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Sample records for ballistocardiography

  1. Using ballistocardiography to measure cardiac performance: a brief review of its history and future significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Emelie; MacQuarrie, David; Neary, John Patrick

    2012-11-01

    Ballistocardiography (BCG) is a non-invasive technology that has been used to record ultra-low-frequency vibrations of the heart allowing for the measurement of cardiac cycle events including timing and amplitudes of contraction. Recent developments in BCG have made this technology simple to use, as well as time- and cost-efficient in comparison with other more complicated and invasive techniques used to evaluate cardiac performance. Recent technological advances are considerably greater since the advent of microprocessors and laptop computers. Along with the history of BCG, this paper reviews the present and future potential benefits of using BCG to measure cardiac cycle events and its application to clinical and applied research. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  2. Pulse and vital sign measurement in mixed reality using a HoloLens

    OpenAIRE

    Mcduff , Daniel; Hurter , Christophe; Gonzalez-Franco , Mar

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Cardiography, quantitative measurement of the functioning of the heart, traditionally requires customized obtrusive contact sensors. Using new methods photoplethysmography and ballistocardiography signals can be captured using ubiquitous sensors, such as webcams and accelerometers. However, these signals are not visible to the unaided eye. We present Cardiolens-a mixed reality system that enables real-time, hands-free measurement and visu-alization of blood ow and vita...

  3. Less Contact Ballistogram Recording during Sleep as a Perspective Technology for the Medical Monitoring System in a Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Funtova, I. I.

    strong argument for success of a future Martian mission is absence of pathologies developed in cosmonauts following one-year or longer space flights that might forbid further gradual extension of piloted missions. However, functional shifts in the neurohormonal regulation revealed during the long-term Mir missions suggest that homeostasis of the vital important body systems is maintained owing to active functioning of the regulatory mechanisms (Grigoriev A.I. et al., 1998). Since overstrain of these mechanisms constitutes one of the main factors of risk of diseases, it is important to provide unfailing and systematic monitoring of the body regulation functional reserves. night ballistocardiography, made it possible to obtain data on super-slow heart rhythm fluctuations reflective of activation of the neurohormonal regulation (Baevsky R.M. et al., 1999). Analysis of the data showed that on a background of extended exposure of the human organism to various stressful factors the cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained through consecutive recruitment in adaptation of higher levels of regulation of the physiological systems (Grigoriev A.I., Baevsky R.M., 2001). This validates the hypothesis concerning the role of the higher autonomous centers in long-term adaptation to the spaceflight factors and opens up the new way to diagnosis and prediction of the human body functional reserves. It was first demonstrated in space during the Mir primary mission 9 in 1991. Sensor-accelerometer secured to cosmonaut's sleeping bag registered micromovements conditioned by the heart, respiratory and motor activities of a sleeping cosmonaut. The joint Russian-Austrian space investigations in 1992-1995 resulted in technology refinement and enhancement. Advantages of medical monitoring during sleep are obvious not only because of the time saving and opportunity to receive systematically information pertaining to the crew health. Records allow, to begin with, evaluate the functional state in

  4. Contactless Patient Monitoring for General Wards: A Systematic Technology Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziyok, Tolga P; Zeleke, Atinkut A; Röhrig, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Sudden, serious life-threatening situations happen even on general wards. Current technologies are working with sensors which are attached to every patient, which is a source of failures and false alarms. The goal of this review was to assess the state of the art of potential techniques for contactless patient monitoring in general wards. The MEDLINE database was used for literature retrieval. 453 unique references screened, 34 research articles met inclusion criteria. Ballistocardiography, Radar and Thermography technologies are the most widely tested techniques. The Majority of the studies are done in a laboratory setting. No study shows the feasibility of one contactless monitoring technology over the distance required for monitoring rooms. Today no technology is feasible. A combination of technologies may become feasible in 10 or more years, until then we have to think about ethical and privacy issues of these pervasive technologies.

  5. The Application of a Piezo-Resistive Cardiorespiratory Sensor System in an Automobile Safety Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Talha Ali Hamdani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory and heart failure are conditions that can occur with little warning and may also be difficult to predict. Therefore continuous monitoring of these bio-signals is advantageous for ensuring human health. The car safety belt is mainly designed to secure the occupants of the vehicle in the event of an accident. In the current research a prototype safety belt is developed, which is used to acquire respiratory and heart signals, under laboratory conditions. The current safety belt is constructed using a copper ink based nonwoven material, which works based on the piezo-resistive effect due to the pressure exerted on the sensor as a result of expansion of the thorax/abdomen area of the body for respiration and due to the principle of ballistocardiography (BCG in heart signal sensing. In this research, the development of a theoretical model to qualitatively describe the piezo-resistive material is also presented in order to predict the relative change in the resistance of the piezo-resistive material due to the pressure applied.

  6. The Application of a Piezo-Resistive Cardiorespiratory Sensor System in an Automobile Safety Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Syed Talha Ali; Fernando, Anura

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and heart failure are conditions that can occur with little warning and may also be difficult to predict. Therefore continuous monitoring of these bio-signals is advantageous for ensuring human health. The car safety belt is mainly designed to secure the occupants of the vehicle in the event of an accident. In the current research a prototype safety belt is developed, which is used to acquire respiratory and heart signals, under laboratory conditions. The current safety belt is constructed using a copper ink based nonwoven material, which works based on the piezo-resistive effect due to the pressure exerted on the sensor as a result of expansion of the thorax/abdomen area of the body for respiration and due to the principle of ballistocardiography (BCG) in heart signal sensing. In this research, the development of a theoretical model to qualitatively describe the piezo-resistive material is also presented in order to predict the relative change in the resistance of the piezo-resistive material due to the pressure applied. PMID:25831088

  7. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms - and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries - in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of -0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of -0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  8. Quantifying and Reducing Posture-Dependent Distortion in Ballistocardiogram Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Abdul Q.; Wiens, Andrew D.; Fesmire, N. Forrest; Weitnauer, Mary A.; Inan, Omer T.

    2015-01-01

    Ballistocardiography is a non-invasive measurement of the mechanical movement of the body caused by cardiac ejection of blood. Recent studies have demonstrated that ballistocardiogram (BCG) signals can be measured using a modified home weighing scale, and used to track changes in myocardial contractility and cardiac output. With this approach, the BCG can potentially be used both for preventive screening and for chronic disease management applications. However, for achieving high signal quality, subjects are required to stand still on the scale in an upright position for the measurement; the effects of intentional (for user comfort) or unintentional (due to user error) modifications in the position or posture of the subject during the measurement have not been investigated in the existing literature. In this study, we quantified the effects of different standing and seated postures on the measured BCG signals, and on the most salient BCG-derived features compared to reference standard measurements (e.g., impedance cardiography). We determined that the standing upright posture led to the least distorted signals as hypothesized, and that the correlation between BCG-derived timing interval features (R-J interval) and the pre-ejection period, PEP (measured using ICG), decreased significantly with impaired posture or sitting position. We further implemented two novel approaches to improve the PEP estimates from other standing and sitting postures, using system identification and improved J-wave detection methods. These approaches can improve the usability of standing BCG measurements in unsupervised settings (i.e. the home), by improving the robustness to non-ideal posture, as well as enabling high quality seated BCG measurements. PMID:26058064

  9. Balistocardiógrafo: historia de un instrumento para medir en forma indirecta el desempeño del corazón Balistocardiograph: history of an instrument for indirect assessment of heart performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Barón C

    2009-02-01

    with phonocardiography and the registry of carotid and venous pulse, and the apexcardiogram, was of great importance to relate the waves with physiological events. Dr. Starr recognized the relationship between the waves and cardiac output and it’s usefulness in the follow-up of patients with heart failure. Luis Carlos Barón Plata, a cardiologist born in Bogotá, designed and handcrafted a direct ballistocardiograph. It differed from Dock and Taubman’s machine in the way of obtaining the corporal movements: he designed a sensor placed in contact with the head in order to record the displacement of the cranium. With this he was able to register adequately the ballistocardiographic waves. The construction was austere and was connected by two cables to the electrocardiograph. With the development of simpler and more accurate methods to observe and quantify the heart’s physiology, the ballistocardiography lost popularity, and that technique has disappeared from almost all the cardiology units.