelli, Marco; Ferreira, Ivan; Lubin, Philip M; Meinhold, Peter R; O'Neill, Hugh; Stebor, Nathan C; Villa, Fabrizio; Villela, Thyrso; Wuensche, Carlos A

    2006-01-01

    The COsmic Foreground Explorer (COFE) is a balloon-borne microwave polarime- ter designed to measure the low-frequency and low-l characteristics of dominant diffuse polarized foregrounds. Short duration balloon flights from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres will allow the telescope to cover up to 80% of the sky with an expected sensitivity per pixel better than 100 $\\mu K / deg^2$ from 10 GHz to 20 GHz. This is an important effort toward characterizing the polarized foregrounds for future CMB experiments, in particular the ones that aim to detect primordial gravity wave signatures in the CMB polarization angular power spectrum.

  1. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dorf

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, results of all four existing stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM. Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY satellite instrument. The balloon observations include (a balloon-borne in situ resonance fluorescence detection of BrO, (b balloon-borne solar occultation DOAS measurements (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy of BrO in the UV, and (c BrO profiling from the solar occultation SAOZ (Systeme d'Analyse par Observation Zenithale balloon instrument. Since stratospheric BrO is subject to considerable diurnal variation and none of the measurements are performed close enough in time and space for a direct comparison, all balloon observations are considered with reference to outputs from the 3-D CTM. The referencing is performed by forward and backward air mass trajectory calculations to match the balloon with the satellite observations. The diurnal variation of BrO is considered by 1-D photochemical model calculation along the trajectories. The 1-D photochemical model is initialised with output data of the 3-D model with additional constraints on the vertical transport, the total amount and photochemistry of stratospheric bromine as given by the various balloon observations. Total [Bry]=(20.1±2.8pptv obtained from DOAS BrO observations at mid-latitudes in 2003, serves as an upper limit of the comparison. Most of the balloon observations agree with the photochemical model predictions within their given error estimates. First retrieval exercises of BrO limb profiling from the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument agree to <±50% with the photochemically-corrected balloon observations, and tend to show less agreement

  2. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dorf

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, results of four stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM. Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY satellite instrument. The balloon observations include (a balloon-borne in situ resonance fluorescence detection of BrO (Triple, (b balloon-borne solar occultation DOAS measurements (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy of BrO in the UV, and (c BrO profiling from the solar occultation SAOZ (Systeme d'Analyse par Observation Zenithale balloon instrument. Since stratospheric BrO is subject to considerable diurnal variation and none of the measurements are performed close enough in time and space for a direct comparison, all balloon observations are considered with reference to outputs from the 3-D CTM. The referencing is performed by forward and backward air mass trajectory calculations to match the balloon with the satellite observations. The diurnal variation of BrO is considered by 1-D photochemical model calculation along the trajectories. The 1-D photochemical model is initialised with output data of the 3-D model with additional constraints on the vertical transport, the total amount and photochemistry of stratospheric bromine as given by the various balloon observations. Total [Bry]=(20.1±2.5 pptv obtained from DOAS BrO observations at mid-latitudes in 2003, serves as an upper limit of the comparison. Most of the balloon observations agree with the photochemical model predictions within their given error estimates. First retrieval exercises of BrO limb profiling from the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument on average agree to around 20% with the photochemically-corrected balloon observations of the remote sensing instruments (SAOZ

  3. Large-Area Balloon-Borne Polarized Gamma Ray Observer (PoGO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGO), to measure polarization of soft gamma rays (25-200 keV) using asymmetry in azimuth angle distribution of Compton scattering. PoGO will detect 10% polarization in 100mCrab sources in a 6-8 hour observation and bring a new dimension to studies on gamma ray emission/transportation mechanism in pulsars, AGNs, black hole binaries, and neutron star surface. The concept is an adaptation to polarization measurements of well-type phoswich counter technology used in balloon-borne experiments (Welcome-1) and AstroE2 Hard X-ray Detector. PoGO consists of close-packed array of 397 hexagonal well-type phoswich counters. Each unit is composed of a long thin tube (well) of slow plastic scintillator, a solid rod of fast plastic scintillator, and a short BGO at the base. A photomultiplier coupled to the end of the BGO detects light from all 3 scintillators. The rods with decay times 2) strike a fast scintillator, some are Compton scattered. A fraction of the scattered photons are absorbed in another rod (or undergo a second scatter). A valid event requires one clean fast signal of pulse-height compatible with photo-absorption (> 20keV) and one or more compatible with Compton scattering (< 10keV). Studies based on EGS4 (with polarization features) and Geant4 predict excellent background rejection and high sensitivity

  4. Analysis of the Motion Control Methods for Stratospheric Balloon-Borne Gondola Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, gondola platform is one of the stratospheric balloon-borne platforms being in research focus at home and overseas. Comparing to other stratospheric balloon-borne platforms, such as airship platform, gondola platform has advantages of higher stability, rapid in motion regulation and lower energy cost but disadvantages of less supporting capacity and be incapable of fixation. While all platforms have the same goal of keeping them at accurate angle and right pose for the requirements of instruments and objects installed in the platforms, when platforms rotate round the ground level perpendicular. That is accomplishing motion control. But, platform control system has factors of low damper, excessive and uncertain disturbances by the reason of its being hung over balloon in the air, it is hard to achieve the desired control precision because platform is ease to deviate its benchmark motion. Thus, in the controlling procedure in order to get higher precision, it is crucial to perceive the platform's swing synchronously and rapidly, and restrain the influence of disturbances effectively, keep the platform's pose steadily. Furthermore, while the platform in the air regard control center in the ground as reference object, it is ultimate to select a appropriate reference frame and work out the coordinates and implement the adjustment by the PC104 controller. This paper introduces the methods of the motion control based on stratospheric balloon-borne gondola platform. Firstly, this paper compares the characteristic of the flywheel and CMG and specifies the key methods of obtaining two significant states which are 'orientation stability' state and 'orientation tracking' state for platform motion control procedure using CMG as the control actuator. These two states reduce the deviation amplitude of rotation and swing of gondola's motion relative to original motion due to stratospheric intense atmosphere disturbance. We define it as the first procedure. In next

  5. Analysis of the Motion Control Methods for Stratospheric Balloon-Borne Gondola Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H H [College of Automation, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an (China); Yuan, Z H [College of Automation, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an (China); Wu, J [College of Automation, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an (China)

    2006-10-15

    At present, gondola platform is one of the stratospheric balloon-borne platforms being in research focus at home and overseas. Comparing to other stratospheric balloon-borne platforms, such as airship platform, gondola platform has advantages of higher stability, rapid in motion regulation and lower energy cost but disadvantages of less supporting capacity and be incapable of fixation. While all platforms have the same goal of keeping them at accurate angle and right pose for the requirements of instruments and objects installed in the platforms, when platforms rotate round the ground level perpendicular. That is accomplishing motion control. But, platform control system has factors of low damper, excessive and uncertain disturbances by the reason of its being hung over balloon in the air, it is hard to achieve the desired control precision because platform is ease to deviate its benchmark motion. Thus, in the controlling procedure in order to get higher precision, it is crucial to perceive the platform's swing synchronously and rapidly, and restrain the influence of disturbances effectively, keep the platform's pose steadily. Furthermore, while the platform in the air regard control center in the ground as reference object, it is ultimate to select a appropriate reference frame and work out the coordinates and implement the adjustment by the PC104 controller. This paper introduces the methods of the motion control based on stratospheric balloon-borne gondola platform. Firstly, this paper compares the characteristic of the flywheel and CMG and specifies the key methods of obtaining two significant states which are 'orientation stability' state and 'orientation tracking' state for platform motion control procedure using CMG as the control actuator. These two states reduce the deviation amplitude of rotation and swing of gondola's motion relative to original motion due to stratospheric intense atmosphere disturbance. We define it as

  6. Balloon-Borne, High-Energy Astrophysics: Experiences from the 1960s to the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2008-01-01

    Observational high-energy astrophysics in the hard-x-ray and gamma-ray regions owes its development and initial successes to the balloon-borne development of detector systems, as well as pioneering observations, primarily in the timeframe from the 1960s to the 1990s. I will describe some of the first observations made by the Rice University balloon group in the 1960s, including the impetus for these observations. The appearance of SN 1987a led to several balloon-flight campaigns, sponsored by NASA, from Alice Springs, Australia in 1987 and 1988. During the 1980s, prototypes of instruments for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory were flown on many balloon flights, which greatly enhanced the success of that mission.

  7. Analysis of Data from the Balloon Borne Gamma RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasti, Sambid K.; Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.

    2016-04-01

    The Gamma Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE), a balloon borne polarimeter for 50~300 keV gamma rays, successfully flew in 2011 and 2014. The main goal of these balloon flights was to measure the gamma ray polarization of the Crab Nebula. Analysis of data from the first two balloon flights of GRAPE has been challenging due to significant changes in the background level during each flight. We have developed a technique based on the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to estimate the background for the Crab observation. We found that the background depended mostly on the atmospheric depth, pointing zenith angle and instrument temperatures. Incorporating Anti-coincidence shield data (which served as a surrogate for the background) was also found to improve the analysis. Here, we present the calibration data and describe the analysis done on the GRAPE 2014 flight data.

  8. BLASTbus electronics: general-purpose readout and control for balloon-borne experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Benton, S J; Amiri, M; Angilè, F E; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Doré, O P; Dowell, C D; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Fukui, Y; Galitzki, N; Gambrel, A E; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S R; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hilton, G C; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Matthews, T G; Megerian, K G; Moncelsi, L; Morford, T A; Mroczkowski, T K; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Thomas, N E; Trangsrud, A; Truch, M D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Ward-Thompson, D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

    2014-01-01

    We present the second generation BLASTbus electronics. The primary purposes of this system are detector readout, attitude control, and cryogenic housekeeping, for balloon-borne telescopes. Readout of neutron transmutation doped germanium (NTD-Ge) bolometers requires low noise and parallel acquisition of hundreds of analog signals. Controlling a telescope's attitude requires the capability to interface to a wide variety of sensors and motors, and to use them together in a fast, closed loop. To achieve these different goals, the BLASTbus system employs a flexible motherboard-daughterboard architecture. The programmable motherboard features a digital signal processor (DSP) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA), as well as slots for three daughterboards. The daughterboards provide the interface to the outside world, with versions for analog to digital conversion, and optoisolated digital input/output. With the versatility afforded by this design, the BLASTbus also finds uses in cryogenic, thermometry, and powe...

  9. Near infrared multi-color photometry of red giants by a balloon-borne telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1974, near infrared photometry on fixed stars has been conducted with balloon-borne telescopes. The telescope was 15 cm in diameter. The purpose of the experiment is to observe the infrared spectra of red giants and super red giants at balloon altitude, and to study their atmospheric structure. In this experiment, the physical parameters of red giants and super red giants were determined, comparing the present data with line blanketed model atmosphere. The balloon was launched on September 16, 1977. The detector was PbS, and infrared in the wavelength range from 0.9 to 2.5 μm were observed. α Sco, α Her, epsilon Peg, delta Oph and low temperature stars were observed, and their effective temperature, surface gravity and turbulent velocity were determined. (Yoshimori, M.)

  10. Large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne studies of neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large area (1 m x 1 m) double scattering telescope for balloon-borne research is described. It measures the flux, energy and direction of 2 to 100 MeV neutrons and 0.5 to 30 MeV gamma rays. These measurements are made using time-of-flight and pulse height analysis techniques with two large tanks of mineral oil liquid scintillator. Results from Monte Carlo calculations of the efficiency, energy resolution and angular resolution are presented and the electronics implementation for the processing of 80 photomultiplier tubes signals will be discussed. The detector weighs 800 kg with a large part of this weight being the liquid scintillator (320 kg). It will be flown at 3 mbars for flight durations up to 40 hours. The first flight is planned for Spring, 1975. (U.S.)

  11. Large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne studies of neutrons and gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, A. D.; Herzo, D.; Koga, R.; Millard, W. A.; Moon, S.; Ryan, J.; Wilson, R.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1975-01-01

    A large area double scattering telescope for balloon-borne research is described. It measures the flux, energy and direction of 2-100 MeV neutrons and 0.5-30 MeV gamma rays. These measurements are made using time-of-flight and pulse height analysis techniques with two large tanks of mineral oil liquid scintillator. Results from Monte Carlo calculations of the efficiency, energy resolution and angular resolution are presented and the electronics implementation for the processing of 80 photomultiplier tubes signals will be discussed. The detector weighs 800 kg with a large part of this weight being the liquid scintillator (320 kg). It will be flown at 3 mbars for flight durations up to 40 hours. The first flight is planned for Spring, 1975.

  12. Pre-flight integration and characterization of the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Rahlin, A S; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; Doré, O; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Gambrel, A E; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M F; Hilton, G; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Megerian, K; Moncelsi, L; Morford, T A; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; O'Brient, R; Reintsema, C; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of integration and characterization of the SPIDER instrument after the 2013 pre-flight campaign. SPIDER is a balloon-borne polarimeter designed to probe the primordial gravitational wave signal in the degree-scale $B$-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. With six independent telescopes housing over 2000 detectors in the 94 GHz and 150 GHz frequency bands, SPIDER will map 7.5% of the sky with a depth of 11 to 14 $\\mu$K$\\cdot$arcmin at each frequency, which is a factor of $\\sim$5 improvement over Planck. We discuss the integration of the pointing, cryogenic, electronics, and power sub-systems, as well as pre-flight characterization of the detectors and optical systems. SPIDER is well prepared for a December 2014 flight from Antarctica, and is expected to be limited by astrophysical foreground emission, and not instrumental sensitivity, over the survey region.

  13. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun Balloon-Borne Telescope: Astrophysical Pointing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeff; Kurt, Dietz; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Douglas; Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert

    2014-01-01

    On September 21, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, or HEROES, balloon-borne x-ray telescope launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's site in Ft. Summer, NM. The flight lasted for approximately 27 hours and the observational targets included the Sun and astrophysical sources GRS 1915+105 and the Crab Nebula. Over the past year, the HEROES team upgraded the existing High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES Project is a multi-NASA Center effort with team members at both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and is led by Co-PIs (one at each Center). The HEROES payload consists of the hard X-ray telescope HERO, developed at MSFC, combined with several new systems. To allow the HEROES telescope to make observations of the Sun, a new solar aspect system was added to supplement the existing star camera for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter was added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations and two alignment monitoring systems were added for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. This mission was funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands-On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  14. Computer program design specifications for the Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) science data decommutation program (BAPS48)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Balloon-Borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) Science Data Docummutation Program (BAPS48) is a pulse code modulation docummutation program that will format the BUSS science data contained on a one inch PCM tracking tape into a seven track serial bit stream formatted digital tape.

  15. Imaging Pion Showers with the CALICE Analogue Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Feege, Nils

    2011-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration investigates different technology options for highly granular calorimeters for detectors at a future electron-positron collider. One of the devices constructed and tested by the collaboration is a 1m^3 prototype for an imaging scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter for hadrons with analogue readout (AHCAL). The light from 7608 small scintillator cells is detected with silicon photomultipliers. The AHCAL has been successfully operated during electron and hadron test-beam measurements at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The collected data allow for evaluating the novel technologies employed. In addition, these data provide a valuable basis for validating pion cascade simulations. This paper presents the current status of comparisons between the AHCAL data and predictions from different Monte Carlo models implemented in GEANT4. The comparisons cover the total visible energy, longitudinal and radial shower profiles, and the shower substructure. Furthermore, this paper discusses a sof...

  16. SiPM characterisation and quality Assurance for imaging calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future lepton colliders like the ILC require a new generation of detectors with unprecedented precision. In this context the CALICE collaboration is developing a highly granular ''imaging'' calorimeter consisting out of ca. 8 million scintillating tiles with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. SiPMs are a novel type of solid state photo-detectors with promising properties. A detailed understanding and characterisation of the SiPMs as well as the characterisation and quality assurance of the scintillating tiles is essential for the final detector. In this talk results of the studies on SiPM and tile characterisation and large scale quality assurance are presented.

  17. A Frequency Selective Surface based focal plane receiver for the OLIMPO balloon-borne telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mahashabde, Sumedh; Bengtsson, Andreas; Andrén, Daniel; Tarasov, Michael; Salatino, Maria; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia; Kuzmin, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    We describe here a focal plane array of Cold-Electron Bolometer (CEB) detectors integrated in a Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) for the 350 GHz detection band of the OLIMPO balloon-borne telescope. In our architecture, the two terminal CEB has been integrated in the periodic unit cell of the FSS structure and is impedance matched to the embedding impedance seen by it and provides a resonant interaction with the incident sub-mm radiation. The detector array has been designed to operate in background noise limited condition for incident powers of 20 pW to 80 pW, making it possible to use the same pixel in both photometric and spectrometric configurations. We present high frequency and dc simulations of our system, together with fabrication details. The frequency response of the FSS array, optical response measurements with hot/cold load in front of optical window and with variable temperature black body source inside cryostat are presented. A comparison of the optical response to the CEB model and estimations...

  18. PULSAR: a balloon-borne experiment to detect variable low energy gamma-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of the balloon-borne 'PULSAR' experiment is to observe γ-ray photons of variable sources and pulsars in the energy range 0.1-5.0 MeV. The geometrical arrangement of the telescope has been designed according to detector sensitivity estimations for the pulsed radiation, which have been made by empirical and analytical methods. From the obtained results we expect to achieve a detection sensitivity of 3.7 x 10-7 photons cm-2 s-1 KeV-1 (0.1 - 0.5 MeV) and 4.5 x 10-6 photons cm-2 s-1 KeV-1 (1.0 - 5.0 MeV), for 5 hours integration time at 5 g cm-2 atmospheric depth, with 3σ statistical significance. It was developed an on-board electronics, compatible with the available telemetry capacity, that is able to process the data with a time resolution of approximatelly 4 miliseconds. (Author)

  19. The Half Wave Plate Rotator for the BLAST-TNG Balloon-Borne Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Hananiel; Ashton, Peter; Novak, Giles; Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Galitzki, Nicholas; Ade, Peter; Doyle, Simon; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Tucker, Carole E.

    2016-01-01

    The Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST-TNG) is an experiment designed to map magnetic fields in molecular clouds in order to study their role in the star formation process. The telescope will be launched aboard a high-altitude balloon in December 2016 for a 4-week flight from McMurdo station in Antarctica. BLAST-TNG will measure the polarization of submillimeter thermal emission from magnetically aligned interstellar dust grains, using large format arrays of kinetic inductance detectors operating in three bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns, with sub-arcminute angular resolution. The optical system includes an achromatic Half Wave Plate (HWP), mounted in a Half Wave Plate rotator (HWPr). The HWP and HWPr will operate at 4 K temperature to reduce thermal noise in our measurements, so it was crucial to account for the effects of thermal contraction at low temperature in the HWPr design. It was also equally important for the design to meet torque requirements while minimizing the power from friction and conduction dissipated at the 4 K stage. We also discuss our plan for cold testing the HWPr using a repurposed cryostat with a Silicon Diode thermometer read out by an EDAS-CE Ethernet data acquisition system.

  20. Design of 280~GHz feedhorn-coupled TES arrays for the balloon-borne polarimeter SPIDER

    CERN Document Server

    Hubmayr, Johannes; Beall, James A; Becker, Daniel T; Benton, Steven J; Bergman, A Stevie; Bond, J Richard; Bryan, Sean; Duff, Shannon M; Duivenvoorden, Adri J; Eriksen, H K; Filippini, Jeffrey P; Fraisse, Aurelien A; Galloway, Mathew; Gambrel, Anne E; Ganga, K; Grigorian, Arpi L; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Gudmundsson, Jon E; Hartley, John W; Halpern, M; Hilton, Gene C; Jones, William C; McMahon, Jeffrey J; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nagy, Johanna M; Netterfield, C B; Osherson, Benjamin; Padilla, Ivan; Rahlin, Alexandra S; Racine, B; Ruhl, John; Ruud, T M; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Song, Xue; Ullom, Joel N; Van Lanen, Jeff; Vissers, Michael R; Wehus, I K; Wen, Shyang; Wiebe, D V; Young, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe 280 GHz bolometric detector arrays that instrument the balloon-borne polarimeter SPIDER. A primary science goal of SPIDER is to measure the large-scale B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background in search of the cosmic-inflation, gravitational-wave signature. 280 GHz channels aid this science goal by constraining the level of B-mode contamination from galactic dust emission. We present the focal plane unit design, which consists of a 16$\\times$16 array of conical, corrugated feedhorns coupled to a monolithic detector array fabricated on a 150 mm diameter silicon wafer. Detector arrays are capable of polarimetric sensing via waveguide probe-coupling to a multiplexed array of transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers. The SPIDER receiver has three focal plane units at 280 GHz, which in total contains 765 spatial pixels and 1,530 polarization sensitive bolometers. By fabrication and measurement of single feedhorns, we demonstrate 14.7$^{\\circ}$ FHWM Gaussian-shaped beams with $<$1% ellip...

  1. BLASTbus electronics: general-purpose readout and control for balloon-borne experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, S. J.; Ade, P. A.; Amiri, M.; Angilè, F. E.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Doré, O. P.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J. P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S. R.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Holmes, W. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z. D.; Klein, J.; Korotkov, A. L.; Kuo, C. L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Matthews, T. G.; Megerian, K. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T. A.; Mroczkowski, T. K.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Nutter, D.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Thomas, N. E.; Trangsrud, A.; Truch, M. D.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present the second generation BLASTbus electronics. The primary purposes of this system are detector readout, attitude control, and cryogenic housekeeping, for balloon-borne telescopes. Readout of neutron transmutation doped germanium (NTD-Ge) bolometers requires low noise and parallel acquisition of hundreds of analog signals. Controlling a telescope's attitude requires the capability to interface to a wide variety of sensors and motors, and to use them together in a fast, closed loop. To achieve these different goals, the BLASTbus system employs a flexible motherboard-daughterboard architecture. The programmable motherboard features a digital signal processor (DSP) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA), as well as slots for three daughterboards. The daughterboards provide the interface to the outside world, with versions for analog to digital conversion, and optoisolated digital input/output. With the versatility afforded by this design, the BLASTbus also finds uses in cryogenic, thermometry, and power systems. For accurate timing control to tie everything together, the system operates in a fully synchronous manner. BLASTbus electronics have been successfully deployed to the South Pole, and own on stratospheric balloons.

  2. Large-Area Balloon-Borne Polarized Gamma Ray Observer (PoGO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGO), to measure polarization of soft gamma rays (30-200 keV) using asymmetry in azimuth angle distribution of Compton scattering. PoGO is designed to detect 10% polarization in 100mCrab sources in a 6-8 hour observation and bring a new dimension to studies on gamma ray emission/transportation mechanism in pulsars, AGNs, black hole binaries, and neutron star surface. The concept is an adaptation to polarization measurements of well-type phoswich counter consisting of a fast plastic scintillator (the detection part), a slow plastic scintillator (the active collimator) and a BGO scintillator (the bottom anti-counter). PoGO consists of close-packed array of 217 hexagonal well-type phoswich counters and has a narrow field-of-view (∼ 5 deg2) to reduce possible source confusion. A prototype instrument has been tested in the polarized soft gamma-ray beams at Advanced Photon Source (ANL) and at Photon Factory (KEK). On the results, the polarization dependence of EGS4 has been validated and that of Geant4 has been corrected

  3. Studies of interstellar magnesium absorption in the ultraviolet from a balloon-borne platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    51 ultraviolet spectra of 26 early-type stars in the solar neighbourhood have been obtained with a balloon-borne scientific payload, consisting of the UCL Mk 1 primary star-pointing platform carrying an objective grating spectrograph and an associated secondary fine-guidance system. The spectrograms cover the wavelength range 2870 A to 2740 A, with a resolution of approximately 0.1 A (approximately equal to 10 km s-1), and include the absorption lines of Mg0 at lambda2852.13 and of Mg+ at lambdalambda2802.70, 2795.53 formed in the interstellar medium in line of sight to the stars observed. The MgI lines formed in the cold neutral clouds in front of 12 moderately reddened stars have been analysed with models for the velocity dispersion of the gas derived from very high resolution scans of optical lines of Na0, K0, Ca+, and CH+ referring to the same lines of sight. The effects of possible contributions to the MgII doublet from absorbing regions undetected in the lines of the minor species have been considered in detail for four well observed background stars. Estimates of electron density n(e) in interstellar clouds are deduced by combining the measurements of the column densities of Mg+ and Mg0, and assuming ionization equilibrium. (author)

  4. Ozone loss derived from balloon-borne tracer measurements and the SLIMCAT CTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Robinson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne measurements of CFC-11 (on flights of the DIRAC in situ gas chromatograph and the DESCARTES grab sampler, ClO and O3 were made during the 1999/2000 winter as part of the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign. Here we present the CFC-11 data from nine flights and compare them first with data from other instruments which flew during the campaign and then with the vertical distributions calculated by the SLIMCAT 3-D CTM. We calculate ozone loss inside the Arctic vortex between late January and early March using the relation between CFC-11 and O3 measured on the flights, the peak ozone loss (1200 ppbv occurs in the 440–470 K region in early March in reasonable agreement with other published empirical estimates. There is also a good agreement between ozone losses derived from three independent balloon tracer data sets used here. The magnitude and vertical distribution of the loss derived from the measurements is in good agreement with the loss calculated from SLIMCAT over Kiruna for the same days.

  5. ISOMAX: a balloon-borne instrument to measure cosmic ray isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Isotope Magnet Experiment (ISOMAX) is a new balloon-borne instrument developed to measure the isotopic composition of the light elements in the cosmic radiation, in particular to obtain the ratio of the radioactive 10Be to stable 9Be. ISOMAX was first flown in August 4-5, 1998, from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada. ISOMAX has a geometry factor of 450 cm2 sr and was configured for this flight with a large, Helmholtz-like, superconducting magnet in combination with a drift-chamber tracking system, a state-of-the-art time-of-flight system and two aerogel Cherenkov detectors to measure light isotopes with a mass resolution of better than 0.25 amu. In the 1998 flight the obtained maximum detectable rigidity of the magnetic spectrometer was 970 GeV/c for helium at 60% of the full magnetic field. ISOMAX took data for more than 16 h at float altitudes above 36 km. We here present the performance of the individual detectors and initial isotopic results of the instrument

  6. PoGOLite - A High Sensitivity Balloon-Borne Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Arimoto, Makoto; Axelsson, Magnus; Bettolo, Cecilia Marini; Björnsson, Claes-Ingvar; Bogaert, Gilles; Carlson, Per; Craig, William; Ekeberg, Tomas; Engdegård, Olle; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gunji, Shuichi; Hjalmarsdotter, Linnea; Iwan, Bianca; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kataoka, Jun; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kazejev, Jaroslav; Kiss, Mózsi; Klamra, Wlodzimierz; Larsson, Stefan; Madejski, Grzegorz; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Ng, Johnny; Pearce, Mark; Ryde, Felix; Suhonen, Markus; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takuya; Thurston, Timothy; Ueno, Masaru; Varner, Gary; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Yamashita, Yuichiro; Ylinen, Tomi; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGOLite) capable of detecting 10% polarisation from 200mCrab point-like sources between 25 and 80keV in one 6 hour flight. Polarisation measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are expected to provide a powerful probe into high-energy emission mechanisms as well as the distribution of magnetic fields, radiation fields and interstellar matter. At present, only exploratory polarisation measurements have been carried out in the soft gamma-ray band. Reduction of the large background produced by cosmic-ray particles has been the biggest challenge. PoGOLite uses Compton scattering and photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells made of plastic and BGO scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence shield and a thick polyethylene neutron shield. The narrow FOV (1.25msr) obtained with well-type phoswich detector technology and the use of thick background shields enhance the detected S/N ratio. Event selections based on recorded phototube wavefor...

  7. Fine-scale turbulence soundings in the stratosphere with the new balloon-borne instrument LITOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Theuerkauf

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new compact balloon payload called LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere for high resolution wind turbulence soundings up to 35 km altitude. The wind measurements are performed applying a constant temperature anemometer (CTA with a vertical resolution of ~2.5 mm, i.e. 2 kHz sampling rate at 5 m/s ascent speed. Thereby, for the first time, it is possible to study the entire turbulence spectrum down to the viscous subrange in the stratosphere. Including telemetry, housekeeping, batteries and recovery unit the payload weighs less than 5 kg and can be launched at any radiosonde station. Since autumn 2007 LITOS has been successfully launched several times from the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP in Kühlungsborn, Germany (54° N, 12° E. Two additional soundings were carried out in 2008 and 2009 at Kiruna, Sweden (67° N, 21° E as part of the BEXUS program (Balloon-borne EXperiments for University Students. We describe here the basic principle of CTA measurements and prove the validity of this method in the stratosphere. First case studies allow a clear distinction between non-turbulent layers and turbulent layers with a thickness of some tens of meters. Since our measurements cover the transition between the inertial and viscous subrange, energy dissipation rates can be calculated with high reliability.

  8. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Stiehl, gregory M.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  9. A new project, SPIRALE. Balloon-borne in situ multi-component measurement using infrared diode lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, G.; Pirre, M.; Robert, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France); Rosier, B.; Louvet, Y.; Ramaroson, R. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Peyret, C.C. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Macleod, Y. [Universite Pierreet Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Courtois, D. [Reims Univ., 51 (France). Faculte des Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The scientific goals and the description of a new experiment for stratospheric studies SPIRALE are presented which is a balloon-borne instrument, able to measure in situ several air components (up to 10). Infrared diode laser spectroscopy is applied for monitoring simultaneously atmospheric trace gases at high rate. Its specificity, sensitivity, and wide range of compounds to which it can be applied is described. (R.P.) 5 refs.

  10. Low-frequency (f less than about 1 Hz) stratospheric electrical noise measured by balloon-borne sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, I. B.; Mohl Madsen, M.; Dangelo, N.

    1983-01-01

    Low-frequency (f less than about 1 Hz) stratospheric electrical noise is occasionally observed by balloon-borne sensors. The phenomenon occurs 1-3 percent of the time, with maximum incidence during the morning hours. It appears to be related to fluctuations of the electrical conductivity of the medium around the balloons, produced by air turbulence due to the wind shear and/or gravity waves.

  11. Development and Application of a Versatile Balloon-Borne DOAS Spectrometer for Skylight Radiance and Atmospheric Trace Gas Profile Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Weidner, Frank

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis, a novel balloon-borne DOAS instrument was developed, characterized in the laboratory and employed during 5 stratospheric balloon flights. Its light weight and small size allows versatile applications on different platforms and under several observation geometries (scanning and fixed limb, nadir, and direct sunlight). Skylight radiances in the UV/visible range between 330 and 550 nm are measured, and the recorded spectra are analyzed for column densities of ozo...

  12. Case Studies of Stratospheric Nitrogen, Chlorine and Iodine Photochemistry Based on Balloon Borne UV/visible and IR Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Butz, André

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen and halogen bearing compounds play an important role in catalytic loss of stratospheric ozone. Balloon borne spectroscopic measurements of the vertical distribution of the most important nitrogen, chlorine and iodine containing species are used to estimate the quality of state-of-the-art instruments and retrieval algorithms and to gain new insights into stratospheric photochemistry. A comparison study between observations of O3 and NO2 in the UV/visible and infrared spectral ranges i...

  13. Calibration of the CREAM-I calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Y S; Bagliesi, M G; Bigongiari, G; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Jeon, J A; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinin, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Nam, S; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Wu, J; Yang, J; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) calorimeter is designed to measure the spectra of cosmic-ray particles over the energy range from ~10^11 eV to ~10^15 eV. Its first flight as part of the CREAM-I balloon-borne payload in Antarctica during the 2004/05 season resulted in a recordbreaking 42 days of exposure. Calorimeter calibration using various beam test data will be discussed in an attempt to assess the uncertainties of the energy measurements.

  14. A Balloon-Borne Telescope System for Planetary Atmosphere and Plasma Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kanazawa, T.; Shoji, Y.; Sawakami, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Sato, T.; Sakanoi, T.

    2007-12-01

    A telescope floating in the polar stratosphere can continuously monitor planets for more than 24 hours. Thin, clear and stable air of the stratosphere makes it possible to observe planets in a condition free from cloud with fine seeing and high atmospheric transmittance. Moreover, a balloon-borne telescope system is less expensive compared with a huge terrestrial telescope or a direct planetary probe mission. Targets of a balloon-borne telescope system will extend over various atmospheric and plasma phenomena on almost all the planets, i.e., a sodium tail of Mercury, lightning, airglow and aurora in the atmospheres of Venus, Jupiter and Saturn, escaping atmospheres of the Earth-type planets, satellite-induced luminous events in the Jovian atmosphere, etc. The first target is global dynamics of the Venusian atmosphere by detecting cloud motion in UV and NIR imagery. A decoupling mechanism and a pair of control moment gyros (CMGs) are mounted at the top of the gondola. The decoupling mechanism isolates the gondola from a balloon and also transfers an excess angular momentum of the CMGs to the balloon. The attitude of the gondola is stabilized at a constant sun azimuthal angle so that a solar cell panel faces to the sun. A 300 mm F30 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope is installed at the bottom of the gondola. DC/DC converters, a PC, a high voltage power supply for a piezo-electrically moving mirror and digital video recorders are contained in a sealed cell. The azimuthal angle is detected by a sun-sensor. A PC processes sensor output to control DC motors used in the decoupling mechanism and CMGs with an accuracy in azimuthal attitude of about 0.5 deg. The two-axis gimbal mount of the telescope is controlled by the same PC, guiding an object within a field-of-view of a guide telescope. Residual tracking error is detected by a position sensitive photomultiplier tube and corrected by the two-axis moving mirror installed in the optical system. The optical path is divided into

  15. Analysis of charge transport during lightning using balloon-borne electric field sensors and Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, William W.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Aslan, Beyza Caliskan; Lu, Gaopeng; Winn, William P.; Boeck, William L.

    2007-09-01

    Recently, wide band measurements of the electric field near a lightning flash have been obtained by a balloon-borne electric field sonde or Esonde. This paper develops new techniques for analyzing lightning-associated charge transport in a thundercloud by using both the Esonde data and simultaneous Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) measurements of VHF pulses emitted during lightning breakdown processes. Innovations in this paper include the following: (1) A filtering procedure is developed to separate the background field associated with instrument rotation and cloud charging processes from the lightning-induced electric field change. Because of the abrupt change in the signal caused by lightning, standard filtering techniques do not apply. A new mathematical procedure is developed to estimate the background electric field that would have existed if the lightning had not occurred. The estimated background field is subtracted from the measured field to obtain the lightning-induced field change. (2) Techniques are developed to estimate the charge transport due to lightning. At any instant of time during a cloud-to-ground (CG) flash, we estimate the charge transport by a monopole. During an intracloud (IC) flash, we estimate the charge transport by a dipole. Since the location of the monopole and dipole changes with time, they are referred to as a dynamic monopole and a dynamic dipole. The following physical constraints are used to achieve a unique fit: charge conservation during an IC flash, separation (distance between the CG monopole charge center and the ground and separation between IC dipole charge centers both exceed a minimum threshold), location (charge is placed on lightning channel), and likelihood (after a statistical analysis based on instrument uncertainty, highly unlikely charge locations are excluded). To implement the constraint that the charge is located on the lightning channel, we develop a mathematical object called the "pulse graph." Vertices in the

  16. Performance of CREAM Calorimeter: Results of Beam Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM), a balloon-borne experiment, is under preparation for a flight in Antarctica at the end of 2004. CREAM is planned to measure the energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays directly at energies between 1 TeV and 1000 TeV. Incident particle energies will be measured by a transition radiation detector and a sampling calorimeter. The calorimeter was constructed at the University of Maryland and tested at CERN in 2003. Performance of the calorimeter during the beam tests is reported

  17. Application of the image calorimeter in the high energy gamma astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of registration of the primary high energy cosmic ray gamma emission by a gamma-telescope made of an image calorimeter is shown in this paper. The problem of triggering and off-line identification of primary particles by the analysis of the electromagnetic showers induced in the calorimeter is under consideration. The estimations of the background flux of delayed secondaries induced by nuclear interactions are presented too

  18. Application of the image calorimeter in the high energy gamma astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casolino, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata`, Rome (Italy); Carlson, P. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Fuglesang, C. [ESA-EAC, Cologne (Germany); Ozerov, Yu.V.; Zemskov, V.M.; Zverev, V.G.; Galper, A.M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The capability of registration of the primary high energy cosmic ray gamma emission by a gamma-telescope made of an image calorimeter is shown in this paper. The problem of triggering and off-line identification of primary particles by the analysis of the electromagnetic showers induced in the calorimeter is under consideration. The estimations of the background flux of delayed secondaries induced by nuclear interactions are presented too.

  19. The WiZard/CAPRICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A silicon-tungsten calorimeter has been developed to be flown in the WiZard/ CAPRICE balloon borne experiment to measure the flux of antiprotons, positrons and light nuclei in the cosmic radiation. The calorimeter is composed of 8 x, y silicon sampling planes (active area (48x48) cm2) interleaved with 7 tungsten absorbers (7 radiation lengths); it provides the topology of the interacting events together with an independent measurement of the deposited energy. Details of the front-end electronics and of the read-out system are given and the overall performances during pre-flight ground operations are described as well

  20. Planetary Science with Balloon-Borne Telescopes: A Summary of the BOPPS Mission and the Planetary Science that may be Possible Looking Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, T.; Cheng, A.; Hibbitts, K.; Young, E. F.

    2015-09-01

    well as some of the residual motion from the gondola that was not addressed by the gondola's coarse pointing systems. The mission met its primary science and engineering objectives. The results of the BOPPS mission will feed into the body of science knowledge, but also feed into future planning for more science from balloon-borne platforms. A notional platform called Gondola for High-Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) has been explored, and this concept platform can address a number of important decadal questions. This paper provides a summary of the assessment of potential balloon borne observations for planetary science purposes including where potential science contributions can be expected, the necessary performance/characteristics of the platform, and other features required or desired. The BOPPS mission is summarized including descriptions of the main elements and key science and engineering results. The paper then briefly describes GHAPS, and the salient features that can make it a valuable tool for future planetary observations.

  1. The direct photograph of solar faculae and sunspots with a balloon-borne 10 cm telescope, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the flight in September, 1977, of a balloon-borne 10 cm solar telescope, direct photographs of faculae and sunspots were successfully taken at wavelength near 5300 A. (1) In the measurement of brightness of 662 faculae in the places closer to the photosphere center (two regions at 76% and 87% of the radius), the valves were 9.2% and 16.2% respectively brighter in comparison of the surrounding photosphere. The faculae are at higher temperature than the photosphere, 500 k (facula diameter of 1 sec angle) to 1000 k (facula diameter of 0.2 sec angle). (2) At a place close to the umbra within the penumbra of sunspots, there is brightness equal to that of the photosphere. (3) As the result of comparing the polar-region faculae by balloon observation and the soft X-ray bright points by sky-lab observation in 1973, it was found that both were not shining simultaneously. (Mori, K.)

  2. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry-BLASTPol: Performance and results from the 2012 Antarctic flight

    CERN Document Server

    Galitzki, N; Angilé, F E; Benton, S J; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Fissel, L M; Fukui, Y; Gandilo, N N; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Matthews, T G; Moncelsi, L; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Ward-Thompson, D

    2014-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) is a suborbital mapping experiment, designed to study the role played by magnetic fields in the star formation process. BLASTPol observes polarized light using a total power instrument, photolithographic polarizing grids, and an achromatic half-wave plate to modulate the polarization signal. During its second flight from Antarctica in December 2012, BLASTPol made degree scale maps of linearly polarized dust emission from molecular clouds in three wavebands, centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The instrumental performance was an improvement over the 2010 BLASTPol flight, with decreased systematics resulting in a higher number of confirmed polarization vectors. The resultant dataset allows BLASTPol to trace magnetic fields in star-forming regions at scales ranging from cores to entire molecular cloud complexes.

  3. Constraints on JN2O5 from balloon-borne limb scanning measurements of NO2 in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritten, Lena; Butz, Andre; Deutschmann, Tim; Dorf, Marcel; Kreycy, Sebastian; Prados-Roman, Cristina; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    The NOx ozone cycle (NOx = NO + NO2) is of great importance for the budget of stratospheric ozone and in future may even become more important due to increasing stratospheric N2O concentrations (Ravishankara et al., 2009). A regulating process for the amount of stratospheric NOx and thus for the efficiency of the NOx mediated ozone loss cycle is photolytic release of N2O5 at daytime since N2O5 acts as a nighttime reservoir gas for stratospheric NOx radicals. Observations of UV/vis scattered skylight by balloon-borne limb scanning spectrometry support the detection of time dependent trace gas and radical profiles, in particular of NO2. Here we present balloon borne measurements of time dependent NO2 profiles from the tropical stratosphere - taken at north-eastern Brazil (5° S, 43° W) in June 2005 - where excess stratospheric ozone is produced and transported to higher latitudes by the Brewer-Dobson circulation. The photolysis rate of N2O5 - uncertain by a factor of 2 (JPL-2006) - is constrained from the comparison of the measured and modelled diurnal variation of NO2. For the photochemical model initial conditions are based on our own observations of O3 and NO2, MIPAS-B measurements and on output of the 3-D SLIMCAT model. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters and absorption cross-sections are taken from the JPL-2006 compilation (Sander et. al, 2006). Overall it is found that, the observed rate of diurnal NO2 increase requires a N2O5 photolysis frequency at the upper limit of values possible according to the uncertainty range given by the JPL-2006 compilation. In conclusion it suggested that the NOx mediated ozone loss in the tropical stratosphere is probably larger than assumed by many photochemical models, and in future may even relatively become more important.

  4. The Development of a 3D Imaging Calorimeter of DAMPE for Cosmic Ray Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Hu, Yiming; Feng, Changqing; Liu, Shubin; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wei, Yifeng; Huang, Guangshun

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) experiment began its on-orbit operations on December 17, 2015. The BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter (BGO ECAL) of the DAMPE is a total absorption calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the shower shape. It provides a good energy resolution (10^5). The calorimeter also provides a trigger capability to DAMPE. The BGO ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. An Engineering qualified model was built and tested using high energy electron and proton beams with energy ranging from 1 GeV to 250GeV. Some pre results will be introduced in this talk.

  5. The design and flight performance of the PoGOLite Pathfinder balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, M.; Florén, H.-G.; Jackson, M.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Olofsson, G.; Rydström, S.; Takahashi, H.; Lind, J.; Strömberg, J.-E.; Welin, O.; Iyudin, A.; Shifrin, D.; Pearce, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of X-ray astronomy there have been many scientific advances due to the development of new experimental techniques for detecting and characterising X-rays. Observations of X-ray polarisation have, however, not undergone a similar development. This is a shortcoming since a plethora of open questions related to the nature of X-ray sources could be resolved through measurements of the linear polarisation of emitted X-rays. The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-240 keV energy band from a stabilised observation platform. Polarisation is determined using coincident energy deposits in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013. A near-circumpolar flight was achieved with a duration of approximately two weeks. The flight performance of the Pathfinder design is discussed for the three Crab observations conducted. The signal-to-background ratio for the observations is shown to be 0.25 ±0.03 and the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (99 % C.L.) is (28.4 ±2.2) %. A strategy for the continuation of the PoGOLite programme is outlined based on experience gained during the 2013 maiden flight.

  6. Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Tristan G; Angilè, Francesco E; Benton, Steven J; Chapin, Edward L; Chapman, Nicholas L; Devlin, Mark J; Fissel, Laura M; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N; Gundersen, Joshua O; Hargrave, Peter C; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K; Netterfield, Calvin B; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A; Soler, Juan Diego; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole E; Tucker, Gregory S; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 {\\mu}m. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.). The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I,...

  7. LUPUS I observations from the 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Benton, Steven J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Chapin, Edward L. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Korotkov, Andrei L. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Olmi, Luca [University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Physics Department, Box 23343, UPR station, San Juan (Puerto Rico); and others

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  8. Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Soler, Juan Diego; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  9. A balloon-borne Ge(Li) spectrometer for observation of cyclotron line emissions from neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A balloon-borne high-resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer for observation of electron cyclotron line emissions in the hard X-ray spectra of neutron stars is described. The spectrometer consists of four planar type Ge(Li) crystals and operates in the energy range of 20-200keV. The Ge(Li) crystals are housed in vacuum cryostats and cooled by liquid nitrogen. A total effective area of the spectrometer is 120 cm2 and an energy resolution is 2keV fwhm at 60 keV. A 2 mm thick lead honeycomb collimator provides background rejection and collimation, defining a field of view 200x200 fwhm. The sensitivity of the spectrometer to line emissions from cosmic point sources is 10-3 photons cm-2 s-1 over the energy range. The Ge(Li) spectrometer is scheduled for balloon-flight in September 1979. Electron cyclotron line emissions from Her X-1 and Crab Nebula are to be searched. (orig.)

  10. High-resolution ultraviolet observations of interstellar lines toward Zeta Persei observed with the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer payload has been used to obtain high-resolution data on interstellar absorption lines toward Zeta Per. The only lines clearly present in the 2150-2450 region were several Fe II features, which show double structure. The two velocity components were sufficiently well separated that it was possible to construct separate curves of growth to derive the Fe II column densities for the individual components. These column densities and the component velocity separation were then used to compute a realistic two-component curve of growth for the line of sight to Zeta Per, which was then used to reanalyze existing ultraviolet data from Copernicus. The results were generally similar to an earlier two-component analysis of the Copernicus data, with the important exception that the silicon depletion increased from near zero to about 1 dex. This makes the Zeta Per depletion pattern quite similar to those derived for other reddened lines of sight, supporting the viewpoint that the general diffuse interstellar medium has a nearly constant pattern of depletions. 31 references

  11. A Balloon-borne Measurement of High Latitude Atmospheric Neutrons Using a LiCAF Neutron Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mózsi; Moretti, Elena; Salinas, Maria Fernanda Muñoz; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    PoGOLino is a scintillator-based neutron detector. Its main purpose is to provide data on the neutron flux in the upper stratosphere at high latitudes at thermal and nonthermal energies for the PoGOLite instrument. PoGOLite is a balloon borne hard X-ray polarimeter for which the main source of background stems from high energy neutrons. No measurements of the neutron environment for the planned flight latitude and altitude exist. Furthermore this neutron environment changes with altitude, latitude and solar activity, three variables that will vary throughout the PoGOLite flight. PoGOLino was developed to study the neutron environment and the influences from these three variables upon it. PoGOLino consists of two Europium doped Lithium Calcium Aluminium Fluoride (Eu:LiCAF) scintillators, each of which is sandwiched between 2 Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) scintillating crystals, which serve to veto signals produced by gamma-rays and charged particles. This allows the neutron flux to be measured even in high rad...

  12. The design and flight performance of the PoGOLite Pathfinder balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, M; Jackson, M; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kiss, M; Kole, M; Mikhalev, V; Moretti, E; Olofsson, G; Rydström, S; Takahashi, H; Lind, J; Strömberg, J -E; Welin, O; Iyudin, A; Shifrin, D; Pearce, M

    2015-01-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of X-ray astronomy there have been many scientific advances due to the development of new experimental techniques for detecting and characterising X-rays. Observations of X-ray polarisation have, however, not undergone a similar development. This is a shortcoming since a plethora of open questions related to the nature of X-ray sources could be resolved through measurements of the linear polarisation of emitted X-rays. The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25 - 240 keV energy band from a stabilised observation platform. Polarisation is determined using coincident energy deposits in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013. A near-circumpolar flight was achieved with a duration of approximately two weeks. The flight performance of the Pathfinder design is discussed for the...

  13. LUPUS I observations from the 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  14. LITOS – a new balloon-borne instrument for fine-scale turbulence soundings in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Theuerkauf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new compact balloon payload called LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere for high resolution wind turbulence soundings in the stratosphere up to 35 km altitude. The wind measurements are performed using a constant temperature anemometer (CTA with a vertical resolution of ~2.5 mm, i.e. 2 kHz sampling rate at 5 m/s ascent speed. Thereby, for the first time, it is possible to study the entire turbulence spectrum down to the viscous subrange in the stratosphere. Including telemetry, housekeeping, batteries and recovery unit, the payload weighs less than 5 kg and can be launched from any radiosonde station. Since autumn 2007, LITOS has been successfully launched several times from the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP in Kühlungsborn, Germany (54° N, 12° E. Two additional soundings were carried out in 2008 and 2009 in Kiruna, Sweden (67° N, 21° E as part of the BEXUS program (Balloon-borne EXperiments for University Students. We describe here the basic principle of CTA measurements and prove the validity of this method in the stratosphere. A first case study allows a clear distinction between non-turbulent regions and a turbulent layer with a thickness of some tens of meters. Since our measurements cover the transition between the inertial and viscous subrange, energy dissipation rates can be calculated with high reliability.

  15. Balloon-borne Limb profiling of UV/vis skylight radiances, O3, NO2 and BrO: technical set-up and validation of the method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Platt

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel light-weight, elevation scanning and absolutely calibrated UV/vis spectrometer and its application to balloon-borne Limb radiance and trace gas measurements is described. Its performance and the novel method of balloon-borne UV/vis Limb trace gas measurements has been tested against simultaneous observations of the same atmospheric parameters available from either (a in-situ instrumentation (cf., by an electrochemical cell (ECC ozone sonde also deployed aboard the gondola or (b trace gas profiles from inferred UV/vis/near IR solar occultation measurements performed on the same payload. The novel technique is also cross validated with radiative transfer modelling. Reasonable agreement is found (a between measured and simulated Limb radiances and (b inferred Limb O3, NO2 and BrO and otherwise measured profiles when properly accounting for all relevant atmospheric parameters (temperature T, pressure P, aerosol extinction, and major absorbers.

  16. Balloon-borne limb profiling of UV/vis skylight radiances, O3, NO2, and BrO: technical set-up and validation of the method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Weidner

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel light-weight, elevation scanning and absolutely calibrated UV/vis spectrometer and its application to balloon-borne limb radiance and trace gas profile measurements is described. Its performance and the novel method of balloon-borne UV/vis limb trace gas measurements has been tested against simultaneous observations of the same atmospheric parameters available from either (a in-situ instrumentation (cf., by an electrochemical cell (ECC ozone sonde also deployed aboard the gondola or (b trace gas profiles inferred from UV/vis/near IR solar occultation measurements performed on the same payload. The novel technique is also cross validated with radiative transfer modeling. Reasonable agreement is found (a between measured and simulated limb radiances and (b inferred limb O3, NO2, and BrO and correlative profile measurements when properly accounting for all relevant atmospheric parameters (temperature, pressure, aerosol extinction, and major absorbers.

  17. Near Space Observations: Planetary Science from a Balloon-Borne Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E.; Hibbitts, C.; Cheng, A.; Dolloff, M.; Kremic, T.

    2015-10-01

    On 25-SEP-2014, the BOPPS balloon mission (Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science) launched from Ft Sumner, NM. During its 17-hour flight, BOPPS observed three comets in wavelengths from 0.8 to 4.6 μm with its infrared camera and demonstrated 66 mas image stability with its visible- UV cameras. The BOPPS payload was intended to develop and demonstrate two key capabilities of balloonborne telescopes: the ability to acquire IR wavelengths that are obscured from the ground or from SOFIA, and the ability to obtain diffraction-limited images at wavelengths shortward of 1 μm, where ground-based adaptive optics systems typically provide poor Strehl ratios. Now that the successful BOPPS mission is behind us, there is the potential to re-use the BOPPS instrumentation for additional long-duration balloon missions to address other planetary science investigations: a planetary observatory in the stratosphere, with the possibility of performing observations that are proposed and competed by the planetary community. NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility just flew a record-setting 32-day circumglobal super-pressure balloon mission at southern mid-latitudes. Unlike previous long-duration flights from Antarctica (zeropressure balloons flying in constant daylight), this recent flight launched from New Zealand and passed through day/night cycles, demonstrating the ability of balloons to carry science payloads weighing up to 3000 lb and provide hundreds of hours of dark time above 99.5 % of the atmosphere. We will provide an overview of the BOPPS payload and a review of the BOPPS flight. We will highlight the recommended changes that would allow BOPPS to become a general purpose infrared and visible/UV observatory.

  18. Space-quality data from balloon-borne telescopes: the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO)

    CERN Document Server

    Rhodes, Jason; Booth, Jeffrey; Massey, Richard; Liewer, Kurt; Smith, Roger; Amara, Adam; Aldrich, Jack; Berge, Joel; Bezawada, Naidu; Brugarolas, Paul; Clark, Paul; Dubbeldam, Cornelis M; Ellis, Richard; Frenk, Carlos; Gallie, Angus; Heavens, Alan; Henry, David; Jullo, Eric; Kitching, Thomas; Lanzi, James; Lilly, Simon; Lunney, David; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morris, David; Paine, Christopher; Peacock, John; Pellegrino, Sergio; Pittock, Roger; Pool, Peter; Refregier, Alexandre; Seiffert, Michael; Sharples, Ray; Smith, Alexandra; Stuchlik, David; Taylor, Andy; Teplitz, Harry; Vanderveld, R Ali; Wu, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for attaining sub-arcsecond pointing stability during sub- orbital balloon flights, as designed for in the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO) concept. The pointing method presented here has the potential to perform near-space quality optical astronomical imaging at 1-2% of the cost of space-based missions. We also discuss an architecture that can achieve sufficient thermomechanical stability to match the pointing stability. This concept is motivated by advances in the development and testing of Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights which promise to allow observation campaigns lasting more than three months. The design incorporates a multi-stage pointing architecture comprising: a gondola coarse azimuth control system, a multi-axis nested gimbal frame structure with arcsecond stability, a telescope de-rotator to eliminate field rotation, and a fine guidance stage consisting of both a telescope mounted angular rate sensor and guide CCDs in the focal plane to drive a fast-steering ...

  19. Microwave power imaging with ferromagnetic calorimeter probes on bimaterial cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a near-field microscope technique that uses a ferromagnetic film deposited onto a bimaterial cantilever for imaging of microwave power distributions. The bimaterial cantilever absorbs microwave power via the induction of eddy currents and, additionally, in the presence of a biasing magnetic field, via ferromagnetic resonance. The resultant heating of the cantilever leads to deflection that is detected by a laser beam-bounce method. Comparison of images of a microstrip resonator acquired with and without a biasing field indicates that eddy currents induced by the tangential component of the magnetic field play a significant role in cantilever heating

  20. A 16 channel frequency-domain-modulation readout system with custom superconducting LC filters for the SWIPE instrument of the balloon-borne LSPE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, G.; Baldini, A. M.; Bemporad, C.; Biasotti, M.; Cei, F.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; Fontanelli, F.; Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Gatti, F.; Incagli, M.; Grassi, M.; Nicolò, D.; Spinella, F.; Vaccaro, D.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design, implementation and first tests of the superconducting LC filters for the frequency domain readout of spiderweb TES bolometers of the SWIPE experiment on the balloon-borne LSPE mission which aims at measuring the linear polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background at large angular scales to find the imprint of inflation on the B-mode CMB polarization. LC filters are designed, produced and tested at the INFN sections of Pisa and Genoa where thin film deposition and cryogenic test facilities are present, and where also the TES spiderweb bolometers are being produced.

  1. The BOOMERANG North America Instrument a balloon-borne bolometric radiometer optimized for measurements of cosmic background radiation anisotropies from 0.3 to 4 degrees

    CERN Document Server

    Piacentini, F; Bathia, R; Bock, J J; Boscaleri, A; Cardoni, P; Crill, B P; De Bernardis, P; Castillo, H D; De Troia, G; Farese, P; Giacometti, M; Hivon, E F; Hristov, V V; Iacoangeli, A; Lange, A E; Masi, S; Mauskopf, P D; Miglio, L; Netterfield, C B; Palangio, P; Pascale, E; Raccanelli, A; Rao, S; Romeo, G; Ruhl, J E; Scaramuzzi, F

    2001-01-01

    We describe the BOOMERANG North America (BNA) instrument, a balloon-borne bolometric radiometer designed to map the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation with 0.3 deg resolution over a significant portion of the sky. This receiver employs new technologies in bolometers, readout electronics, millimeter-wave optics and filters, cryogenics, scan and attitude reconstruction. All these subsystems are described in detail in this paper. The system has been fully calibrated in flight using a variety of techniques which are described and compared. It has been able to obtain a measurement of the first peak in the CMB angular power spectrum in a single balloon flight, few hours long, and was a prototype of the BOOMERANG Long Duration Balloon (BLDB) experiment.

  2. Calorimeter insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Calorimeter insertion between toroids in the ATLAS experiment detector Calorimeters are surrounding the inner detector. Calorimeters will absorb and measure the energies of the most charged and neutral particles after the collisions. The saved energy in the calorimeter is detected and converted to signals that are taken out with data taking electronics.

  3. Development of balloon-borne CO2 sonde: CO2 vertical profile (0-10km) observations and comparison with the air craft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, M.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration has drastically increased since the Industrial Revolution due to the mass consumption of fossil fuels and natural gas by human activities. CO2 is considered to be a major factor of global warming; therefore it is important to measure CO2 correctly. CO2 vertical profile measurement is the key to estimate CO2 sources and sinks in high precision. However, current CO2 monitoring sites are limited and there are few CO2 vertical profile measurements. We have been developing a balloon-borne instrument that can measure the vertical distribution of CO2 in any place in the world under any kind of weather conditions (CO2 sonde). The target specifications of altitude range is from surface to 10 km. Time resolution is 1min. The CO2 sensor, originally developed for upper air sounding by our team, is based on the non-dispersed infrared absorption spectroscopy technique (NDIR) at the wavelengths of 4.0 and 4.3 micrometer. The data of the optical infrared absorption are transmitted through a GPS sonde with temperature, humidity and GPS data every second. In this study, we will show simultaneous measurement campaigns of the balloon-borne instruments and in-situ aircraft measurements in January and February 2011 in the Tokyo metropolitan area in Japan. We will present the comparisons between the results of CO2 sonde (5 flights) and two types of aircraft measurements. One is observed by the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner) and the other is chartered flight measurements operated by NIES/JAXA.

  4. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Fissel, Laura M; Angilè, Francesco E; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven; Devlin, Mark J; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N; Klein, J R; Li, Zhi-Yun; Korotkov, Andrei L; Martin, Peter G; Matthews, Tristan G; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, C Barth; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A; Soler, Juan D; Thomas, Nicholas E; Tucker, Carole E; Tucker, Gregory S; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2015-01-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 {\\mu}m. In this initial paper, we show our 500 {\\mu}m data smoothed to a resolution of 2.5 arcminutes (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p = p_0 N^(-0.4) S^(-0.6), where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high colum...

  5. SPECIES: a versatile spectrometer based on optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption for in situ balloon-borne and airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Patrick; Catoire, Valery; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Huret, Nathalie; Desbois, Thibault; Marocco, Nicola; Kassi, Samir; Kerstel, Eric; Romanini, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Over the last twenty years, thanks to significant technological advances in measurement techniques, our understanding of the chemistry and dynamics of the upper troposphere and stratosphere has progressed significantly. However some key questions remain unsolved, and new ones arise in the changing climate context. The full recovery of the ozone layer and the delay of recovery, the impact of the climate change on the stratosphere and the role of this one as a feedback are almost unknown. To address these challenges, one needs instruments able to measure a wide variety of trace gas species simultaneously with a wide vertical range. In this context, LPC2E and LIPHY are developing a new balloon-borne and airborne instrument: SPECIES (SPECtromètre Infrarouge à lasErs in Situ, i.e. in-Situ Infrared lasEr SPECtrometer). Based on the Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy technique, combined with mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, this instrument will offer unprecedented performances in terms of the vertical extent of the measurements, from ground to the middle stratosphere, and the number of molecular species simultaneously measured with sub-ppb detection limits (among others: NO, N2O, HNO3, H2O2, HCl, HOCl, CH3Cl, COF2, HCHO, HCOOH, O3, NH3 NO2, H2O, OCS, SO2). Due to high frequency measurement (>0.5 Hz) it shall offer very high spatial resolution (a few meters).

  6. Simultaneous balloon-borne measurements of the key inorganic bromine species BrO and BrONO2 in the stratosphere: DOAS and MIPAS-B evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarski, Sebastian; Maucher, Guido; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Butz, André; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Höpfner, Michael; Kleinert, Anne; Nordmeyer, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Wetzel, Gerald; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Inorganic bromine contributes to a loss of stratospheric ozone of about 25 - 30%. Past studies have demonstrated several uncertainties in the photochemistry of stratospheric bromine, especially by considering the three body reaction (kBrONO2) BrO + NO2 + M → BrONO2 + M, and the photolysis frequencies of BrONO2 (jBrONO2). Hence, an improved knowledge of the ratio jBrONO2/kBrONO2 is crucial to better assess the bromine-related loss of ozone as well as the total amount of bromine in the stratosphere. Here, we report on the first simultaneous balloon-borne measurements of NO2, BrO, and BrONO2 in the stratosphere, performed over Timmins (Ontario, 49 °N, Canada) on Sept., 7th and 8th, 2014. During the flight the targeted species were monitored by remote sensing in the UV, visible and mid-IR spectral ranges by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B), respectively. The analysis and interpretation of the measurements involves radiative transfer as well as photochemical modelling. Major features of the applied techniques are reported and first results of the DOAS as well as MIPAS-B evaluation are discussed. Further investigations address inter-comparisons of the retrieved NO2, BrO, and O3 concentrations and volume mixing ratios, to demonstrate validations of both evaluation methods.

  7. Optimising a balloon-borne polarimeter in the hard X-ray domain: from the PoGOLite Pathfinder to PoGO+

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, Maxime; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mózsi; Kole, Merlin; Mikhalev, Victor; Moretti, Elena; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Pearce, Mark

    2016-01-01

    PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter dedicated to the study of point sources. Compton scattered events are registered using an array of plastic scintillator units to determine the polarisation of incident X-rays in the energy range 20 - 240 keV. In 2013, a near circumpolar balloon flight of 14 days duration was completed after launch from Esrange, Sweden, resulting in a measurement of the linear polarisation of the Crab emission. Building on the experience gained from this Pathfinder flight, the polarimeter is being modified to improve performance for a second flight in 2016. Such optimisations, based on Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, take into account the source characteristics, the instrument response and the background environment which is dominated by atmospheric neutrons. This paper describes the optimisation of the polarimeter and details the associated increase in performance. The resulting design, PoGO+, is expected to improve the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (MDP) for the Crab from ...

  8. Validation of Refractivity Profiles Retrieved from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Soundings: Preliminary Results of Statistical Comparisons Utilizing Balloon-Borne Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroo Hayashi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The GPS radio occultation (RO soundings by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC _ Formosa Satellite Misssion #3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate satellites launched in mid-April 2006 are compared with high-resolution balloon-borne (radiosonde and ozonesonde observations. This paper presents preliminary results of validation of the COSMIC RO measurements in terms of refractivity through the troposphere and lower stratosphere. With the use of COSMIC RO soundings within 2 hours and 300 km of sonde profiles, statistical comparisons between the collocated refractivity profiles are erformed for some tropical regions (Malaysia and Western Pacific islands where moisture-rich air is expected in the lower troposphere and for both northern and southern polar areas with a very dry troposphere. The results of the comparisons show good agreement between COSMIC RO and sonde refractivity rofiles throughout the troposphere (1 - 1.5% difference at most with a positive bias generally becoming larger at progressively higher altitudes in the lower stratosphere (1 - 2% difference around 25 km, and a very small standard deviation (about 0.5% or less for a few kilometers below the tropopause level. A large standard deviation of fractional differences in the lowermost troposphere, which reaches up to as much as 3.5 - 5%at 3 km, is seen in the tropics while a much smaller standard deviation (1 - 2% at most is evident throughout the polar troposphere.

  9. Time dependent profile retrieval of UV/vis absorbing radicals from balloon-borne limb measurements – a case study on NO2 and O3

    OpenAIRE

    L. Kritten; A. Butz; Dorf, M.; Deutschmann, T.; Kühl, S.; C. Prados-Roman; J. Puķīte; Rozanov, A.(CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille, France); Schofield, R.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2010-01-01

    A new "Bayesian" minimization algorithm for the retrieval of the diurnal variation of UV/vis absorbing radicals (O3, NO2, BrO, OClO and HONO) from balloon-borne limb scattered skylight observations is discussed. The method evaluates spectroscopic measurements in combination with radiative transfer calculations to drive a mathematical inversion on a discrete time and height grid. Here, the proposed method is applied to data obtained during two deployments of the mini-DOAS instrument on differe...

  10. Investigation of the Stratospheric Bromine Chemistry by Balloon-Borne Spectroscopic Observations and Photochemical Modelling: A Case Study of J(BrONO2) / k[BrO][NO2

    OpenAIRE

    Kreycy, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Besides chlorine, bromine is the second most important halogen when it comes to the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Although 150 times more chlorine than bromine is transported into the stratosphere, the higher ozone-depleting efficiency of bromine (by a factor of 45) makes it very important for catalytic cycles. In this study, balloon-borne DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements of direct sunlight and limb measurements of scattered skylight, recorded...

  11. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorf, M.; H. Bösch; Butz, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Engel, A.; Goutail, F.; Grunow, K.; Hendrick, F.; Hrechanyy, S.; B. Naujokat; J.-P. Pommereau; Van Roozendael, M.; C. Sioris; F. Stroh

    2005-01-01

    For the first time, results of all four existing stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM). Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) satellite instrument. The balloon observations include (a) balloon-b...

  12. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorf, M.; H. Bösch; Butz, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Engel, A.; Goutail, F.; Grunow, K.; Hendrick, F.; Hrechanyy, S.; B. Naujokat; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.; C. Sioris; F. Stroh

    2005-01-01

    International audience For the first time, results of all four existing stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM). Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) satellite instrument. The balloon observat...

  13. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorf, M.; H. Bösch; Butz, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Engel, A.; Goutail, F.; Grunow, K.; Hendrick, F.; Hrechanyy, S.; B. Naujokat; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.; C. Sioris; F. Stroh

    2006-01-01

    International audience For the first time, results of four stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM). Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) satellite instrument. The balloon observations include ...

  14. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements : comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorf, Marcel; Bösch, Hartmut; BUTZ Andre; Camy-Peyret, Claude C.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Engel, Andreas; Goutail, Florence; Grunow, Katja; Hendrick, François; Hrechanyy, Serhiy; Naujokat, Barbara; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Van Roozendael, Michel; Sioris, Christopher E.; Stroh, Fred

    2005-01-01

    For the first time, results of all four existing stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM). Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) satellite instrument. The balloon observations include (a) balloon-b...

  15. Balloon-borne stratospheric BrO measurements: comparison with Envisat/SCIAMACHY BrO limb profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorf, Marcel; Bösch, Hartmut; BUTZ Andre; Camy-Peyret, Claude C.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Engel, Andreas; Goutail, Florence; Grunow, Katja; Hendrick, François; Hrechanyy, Serhiy; Naujokat, Barbara; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Van Roozendael, Michel; Sioris, Christopher E.; Stroh, Fred

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, results of all four existing stratospheric BrO profiling instruments, are presented and compared with reference to the SLIMCAT 3-dimensional chemical transport model (3-D CTM). Model calculations are used to infer a BrO profile validation set, measured by 3 different balloon sensors, for the new Envisat/SCIAMACHY (ENVIronment SATellite/SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) satellite instrument. The balloon observations include (a) balloon-b...

  16. Validation of atmospheric chemistry measurements from MIPAS,SCIAMACHY,GOMOS onboard ENVISAT by observations of balloon-borne MIPAS-B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WETZEL; G; OELHAF; H; FRIEDL-VALLON; F; KLEINERT; A; LENGEL; A; MAUCHER; G; NORDMEYER; H; GRUNOW; K; FISCHER; H

    2010-01-01

    In order to validate the atmospheric chemistry measurements by MIPAS,SCIAMACHY,and GOMOS onboard the ENVISAT,three flights of the balloon-borne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Sounding(MIPAS-B) were carried out in 2002 and 2003 at Aire sur l’Adour(France 44°N,0°E) and Esrange,Kiruna(Sweden 68°N,21°E).The validation campaign activities are summarized in this paper.The MIPAS-B instrument and its data processing procedure as well as the validation approaches are discussed in detail.The satellite and balloon measurements are matched with high coincidence in time and space,allowing a coincident approach to be applied for their comparisons.Further,a trajectory model is used to confirm and enhance the statistical significance of the validation.The validation results show that MIPAS measurements of accuracy for temperature,H2O,O3,HNO3,CH4,N2O,and NO2 are good in the altitude range of 8-39 km(No2,22-39 km).And the precision is good between the altitudes of 15-33 km(No2,22-23 km).However,some exceptions were also found for temperature,H2O,HNO3,and NO2.The SCIAMACHY data of accuracy for O3 and NO2 are within expectations between the altitudes 9-38 km except for O3 in 28-38 km.The GOMOS data about O3 and NO2 are promising according to the preliminary comparison results.

  17. Balloon-Borne Gamma-Ray Polarimeter (PoGO) to Study Black Holes, Pulsars, and AGN Jets: Design and Calibration(SULI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarization measurements at X-ray and gamma-ray energies can provide crucial information on the emission region around massive compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars. The Polarized Gamma-ray Observer (PoGO) is a new balloon-borne instrument designed to measure polarization from such astrophysical objects in the 30-100 keV range, under development by an international collaboration with members from United States, Japan, Sweden and France. The PoGO instrument has been designed by the collaboration and several versions of prototype models have been built at SLAC. The purpose of this experiment is to test the latest prototype model with a radioactive gamma-ray source. For this, we have to polarize gamma-rays in a laboratory environment. Unpolarized gamma-rays from Am241 (59.5 keV) were Compton scattered at around 90 degrees for this purpose. Computer simulation of the scattering process in the setup predicts a 86% polarization. The polarized beam was then used to irradiate the prototype PoGO detector. The data taken in this experiment showed a clear polarization signal, with a measured azimuthal modulation factor of 0.35 ± 0.02. The measured modulation is in very close agreement with the value expected from a previous beam test study of a polarized gamma-ray beam at the Argonne National Laboratories Advanced Photon Source. This experiment has demonstrated that the PoGO instrument (or any other polarimeter in the energy range) can be tested in a libratory with a simple setup to a similar accuracy

  18. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2016-06-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 μm. In this initial paper, we show our 500 μm data smoothed to a resolution of 2.‧5 (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p \\propto {{\\boldsymbol{N}}}-0.45 {{\\boldsymbol{S}}}-0.60, where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high column density sightlines. Alternatively, the intrinsic polarization efficiency of the dust grain population might be lower for material along higher density sightlines. We find no significant correlation between N and S. Comparison of observed submillimeter polarization maps with synthetic polarization maps derived from numerical simulations provides a promising method for testing star formation theories. Realistic simulations should allow for the possibility of variable intrinsic polarization efficiency. The measured levels of correlation among p, N, and S provide points of comparison between observations and simulations.

  19. Feature of Dust Particles in the Spring Free Troposphere over Dunhuang in Northwestern China: Electron Microscopic Experiments on Individual Particles Collected with a Balloon-borne Impactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free tropospheric aerosol particles were collected using a balloon-borne particle impactor in August of 2002 and March of 2003 at Dunhuang in northwestern China (40o00'N, 94o30'E), and the morphology and elemental composition of the aerosol particles were analyzed in order to understand the mixing state of coarse dust particles (diameter >1 μm) over the desert areas in the Asian continent in spring. Electron microscopic experiments on the particles revealed that dust particles were major constituents of coarse mode particles in the free troposphere over the Taklamakan Desert in spring and summer.Si-rich or Ca-rich particles are major components of dust particles collected in the free troposphere over dunhuang and the values of [number of Ca-rich particles]/[number of Si-rich particles] differs markedly between spring and summer, being about 0.3 in the spring of 2003 and about 1.0 in the summer of 2002 at heights 3-5 km above sea level. It is likely that the condition of the ground surface and the strength of vertical mixing in source areas of Asian dust are potential factors causing the difference in the chemical types of dust particles.Comparison of the elemental compositions of these particles with those of particles collected over Japan strongly suggests that these particles were chemically modified during their long-range transport in the free troposphere. Analysis of wind systems shows that both the predominating westerly wind in the free troposphere and the surface wind strongly controlled by the geographical structure of the Tarim Basin are important in the long-range transport of KOSA particles originating in the Taklamakan Desert

  20. X-ray observations of MeV electron precipitation with a balloon-borne germanium spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, R. M.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; Lorentzen, K. R.; McCarthy, M. P.

    2002-12-01

    The high-resolution germanium detector aboard the MAXIS (MeV Auroral X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy) balloon payload detected nine X-ray bursts with significant flux extending above 0.5 MeV during an 18 day flight over Antarctica. These minutes-to-hours-long events are characterized by an extremely flat spectrum (~E-2) similar to the first MeV event discovered in 1996, indicating that the bulk of parent precipitating electrons is at relativistic energies. The MeV bursts were detected between magnetic latitudes 58°-68° (L-values of 3.8-6.7) but only in the late afternoon/dusk sectors (14:30-00:00 MLT), suggesting scattering by EMIC (electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves as a precipitation mechanism. We estimate the average flux of precipitating E >= 0.5 MeV electrons to be ~360 cm-2s-1, corresponding to about 5 × 1025 such electrons precipitated during the eight days at L = 3.8-6.7, compared to ~2 × 1025 trapped 0.5-3.6 MeV electrons estimated from dosimeter measurements on a GPS spacecraft. These observations show that MeV electron precipitation events are a primary loss mechanism for outer zone relativistic electrons.

  1. A prototype of fine granularity lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter with imaging read out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and tests performed on a smal prototype of lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter instrumented with multianode photomultipliers are reported. The prototype is 15 cm wide, 15 radiation lenghts deep and is made of 200 layers of 50 cm long fibers. One side of the calorimeter has been instrumented with an array of 3 x 5 multianode R8900-M16 Hamamatsu photomultipliers, each segmented with a matrix of 4 x 4 anodes. The read-out granularity is 240 pixels 11 x 11 mm2 reading about 64 fibers each. They are interfaced to the 6 x 6 mm2 pixelled photocade with truncated pyramid light guides made of BC-800 plastic, UV transparent. Moreover each photomultiplier provides also the OR information of the last 12 dynodes. This information can be useful for trigger purposes. The response of the individual anodes, their relative gain and cross-talk has been measured with a 404 nm picosecond laser illuminating only a few fibers on the opposite side of the read-out. We also present first results of the calorimeter response to cosmic rays and electron beam data collected at BTF facility in Frascati.

  2. Overview of balloon-borne aerosol measurements with the aerosol counter LOAC, with focus on the ChArMEx 2013 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulac, François; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of 250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles: the first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.2-100 mm; the second angle, at 60°, is used to discriminate between different types of particles dominating different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with measurements from other sensors at the surface are shown. We shall give a quick review of balloon-borne experiences since 2011 with LOAC under all kinds of balloons including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric, and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLBP) from CNES. Observation domains include the atmospheric surface layer, the boundary layer, the free troposphere and the lower stratosphere up to more than 35 km in altitude. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Results from the various campaigns will be illustrated including the study of fog events, urban aerosols, Saharan dust transport over France, stratospheric soot... Emphasis will be put on the ChArMEx campaign (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) performed in summer 2013 in the Mediterranean basin: 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France) in late July and early August. Most of the flights were coupled with ozone concentration measurements (see presentation by F. Gheusi et al.). LOAC balloons were especially, but not

  3. Calorimeter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Although the instantaneous and integrated luminosity in HL-LHC will be far higher than the LHC detectors were originally designed for, the Barrel calorimeters of the four experiments are expected to continue to perform well  throughout the Phase II program. The conditions for the End-Cap calorimeters are far more challenging and whilst some detectors will require relatively modest changes, others require far more substantial upgrades. We present the results of longevity and performance studies for the calorimeter systems of the four main LHC experiments and outline the upgrade options under consideration. We include a discussion of the R&D required to make the final technology choices for the upgraded detectors.

  4. Balloon Borne Soundings of Water Vapor, Ozone and Temperature in the Upper Tropospheric and Lower Stratosphere as Part of the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voemel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of our work was to provide in situ water vapor and ozone profiles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere as reference measurements for the validation of SAGE III water vapor and ozone retrievals. We used the NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer and ECC ozone sondes on small research balloons to provide continuous profiles between the surface and the mid stratosphere. The NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer is currently the only lightweight balloon borne instrument capable of measuring water vapor between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere. The validation measurements were based in the arctic region of Scandinavia for northern hemisphere observations and in New Zealand for southern hemisphere observations and timed to coincide with overpasses of the SAGE III instrument. In addition to SAGE III validation we also tried to coordinate launches with other instruments and studied dehydration and transport processes in the Arctic stratospheric vortex.

  5. Application of artificial neural network in 3D imaging with lanthanum bromide calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostojic, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Kiener, J.; Hamadache, C.; Karkour, N.; Linget, D.; Grave, X.; Gibelin, L.; Travers, B.; Blin, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range from 0.1 up to 100 MeV holds many understudied questions connected with e.g. stellar nucleosynthesis, the active Sun, neutron stars and black holes. To access the physics behind, a significant improvement in detection sensitivity is needed compared to previous missions, e.g. CGRO and INTEGRAL. One of the promising concepts for a future gamma-ray mission is an Advanced Compton Telescope. Under the project of creating a prototype of such instrument, we study the perspectives of using a novel inorganic scintillator as a calorimeter part. Modern inorganic crystal or ceramics scintillators are constantly improving on qualities such as energy resolution and radiation hardness, and this makes them a smart choice for a new space-borne telescope. At CSNSM Orsay, we have assembled a detection module from a 5 × 5cm2 area and 1 cm thick, cerium-doped lanthanum (III) bromide (LaBr3:Ce) inorganic scintillator coupled to a 64 channel multi-anode photomultiplier. The readout of the PMT signals is carried out with the ASIC MAROC, used previously for the luminometer of the ATLAS detector (CERN). Characterization, thorough measurements with various radioactive sources, as well as, single photoelectron detection have been done. Furthermore, we made a comparison of measurements with a detailed GEANT4-based simulation which includes tracking of the optical photons. Finally, we have studied the 3D reconstruction of the first interaction point of incident gamma rays, utilizing a neural network algorithm. This spatial position resolution plays a crucial part in the future implementations and, together with the other measured properties, it makes our detector module very interesting for the next generation of space telescopes operating in the MeV range.

  6. The AMS-02 electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Cadoux, F; Chambert-Hermel, V; Chen, G; Chen, H; Coignet, G; Di Falco, S; Dubois, J M; Falchini, E; Franzoso, A; Fougeron, D; Fouque, N; Galeotti, S; Girard, L; Goy, C; Hermel, R; Incagli, M; Kossakowski, R; Lieunard, B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lomtadze, T A; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Paoletti, R; Pilo, F; Rosier-Lees, S; Spinella, F; Turini, N; Valle, G D; Venanzoni, G; Vialle, J P; Yu, Z; Zhuang, H

    2002-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a lead-scintillating fibers sampling calorimeter characterized by high granularity that allows to image the longitudinal and lateral showers development, a key issue to provide high electron/hadron discrimination. The light collection system and the FE electronics are designed to let the calorimeter operate over a wide energy range from few GeV up to 1 TeV. A full-scale prototype of the e.m. calorimeter was tested at CERN in October 2001 using electrons and pions beams with energy ranging from 3 to 100 GeV. Effective sampling thickness, linearity and energy resolution were measured. (8 refs).

  7. Skiroc : a Front-end Chip to Read Out the Imaging Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter for ILC

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchel, M.; El Berni, M.; Fleury, J.; De La Taille, C.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Wicek, F.; Bohner, G; Gay, Pascal; Lecoq, J.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.

    2007-01-01

    CALICE Collaboration EUDET Collaboration This abstract describes the new front end ASIC designed for the silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter called SKIROC. This new chip embeds the main features required for the ILC final detector. Integration and low-power consumption of the read-out ASIC for the International Linear Collider (ILC) 82-million-channel W-Si calorimeter must reach an unprecedented level as it will be embedded inside the detector. Uniformity and dynamic range perform...

  8. The ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer: X-ray calorimeter performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the anticipated performance of an x-ray microcalorimeter instrument on ITER. As part of the core imaging x-ray spectrometer, the instrument will augment the imaging crystal spectrometers by providing a survey of the concentration of heavy ion plasma impurities in the core and possibly ion temperature values from the emission lines of different elemental ions located at various radial positions.

  9. The ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer: x-ray calorimeter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Bitter, M; Feder, R; Hill, K W; Johnson, D; Barnsley, R

    2010-10-01

    We describe the anticipated performance of an x-ray microcalorimeter instrument on ITER. As part of the core imaging x-ray spectrometer, the instrument will augment the imaging crystal spectrometers by providing a survey of the concentration of heavy ion plasma impurities in the core and possibly ion temperature values from the emission lines of different elemental ions located at various radial positions. PMID:21034021

  10. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  11. Family reunion for the UA2 calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2015-01-01

    After many years in CERN’s Microcosm exhibition, the last surviving UA2 central calorimeter module has been moved to Hall 175, the technical development laboratory of the ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter (Tilecal). The UA2 and ATLAS calorimeters are cousins, as both were designed by Otto Gildemeister. Now side by side, the calorimeters illustrate the progress made in sampling organic scintillator calorimeters over the past 35 years.   The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter prototypes (left) and the UA2 central calorimeter (right) in Hall 175. (Image: Mario Campanelli/ATLAS.) From 1981 to 1990, the UA2 experiment was one of the two detectors on CERN’s flagship accelerator, the SPS. At the heart of the UA2 detector was the central calorimeter. It was made up of 24 slices – each weighing four tonnes – arranged like orange segments around the collision point. These calorimeter slices played a central role in the research carried out by UA2 for the discovery of W bosons...

  12. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  13. Mitigation of calorimeter noise.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santi, P. A. (Peter A.); Bracken, D. S. (David S.); Smith, M. K. (Morag K.)

    2004-01-01

    One of the main factors that limit the sensitivity of calorimeters is the noise in the calorimeter response. A previous study into the sources of noise in a Wheatstone bridge calorimeter used by Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has shown that the control system for maintaining the water bath at a constant temperature was an important contributor to the noise in the system. In order to minimize the contribution that the control system makes to the noise in the calorimeter response, a new control system for the calorimeter has been developed. An experimental and analytical study has been performed to determine the effectiveness of this new control system in reducing the response noise in a Wheatstone bridge calorimeter. The results of this study are presented along with their implications for future work in minimizing the equilibrium noise of calorimeters.

  14. The Balloon-Borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) 2005: A 10 deg^2 Survey of Star Formation in Cygnus X

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Arabindo; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon R; France, Kevin; Gibb, Andrew G; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Jorge L Morales Ortiz Calvin B; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P; Wiebe, Donald V

    2010-01-01

    We present Cygnus X in a new multi-wavelength perspective based on an unbiased BLAST survey at 250, 350, and 500 {\\mu}m, combined with rich datasets for this well-studied region. To interpret the BLAST emission more fully and place the compact sources in context, we make use of archival data cubes of 13CO line emission from KOSMA, MIPS images from the Spitzer Legacy Survey of this region, and 21-cm radio continuum maps from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS). Our primary goal is to investigate the early stages of high mass star formation. We have detected 184 compact sources in various stages of evolution across all three BLAST bands. From their spectral energy distributions, now well constrained by the broad spectral coverage, we obtain the physical properties mass (M), bolometric luminosity (L), and dust temperature (T). Some of the bright sources with T reaching 40 K contain well-known compact H II regions, like W75N, DR21, and AFGL2591. We relate these to other sources at earlier stages of evolutio...

  15. THE BALLOON-BORNE LARGE APERTURE SUBMILLIMETER TELESCOPE (BLAST) 2005: A 10 deg2 SURVEY OF STAR FORMATION IN CYGNUS X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Cygnus X in a new multi-wavelength perspective based on an unbiased BLAST survey at 250, 350, and 500 μm, combined with rich data sets for this well-studied region. Our primary goal is to investigate the early stages of high-mass star formation. We have detected 184 compact sources in various stages of evolution across all three BLAST bands. From their well-constrained spectral energy distributions, we obtain the physical properties mass, surface density, bolometric luminosity, and dust temperature. Some of the bright sources reaching 40 K contain well-known compact H II regions. We relate these to other sources at earlier stages of evolution via the energetics as deduced from their position in the luminosity-mass (L-M) diagram. The BLAST spectral coverage, near the peak of the spectral energy distribution of the dust, reveals fainter sources too cool (∼10 K) to be seen by earlier shorter-wavelength surveys like IRAS. We detect thermal emission from infrared dark clouds and investigate the phenomenon of cold 'starless cores' more generally. Spitzer images of these cold sources often show stellar nurseries, but these potential sites for massive star formation are 'starless' in the sense that to date there is no massive protostar in a vigorous accretion phase. We discuss evolution in the context of the L-M diagram. Theory raises some interesting possibilities: some cold massive compact sources might never form a cluster containing massive stars, and clusters with massive stars might not have an identifiable compact cold massive precursor.

  16. The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonov, A.; Bailey, D.; Belanger, G.; Cadabeschi, M.; Chen, T.-Y.; Epshteyn, V.; Gorbounov, P.; Joo, K. K.; Khakzad, M.; Khovanskiy, V.; Krieger, P.; Loch, P.; Mayer, J.; Neuheimer, E.; Oakham, F. G.; O'Neill, M.; Orr, R. S.; Qi, M.; Rutherfoord, J.; Savine, A.; Schram, M.; Shatalov, P.; Shaver, L.; Shupe, M.; Stairs, G.; Strickland, V.; Tompkins, D.; Tsukerman, I.; Vincent, K.

    2008-02-01

    Forward calorimeters, located near the incident beams, complete the nearly 4π coverage for high pT particles resulting from proton-proton collisions in the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Both the technology and the deployment of the forward calorimeters in ATLAS are novel. The liquid argon rod/tube electrode structure for the forward calorimeters was invented specifically for applications in high rate environments. The placement of the forward calorimeters adjacent to the other calorimeters relatively close to the interaction point provides several advantages including nearly seamless calorimetry and natural shielding for the muon system. The forward calorimeter performance requirements are driven by events with missing ET and tagging jets.

  17. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Imaging Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub Wesley; Bryden, Geoff; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Chen, Pin; Trauger, John

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed coronagraph on a balloon-borne platform, for the purpose of observing debris disks around nearby stars. Zodiac II will have a 1.2-m diameter telescope mounted in a balloon-borne gondola capable of arcsecond quality pointing, and with the capability to make long-duration (several week) flights. Zodiac II will have a coronagraph able to make images of debris disks, meaning that its scattered light speckles will be at or below an average contrast level of about 10(exp -7) in three narrow (7 percent) bands centered on the V band, and one broad (20%) one at I band. We will discuss the potential science to be done with Zodiac II.

  18. LHCb calorimeter electronics. Photon identification. Calorimeter calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LHCb is one of the four large experiments installed on the LHC accelerator ring. The aim of the detector is to precisely measure CP violation observables and rare decays in the B meson sector. The calorimeter system of LHCb is made of four sub-systems: the scintillating pad detector, the pre-shower, the electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) calorimeters. It is essential to reconstruct B decays, to efficiently trigger on interesting events and to identify electrons and photons. After a review of the LHCb detector sub-systems, the first part of this document describes the calorimeter electronics. First, the front-end electronics in charge of measuring the ECAL and HCAL signals from the photomultipliers is presented, then the following section is an overview of the control card of the four calorimeters. The chapters three and four concern the test software of this electronics and the technological choices making it tolerant to radiations in the LHCb cavern environment. The measurements performed to ensure this tolerance are also given. The second part of this document concerns both the identification of the photons with LHCb and the calibration of the calorimeters. The photon identification method is presented and the performances given. Finally, the absolute energy calibration of the PRS and ECAL, based on the data stored in 2010 is explained. (author)

  19. AIDA: concerted calorimeter development

    CERN Multimedia

    Felix Sefkow

    2013-01-01

    AIDA – the EU-funded project bringing together more than 80 institutes worldwide – aims at developing new detector solutions for future accelerators. Among the highlights reported at AIDA’s recent annual meeting in Frascati was the completion of an impressive calorimeter test beam programme, conducted by the CALICE collaboration over the past two years at CERN’s PS and SPS beam lines.   The CALICE tungsten calorimeter prototype under test at CERN. This cubic-metre hadron calorimeter prototype has almost 500,000 individually read-out electronics channels – more than all the calorimeters of ATLAS and CMS put together. Calorimeter development in AIDA is mainly motivated by experiments at possible future electron-positron colliders, namely ILC or CLIC. The physics requirements of such future machines demand extremely high-performance calorimetry. This is best achieved using a finely segmented system that reconstructs events using the so-called pa...

  20. International workshop on calorimeter simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the Juelich workshop was to provide an overview of the state of calorimeter simulation and the methods used. This resulted in 29 contributions to the following topics: Code systems relevant to calorimeter simulation, vectorization and code speed-up, simulation of calorimeter experiments, special applications of calorimeter simulation. This report presents the viewgraphs of the given talks. (orig./HSI)

  1. Software studies of GLD calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Matsunaga

    2007-12-01

    The baseline design of the GLD calorimeter is scintillator-strip arrays interleaved with absorber plates. We present preliminary performance studies of the hit clustering with this calorimeter using a simulator. Also, simulation results of a `digital' calorimeter, which is an option of the GLD calorimeter, are presented.

  2. LHCb calorimeter electronics. Photon identification. Calorimeter calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Machefert, F

    LHCb is one of the four large experiments installed on the LHC accelerator ring. The aim of the detector is to precisely measure CP violation observables and rare decays in the B meson sector. The calorimeter system of LHCb is made of four sub-systems: the scintillating pad detector, the preshower, the electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) calorimeters. It is essential to reconstruct B decays, to efficiently trigger on interesting events and to identify electrons and photons. After a review of the LHCb detector sub-systems, the first part of this document describes the calorimeter electronics. First, the front-end electronics in charge of measuring the ECAL and HCAL signals from the photomultipliers is presented, then the following section is an overview of the control card of the four calorimeters. The chapters three and four concern the test software of this electronics and the technological choices making it tolerant to radiations in the LHCb cavern environment. The measurements performed to ensure th...

  3. The ZEUS uranium calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium-scintillator calorimeter of the ZEUS experiment in the HERA electron proton collider at DESY in Hamburg, Germany, is described. It covers 99.8% of the solid angle, has an energy resolution 35%/√E for single hadrons and jets, and 17.5%/√E for electrons. e/h is 1 within 2% in energy range of 2 to 100 GeV. Test beam results show that inter calibration at the 1% level is achievable using uranium radioactivity. The calorimeter was commissioned in April 1992, and has been taken data since May 1992. Main characteristics of the calorimeter construction, readout, and trigger were reviewed. Experience from the first data taking period, including results on noise, stability of calibration, background from HERA accelerator, and performance of the calorimeter trigger is discussed. (author). 28 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  4. GSPEL - Calorimeter Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Testing performance claims on heat transfer components The Calorimeter Lab, located in the Ground Systems Power and Energy Lab (GSPEL), is one of the largest in the...

  5. Calorimeters for biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isothermal and temperature scanning calorimeters manufactured by Calorimetry Sciences Corporation are briefly described. Applications of calorimetry to determine thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions of interest in biotechnology are described with illustrative examples

  6. Hadron showers in a highly granular calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Benjamin

    2010-11-15

    A future electron-positron collider like the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) needs excellent detectors to exploit the full physics potential. Different detector concepts have been evaluated for the ILC and two concepts on the particle-flow approach were validated. To make particle-flow work, a new type of imaging calorimeters is necessary in combination with a high performance tracking system, to be able to track the single particles through the full detector system. These calorimeters require an unprecedented level of both longitudinal and lateral granularity. Several calorimeter technologies promise to reach the required readout segmentation and are currently studied. This thesis addresses one of these: The analogue hadron calorimeter technology. It combines work on the technological aspects of a highly granular calorimeter with the study of hadron shower physics. The analogue hadron calorimeter technology joins a classical scintillator-steel sandwich design with a modern photo-sensor technology, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). The SiPM is a millimetre sized, magnetic field insensitive, and low cost photo-sensor, that opens new possibilities in calorimeter design. This thesis outlines the working principle and characteristics of these devices. The requirements for an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to read the SiPM are discussed; the performance of a prototype chip for SiPM readout, the SPIROC, is quantified. Also the SiPM specific reconstruction of a multi-thousand channel prototype calorimeter, the CALICE AHCAL, is explained; the systematic uncertainty of the calibration method is derived. The AHCAL does not only offer a test of the calorimeter technology, it also allows to record hadron showers with an unprecedented level of details. Test-beam measurements have been performed with the AHCAL and provide a unique sample for the development of novel analysis techniques and the validation of hadron shower simulations. A method to

  7. Hadron showers in a highly granular calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A future electron-positron collider like the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) needs excellent detectors to exploit the full physics potential. Different detector concepts have been evaluated for the ILC and two concepts on the particle-flow approach were validated. To make particle-flow work, a new type of imaging calorimeters is necessary in combination with a high performance tracking system, to be able to track the single particles through the full detector system. These calorimeters require an unprecedented level of both longitudinal and lateral granularity. Several calorimeter technologies promise to reach the required readout segmentation and are currently studied. This thesis addresses one of these: The analogue hadron calorimeter technology. It combines work on the technological aspects of a highly granular calorimeter with the study of hadron shower physics. The analogue hadron calorimeter technology joins a classical scintillator-steel sandwich design with a modern photo-sensor technology, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). The SiPM is a millimetre sized, magnetic field insensitive, and low cost photo-sensor, that opens new possibilities in calorimeter design. This thesis outlines the working principle and characteristics of these devices. The requirements for an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to read the SiPM are discussed; the performance of a prototype chip for SiPM readout, the SPIROC, is quantified. Also the SiPM specific reconstruction of a multi-thousand channel prototype calorimeter, the CALICE AHCAL, is explained; the systematic uncertainty of the calibration method is derived. The AHCAL does not only offer a test of the calorimeter technology, it also allows to record hadron showers with an unprecedented level of details. Test-beam measurements have been performed with the AHCAL and provide a unique sample for the development of novel analysis techniques and the validation of hadron shower simulations. A method to

  8. Original sounding and drifting balloon-borne measurements in the western Mediterranean with the aerosol counter/sizer LOAC during summer ChArMEx campaigns, with a focus on desert dust events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Chazette, Patrick; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Totems, Julien; Durand, Pierre; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corinne; Mallet, Marc; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2015-04-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles (12° and 60°), allowing the determination of the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 µm and some identification of the nature of particles dominating different size classes. Following laboratory calibration, the sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with other in situ sensors at the surface and with remote sensing measurements on the vertical were performed to give confidence in measurements. The instrument has been operated at the surface, under all kinds of balloons up to more than 35 km in altitude, including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLPB) from CNES, and was tested on board a small UAV. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Presented results are focused on the LOAC balloon-borne measurements performed in the western Mediterranean basin during MISTRALS/ChArMEx campaigns (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-hjome.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), with a focus on African dust events. Two test flights with a first version of LOAC under sounding balloons were first successfully performed in late June 2012 near Marseille during an intense dust event. In 2013, 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France

  9. ATLAS - End-Cap calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The End-cap calorimeter was moved with the help of the rails and this calorimeter will measure the energy of particles close to the beam axis when protons collide. Cooling is important for maximum detector efficiency.

  10. Testing a liquid Argon calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    Physicists from Karlsruhe test a liquid argon calorimeter in the neutral beam b16 at the PS. The calorimeter was meant to supply some neutral particles identification at the Split-Field Magnet Facility for R416.

  11. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Henriques Correia, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    TileCal is the Hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitised every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution will review in a first part the performances of the calorimeter during run 1, obtained from calibration data, and from studies of the response of particles from collisions. In a second part it will present the solutions being investigated for the ongoing and future upgrades of the calorimeter electronics.

  12. ALICE Zero Degree Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    De Marco, N

    2013-01-01

    Two identical sets of calorimeters are located on both sides with respect to the beam Interaction Point (IP), 112.5 m away from it. Each set of detectors consists of a neutron (ZN) and a proton (ZP) Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC), positioned on remotely controlled platforms. The ZN is placed at zero degree with respect to the LHC beam axis, between the two beam pipes, while the ZP is positioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The spectator protons are separated from the ion beams by means of the dipole magnet D1.

  13. The SDC central calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the calorimeter being designed and constructed by Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) for use at the Superconducting SuperCollider is presented. The collaboration have chosen to build a sampling calorimeter using scintillating tile with wavelength-shifter fiber readout as the detector medium, and absorber media of lead and iron for the electromagnetic and hadronic compartments. This choice was based on a substantial amount of R ampersand D and Monte Carlo simulation calculations, which showed that it both met the necessary experimental specifications in addition to being a cost effect design

  14. MAC calorimeters and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MAC detector at PEP features a large solid-angle electromagnetic/hadronic calorimeter system, augmented by magnetic charged-particle tracking, muon analysis and scintillator triggering. Its implementation in the context of electron-positron annihilation physics is described, with emphasis on the utilization of calorimetry

  15. Geiger projection calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of a second generation p-decay experiment in the Gran Sasso Laboratory, a digital tracking calorimeter is being developed, based on the use of plastic tubes of the Mont Blanc detector type, which are operated in limited Geiser mode

  16. Gas calorimeter workshop: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas calorimeters combining functions of energy measurement and fine tracking have become more and more popular in the past few years. They help identify muons, gammas, electrons, and hadrons within dense tracks from transverse and longitudinal shower development. Fine segmentation capability using pads and strips on the cathodes have made gas-sampling calorimeters very attractive for colliding-beam detectors where a large multiplicity of particles are detected in a projected geometry. Linearity, energy resolution, shower position resolution, multishower resolution, and calibration questions were discussed in detail at the workshop. Ease of energy calibration by monitoring radioactive sources, good gain uniformity, and gain stability obtained were among the topics of the speakers. There was a discussion session on the operation mode of wire chambers. Gas calorimeters have been used successfully at CERN, Cornell, Fermilab, and SLAC for experiments. Some of the results from those large-scale devices were reported. Future usage of gas-sampling calorimeters for colliding-beam experiments at Fermilab and CERN were discussed. Wire chambers using extruded conductive plastic tubes have made construction easy of pads and strips which can conveniently read out induced signals from the cathode. The results of extensive studies on such devices were discussed. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the 17 papers presented

  17. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  18. Automatic low-temperature calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a low-temperature adiabatic calorimeter with a range of 1.5-500K. The system for maintaining adiabatic conditions is implemented by two resitance thermometers, whose sensitivity at low temperatures is several orders higher than that of thermocouples. The calorimeter cryostat is installed in an STG-40 portable Dewar flask. The calorimeter is controlled by an Elektronika-60 microcomputer. Standard platinum and germanium thermometers were placed inside of the calorimeter to calibrate the thermometers of the calorimeter and the shield, and the specific heats of specimens of OSCh 11-4 copper and KTP-8 paste were measured to demonstrate the possibilities of the described calorimeter. Experience with the calorimeter has shown that a thorough study of the dependence of heat capacity on temperature (over 100 points for one specimen) can be performed in one or two dats

  19. EURECA - A European-Japanese micro-calorimeter array

    OpenAIRE

    Korte, Piet A. de; Anguita, José Virgilio; Barcons, Xavier; Briones Fernández-Pola, Fernando; Camón, Agustín; Carrera, Francisco J.; Ceballos, María Teresa; Fàbrega, Lourdes; González-Arrabal, Raquel; Parra-Borderías, María; Sesé Monclús, Javier

    2008-01-01

    The EURECA (EURopean-JapanEse Calorimeter Array) project aims to demonstrate the science performance and technological readiness of an imaging X-ray spectrometer based on a micro-calorimeter array for application in future X-ray astronomy missions, like Constellation-X and XEUS. The prototype instrument consists of a 5 x 5 pixel array of TES-based micro-calorimeters read out by by two SQUID-amplifier channels using frequency-domain-multiplexing (FDM). The SQUID-amplifiers are linearized by di...

  20. NA48 prototype calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    This is a calorimeter, a detector which measures the energy of particles. When in use, it is filled with liquid krypton at -152°C. Electrons and photons passing through interact with the krypton, creating a shower of charged particles which are collected on the copper ribbons. The ribbons are aligned to an accuracy of a tenth of a millimetre. The folding at each end allows them to be kept absolutely flat. Each shower of particles also creates a signal in scintillating material embedded in the support disks. These flashes of light are transmitted to electronics by the optical fibres along the side of the detector. They give the time at which the interaction occurred. The photo shows the calorimeter at NA48, a CERN experiment which is trying to understand the lack of anti-matter in the Universe today.

  1. UA2 central calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    The UA2 central calorimeter measured the energy of individual particles created in proton-antiproton collisions. Accurate calibration allowed the W and Z masses to be measured with a precision of about 1%. The calorimeter had 24 slices like this one, each weighing 4 tons. The slices were arranged like orange segments around the collision point. Incoming particles produced showers of secondary particles in the layers of heavy material. These showers passed through the layers of plastic scintillator, generating light which was taken by light guides (green) to the data collection electronics. The amount of light was proportional to the energy of the original particle. The inner 23 cm of lead and plastic sandwiches measured electrons and photons; the outer 80 cm of iron and plastic sandwiches measured strongly interacting hadrons. The detector was calibrated by injecting light through optical fibres or by placing a radioactive source in the tube on the bottom edge.

  2. ELECTROMAGNETIC CALORIMETER (ECAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    Roger Rusack

    Occupancy of the trigger primitives during a global run: the observed pattern is consistent with the polar angle dependence of the transverse energy equivalent of the electronic noise in the endcaps.   Progress on ECAL since the last CMS week has been mostly on three major fronts: we have continued with the installation and commissioning of the preshower detectors; the endcap calorimeter trigger has been installed and tested; and there have been many changes to the calorimeter detector control and safety systems. Both Preshower (ES) endcaps were installed in CMS on schedule, just before Easter. There followed a campaign of "first commissioning" to ensure that all services were correctly connected (electrical, optical, cooling, etc.). Apart from some optical ribbons that had to be replaced the process went rather smoothly, finishing on 23rd April. All power supplies are installed and operational. The cooling system (two branches of the joint Tracker-Preshower system) is fully fun...

  3. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  4. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  5. Photomultipliers on an LHCb calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    An engineer attaches photomultiplier tubes to the electromagnetic calorimeter on the LHCb experiment. These large wall detectors will be used to study the bottom quark, a heavy, short-lived version of quarks found in protons and neutrons. The electromagnetic calorimeter will be used to detect photons, electrons and positrons produced by the decay of these short-lived quarks.

  6. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs

  7. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Skuja

    Central Calorimeter (HB/HE/HO) Photodetectors The main activity of the HCAL group during the present shutdown is the replacement of a small fraction of the Central Calorimeter (HB/HE/HO) photodetectors -- the Hybrid Photo-Detectors (HPDs). During the MTCC of 2006 it was established that all HPDs exhibit a low rate of discharge generating large random pulses. This behaviour persists at the full CMS field. However, at relatively low fields (0.5 Tesla) this discharge rate increases dramatically and becomes very large for a fraction of the HPDs. The HO HPDs which sit in the gap of the return yoke are thus adversly affected. These discharge pulses have been labelled "HPD noise" (which must be distinguished from low level electronic noise which manifests itself as pedestal noise for all HPD readout channels). Additional intermediate level noise can be generated by ion-feedback arising from thermal and field emission electrons. Ion feedback noise never exceeds the equivalent of few 10s of GeV, the...

  8. Electromagnetic Calorimeter for HADES

    CERN Document Server

    Czyzycki, W; Fabbietti, L; Golubeva, M; Guber, F; Ivashkin, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Krasa, A; Krizek, F; Kugler, A; Lapidus, K; Lisowski, E; Pietraszko, J; Reshetin, A; Salabura, P; Sobolev, Y; Stanislav, J; Tlusty, P; Torrieri, T; Traxler, M

    2011-01-01

    We propose to build the Electromagnetic calorimeter for the HADES di-lepton spectrometer. It will enable to measure the data on neutral meson production from nucleus-nucleus collisions, which are essential for interpretation of dilepton data, but are unknown in the energy range of planned experiments (2-10 GeV per nucleon). The calorimeter will improve the electron-hadron separation, and will be used for detection of photons from strange resonances in elementary and HI reactions. Detailed description of the detector layout, the support structure, the electronic readout and its performance studied via Monte Carlo simulations and series of dedicated test experiments is presented. The device will cover the total area of about 8 m^2 at polar angles between 12 and 45 degrees with almost full azimuthal coverage. The photon and electron energy resolution achieved in test experiments amounts to 5-6%/sqrt(E[GeV]) which is sufficient for the eta meson reconstruction with S/B ratio of 0.4% in Ni+Ni collisions at 8 AGeV....

  9. ELECTROMAGNETIC CALORIMETER (ECAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Bloch

    ECAL crystal calorimeter (EB + EE) The Barrel and Endcaps ECAL calorimeters have been used routinely in global runs. The CRAFT data have confirmed that ECAL performance is the same with or without magnetic field. The CRUZET and CRAFT runs have allowed experience to be gained with ECAL operation in many areas, in particular for the trigger and the calibration sequence using gap events (laser events and LED pulsing). More details can be found in the Commissioning/DPG report in this bulletin.   The last components remaining to be installed and commissioned are the specific Endcap Trigger modules (TCC-48). Most of the modules have been delivered to LLR and half of them are already at CERN. In parallel, large progress has been made on the validation of the TCC-48 firmware. Preshower (ES) The Preshower project has also made impressive progress during Autumn. All the elements required to complete the detector assembly are at hand. Ladder assembly, test and calibration with cosmic rays at the operating ...

  10. ELECTROMAGNET CALORIMETER (ECAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Rusack

    Installation is under way of the last piece of the electromagnetic calorimeter. This is the preshower (ES) that sits in front of the two endcap calorimeters. The construction of the ES was completed in December and went through a detailed set of tests in December and January. The two preshower detectors have a total of 4300 silicon sensors with 137,000 strips. After final assembly and system testing in January, only two of the strips were found to be defective. Once CMS was fully opened a new support structure (‘Gazprom’) was put into place underneath the beam pipe, to support the Surkov platform, on which the preshower installation takes place. In the early hours of 26th February the first two Dees, which form the ‘ES+’ endcap,  were transported to P5 , a journey that took two and a half hours. The Dees, still inside environmental protection boxes, were then lowered  underground and moved to the ‘+’ end of CMS. Installation start...

  11. LHCb: High Voltage system for the LHCb calorimeter detectors at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Konoplyannikov, A

    2006-01-01

    All calorimeters are equipped with Hamamatsu photo tubes as devices for light to signal conversion. Eight thousand R7899-20 tubes are used for the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and two hundred 64 channels multi-anode R7600 -00-M64 for Scintillator-Pad/Preshower detectors. Similar photo-detectors are widely used in the Molecular Imaging applications.

  12. The CDF miniplug calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lami, Stefano

    2002-06-28

    Two MiniPlug calorimeters, designed to measure the energy and lateral position of particles in the (forward) pseudorapidity region of 3.6 < |{nu}| < 5.2 of the CDF detector, have been recently installed as part of the Run II CDF upgrade at the Tevatron {bar p}p collider. They consist of lead/liquid scintillator read out by wavelength shifting fibers arranged in a pixel-type towerless geometry suitable for ''calorimetric tracking''. The design concept, the prototype performance and the final design of the MiniPlugs are here described. A recent cosmic ray test resulted in a light yield of approximately 100 pe/MIP, which exceeds our design requirements.

  13. The KLOE electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general purpose detector, KLOE, is under construction for operations at the Frascati φ factory, DAΦNE. Its central mission is the study of direct CP violation in K0 decays, which places very stringent requirements on electromagnetic shower measurements in the 20-280 MeV/c region. We have chosen to use a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter, EmC, consisting of very thin (0.5 mm) lead layers in which are embedded 1 mm diameter scintillating fibers. Much prototyping and testing has been done during its design, yielding, for the final EmC, an expected energy resolution of σ(E)/E similar 4.4%/√(E(GeV)) and a time resolution of similar 46 ps/√(E(GeV)), with excellent linearity in the region of interest and with little dependence on incidence angle and entry position. (orig.)

  14. Electromagnetic shower detector-calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the state-of-the-art of electromagnetic calorimeters is presented. The choice of detector based on the experimental requirements in cost, spatial resolution, energy resolution, and hadron rejection is discussed

  15. Electromagnetic Calorimeter for Hades Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, A.; Blume, C.; Czyžycki, W.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlaváč, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowic, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Lapidus, K.; Lisowski, E.; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Sobolev, Y. G.; Svoboda, O.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.

    2014-06-01

    Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being developed to complement the dilepton spectrometer HADES currently operating at GSI Darmstadt, Germany. ECAL will enable the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions at the energy range of 2-10 A GeV on the beam of future accelerator SIS100@FAIR. The calorimeter will also improve the electron-hadron separation and will as well be used for the detection of photons from strange resonances in elementary and heavy ion reactions. Calorimeter modules constructed of lead glass Cherenkov counter, photomultiplier, HV divider and optical fiber are described in the detail. Two prototypes of novel front-end electronics based on TRB3 are presented. A dedicated LED based system being developed to monitor the stability of the calorimeter during beamtime is introduced as well.

  16. The liquid argon calorimeter subsystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past several months, Tennessee, Mississippi, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been coordinating efforts to benchmark the CALOR89 code system against the DO and HELIOS prototype calorimeter data, and to use the CALOR89 system to generate currently needed data for radiation damage studies, signal collection time, and compensation characteristics of various calorimeter designs. This report describes these results and gives our plans and projected budgets for the following year. 8 refs., 5 figs

  17. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Skuja

    HCAL installation and commissioning is approaching completion. Work continues on commissioning of HE-, HF- and the minus wheels of HO. We expect that all commissioning will be completed by mid-March. HCAL commissioning is interleaved with integration of HCAL and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT). HCAL is attempting to take data using the HPD self-trigger as part of the GCT trigger path. Initial attempts in mid-February have not succeeded. Work continues on HCAL and the GCT. HPD lifetimes at 4 Tesla are being measured in Princeton. After more than a month of testing in a 4 Tesla field there are no sur¬prises. As the lifetime measurements proceed, the HPD response at intermediate fields of 1 Tesla will be verified and analyzed. Work also continues on HCAL calibration and DCS/DSS at Point 5. More details for some of the subsystems are presented in what follows. HE HE plus The cooling system of HE+ is functional now. The HE+ final connections to the LV system are complete. LV and HV tests to ev...

  18. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Spalding

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the entire proton-proton run of 2011, all HCAL calorimeters operated very efficiently. Over 99% of HCAL readout and trigger channels were alive. However, during the year we did face two hardware problems. One major operation problem was the occasional loss of data from a single RBX caused by single event upsets (SEUs). The rate of RBX data loss was on average one incident per 10 pb–1 of integrated luminosity. This led to approximately 1% of CMS data loss. In order to mitigate this problem, HCAL has introduced an automatic reset of the RBX. With this reset, full operation was restored within about one minute. The final hardware correction of the problem will be possible only during a long shutdown (LS1) in 2013-’14. Another hardware problem that developed in 2011 was the failure of QPLL (quartz phase lock loops) chips. This led to the loss of phase of the readout clock with respect to the LHC clock. As a consequence, in two sections in HCAL (10 degree in φ on HB and 1...

  19. Calorimeter Process Variable Archiving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, David; /Fermilab

    2002-01-14

    These steps were taken to maintain weekly archives: (1) Friday morning you stop the archiver and wait for it to finish writing data (the lock file will be removed from the directory); (2) move the current archive information to a PC via FTP; (3) remove all previous archive information in the previous directory; (4) move the current archive into the previous directory; (5) start a new archive; (6) burn a CDROM of the archive; and (7) copy the current archive to a specific directory. There are 2 ways to check if the Calorimeter Archiver is running, either through the WEB based front end or directly from a command line. Once the archiver is running it can be monitored from a WEB page. This only works with a browser launched from the online machine running the archiver. Each time the browser is reloaded there should be an update reported in the last write check field. You might have to wait a few minutes to see the update. Calorimetry currently takes readings every (300 sec.) 5 minutes. The second method to verify the archiver is running is to issue a command from a Linux cluster machine.

  20. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Green

    The organization of CMS HCAL contains four “geographic” efforts, HB, HO, HE and HF. In addition there are presently five “common” HCAL activities. These ef¬forts are concentrated on electronics, on controls (DCS), on physics objects (JetMet), on Installation and Commissioning (I&C), and on Test Beam (TB) and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) data taking. HCAL has begun planning to re-organize to be synchronized with the overall CMS management structure. HF The full production of the wedges is completed for some time. The 2004 test beam work has established the radioactive source calibration system for HF works at the 5 % level or better and a note is completed. The calibration of the complete HF is complete. HF is now in the UX cavern and will be hooked up and read out as soon as the services are available. HE The two HE calorimeters are installed and an initial calibration has been established. In the MTCC the HE was read out and muon data was observed. Event b...

  1. ELECTROMAGNETIC CALORIMETER (ECAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Bloch

    ECAL Barrel (EB) The cabling of the ECAL Barrel services on YB0 was completed early December 2007. The team has now commissioned the complete Barrel. To run all the supermodules in parallel, it is necessary to remove the heat from the service cables on YB0. The corresponding thermal screens are being installed and, for the time being, a max¬imum of 25 supermodules has been run concurrently. EB is read out regularly with a local DAQ as well as with the central DAQ and trigger. The calorimeter trigger has also been commissioned, allowing us to trigger on cosmic muons. ECAL Endcaps (EE) The Endcaps crystal production will be completed before the end of March 2008, as planned. The gluing of the VPTs (Vacuum Photo Triodes) on the crystals and the assembly of Supercrystals (sets of 25 crystals) are proceeding at the pace of 16 Supercrystals (400 channels) per week. Two thirds of the Supercrystals needed for the complete EE have been produced. Their mounting on the Dee backplates (including the connectio...

  2. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Skuja

    Since the beginning of 2007, HCAL has made significant progress in the installation and commissioning of both hardware and software. A large fraction of the physical Hadron Calorimeter modules have been installed in UX5. In fact, the only missing pieces are HE- and part of HO. The HB+/- were installed in the cryostat in March. HB scintillator layer-17 was installed above ground before the HB were lowered. The HB- scintillator layer-0 was installed immediately after completion of EB- installation. HF/HCAL Commissioning The commissioning and checkout of the HCAL readout electronics is also proceeding at a rapid pace in Bldg. 904 and USC55. All sixteen crates of HCAL VME readout electronics have been commissioned and certified for service. Fifteen are currently operating in the S2 level of USC55. The last crate is being used for firmware development in the Electronics Integration Facility in 904. All installed crates are interfaced to their VME computers and receive synchronous control from the fully-equipp...

  3. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Spalding and A. Skuja

    2010-01-01

    Splash and Collision Data HCAL recorded the beam-on-collimator (splash) and the first collision data in November and December 2009, and provided triggers to CMS with the forward calorimeter, HF. Splash events were used to improve the energy inter-calibration of the HB and HE channels, with the basic assumption that the energy deposited in the detector by the large flux of muons that passed through in splash events was a smooth function in eta and phi. The new HB and HE calibration coefficients were applied prior to the collision data taking. For HO, a similar analysis is being finalized. Splash events were also used to determine the relative timing between channels in HB and HE, and new delay settings were calculated based on splashes from one beam, applied and verified with the splash events from the other beam. During Fall 2009, the HF technical trigger was improved in order to be effectively used as one of the main CMS triggers during the collision data taking. Collisions were successfully recorded by all...

  4. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Skuja

    During the last 3 months commissioning of HCAL has continued for HO and HE+. We have also started the commissioning of the first wedge of HB+. Progress continues to be made by our Trigger/DAQ, DCS and DPG colleagues. HF will be used to obtain a Luminosity measurement for CMS. A first test of the modifications to the HF electronics was made in the August CMS global run. In addition to installation and commissioning of various parts of HCAL, we also completed a very successful summer Test Beam period which saw measurements of the combined HE/EE/ES calorimeter system in the H2 test beam. Installation and Commissioning a. HB commissioning This week, part of the final water-cooling system for HB was commissioned. Eighteen HB- wedges and two pilot wedges on HB+ have been connected to the water circuit on YB0. On Sept 6, 2007 cabling and commissioning was started for the first HB readout box (RBX) using temporary set of cables. We have connected RBX-17 to the Low Voltage PS and the HCAL Detector Control Sy...

  5. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Spalding

    2011-01-01

    All the HCAL calorimeters are ready for data-taking in 2011 and participated fully in the cosmic running and initial beam operations in the last few weeks. Several improvements were made during the winter technical stop, including replacement of the light-guide sleeves in HF, improvements to the low voltage power connections, and separation of HF from HB and HE in the DAQ partitions. During the 2010 running a form of anomalous noise in the HF was identified as being caused by scintillation when charged particles pass through a portion of the air light-guide sleeve. This portion was constructed from a non-conductive mirror-like material called “HEM”. To suppress these anomalous signals, during the recent winter technical stop all sleeves in the detector were replaced with sleeves made of Tyvek. The detector has been recommissioned with all channels fully operational. Recalibration of the detector will be required due to the differing reflectivity of the new sleeves compared with the HEM sl...

  6. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    by J. Spalding and A. Skuja

    2010-01-01

    Operations and Maintenance All HCAL sub-detectors participated throughout the recent data taking with 7 TeV collisions. A timing scan of HF was performed to optimize the timing across the detectors and to set the overall time position of the ~10-ns wide signals within the 25-ns integration time slice. This position was chosen to ensure that the trigger primitives in physics events are generated synchronously at the desired bunch crossing, while also providing discrimination between the calorimeter signals and anomalous signals due to interactions within the photomultiplier tubes. This timing discrimination is now used in the standard filter algorithms for anomalous signals. For HB and HE, once the statistics needed to assess the timing of a sufficient number of channels was accumulated, it was verified that the time settings determined with cosmic, splash events and initial collision data were appropriate for the 7 TeV collision data taking. A further fine-tuning of the HB and HE time settings will be perfo...

  7. Thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    The thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters are modeled using a lumped heat transfer analysis in which heat is released in a pressure vessel/bomb immersed in a stirred water bath that is surrounded by a static air space bounded by an insulated (static) jacket, a constant/controlled temperature jacket (isoperibol), or a changing temperature (adiabatic) jacket. The temperature history of the water bath for each of these boundary conditions (methods) is well described by the two-term solution for the calorimeter response to a heat impulse (combustion), allowing the heat transfer coefficients and thermal capacities of the bomb and water bath to be determined parametrically. The validated heat transfer model provides an expression for direct calculation of the heat released in an arbitrary process inside a bomb calorimeter using the temperature history of the water bath for each of the boundary conditions (methods). This result makes possible the direct calculation of the heat of combustion of a sample in an isoperibol calorimeter from the recorded temperature history without the need for semi-empirical temperature corrections to account for non-adiabatic behavior. Another useful result is that the maximum temperature rise of the water bath in the static jacket method is proportional to the total heat generated, and the empirical proportionality constant, which is determined by calibration, accounts for all of the heat losses and thermal lags of the calorimeter. PMID:26724069

  8. 基于系留气艇平台的红外辐射传输算法实验验证%Validation of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model with Field Experiments Using Tethered-balloon-borne Facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章文星; 吕达仁; 霍娟; 王勇; 孙宝来; 李立群

    2011-01-01

    中国科学院大气物理研究所中层大气和全球环境探测重点实验室(LAGEO)建立了以系留气艇为平台的综合探测系统.通过气艇在大气边界层上升、下降过程获得不同高度的气象参数和同时的辐射参数.以气象参数为输入,应用辐射传输模式(MODTRAN4.0)获得模式辐射输出,将其与实测辐射值作对比,验证MODTRAN4.0模式的准确性,为有关目标识别与遥感提供基础.2006年8月在中国科学院大气物理研究所香河综合观测站利用系留气艇平台进行了验证实验,并对热红外波段的模式对比结果进行分析.结果表明:所建实验系统具备进行模式验证的能力,在热红外波段,MODTRAN4.0模式输出结果与实测辐射亮度之间的相对误差的均方差在边界层大气条件下小于3%.%Atmospheric radiative transfer and its algorithms are the theoretical basis and effective tools in the field of remote sensing and inversion algorithm in the earth system, and also the key tools for the space, ground target recognition and quantitative assessment of background radiation. During recent decades, a series of radiative transfer(RT) model have been proposed to support a large variety of quantitative remote sensing as well as target,background discrimination research and applications. Owing to respective approximations and simplifications inherent in those RT models, their accuracy, uncertainty and adaptability are of critical significance to different researchers and end users. Validation of the RT model for its different wave band, in particular by using field experiments is necessary, especially for those applications with higher accuracy demands. Among the RT codes currently used, a considerable part of them are MODT-RAN and its evolution versions. In China, MODTRAN has also been applied to the study of remote sensing, atmospheric correction of satellite images, and a wide range of applications in the atmospheric sciences, hence, the

  9. The Prism Plastic Calorimeter (PPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This proposal supports two goals: \\\\ \\\\ First goal:~~Demonstrate that current, widely used plastic technologies allow to design Prism Plastic Calorimeter~(PPC) towers with a new ``liquid crystal'' type plastic called Vectra. It will be shown that this technique meets the requirements for a LHC calorimeter with warm liquids: safety, hermeticity, hadronic compensation, resolution and time response. \\\\ \\\\ Second goal:~~Describe how one can design a warm liquid calorimeter integrated into a LHC detector and to list the advantages of the PPC: low price, minimum of mechanical structures, minimum of dead space, easiness of mechanical assembly, accessibility to the electronics, possibility to recirculate the liquid. The absorber and the electronic being outside of the liquid and easily accessible, one has maximum flexibility to define them. \\\\ \\\\ The R&D program, we define here aims at showing the feasibility of these new ideas by building nine towers of twenty gaps and exposing them to electron and hadron beams.

  10. Polystyrene calorimeter for electron beam dose measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    Calorimeters from polystrene have been constructed for dose measurement at 4-10 MeV electron accelerators. These calorimeters have been used successfully for a few years, and polystyrene calorimeters for use at energies down to 1 MeV and being tested. Advantage of polystyrene as the absorbing...

  11. Compton scattering sequence reconstruction algorithm for the liquid xenon gamma-ray imaging telescope (LXeGRIT)

    OpenAIRE

    Oberlack, U. G.; Aprile, E.; Curioni, A.; Egorov, V.; Giboni, K. L.

    2000-01-01

    The Liquid Xenon Gamma-Ray Imaging Telescope (LXeGRIT) is a balloon born experiment sensitive to \\g -rays in the energy band of 0.2-20 MeV. The main detector is a time projection chamber filled with high purity liquid xenon (LXeTPC), in which the three-dimensional location and energy deposit of individual \\g -ray interactions are accurately measured in one homogeneous volume. To determine the \\g -ray initial direction (Compton imaging), as well as to reject background, the correct sequence of...

  12. The University of Toronto's balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunch, D.; Drummond, J. R.; Midwinter, C.; Taylor, J. R.; Fu, D.; Walker, K. A.; McElroy, C. T.; Strong, K.; Bernath, P.; Fast, H.

    The University of Toronto s Fourier transform spectrometer U of T FTS derived from a Bomem DA5 Michelson-type interferometer was rebuilt and flown on the Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment MANTRA high-altitude balloon platform in September 2004 The U of T FTS has a resolution of 0 02 cm -1 a spectral range covering 1200-5000 cm -1 and InSb and MCT detectors that measure simultaneously The spectrometer was originally built in the 1980s and purchased by the Meteorological Service of Canada To prepare the instrument for flight the original software was replaced with new LabVIEW control software creating a robust and easily-controlled instrument adaptable to either remote control or lab-based work As a result of replacing the software most of the electronics had to be replaced creating a lighter lower-power more robust instrument A description of the refurbishment will be presented Despite balloon launch and gondola pointing system failures during the MANTRA 2004 campaign two spectra were recorded on each detector during sunset from a float height of 35 km The data indicate that the instrument performed well throughout the flight and had the payload pointing been under control would have retrieved a full set of occultation data The data that were acquired will be shown The U of T FTS has since participated in a ground-based FTS inter-comparison campaign with two other FTS instruments the University of Toronto s Toronto Atmospheric Observatory TAO FTS a complementary NDACC station Network for the Detection of

  13. Self-Calibrating Greenhouse Gas Balloon-Borne Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, the importance of understanding the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases has been recognized. In particular,...

  14. A high performance anticoincidence rejection system for balloon borne MWPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supernova SN1987A have been observed in the range of hard X-rays (15 / 180 KeV) and high energy γ-rays (50 / 500 MeV) with a payload launched from the balloon facility of Alice Springs (Australia) during April 1987 and 1988. The low energy detector based on a MWPC had a sensitive area of 500 cm/sup 2/. In the second flight a complete plastic shield was added for the first time to the Multiwire Proportional Counter (MWPC). In this way, switching on the active shield, the background counting rate dropped from 4.2 to 2.8 x 10/sup -4/ ct/cm/sup 2/ s keV with no change in the dead time of the counter. This clearly demonstrates the advantage of the use of a multitechnique rejection system for this kind of gaseous detectors

  15. GRAPE: a balloon-borne gamma-ray polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.; Bancroft, Christopher; Bloser, Peter F.; Connor, Taylor; Legere, Jason; Ryan, James M.

    2009-08-01

    The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a concept for an astronomical hard X-ray Compton polarimeter operating in the 50 - 500 keV energy band. The instrument has been optimized for wide-field polarization measurements of transient outbursts from energetic astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts and solar flares. The GRAPE instrument is composed of identical modules, each of which consists of an array of scintillator elements read out by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). Incident photons Compton scatter in plastic scintillator elements and are subsequently absorbed in inorganic scintillator elements; a net polarization signal is revealed by a characteristic asymmetry in the azimuthal scattering angles. We have constructed a prototype GRAPE module that has been calibrated at a polarized hard X-ray beam and flown on an engineering balloon test flight. A full-scale scientific balloon payload, consisting of up to 36 modules, is currently under development. The first flight, a one-day flight scheduled for 2011, will verify the expected scientific performance with a pointed observation of the Crab Nebula. We will then propose long-duration balloon flights to observe gamma-ray bursts and solar flares.

  16. Self-Calibrating Greenhouse Gas Balloon-Borne Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases has been recognized as critical to predicting climate change and global warming. A...

  17. A Low Cost Weather Balloon Borne Solar Cell Calibration Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David B.; Wolford, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Calibration of standard sets of solar cell sub-cells is an important step to laboratory verification of on-orbit performance of new solar cell technologies. This paper, looks at the potential capabilities of a lightweight weather balloon payload for solar cell calibration. A 1500 gr latex weather balloon can lift a 2.7 kg payload to over 100,000 ft altitude, above 99% of the atmosphere. Data taken between atmospheric pressures of about 30 to 15 mbar may be extrapolated via the Langley Plot method to 0 mbar, i.e. AMO. This extrapolation, in principle, can have better than 0.1 % error. The launch costs of such a payload arc significantly less than the much larger, higher altitude balloons, or the manned flight facility. The low cost enables a risk tolerant approach to payload development. Demonstration of 1% standard deviation flight-to-flight variation is the goal of this project. This paper describes the initial concept of solar cell calibration payload, and reports initial test flight results. .

  18. A Cherenkov imager for the charge measurement of the elements of nuclear cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Cherenkov imager, CHERCAM (Cherenkov Camera) has been designed and built for the CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass) balloon-borne experiment. The instrument will perform charge measurements of nuclear cosmic-ray over a range extending from proton to iron in the energy domain from 1010 to 1015 eV. This work has focused on the development of CHERCAM by creating a simulation of the detector and on the aerogel plan characterization for the radiator. But it has also expanded on the technical aspects of the construction of the detector and its various tests, as well as the development of calibration software and data analysis. (author)

  19. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. The performance of the calorimeter has been studied employing cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the Run 1 of LHC (2010-2012). Results on the calorimeter performance on absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities are presented. The results show that the Tile Calorimeter performance is within the design requirements of the detector.

  20. ELECTRONICS FOR CALORIMETERS AT LHC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RADEKA,V.

    2001-09-11

    Some principal design features of front-end electronics for calorimeters in experiments at the LHC will be highlighted. Some concerns arising in the transition from the research and development and design phase to the construction will be discussed. Future challenges will be indicated.

  1. COE1 Calorimeter Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santi, Peter Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the operations of the COE1 calorimeter which is used to measure the thermal power generated by the radioactive decay of plutonium-bearing materials for the purposes of assaying the amount of plutonium within the material.

  2. The CMS central hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.; E892 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a copper absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe design choices that led us to this concept, details of the mechanical and optical structure, and test beam results. We discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  3. ELECTRONICS FOR CALORIMETERS AT LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some principal design features of front-end electronics for calorimeters in experiments at the LHC will be highlighted. Some concerns arising in the transition from the research and development and design phase to the construction will be discussed. Future challenges will be indicated

  4. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkens, H G S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 4900 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and electronic charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of pp collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution, and associated stabilities. In addition to the measurement of the energy and direction of hadronic showers and particles, the calorimeter determines the arriv...

  5. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section ($0 < |eta| < 1.7$) of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons decaying hadronically, and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 4900 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and electronic charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of pp collisions acquired during 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance will be presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution, and associated stabilities. These results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter is performing...

  6. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 4900 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and electronic charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of pp collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance will be presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution, and associated stabilities. These results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter is performing well within the design requirements and is giving essential ...

  7. CMS Forward Calorimeters Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2014-01-01

    The Phase II Upgrade of the CMS forward calorimeters (electromagnetic and hadronic) originates from the fact that these calorimeters will not be sufficiently performant with the expected High Luminosity LHC conditions, planned to be started in 2025. The major challenge is to preserve/improve the high performance of the current forward detectors with new devices that can withstand the unprecedented radiation levels and disentangle the very large event pileup. CMS elected two design concepts to be presented in the Phase II Upgrade Technical Proposal Shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter + Hadronic Endcap Rebuild, and High Granularity Calorimeter. The former concept is based on reconstructing the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter with a shashlik design and replacing the active media of the endcap hadron calorimeter with radiation tolerant active media with a possibility to extend the coverage. The latter concept is concentrating on constructing a high granularity (both longitudinally and laterally) calorimeter ...

  8. A sampling ADC data acquisition system for the electromagnetic calorimeters of COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Alexander; Angerer, Heinz; Konorov, Igor; Kraemer, Markus; Paul, Stephan [Physik-Department E18, Technische Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    For the readout of the two electromagnetic calorimeters of the two stage COMPASS spectrometer at CERN, a sampling ADC (SADC) based data acquisition system was developed. The shaped photomultiplier signals are continuously digitized with 80 MHz and processed within field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The FPGAs implement zero suppression, latency buffering and provide an option to derive online calorimeter trigger decisions. In total, 4704 calorimeter channels are currently read by two different SADC module types with 10 bit and 12 bit resolution, respectively. With modified FPGA firmware, the same modules are also used in other applications, e.g. for medical imaging (PET) and ultracold neutron experiments.

  9. A sampling ADC data acquisition system for the electromagnetic calorimeters of COMPASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the readout of the two electromagnetic calorimeters of the two stage COMPASS spectrometer at CERN, a sampling ADC (SADC) based data acquisition system was developed. The shaped photomultiplier signals are continuously digitized with 80 MHz and processed within field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The FPGAs implement zero suppression, latency buffering and provide an option to derive online calorimeter trigger decisions. In total, 4704 calorimeter channels are currently read by two different SADC module types with 10 bit and 12 bit resolution, respectively. With modified FPGA firmware, the same modules are also used in other applications, e.g. for medical imaging (PET) and ultracold neutron experiments.

  10. Thermal Equilibrium Calorimeters -- An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    McCammon, D

    2005-01-01

    Near-equilibrium thermal detectors operate as classical calorimeters, with energy deposition and internal equilibration times short compared to the thermal time constant of the device. Advances in fabrication techniques, cryogenics, and electronics have made it practical to measure deposited energy with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. In this chapter we discuss performance considerations for these devices, including optimal filtering and energy resolution calculations. We begin with the basic theory of simple equilibrium calorimeters with ideal resistive thermometers. This provides a starting point for a brief discussion of electrothermal feedback, other noise sources, various non-ideal effects, and nonlinearity. We then describe other types of thermometers and show how they fit into this theoretical framework and why they may require different optimizations and figures of merit. Most of this discussion is applicable also to power detectors, or bolometers, where the detector time constants may be sho...

  11. Electromagnetic Calorimeter for HADES Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Ramos P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL is being developed to complement dilepton spectrometer HADES. ECAL will enable the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions at the energy range of 2-10 AGeV on the beam of future accelerator SIS100@FAIR. We will report results of the last beam test with quasi-monoenergetic photons carried out in MAMI facility at Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz.

  12. Electromagnetic calorimeter for HADES experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kugler, Andrej; Blume, C.; Czyzycki, W.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlaváč, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Lapidus, K.; Lisowski, E.; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Sobolev, Yuri, G.; Svoboda, Ondřej; Tlustý, Pavel; Traxler, M.

    Vol. 8. Montreal: World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd, 2014, s. 578-582. ISBN 978-981-4603-15-7. [14th International Conference on Advanced Technology and Particle Physics. Como (IT), 23.09.2013-27.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG12007; GA ČR GA13-06759S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : HADES collaboration * calorimeter * HADES@FAIR Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  13. A calorimeter with array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5 x 25 = 125 detector array has been designed for a calorimeter. Each element is consisted of a graphite block and a chromel-alumel. A new '0'-point set up was designed by using the critical temperature of the liquid nitrogen as the '0'-point of the temperature. A FY-1 data acquisition system was used for the detector array. The energy distribution of the electron beam has been measured on large-area diode with the system

  14. Calorimeter based on resistance thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calorimeter on the aluminium alloy basis is developed for the Bremsstrahlung dosimetry. The registration of the absorbed dose is accomplished through the bridge-mounted resistance wire thermometer. It is shown that application of the modern measuring technique makes it possible to register the doses average values from 0.1 Gy, which corresponds to the temperature change in the 10-4 K transducer

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Heelan, Louise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design ...

  16. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Solodkov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5182 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1\\% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. The results demonstrate a very good understanding of the performance of the Tile Calorimeter that is well within the design expectations.

  17. Central hadron calorimeter of UA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An iron-scintillator sampling calorimeter is described, which measures hadronic energy in proton-antiproton interactions at the CERN 540 GeV SPS collider. Construction details are given of the instrumentation of the magnet pieces of the UA1 experiment and of the methods used to measure the calorimeter response and resolution. The system of lasers and quartz fibres, which allows long term monitoring of the calorimeter response, is also described. (author)

  18. Rugged calorimeter with a fast rise time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intrinsic 1-mil-thick gold foil calorimeter has been developed which rises to 95% of the energy deposited in less than 2 microseconds. This calorimeter is very rugged, and can withstand rough handling without damage. The time constant is long, in the millisecond range, because of its unique construction. Use of this calorimeter has produced 100% data recovery, and agreement with true deposition to less than 10%

  19. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Shima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of pp collisions. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, time resolution, and associated stabilities.

  20. ATLAS calorimeters energy calibration for jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calibration of ATLAS barrel calorimeters (including pre shower system, electromagnetic Liquid Argon calorimeter and scintillating hadron tile calorimeter) was done by standard calibration and weighting technique approaches. The standard calibration gives the bad linearity for hadron non compensated calorimeter. The calibration with weighting technique, in comparison with standard calibration, restores linearity and improves energy resolution up to (σ/E)2 = (38.6%/√E)2 + (1.5%)2 for η 0.6. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. LHCb: Physics with the LHCb calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Barsuk, S

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb calorimeter comprises the scintillator pad detector (SPD), preshower (PS), electromagnetic Shashlyk type (ECAL) and hadronichadronic Tile (HCAL) calorimeters, arranged in pseudo-projective geometry. All the four detectors follow the general principle of reading the light from scintillator tiles with wave length shifting fibers, and transporting the light towards photomultipliers (25 ns R/O).

  2. Status of the ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short status of the Tile Calorimeter project is given. Major achievements in the mechanical construction of the detector modules, their instrumentation, cylinders assembly, as well as the principles of the detector front-end electronics, are described. The ideas of Tile Calorimeter module calibration are presented

  3. Mounting LHCb hadron calorimeter scintillating tiles

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Scintillating tiles are carefully mounted in the hadronic calorimeter for the LHCb detector. These calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  4. Assembly of the CMS hadronic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The hadronic calorimeter is assembled on the end-cap of the CMS detector in the assembly hall. Hadronic calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  5. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chomont, Arthur Rene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scin...

  6. Commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaie, Erfan

    ATLAS, a multi-purpose detector built at the LHC at CERN, requires an extensive commissioning campaign to be ready for proton-proton collisions. In this work, we focus on the commissioning of the liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters, with emphasis on commissioning with cosmic rays. First we outline one phase of the commissioning work, which involves testing of the front-end electronics of the two endcap calorimeters. We then describe two cosmic ray generators as input to a Monte-Carlo simulation of cosmic rays in ATLAS, and compare their results. Finally, we explain a technique developed for this work which uses information from the Tile calorimeters to predict the timing of cosmic rays within the LAr calorimeters, because cosmic rays occur randomly in time whereas the electronics are clocked at [Special characters omitted.] . The results from this analysis tool are compared to default tools, using both simulated and real cosmic ray data in the calorimeters.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Solodkov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of muons and single hadrons from proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design requirements and it has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results.

  8. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Calibration and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Because of its very good signal to noise ratio it is also useful for the identification and reconstruction of muons. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and charge injection systems. This multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. The performance of the calorimeter has also been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and t...

  9. WE-G-17A-06: A Water Calorimeter for Use in MRI Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: At VSL, Dutch Metrology Institute, a new water calorimeter was developed with the purpose to replace the existing primary standard for absorbed dose to water in the Netherlands. The new water calorimeter is designed to be operable in medium- to high energy photon beams, electrons, protons as well as MRI integrated linear accelerators. VSL has operated a water calorimeter since 2001. This calorimeter formed the basis for the NCS-18 dosimetry protocol, which is commonly applied by medical physicists in the Netherlands and Belgium. Methods: The unit Gray is the unit of interest for measurement of the absorbed dose to water. Water calorimetry involves the measurement of a small temperature rise (0.24 mK/Gy) with an uncertainty of less than 1 μK/Gy at a temperature of 4 °C. Using extensive multi-physics simulations the new calorimeter's thermal performance was simulated before it was constructed at the end of 2013. With the advent of radiotherapy treatment units incorporating MR imaging the performance of the thermistor temperature sensors were characterized in a 1.5 T magnetic field. Results: A change of thermistor resistance was observed of less than 0.004% as a Result of the magneto-resistance effect in a 1.5 T magnetic field. Although a magneto-resistance effect was detectable, the effect on the temperature response in the water calorimeter was found to be negligible. Conclusion: With the realization of the new calorimeter operable in MRI linacs and designed for use in a variety of beam modalities, VSL is ready for accurate dosimetry in new advanced radiotherapy modalities. Due to the small form factor the calorimeter can be used on location in the actual therapy beam inside a 68 cm linac bore. This work was supported by EMRP grant HLT06. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union

  10. Large capacity water and air bath calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EG and G Mound Applied Technologies has developed an 11 in. x 17 in. sample size water bath and an 11 in. x 17 in. sample size air bath calorimeter which both function under servo control mode of operation. The water bath calorimeter has four air bath preconditioners to increase sample throughput and the air bath calorimeter has two air bath preconditioners. The large capacity calorimeters and preconditioners were unique to Mound design which brought about unique design challenges. Both large capacity systems calculate the optimum set temperature for each preconditioner which is available to the operator. Each system is controlled by a personal computer under DOS which allows the operator to download data to commercial software packages when the calorimeter is idle. Qualification testing yielded a one standard deviation of 0.6% for 0.2W to 3.0W Pu-238 heat standard range in the water bath calorimeter and a one standard deviation of 0.3% for the 6.0W to 20.0W Pu-238 heat standard range in the air bath calorimeter

  11. Calibration of the CALICE analog hadronic calorimeter (AHCAL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CALICE AHCAL technological prototype is a hadronic calorimeter prototype for a future e+e- - collider (ILC and CLIC). It is designed as a sampling calorimeter alternating tungsten or steel absorber plates and active readout layers, segmented in single plastic scintillator tiles of 3 x 3 x 0.3 cm3 volume. Each tile is individually coupled to a silicon photomultiplier, read out by a dedicated ASIC with energy measurement and time stamping capability. The high granularity is meant to enable imaging and separation of single showers, for a Particle Flow approach to the jet energy measurement. The prototype aims to establish this technology as a scalable solution for an ILC detector. The first 14 layers of this prototype have been assembled and commissioned. The first 10 layers in the stack are used as tracker to determine the position of the first hard interaction of a pion shower in the first interaction length (λ) of the calorimeter. Four full size layers (72 x 72 cm2) are distributed between 1 and 3λ depth in the steel absorber. Data has been collected with muon, electron and pion beams at the CERN PS (2014). The first results on energy calibration with muons are presented, together with a comparison to the bench calibration obtained during tile production.

  12. Polystyrene calorimeter for electron beam dose measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    Calorimeters from polystrene have been constructed for dose measurement at 4-10 MeV electron accelerators. These calorimeters have been used successfully for a few years, and polystyrene calorimeters for use at energies down to 1 MeV and being tested. Advantage of polystyrene as the absorbing...... material are the radiation stability of this material and the fact that identical phantoms can be made for irradiation of other dosimeters for calibration. This provides a precise tool for establishing traceability of dose measurements at industrial electron electron accelerators....

  13. Calorimeter prediction based on multiple exponentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.K. E-mail: mks@lanl.gov; Bracken, D.S

    2002-05-21

    Calorimetry allows very precise measurements of nuclear material to be carried out, but it also requires relatively long measurement times to do so. The ability to accurately predict the equilibrium response of a calorimeter would significantly reduce the amount of time required for calorimetric assays. An algorithm has been developed that is effective at predicting the equilibrium response. This multi-exponential prediction algorithm is based on an iterative technique using commercial fitting routines that fit a constant plus a variable number of exponential terms to calorimeter data. Details of the implementation and the results of trials on a large number of calorimeter data sets will be presented.

  14. Calorimeter prediction based on multiple exponentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calorimetry allows very precise measurements of nuclear material to be carried out, but it also requires relatively long measurement times to do so. The ability to accurately predict the equilibrium response of a calorimeter would significantly reduce the amount of time required for calorimetric assays. An algorithm has been developed that is effective at predicting the equilibrium response. This multi-exponential prediction algorithm is based on an iterative technique using commercial fitting routines that fit a constant plus a variable number of exponential terms to calorimeter data. Details of the implementation and the results of trials on a large number of calorimeter data sets will be presented

  15. Calorimeter prediction based on multiple exponentials

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M K

    2002-01-01

    Calorimetry allows very precise measurements of nuclear material to be carried out, but it also requires relatively long measurement times to do so. The ability to accurately predict the equilibrium response of a calorimeter would significantly reduce the amount of time required for calorimetric assays. An algorithm has been developed that is effective at predicting the equilibrium response. This multi-exponential prediction algorithm is based on an iterative technique using commercial fitting routines that fit a constant plus a variable number of exponential terms to calorimeter data. Details of the implementation and the results of trials on a large number of calorimeter data sets will be presented.

  16. ALICE Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC), General Pictures.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The ZDC Calorimeter for spectator neutrons is made by 44 slabs of W-alloy; each slab has 44 grooves where quartz fibres are placed. The charged particles of the hadronic shower generated by the neutrons make Cerenkov light in the fibres and the light is collected by photomultipliers. Photos from 1 to 9 show the front-face of the calorimeter. Photo n. 10 shows the rear of the calorimeter where the fibres are divided in several groups to go to the different PMs.

  17. Liquid Krypton Calorimeter Calibration Software

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Christina Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Calibration of the liquid krypton calorimeter (LKr) of the NA62 experiment is managed by a set of standalone programs, or an online calibration driver. These programs are similar to those used by NA48, but have been updated to utilize classes and translated to C++ while maintaining a common functionality. A set of classes developed to handle communication with hardware was used to develop the three standalone programs as well as the main driver program for online calibration between bursts. The main calibration driver has been designed to respond to run control commands and receive burst data, both transmitted via DIM. In order to facilitate the process of reading in calibration parameters, a serializable class has been introduced, allowing the replacement of standard text files with XML configuration files.

  18. The LHCb hadron calorimeter prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LHCb is a Large Hadron Collider Beauty experiment dedicated for precision measurements of CP violation and rare phenomena. The experiment is built as a single arm detector covering a forward angle between ∼ 15 mrad and ∼ 300 mrad. It consists in a vertex detector, a tracking system, two RICH detectors, a calorimeter system comprising a preshower, electromagnetic and hadron sections, and a muon system. The role of the calorimeters is to provide identification of the electrons and hadrons for trigger and offline analysis with measurements of position and energy. The hadron calorimeter (HCAL) has to provide data for the trigger and to assist in background suppression when B decays are reconstructed. In 1997 an HCAL prototype stack of 3 modules, each having the dimensions 96 x 16 x 153 cm3, has been constructed and exposed to the X7 test beams of the SPS at CERN. Each module is constructed from scintillator tiles embedded in an iron structure, which are parallel to the beam direction in a staggered arrangement. The cell segmentation of the 1997 prototype was 16 x 16 cm2 and had a 2-fold in depth readout. Around 3760 spacer plates and weld straps necessary for all 6 modules were supplied by Romanian group of IFIN-HH in 1997, as well as about 200 master plates for two modules in 1998. The assembling of the modules was performed at CERN by people of our group, IHEP Serpukhov and CERN. During November 1997 test beam data were taken with pion and electron beams of 5 up to 50 GeV/c momenta. The energy spectra for pions were obtained. A shift of about 1.3 GeV of the energy mean value with respect to the beam energy was observed for all studied energies. This could be due to different effects. The energy resolution as a function of the beam energy fitted by the dependence σ/E = a/√E + b gives parameters in agreement with the values expected from Monte Carlo. Uniformity response for pions at 20 GeV oscillates within 2.5 % around the mean value. Data taken with ECAL

  19. Tritium calorimeter setup and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Rodgers, D E

    2002-01-01

    The LBNL tritium calorimeter is a stable instrument capable of measuring tritium with a sensitivity of 25 Ci. Measurement times range from 8-hr to 7-days depending on the thermal conductivity and mass of the material being measured. The instrument allows accurate tritium measurements without requiring that the sample be opened and subsampled, thus reducing personnel exposure and radioactive waste generation. The sensitivity limit is primarily due to response shifts caused by temperature fluctuation in the water bath. The fluctuations are most likely a combination of insufficient insulation from ambient air and precision limitations in the temperature controller. The sensitivity could probably be reduced to below 5 Ci if the following improvements were made: (1) Extend the external insulation to cover the entire bath and increase the top insulation. (2) Improve the seal between the air space above the bath and the outside air to reduce evaporation. This will limit the response drift as the water level drops. (...

  20. The development of mini gamma calorimeter. Analysis of the calorimeter characteristic using analytical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of mini gamma calorimeter. Analysis of the calorimeter characteristic using analytical method. To increase the gamma calorimeter capability, especially to obtain the new type of calorimeter that can be used at high power reactor, it is necessary to find out an innovation of the existing calorimeter model. The basic idea of the innovation is to eliminate the absorber material which restricts the performance of the old calorimeter. As the first step of innovation, characteristics of this mini calorimeter without absorber will be analyzed by analytical method in the static condition. The analysis was performed for several combinations of geometries and dimensions of active parts as well as those of gas isolations. The calculation results showed that the sensitivity (as a principal characteristic) of the calorimeter of 30oC per W/g is acceptable value, and the active length of 2 cm with the diameter of 1 mm of thermocouples (active part) is the optimum geometry. According to the results, it can be concluded that the mini gamma calorimeter proposed is reasonable to be made

  1. Upgrading the ATLAS fast calorimeter simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hubacek, Zdenek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Many physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider require very large samples of simulated events, and producing these using the full GEANT4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. Often, a very detailed detector simulation is not needed, and in these cases fast simulation tools can be used to reduce the calorimeter simulation time. In ATLAS, a fast simulation of the calorimeter systems was developed, called Fast Calorimeter Simulation (FastCaloSim). It provides a parametrized simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level. It is interfaced to the standard ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software, and can be tuned to data more easily than with GEANT4. An improved parametrization is being developed, to eventually address shortcomings of the original version. It makes use of statistical techniques such as principal component analysis, and a neural network parametrization to optimise the amount of information to store in the ATL...

  2. Measurements Made by Vinca-Calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cross section of the Vinca-Heat-Flow calorimeter is shown. The sample container (10 mm diameter, 50 mm high, 0.25 mm. wall thickness) is centred in the jacket (48 mm diameter, 100 mm high, 2 mm wall thickness) by styrofoam which acts as the homogeneous heat transfer medium. The calibration heater, a coil wound on a thin hollow paper cylinder is placed inside the sample container. The temperature difference between the sample container and the jacket was measured with a copper-constantan thermocouple. The lid served also as a support to which the cable was fastened. Two calorimeters were constructed. Particular attention was paid to counterbalance the mass of aluminium capsules (better than 1% of the weight). In one calorimeter the sample container was empty (the ''empty'' calorimeter) in the other one a known mass of graphite was placed

  3. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, Pavol; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. Results on the calorimeter operation and performance are presented, including the calibration, stability, absolute energy scale, uniformity and time resolution. These results show that the TileCal performance is within the design requirements and has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results.

  4. Magnetic micro-calorimeters for neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic magnetic micro-calorimeters are energy dispersive detectors operated at temperatures below 0.1 Kelvin. Their resolving power E/ ΔE approaching 5000, the intrinsic response time well below 1 μs and the excellent linearity make magnetic micro-calorimeters very attractive for numerous experiments. With such detectors we have performed the first high resolution calorimetric measurements of the 163Ho electron capture spectrum. The achieved performance motivated the formation of the international collaboration ECHo (Electron Capture in 163Ho) to investigate the electron neutrino mass in the sub-eV range using the 163Ho. For the search of neutrinoless double beta decay in 100Mo with scintillating crystals, we have developed photon and phonon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters to be used in the experiments AMoRE and LUMINEU. In this talk, the ECHo experiment as well as the other applications of metallic magnetic calorimeters for neutrino physics will be discussed.

  5. The CMS central hadron calorimeter: Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a brass absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe details of the mechanical and optical structure. We also discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule

  6. CDF End Plug calorimeter Upgrade Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the status of the CDF End Plug Upgrade Project. In this project, the CDF calorimeters in the end plug and the forward regions will be replaced by a single scintillator based calorimeter. After an extensive R ampersand D effort on the tile/fiber calorimetry, we have now advanced to a construction phase. We review the results of the R ampersand D leading to the final design of the calorimeters and the development of tooling devised for this project. The quality control program of the production of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters is described. A shower maximum detector for the measurement of the shower centroid and the shower profile of electrons, γ and π0 has been designed. Its performance requirements, R ampersand D results and mechanical design are discussed

  7. Overview of the LHCb Calorimeter Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Perret, P

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb calorimeter system is composed of four subdetectors: an electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) followed by a hadron calorimeter (HCAL). In addition the system includes in front of them the Scintillating Pad Detector (SPD) and Pre-Shower (PS). It is used to select transverse energy hadron, electron and photon candidates for the first trigger level and it provides the identification of electrons, photons and hadrons as well as the measurement of their energies and positions. The design and construction characteristics of the LHCb calorimeter will be recalled. Strategies for monitoring and calibration during data taking will be detailed in all aspects. Scintillating fibres, plastics and photomultipliers suffer from ageing due to radiation damage or high currents. Different methods which are used to calibrate the detectors and to recover the initial performances will be presented. The performances achieved will be illustrated in selected channels of interest for B physics.

  8. Status and perspecitves of liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of liquid argon calorimeters is reviewed, and experience obtained with these devices is described. Future perspectives of the liquid ionization chamber technique in calorimetry are also discussed. (orig.)

  9. Uranium scintillator calorimeter at the CERN ISR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, Monte Carlo studies and test beam results of a uranium/scintillator calorimeter to be installed in the Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR) at CERN are described. In its final stage the calorimeter will cover the full azimuth over a polar region of 450 0. The full calorimeter is built in a modular way from 128 stacks, with each stack internally subdivided into six cells of 20 x 20 cm2 cross section. The readout is by wavelength shifting (WLS) plates with a separate readout of the front part of the calorimeter (first ten plates) to allow electromagnetic/hadronic separation. Since the readout plates are on both sides of the cells, position information is obtained from the left/right ratio

  10. The NA48 liquid krypton calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, B

    1997-01-01

    The NA48 collaboration goal is to measure the CP violation parameter Re(ɛl/ɛ) at the level of 2 × 10−4. The neutral Kaon decays will be reconstructed by an electromagnetic liquid Krypton calorimeter with fine granularity and a volume almost totally sensible, to obtain excellent position and energy resolution, as well as time resolution. A description of the detector, results from tests of a prototype and the status of the final calorimeter are reported.

  11. Time resolution of the SND electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new spectrometric channel of the SND electromagnetic calorimeter is described. It has a time resolution of about 1.3 ns at an energy deposition in the calorimeter crystal of 100 MeV and an amplitude resolution of about 250 keV. The new channel is designed, in particular, for the study of the e+e−→ n n-bar process at the VEPP-2000 e+e− collider

  12. Heavy ion studies with CMS HF calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of the very forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS detector at LHC to be applied to specific studies with heavy ion beams is discussed. The simulated responses of the HF calorimeter to nucleus-nucleus collisions are used for the analysis of different problems: reconstruction of the total energy flow in the forward rapidity region, accuracy of determination of the impact parameter of collision, study of fluctuations of the hadronic-to-electromagnetic energy ratio, fast inelastic event selection

  13. Proportional model calorimeters of the TPC facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two wire proportional mode gas calorimeter modules have been tested as prototypes for the Pole Tip calorimeters of the TPC Facility at PEP. The results of the tests at several electron energies (0.25 to 12. GeV) and several pressures (1.0 to 30. atms) are presented, comparisons with a detailed simulation program are made, and results from the Pole Tip modules now operating at PEP are given

  14. Last Few Metres for the Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Nyman, T.

    On Friday 4th November, the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter was moved from its assembly point at the side of the ATLAS cavern to the centre of the toroidal magnet system. The detector was finally aligned, to the precision of within a millimetre, on Wednesday 9th November. The ATLAS installation team, led by Tommi Nyman, after having positioned the Barrel Calorimeter in its final location in the ATLAS experimental cavern UX15. The Barrel Calorimeter which will absorb and measure the energy of photons, electrons and hadrons at the core of the ATLAS detector is 8.6 meters in diameter, 6.8 meters long, and weighs over 1600 Tonnes. It consists of two concentric cylindrical detector elements. The innermost comprises aluminium pressure vessels containing the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and the solenoid magnet. The outermost is an assembly of 64 hadron tile calorimeter sectors. Assembled 18 meters away from its final position, the Barrel Calorimeter was relocated with the help of a railway, which allows ...

  15. ATLAS: last few metresfor the Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On Friday 4th November, the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter was moved from its assembly point at the side of the ATLAS cavern to the centre of the toroidal magnet system. The detector was finally aligned, to the precision of within a millimetre, on Wednesday 9th November. The ATLAS installation team, led by Tommi Nyman, after having positioned the Barrel Calorimeter in its final location in the ATLAS experimental cavern UX15. The Barrel Calorimeter which will absorb and measure the energy of photons, electrons and hadrons at the core of the ATLAS detector is 8.6 meters in diameter, 6.8 meters long, and weighs over 1600 Tonnes. It consists of two concentric cylindrical detector elements. The innermost comprises aluminium pressure vessels containing the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and the solenoid magnet. The outermost is an assembly of 64 hadron tile calorimeter sectors. Assembled 18 meters away from its final position, the Barrel Calorimeter was relocated with the help of a railway, which allows the ...

  16. Structure design and enviromental test of BGO calorimeter for satellite DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yiming; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chen, Dengyi; Chang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, DAMPE, is a new designed satellite developed for the new Innovation 2020 program of Chinese Academy of Sciences. As the most important payload of China's first scientific satellite for detecting dark matter, the primary purposes of BGO calorimeter is to measure the energy of incident high energy electrons and gamma rays (5GeV-10TeV) and to identify hadron and electronics. BGO calorimeter also provides an important background discriminator by measuring the energy deposition due to the particle shower that produced by the e^{±}, γ and imaging their shower development profile. Structure design of BGO calorimeter is described in this paper. The new designed BGO calorimeter consists of 308 BGO crystals coupled with photomultiplier tubes on its two ends. The envelop size of the BGO calorimeter is 907.5mm×907.5mm×494.5mm,and the weight of which is 1051.4Kg. The most important purpose of mechanical design is how to package so heavy crystals into a detector as required arrangement and to make sure reliability and safety. This paper describes the results of vibration tests using the Flight Module of the BGO Calorimeter for the DAMPE satellite. During the vibration tests, no degradation of the mechanical assembly was observed. After random or sinusoidal vibrations, there was no significant changes of the frequency signatures observed during the modal surveys. The comparison of results of cosmic ray tests before and after the vibration shows no change in the performance of the BGO calorimeter.

  17. The spaghetti calorimeter. Research, development, application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheel, C.V.

    1994-12-22

    The Spaghetti Calorimeter (SPACAL) is a detector intended primarily for the energy measurement of high-energy particles, but also provides spatial information and particle identification. It is a sampling calorimeter composed of plastic scintillating fibers, oriented in the direction of the particle, embedded in lead. The scintillation light is read out by photomultipliers, which are coupled to bunches of fibers through light guides, each forming a tower. It was developed as an electromagnetic (e.m.) and compensating hadronic calorimeter for use in future multi-TeV collider experiments. The largest prototype was installed for an alternative application as an hadronic calorimeter in the WA89 experiment, where it is used for the detection of neutrons resulting from {Sigma} decays. The basic concepts behind calorimetry are discussed in detail. Several prototypes were tested in beams of electrons and pions with energies up to 150 GeV. Resonable e.m. energy resolution, at {sigma}/E=12.9%/{radical}E[GeV]+1.23%, was measured. Excellent hadronic energy resolution was found, at 30.6%/{radical}E[GeV]+1.0%, but the calorimeter was found to be slightly undercompensating with e/h=1.15. The position of the shower barycenter for both electrons and pions was easily found according to the relative energy deposits in the calorimeter towers. The calorimeter was also found to be able to provide effective discrimination between electrons and hadrons. The performance of SPACAL in the WA89 experiment at the Omega spectrometer at CERN was studied with the reconstruction of beam {Sigma}{sup -}particles via its decay {Sigma}{sup -}{yields}n{pi}{sup -}. Details of the calibration of SPACAL with electrons and protons are presented. (orig.).

  18. The spaghetti calorimeter. Research, development, application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spaghetti Calorimeter (SPACAL) is a detector intended primarily for the energy measurement of high-energy particles, but also provides spatial information and particle identification. It is a sampling calorimeter composed of plastic scintillating fibers, oriented in the direction of the particle, embedded in lead. The scintillation light is read out by photomultipliers, which are coupled to bunches of fibers through light guides, each forming a tower. It was developed as an electromagnetic (e.m.) and compensating hadronic calorimeter for use in future multi-TeV collider experiments. The largest prototype was installed for an alternative application as an hadronic calorimeter in the WA89 experiment, where it is used for the detection of neutrons resulting from Σ decays. The basic concepts behind calorimetry are discussed in detail. Several prototypes were tested in beams of electrons and pions with energies up to 150 GeV. Resonable e.m. energy resolution, at σ/E=12.9%/√E[GeV]+1.23%, was measured. Excellent hadronic energy resolution was found, at 30.6%/√E[GeV]+1.0%, but the calorimeter was found to be slightly undercompensating with e/h=1.15. The position of the shower barycenter for both electrons and pions was easily found according to the relative energy deposits in the calorimeter towers. The calorimeter was also found to be able to provide effective discrimination between electrons and hadrons. The performance of SPACAL in the WA89 experiment at the Omega spectrometer at CERN was studied with the reconstruction of beam Σ-particles via its decay Σ-→nπ-. Details of the calibration of SPACAL with electrons and protons are presented. (orig.)

  19. Top quark pair production and calorimeter energy resolution studies at a future collider experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, Katja

    This thesis is focused on detector concepts and analyses investigated at a future linear electron positron collider. For precision measurements at such a collider, the CALICE collaboration develops imaging calorimeters, which are characterized by a fine granularity. CALICE has constructed prototypes of several design options for electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and has successfully operated these detectors during combined test beam programs at DESY, CERN and Fermilab. To improve the hadronic energy reconstruction and energy resolution of a hadron calorimeter prototype with analog readout three software compensation techniques are presented in this thesis, of which one is a local and two are global software compensation approaches. One method is based on a neural network to optimize the energy reconstruction, while two are energy weighting techniques, depending on the energy density. Weight factors are extracted from and applied to simulated and test beam data and result in an average energy resolutio...

  20. Visualizing and Understanding Atlas Calorimeters with Atlantis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe tools that have been developed for the visualization and understanding of the hadronic and electromagnetic calorimeters of the Atlas experiment with the event visualization program Atlantis. The event data is extracted into XML format by dedicated algorithms running within the Atlas Software framework Athena, and read into Atlantis directly from physical data files or via a server/client-setup. For the Atlas Calorimeters commissioning, code was developed to create XML-data with detailed calorimeter information, like the electronic pulse shapes, calibration factors and cell identifiers. All this information is displayed in Atlantis through tools developed for this purpose. With these new features, the user has access to the reconstructed and raw data in the same place, and can check for example the consistency of the reconstruction. It allows easy identification of problematic calorimeter cells, e.g. high noise or dead cells, and also allows one to compare digital data from calorimeter and trigger channels, and was used during the Atlas detector commissioning in 2008 and 2009.

  1. LHCb Calorimeter modules arrive at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Two of the three components of the LHCb Calorimeter system have started to arrive from Russia. Members of the LHCb Calorimeter group with the ECAL and HCAL modules that have just arrived at CERN. The first two of the 56 Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) modules and 1200 of the 3300 modules of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have reached CERN from Russia. The third part of the system, the Preshower detector, is still being prepared in Russia. The calorimeter system identifies and triggers on high-energy particles, namely electrons, hadrons and photons by measuring their positions and energies. The HCAL is going to be a pure trigger device. The ECAL will also be used in the triggering, but in addition it will reconstruct neutral pions and photons from B meson decays. One of the major aims of the LHCb experiment is to study CP violation through B meson decays including Bs mesons with high statistics in different decay modes. CP violation (violation of charge and parity) is necessary to explain why the Universe...

  2. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, Pavol; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the calorimeter have been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations o...

  3. A concept for a hadron calorimeter with photodiode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept for a hadron calorimeter will be described. The calorimeter is a scintillator sandwich type with WLS-bars and photodiode readout. Emphasis is put on compactness, high stability, easy fabrication, and safety. (orig.)

  4. ATLAS - End-Cap calorimeter lowered in to the cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    IT-UDS Audiovisual Services

    2006-01-01

    The End-cap calorimeter was lowered into the ATLAS cavern at POINT1. This calorimeter will measure the energy of particles close to the beam axis when protons collide. Cooling is important for maximum detector efficiency.

  5. Detailed GEANT description of the SDC central calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article represents the very detailed simulation model of the SDC central calorimeters and some results which were obtained using that model. The central calorimeters structure was coded on the GEANT 3.15 base in the frame of the SDCSIM environment. The SDCSIM is the general shell for simulation of the SDC set-up. The calorimeters geometry has been coded according to the FNAL and ANL engineering drawings and engineering data file. SDC central calorimeters detailed description is extremely useful for different simulation tasks, for fast simulation program parameters tuning, for different geometry especially studying (local response nonuniformity from bulkheads in the e.m. calorimeter and from coil supports and many others) and for the interpretation of the experimental data from the calorimeters. This simulation model is very useful for tasks of the test beam modules calorimeter calibration and for calorimeter in situ calibration. 3 refs., 8 figs

  6. Hollow micro string based calorimeter device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a micron-scale calorimeter and a calorimetry method utilizing the micron-scale calorimeter. In accordance with the invention, there is provided a micron-scale calorimeter comprising a micro-channel string, being restrained at at least two longitudinally distanced...... positions so as to form a free released double clamped string in-between said two longitudinally distanced positions said micro-channel string comprising a microfluidic channel having a closed cross section and extending in the longitudinal direction of the hollow string, acoustical means adapted to...... oscillate the string at different frequencies by emitting sound waves towards the string, optical means adapted to detect oscillating frequencies of the string, and controlling means controlling the strength and frequency of the sound wave emitted by the acoustical means and receiving a signal from the...

  7. Experimental study of uranium plastic scintillator calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a preparation for the ZEUS high resolution calorimeter, sampling calorimeters made from 3.2 mm plates of depleted uranium read out by plastic scintillator of 3 mm and 5 mm thickness have been built. The response of hadrons, electrons and muons has been measured in the energy range between 3 and 100 GeV. In agreement with predictions, the relative response of electrons and hadrons as well as the hadronic energy resolution depend strongly on the thickness of the plastic scintillator. For 3.2 mm depleted uranium and 3 mm thick scintillator we observe over the full energy range equal response for electrons and hadrons; a hadronic energy resolution of 34.5%/√(E[GeV]) is obtained. Results are given for the spatial resolution for electrons and hadrons. Finally, results from a lead scintillator calorimeter built as a prestudy before uranium plates were available are reported. (orig.)

  8. Results from ATLAS Calorimeter Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrade, F

    2007-01-01

    Beam tests of combinations of ATLAS calorimeters have been performed both for the barrel and end cap parts. During a combined test beam in summer 2004 a slice of the ATLAS barrel detector - including all detector sub systems from the inner tracker, the calorimetry to the muon system - was exposed to particle beams (electrons, pions, photons, muons) with different energies (1GeV to 350GeV). The aim was to study the combined performance of the different detector sub systems in ATLAS-like conditions. We will present the electronics calibration scheme of the electromagnetic calorimeter and its implementation. The following studies on the combined testbeam data have been performed and will be presented: performance of the electromagnetic calorimetry down to very low energies (> GeV), photon reconstruction including converted photons and position measurements using the very precise ATLAS tracker and the electromagnetic calorimeter. These measurements have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations showing the good de...

  9. Reactor Gamma Heat Measurements with Calorimeters and Thermoluminescence Dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Karsten; Majborn, Benny

    1973-01-01

    Intercomparison measurements of reactor γ-ray heating were carried out with calorimeters and thermoluminescence dosimeters. Within the measurement uncertainties the two methods yield coincident results. In the actual measurement range thermoluminescence dosimeters are less accurate than calorimet...... calorimeters, but possess advantages such as a small probe size and the possibility of making simultaneous measurements at many different positions. Hence, thermoluminescence dosimeters may constitute a valuable supplement to calorimeters for reactor γ-ray heating measurements....

  10. STATUS OF THE ATLAS LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER AND ITS PERFORMANCE

    CERN Document Server

    Berillari, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The liquid argon (LAr) calorimeters are used in ATLAS for all electromagnetic and for hadron calorimetry. The LAr calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two endcaps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The latest status of the detector as well as problems and solutions addressed during the last years will be presented. Aspects of operation of a large detector over a long time period will be summarized and selected topics showing the performance of the detector will be shown.

  11. Construction of a forward electro-magnetic calorimeter SCISSORS III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new electro-magnetic calorimeter complex FOREST with a solid angle of about 4π in total is under construction. It consists of three calorimeters: a forward one with CsI crystals, a middle one with lead scintillating fiber modules, and a backward one with lead glass Cerenkov counters. Recently, the forward calorimeter SCISSORS III takes shape. (author)

  12. Silicon pad detectors for ALICE forward calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newly designed Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) is being proposed as a possible upgrade in the Forward rapidity region, to enhance the physics capabilities of the ALICE experiment at CERN. Each LHC experiment uses a unique approach, in which preference of the designers and the physics requirements has played a decisive role. The requirement of the design of the calorimeter is to have highly granular layers of detectors consisting of 1 mm2 as well as 1 cm2 silicon pad detectors. The high granular layers (1 mm2) yield good position resolution and tracking of incoming particles. Other active layers, composed of pads of 1 cm2 are used for energy measurement

  13. CMS Forward Calorimeters Phase II Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phase II Upgrade of the CMS forward calorimeters (electromagnetic and hadronic) originates from the fact that these calorimeters will not be sufficiently performant with the expected HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) conditions. The major challenge is to preserve/improve the high performance of the current forward detectors with new devices that can withstand the unprecedented radiation levels and disentangle the very large event pileup. Here, we present an overview of the various upgrade options being considered by CMS, explaining the detector concepts and current/future beam test activities

  14. HARP: high pressure argon readout for calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel tubes of approximately 8 mm O.D., filled with Argon gas to approx.200 bar, are considered as the active element for a charge collecting sampling calorimeter readout system. The tubes are permanently sealed and operated in the ion chamber mode, with the charge collection on a one-millimeter concentric anode. We present the motivation for such a device, including Monte Carlo predictions of performance. The method of construction and signal collection are discussed, with initial results on leakage and ageing of the filling gas. A prototype electromagnetic calorimeter is described

  15. Rad Hard Active Media For Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Norbeck, E; Möller, A; Onel, Y

    2006-01-01

    Zero-degree calorimeters have limited space and extreme levels of radiation. A simple, low cost, radiation hard design uses tungstenmetal as the absorber and a suitable liquid as the ˇCerenkov radiator. In other applications a PPAC (Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter) operatingwith a suitable atmosphericpressure gas is an attractive active material for a calorimeter. It can be made radiation hard and has sufficient gain in the gas that no electronic components are needed near the detector. It works well even with the highest concentration of shower particles. For this pressure range, R134A (used in auto air conditioners) has many desirable features.

  16. Comparison between calorimeter and HLNC errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes an error analysis that compares systematic and random errors of total plutonium mass estimated for high-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNC) and calorimeter measurements. This task was part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) study on the comparison of the two instruments to determine if HLNC measurement errors met IAEA standards and if the calorimeter gave ''significantly'' better precision. Our analysis was based on propagation of error models that contained all known sources of errors including uncertainties associated with plutonium isotopic measurements. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  17. Understanding the performance of CMS calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seema Sharma; on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The performance of the CMS hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam facilities at CERN. Two wedges of brass-scintillator calorimeter are exposed to negative and positive beams with momenta between 3 and 300 GeV/c. Light produced in the scintillators are collected using wavelength shifting fibres and read out using hybrid photo-diodes. Each of the wedges has 17 layers of scintillators. In one of these wedges signal from all 17 layers are grouped together while in the other each layer is read out separately. The response, energy resolution, longitudinal and lateral shower profiles are measured.

  18. Study of a novel electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter TGT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept and the basic design of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter are described. This novel calorimeter offers uniform energy response and constant energy resolution independent of the production angle of an impinging particle and of its impact position at the calorimeter. An example of a calorimeter with full rapidity coverage in an application in a collider detector is given. An important aspect of the concept is the electronics for fast signal processing matched to the short charge collection time. We report on the experience with the realization of a prototype calorimeter module and on its performance in a test beam exposure. 15 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  19. ATLAS: First rehearsal for the tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The dry run assembly of the first barrel of the ATLAS tile hadron calorimeter has been successfully completed. It is now being dismantled again so that it can be lowered into the ATLAS cavern where it will be reassembled in October 2004.

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation of HERD Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, M; Dong, Y W; Lu, J G; Quan, Z; Wang, L; Wang, Z G; Wu, B B; Zhang, S N

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. It is designed as a next generation space facility focused on indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. The calorimeter plays an essential role in the main scientific objectives of HERD. A 3-D cubic calorimeter filled with high granularity crystals as active material is a very promising choice for the calorimeter. HERD is mainly composed of a 3-D calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by silicon trackers (TK) from all five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of 9261 cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. Here the simulation results of the performance of CALO with GEANT4 and FLUKA are presented: 1) the total absorption CALO and its absorption depth for precise energy measure...

  1. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter HL-LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS detector at the LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter consisting of alternating thin steel plates and scintillating tiles.Wavelength shifting fibers coupled to the tiles collect the produced light and are read out by photomultiplier tubes.An analog sum of the processed signal of several photomultipliers serves as input to the first level of trigger.Photomultiplier signals are then digitized and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first trigger acceptance has been confirmed. TileCal will undergo a major replacement of its on- and off-detector electronics for the high luminosity program of the LHC in 2024. All signals are digitized and then transferred directly to the off-detector electronics, where the signals are reconstructed, stored, and sent to the first level of trigger at a rate of 40 MHz. This will provide better precision of the calorimeter signals used by the trigger system and...

  2. PEP-4 geiger-mode hexagonal calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance of the calorimeter are briefly described. Design aspects include illustrations of the active volume of the detector, edge connections, module assembly and analog electronics. Performance data for cosmic rays and radiation sources, including efficiency and channel sensitivity are discussed

  3. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape!

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The last of the 64 modules for one of the ATLAS Hadron tile calorimeter barrels has just arrived at CERN. This arrival puts an end to two and a half years work assembling and testing all the modules in the Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), in Barcelona.

  4. Performance test of a TMS calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance tests of a first calorimeter module using the room temperature liquid tetramethylsilane (TMS) as active element are described. Normal carbon steel has been used as absorber. The charge yield is 70% of that in a very pure sample of the liquid. A long term stability of the signal with a lifetime of half a year has been realized. (orig.)

  5. The new ATLAS Fast Calorimeter Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Flavia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A very large number of simulated events is required for physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Producing these with the full GEANT4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. As a very detailed detector simulation is not always required, fast simulation tools have been developed to reduce the calorimeter simulation time by a few orders of magnitude. The fast simulation of ATLAS for the calorimeter systems used in Run 1, called Fast Calorimeter Simulation (FastCaloSim), provides a parameterized simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level. It is then interfaced to the ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software. In Run 1, about 13 billion events were simulated in ATLAS, out of which 50% were produced using fast simulation. For Run 2, a new parameterisation is being developed to improve the original version: It incorporates developments in geometry and physics lists of the last five years and benefits from knowledge acquire...

  6. Upgrading the ATLAS Fast Calorimeter Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hubacek, Zdenek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Many physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider require very large samples of simulated events, and producing these using the full GEANT4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. Often, a very detailed detector simulation is not needed, and in these cases fast simulation tools can be used to reduce the calorimeter simulation time by a few orders of magnitude. In ATLAS, a fast simulation of the calorimeter systems was developed, called Fast Calorimeter Simulation (FastCaloSim). It provides a parametrized simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level. It is interfaced to the standard ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software, and can be tuned to data more easily than with GEANT4. The original version of FastCaloSim has been very important in the LHC Run-1, with several billion events simulated. An improved parametrisation is being developed, to eventually address shortcomings of the original version. It incorporates developme...

  7. Performance of the GEM electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GEM EM calorimeter is optimized for the best energy, position, angular resolution and jet rejection. The detailed simulation results are presented. In the barrel with LKr, an energy resolution of about 6%/√ direct-sum 0.4%, pointing resolution of 40mrad/√E + 0.5mrad, and jet rejection of a factor of 5 are expected

  8. Calibration of the ZEUS forward calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics at the ep-collider HERA requires high resolution calorimetry calibrated with an accuracy of better than 2%. The ZEUS detector meets these conditions by means of a compensating uranium scintillator sandwich calorimeter with an energy resolution of σ/E = 35%/√E + σcal, where σcal is the calibration error. One of the tools to minimize σcal is the calibration with the signals of the radioactivity of the Uranium plates (UNO). Taking UNO data every 8 hours keeps the calibration stable within ≅ 1%. The muon calibration is done employing an algorithm, that determines the most probable energy loss with a precision of ≅ 1%. The channel-to-channel fluctuations of the ratio μ/UNO for a forward calorimeter (FCAL) prototype show a spread of 5.2% for the electromagnetic calorimeter and ≅ 2.5% for the hadronic sections. Improvements in the construction of the FCAL modules decreased these fluctuations to 2.0% and ≅ 1.8% respectively. The influence of the cracks between the calorimeter modules amounts to ≅ 1.7% on average for the ZEUS geometry, if a 2 mm thick Pb-sheet is introduced between the modules. We conclude that we are able to keep σcal below 2%. (orig.)

  9. Tungsen electromagnetic calorimeter of spaghetti type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy and spatial characteristics of the electromagnetic spaghetti-calorimeter based on the tungsten punched modules and scintillating fibers are studied. The resolution dependence on the angle between the detected particle and the fibers has experimentally been obtained. The Monte-Carlo calculated values are in a good agreement with the results obtained. 9 refs.; 4 figs

  10. Calorimeters in Astro and Particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Pretzl, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    In this article an attempt is made to review some of the original works leading to new developments of calorimeters which are so widely and successfully used in astro and particle physics experiments. This report is far from being complete and the author apologizes for omissions and misquotations.

  11. Photodetectors in calorimeters for the linear collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvach, Jaroslav

    Rijeka : InTech, 2012 - (Gateva, S.), s. 441-460 ISBN 978-953-51-0358-5. - ( Electrical and Electronic Engineering ) R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA09042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : photodetectors * calorimeters * international linear collider Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics http://www.intechopen.com/ books /photodetectors

  12. Steel specification for the Atlas calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarino, V.

    1998-02-10

    As part of a collaborative experimental High Energy Physics experiment at the LHC Facility, CERN Laboratory, Geneva Switzerland, a group of US institutions has accepted the responsibility for constructing a large portion of the calorimeter for this experiment. This device is referred to as the Tile Calorimeter. The Tile Calorimeter has three major elements, a large center section (Barrel), and two end sections (Extended Barrel). The US group will be responsible for the construction of one of these extended barrel sections. All of the components that are required to construct this device will be fabricated in the US over a period of three years commencing in 1998. Another similar element and the barrel element will be constructed in both eastern and western Europe by parallel groups. The extended barrel is a cylindrical device approximately 8.5 meters (28 ft.) OD x 4.5 meters (14 ft.) ID, made up of 64 wedges. Each of these wedges (see Attachment 1) is constructed by bolting submodules to a strongback girder. Each submodule is constructed of a series of sheets that are welded and glued together. This document summarizes the characteristics and specifications of these steel sheets. The Tile Calorimeter is the return path for the magnet flux of the ATLAS internal superconducting 2T solenoid, therefore its steel magnetic properties are important.

  13. Theory and Development of Position-Sensitive Quantum Calorimeters. Degree awarded by Stanford Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We have devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (POST). A POST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESS) on the ends of a long absorber capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information from the two TESS, the position of the event in the POST is determined. The energy of the event is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We have developed a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a POST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel POST with 6 keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3 eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel POSTS using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV energy resolution at 1.5 keV, 7-pixel POST calorimeter.

  14. New calorimeters for space experiments: physics requirements and technological challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct measurements of charged cosmic radiation with instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), or flying on balloons above the atmosphere, require the identification of the incident particle, the measurement of its energy and possibly the determination of its sign-of-charge. The latter information can be provided by a magnetic spectrometer together with a measurement of momentum. However, magnetic deflection in space experiments is at present limited to values of the Maximum Detectable Rigidity (MDR) hardly exceeding a few TV. Advanced calorimetric techniques are, at present, the only way to measure charged and neutral radiation at higher energies in the multi-TeV range. Despite their mass limitation, calorimeters may achieve a large geometric factor and provide an adequate proton background rejection factor, taking advantage of a fine granularity and imaging capabilities. In this lecture, after a brief introduction on electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, an innovative approach to the design of a space-borne, large acceptance, homogeneous calorimeter for the detection of high energy cosmic rays will be described

  15. π0 Reconstruction using the Muon Piston Calorimeter Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Dhruv; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Muon-Piston Calorimeter Extension (MPC-EX) is a new detector in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that was installed for the recent Run 15 of the experiment. In polarized p+p and polarized p+A collisions, an important measurement is the yield and momentum distribution of direct photons. Unaffected by the strong force, direct photons traverse the dense medium in the collision zone mostly unchanged, thereby providing information about the initial stages of the collision. However, there is a huge background of photons from other sources, primarily π0 which decay into two photons. The opening angle between the decay photons becomes smaller with higher energies of the original π0. For energies greater than ~20 GeV, the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) cannot distinguish the two decay photons from a single photon, as their showers merge. The MPC-EX, an 8-layer tungsten and silicon sensor sandwich in front of the MPC, can measure and image the shower development, and help distinguish between direct photons and π0 decay photons up to higher energies than the MPC alone. We will describe the MPC-EX detector and its readout, and present the calibration procedures applied to the data in order to obtain the π0 spectrum. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  16. New calorimeters for space experiments: physics requirements and technological challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone

    2015-07-01

    Direct measurements of charged cosmic radiation with instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), or flying on balloons above the atmosphere, require the identification of the incident particle, the measurement of its energy and possibly the determination of its sign-of-charge. The latter information can be provided by a magnetic spectrometer together with a measurement of momentum. However, magnetic deflection in space experiments is at present limited to values of the Maximum Detectable Rigidity (MDR) hardly exceeding a few TV. Advanced calorimetric techniques are, at present, the only way to measure charged and neutral radiation at higher energies in the multi-TeV range. Despite their mass limitation, calorimeters may achieve a large geometric factor and provide an adequate proton background rejection factor, taking advantage of a fine granularity and imaging capabilities. In this lecture, after a brief introduction on electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, an innovative approach to the design of a space-borne, large acceptance, homogeneous calorimeter for the detection of high energy cosmic rays will be described.

  17. Performance of the AMS-02 Electromagnetic Calorimeter in Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMS-02(Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) is an high energy particle detector developed to operate on the International Space Station. AMS-02 was installed on ISS on May 2011 and is expected to operate for 10-20 years collecting about 160-320 billions of events. The main goals of the experiment are the detection of primordial antimatter and dark matter by studying spectra and flux of different cosmic ray components (protons, electrons, nuclei, positrons, antiprotons, gamma rays, etc) in the high energy range (1-2000 GeV). Identification of electrons, positrons and photons is provided by the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL), a fine grained lead-scintillating fibers sampling calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the longitudinal and lateral shower development. It provides an excellent reconstruction of electromagnetic shower energy and a highly efficient rejection of the hadronic background. Thanks to the 3D shower reconstruction capability, ECAL allows a stand-alone determination of the incoming particle direction, with unprecedented angular resolution. As a result, ECAL is able to identify high energy photons coming from galactic or extragalactic sources

  18. CsI calorimeter with 3-D position resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Schopper, Herwig Franz; Shaw, H; Nefzger, C; Zoglauer, A; Schönfelder, V; Kanbach, G

    2000-01-01

    New gamma-ray calorimeter have been developed for the MEGA Compton camera. They consist of arrays of small CsI(Tl) scintillator bars read out by Silicon PIN-diodes and low noise, self-triggering frontend electronics. The length of the bars (the thickness of the calorimeter) can be varied for different applications to fit the stopping power needed and the light loss tolerable. In this paper we present calibration results from 2 cm long bars with diodes on one side, and 8 cm long bars with diodes on two opposite sides. Double-sided readout gives 3-D information of interactions which will be used to overcome the limited position resolution in Anger-cameras at high energies. Simpler detection devices like Anger-cameras might finally resolve only the centre of gravity. As events from gamma-rays with energies of MeV do extend over several cm, it is a prerequisite for an imaging device to resolve the interaction structure in detail. Combining CsI(Tl) scintillators, Silicon PIN-photodiodes and frontend electronics in...

  19. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksa, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps. The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read...

  20. The pipelined readout for the ZEUS calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron-proton storage ring complex HERA under construction at DESY in Hamburg is the first machine of a new generation of colliders. Since physics to be studied at HERA (covered in chapter 2) base on the precise measurement of kinematic variables over a very large range of energies, a foremost emphasis is set in calorimetry. After long studies and an ambitious test program, the ZEUS collaboration has built a high resolution depleted uranium-scintillator calorimeter with photomultiplier readout, the state of the art in detectors of this type. In chapter 3 the principles of calorimetry are reviewed and the construction of the ZEUS calorimeter is described. Mainly due to the large dynamic range and the short bunch crossing times a novel concept for the readout in an analog pipelined fashion had to be designed. This concept is explained in chapter 4. The solid state implementation of the pipeline required two integrated circuits which were developed specially for the ZEUS calorimeter in collaboration with an electronics research institute and produced by industry. The design and construction of these devices and the detailed testing which has been performed for properties critical in the readout is covered in chapters 5 and 6. The whole pipelined readout is a complicated setup with many steps and collaborating systems. Its implementation and the information to operate it are covered in chapter 7. Finally the concepts presented and the applications discussed have been installed and tested on a test beam calibration experiment. There, the modules of the calorimeter have been calibrated. Chapter 8 presents results from these measurements which show excellent performance of the electronics as well as optimal properties of the calorimeter modules. (orig./HSI)

  1. Low-energetic hadron interactions in a highly granular calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CALICE collaboration develops imaging calorimeters for precision measurements at a future electron-positron linear collider. These calorimeters feature a fine granularity in both longitudinal and transverse direction, which is needed to fulfill the shower separation requirement of Particle Flow reconstruction algorithms. CALICE has constructed prototypes for several design options for electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters and has successfully operated these detectors during combined test-beam programs at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The focus of this dissertation is on the prototype for a hadron calorimeter with analog readout (AHCAL), which is a 1m3 scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter with 38 sensitive layers and a depth of 5.3 nuclear interaction lengths. Each scintillator layer is pieced together from separate tiles with embedded silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for measuring the scintillation light. With a total of 7608 readout channels, the AHCAL prototype represents the first large-scale application of SiPMs. This thesis covers the commissioning and operation of the AHCAL and other detectors for several months at the Fermilab Test-beam Facility in 2008 and 2009 and the analysis of electron and pion data collected during these measurements. The analysis covers energies from 1 GeV to 30 GeV and is the first analysis of AHCAL data at energies below 8 GeV. Because the purity of the recorded data is not sufficient for analysis, event selection procedures for electrons and pions at these energies and a method to estimate the purities of these data samples are developed. The calibration of detectors employing SiPMs requires parameters that change with operating voltage and temperature. The correction of these parameters for the effects of temperature variations during data collection and their portability to different operating conditions are evaluated using the AHCAL as an example. This is important for the use of this technology in a collider

  2. Low-energetic hadron interactions in a highly granular calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feege, Nils

    2011-12-15

    The CALICE collaboration develops imaging calorimeters for precision measurements at a future electron-positron linear collider. These calorimeters feature a fine granularity in both longitudinal and transverse direction, which is needed to fulfill the shower separation requirement of Particle Flow reconstruction algorithms. CALICE has constructed prototypes for several design options for electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters and has successfully operated these detectors during combined test-beam programs at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The focus of this dissertation is on the prototype for a hadron calorimeter with analog readout (AHCAL), which is a 1m{sup 3} scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter with 38 sensitive layers and a depth of 5.3 nuclear interaction lengths. Each scintillator layer is pieced together from separate tiles with embedded silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for measuring the scintillation light. With a total of 7608 readout channels, the AHCAL prototype represents the first large-scale application of SiPMs. This thesis covers the commissioning and operation of the AHCAL and other detectors for several months at the Fermilab Test-beam Facility in 2008 and 2009 and the analysis of electron and pion data collected during these measurements. The analysis covers energies from 1 GeV to 30 GeV and is the first analysis of AHCAL data at energies below 8 GeV. Because the purity of the recorded data is not sufficient for analysis, event selection procedures for electrons and pions at these energies and a method to estimate the purities of these data samples are developed. The calibration of detectors employing SiPMs requires parameters that change with operating voltage and temperature. The correction of these parameters for the effects of temperature variations during data collection and their portability to different operating conditions are evaluated using the AHCAL as an example. This is important for the use of this technology in a

  3. The dry heat exchanger calorimeter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiometric isothermal heat flow calorimeter and preconditioner system that uses air instead of water as the heat exchange medium has been developed at Mound. The dry heat exchanger calorimeter is 42 inches high by 18 inches in diameter and the preconditioner is a 22 inch cube, making it extremely compact compared to existing units. The new system is ideally suited for transportable, stand-alone, or glovebox applications. Preliminary tests of the system have produced sample measurements with standard deviations less than 0.25% and sample errors less than 0.50%. These tests have shown that the dry heat exchanger system will yield acceptance data with an accuracy comparable to those of Mound water bath systems now in use. 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Muon Detection Based on a Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ciodaro, T; Abreu, R; Achenbach, R; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Aielli, G; Al-Shabibi, A; Aleksandrov, I; Alexandrov, E; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Amorim, A; Amram, N; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Angelaszek, D; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, S; Anulli, F; Apolle, R; Aracena, I; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Avolio, G; Baak, M; Backes, M; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Baines, J; Ballestrero, S; Banerjee, S; Bansil, H S; Barnett, B M; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, V; Batraneanu, S; Battaglia, A; Bauss, B; Beauchemin, P; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behera, P K; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellagamba, L; Bellomo, M; Ben Ami, S; Bendel, M; Benhammou, Y; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bianco, M; Biglietti, M; Blair, R E; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Bondioli, M; Borer, C; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A G; Brawn, I P; Brelier, B; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Brock, R; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bucci, F; Buda, S; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buscher, V; Buttinger, W; Calvet, S; Camarri, P; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Capasso, L; Caprini, M; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cattani, G; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapleau, B; Childers, J T; Chiodini, G; Christidi, I; Ciapetti, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Coccaro, A; Cogan, J; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Conidi, C; Conventi, F; Corradi, M; Corso-Radu, A; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Crescioli, F; Crone, G; Crupi, R; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cummings, J T; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Dao, V; Darlea, G L; Davis, A O; De Asmundis, R; De Pedis, D; De Santo, A; de Seixas, J M; Degenhardt, J; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Diaz, M A; Dietzsch, T A; Dionisi, C; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Drake, G; Dufour, M-A; Dumitru, I; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, K V; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Ernst, J; Etzion, E; Falciano, S; Farrington, S; Farthouat, P; Faulkner , P J W; Fedorko, W; Fellmann, D; Feng, E; Ferrag, S; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fiorini, L; Fischer, G; Flowerdew, M J; Fonseca Martin, T; Francis, D; Fratina, S; French, S T; Front, D; Fukunaga, C; Gadomski, S; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gee, C N P; George, S; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gillman, A R; Giorgi, M; Giunta, M; Giusti, P; Goebel, M; Gonçalo, R; Gonzalez Silva, L; Göringer, C; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Grabowska-Bold, I; Green, B; Groll, M; Guida, A; Guler, H; Haas, S; Hadavand, H; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hauser, R; Hayakawa, T; Hayden, D; Head, S; Heim, S; Hellman, S; Henke, M; Hershenhorn, A; Hidvégi, A; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hirayama, S; Hod, N; Hoffmann, D; Hong, T M; Hryn'ova, T; Huston, J; Iacobucci, G; Igonkina, O; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Izzo, V; Jez, P; Jimenez Otero, S; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Jones, G; Joos, M; Kadlecik, P; Kajomovitz, E; Kanaya, N; Kanega, F; Kanno, T; Kapliy, A; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Kessoku, K; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kirk, J; Klemetti, M; Klofver, P; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Kobayashi, T; Koeneke, K; Koletsou, I; Koll, J D; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Kowalewski, R V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J; Kreisel, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kunkle, J; Kurashige, H; Kuze, M; Kwee, R; Laforge, B; Landon, M; Lane, J; Lankford, A J; Laranjeira Lima, S M; Larner, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Li, S; Liberti, B; Lilley, J N; Linnemann, J T; Lipeles, E; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Lowe, A; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lundberg, J; Lupu, N; Machado Miguéns, J; Mackeprang, R; Maettig, S; Magnoni, L; Maiani, C; Maltrana, D; Mangeard, P-S; Männer, R; Mapelli, L; Marchese, F; Marino, C; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Martin, T; Martyniuk, A; Marzano, F; Masik, J; Mastrandrea, P; Matsushita, T; McCarn, A; Mechnich, J; Medinnis, M; Meier, K; Melachrinos, C; Mendoza Nava, L M; Merola, L; Messina, A; Meyer, C P; Middleton, R P; Mikenberg, G; Mills, C M; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Moa, T; Moenig, K; Monk, J; Monticelli, F; Mora Herrera, C; Morettini, P; Morris, J D; Müller, F; Munwes, Y; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nelson, S; Nemethy, P; Neubauer, M S; Neusiedl, A; Newman, P; Nisati, A; Nomoto, H; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Nurse, E; Ochando, C; Ochi, A; Oda, S; Oh, A; Ohm, C; Okumura, Y; Olivito, D; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Oshita, H; Ospanov, R; Owen, M A; Özcan, V E; Ozone, K; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Paramonov, A; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Petcu, M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petrolo, E; Phan, A; Piegaia, R; Pilkington, A; Pinder, A; Poddar, S; Polini, A; Pope, B G; Potter, C T; Primavera, M; Prokoshin, F; Ptacek, E; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Ramos Dos Santos Neves, R; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S H; Robinson, M; Rodriguez, D; Roich, A; Romeo, G; Romero, R; Roos, L; Ruiz Martinez, A; Ryabov, Y; Ryan, P; Saavedra, A; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saland, J; Salnikov, A; Salvatore, F; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santonico, R; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sasaki, O; Savu, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schäfer, U; Scharf, V L; Scheirich, D; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, K; Schroder, C; Schroer, N; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekhniaidze, G; Sfyrla, A; Shamim, M; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shooltz, D; Sidoti, A; Silbert, O; Silverstein, S; Sinev, N; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sjoen, R; Sjölin, J; Slagle, K; Sloper, J E; Smith, B C; Soffer, A; Soloviev, I; Spagnolo, S; Spiwoks, R; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strauss, E A; Strom, D; Su, D; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Taffard, A; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tanaka, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Taylor, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Thomson, M A; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomoto, M; Topfel, C; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Traynor, D; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Tripiana, M; Triplett, N; True, P; Tsiakiris, M; Tsuno, S; Tuggle, J; Ünel, G; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vallecorsa, S; Valsan, L; Vandelli, W; Vari, R; Vaz Gil Lopes, L; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J C; Volpi, G; Vorwerk, V; Wagner, P; Wang, M; Warburton, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; White, M; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Winklmeier, F; Woods, K S; Wu, S-L; Wu, X; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Xella, S; Yakovlev, A; Yamazaki, Y; Yang, U; Yasu, Y; Yuan, L; Zaitsev, A; Zanello, L; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; zur Nedden, M

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. The information from TileCal's last segmentation layer can assist in muon tagging and it is being considered for a near future upgrade of the level-one trigger, mainly for rejecting triggers due to cavern background at the barrel region. A muon receiver for the TileCal muon signals is being designed in order to interface with the ATLAS level-one trigger. This paper addresses the preliminary studies concerning the muon discrimination capability for the muon receiver. Monte Carlo simulations for single muons from the interaction point were used to study the effectiveness of hadronic calorimeter information on muon detection.

  5. LYSO crystal calorimeter readout with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berra, A.; Bonvicini, V.; Cecchi, C.; Germani, S.; Guffanti, D.; Lietti, D.; Lubrano, P.; Manoni, E.; Prest, M.; Rossi, A.; Vallazza, E.

    2014-11-01

    Large area Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) are the new frontier of the development of readout systems for scintillating detectors. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micropixels operating in limited Geiger-Muller avalanche mode, and thus working as independent photon counters with a very high gain (~106). This contribution presents the performance in terms of linearity and energy resolution of an electromagnetic homogeneous calorimeter composed of 9 ~ 18X0 LYSO crystals. The crystals were readout by 36 4×4 mm2 SiPMs (4 for each crystal) produced by FBK-irst. This calorimeter was tested at the Beam Test Facility at the INFN laboratories in Frascati with a single- and multi-particle electron beam in the 100-500 MeV energy range.

  6. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrió Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase 2 Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2022. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in the middle of 2014 during the first Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The Main Board will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the Daughter Board will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the super Read-Out Driver (sROD will perform processing tasks on them and will be the interface to the trigger levels 0, 1 and 2.

  7. Work on a ATLAS tile calorimeter Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is designed as one barrel and two extended barrel hadron parts. The calorimeter consists of a cylindrical structure with inner and outer radius of 2280 and 4230 mm respectively. The barrel part is 5640 mm in length along the beam axis, while each of the extended barrel cylinders is 2910 mm long. Each detector cylinder is built of 64 independent wedges along the azimuthal direction. Between the barrel and the extended barrels there is a gap of about 600 mm, which is needed for the Inner Detector and the Liquid Argon cables, electronics and services. The barrel covers the region -1.0

  8. Instrumented module of the ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    The ATLAS tile calorimeter consists of steel absorber plates interspersed with plastic scintillator tiles. Interactions of high-energy hadrons in the plates transform the incident energy into a 'hadronic shower'. When shower particles traverse the scintillating tiles, the latter emit an amount of light proportional to the incident energy. This light is transmitted along readout fibres to a photomultiplier, where a detectable electrical signal is produced. These pictures show one of 64 modules or 'wedges' of the barrel part of the tile calorimeter, which are arranged to form a cylinder around the beam axis. The wedge has been instrumented with scintillators and readout fibres. Photos 03, 06: Checking the routing of the readout fibres into the girder that houses the photomultipliers. Photo 04: A view of the fibre bundles inside the girder.

  9. ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter back end electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bán, J; Bellachia, F; Blondel, A; Böttcher, S; Clark, A; Colas, Jacques; Díaz-Gómez, M; Dinkespiler, B; Efthymiopoulos, I; Escalier, M; Fayard, Lo; Gara, A; He, Y; Henry-Coüannier, F; Hubaut, F; Ionescu, G; Karev, A; Kurchaninov, L; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; La Marra, D; Laplace, S; Le Dortz, O; Léger, A; Liu, T; Martin, D; Matricon, P; Moneta, L; Monnier, E; Oberlack, H; Parsons, J A; Pernecker, S; Perrot, G; Poggioli, L; Prast, J; Przysiezniak, H; Repetti, B; Rosselet, L; Riu, I; Schwemling, P; Simion, S; Sippach, W; Strässner, A; Stroynowski, R; Tisserant, S; Unal, G; Wilkens, H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Xiang, A; Yang, J; Ye, J

    2007-01-01

    The Liquid Argon calorimeters play a central role in the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) experiment. The environment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) imposes strong constraints on the detectors readout systems. In order to achieve very high precision measurements, the detector signals are processed at various stages before reaching the Data Acquisition system (DAQ). Signals from the calorimeter cells are received by on-detector Front End Boards (FEB), which sample the incoming pulse every 25ns and digitize it at a trigger rate of up to 75~kHz. Off-detector Read Out Driver (ROD) boards further process the data and send reconstructed quantities to the DAQ while also monitoring the data quality. In this paper, the ATLAS Liquid Argon electronics chain is described first, followed by a detailed description of the off-detector readout system. Finally, the tests performed on the system are summarized.

  10. LHCb: Upgrade of the LHCb calorimeter electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauricio Ferre, J

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration foresees a major upgrade of the detector for the high luminosity run that should take place after 2018. Apart from the increase of the instantaneous luminosity at the interaction point of the experiment, one of the major ingredients of this upgrade is a full readout at 40MHz of the sub-detectors and the acquisition of the data by a large farm of PC. The trigger will be done by this farm and should increase the overall trigger efficiency with respect to the current detector, especially in hadronic B meson decays. A general overview of the modifications foreseen to the calorimeter system and the integration of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters in this new scheme will be described.

  11. The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Hong Ma; Isabelle Wingerter

    The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop took place at LAPP-Annecy from the 1st to the 3rd of October; 45 people attended the workshop. A detailed program was setup before the workshop. The agenda was organised around very focused presentations where questions were raised to allow arguments to be exchanged and answers to be proposed. The main topics were: Electronics calibration Handling of problematic channels Cluster level corrections for electrons and photons Absolute energy scale Streams for calibration samples Calibration constants processing Learning from commissioning Forty-five people attended the workshop. The workshop was on the whole lively and fruitful. Based on years of experience with test beam analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, and the recent operation of the detector in the commissioning, the methods to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter are well known. Some of the procedures are being exercised in the commisssioning, which have demonstrated the c...

  12. The dry heat exchanger calorimeter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a radiometric isothermal heat flow calorimeter and preconditioner system that uses air instead of water as the heat exchange medium which has been developed for use with nuclear material. The dry heat exchanger calorimeter is 42 in. high by 18 in. in diameter and the preconditioner is a 22 in. cube, making it extremely compact compared to existing units. The new system is ideally suited for transportable, stand-alone, or glovebox applications. Preliminary tests of the system have produced sample measurements with standard deviations less than 0.25% and sample errors less than 0.50%. These tests have shown that the dry heat exchanger system will yield acceptable data with an accuracy comparable to those of Mound water bath systems now in use

  13. Calorimeter measurements of low wattage items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transition of DOE facilities from production to decontamination and decommissioning has led to more measurements of waste, scrap, and other less attractive materials. The difficulty that these materials pose for segmented gamma scanning and neutron counting has increased the use of calorimetric assay for very low wattage items (238Pu oxide ranging in wattage from 25 to 500 milliwatts in the calorimeters at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility and report the error and the precision of the measurements

  14. The ZEUS second level calorimeter trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZEUS is a detector for the HERA ep collider, consisting of several large components. The most important being the inner tracking detectors, which are positioned nearest to the interaction point, the calorimeter surrounding the inner tracking detectors and the muon detectors on the outside of the experimental setup. Each component will deliver a vast amount of information. In order to keep this information manageable, data is preprocessed and condensed per component and then combined to obtain the final global trigger result. The main subject of this thesis is the second level calorimeter trigger processor of the ZEUS detector. In order to be able to reject the unwanted events passing the first level, the topological event signature will have to be used at the second level. The most demanding task of the second level is the recognition of local energy depositions corresponding to isolated electrons and hadron jets. Also part of the work performed by the first level will be repeated with a higher level of accuracy. Additional information not available to the first level trigger will be processed and will be made available to the global second level trigger decision module. For the second level calorimeter trigger processor a special VME module, containing two transputers, has been developed. The second level calorimeter trigger algorithm described in this thesis was tested with simulated events, that were tracked through a computer simulation of the ZEUS detector. A part of this thesis is therefore devoted to the description of the various Monte Carlo models and the justification of the way in which they were used. (author). 132 refs.; 76 figs.; 18 tabs

  15. Performance testing of a large volume calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calorimetry is used as a nondestructive assay technique for determining the power output of heat-producing nuclear materials. Calorimetric assay of plutonium-bearing and tritium items routinely obtains the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques, and the power calibration can be traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology through certified electrical standards. Because the heat-measurement result is completely independent of material and matrix type, it can be reliably used on any material form or item matrix. The calorimetry measurement is combined with isotopic composition information to determine the correct plutonium content of an item. When an item is unsuitable for neutron or gamma-ray NDA, calorimetric assay is used. Currently, the largest calorimeter capable of measuring plutonium-bearing or tritium items is 36 cm in diameter and 61 cm long. Fabrication of a high-sensitivity large volume calorimeter (LVC) capable of measuring tritium and plutonium-bearing items in 208-1 (55-gal) shipping or storage containers has provided a reliable NDA method to measure many difficult to measure forms of plutonium and tritium more accurately. This large calo rimeter can also be used to make secondary working standards from process material for the calibration of faster NDA assay techniques. The footprint of the calorimeter is 104 cm wide by 157 cm deep and 196 cm high in the closed position. The space for a standard electronics rack is also necessary for the operation of the calo rimeter. The maximum item size that can be measured in the LVC is 62 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The extensive use of heat-flow calorimeters for safeguards-related measurements at DOE facilities makes it important to extend the capability of calorimetric assay of plutonium and tritium items to larger container sizes. Measurement times, precision, measurement threshold, and position sensitivity of the instrument will be discussed.

  16. Performance testing of a large volume calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, D. S. (David S.)

    2004-01-01

    Calorimetry is used as a nondestructive assay technique for determining the power output of heat-producing nuclear materials. Calorimetric assay of plutonium-bearing and tritium items routinely obtains the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques, and the power calibration can be traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology through certified electrical standards. Because the heat-measurement result is completely independent of material and matrix type, it can be reliably used on any material form or item matrix. The calorimetry measurement is combined with isotopic composition information to determine the correct plutonium content of an item. When an item is unsuitable for neutron or gamma-ray NDA, calorimetric assay is used. Currently, the largest calorimeter capable of measuring plutonium-bearing or tritium items is 36 cm in diameter and 61 cm long. Fabrication of a high-sensitivity large volume calorimeter (LVC) capable of measuring tritium and plutonium-bearing items in 208-1 (55-gal) shipping or storage containers has provided a reliable NDA method to measure many difficult to measure forms of plutonium and tritium more accurately. This large calo rimeter can also be used to make secondary working standards from process material for the calibration of faster NDA assay techniques. The footprint of the calorimeter is 104 cm wide by 157 cm deep and 196 cm high in the closed position. The space for a standard electronics rack is also necessary for the operation of the calo rimeter. The maximum item size that can be measured in the LVC is 62 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The extensive use of heat-flow calorimeters for safeguards-related measurements at DOE facilities makes it important to extend the capability of calorimetric assay of plutonium and tritium items to larger container sizes. Measurement times, precision, measurement threshold, and position sensitivity of the instrument will be discussed.

  17. Prototype calorimeters for the NA3 experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The NA3 Experiment was set-up on the North Area of the SPS by the CERN/ Ecole Polytechnique/College de France/ Orsay/Saclay Collaboration, to study high transverse momentum leptons and hadrons from hadron collisions. The calorimeters measured the energy of hadrons (prototype on the right) and leptons (prototype on the left). They used a new type of plastic scintillator (plexipop). (see CERN Courier of November 1975) energy (prototype on the right)

  18. Study of a multiwire electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic calorimeter performance with sampling, piling up of lead foils and wire chambers. It shows a non-linearity in partially saturated mode; this one grows up with chamber gain and will be about 1 TeV-1; 16%/√E resolution is obtained with mixing containing xenon, which limits degradation by magnetic field. Electron are identified by longitudinal profile of their shower with π contamination of 10-3

  19. Isothermal calorimeter for reactor radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isothermal calorimeter with thermistors for measuring absorbed dose rates from 104-5-6.105 rad/h in reactor experimental holes has been designed. A kinetics method for determining the equilibrium temperature difference has been developed, and its application in isothermal calorimetry proved. The expected accuracy in measurements within ± 2-5% has been proved by measurements carried out in the reactor. Some data obtained by measurements in the reactor RA are presented (author)

  20. Calorimeter tests with liquid ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Configurations of sampling calorimeters with iron, lead and uranium as absorbers have been investigated using liquid ionization chambers as active elements. As liquid tetramethylsilane has been used. Results of beam tests with electrons, pions and muons in the energy range of 2 to 6 GeV are presented and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. In particular the questions regarding which configuration can compensate and the separation of sampling from intrinsic fluctuations have been studied. (orig.)

  1. The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Detector Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the Detector Control System (DCS) designed and implemented for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The focus is on its distributed controls software architecture, the deployment of the application into production and its integration into the overall CMS DCS. The knowledge acquired from operational issues during the detector commissioning and the first phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics runs is discussed and future improvements are presented.

  2. Performance test of a TMS calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance tests of a first calorimeter module using the room temperature liquid tetramethylsilane (TMS) as active element are described in detail. As absorber planed carbon steel slabs had been used. The charge yield is 70% of that in a very pure sample of the liquid. A long term stability of the signal with a lifetime of half a year has been realized. Experiences are described and the results explained in detail. (orig.)

  3. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Robert; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the main hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. The bulk of its upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC operation (Phase 2 around 2023) where the peak luminosity will increase 5x compared to the design luminosity (10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). The TileCal upgrade aims to replace the majority of the on- and off-detector electronics so that all calorimeter signals can be digitized and directly sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. This will reduce pile-up problems and allow more complex trigger algorithms. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Extensive test beam studies will determine which option will be selected. 10 Gbps optical links are used to read out all digitized data to t...

  4. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  5. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  6. First Half Of CMS Hadron Calorimeter Completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CMS HCAL electronics coordinator John Elias from Fermilab inspecting the assembled first half of the calorimeter. The first half barrel of the CMS hadron calorimeter was completed last month and assembly work on the elements of the second half commenced just last week. This is not a simple task considering the fact that the constructed half-barrel consists of eighteen 30 tonne segments each made with 0.15 mm tolerance. But through the work of everyone on the CMS hadron calorimeter team it is all moving forward. In the LHC, detection of particles produced in collisions of two proton beams requires measurement of their energy. To do this, the particle energy has to be changed into a form that can be easily measured. This is achieved by stopping the initial particles in a dense medium, where they create a shower of secondary particles. While particles that interact through electromagnetic forces (electrons and positrons) create relatively small showers, the size of showers created by hadrons, particles that i...

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bertoli, Gabriele; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau­particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator­steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal front­end electronics read out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. The read­out system is responsible for reconstructing the data in real­time. The digitized signals are reconstructed with the Optimal Filtering algorithm, which computes for each channel the signal amplitude, time and quality factor at the required high rate. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruc...

  8. Run 1 Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Heelan, Louise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design ...

  9. Design, Construction and Commissioning of the Digital Hadron Calorimeter - DHCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C; Bilki, B; Butler, J; Corriveau, F; Cundiff, T; Drake, G; Francis, K; Furst, B; Guarino, V; Haberichter, B; Hazen, E; Hoff, J; Holm, S; Kreps, A; DeLurgio, P; Matijas, Z; Monte, L Dal; Mucia, N; Norbeck, E; Northacker, D; Onel, Y; Pollack, B; Repond, J; Schlereth, J; Skrzecz, F; Smith, J R; Trojand, D; Underwood, D; Velasco, M; Walendziak, J; Wood, K; Wu, S; Xia, L; Zhang, Q; Zhao, A

    2016-01-01

    A novel hadron calorimeter is being developed for future lepton colliding beam detectors. The calorimeter is optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) to the measurement of hadronic jets and features a very finely segmented readout with 1 x 1 cm2 cells. The active media of the calorimeter are Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with a digital, i.e. one-bit, readout. To first order the energy of incident particles in this calorimeter is reconstructed as being proportional to the number of pads with a signal over a given threshold. A large-scale prototype calorimeter with approximately 500,000 readout channels has been built and underwent extensive testing in the Fermilab and CERN test beams. This paper reports on the design, construction, and commissioning of this prototype calorimeter.

  10. Realtime calibration of the A4 electromagnetic lead fluoride calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Baunack, S.; Ríos, D. Balaguer; Capozza, L.; Diefenbach, J.; Frascaria, R.; Gläser, B.; Harrach, D. v.; Imai, Y.; Kothe, R.; Kunne, R.; Lee, J.H.; Maas, F. E.; Espí, M. C. Mora; Morlet, M.; Ong, S.

    2011-01-01

    Sufficient energy resolution is the key issue for the calorimetry in particle and nuclear physics. The calorimeter of the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI is a segmented calorimeter where the energy of an event is determined by summing the signals of neighbouring channels. In this case the precise matching of the individual modules is crucial to obtain a good energy resolution. We have developped a calibration procedure for our total absorbing electromagnetic calorimeter which consists ...

  11. High granularity Semi-Digital Hadronic Calorimeter using GRPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannai, S., E-mail: sameh.mannai@uclouvain.be [Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Manai, K. [Université Tunis El-Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia); Haddad, Y. [Laboratoire Leprince Ringuet, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris (France); Laktineh, I. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard, Lyon (France); Cortina, E. [Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-08-01

    A Semi-Digital Hadronic Calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPCs) is one of the calorimeters candidates proposed for particle physics experiments at the future electrons collider. It is a high granular calorimeter which is required for application of the particle flow algorithm in order to improve the jet energy resolution to achieve 30%/√(E) as one of the goals of these experiments.

  12. Performance of the PrimEx Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Kubantsev, M.; Larin, I.; A. Gasparyan; Collaboration, for the PrimEx

    2006-01-01

    We report the design and performance of the hybrid electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of 1152 $PbWO_4$ crystals and 576 lead glass blocks for the PrimEx experiment at the Jefferson Laboratory. The detector was built for high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime via the Primakoff effect. Calorimeter installation and commissioning was completed with the first physics run in fall of 2004. We present the energy and position resolution of the calorimeter. Obtained $\\pi^0$ mass re...

  13. The LHCb EM calorimeter and π0 detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LHCb calorimeter system comprises a preshower detector, an electromagnetic and a hadronic calorimeter. The purpose of the calorimeters is to identify and provide an energy and position measurement of photons, electrons and hadrons. The calorimeters are an essential part of the LHCb trigger, and are used in offline analysis. Good photon identification is important for the study of B decays with π0s in the final state, an example of which is the Bd0→ π+π-π0 decay. This provides an alternative channel to Bd0→ π+π- for the measurement of the angle α of the unitarity triangle

  14. Analytical model for a fast-response calorimeter: with applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of an electrical analogue thermal-control model for the ANL-type fast-response calorimeter and its application to a new small sample, analytical-type fast-response calorimeter. This was done to obtain a better understanding of the sources of variations in experimentally measured sample power. Thermal quantities of temperature, heat flow and heat storage were reduced to electrical analogues so that the whole calorimeter could be modeled and analyzed as an electrical circuit with the thermal parts of the calorimeter treated as a series of lumped-circuit constants. Latest results of this work are discussed

  15. A calorimeter for neutron flux measurement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chupp, T.E. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Physics Labs.

    1993-04-01

    A calorimeter for absolute neutron flux measurement has been built and tested. The calorimeter measures the heat produced in a 10{degrees}K thick LiPb target when neutrons are captured via the {sup 6}Li(n,{sup 3}H){sup 4}He reaction. The sensitivity achieved was 1.3x10{sup 6} n/s for a 1 hour measurement. Separate flux measurements with the calorimeter and a {sup 238}U fission chamber are in agreement and show that systematic errors are less than 3%. An improved calorimeter has been built which is sensitive to 10{sup 5} n/s for a 1 hour measurement.

  16. Summary talk on fiber tower calorimeter for the scintillation calorimeter subgroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here a new calorimeter design based on small scintillator tiles, lead absorber and wavelength shifting fiber readout. We have addressed all the major issues in SSC calorimetry and have developed a design with many advantageous features. It has been well demonstrated that the best resolution is obtained for a 'compensated' calorimeter. It is also well known how such compensation may be achieved by a suitable choice of active and passive materials and their relative thickness. One such choice is that of lead and scintillator for which the best thickness ratio is 4:1. This selection has been used in the development of the so-called spaghetti calorimeter (SPACAL) discussed at this workshop. The relative merits of this and many other designs have been the subject of much discussion at SSC workshops from which a number of critical issues have emerged for each design. In the present paper, we have addressed the issues raised in the SPACAL design and proposed an alternative, improved design. The SPACAL represents a significant step forward in calorimeter design, but there are always areas which can be improved in any design when it is subjected to detailed study. Specifically we have considered the areas of energy resolution, channeling, projective towers/calibration, longitudinal segmentation, and radiation sensitivity. We will now discuss each of these areas in turn. 5 refs., 9 figs

  17. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Mavromanolakis

    2007-12-01

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 layers and depth of 7.2 0 at normal incidence, having in total 3024 channels of 1 cm2, was tested recently with - beam. We describe the prototype and discuss some preliminary testbeam results on its performance with respect to position resolution, response inhomogeneity and transverse containment.

  18. Large aperture calorimeter for fusion laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    The authors designed and constructed a large aperture calorimeter intended for laser fusion measurements on beams up to 20 cm diameter. The laser beam is absorbed in a glass disc backed by a disc carry a resistance wire. Although it performs essentially as expected with a noise equivalent energy of 20 mJ and a maximum energy of about 100 J, difficulties in construction give a 17% variation of sensitivity across the aperture. To overcome this problem it would probably be necessary to adopt an integral construction with the resistance bridge formed from an etched film on the back of the absorbing glass.

  19. Calibration boards for the ATLAS LAr calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to calibrate the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters to an accuracy better than 1%, over 16 bit dynamic range, chips have been designed in DMILL technology. The design and performance of a 16 bit DAC, a static low offset operational amplifier and a digital chip to control the calibration boards are presented. A 8 channels board using these chips has also been realised and carefully measured as this module will be replicated 16 times to design the final 128 channels calibration board. (authors)

  20. Test of the ZEUS forward calorimeter prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four prototype modules following the same design as the ZEUS forward calorimeter (FCAL) modules have been constructed and tested with electrons, hadrons and muons in the momentum range of 1 to 100 GeV/c. The main topics under investigation were: calibration, uniformity of response, noise, light yield, energy resolution and the electron to hadron response (e/h ratio). The result of the measurements is presented and the expected performance of the FCAL is discussed in the light of these results. (orig.)

  1. Pion showers in highly granular calorimeters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaroslav Cvach; on behalf of the CALICE Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    New results on properties of hadron showers created by pion beam at 8–80 GeV in high granular electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters are presented. Data were used for the first time to investigate the separation of the neutral and charged hadron showers. The result is important to verify the prediction of the PFA algorithm based up to now on the simulated data only. Next, the properties of hadron showers were compared to different physics lists of GEANT4 version 9.3.

  2. Correlated noise unfolding on a Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fiolhais, M C N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The correlated noise component of TileCal, the barrel hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, is studied and an algorithm is used to parametrize and unfold it from the response of the photomultipliers. It is shown that the correlated noise component can be significantly reduced and mostly removed not only for pedestal runs, but also in the presence of physics signals like minimum bias events in 900 GeV collisions and 7 TeV simulated top quark pair production events.

  3. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps.The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read-out channels after cool down will be reported. End 2004 the ATLAS barrel electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter was installed in the ATLAS cavern and since summer 2005 the front-end electronics are being connected and tested. Results of this first commissioning phase will be shown to demonstrate the high standards of quality control for our detectors

  4. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter central barrel assembly and installation.

    CERN Multimedia

    nikolai topilin

    2009-01-01

    These photos belong to the self-published book by Nikolai Topilin "ATLAS Hadron Calorimeter Assembly". The book is a collection of souvenirs from the years of assembly and installation of the Tile Hadron Calorimeter, which extended from November 2002 until May 2006.

  5. The optical instrumentation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abdallah, J.; Adragna, P.; Alexa, C.; Lokajíček, Miloš; Němeček, Stanislav; Přibyl, Lukáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jan (2013), P01005. ISSN 1748-0221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : calorimeters * calorimeter methods * scintillators * scintillation and light emission processes * solid, gas and liquid scintillators Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013

  6. ATLAS End Cap end cap calorimeter transport to POINT1

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2005-01-01

    Calorimeters surround the inner detector. They will absorb and measure the energies of most of the charged and neutral particles after the collisions. The saved energy in the calorimeter is detected and converted to signals that are resolved with data taking electronics.

  7. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter response

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, S N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems.

  8. Calorimeter energy calibration using the energy conservation law

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasily L Morgunov

    2007-12-01

    A new calorimeter energy calibration method was developed for the proposed ILC detectors. The method uses the center-of-mass energy of the accelerator as the reference. It has been shown that using the energy conservation law it is possible to make ECAL and HCAL cross calibration to reach a good energy resolution for the simple calorimeter energy sum.

  9. First experimental tests of a lead glass drift calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are building a drift collection calorimeter, which has a combined radiator and electric field shaping structure made of fused lead glass tubing, treated in a H2 reducing atmosphere. We describe the construction detail of the calorimeter and the experimental measurements on several prototypes with radioative sources and minimum ionizing particles. 9 refs., 11 figs

  10. Readiness of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter for LHC Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; BarreiroGuimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Bathe, S; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, J R A; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bosteels, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Brett, N D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Campabadal-Segura, F; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans-Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along eta (averaged over phi) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained u...

  11. Development of a forward calorimeter system for the STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of an R and D program to develop a forward calorimeter system (FCS) for the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL. The FCS is a very compact, compensated, finely granulated, high resolution calorimeter system being developed for p+p and p+A program at RHIC. The FCS prototype consists of both electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters. The electromagnetic portion of the detector is constructed with W powder and scintillation fibers. The hadronic calorimeter is a traditional Pb/Sc-plate sandwich design. Both calorimeters were readout with Hamamatsu MPPCs. A full- scale prototype of the FCS was tested with a beam at FNAL in March 2014. We present details of the design, construction technique and performance of the FCS prototype during the test run at FNAL

  12. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons from 3.7 to 19 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, M.; Pfeifer, C.; Menn, W.; Simon, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany); Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Laboratory; Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Ricci, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali, Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1996-02-01

    The antiproton to proton ratio in the cosmic rays has been measured in the energy range from 3.7 to 19 GeV. This measurement was carried out using a balloon-borne superconducting magnetic spectrometer along with a gas Cherenkov counter, an imaging calorimeter and a time of flight scintillator system. The measured antiproton to proton ratio was determined to be 1.24 (+0.68, -0.51)X 10{sup -4}. The present result along with other recent observations show that the observed abundances of antiprotons are consistent with models, in which antiprotons are produced as secondaries during the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  13. Transportable calorimeter measurements of highly enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy, C.; Bracken, D.S.; Staples, P.; Carrillo, L.

    1997-11-01

    A sensitive calorimeter has been combined with a small temperature-controlled water bath to compose a transportable system that is capable of measuring multikilogram quantities of highly enriched uranium (HEU). The sample chamber size, 5 in. in diameter by 10 in. high, is large enough to hold sufficient HEU metal or high-grade scrap to provide a measurable thermal signal. Calorimetric measurements performed on well-characterized material indicate that the thermal power generated by 93% {sup 235}U samples with 1.0% {sup 234}U can be measured with a precision of about 1% (1 sigma) for 4-kg samples. The transportable system consists of a twin-bridge calorimeter installed inside a 55-gal. stainless steel drum filled with water with heating and cooling supplied by a removable thermoelectric module attached to the side. Isotopic measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray measurements of the HEU samples and analysis with the FRAM code were used to determine the isotopic ratios and specific power of the samples. This information was used to transform the measured thermal power into grams of HEU. Because no physical standards are required, this system could be used for the verification of plutonium, {sup 238}Pu heat sources, or large quantities of metal or other high-grade matrix forms of HEU.

  14. The NA48 LKr calorimeter readout electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Gianoli, A; Barr, C; Brodier-Yourstone, P; Buchholz, P; Ceccucci, Augusto; Cerri, C; Chlopik, A; Constantini, F; Fantechi, R; Formenti, F; Funk, W; Giudici, Sergio; Gorini, B; Guzik, J A; Hallgren, Björn I; Kozhevnikov, Yu; Iwansky, W; de La Taille, C; Lacourt, A; Laverrière, G C; Ljuslin, C; Mannelli, I; Martin-Chassard, G; Martini, M; Papi, A; Seguin-Moreau, N; Sozzi, M; Tarlé, J C; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Ziolkowski, M

    2000-01-01

    The NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS accelerator is making a measurement of the direct CP violation parameter epsilon '/ epsilon by comparing the four rates of decay of K/sub S/ and K/sub L/ into 2 pi /sup 0/ and pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/. To reconstruct the decays into 2 pi /sup 0/ the information from the almost 13500 channels of a quasi-homogeneous liquid krypton electromagnetic calorimeter is used. The readout electronics of the calorimeter has been designed to provide a dynamic range from a few MeV to about 50 GeV energy deposition per cell, and to sustain a high rate of incident particles. The system is made by cold charge preamplifiers (working at 120 degrees K), low-noise fast shapers followed by digitizer electronics at 40 MHz sampling rate that employs a gain switching technique to expand the dynamic range, where the gain can be selected for each sample individually (i.e. every 25 ns). To reduce the amount of data collected the system contains a zero suppression circuit based on halo expansion. (12 refs)...

  15. Progress on the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Eric Eisenhandler

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo) has recently passed a number of major hurdles. The various electronic modules that make up the trigger are either in full production or are about to be, and preparations in the ATLAS pit are well advanced. L1Calo has three main subsystems. The PreProcessor converts analogue calorimeter signals to digital, associates the rather broad trigger pulses with the correct proton-proton bunch crossing, and does a final calibration in transverse energy before sending digital data streams to the two algorithmic trigger processors. The Cluster Processor identifies and counts electrons, photons and taus, and the Jet/Energy-sum Processor looks for jets and also sums missing and total transverse energy. Readout drivers allow the performance of the trigger to be monitored online and offline, and also send region-of-interest information to the Level-2 Trigger. The PreProcessor (Heidelberg) is the L1Calo subsystem with the largest number of electronic modules (124), and most of its fu...

  16. The ZEUS calorimeter first level trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the ZEUS Calorimeter First Level Trigger (CFLT) is presented. The CFLT utilizes a pipelined architecture to provide trigger data for a global first leel trigger decision 5 μsec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The charges from 13K phototubes are summed into 1792 trigger tower pulseheights which are digitized by flash ADC's. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests. Summary data is forwarded to the Global First Level Trigger for each crossing 2 μsec after the crossing occurred. The CFLT determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the electromagnetic and hadronic energy deposited in various regions of the calorimeter. The CFLT has kept the experimental trigger rate below ∼200 Hz at the highest luminosity experienced at HERA. Performance studies suggest that the CFLT will keep the trigger rate below 1 kHZ against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions on the order of the 100 kHz expected at design luminosity. (orig.)

  17. The ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter high level triggers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector yields a huge sample of data from different sub-detectors. On-line data processing is applied to select and reduce the volume of the stored data. ALICE applies a multi-level hardware trigger scheme where fast detectors are used to feed a three-level (L0, L1, and L2) deep chain. The High-Level Trigger (HLT) is a fourth filtering stage sitting logically between the L2 trigger and the data acquisition event building. The EMCal detector comprises a large area electromagnetic calorimeter that extends the momentum measurement of photons and neutral mesons up to pT = 250 GeV/c, which improves the ALICE capability to perform jet reconstruction with measurement of the neutral energy component of jets. An online reconstruction and trigger chain has been developed within the HLT framework to sharpen the EMCal hardware triggers, by combining the central barrel tracking information with the shower reconstruction (clusters) in the calorimeter. In the present report the status and the functionality of the software components developed for the EMCal HLT online reconstruction and trigger chain will be discussed, as well as preliminary results from their commissioning performed during the 2011 LHC running period.

  18. Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger starts firing

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephen Hillier

    2007-01-01

    L1Calo is one of the major components of ATLAS First Level trigger, along with the Muon Trigger and Central Trigger Processor. It forms all of the first-level calorimeter-based triggers, including electron, jet, tau and missing ET. The final system consists of over 250 custom designed 9U VME boards, most containing a dense array of FPGAs or ASICs. It is subdivided into a PreProcessor, which digitises the incoming trigger signals from the Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters, and two separate processor systems, which perform the physics algorithms. All of these are highly flexible, allowing the possibility to adapt to beam conditions and luminosity. All parts of the system are read out through Read-Out Drivers, which provide monitoring data and Region of Interest (RoI) information for the Level-2 trigger. Production of the modules is now essentially complete, and enough modules exist to populate the full scale system in USA15. Installation is proceeding rapidly - approximately 90% of the final modules are insta...

  19. COTS Analog Prototype for LHCb's Calorimeter Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Abellan Beteta, Carlos; Herms i Berenguer, Atilà

    The objective of this thesis is to present a proposal for the analogue signal processing chain needed for the LHCb calorimeter upgrade improving the design used originally. The design contains several novelties: the system was designed with low noise in mind from the beginning, it is made to have good immunity to interferences stressing the fact that the board will be shared with large digital circuits, differential operational amplifiers are used in a non-standard way as a mean to obtain opposite polarity signals for the signal treatment and a way to increase the available signal in the front end electronics is proposed. The thesis starts with a brief introduction to the detector and its environment. This is followed by an explanation of the use of shapers in high energy physics detectors and the constraints that the shaper must address in the LHCb calorimeter. This leads to a chapter where the circuit design is explained starting from the analysis of the original circuit and its flaws. Once the original cir...

  20. METROLOGICAL PERFORMANCES OF BOMB CALORIMETERS AT REAL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Maksimuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-usage measurement equipment for heat of combustion of organic fuels are bomb isoperibol calorimeters with a water thermostat. The stability of work of calorimeters at real conditions is important for maintenance of reliability of measurement results. The article purpose – the analysis of stability for parameters of calorimeters to environment changes. In this work influence room temperature (Тк and heat exchange conditions on metrological characteristics of two models of calorimeters is considered with different degree of thermal protection: V-08МА and BIC 100. For calorimeters V-08МА the increase in a effective heat capacity (W on 0,1 % by growth of Tк on everyone 5 °С is established. To use value W in all interval laboratory temperatures Tк = 14–28 °С it is necessary to correct W on 2,8 J/°C on everyone 1 °С changes of Tк. Updating W is required, if the correction exceeds error in determination W. For calorimeter BIC 100 it is not revealed dependences W from Tк. BIC 100 have constant-temperature cap, high stability a temperature in thermostat and stabilized heat exchange. It is established that an standard deviation of cooling constant for all calorimeters in direct proportional to standard deviation W. 

  1. Testbeam studies of production modules of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report test beam studies of 11% of the production ATLAS Tile Calorimeter modules. The modules were equipped with production front-end electronics and all the calibration systems planned for the final detector. The studies used muon, electron and hadron beams ranging in energy from 3 to 350 GeV. Two independent studies showed that the light yield of the calorimeter was ∼70pe/GeV, exceeding the design goal by 40%. Electron beams provided a calibration of the modules at the electromagnetic energy scale. Over 200 calorimeter cells the variation of the response was 2.4%. The linearity with energy was also measured. Muon beams provided an intercalibration of the response of all calorimeter cells. The response to muons entering in the ATLAS projective geometry showed an RMS variation of 2.5% for 91 measurements over a range of rapidities and modules. The mean response to hadrons of fixed energy had an RMS variation of 1.4% for the modules and projective angles studied. The response to hadrons normalized to incident beam energy showed an 8% increase between 10 and 350 GeV, fully consistent with expectations for a noncompensating calorimeter. The measured energy resolution for hadrons of σ/E=52.9%/√(E)+5.7% was also consistent with expectations. Other auxiliary studies were made of saturation recovery of the readout system, the time resolution of the calorimeter and the performance of the trigger signals from the calorimeter.

  2. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Barillari, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used in ATLAS for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region |eta|<3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry from |eta|=1.4 to |eta|=4.8. The calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two endcaps with electromagnetic (EMEC), hadronic (HEC) and forward (FCAL) calorimeters. The lead-liquid argon sampling technique with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the endcap (EMEC). This geometry allows a uniform acceptance over the whole azimuthal range without any gap. The hadronic endcap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with plate geometry and is subdivided into two wheels in depth per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules featuring cylindrical electrodes ...

  3. Design, Performance, and Calibration of the CMS Hadron-Outer Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullin, Salavat; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Adam, Nadia; Adams, Mark Raymond; Akchurin, Nural; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Anderson, E Walter; Antchev, Georgy; Arcidy, M; Ayan, S; Aydin, Sezgin; Aziz, Tariq; Baarmand, Marc M; Babich, Kanstantsin; Baden, Drew; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bard, Robert; Barnes, Virgil E; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Baiatian, G; Bencze, Gyorgy; Beri, Suman Bala; Berntzon, Lisa; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhatti, Anwar; Bodek, Arie; Bose, Suvadeep; Bose, Tulika; Budd, Howard; Burchesky, Kyle; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cankocak, Kerem; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Cerci, Salim; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Chung, Yeon Sei; Clarida, Warren; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Cushman, Priscilla; Damgov, Jordan; De Barbaro, Pawel; Debbins, Paul; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Demianov, A; de Visser, Theo; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Díaz, Jonathan; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Dugad, Shashikant; Dumanoglu, Isa; Duru, Firdevs; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elias, John E; Elvira, D; Emeliantchik, Igor; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ershov, Alexander; Erturk, Sefa; Esen, Selda; Eskut, Eda; Fenyvesi, Andras; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Freeman, Jim; Ganguli, Som N; Gaultney, Vanessa; Gamsizkan, Halil; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Genchev, Vladimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Golutvin, Igor; Goncharov, Petr; Grassi, Tullio; Green, Dan; Gribushin, Andrey; Grinev, B; Gurtu, Atul; Murat Güler, A; Gülmez, Erhan; Gümüs, K; Haelen, T; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Halyo, Valerie; Hashemi, Majid; Hauptman, John M; Hazen, Eric; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Heister, Arno; Hunt, Adam; Ilyina, N; Ingram, D; Isiksal, Engin; Jarvis, Chad; Jeong, Chiyoung; Johnson, Kurtis F; Jones, John; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kalinin, Alexey; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kaur, Manjit; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Kellogg, Richard G; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Kim, Heejong; Kisselevich, I; Kodolova, Olga; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kolossov, V; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Kosarev, Ivan; Kramer, Laird; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kryshkin, V; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kumar, Arun; Kunori, Shuichi; Laasanen, Alvin T; Ladygin, Vladimir; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Laszlo, Andras; Lawlor, C; Lazic, Dragoslav; Lee, Sang Joon; Levchuk, Leonid; Linn, Stephan; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Lobolo, L; Los, Serguei; Lubinsky, V; Lukanin, Vladimir; Ma, Yousi; Machado, Emanuel; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mans, Jeremy; Marlow, Daniel; Markowitz, Pete; Martínez, German; Mazumdar, Kajari; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mescheryakov, G; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael; Möller, A; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M; Moissenz, P; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Mossolov, Vladimir; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Onengüt, G; Ozkan, Cigdem; Ozkurt, Halil; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Ozok, Ferhat; Paktinat, S; Pal, Andras; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Penzo, Aldo; Petrushanko, Sergey; Petrosian, A; Pikalov, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Podrasky, V; Polatoz, A; Pompos, Arnold; Popescu, Sorina; Posch, C; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Qian, Weiming; Ralich, Robert; Reddy, L; Reidy, Jim; Rogalev, Evgueni; Roh, Youn; Rohlf, James; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Ruchti, Randy; Ryazanov, Anton; Safronov, Grigory; Sanders, David A; Sanzeni, Christopher; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Satyanarayana, B; Schmidt, Ianos; Sekmen, Sezen; Semenov, Sergey; Senchishin, V; Sergeyev, S; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sirunyan, Albert M; Skuja, Andris; Sharma, Seema; Sherwood, Brian; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Sogut, Kenan; Sonmez, Nasuf; Sorokin, Pavel; Spezziga, Mario; Stefanovich, R; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Sudhakar, Katta; Sulak, Lawrence; Suzuki, Ichiro; Talov, Vladimir; Teplov, Konstantin; Thomas, Ray; Tonwar, Suresh C; Topakli, Huseyin; Tully, Christopher; Turchanovich, L; Ulyanov, A; Vanini, A; Vankov, Ivan; Vardanyan, Irina; Varela, F; Vergili, Mehmet; Verma, Piyush; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Vidal, Richard; Vishnevskiy, Alexander; Vlassov, E; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Volobouev, Igor; Volkov, Alexey; Volodko, Anton; Wang, Lei; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Wetstein, Matthew; Winn, Dave; Wigmans, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Shouxiang; Yazgan, Efe; Yetkin, Taylan; Zálán, Peter; Zarubin, Anatoli; Zeyrek, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with an outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in the calorimeter. Fabrication, testing and calibration of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter will also be used for the muon trigger in coincidence with other muon chambers in CMS.

  4. Energy Resolution Performance of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adzic, Petar; Almeida, Carlos; Almeida, Nuno; Anagnostou, Georgios; Anfreville, Marc; Anicin, Ivan; Antunovic, Zeljko; Auffray, Etiennette; Baccaro, Stefania; Baffioni, Stephanie; Barney, David; Barone, Luciano; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Bell, Ken W; Benetta, Robert; Bercher, Michel; Berthon, Ursula; Betev, Botjo; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Biino, Cristina; Bimbot, Stephane; Blaha, Jan; Bloch, Philippe; Blyth, Simon; Bordalo, Paula; Bornheim, Adolf; Bourotte, Jean; Britton1, D; Brown, Robert M; Brunelière, Renaud; Busson, Philippe; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cavallari, Francesca; Cerutti, Muriel; Chamont, David; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Charlot, Claude; Chatterji, Sudeep; Chen, E Augustine; Chipaux, Rémi; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cockerill, David J A; Collard, Caroline; Combaret, Christophe; Cossutti, Fabio; Costantini, Silvia; Da Silva, J C; Dafinei, Ioan; Daskalakis, Georgios; Davatz, Giovanna; Debraine, Alain; Decotigny, David; De Min, Alberto; Deiters, Konrad; Dejardin, Marc; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Depasse, Pierre; Descamp, J; Dewhirst, Guy; Dhawan, Satish; Diemoz, Marcella; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Drndarevic, Snezana; Dupanloup, Michel; Dzelalija, Mile; Ehlers, Jan; El-Mamouni, H; Peisert, Anna; Evangelou, Ioannis; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Fay, Jean; Ferri, Federico; Flower, Paul S; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaillac, Anne-Marie; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gascon-Shotkin, S; Geerebaert, Yannick; Gentit, François-Xavier; Ghezzi, Alessio; Gilly, Jean; Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, Sergei; Go, Apollo; Godinovic, Nikola; Golubev, Nikolai; Golutvin, Igor; Gómez-Reino, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Grahl1, J; Gras1, P; Greenhalgh, Justin; Guillaud, Jean-Paul; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hamel-de-Montechenault, G; Hansen, Magnus; Heath, Helen F; AHill, J; Hobson, Peter R; Holmes, Daniel; Holzner, André; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Ille, Bernard; Ingram, Quentin; Jain, Adarsh; Jarry, Patrick; Jauffret, C; Jha, Manoj; Karar, Akli; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Katchanov, V A; Kennedy, Bruce W; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Korjik, M; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Krpic, Dragomir; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Lebeau, Michel; Lecomte, Pierre; Lecoq, Paul; Lemaire, Marie-Claude; Lethuillier, Morgan; Lin, Willis; Lintern, A L; Lister, Alison; Litvin, V; Locci, Elizabeth; Lodge, Anthony B; Longo, Egidio; Loukas, Demetrios; Luckey, D; Lustermann, Werner; Lynch, Clare; MacKay, Catherine Kirsty; Malberti, Martina; Maletic, Dimitrije; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Manthos, Nikolaos; Markou, Athanasios; Mathez, Hervé; Mathieu, Antoine; Matveev, Viktor; Maurelli, Georges; Menichetti, Ezio; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Mur, Michel; Musienko, Yuri; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nash, Jordan; Neal, Homer; Nédélec, Patrick; Negri, Pietro; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Newman26, H B; Nikitenko, Alexander; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Organtini, Giovanni; Paganini, Pascal; Paganoni, Marco; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paramatti, Riccardo; Pastrone, Nadia; Pauss, Felicitas; Poilleux, Patrick; Puljak, Ivica; Pullia, Antonino; Puzovic, Jovan; Ragazzi, Stefano; Ramos, Sergio; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rander, John; Ranjan, Kirti; Ravat, Olivier; Raymond, M; Razis, Panos A; Redaelli, Nicola; Renker, Dieter; Reucroft, Steve; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Reynaud, Michel; Reynaud, Serge; Romanteau, Thierry; Rondeaux, Françoise; Rosowsky, André; Rovelli, Chiara; Rumerio, Paolo; Rusack, Roger; Rusakov, Sergey V; Ryan, Matthew John; Rykaczewski, Hans; Sakhelashvili, Tariel; Salerno, Roberto; Santos, Marcelino; Seez, Christopher; Semeniouk, Igor; Sharif, Omar; Sharp, Peter; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Shevchenko, Sergey; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Sidiropoulos, Georgios; Sillou, Daniel; Singovsky, Alexander; Sirois, Yves; Sirunyan, Albert M; Smith, Brian; Smith, Vincent J; Sproston, Martin; Suter, Henry; Swain, John; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Takahashi, Maiko; Tapper, Robert J; Tcheremoukhine, Alexandre; Teixeira, Isabel; Teixeira, Joao Paulo; Teller, Olivier; Timlin, Claire; ATriantis, F; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Ueno, Koji; Uzunian, Andrey; Varela, Joao; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Verrecchia, Patrice; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Vigano, S; Viertel, Gert; Virdee, Tejinder; Vlassov, E; Wang, Minzu; Weinstein, Alan; Williams, Jennifer C; Yaselli, Ignacio; Zabi, Alexandre; Zamiatin, Nikolai; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Zeller, Michael E; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Yawei; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    The energy resolution performance of the CMS lead tungstate crystal electromagnetic calorimeter is presented. Measurements were made with an electron beam using a fully equipped supermodule of the calorimeter barrel. Results are given both for electrons incident on the centre of crystals and for electrons distributed uniformly over the calorimeter surface. The electron energy is reconstructed in matrices of 3 times 3 or 5 times 5 crystals centred on the crystal containing the maximum energy. Corrections for variations in the shower containment are applied in the case of uniform incidence. The resolution measured is consistent with the design goals.

  5. D0 Silicon Upgrade: End Calorimeter Transfer Bridge Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the assembly of major components into the D0 Detector, a transfer bridge was required to move the North-End Calorimeter from the clean room,over the cable bridge and onto the north sidewalk of the assembly hall. This experiment is now at the beginning stages of the next phase, namely the upgrade of this Detector for future physics research. A major piece of this upgrade is the installation of a solenoid magnet into the Central Calorimeter. In order to accomplish this, the South End Calorimeter has to be removed from the detector and the North End Calorimeter must be moved an additional 20-inch from its nominal open position (total 60-inch movement). The South End Calorimeter will be removed from the detector using the equipment designed for its installation. The calorimeter will be staged on the south sidewalk during the installation of the solenoid magnet and the central tracking systems. The North End Calorimeter is moved 60-inch to give more space between calorimeters during magnet, tracker and cable installation work. This movement will allow the calorimeter to remain coupled to the cryo system. However, this movement requires an extension be added to the center beam. This extension will support the rear wheels of the calorimeter and in the case of the end calorimeters, carry the majority of the weight. The extension is to be a modification of the transfer bridge. This modification, basically has T1 steel blocks added to one end and legs to the sidewalk supports at the other. The T1 steel blocks are notched to fit into the center beam porches and are welded to bridge rails. This design is the same as that for the installation bridge (3740.312-ME-273456), including the welds and weld procedures which are identical in both cases. Since load testing is impractical, the critical welds will be non-destructive tested by ultrasonic means. The laboratory, through the FESS Department, has a contract with M.Q.S. Inspection Inc. The results of this testing will be

  6. Radioactively induced noise in gas-sampling uranium calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The signal induced by radioactivity of a U238 absorber in a cell of a gas-sampling uranium calorimeter was studied. By means of Campbell's theorem, the levels of the radioactively induced noise in uranium gas-sampling calorimeters was calculated. It was shown that in order to obtain similar radioactive noise performance as U-liquid argon or U-scintillator combinations, the α-particles from the uranium must be stopped before entering the sensing volume of gas-uranium calorimeters

  7. The Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter for the GlueX Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic barrel calorimeter is one of the main components of the planned GlueX experiment. It will consist of 48 modules made of consecutive layers of 4 m long lead sheet and fast green scintillator fibers for an overall number of approximately 3000 readout channels with silicon-photomultiplier-based photo-sensors for light collection. The calorimeter is expected to achieve energy and time resolution better than 5% bigsl √(E)+ 2% and 200 ps, respectively. In this contribution we present an overview of the calorimeter design and some preliminary studies of its performance using Monte Carlo simulations and beam test measurements

  8. The Electromagentic Barrel Calorimeter for the GlueX Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barbi, M

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic barrel calorimeter is one of the main components of the planned GlueX experiment. It will consist of 48 modules made of consecutive layers of 4 m long lead sheet and fast green scintillator fibers for an overall number of approximately 3000 readout channels with silicon photomultiplier-based photo-sensors for light collection. The calorimeter is expected to achieve energy and time resolution better than 5%/sqrt(E)+2% and 200 ps, respectively. In this contribution we present an overview of the calorimeter design and some preliminary studies of its performance using Monte Carlo simulations and beam test measurements.

  9. The ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter construction status

    CERN Document Server

    Jérémie, A

    2004-01-01

    The construction and assembly of the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter was described. The calorimeter was built with accordion geometry composed of lead absorbers, liquid argon as ionizing medium and highly granular readout electrodes. The calorimeter was composed of the Barrel and the End-cap, both preceded by presampler sectors to ensure complete recovery of the energy resolution. The detection of cabling errors and testing of the whole calibration chain was done by sending a pulse through the calibration circuit with single readout. (Edited abstract) 3 Refs.

  10. Hadron calorimeter module prototype for baryonic matter studies at Nuclotron

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrishchuk, O. P.; Ladygin, V. P.; Petukhov, Yu. P.; Sychkov, S. Ya

    2014-01-01

    The prototype of the hadron calorimeter module consisting of 66 scintillator/lead layers with the 15x15 cm^2 cross section and 5 nuclear interaction lengths has been designed and produced for the zero degree calorimeter of the BM@N experiment. The prototype has been tested with high energy muon beam of the U-70 accelerator at IHEP. The results of the beam test for different types of photo multipliers and light guides are presented. The results of the Monte-Carlo simulation of the calorimeter ...

  11. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter response

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, S N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data acquisition systems. This contribution describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. The improved description of the optical and electronic signal propagation is highlighted and the validation with the real particle data is presented.

  12. Forward hadron calorimeter of European hybrid spectrometer monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The light-monitoring system of the forward neutral-hadron calorimeter of the European hybrid spectrometer is described. A general block diagram of the system, the functional relationships of the modules, and the ideology of the mathematical support are presented. The calorimeter records neutral particles in momentum range of 10-400 MeV/c. The calorimeter consists of 200 identical counters in modules of four each in a 10 X 20 matrix. The counters are made from plastic scintillators interlayed by steel plates. Light is collected by means of a rod reemitter admitted along the counter axis

  13. Development of real-time low energy electron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy electron beam calorimeter with a thin film window has been fabricated to facilitate a reliable method of dose assessment for electron beam energies down to 200 keV. The system was designed to incorporate a data-logger in order that it could be used on the self-shielded 200 keV facility at MINT. In use, the calorimeter started logging temperature a short time before it passed under the beam and it continued taking data until well after the end of the irradiation. Data could be retrieved at any time after the calorimeter had emerged from the irradiator

  14. Analytical Heat Transfer Modeling of a New Radiation Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ndong, Elysée Obame; Aitken, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an analytical modeling of heat transfers simulating a new radiation calorimeter operating in a temperature range from -50 {\\deg}C to 150 {\\deg}C. The aim of this modeling is the evaluation of the feasibility and performance of the calorimeter by assessing the measurement of power losses of some electrical devices by radiation, the influence of the geometry and materials. Finally a theoretical sensibility of the new apparatus is estimated at ~1 mW. From these results the calorimeter has been successfully implemented and patented.

  15. The UA1 upgrade calorimeter trigger processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased luminosity of the improved CERN Collider and the more subtle signals of second-generation collider physics demand increasingly sophisticated triggering. We have built a new first-level trigger processor designed to use the excellent granularity of the UA1 upgrade calorimeter. This device is entirely digital and handles events in 1.5 μs, thus introducing no deadtime. Its most novel feature is fast two-dimensional electromagnetic cluster-finding with the possibility of demanding an isolated shower of limited penetration. The processor allows multiple combinations of triggers on electromagnetic showers, hadronic jets and energy sums, including a total-energy veto of multiple interactions and a full vector sum of missing transverse energy. This hard-wired processor is about five times more powerful than its predecessor, and makes extensive use of pipelining techniques. It was used extensively in the 1988 and 1989 runs of the CERN Collider. (author)

  16. High resolution X-ray micro calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently we have produced X-ray micro calorimeters with resolving powers approaching 2000 at 5.9keV using a spare XRS microcalorimeter array. In these experiments, we attached 400μm square, 8μm thick HgTe absorbers using a variety of attachment methods to an XRS array and tested the detector array at temperatures between 40 and 60mK. The best results were for absorbers attached using the standard XRS absorber-pixel thermal isolation scheme utilizing SU-8 polymer tubes. In this scenario we achieved a resolution of 3.2eV FWHM at 5.9keV. Substituting a silicon spacer for the SU-8 tubes also yielded sub-5eV results. In contrast, absorbers attached directly to the thermistor produced significant position dependence and thus degraded resolution. We discuss these new high resolution results, the various absorber attachment schemes, and planned future improvements

  17. Muon Detection Based on a Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ciodaro, Thiago; Abreu, R; Achenbach, R; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Aielli, G; Al-Shabibi, A; Aleksandrov, I; Alexandrov, E; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Amorim, A; Amram, N; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Angelaszek, D; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, S; Anulli, F; Apolle, R; Aracena, I; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Avolio, G; Baak, M; Backes, M; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Baines, J; Ballestrero, S; Banerjee, S; Bansil, H S; Barnett, B M; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, V; Batraneanu, S; Battaglia, A; Bauss, B; Beauchemin, P; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behera, P K; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellagamba, L; Bellomo, M; Ben Ami, S; Bendel, M; Benhammou, Y; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bianco, M; Biglietti, M; Blair, R E; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Bondioli, M; Borer, C; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A G; Brawn, I P; Brelier, B; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Brock, R; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bucci, F; Buda, S; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buscher, V; Buttinger, W; Calvet, S; Camarri, P; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Capasso, L; Caprini, M; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cattani, G; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapleau, B; Childers, J T; Chiodini, G; Christidi, I; Ciapetti, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Coccaro, A; Cogan, J; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Conidi, C; Conventi, F; Corradi, M; Corso-Radu, A; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Crescioli, F; Crone, G; Crupi, R; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cummings, J T; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Dao, V; Darlea, G L; Davis, A O; De Asmundis, R; De Pedis, D; De Santo, A; de Seixas, J M; Degenhardt, J; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Diaz, M A; Dietzsch, T A; Dionisi, C; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Drake, G; Dufour, M-A; Dumitru, I; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, K V; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Ernst, J; Etzion, E; Falciano, S; Farrington, S; Farthouat, P; Faulkner, P J W; Fedorko, W; Fellmann, D; Feng, E; Ferrag, S; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fiorini, L; Fischer, G; Flowerdew, M J; Fonseca Martin, T; Francis, D; Fratina, S; French, S T; Front, D; Fukunaga, C; Gadomski, S; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gee, C N P; George, S; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gillman, A R; Giorgi, M; Giunta, M; Giusti, P; Goebel, M; Gonçalo, R; Gonzalez Silva, L; Göringer, C; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Grabowska-Bold, I; Green, B; Groll, M; Guida, A; Guler, H; Haas, S; Hadavand, H; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hauser, R; Hayakawa, T; Hayden, D; Head, S; Heim, S; Hellman, S; Henke, M; Hershenhorn, A; Hidvégi, A; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hirayama, S; Hod, N; Hoffmann, D; Hong, T M; Hryn'ova, T; Huston, J; Iacobucci, G; Igonkina, O; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Izzo, V; Jez, P; Jimenez Otero, S; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Jones, G; Joos, M; Kadlecik, P; Kajomovitz, E; Kanaya, N; Kanega, F; Kanno, T; Kapliy, A; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Kessoku, K; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kirk, J; Klemetti, M; Klofver, P; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Kobayashi, T; Koeneke, K; Koletsou, I; Koll, J D; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Kowalewski, R V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J; Kreisel, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kunkle, J; Kurashige, H; Kuze, M; Kwee, R; Laforge, B; Landon, M; Lane, J; Lankford, A J; Laranjeira Lima, S M; Larner, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Li, S; Liberti, B; Lilley, J N; Linnemann, J T; Lipeles, E; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Lowe, A; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lundberg, J; Lupu, N; Machado Miguéns, J; Mackeprang, R; Maettig, S; Magnoni, L; Maiani, C; Maltrana, D; Mangeard, P-S; Männer, R; Mapelli, L; Marchese, F; Marino, C; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Martin, T; Martyniuk, A; Marzano, F; Masik, J; Mastrandrea, P; Matsushita, T; McCarn, A; Mechnich, J; Medinnis, M; Meier, K; Melachrinos, C; Mendoza Nava, L M; Merola, L; Messina, A; Meyer, C P; Middleton, R P; Mikenberg, G; Mills, C M; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Moa, T; Moenig, K; Monk, J; Monticelli, F; Mora Herrera, C; Morettini, P; Morris, J D; Müller, F; Munwes, Y; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nelson, S; Nemethy, P; Neubauer, M S; Neusiedl, A; Newman, P; Nisati, A; Nomoto, H; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Nurse, E; Ochando, C; Ochi, A; Oda, S; Oh, A; Ohm, C; Okumura, Y; Olivito, D; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Oshita, H; Ospanov, R; Owen, M A; Özcan, V E; Ozone, K; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Paramonov, A; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Petcu, M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petrolo, E; Phan, A; Piegaia, R; Pilkington, A; Pinder, A; Poddar, S; Polini, A; Pope, B G; Potter, C T; Primavera, M; Prokoshin, F; Ptacek, E; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Ramos Dos Santos Neves, R; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S H; Robinson, M; Rodriguez, D; Roich, A; Romeo, G; Romero, R; Roos, L; Ruiz Martinez, A; Ryabov, Y; Ryan, P; Saavedra, A; Safai Tehrani, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saland, J; Salnikov, A; Salvatore, F; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santonico, R; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sasaki, O; Savu, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schäfer, U; Scharf, V L; Scheirich, D; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, K; Schroder, C; Schroer, N; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekhniaidze, G; Sfyrla, A; Shamim, M; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shooltz, D; Sidoti, A; Silbert, O; Silverstein, S; Sinev, N; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sjoen, R; Sjölin, J; Slagle, K; Sloper, J E; Smith, B C; Soffer, A; Soloviev, I; Spagnolo, S; Spiwoks, R; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strauss, E A; Strom, D; Su, D; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Taffard, A; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tanaka, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Taylor, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Thomson, M A; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomoto, M; Topfel, C; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Traynor, D; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Tripiana, M; Triplett, N; True, P; Tsiakiris, M; Tsuno, S; Tuggle, J; Ünel, G; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vallecorsa, S; Valsan, L; Vandelli, W; Vari, R; Vaz Gil Lopes, L; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J C; Volpi, G; Vorwerk, V; Wagner, P; Wang, M; Warburton, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; White, M; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Winklmeier, F; Woods, K S; Wu, S-L; Wu, X; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Xella, S; Yakovlev, A; Yamazaki, Y; Yang, U; Yasu, Y; Yuan, L; Zaitsev, A; Zanello, L; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; zur Nedden, M

    2010-01-01

    The TileCal hadronic calorimeter provides a muon signal which can be used to assist in muon tagging at the ATLAS level-one trigger. Originally, the muon signal was conceived to be combined with the RPC trigger in order to reduce unforeseen high trigger rates due to cavern background. Nevertheless, the combined trigger cannot significantly deteriorate the muon detection performance at the barrel region. This paper presents preliminary studies concerning the impact in muon identification at the ATLAS level-one trigger, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations with single muons with 40 GeV/c momentum. Further, different trigger scenarios were proposed, together with an approach for matching both TileCal and RPC geometries.

  18. Liquid xenon/krypton scintillation calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scintillating LXe/LKr electromagnetic calorimeter has been built at the ITEP and tested at the BATES (MIT) accelerator. The detector consists of PMT matrix and 45 light collecting cells made of aluminized 50 microns Mylar partially covered with p-terphenyl as a wavelength-shifter. Each pyramidal cell has (2.1 x 2.1) x 40 x (4.15 x 4.15) cm dimensions and is viewed by FEU-85 glass-window photomultiplier. The detector has been exposed at 106-348 MeV electron beam. The energy resolution σE/E ≅ 5% √ E at 100 - 350 MeV range in LXe, the coordinate resolution τx ≅ 0.7 cm, the time resolution for single cell ≅ 0.6 ns have been obtained. Possible ways to improve energy resolution are discussed. 8 refs., 15 figs

  19. Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration with $\\pi^{0}$

    CERN Multimedia

    Puig Navarro, A

    2009-01-01

    Several methods can be used in order to achieve precise calibration of the LHCb Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) once reasonable cell equalization has been reached. At low transverse energy, the standard calibration procedure is an iterative method based on the fit of the $\\gamma\\gamma$ invariant mass distribution for each cell of the decay $\\pi^{0}\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ with resolved photons. A new technique for generating the combinatorial background of such decays directly from data has been developed. Knowledge of the background could allow an alternative calibration method based on a event by event fit of the same $\\gamma\\gamma$ invariant mass distribution where contributions from groups of cells are considered in a single fit. The background generation procedure and this possible new calibration method are presented in this poster, in addition to an overview of the LHCb Calorimetry system and ECAL calibration techniques.

  20. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  1. Development of Shashlyk Calorimeter for KOPIO

    CERN Document Server

    Atoian, G S; Karavichev, O V; Karavitcheva, T L; Poblaguev, A A; Zeller, M E

    2003-01-01

    A Shashlyk calorimeter prototype for the KOPIO experiment has been constructed and experimentally tested. The energy resolution of about 4%/sqrt(E(GeV)) for 0.5-2.0 GeV/c positrons was obtained. Based on this results as well as on the results of special measurements, a Monte-Carlo model of the Shashlyk module response was developed. This model, including the effects of shower evolution, light collection in scintillator plates, light attenuation in fibers, quantum efficiency of the photodetector, thresholds and noises in the readout system is consistent with experimental results. Possible improvment of the Shashlyk energy resolution up to 3%/sqrt(E(GeV)), the level required by KOPIO experiment, are discussed.

  2. Scintillating LXe/LKr electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scintillating LXe/LKr electromagnetic calorimeter has been built at the ITEP and tested at the BATES (MIT) accelerator. The detector consists of a PMT matrix and 45 light collecting cells made of aluminized Mylar partially covered with p-terphenyl as a wavelength-shifter (WLS). Each pyramidal cell has (2.1 x 2.1) x 40 x (4.15 x 4.15) cm dimensions and is viewed by an FEU-85 glass-window photomultiplier. The detector has been exposed to the 106--348 MeV electron beam. The energy resolution is σE/E ≅ 5%/√E at 100--350 MeV range in LXe; the coordinate resolution is σX ≅ 0.7 cm; the time resolution is στ ≅ 0.6 ns for a single cell. Possible ways to improve energy resolution are discussed

  3. Trigger circuits for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monolithic and discrete circuits have been developed to provide trigger signals for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter detector. These trigger circuits are deadtimeless and create overlapping 4 by 4 energy sums, a cosmic muon trigger, and a 144 channel energy sum. The front end electronics of the PHENIX system sample the energy and timing channels at each bunch crossing (BC) but it is not known immediately if this data is of interest. The information from the trigger circuits is used to determine if the data collected is of interest and should be digitized and stored or discarded. This paper presents details of the design, issues affecting circuit performance, characterization of prototypes fabricated in 1.2 microm Orbit CMOS, and integration of the circuits into the EMCal electronics system

  4. Development of 300 g scintillating calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity for WIMP detection can be improved by an ability to efficiently discriminate the γ and β backgrounds from the nuclear recoil signals. The CRESST phase II detectors will achieve this discrimination by means of simultaneous measurement of phonons and scintillation light. We report on the development of a 300 g detector module consisting of two separate calorimeters fitted with tungsten phase transition thermometers. A 300 g CaWO4 crystal serves as the target material in which a recoiling WIMP creates both phonons and scintillation light. Phonons are detected by a thermometer on the CaWO4 crystal. A second smaller detector in close proximity detects the scintillation light. Measurements with this setup will be presented

  5. Microfabrication of High Resolution X-ray Magnetic Calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic magnetic calorimeter (MMC) is one of the most promising x-ray detector technologies for providing the very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray imaging spectroscopy. For this purpose, we have developed micro-fabricated 5x5 arrays of MMC of which each individual pixel has excellent energy resolution as good as 3.4 eV at 6 keV x-ray. Here we report on the fabrication techniques developed to achieve good resolution and high efficiency. These include: processing of a thin insulation layer for strong magnetic coupling between the AuEr sensor film and the niobium pick-up coil; production of overhanging absorbers for enhanced efficiency of x-ray absorption; fabrication on SiN membranes to minimize the effects on energy resolution from athermal phonon loss. We have also improved the deposition of the magnetic sensor film such that the film magnetization is nearly completely that is expected from the AuEr sputter target bulk material. In addition, we have included a study of a positional sensitive design, the Hydra design, which allows thermal coupling of four absorbers to a common MMC sensor and circuit.

  6. Design, Performance and Calibration of the CMS Forward Calorimeter Wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Baiatian, G; Emeliantchik, Igor; Massolov, V; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Stefanovich, R; Damgov, Jordan; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Vankov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Bencze, Gyorgy; Laszlo, Andras; Pal, Andras; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zálán, Peter; Fenyvesi, Andras; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnager, V; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Arun; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Singh, Jas Bir; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Dugad, Shashikant; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Katta, S; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Verma, Piyush; Hashemi, Majid; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M; Paktinat, S; Babich, Kanstantsin; Golutvin, Igor; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kosarev, Ivan; Ladygin, Vladimir; Meshcheryakov, Gleb; Moissenz, P; Petrosian, A; Rogalev, Evgueni; Sergeyev, S; Smirnov, Vitaly; Vishnevski, A V; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Gershtein, Yuri; Ilyina, N P; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kisselevich, I; Kolossov, V; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Oulyanov, A; Safronov, S; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Gribushin, Andrey; Demianov, A; Kodolova, Olga; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Teplov, Konstantin; Vardanyan, Irina; Yershov, A A; Abramov, Victor; Goncharov, Petr; Kalinin, Alexey; Korablev, Andrey; Khmelnikov, V A; Korneev, Yury; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Kryshkin, V; Lukanin, Vladimir; Pikalov, Vladimir; Ryazanov, Anton; Talov, Vladimir; Turchanovich, L K; Volkov, Alexey; Camporesi, Tiziano; De Visser, Theo; Vlassov, E; Aydin, Sezgin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Koylu, S; Kurt, Pelin; Kuzucu, A; Onengüt, G; Ozdes-Koca, N; Ozkurt, Halil; Sogut, Kenan; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Gamsizkan, Halil; Ozkan, Cigdem; Sekmen, Sezen; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, Ramazan; Yazgan, Efe; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Dindar, Kamile; Gülmez, Erhan; Isiksal, Engin; Kaya, Mithat; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Grinev, B; Lubinsky, V; Senchyshyn, Vitaliy; Anderson, E Walter; Hauptman, John M; Elias, John E; Freeman, Jim; Green, Dan; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Lazic, Dragoslav; Los, Serguei; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Suzuki, Ichiro; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Antchev, Georgy; Arcidy, M; Hazen, Eric; Lawlor, C; Machado, Emanuel; Posch, C; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Varela, F; Wu, Shouxiang; Adams, Mark Raymond; Burchesky, Kyle; Qiang, W; Abdullin, Salavat; Baden, Drew; Bard, Robert; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Grassi, Tullio; Jarvis, Chad; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunori, Shuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Skuja, Andris; Wang, Lei; Wetstein, Matthew; Ayan, S; Akgun, Ugur; Duru, Firdevs; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Schmidt, Ianos; Akchurin, Nural; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Gumus, Kazim; Kim, Heejong; Spezziga, Mario; Thomas, Ray; Wigmans, Richard; Baarmand, Marc M; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Vodopyanov, I; Kramer, Laird; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martínez, German; Cushman, Priscilla; Ma, Yousi; Sherwood, Brian; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Reidy, Jim; Sanders, David A; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Tully, Christopher; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Barnes, Virgil E; Laasanen, Alvin T; Pompos, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    We report on the test beam results and calibration methods using charged particles of the CMS Forward Calorimeter (HF). The HF calorimeter covers a large pseudorapidity region (3\\l |\\eta| \\le 5), and is essential for large number of physics channels with missing transverse energy. It is also expected to play a prominent role in the measurement of forward tagging jets in weak boson fusion channels. The HF calorimeter is based on steel absorber with embedded fused-silica-core optical fibers where Cherenkov radiation forms the basis of signal generation. Thus, the detector is essentially sensitive only to the electromagnetic shower core and is highly non-compensating (e/h \\approx 5). This feature is also manifest in narrow and relatively short showers compared to similar calorimeters based on ionization. The choice of fused-silica optical fibers as active material is dictated by its exceptional radiation hardness. The electromagnetic energy resolution is dominated by photoelectron statistics and can be expressed...

  7. Electromagnetic response of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CALICE collaboration is studying the design of high performance electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters for future International Linear Collider detectors. For the hadronic calorimeter, one option is a highly granular sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillator layers as active material. High granularity is obtained by segmenting the scintillator into small tiles individually read out via silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM). A prototype has been built, consisting of thirty-eight sensitive layers, segmented into about eight thousand channels. In 2007 the prototype was exposed to positrons and hadrons using the CERN SPS beam, covering a wide range of beam energies and incidence angles. The challenge of cell equalization and calibration of such a large number of channels is best validated using electromagnetic processes. The response of the prototype steel-scintillator calorimeter, including linearity and uniformity, to electrons is investigated and described. (orig.)

  8. Electromagnetic response of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Blaising, J-J; Drancourt, C; Espargilière, A; Gaglione, R; Geffroy, N; Karyotakis, Y; Prast, J; Vouters, G; Francis, K; Repond, J; Smith, J; Xia, L; Baldolemar, E; Li, J; Park, S T; Sosebee, M; White, A P; Yu, J; Mikami, Y; Goto, N K Watson T; Mavromanolakis, G; Thomson, M A; Yan, D R Ward W; Benyamna, M; Cârloganu, C; Fehr, F; Gay, P; Manen, S; Royer, L; Blazey, G C; Dyshkant, A; Lima, J G R; Zutshi, V; Hostachy, J-Y; Morin, L; Cornett, U; David, D; Fabbri, R; Falley, G; Gadow, K; Garutti, E; Göttlicher, P; Günter, C; Karstensen, S; Krivan, F; Lucaci-Timoce, A-I; Lu, S; Lutz, B; Marchesini, I; Meyer, N; Morozov, S; Morgunov, V; Reinecke, M; Sefkow, F; Smirnov, P; Terwort, M; Vargas-Trevino, A; Wattimena, N; Wendt, O; Feege, N; Haller, J; Richter, S; Eckert, J Samson P; Kaplan, A; Schultz-Coulon, H-Ch; Shen, W; Stamen, R; Tadday, A; Bilki, B; Norbeck, E; Onel, Y; Wilson, G W; Kawagoe, K; Uozumi, S; Ballin, J A; Dauncey, P D; Magnan, A -M; Yilmaz, H S; Zorba, O; Bartsch, V; Postranecky, M; Warren, M; Wing, M; Salvatore, F; Alamillo, E Calvo; Fouz, M -C; Puerta-Pelayo, J; Balagura, V; Bobchenko, B; Chadeeva, M; Danilov, M; Epifantsev, A; Markin, O; Mizuk, R; Novikov, E; Rusinov, V; Tarkovsky, E; Soloviev, Y; Kozlov, V; Buzhan, P; Dolgoshein, B; Ilyin, A; Kantserov, V; Kaplin, V; Karakash, A; Popova, E; Smirnov, S; Frey, A; Kiesling, C; Seidel, K; Simon, F; Soldner, C; Weuste, L; Bonis, J; Bouquet, B; Callier, S; Cornebise, P; Doublet, Ph; Dulucq, F; Faucci Giannelli, M; Fleury, J; Guilhem, G; Li, H; Martin-Chassard, G; Richard, F; de la Taille, Ch; Pöschl, R; Raux, L; Seguin-Moreau, N; Wicek, F; Anduze, M; Boudry, V; Brient, J-C; Jeans, D; Mora de Freitas, P; Musat, G; Reinhard, M; Ruan, M; Videau, H; Bulanek, B; Zacek, J; Cvach, J; Gallus, P; Havranek, M; Janata, M; Kvasnicka, J; Lednicky, D; Marcisovsky, M; Polak, I; Popule, J; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Ruzicka, P; Sicho, P; Smolik, J; Vrba, V; Zalesak, J; Belhorma, B; Ghazlane, H; Kotera, K; Nishiyama, M; Takeshita, T; Tozuka, S

    2010-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration is studying the design of high performance electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters for future International Linear Collider detectors. For the hadronic calorimeter, one option is a highly granular sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillator layers as active material. High granularity is obtained by segmenting the scintillator into small tiles individually read out via silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM). A prototype has been built, consisting of thirty-eight sensitive layers, segmented into about eight thousand channels. In 2007 the prototype was exposed to positrons and hadrons using the CERN SPS beam, covering a wide range of beam energies and incidence angles. The challenge of cell equalization and calibration of such a large number of channels is best validated using electromagnetic processes. The response of the prototype steel-scintillator calorimeter, including linearity and uniformity, to electrons is investigated and described.

  9. LHCb: First year of running for the LHCb calorimeter system

    CERN Multimedia

    Guz, Y

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva) [1, 2]. LHCb is a single-arm spectrometer with a forward angular coverage from approximately 10 mrad to 300 mrad. It comprises a calorimeter system composed of four subdetectors [3]. It selects transverse energy hadron, electron and photon candidates for the first trigger level (L0), which makes a decision 4µs after the interaction. It provides the identification of electrons, photons and hadrons as well as the measurement of their energies and positions. The set of constraints resulting from these functionalities defines the general structure and the main characteristics of the calorimeter system and its associated electronics. A classical structure of an electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) followed by a hadron calorimeter (HCAL) has been adopted. In addition the system includes in front of them the Scintillating Pad Detector (SPD) and Pre-Showe...

  10. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding

  11. Calibration and Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Peralva, B S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. The calorimeter response is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser, and charge injection systems. This multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This contribution presents a brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems as well as the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability. The performance of the Tile Calorimeter with...

  12. Use of the calorimeter in the dosimetry for electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measure of different radiation types, with specific dosemeters, requires that the absorbed dose should be measured with accuracy by some common standard. The existent problem around the dosimetry of accelerated electrons has forced to the development of diverse detector types that after having analyzed the characteristics; dependability and reproducibility are used as dosemeters. Recently the calorimeters have been developed, with the purpose of carrying out dosimetry for electron accelerators. The RISO laboratory in Denmark, in it 10 MeV accelerator had been used for the dosimetry those water calorimeters, later on, using the principle of the water calorimeter, it was designing one similar, for the accelerator of 400 keV. Recently manufactured simple calorimeters of graphite have been used, which can be used in both accelerators of 10 MeV and 400 keV. (Author)

  13. The optical instrumentation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tile Calorimeter, covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment up to pseudorapidities of ±1.7, is a sampling device built with scintillating tiles that alternate with iron plates. The light is collected in wave-length shifting (WLS) fibers and is read out with photomultipliers. In the characteristic geometry of this calorimeter the tiles lie in planes perpendicular to the beams, resulting in a very simple and modular mechanical and optical layout. This paper focuses on the procedures applied in the optical instrumentation of the calorimeter, which involved the assembly of about 460,000 scintillator tiles and 550,000 WLS fibers. The outcome is a hadronic calorimeter that meets the ATLAS performance requirements, as shown in this paper.

  14. ATLAS LAr calorimeter degradation studies for HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novgorodova, Olga [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The future High Luminosity LHC upgrade (HL-LHC) will increase the luminosity by a factor of ten, which implies radiation hardness requirements for the LHC detectors. This requires to test the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters for higher intensities. In several test beam campaigns at IHEP/Protvino, the HiLum collaboration investigated small-size modules of the electromagnetic, hadronic, and forward calorimeters. The intensity of beam varied over a wide range (10{sup 6} to 10{sup 12} p/s) and beyond the maximum expected at HL-LHC for these calorimeters. The correlation between beam intensity and the electromagnetic calorimeter HV current signal is used to quantify the possible signal degradation. The results of the detector performance before and after operation in highest beam intensities are presented.

  15. The Forward Calorimeter of the GlueX Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Daniel; GlueX Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Forward Calorimeter (FCAL) of the GlueX experiment is a lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter currently being built in Hall D of Jefferson Lab. The GlueX experiment is a photoproduction experiment that will utilize coherent bremsstrahlung radiation to map out the light meson spectrum, including a search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers (JPC). The FCAL will detect photons between 1° and 10 .8° downstream from the target. The calorimeter is built out of 2800 elements, each of which consists of a lead glass block, an FEU 84-3 PMT, and a custom Cockcroft-Walton electronic base. In the Fall of 2011, a 25 element prototype detector was installed in Hall B of Jefferson Lab to measure the energy and timing resolution of the calorimeter using electrons between 100 and 250 MeV. The design and construction of FCAL and the results from the prototype test will be discussed.

  16. Electron identification in and performance of the ND280 Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Carver, Antony

    T2K is an o axis neutrino beam experiment with a baseline of 295 km to the far detector, Super-Kamiokande. The near detector, ND280, measures the ux and energy spectra of electron and muon neutrinos in the direction of Super-Kamiokande. An electromagnetic calorimeter constructed from lead and scintillator surrounds the inner detector. Three time projection chambers and two ne grained scintillator detectors sit inside the calorimeter. This thesis describes the development of a particle identification algorithm for the calorimeter and studies how it can enhance a simple electron neutrino analysis. A particle identification algorithm was written for the electromagnetic calorimeter to separate minimally ionising particles, electromagnetic and hadronic showers. A Monte Carlo study suggested that the algorithm produced an electron sample with a relative muon contamination of 10+-2 whilst maintaining an electron efficiency of 80%. Data collected at CERN was then used to make comparisons between the Monte Carlo simul...

  17. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    --Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at LHC TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Detector non-uniformities and imperfections are also represented. Detailed validation has shown that the simulated detector response characteristics have been successfully integrated and...

  18. Electromagnetic response of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, C.; Blaha, J.; Blaising, J.J. [Savoie Univ., CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-le-Vieux (FR). Lab. d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules] (and others)

    2010-12-15

    The CALICE collaboration is studying the design of high performance electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters for future International Linear Collider detectors. For the hadronic calorimeter, one option is a highly granular sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillator layers as active material. High granularity is obtained by segmenting the scintillator into small tiles individually read out via silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM). A prototype has been built, consisting of thirty-eight sensitive layers, segmented into about eight thousand channels. In 2007 the prototype was exposed to positrons and hadrons using the CERN SPS beam, covering a wide range of beam energies and incidence angles. The challenge of cell equalization and calibration of such a large number of channels is best validated using electromagnetic processes. The response of the prototype steel-scintillator calorimeter, including linearity and uniformity, to electrons is investigated and described. (orig.)

  19. Investigations of the characteristics of the DELPHI hadron calorimeter prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the DELHI hadron calorimeter prototype in various modes of operation of its detectors are presented in this paper. It is shown that the transition to a saturated proportional mode and use of more sensitive electronics do not make worse the hadron calorimeter operation. The possibility to select muon tracks in the hadron calorimeter and to use them for detector triggering has been investigated. The results of nuclear shower simulation in the detector are presented. The form of the dependence between signals from the electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters has been found out. The supposition to improve the procedure of the hadron energy reconstruction with the help of the discovered function has been made

  20. Quantum Calorimeters Based on HgCdTe Alloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's next generation of x-ray observation missions require x-ray calorimeters with superior energy resolution. Semimetallic HgTe has already proven itself as an...

  1. Closing LHCb's calorimeter around the beam-pipe

    CERN Multimedia

    Kristic, R

    2008-01-01

    Photos 1 and 2 show the pre-shower, lead absorber and the scintillating pad detector layers moving in towards the beam-pipe. Photos 3,4 and 5 show the hadron calorimeter with both halves closed around the beam-pipe, to the left of the picture and, in the centre, half of the electromagnetic calorimeter closed in towards the beam-pipe.

  2. The BaBar Electromagnetic Calorimeter: Status and Performance Improvements

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Johannes M.; Group, for the BaBar Collaboration EMC

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter at the BaBar detector, part of the asymmetric B Factory at SLAC, measures photons in the energy range from 20 MeV to 8 GeV with high resolution. The current status of the calorimeter, now in its seventh year of operation, is being presented, as well as details on improvements made to the analysis code during the last years.

  3. A purity monitoring system for liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For liquid argon calorimeters electronegative impurities dissolved in the medium degrade the detector response and deteriorate the energy resolution, especially at high energies. A concept for a purity monitoring system for liquid argon calorimeters has been developed and is presented here. Special combined monitors of 241Am- and 207Bi-cells are used to monitor the concentration of impurities. The working principle as well as results from test measurements are discussed

  4. Measurement of the Contribution of Neutrons to Hadron Calorimeter Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Akchurin, N.

    2007-01-01

    The contributions of neutrons to hadronic signals from the DREAM calorimeter are measured by analyzing the time structure of these signals. The neutrons, which mainly originate from the evaporation stage of nuclear breakup in the hadronic shower development process, contribute through elastic scattering off protons in the plastic scintillating fibers which provide the $dE/dx$ information in this calorimeter. This contribution is characterized by an exponential tail in the pulse shape, with a ...

  5. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  6. A 3000 element lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3045 element lead glass calorimeter and an associated fast trigger processor have been constructed, tested and implemented in BNL experiment E852 in conjunction with the multi-particle spectrometer (MPS). Approximately, 109 all-neutral and neutral plus charged triggers were recorded with this apparatus during data runs in 1994 and 1995. This paper reports on the construction, testing and performance of this lead glass calorimeter and the associated trigger processor. (orig.)

  7. Response of a sampling calorimeter to low energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Pb/scintillator sampling calorimeter has been built for use in relativistic heavy ion experiments. The calorimeter is constructed from 59 layers of 3 mm scintillator separated by 1.0 cm layers of Pb, with every 6th Pb layer replaced with a 1.6 cm plate of Fe. The read-out is done via wave-length shifting optical fibers which are connected to photomultipliers in groups. (orig./HSI)

  8. Performance and Operation of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; 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Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The operation and general performance of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter using cosmic-ray muons are described. These muons were recorded after the closure of the CMS detector in late 2008. The calorimeter is made of lead tungstate crystals and the overall status of the 75848 channels corresponding to the barrel and endcap detectors is reported. The stability of crucial operational parameters, such as high voltage, temperature and electronic noise, is summarised and the performance of the light monitoring system is presented.

  9. Ultra-Relativistic Magnetic Monopole Search with the ANITA-II Balloon-borne Radio Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Detrixhe, M; Gorham, P W; Allison, P; Baughmann, B; Beatty, J J; Belov, K; Bevan, S; Binns, W R; Chen, C; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; DeMarco, D; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Frankenfeld, C; Grashorn, E W; Hogan, D P; Griffith, N; Hill, B; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Javaid, A; Liewer, K M; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B C; Miki, C; Mottram, M; Nam, J; Nichol, R J; Palladino, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Ruckman, L; Saltzberg, D; Seckel, D; Varner, G S; Vieregg, A G; Wang, Y

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a search for extended energy deposition trails left by ultra-relativistic magnetic monopoles interacting in Antarctic ice. The non-observation of any satisfactory candidates in the 31 days of accumulated ANITA-II flight data results in an upper limit on the diffuse flux of relativistic monopoles. We obtain a 90% C.L. limit of order 10^{-19}/(cm^2-s-sr) for values of Lorentz boost factor 10^{10}

  10. Observation of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon-borne Radio Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, S; Gorham, P W; Grashorn, E; Allison, P; Barwick, S W; Beatty, J J; Belov, K; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, C; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; DuVernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Vieregg, A G; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Israel, M H; Javaid, A; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B C; Miki, C; Miočinović, P; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R J; Palladino, K; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Ruckman, L; Saltzberg, D; Seckel, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

    2010-01-01

    We report the observation of sixteen cosmic ray events of mean energy of $1.5 \\times 10^{19}$ eV, via radio pulses originating from the interaction of the cosmic ray air shower with the Antarctic geomagnetic field, a process known as geosynchrotron emission. We present the first ultra-wideband, far-field measurements of the radio spectral density of geosynchrotron emission in the range from 300-1000 MHz. The emission is 100% linearly polarized in the plane perpendicular to the projected geomagnetic field. Fourteen of our observed events are seen to have a phase-inversion due to reflection of the radio beam off the ice surface, and two additional events are seen directly from above the horizon.

  11. Interference of sulphur dioxide to balloon-borne ECC ozone sensors over the Valley of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal decrease in the ozonesonde sensor signal occurred during air-pollution study campaigns in November 2011 and March 2012 in Mexico City. Sharp drops around 5 km a.s.l. and above were observed in November 2011, and a broad deficit in the convective boundary layer in March 2012. Various circumstantial evidence indicates that the decrease was due to interference of SO2 gas to Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC ozone sensors. The sharp drops in November 2011 are considered to be caused by the SO2 plume from the Popocatépetl volcano to the south-east of Mexico City. Response experiments of the ECC sensor to representative atmospheric trace gases showed that only SO2 could generate the observed abrupt drops. The vertical structure of the plume reproduced by a Lagrangian particle diffusion simulation also supported this assumption. The near-ground deficit in March 2012 is considered to be generated by the SO2 plume from the Tula industrial complex to the north-west of Mexico City. Sporadic large SO2 emission is known to occur from this region, and before and at the ozonesonde launching time, large intermittent peaks of SO2 concentration were recorded at the ground-level monitoring stations. The difference between the O3 concentration obtained by ozonesonde and that by UV-based O3 monitor was consistent with the SO2 concentration measured by a UV-based monitor on the ground. The plume vertical profiles estimated by the Lagrangian particle diffusion simulation agreed fairly well with the observed profile. Statistical analysis of the wind field in Mexico City revealed that the Popocatépetl effect is most likely to occur from June to October, and the Tula effect all the year.

  12. B-MINE, the balloon-borne microcalorimeter nuclear line explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, E.; Schnopper, H.; Jones, C.;

    2002-01-01

    introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band...

  13. Interference of sulphur dioxide to balloon-borne ECC ozone sensors over the Valley of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    I. Kanda; Basaldud, R.; Horikoshi, N.; Okazaki, Y.; S. E. Benítez Garcia; Ortínez, A.; Ramos Benítez, V. R.; B. Cárdenas; Wakamatsu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal decrease in the ozonesonde sensor signal occurred during air-pollution study campaigns in November 2011 and March 2012 in Mexico City. Sharp drops around 5 km a.s.l. and above were observed in November 2011, and a broad deficit in the convective boundary layer in March 2012. Various circumstantial evidence indicates that the decrease was due to interference of SO2 gas to Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) ozone sensors. The sharp drops in ...

  14. A 3D CZT hard x-ray polarimeter for a balloon-borne payload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caroli, E.; Alvarez, J. M.; Auricchio, N.;

    2012-01-01

    status of the Crab pulsar, i.e. the polarization level and direction. The detector with 3D spatial resolution is based on a CZT spectrometer in a highly segmented configuration designed to operate as a high performance scattering polarimeter. We discuss different configurations based on recent...

  15. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and a VLF antenna system.

  16. B-MINE, the balloon-borne microcalorimeter nuclear line explorer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B-MINE is a concept for a balloon mission designed to probe the deepest regions of a supernova explosion by detecting 44Ti emission at 68 keV with spatial and spectral resolutions that are sufficient to determine the extent and velocity distribution of the 44Ti emitting region. The payload introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band. This combination provides a reduced background, an energy resolution of 50 eV and a 3σ sensitivity in 106 s of 3.3x10-7 ph cm-2 s-1 at 68 keV. During the course of a long duration balloon flight, B-MINE could carry out a detailed study of the 44Ti emission line centroid and width in CAS A

  17. Near infrared multicolor photometry of late type stars with the balloon borne astronomical telescope BAT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new star follower has been developed for observing the near infrared emission of late type stars. The sensor of the follower consists of a semicircular rotating sector and a photomultiplier. The practical accuracy of the angle of tracing was about 1 minute. A photometer was installed at the focus point of the main telescope. The infrared photometer consists of a filter turret, a chopper, an infrared detector and a synchronous amplifier. Five flights of balloons were made since September 13, 1974. The height of the flights was about 25 km. The type of observed spectra ranges from A0 to M6. The results of analysis was compared with the atmospheric model by Tsuji. The physical parameters, such as effective temperature, logarithm of surface gravity and velocity of turbulent flow, of late type stars (K5 - M6) were determined. (Kato, T.)

  18. Approaching the knee-balloon-borne observations of cosmic ray composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Below the knee in the cosmic ray spectrum, balloon and spacecraft experiments offer the capability of direct composition and energy measurements on the primary particles. A major difficulty is obtaining enough exposure to extend the range of direct measurements sufficiently high in energy to permit overlap with ground-based observations. Presently, balloon and space measurements extend only up to ∼100 TeV, well below the range of groundbased experiments. The prospect of Ultra-Long Duration Balloon missions offers the promise of multiple long flights that can build up exposure. The status of balloon measurements to measure the high energy proton and nuclear composition and spectrum is reviewed, and the statistical considerations involved in searching for a steepening in the spectrum are discussed. Given the very steeply falling spectrum, it appears unlikely that balloon experiments will be able to extend the range of direct measurements beyond 1000 TeV any time in the near future. Especially given the recent suggestions from KASCADE that the proton spectrum steepens only at 4000-5000 TeV, the chance of detecting the knee with direct measurements of protons to iron on balloons is not likely to occur without significant increases in the payload and flight duration capabilities of high altitude balloons

  19. Note: A balloon-borne accelerometer technique for measuring atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlton, Graeme J.; Giles Harrison, R.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Williams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    A weather balloon and its suspended instrument package behave like a pendulum with a moving pivot. This dynamical system is exploited here for the detection of atmospheric turbulence. By adding an accelerometer to the instrument package, the size of the swings induced by atmospheric turbulence can be measured. In test flights, strong turbulence has induced accelerations greater than 5g, where g = 9.81 m s-2. Calibration of the accelerometer data with a vertically orientated lidar has allowed eddy dissipation rate values of between 10-3 and 10-2 m2 s-3 to be derived from the accelerometer data. The novel use of a whole weather balloon and its adapted instrument package can be used as a new instrument to make standardized in situ measurements of turbulence.

  20. B-MINE, the balloon-borne microcalorimeter nuclear line explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, E; Schnopper, H; Jones, C;

    2001-01-01

    introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band....... This combination provides a reduced background, an energy resolution of 50 eV and a 3sigma sensitivity in 10(6) s of 3.3 x 10(-7) ph cm(-2) s(-1) at 68 keV. During the course of a long duration balloon flight, B-MINE could carry out a detailed study of the Ti-44 emission line centroid and width in CAS A....

  1. B-MINE, the balloon-borne microcalorimeter nuclear line explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, E; Schnopper, H; Jones, C; Forman, W; Bandler, S; Murray, S; Romaine, S; Slane, P; Grindlay, J; Madden, N; Beeman, J; Haller, EE; Smith, D; Barbera, M; Collura, A; Christensen, Finn Erland; Ramsey, B; Woosley, S; Diehl, R; Tucker, G; Fabregat, J; Reglero, V; Gimenez, A

    2001-01-01

    introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band. This...

  2. B-MINE: The Balloon-Borne Microcalorimeter Nuclear Line Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, E.; Schnopper, H.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Bandler, S.; Murray, S.; Romaine, S.; Slane, P.; Grindlay, J.; Madden, N.

    2001-01-01

    B-MINE is a concept for a balloon mission designed to probe the deepest regions of a supernova explosion by detecting 44Ti emission at 68 keV with spatial and spectral resolutions that are sufficient to determine the extent and velocity distribution of the 44Ti emitting region. The payload introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band. This combination provides a reduced background, an energy resolution of 50 eV and a 3 sigma sensitivity in 10 (exp 6) s of 3.3 x 10(exp -7) ph cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) at 68 keV. During the course of a long duration balloon flight, B-MINE could carry out a detailed study of the 44Ti emission line centroid and width in CAS A.

  3. Balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimetry with PoGOLite

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    PoGOLite is a hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-100 keV energy band. The instrument design is optimised for the observation of compact astrophysical sources. Observations are conducted from a stabilised stratospheric balloon platform at an altitude of approximately 40 km. The primary targets for first balloon flights of a reduced effective area instrument are the Crab and Cygnus-X1. The polarisation of incoming photons is determined using coincident Compton scattering and photo-absorption events reconstructed in an array of plastic scintillator detector cells surrounded by a bismuth germanate oxide (BGO) side anticoincidence shield and a polyethylene neutron shield. A custom attitude control system keeps the polarimeter field-of-view aligned to targets of interest, compensating for sidereal motion and perturbations such as torsional forces in the balloon rigging. An overview of the PoGOLite project is presented and the outcome of the ill-fated maiden balloon flight is discussed.

  4. Flight performance of EXAM - a balloon-borne detector to search for extragalactic antimatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the performance of the EXAM detector during its five hour balloon flight in 1988. EXAM is an experiment designed to search for cosmic rays of extragalactic origin which are made of antimatter. The EXAM technique to identify antinuclei is unique, being based on higher order corrections to electronic stopping power of charged particles, and on the response characteristics of CR-39 track-etch detectors, plastic scintillators, and Cherenkov radiators. Included in the present paper are the completed analysis of the electronic detectors, and preliminary results of the analysis of the track-etch detectors, including a demonstration of our ability to match particles identified with the drift tube tracking elements during the flight with their tracks found in the passive CR-39 detectors. When the CR-39 analysis is complete, we will have approximately 10 000 events for which antimatter analysis can be made. ((orig.))

  5. Ultrarelativistic magnetic monopole search with the ANITA-II balloon-borne radio interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted a search for extended energy deposition trails left by ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles interacting in Antarctic ice. The nonobservation of any satisfactory candidates in the 31 days of accumulated ANITA-II (Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna) flight data results in an upper limit on the diffuse flux of relativistic monopoles. We obtain a 90% C.L. limit of order 10-19 (cm2 s sr)-1 for values of Lorentz factor, γ, 1010≤γ at the anticipated energy Etot=1016 GeV. This bound is stronger than all previously published experimental limits for this kinematic range.

  6. The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer Through Satellite and Balloon-Borne Measurements Combined With Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Natarajan, M.; Wegner, T.; Baker, N.; Crawford, J.; Moore, J.; Pandit, A.; Kumar, S.; Singh, A.; Vignelles, D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Deshler, T.; Gadhavi, H.; Jayaraman, A.; Raj, A.; Kumar, H.; Stenchikov, G.; Wiehold, F.; Bian, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer-ATAL is a confined area of enhanced aerosol associated Summer Asia Monsoon spanning from the E. Med Sea to W. China. It essentially extends from top of convective outflow over much of SE Asia Existence recognize through CALIPSO observations.

  7. Performance validation of phase diversity image reconstruction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-05-01

    We present a performance study of a phase diversity (PD) image reconstruction algorithm based on artificial solar images obtained from MHD simulations and on seeing-free data obtained with the SuFI instrument on the Sunrise balloon borne observatory. The artificial data were altered by applying different levels of degradation with synthesised wavefront errors and noise. The PD algorithm was modified by changing the number of fitted polynomials, the shape of the pupil and the applied noise filter. The obtained reconstructions are evaluated by means of the resulting rms intensity contrast and by the conspicuousness of appearing artifacts. The results show that PD is a robust method which consistently recovers the initial unaffected image contents. The efficiency of the reconstruction is, however, strongly dependent on the number of used fitting polynomials and the noise level of the images. If the maximum number of fitted polynomials is higher than 21, artifacts have to be accepted and for noise levels higher than 10-3 the commonly used noise filtering techniques are not able to avoid amplification of spurious structures.

  8. Results on the LHCb hadron calorimeter prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hadron calorimeter HCAL of the LHCb experiment at CERN is the key device which provides data for the level-0 high pt trigger and can perform fast trigger signal construction with reasonable background suppression when B decays are reconstructed. During 1997-1999 an HCAL prototype stack of 6 modules of 0.96 x 0.96 m2 front surface and with different internal structure has been constructed and exposed to the X7 test beams of the SPS at CERN. HCAL technology consists of a scintillator/iron sampling structure with scintillating tiles parallel to the beam axis and a passive radiator made of steel plates. The absorber plates were supplied by Romanian, CERN and IPT Kharkiv groups. Scintillating tiles have been produced in Russia using a modern casting technique. In the prototype we use Pol.Hi.Tech.(S250) single clad wave-length shifting fibers of 1 mm in diameter with a polished and aluminized mirror at one end. Parts of two HCAL modules have been recently re-assembled with new faster fiber of type Bicron BCF-92 and irradiated components. Two types of Russian photomultipliers have been used in the CAL Prototype beam-tests: FEU-84-3 and FEU-115M. A calibration system with radioactive source and pulsing LED has been used and checked. Beam tests with the HCAL Prototype have been done at the X7 beam-line of the West Area experimental hall at CERN in a wide beam momentum range from 5 to 100 GeV. A rotating table on the platform allows to turn the detector on up to 180 angle around he vertical axis and a lateral and an up-down displacement of 2 m. A computer controlled High Voltage distribution scheme, developed by IFIN-HH group, allows individual setting of the HV on each PMT for the gain adjustment with a minimal amount of cables. The system consists of three parts: 1) the control box which includes the low voltage power supply, the RS232 interface to a PC and three modules of the high voltage power supply: two with Vmax = 2000 V, Imax = 10 mA and one with Vmax = 2500 V

  9. The ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Garvey, J; Mahout, G; Moye, T H; Staley, R J; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Achenbach, R; Hanke, P; Kluge, E E; Meier, K; Meshkov, P; Nix, O; Penno, K; Schmitt, K; Ay, Cc; Bauss, B; Dahlhoff, A; Jakobs, K; Mahboubi, K; Schäfer, U; Trefzger, T M; Eisenhandler, E F; Landon, M; Moyse, E; Thomas, J; Apostoglou, P; Barnett, B M; Brawn, I P; Davis, A O; Edwards, J; Gee, C N P; Gillman, A R; Perera, V J O; Qian, W; Bohm, C; Hellman, S; Hidvégi, A; Silverstein, S; RT 2003 13th IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference

    2004-01-01

    The architecture of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger system (L1Calo) is presented. Common approaches have been adopted for data distribution, result merging, readout, and slow control across the three different subsystems. A significant amount of common hardware is utilized, yielding substantial savings in cost, spares, and development effort. A custom, high-density backplane has been developed with data paths suitable for both the em/tt cluster processor (CP) and jet/energy-summation processor (JEP) subsystems. Common modules also provide interfaces to VME, CANbus and the LHC Timing, Trigger and Control system (TTC). A common data merger module (CMM) uses FPGAs with multiple configurations for summing electron/photon and tau/hadron cluster multiplicities, jet multiplicities, or total and missing transverse energy. The CMM performs both crate- and system-level merging. A common, FPGA-based readout driver (ROD) is used by all of the subsystems to send input, intermediate and output data to the data acquis...

  10. Bon voyage to the hadronic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    It was a grand entourage for the first half of the CMS hadronic forward calorimeter (HF) that was escorted to Cessy, France by the police on 11 July. The impressive trailer carrying the 7-m-long and 4-m-wide element was pushed and pulled by two specially designed trucks. It took the 64-m-long convoy around 5 hours to travel the 15 km to its final destination. The days leading up to this operation involved intensive checks to the balance and pressure of the hydraulic system of the trailer's wheels. As one side of the HF is slightly heavier than the other, it is crucial to take this into account when transporting such a massive object (each half of the HF weighs 260 tonnes). However, once these checks were complete, the transport was safely underway. The second half of the HF also received a police escort on 18 July as it made its way to the assembly hall at Point 5. The HF will be the first major detector to be lowered into the CMS cavern via the gantry crane in the coming months.

  11. Monolithic JFET preamplifier for ionization chamber calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype preamplifier circuit is presented for use in SSC ionization chamber calorimeters. It consists of a new type of silicon integrated circuit comprised of very low noise junction FET (JFET) components. Presently, monolithic preamplifier circuits for use in highly segmented detectors are made of implanted channel JFETs or MOS devices. While such circuits solve the density problems, they do not perform to the same level of low noise characteristics as found in discrete JFET components. The JFETs which comprise this new integrated circuit preserve the excellent low noise performance normally found only in discrete JFETs. JFETs also are much more radiation resistant and less prone to damage by electromagnetic discharges than MOS transistors. Two innovative fabrication processes are discussed. They solve the difficult gate-to-gate isolation problem needed to manufacture JFET integrated circuits. Both allow the use of an epitaxially formed channel and a diffused gate, as in standard discrete JFET processing. This, presumably, results in JFETs which exhibit lower noise than those made with implanted channels. 11 refs., 9 figs

  12. Evolution of the dual-readout calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aldo Penzo; on behalf of 4th Concept and DREAM

    2007-12-01

    Measuring the energy of hadronic jets with high precision is essential at present and future colliders, in particular at ILC. The 4th concept design is built upon calorimetry criteria that result in the DREAM prototype, read-out via two different types of longitudinal fibers, scintillator and quartz respectively, and therefore capable of determining for each shower the corresponding electromagnetic fraction, thus eliminating the strong effect of fluctuations in this fraction on the overall energy resolution. In this respect, 4th is orthogonal to the other three concepts, which rely on particle flow analysis (PFA). The DREAM test-beam results hold promises for excellent performances, coupled with relatively simple construction and moderate costs, making such a solution an interesting alternative to the PFA paradigm. The next foreseen steps are to extend the dual-readout principle to homogeneous calorimeters (with the potential of achieving even better performances) and to tackle another source of fluctuation in hadronic showers, originating from binding energy losses in nuclear break-up (measuring neutrons of few MeV energy).

  13. Important ATLAS Forward Calorimeter Milestone Reached

    CERN Multimedia

    Loch, P.

    The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter working group has reached an important milestone in the production of their detectors. The mechanical assembly of the first electromagnetic module (FCal1C) has been completed at the University of Arizona on February 25, 2002, only ten days after the originally scheduled date. The photo shows the University of Arizona FCal group in the clean room, together with the assembled FCal1C module. The module consists of a stack of 18 round copper plates, each about one inch thick. Each plate is about 90 cm in diameter, and has 12260 precision-drilled holes in it, to accommodate the tube/rod electrode assembly. The machining of the plates, which was done at the Science Technology Center (STC) at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, required high precision to allow for easy insertion of the electrode copper tube. The plates have been carefully cleaned at the University of Arizona, to remove any machining residue and metal flakes. This process alone took about eleven weeks. Exactly 122...

  14. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehr Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field – a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response.

  15. Calibration of the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter using muons

    CERN Document Server

    van Woerden, M C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the barrel hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is a sampling calorimeter using plastic scintillator as the active material and iron as the absorber. TileCal , together with the electromagnetic calorimeter, provides precise measurements of hadrons, jets, taus and the missing transverse energy. Cosmic rays muons and muon events produced by scraping 450 GeV protons in one collimator of the LHC machine have been used to test the calibration of the calorimeter. The analysis of the cosmic rays data shows: a) the response of the third longitudinal layer of the Barrel differs from those of the first and second Barrel layers by about 3-4%, respectively and b) the differences between the energy scales of each layer obtained in this analysis and the value set at beam tests using electrons are found to range between -3% and +1%. In the case of the scraping beam data, the responses of all the layer pairs were found to be consisten...

  16. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an “inline” calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an “offline” calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a “cold test” on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the “inline” calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device’s power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the “offline” calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the “cold tests,” and the experiments show good agreement

  17. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Brian D.; Parma, Edward J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field - a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP) bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ) contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified) cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ) cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy.

  18. The E864 lead-scintillating fiber hadronic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large hadronic lead scintillating fiber calorimeter has been built and integrated into the AGS experiment E864 [C. Pruneau et al. (1996); F. Rotondo et al. (1996)] spectrometer to provide an independent measurement of the mass of particles produced in heavy ion collisions. The ''''spaghetti-type'''' calorimeter design and construction techniques are described in detail. Results from a prototype and the full implementation of the calorimeter are reported. The hadronic energy resolution of the calorimeter is found to be δE/E=0.035(±0.005)+0.344(±0.008)/√(E/GeV), in very good agreement with a FLUKA calculation. The hadronic time resolution is measured to be better than 400 ps. The combined calorimeter energy and time signals provide for a mass determination with good resolution. The mass resolution scales as δm/m=0.026+0.347/√(E(GeV)) for velocities v/c<0.98. (orig.)

  19. Commissioning of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter with minimum bias events

    CERN Document Server

    Hubaut, F

    2007-01-01

    This note presents the potentiality to commission the ATLAS EM calorimeter during the (very) first days of data taking, prior to be able to trig and identify correctly electrons. For this purpose, a very simple analysis using the $\\phi$ symmetry of the abundant minimum bias events and computing the energy accumulated in the EM calorimeter is proposed. No input from the Monte Carlo is necessary, and only information from the calorimeter is used. To cope with the high number of events, simulation and analysis are performed using the GRID technology. Adopting a simple energy reconstruction scheme based on the cosmic muon experience should allow to spot intrinsic problems of the EM calorimeter in a few days. It should also give first hints on the $\\phi$ dispersion of the Inner Detector material, if the excess is sizeable >10\\% X$_0$ in a region $\\Delta \\eta \\times \\Delta \\phi=0.1\\times 0.1$. Ultimately, a first flavor of systematics coming from the EM calorimeter $\\phi$~non-uniformity and its positionning (in the...

  20. The H1 lead/scintillating-fibre calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The backward region of the H1 detector has been upgraded in order to provide improved measurement of the scattered electron in deep inelastic scattering events. The centerpiece of the upgrade is a high-resolution lead/scintillating-fibre calorimeter. The main design goals of the calorimeter are: good coverage of the region close to the beam pipe, high angular resolution and energy resolution of better than 2% for 30 GeV electrons. The calorimeter should be capable of providing coarse hadronic energy measurement and precise time information to suppress out-of-time background events at the first trigger level. It must be compact due to space restrictions. These requirements were fulfilled by constructing two separate calorimeter sections. The inner electromagnetic section is made of 0.5 mm scintillating plastic fibres embedded in a lead matrix. Its lead-to-fibre ratio is 2.3:1 by volume. The outer hadronic section consists of 1.0 mm diameter fibres with a lead-to-fibre ratio of 3.4:1. The mechanical construction of the new calorimeter and its assembly in the H1 detector are described. (orig.)

  1. The ATLAS tile calorimeter web systems for data quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS detector consists of four major components: inner tracker, calorimeter, muon spectrometer and magnet system. In the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), there are 4 partitions, each partition has 64 modules and each module has up to 48 channels. During the ATLAS pre-operation phase, a group of physicists need to analyze the Tile Calorimeter data quality, generate reports and update the official database, when necessary. The Tile Commissioning Web System (TCWS) retrieves information from different directories and databases, executes programs that generate results, stores comments and verifies the calorimeter status. TCWS integrates different applications, each one presenting a unique data view. The Web Interface for Shifters (WIS) supports monitoring tasks by managing test parameters and all the calorimeter status. The TileComm Analysis stores plots, automatic analyses results and comments concerning the tests. With the necessity of increasing granularity, a new application was created: the Monitoring and Calibration Web System (MCWS). This application supports data quality analyses at the channel level by presenting the automatic analyses results, the problematic known channels and the channels masked by the shifters. Through the web system, it is possible to generate plots and reports, related to the channels, identify new bad channels and update the Bad Channels List at the ATLAS official database (COOL DB). The Data Quality Monitoring Viewer (DQM Viewer) displays the data quality automatic results through an oriented visualization.

  2. Engineering prototype of the CALICE analog hadron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new prototype of a tile hadron calorimeter (AHCAL) for the International Linear Collider detector is currently developed within the CALICE collaboration. The aim is to improve the energy resolution by measuring details of the shower development and combining them with the data of the tracking chamber (particle flow). The prototype is based on scintillating tiles that are read out by novel Silicon-Photomultiplier (SiPM). This new prototype will take into account all design aspects that are demanded by the intended operation at the ILC It will contain about 2500 detector channels. This is the first calorimeter design which makes full use of the high integration potential of the novel photo-sensor technology. Main focus of this contribution is the mechanical and electrical integration of the front-end electronics into the calorimeter absorber structure, with the aim of maintaining high-density calorimeter. Integration aspects and scalability to an ILC detector are discussed. For the analog calorimeter the proposal of an integrated light-calibration system for calibration and gain monitoring are presented, addressing temperature and bias dependence of the SiPM gain. First results from the measurements with one prototype module at the DESY test beam are presented, which demonstrate the quality of the readout system, and of the light-calibration system.

  3. Summary of the liquid argon calorimeter hermeticity working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cryogenic nature, and hence the need to provide thermal insulation, of liquid argon calorimeters is known to pose serious problems for precise measurements of missing transverse energy, a key signature for new physics at the SSC. This problem is exacerbated by the central detector requirement of access to both sides of the detector. The original DiGiacomo et al. design sought to satisfy this access requirement and still minimize the effect of electromagnetic showers by protruding the end cap calorimeter into the central volume. This design was compared with two design variations by using a parameterization of hadronic and electromagnetic showers assuming no transverse width. These authors concluded that a flat head End Cap design was preferable to the original design for both electromagnetic and hadronic showers. The practical design advantages of this method was further demonstrated by the conclusions that instrumented calorimeter volumes which are not thick enough to absorb most of an electromagnetic shower before a dead volume enhance the resolution degradation. This means, for instance, that calorimeter modules should have their large eta edge on the front face beveled to decrease the effect of the structural washers separating the calorimeter module bays

  4. Identification of cosmic ray electrons and positrons by neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A data analysis based on artificial neural network classifiers has been done to identify cosmic ray electrons and positrons detected with the balloon-borne NMSU/Wizard-TS93 experiment. The information is provided by two ancillary and independent particle detectors: a transition radiation detector and a silicon- tungsten imaging calorimeter. Electrons and positrons measured during the flight have been identified with background rejection factors of 80+-3 and 500+-37 at signal efficiencies of 72+-3% and 86+-2% for the transition radiation detector and the silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter, respectively. The ability of the artificial neural network classifiers to perform a careful multidimensional analysis surpasses the results achieved by conventional methods

  5. Identification of Low PT Muon with the Atlas Tile Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usai, G.

    2005-02-01

    A method for the identification of muons with the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is presented and its efficiency and mis-tagging fraction are discussed. It is demonstrated that the Tile Calorimeter can identify muons with good efficiency down to 2 GeV/c transverse momentum, where the stand-alone Muon Spectrometer has zero efficiency. This kinematic region is important for study of B meson physics and in the particular for the CP violating decay channels. The effectiveness of this method is tested, in particular, in the case of bbar {b} events at low LHC luminosity (1033cm-1s-2) with full simulation of experimental conditions. The muon identification with the Tile Calorimeter is fast and can be used for muon selection at the trigger level. A method of exploiting the information available in other ATLAS sub-detectors in order to reduce spurious muon-tag and measure the candidate muon momentum is discussed.

  6. OPAL Forward Calorimeter (half cylinder with lead scintillator)

    CERN Multimedia

    1 half cylinder piece is available for loan. The OPAL forward Detector Calorimeter was made in 4 half cylindrical pieces. Two full cylinders were placed round the LEP beam pipe about 3m downstream of the interaction point. The detector was used primarily to measure the luminosity of LEP (rate of interactions) and also to trigger on 2-photon events. In addition it formed an essential part of the detector coverage which OPAL needed to carry out searches for new particles such as the Higgs boson. The detector is made of scintillators sandwiched between lead sheets. The light from the scintillators passes via bars of wavelength shifter and light guides on its way to be measured by photomultipliers. There is a layer of gas filled tube chambers within the calorimeter. These provide a measure of the position of the particles interacting in the calorimeter.

  7. Detector Control System of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Arabidze, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Ribeiro, G; Santos, H; Vinagre, F

    2011-01-01

    The main task of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter Detector Control System (DCS) is to enable the coherent and safe operation of the calorimeter. All actions initiated by the operator, as well as all errors, warnings and alarms concerning the hardware of the detector are handled by DCS. The Tile calorimeter DCS controls and monitors mainly the low voltage and high voltage power supply systems, but it is also interfaced with the infrastructure (cooling system and racks), the calibration systems, the data acquisition system, configuration and conditions databases and the detector safety system. The system has been operational since the beginning of LHC operation and has been extensively used in the operation of the detector. In the last months effort was directed to the implementation of automatic recovery of power supplies after trips. Current status, results and latest developments will be presented.

  8. A compact light readout system for longitudinally segmented shashlik calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Berra, A; Cecchini, S; Cindolo, F; Jollet, C; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Mandrioli, G; Mauri, N; Meregaglia, A; Paoloni, A; Pasqualini, L; Patrizii, L; Pozzato, M; Pupilli, F; Prest, M; Sirri, G; Terranova, F; Vallazza, E; Votano, L

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal segmentation of shashlik calorimeters is challenged by dead zones and non-uniformities introduced by the light collection and readout system. This limitation can be overcome by direct fiber-photosensor coupling, avoiding routing and bundling of the wavelength shifter fibers and embedding ultra-compact photosensors (SiPMs) in the bulk of the calorimeter. We present the first experimental test of this readout scheme performed at the CERN PS-T9 beamline in 2015 with negative particles in the 1-5~GeV energy range. In this paper, we demonstrate that the scheme does not compromise the energy resolution and linearity compared with standard light collection and readout systems. In addition, we study the performance of the calorimeter for partially contained charged hadrons to assess the $e/\\pi$ separation capability and the response of the photosensors to direct ionization.

  9. Calibration of the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, D

    2015-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, Laser, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems as well TileCal calibration stability are presented.

  10. Integrator based readout in Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez Parra, G

    2012-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic tile calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at LHC/CERN. To equalize the response of individual TileCal cells with a precision better than 1 % and to monitor the response of each cell over time, a calibration and monitoring system based on a Cs137 radioactive source driven through the calorimeter volume by liquid flow has been implemented. This calibration system relies on dedicated readout chain based on a slow integrators that read currents from the TileCal photomultipliers integrating over milliseconds during the calibration runs. Moreover, during the LHC collisions the TileCal integrator based readout provides the signal coming from inelastic proton- proton collisions at low momentum transfer (MB) which is used to monitor ATLAS instantaneously luminosity and to continuously monitor the response of all calorimeter cells during data-taking.

  11. The development of a virtual heat bath for calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, M.M.; Bracken, D.S.; Rudy, C.R.

    1998-12-31

    All existing calorimeter systems for sensitive nuclear assay employ a heat bath surrounding the sample chamber. The purpose of the heat bath is to maintain a constant temperature so that a fixed temperature difference is maintained across the thermal resistance of the calorimeter. Present calorimeter systems all employ an active, feedback-controlled system to maintain a fixed temperature. An alternative would be to allow the heat-bath temperature to change, to measure it, and to compensate the assay for this change. Two significant observations make this approach possible: (1) the effect on the measurement of a temperature change in the heat bath is differential in form and (2) temperature measurement systems are very accurate when measuring differences in temperature (either in time or between two locations). From these observations, the authors have developed a virtual heat-bath compensation system. The control theory and results will be presented.

  12. "Finger" structure of tiles in CMS Endcap Hadron Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Sergey; Danilov, Mikhail; Emeliantchik, Igor; Ershov, Yuri; Golutvin, Igor; Grinyov, B.V; Ibragimova, Elvira; Levchuk, Leonid; Litomin, Aliaksandr; Makankin, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Nuritdinov, I; Popov, V.F; Rusinov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Sorokin, Pavlo; Tarkovskiy, Evgueni; Tashmetov, A; Vasiliev, S.E; Yuldashev, Bekhzod; Zamyatin, Nikolay; Zhmurin, Petro

    2015-01-01

    Two CMS Endcap hadron calorimeters (HE) have been in operation for several years and contributed substantially to the success of the CMS Physics Program. The HE calorimeter suffered more from the radiation than it had been anticipated because of rapid degradation of scintillator segments (tiles) which have a high radiation flux of secondary particles. Some investigations of scintillators have shown that the degradation of plastic scintillator increases significantly at low dose rates. A proposal to upgrade up-grade the HE calorimeter has been prepared to provide a solution for survivability of the future LHC at higher luminosity and higher energy. A finger-strip plastic scintillator option has many advantages and is a lower cost alternative to keep the excellent HE performance at high luminosity. Measurements have been performed and this method has proved to be a good upgrade strategy.

  13. The ATLAS liquid Argon calorimeters read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Fayard, L; La Marra, D; Léger, A; Matricon, P; Perrot, G; Poggioli, L; Prast, J; Riu, I; Simion, S

    2004-01-01

    The calorimetry of the ATLAS experiment takes advantage of different detectors based on the liquid Argon (LAr) technology. Signals from the LAr calorimeters are processed by various stages before being delivered to the Data Acquisition system. The calorimeter cell signals are received by the front-end boards, which digitize a predetermined number of samples of the bipolar waveform and sends them to the Read-Out Driver (ROD) boards. The ROD board receives triggered data from 1028 calorimeter cells, and determines the precise energy and timing of the signals by processing the discrete samplings of the pulse. In addition, it formats the digital stream for the following elements of the DAQ chain, and performs monitoring. The architecture and functionality of the ATLAS LAr ROD board are discussed, along with the final design of the Processing Unit boards housing the Digital Signal Processors (DSP). (9 refs).

  14. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter for the SELEX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-acceptance, highly segmented electromagnetic lead-glass calorimeter for Experiment E781 (SELEX) at Fermi National Acceleration Laboratory was designed and built. This detector has been used to reconstruct photons and electrons with energies ranging from a few GeV up to 500GeV in the collisions of the 600GeV Σ- hyperons, π mesons and protons with the target nucleons. The design, calibration and performance of the calorimeter are described. Energy resolution and position resolution are assessed using both calibration electron beams and π0 mesons reconstructed in 600GeV hadron-hadron interactions. The performance of the calorimeter in selecting resonant states that involve photons is demonstrated

  15. Fractal dimension analysis in a highly granular calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M; Brient, J.C; Jeans, D; Videau, H

    2015-01-01

    The concept of “particle flow” has been developed to optimise the jet energy resolution by distinguishing the different jet components. A highly granular calorimeter designed for the particle flow algorithm provides an unprecedented level of detail for the reconstruction of calorimeter showers and enables new approaches to shower analysis. In this paper the measurement and use of the fractal dimension of showers is described. The fractal dimension is a characteristic number that measures the global compactness of the shower. It is highly dependent on the primary particle type and energy. Its application in identifying particles and estimating their energy is described in the context of a calorimeter designed for the International Linear Collider.

  16. Researchers use world's only direct calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollinsky, N.

    2008-09-15

    The world's only direct calorimeter is being used as part of a study to evaluate the risk of heat stress in miners working underground. The direct calorimeter measures the body's capacity for heat dissipation in specific environmental conditions. The body dissipates heat by increasing blood flow to the skin and transferring it to the environment. The surface of the skin is then cooled by airflow and sweat evaporation. While most studies examining the risks of heat stress are conducted using young, healthy males, the average age of most miners is 42, and many miners are obese or diabetic. Conditions such as diabetes can compromise the body's ability to cool itself. The calorimeter will also be used to measure the impact of different clothing options and materials on heat dissipation. The aim of the study was to ensure that adequate guidelines are developed to ensure the safety and comfort of miners. 1 fig.

  17. Performance of the PrimEx Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the design and performance of the hybrid electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of 1152 PbWO4 crystals and 576 lead glass blocks for the PrimEx experiment at the Jefferson Laboratory. The detector was built for high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime via the Primakoff effect. Calorimeter installation and commissioning was completed with the first physics run in fall of 2004. We present the energy and position resolution of the calorimeter. Obtained π0 mass resolution of 1.3 MeV/c2 and its production angle resolution of 0.34 mrad demonstrate the ability of the experiment to extract the π0 lifetime on one percent level

  18. Performance of the PrimEx Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Kubantsev, M; Gasparyan, A

    2006-01-01

    We report the design and performance of the hybrid electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of 1152 $PbWO_4$ crystals and 576 lead glass blocks for the PrimEx experiment at the Jefferson Laboratory. The detector was built for high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime via the Primakoff effect. Calorimeter installation and commissioning was completed with the first physics run in fall of 2004. We present the energy and position resolution of the calorimeter. Obtained $\\pi^0$ mass resolution of $1.3 \\mathrm{MeV/c^2}$ and its production angle resolution of $0.34 \\mathrm{mrad}$ demonstrate the ability of the experiment to extract the $\\pi^0$ lifetime on one percent level.

  19. Performance of the PrimEx Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the design and performance of the hybrid electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of 1152 PbWO4 crystals and 576 lead glass blocks for the PrimEx experiment at the Jefferson Laboratory. The detector was built for high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime via the Primakoff effect. Calorimeter installation and commissioning was completed with the first physics run in fall of 2004. We present the energy and position resolution of the calorimeter. Obtained π0 mass resolution of 1.3MeV/c2 and its production angle resolution of 0.34mrad demonstrate the ability of the experiment to extract the π0 lifetime on one percent level

  20. R&D proposal the prism plastic calorimeter:PPC

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Marchand, P; Nédélec, P; Salin, P; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    This proposal supports two goals: First Goal_Demonstrate that current, widely used plastic technologies allow to design Prism Plastic Calorimeter (PPC) towers with a new "liquid crystal" type plastic called Vectra. It will be shown that this technique meets the requirements for a LHC calorimeter with warm liquids: safety, hermeticity, hadronic compensation, resolution and time response. Second Goal_ Describe how one can design a warm liquid calorimeter integrated into a LHC detector,and list the advantages of the PPC: low price, minimum of mechanical structures, minimum amount of dead space, easiness of mechanical assembly, accessibility to the electronics, possibility to recirculate the liquid. The absorber and the electronics being outside the liquid and easily accessible, one has maximum flexibility to define them. The R&D program we define here aims at showing the feasibility of these new ideas by building nine towers of twenty gaps and exposing them to electron and hadron beams.

  1. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S. N.

    2014-09-01

    The Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data acquisition systems. This paper describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Recently improved description of the optical and electronic signal propagation is highlighted and the validation with the real particle data is presented.

  2. Highly granular hadron calorimeter: software compensation and shower decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadeeva, M.; CALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The highly granular analogue hadron calorimeter was developed and constructed by the CALICE collaboration. The active layers of the calorimeter are assembled from scintillator tiles with individual readout by silicon photomultipliers and are interleaved with absorber plates. The response and resolution of the calorimeter equipped with steel absorber was intensively tested in single particle beams. The application of software compensation techniques developed for the scintillator-steel prototype allows for reduction of the stochastic term of the single particle resolution from 58%/ √E/GeV to 45%/ √E/GeV. The detailed study and decomposition of the longitudinal and radial profiles of hadron-induced showers in the energy range from 10 to 80 GeV are presented and compared to GEANT4 simulations.

  3. Energy calibration of the electromagnetic forward calorimeters in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic forward calorimeters of the ATLAS detector are responsible for the measurement of the energy of electrons in the region from 2.5 < η < 4.9. In this so called forward region tracking coverage is not available implying that electrons need to be reconstructed and identified by calorimetric information only. A calibration of the electromagnetic forward calorimeters is of importance for many electroweak measurements and searches for new physics. The energy calibration is based on an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √(s) = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector in 2012. A selection of Z → ee events with one electron in the forward region and one electron in the more central region is performed to compare the shape of the Z resonance in data and simulations. This talk discusses the detailed approach to accomplish the calibration of the electromagnetic forward calorimeters in ATLAS.

  4. A compact light readout system for longitudinally segmented shashlik calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berra, A.; Brizzolari, C.; Cecchini, S.; Cindolo, F.; Jollet, C.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Mandrioli, G.; Mauri, N.; Meregaglia, A.; Paoloni, A.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Prest, M.; Sirri, G.; Terranova, F.; Vallazza, E.; Votano, L.

    2016-09-01

    The longitudinal segmentation of shashlik calorimeters is challenged by dead zones and non-uniformities introduced by the light collection and readout system. This limitation can be overcome by direct fiber-photosensor coupling, avoiding routing and bundling of the wavelength shifter fibers and embedding ultra-compact photosensors (SiPMs) in the bulk of the calorimeter. We present the first experimental test of this readout scheme performed at the CERN PS-T9 beamline in 2015 with negative particles in the 1-5 GeV energy range. In this paper, we demonstrate that the scheme does not compromise the energy resolution and linearity compared with standard light collection and readout systems. In addition, we study the performance of the calorimeter for partially contained charged hadrons to assess the e / π separation capability and the response of the photosensors to direct ionization.

  5. The supermodule insertion tool of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter and the first trial insertion of a supermodule.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The first trial insertion of a complete Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) "supermodule" (1700 lead-tungstate crystals, with support structures, light detectors (avalanche photodiodes), readout electronics and cooling system) was performed on 1st March. This delicate operation - sliding a 2-tonne 3m-long object onto support rails (in real life these are attached to the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL)) - made use of a custom designed "squirrel cage". The rotatable squirrel cage allows the insertion of any supermodule into any of the 18 positions, including very fine (sub-mm) adjustments. The first supermodule will be inserted into the real HCAL later this month in preparation for the "magnet test and cosmic-ray challenge" (MTCC). In the first image the supermodule is in the centre and the alignment disks are highlighted by the flash.

  6. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Cameron Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  7. CHERCAM: The Cherenkov imager of the CREAM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Cherenkov imager, CHERCAM (CHERenkov CAMera), has been designed and built for the CREAM (Cosmic-Ray Energetic and Mass) balloon-borne experiment. The instrument will perform charge measurements of nuclear cosmic-ray over a range extending from proton to iron. It will achieve individual charge separation of the elements over this range [M. Buenerd, et al., in: 28th ICRC, Tsukuba, Japan, OG 1.5, 2003, p. 2157. ] (0.25 charge unit rms), allowing measurements of the energy spectra of individual elements by the CREAM instrument in the energy range from 1010 to 1015eV. CHERCAM is a proximity focused imager, based on a dedicated mechanical structure, equipped with an n=1.05 silica aerogel radiator plane, separated by a 12 cm ring expansion gap from a photon detector plane consisting of a 1600 photomultiplier array, backed with dedicated front-end readout electronics. A prototype of the detector has been recently tested with 100 and 300 GeV/cZ=1 particle beams at CERN. The contribution reports on both the beam test results of the prototype, and of the counter performance in ground operation

  8. Development and Construction of Large Size Signal Electrodes for the ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Colas, Jacques; Girard, C; Jérémie, A; Jézéquel, S; Lesueur, J; Sauvage, G; Lissauer, D; Makowiecki, D S; Radeka, V; Rescia, S; Wolniewicz, K; Belymam, A; Hoummada, A; Cherif, A; Chevalley, J L; Hervás, L; Marin, C P; Fassnacht, P; Szeless, Balázs; Collot, J; Gallin-Martel, M L; Hostachy, J Y; Martin, P; Leltchouk, M; Seman, M; Dargent, P; Djama, F; Monnier, E; Olivier, C; Tisserant, S; Battistoni, G; Carminati, L; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Delmastro, M; Fanti, M; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Perini, L; Tartarelli, F; Augé, E; Bonivento, W; Fournier, D; Puzo, P; Serin, L; de La Taille, C; Astesan, F; Canton, B; Imbault, D; Lacour, D; Rossel, F; Schwemling, P

    2005-01-01

    We describe the electric circuits (electrodes) which polarize and read out the Lead-Liquid Argon electromagnetic calorimeter for the ATLAS detector. The paper covers design and material choices of the circuits as well as their production in industry. We also show how the electrodes integrate into the calorimeter and conclude with results from groups of electrodes making up calorimeter modules.

  9. On the optimization of the energy resolution of hadron calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements on hadron sampling calorimeters are presented. The calorimeters consisted of lead or depleted uranium plates and of scintillator plates of different thicknesses. Design properties which influence the energy resolution were investigated. It is shown that the thickness of absorber- and scintillator plates is a very important parameter. The absorber material and plate thickness leading to the optimum energy resolution of a hadron calorimeter are determined. The measurements on hadron sampling calorimeters show that the energy resolution of such instruments can be optimized if one reduces parts of the strongly fluctuating fraction of nondetectable energy. The hadronic energy resolution of a lead-scintillator calorimeter with a thickness ratio of passive to active absorber of Rd=0.95 is measured to σE/E (h)=41.0%/√E[GeV] +6.1% between 3 and 9 GeV. The e/h-ratio is =1.34 and its deviation from 1 causes the large additive term in the hadronic energy resolution. The energy resolution for hadrons improves for a depleted uranium-scintillator calorimeter of Rd=0.64 to σE/E (h)=29.6%/√E[GeV] +3.2% between 3 and 9 GeV at =1.10. With a depleted uranium-scintillator calorimeter of Rd=2.0 one can achieve overcompensation, i.e. =0.76, at an hadronic energy resolution of σE/E (h)=37.7%/√E[GeV] +3.4% between 5 and 40 GeV. The optimum energy resolution of σE/E (h)=32.9%/√E[GeV] +0.5% between 10 and 100 GeV at =1.00 is achieved for Rd=1.07. Starting from predictions obtained from Monte Carlo calculations, compensation is also achieved with a lead-scintillator calorimeter for Rd=4.0. The measured energy resolution is σE/E (h)=44.2%/√E[GeV] between 3 and 75 GeV at =1.05. (orig.)

  10. Performance of the TGT liquid argon calorimeter and trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel concept of a liquid argon calorimeter, the 'Thin Gap Turbine' (TGT) calorimeter, is presented. A TGT test module, equipped with specially developed cold front-end electronics in radiation hard GaAs technology, has been operated in a particle beam. Results on its performance are given. A 40 MHz FADC system with a 'circular data store' and standalone readout and playback capability has been developed to test the properties of the TGT detector for trigger purposes. Results on trigger efficiency, response and energy resolution are given. 12 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs

  11. HARP: high-pressure argon readout for calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel tubes of approximately 8 mm O.D., filled with Argon gas to approx. 200 bar, are considered as the active element for a charge collecting sampling calorimeter readout system. The tubes are permanently sealed and operated in the ion chamber mode, with the charge collection on a one-millimeter concentric anode. We present the motivation for such a device, including Monte Carlo predictions of performance. The method of construction and signal collection are discussed, with initial results on leakage and ageing of the filling gas. A prototype electromagnetic calorimeter is described

  12. Study of Silicon Photomultipliers for the GRIPS Calorimeter Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Ulyanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available GRIPS is a proposed gamma-ray (200 keV to 80 MeV astronomy mission, which incorporates a pair-creation and Compton scattering telescope, along with X-ray and infrared telescopes. It will carry out a sensitive all-sky scanning survey, investigating phenomena such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars and core collapse supernovae. The main telescope is composed of a Si strip detector surroundedby a calorimeter with a fast scintillator material. We present the initial results of a study which considers the potential use of silicon photomultipliers in conjunction with the scintillator in the GRIPS calorimeter module.

  13. Design and Prototyping of a High Granularity Scintillator Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutshi, Vishnu [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-03-27

    A novel approach for constructing fine-granularity scintillator calorimeters, based on the concept of an Integrated Readout Layer (IRL) was developed. The IRL consists of a printed circuit board inside the detector which supports the directly-coupled scintillator tiles, connects to the surface-mount SiPMs and carries the necessary front-end electronics and signal/bias traces. Prototype IRLs using this concept were designed, prototyped and successfully exposed to test beams. Concepts and implementations of an IRL carried out with funds associated with this contract promise to result in the next generation of scintillator calorimeters.

  14. Performance of an accordion electromagnetic calorimeter with liquid krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam test results of the liquid krypton electromagnetic calorimeter with a projective accordion type electrode structure are presented. The electrode had a fine segmentation in the front to enhance π0 rejection and pointing. The test was carried out at the H4 line at the CERN SPS with e- beams between 20 and 200 GeV. Preliminary results of energy resolution, linearity, μ response and the dependence of the energy resolution on the amount of inactive material in front of the calorimeter are presented

  15. Study of a Novel Concept for a Liquid Argon Calorimeter \

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD33 \\\\ \\\\ The development of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter prototype is proposed as a generic R\\&D project for a novel concept of calorimetry in proton-proton and electron-positron collider detectors: the $^{\\prime$Thin Gap Turbine$^{\\prime}$ (TGT). The TGT calorimeter has a modular construction, is flexible in its longitudinal and transverse granularity, and offers a uniform energy response and resolution, independent of the production angle of incident particles. An important aspect of the project is the development of fast, radiation-hard front-end electronics which is operating in the cold.

  16. The electromagnetic calorimeter of the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchi, M; Bigongiari, G; Cervelli, F; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Coignet, G; Di Falco, S; Elles, S; Fiasson, A; Fougeron, D; Gallucci, G; Goy, C; Incagli, M; Kossakowki, R; Lepareur, V; Li, Z H; Maire, M; Paniccia, M; Pilo, F; Rosier-Lees, S; Tang, X W; Vannini, C; Vialle, J P; Zhuang, H L

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a 3-dimensional sampling calorimeter, made of lead and scintillating fibers. The detector allows for a high granularity, with 18 samplings in the longitudinal direction, and 72 sampling in the lateral direction. The ECAL primary goal is to measure the energy of cosmic rays up to few TeV, however, thanks to the fine grained structure, it can also provide the separation of positrons from protons, in the GeV to TeV region. A direct measurement of high energy photons with accurate energy and direction determination can also be provided.

  17. The Electromagentic Barrel Calorimeter for the GlueX Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Barbi, M

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic barrel calorimeter is one of the main components of the planned GlueX experiment. It will consist of 48 modules made of consecutive layers of 4 m long lead sheet and fast green scintillator fibers for an overall number of approximately 3000 readout channels with silicon photomultiplier-based photo-sensors for light collection. The calorimeter is expected to achieve energy and time resolution better than 5%/sqrt(E)+2% and 200 ps, respectively. In this contribution we presen...

  18. The response of a streamer tube sampling calorimeter to electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have constructed a simple modular electromagnetic calorimeter with 0.8 X0 copper absorbers using gas sampling with streamer tubes. To suppress saturation effects we use small cell streamer tubes (6 mm x 6 mm) filled with pure isobutane. The calorimeter has been tested with electrons in the energy range from 1 to 6 GeV. In this range the instrument shows a linear response. The energy resolution from pad and wire signals amounts to sigmaapprox.=20%/√E. The longitudinal shower profiles are in reasonable agreement with expectations from standard shower calculations. (orig.)

  19. ANL small-sample calorimeter system design and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, C.T.; Perry, R.B.; Lewis, R.N.; Jung, E.A.; Haumann, J.R.

    1978-07-01

    The Small-Sample Calorimetric System is a portable instrument designed to measure the thermal power produced by radioactive decay of plutonium-containing fuels. The small-sample calorimeter is capable of measuring samples producing power up to 32 milliwatts at a rate of one sample every 20 min. The instrument is contained in two packages: a data-acquisition module consisting of a microprocessor with an 8K-byte nonvolatile memory, and a measurement module consisting of the calorimeter and a sample preheater. The total weight of the system is 18 kg.

  20. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter: simulation and validation of the response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltova, Jana; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is readout by wavelength shifting fibers and transmitted to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being further transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. Detailed simulations are described in this contribution, ranging from the implementation of the geometrical elements to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, including specific noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Special attention is given to the improved optical signal propagation and the validation with the real particle data.