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Sample records for ballistic electrons probe

  1. Quantum electronics. Probing Johnson noise and ballistic transport in normal metals with a single-spin qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkowitz, S; Safira, A; High, A A; Devlin, R C; Choi, S; Unterreithmeier, Q P; Patterson, D; Zibrov, A S; Manucharyan, V E; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2015-03-06

    Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal. We use single-spin qubits associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to probe Johnson noise in the vicinity of conductive silver films. Measurements of polycrystalline silver films over a range of distances (20 to 200 nanometers) and temperatures (10 to 300 kelvin) are consistent with the classically expected behavior of the magnetic fluctuations. However, we find that Johnson noise is markedly suppressed next to single-crystal films, indicative of a substantial deviation from Ohm's law at length scales below the electron mean free path. Our results are consistent with a generalized model that accounts for the ballistic motion of electrons in the metal, indicating that under the appropriate conditions, nearby electrodes may be used for controlling nanoscale optoelectronic, atomic, and solid-state quantum systems. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Ballistic transport and electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Kees M.; Kelly, Paul J.; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the electronic structure in determining the transport properties of ballistic point contacts is studied. The conductance in the ballistic regime is related to simple geometrical projections of the Fermi surface. The essential physics is first clarified for simple models. For real

  3. Electron Interference in Ballistic Graphene Nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baringhaus, Jens; Settnes, Mikkel; Aprojanz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    We realize nanometer size constrictions in ballistic graphene nanoribbons grown on sidewalls of SiC mesa structures. The high quality of our devices allows the observation of a number of electronic quantum interference phenomena. The transmissions of Fabry-Perot-like resonances are probed...

  4. Interaction of a ballistic probe with gaseous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerovsky, Zden; Greason, William D

    2008-01-01

    Free-flying metal probes are used to determine charge densities in gaseous media containing free charge or low density plasma. The trajectory of the probe is ensured either by gravity or by propelling the probe to a certain velocity at the launch site. While travelling, the probe charge changes from its launch-site magnitude to that related to the space charge density existing along the trajectory. The degree to which the probe's arrival-site charge magnitude matches the space charge density in the area of interest depends on the probe shape and on the charge exchange processes between the probe body and the medium. The paper studies a probe acting as a free-flying charge carrier in air, and discusses the problems that may lead to an imbalance between the charge collected by the probe in the area of interest and the charge measured at the arrival site. The analysis and the described experiments are of the ballistic type: a small, triboelectrically pre-charged metal probe was propelled on a horizontal path, and the charge carried by the probe was measured at several points along the trajectory by means of contact-free induction rings; the initial and final charges were determined by static Faraday cups. A charge disparity was found under certain conditions, and its degree explained by the effects of the charge carrier potential. The studied probe charges ranged from 10 to 50 nF, and the fly-times needed to cross a one-meter path ranged from 20 to 40 ms. The probe to gas charge exchange experiments and their analysis yielded conditions under which the probe lost approximately 10 % of its charge. The results of our study may be of interest to those who intend to use the free-flying probe technique for the determination of space charge density.

  5. Noninteracting beams of ballistic two-dimensional electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, J.; Stormer, H.L.; Baldwin, K.W.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; West, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    We demonstrate that two beams of two-dimensional ballistic electrons in a GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructure can penetrate each other with negligible mutual interaction analogous to the penetration of two optical beams. This allows electrical signal channels to intersect in the same plane with negligible crosstalk between the channels

  6. Pivotal role of ballistic and quasi-ballistic electrons on LED efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, X.; Li, X.; Lee, J.; Liu, S.; Avrutin, V.; Matulionis, A.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2010-08-01

    Significant progress in the power conversion efficiency and brightness of InGaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) has paved the way for these devices to be considered for LED lighting. In this realm, however, the efficiency must be retained at high injection levels in order to generate the lumens required. Unfortunately, LEDs undergo a monotonic efficiency degradation starting at current densities even lower than 50 A/cm 2 which would hinder LED insertion into the general lighting market. The physical origins for the loss of efficiency retention are at present a topic of intense debate given its enormous implications. This paper reviews the current status of the field regarding the mechanisms that have been put forward as being responsible for the loss of efficiency, such as Auger recombination, electron overflow (spillover), current crowding, asymmetric injection of electrons and holes, and poor transport of holes through the active region, the last one being applicable to multiple quantum well designs. While the Auger recombination received early attention, increasing number of researchers seem to think otherwise at the moment in that it alone (if any) cannot explain the progressively worsening loss of efficiency reduction as the InN mole fraction is increased. Increasing number of reports seems to suggest that the electron overflow is one of the major causes of efficiency degradation. The physical driving force for this is likely to be the relatively poor hole concentration and transport, and skewed injection favoring electrons owing to their relatively high concentration. Most intriguingly there is recent experimental convincing evidence to suggest that quasi-ballistic electrons in the active region, which are not able to thermalize within the residence time and possibly longitudinal optical phonon lifetime, contribute to the carrier overflow which would require an entirely new thought process in the realm of LEDs.

  7. A ballistic transport model for electronic excitation following particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, S.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a ballistic model for the transport of electronic excitation energy induced by keV particle bombardment onto a solid surface. Starting from a free electron gas model, the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is employed to follow the evolution of the temporal and spatial distribution function f (r → , k → , t) describing the occupation probability of an electronic state k → at position r → and time t. Three different initializations of the distribution function are considered: i) a thermal distribution function with a locally and temporally elevated electron temperature, ii) a peak excitation at a specific energy above the Fermi level with a quasi-isotropic distribution in k-space and iii) an anisotropic peak excitation with k-vectors oriented in a specific transport direction. While the first initialization resembles a distribution function which may, for instance, result from electronic friction of moving atoms within an ion induced collision cascade, the peak excitation can in principle result from an autoionization process after excitation in close binary collisions. By numerically solving the BTE, we study the electronic energy exchange along a one dimensional transport direction to obtain a time and space resolved excitation energy distribution function, which is then analyzed in view of general transport characteristics of the chosen model system.

  8. Some applications of ballistic electron emission microscopy/spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walachová, Jarmila

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 2 (1998), s. 365-372 ISSN 0587-4246. [Scanning Probe Spectroscopy and Related Methods - SPS'97 /1./. Poznan, 15.07.1997-18.07.1997] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/97/0427 Keywords : field emission electron microscopes * nanostructured materials * Schottky effect Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.344, year: 1998

  9. Model for ballistic spin-transport in ferromagnet/two-dimensional electron gas/ferromagnet structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapers, T; Nitta, J; Heersche, HB; Takayanagi, H

    The spin dependent conductance of a ferromagnet/two-dimensional electron gas ferromagnet structure is theoretically examined in the ballistic transport regime. It is shown that the spin signal can be improved considerably by making use of the spin filtering effect of a barrier at the ferromagnet

  10. Quantum and classical ballistic transport in a chaotic 2D electron channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna A, G.A.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Krokhin, A.; Na, K.; Mendez, A.

    1998-01-01

    We review recent results concerning the quantum and classical dynamical properties of ballistic electrons in a ripple channel, their transport properties and its classical-quantum correspondence is analyzed in terms of q uantum Poincare plots , energy level statistics, and certain features of the energy-band spectra. (Author)

  11. Nonlinear electron transport in InAs/AlGaSb three-terminal ballistic junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, M; Inoue, T; Amano, N; Maemoto, T; Sasa, S; Inoue, M

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated and characterized an InAs/AlGaSb three-terminal ballistic junction device. The fabricated device exhibited nonlinear electron transport properties because of ballistic motion of electrons in this structure that is comparable to the electron mean free path. When the left branch is biased to a finite voltage Vand the right to a voltage of -V (push-pull fashion), negative voltages appeared at the floating central branch regardless of the polarity of the input voltages. In the case of the central branch grounded in push-pull fashion, the clear current rectification effect also observed in the current flow of the central branch at 4.2K to even at 300K

  12. Temperature dependence of ballistic mobility in a metamorphic InGaAs/InAlAs high electron mobility transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jongkyong; Gang, Suhyun; Jo, Yongcheol; Kim, Jongmin; Woo, Hyeonseok; Han, Jaeseok; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of ballistic mobility in a 100 nm-long InGaAs/InAlAs metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistor designed for millimeter-wavelength RF applications. To extract the temperature dependence of quasi-ballistic mobility, our experiment involves measurements of the effective mobility in the low-bias linear region of the transistor and of the collision-dominated Hall mobility using a gated Hall bar of the same epitaxial structure. The data measured from the experiment are consistent with that of modeled ballistic mobility based on ballistic transport theory. These results advance the understanding of ballistic transport in various transistors with a nano-scale channel length that is comparable to the carrier's mean free path in the channel.

  13. Electronic transport on the nanoscale: ballistic transmission and Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homoth, J; Wenderoth, M; Druga, T; Winking, L; Ulbrich, R G; Bobisch, C A; Weyers, B; Bannani, A; Zubkov, E; Bernhart, A M; Kaspers, M R; Möller, R

    2009-04-01

    If a current of electrons flows through a normal conductor (in contrast to a superconductor), it is impeded by local scattering at defects as well as phonon scattering. Both effects contribute to the voltage drop observed for a macroscopic complex system as described by Ohm's law. Although this concept is well established, it has not yet been measured around individual defects on the atomic scale. We have measured the voltage drop at a monatomic step in real space by restricting the current to a surface layer. For the Si(111)-( [see text]3 x [see text]3)-Ag surface a monotonous transition with a width below 1 nm was found. A numerical analysis of the data maps the current flow through the complex network and the interplay between defect-free terraces and monatomic steps.

  14. Using ballistic electron emission microscopy to investigate the metal-vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baykul, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the possibility of using the ballistic electron microscope (BEEM) to study the metal-vacuum interface. In order to do that, we have designed and built a novel experimental setup which consists of an STM tip from which electrons tunnel into a thin (<60 nm), free-standing metal film in vacuum ambient. When the tunnel bias exceeds the work function of the metal, some small fraction of the tunneling electrons traverses through the film without any energy loss, and emits into the vacuum through the back side of the film. The rate of emission of such ballistic electrons, which is called the collector current, is measured by a channel electron multiplier. One of the major challenges for this investigation was preparing free-standing thin films by the following steps: (a) evaporating Au onto a (100) face of NaCl at room temperature, (b) dissolving the NaCl in a 50-50 mixture of ethyl alcohol and distilled water, and (c) catching the Au film that floats on the surface of the solvent onto a Cu grid. Subsequent annealing increased the grain size, and improved the bonding of the film onto the grid. We have succeeded in observing ballistic electron emission through these free-standing thin films, even though the collector current tended to decay in a time interval of a few tenths of a second. The exact cause of this decay is not known, however we have suggested some possibilities. By ramping the bias voltage from about 0.2 V to about 10.5 V, we find the threshold bias voltage at which the collector current begins. This threshold voltage is an upper limit for the work function of AU. From our data we obtained a value of 5.2 V for this upper limit. We also have plotted the collector current, that was averaged over a scan area of 375 nm x 375 nm, against the tunnel bias. This plot shows that, for this region, the lowest threshold bias voltage for ballistic electron emission is between 3.5 V and 4.5 V

  15. Ballistic magnetotransport in a suspended two-dimensional electron gas with periodic antidot lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, E. Yu., E-mail: zhdanov@isp.nsc.ru; Pogosov, A. G.; Budantsev, M. V.; Pokhabov, D. A.; Bakarov, A. K. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The magnetoresistance of suspended semiconductor nanostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas structured by periodic square antidot lattices is studied. It is shown that the ballistic regime of electron transport is retained after detaching the sample from the substrate. Direct comparative analysis of commensurability oscillations of magnetoresistance and their temperature dependences in samples before and after suspension is performed. It is found that the temperature dependences are almost identical for non-suspended and suspended samples, whereas significant differences are observed in the nonlinear regime, caused by direct current passage. Commensurability oscillations in the suspended samples are more stable with respect to exposure to direct current, which can be presumably explained by electron–electron interaction enhancement after detaching nanostructures from the high-permittivity substrate.

  16. Nanoscale magnetic hysteresis of Ni80Fe20/Au/Co trilayers using ballistic electron magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Gokcan, H.; Banerjee, T.; Postma, F.M.; Siekman, M.H.; Jansen, R.; Lodder, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Ballistic electron magnetic microscopy is used to study spin-dependent hot-electron transport and local magnetic switching of ferromagnetic thin films grown on a Au/Si(100) collector. For Ni80Fe20 films, the collector current is a factor of 2 larger than for Co, consistent with the shorter

  17. Ballistic electron channels including weakly protected topological states in delaminated bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, T. L. M.; Andelković, M.; Wallbank, J. R.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.; Fal'ko, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    We show that delaminations in bilayer graphene (BLG) with electrostatically induced interlayer symmetry can provide one with ballistic channels for electrons with energies inside the electrostatically induced BLG gap. These channels are formed by a combination of valley-polarized evanescent states propagating along the delamination edges (which persist in the presence of a strong magnetic field) and standing waves bouncing between them inside the delaminated region (in a strong magnetic field, these transform into Landau levels in the monolayers). For inverted stackings in BLGs on the left and right of the delamination (AB-2ML-BA or BA-2ML-AB, where 2ML indicates two decoupled monolayers of graphene), the lowest-energy ballistic channels are gapless, have linear dispersion, and appear to be weakly topologically protected. When BLG stackings on both sides of the delamination are the same (AB-2ML-AB or BA-2ML-BA), the lowest-energy ballistic channels are gapped, with a gap ɛg scaling as ɛg∝W-1 with delamination width and ɛg∝δ-1 with the on-layer energy difference in the delaminated part of the structure. Depending on the width, delaminations may also support several "higher-energy" waveguide modes. Our results are based on both the analytical study of the wave matching of Dirac states and tight-binding model calculations, and we analyze in detail the dependence of the delamination spectrum on the electrostatic conditions in the structure, such as the vertical displacement field.

  18. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  19. The quasi-ballistic model of electron mobility in liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozumder, A.

    1996-01-01

    A phenomenological theory of low-mobility liquid hydrocarbons is developed which includes electron ballistic motion in the quasi-free state, in competition with diffusion and trapping. For most low-mobility liquids the theory predicts consistently the effective mobility and activation energy, in agreement with experiments, using quasi-free mobility and trap density respectively as ∼ 100 cm 2 v -1 s -1 and ∼ 10 19 cm -3 . Field dependence of mobility if theoretically of quadratic type for relatively small fields, agreeing approximately with experimental data for n-hexane. Electron scavenging with ''good'' scavengers occurs via the quasi-free state at nearly diffusion-controlled rate; however the effect of large mean free path is seen clearly. (author)

  20. Probing the valley filtering effect by Andreev reflection in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a ballistic point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Wei

    2017-12-01

    The ballistic point contact (BPC) with zigzag edges in graphene is a main candidate for a valley filter, in which the polarization of the valley degree of freedom can be selected by using a local gate voltage. Here, we propose to detect the valley filtering effect by Andreev reflection. By using both scattering matrix analysis and numerical simulation, we show that Andreev reflection is strongly suppressed as the incident electron and reflected hole propagate through different bands of BPC with opposite chirality. The conductance as a function of both the incident energy of electron and the local gate voltage at the BPC is obtained, with which the parametric region for a perfect valley filter and the direction of the valley polarization can be determined. As the length of the BPC increases, the conductance exhibits an oscillatory decay behavior, indicating a negative correlation between Andreev reflection and valley polarization.

  1. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy/Spectroscopy on Au/Titanylphthalocyanine/GaAs Heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezcan, S; Roch, T; Strasser, G; Smoliner, J; Franke, R; Fritz, T

    2007-01-01

    In this article Au/titanylphthalocyanine/GaAs diodes incorporating ultra smooth thin films of the archetypal organic semiconductor titanylphthalocyanine (TiOPc) were investigated by Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy/Spectroscopy (BEEM/S). Analyzing the BEEM spectra, we find that the TiOPc increases the BEEM threshold voltage compared to reference Au/GaAs diodes. From BEEM images taken we conclude that our molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) grown samples show very homogeneous transmission, compare to wet chemically manufactured organic films. The barrier height measured on the Au- TiOPc-GaAs is V b ∼ 1.2eV, which is in good agreement with the data found in [T. Nishi, K. Tanai, Y. Cuchi, M. R. Willis, and K. Seki Chem. Phys. Lett., vol. 414, pp. 479-482, 2005.]. The results indicate that TiOPc functions as a p-type semiconductor, which is plausible since the measurements were carried out in air [K. Walzer, T. Toccoli, A. Pallaori, R. Verucchi, T. Fritz, K. Leo, A. Boschetti, and S. Iannotte Surf. Scie., vol. 573, pp. 346-358, 2004

  2. Electronic system for Langmuir probe measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mitov, M.; Bankova, A.; Dimitrova, M.; Ivanova, P.; Tutulkov, K.; Djermanova, N.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Stöckel, Jan; Popov, Tsv.K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 356, č. 1 (2012), s. 012008 ISSN 1742-6588. [InternationalSummerSchoolonVacuum,Electron, and IonTechnologies(VEIT2011)/17./. Sunny Beach, 19.09.2011-23.09.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma * tokamak * diagnostics * electric probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/356/1/012008/pdf/1742-6596_356_1_012008.pdf

  3. Electronic probe microanalyzer. Annual report 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirianenko, Alexis; Maurice, Francoise; Seguin, Remy; Zemskoff, Anne; Adda, Yves

    1964-09-01

    This annual report presents the highlights of the fifth year of operation of the CEA Saclay's electronic probe microanalyzer. It provides a list of the analyses performed during the year with some illustrations and mentions the improvements given to the apparatus and its new analysing possibilities (crystallographic analysis using divergent X beams, 'electronic' image formation with respect to the atomic number). Highlights in the development of this analytical technique are presented as well as a new device designed by R. Castaing: the secondary ion emission microanalyser. A list of all laboratories equipped with the French microanalyser is provided

  4. Electronic system for Langmuir probe measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, M.; Bankova, A.; Dimitrova, M.; Ivanova, P.; Tutulkov, K.; Djermanova, N.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Popov, Tsv K.

    2012-03-01

    A newly developed Langmuir probe system for measurements of current-voltage (IV) characteristics in the tokamak divertor area is presented and discussed. The system is partially controlled by a computer allowing simultaneous and independent feeding and registration of signals. The system is mounted in the COMPASS tokamak, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The new electronic circuit boards include also active low-pass filters which smooth the signal before recording by the data acquisition system (DAQ). The signal is thus less noisy and the data processing is much easier. We also designed and built a microcontroller-driven waveform generator with resolution of 1 Ms/s. The power supply is linear and uses a transformer. We avoided the use of a switching power supply because of the noise that it could generate. Examples of measurements of the IV characteristics by divertor probes in the COMPASS tokamak and evaluation of the EEDF are presented.

  5. Scattering theory of ballistic-electron-emission microscopy at nonepitaxial interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D. L.; Kozhevnikov, M.; Lee, E. Y.; Narayanamurti, V.

    2000-01-01

    We present an interface scattering model to describe ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) at nonepitaxial metal/semiconductor interfaces. The model starts with a Hamiltonian consisting of the sum of two terms: one term, H 0 , describes an ideal interface for which the interface parallel component of wave vector is a good quantum number, and the second term, δH, describes interfacial scattering centers. The eigenstates of H 0 consist of an incident and a reflected part in the metal and a transmitted part in the semiconductor. The three components of each eigenstate have the same interface parallel wave vector. Because tunneling preferentially weights forward-directed states, the interface parallel component of wave vector is small for the H 0 eigenstates that are initially populated with high probability in BEEM. δH scatters electrons between the eigenstates of H 0 . The scattering conserves energy, but not the interface parallel wave vector. In the final state of the scattering process, states with a large interface parallel wave vector can be occupied with reasonable probability. If scattering is weak, so that the parallel wave vector is nearly conserved, the calculated collector current into conduction-band valleys with zero parallel wave vector at the minimum, such as the Γ valley for GaAs(100), is much larger than the calculated collector current into conduction-band valleys with a large parallel wave vector at the minimum, such as the L valleys for GaAs(100). However, if scattering is strong, the injected electron flux distribution is redistributed and valleys with zero interface transverse wave vector at their energy minimum are not preferentially weighted. Instead, the weighting varies as the density of final states for the scattering process so that, for example, the calculated L-channel collector current is much larger than the calculated Γ-channel collector current for GaAs(100). Interfacial scattering reduces the overall magnitude of the

  6. A deterministic model of electron transport for electron probe microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, J.; Richter, S.; Torrilhon, M.

    2018-01-01

    Within the last decades significant improvements in the spatial resolution of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were obtained by instrumental enhancements. In contrast, the quantification procedures essentially remained unchanged. As the classical procedures assume either homogeneity or a multi-layered structure of the material, they limit the spatial resolution of EPMA. The possibilities of improving the spatial resolution through more sophisticated quantification procedures are therefore almost untouched. We investigate a new analytical model (M 1-model) for the quantification procedure based on fast and accurate modelling of electron-X-ray-matter interactions in complex materials using a deterministic approach to solve the electron transport equations. We outline the derivation of the model from the Boltzmann equation for electron transport using the method of moments with a minimum entropy closure and present first numerical results for three different test cases (homogeneous, thin film and interface). Taking Monte Carlo as a reference, the results for the three test cases show that the M 1-model is able to reproduce the electron dynamics in EPMA applications very well. Compared to classical analytical models like XPP and PAP, the M 1-model is more accurate and far more flexible, which indicates the potential of deterministic models of electron transport to further increase the spatial resolution of EPMA.

  7. Colossal Seebeck effect enhanced by quasi-ballistic phonons dragging massive electrons in FeSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Okazaki, R.; Ishiwata, S.; Taniguchi, H.; Okutani, A.; Hagiwara, M.; Terasaki, I.

    2016-09-01

    Phonon transport is an essential property of thermoelectric materials. Although the phonon carries heat, which reduces the thermoelectric efficiency, it contributes positively to the Seebeck coefficient S through the phonon-drag effect, as typified by the high-purity semiconductors, which show fairly large S at cryogenic temperatures. Although such a large S is attractive in terms of Peltier cooling, a clear guiding principle for designing thermoelectric materials enriched by the phonon-drag effect remains to be established. Here we demonstrate that a correlated semiconductor, FeSb2, is a promising thermoelectric material featuring quasi-ballistic phonons dragging d electrons with large effective mass. By changing the sample size within the sub-millimetre order for high-purity single crystals, we succeed in substantially increasing S to as much as -27 mV K-1 at low temperatures. Our results exemplify a strategy for exploring phonon-drag-based thermoelectric materials, the performance of which can be maximized by combining heavy electrons with ballistic phonons.

  8. Ballistic hole magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Banerjee, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to study nanoscale spin transport of holes is presented: ballistic hole magnetic microscopy. The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is used to inject hot electrons into a ferromagnetic heterostructure, where inelastic decay creates a distribution of electron-hole pairs.

  9. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  10. Standardless quantification methods in electron probe microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trincavelli, Jorge, E-mail: trincavelli@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina, Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Limandri, Silvina, E-mail: s.limandri@conicet.gov.ar [Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina, Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Bonetto, Rita, E-mail: bonetto@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge Ronco, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, de la Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Calle 47 N° 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2014-11-01

    The elemental composition of a solid sample can be determined by electron probe microanalysis with or without the use of standards. The standardless algorithms are quite faster than the methods that require standards; they are useful when a suitable set of standards is not available or for rough samples, and also they help to solve the problem of current variation, for example, in equipments with cold field emission gun. Due to significant advances in the accuracy achieved during the last years, product of the successive efforts made to improve the description of generation, absorption and detection of X-rays, the standardless methods have increasingly become an interesting option for the user. Nevertheless, up to now, algorithms that use standards are still more precise than standardless methods. It is important to remark, that care must be taken with results provided by standardless methods that normalize the calculated concentration values to 100%, unless an estimate of the errors is reported. In this work, a comprehensive discussion of the key features of the main standardless quantification methods, as well as the level of accuracy achieved by them is presented. - Highlights: • Standardless methods are a good alternative when no suitable standards are available. • Their accuracy reaches 10% for 95% of the analyses when traces are excluded. • Some of them are suitable for the analysis of rough samples.

  11. Quantum ballistic transistor and low noise HEMT for cryo-electronics lower than 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gremion, E.

    2008-01-01

    Next generations of cryo-detectors, widely used in physics of particles and physics of universe, will need in the future high-performance cryo-electronics less noisy and closer to the detector. Within this context, this work investigates properties of two dimensional electron gas GaAlAs/GaAs by studying two components, quantum point contact (QPC) and high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). Thanks to quantized conductance steps in QPC, we have realized a quantum ballistic transistor (voltage gain higher than 1), a new component useful for cryo-electronics thanks to its operating temperature and weak power consumption (about 1 nW). Moreover, the very low capacity of this component leads to promising performances for multiplexing low temperature bolometer dedicated to millimetric astronomy. The second study focused on HEMT with very high quality 2DEG. At 4.2 K, a voltage gain higher than 20 can be obtained with a very low power dissipation of less than 100 μW. Under the above experimental conditions, an equivalent input voltage noise of 1.2 nV/√(Hz) at 1 kHz and 0.12 nV/√(Hz) at 100 kHz has been reached. According to the Hooge formula, these noise performances are get by increasing gate capacity estimated to 60 pF. (author)

  12. Ballistic Phosphorene Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-19

    satisfactory. W911NF-14-1-0572 -II 66414-EL-II.3 TO:(1) Electronics Division (Qiu, Joe) TITLE: Final Report: Ballistic Phosphorene Transistor (x) Material... Transistor ” as a STIP award for the period 09/1/2014 through 5/31/2015. The ARO program director responsible for the grant is Dr. Joe Qiu. The PI is Prof...UU 19-11-2015 1-Sep-2014 31-May-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Ballistic Phosphorene Transistor The views

  13. Remote operation of a fully shielded electron probe microanalyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.; Sparry, R.P.

    1977-11-01

    A 'Microscan 5' Cambridge Instrument Company electron probe micro-analyser has been equipped with full shielding to enable high radioactive materials to be examined. The transfer of controls for remote operation are described. (author)

  14. Terminal Ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the important issues of terminal ballistics in a comprehensive way combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. The first chapter reviews the experimental equipment which are used for ballistic tests and the diagnostics for material characterization under impulsive loading conditions. The second chapter covers essential features of the codes which are used for terminal ballistics such as the Euler vs. Lagrange schemes and meshing techniques, as well as the most popular material models. The third chapter, devoted to the penetration mechanics of rigid penetrators, brings the update of modeling in this field. The fourth chapter deals with plate perforation and the fifth chapter deals with the penetration mechanics of shaped charge jets and eroding long rods. The last two chapters discuss several techniques for the disruption and defeating of the main threats in armor design. Throughout the book the authors demonstrate the advantages of numerical simulations in unde...

  15. Probing of InAs/AlSb double barrier heterostructures by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walachová, Jarmila; Zelinka, Jiří; Vaniš, Jan; Chow, D. H.; Schulman, J. N.; Karamazov, Simeon; Cukr, Miroslav; Zich, P.; Král, J.; McGill, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 26 (1997), s. 3588-3590 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/94/1056 Keywords : spectroscopy * semiconductor heterojunctions * semiconductor devices Impact factor: 3.033, year: 1997

  16. Electronic control system for irradiation probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluza, E.; Neumann, J.; Zahalka, F.

    1980-01-01

    The EROS-78 system for the supply and power control of six heating sections of the irradiation probe of the CHOUCA type placed in the reactor vessel is described. The system allows temperature control at the location of the heat sensor with an accuracy of +-1% of the rated value within the region of 100 to 1000 degC. The equipment is provided with its own quartz controlled clock. The temperature is picked up by a chromel-alumel jacket thermocouple. The power input of the heating elements is thyristor controlled. (J.B.)

  17. Collision dynamics probed by convoy electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliger, M.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Toekesi, K.; Reinhold, C.O.; Takabayashi, Y.; Ito, T.; Komaki, K.; Azuma, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; RIKEN, Saitama

    2002-01-01

    The description of the collision mechanisms was examined by the emission of convoy electrons as a result of the transport of an Ar 17+ ion with an energy of 390 MeV/amu through self-supporting amorphous carbon foils of thickness varying from 25 to 9190 μg/cm 2 . A classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation of the random walk of the electron initially attached to the relativistic hydrogenic Argon ion was performed. Measurements were made of the final kinetic energy of the emitted convoy electrons at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). (R.P.)

  18. Ballistic electron emissions microscopy (BEEM) of ferromagnet-semiconductor interfaces; Ballistische Elektronen Emissions Mikroskopie (BEEM) an Ferromagnet-Halbleitergrenzflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obernhuber, S.

    2007-04-15

    For current research on spin-transistors it is important to know the characteristics of ferromagnet semiconductor interfaces. The ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) is a method to investigate such a buried interface with nanometer resolution. In this work several ferromagnet/GaAs(110) interfaces have been analysed concerning their homogeneity and mean local Schottky-barrier heights (SBH) have been determined. In Addition, the resulting integral SBH was calculated from the distribution of the local SBHs and compared with the SBH determined from voltage/current characteristics. The areas with a low SBH dominate the current conduction across the interface. Additional BEEM measurements on (AlGaAs/GaAs) heterostructures have been performed. This heterostructures consist of 50 nm AlGaAs/GaAs layers. The results of the BEEM measurements indicate, that the GaAs QWs are defined by AlGaAs barriers. The transition from AlGaAs to GaAs is done within 10 nm. (orig.)

  19. The features of ballistic electron transport in a suspended quantum point contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevyrin, A. A.; Budantsev, M. V.; Bakarov, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.; Pogosov, A. G.; Ishutkin, S. V.; Shesterikov, E. V.

    2014-01-01

    A suspended quantum point contact and the effects of the suspension are investigated by performing identical electrical measurements on the same experimental sample before and after the suspension. In both cases, the sample demonstrates conductance quantization. However, the suspended quantum point contact shows certain features not observed before the suspension, namely, plateaus at the conductance values being non-integer multiples of the conductance quantum, including the “0.7-anomaly.” These features can be attributed to the strengthening of electron-electron interaction because of the electric field confinement within the suspended membrane. Thus, the suspended quantum point contact represents a one-dimensional system with strong electron-electron interaction

  20. Electronic Transport in Helium Beam Modified Graphene and Ballistic Josephson Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the capabilities of the helium ion microscope (HIM) and that of graphene to explore fundamental physics and novel applications. While graphene offers superior electronic properties, the helium ion microscope allows us to combine imaging and modification of materials at the

  1. Statistics techniques applied to electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizuela, H.; Del Giorgio, M.; Budde, C.; Briozzo, C.; Riveros, J.

    1987-01-01

    A description of Montroll-West's general theory for a tridimensional random walk of a particle with internal degrees of freedom is given, connecting this problem with the master equation solution. The possibility of its application to EPMA is discussed. Numerical solutions are given for thick or collimated beams at several energies interacting with samples of different shape and size. Spatial distribution of particles within the sample -for a stationary state- is analized, as well as the electron backscattering coefficient. (Author) [es

  2. Modeling of ballistic and trapping effects on the collection efficiency of holes and electrons separately for a planar mercuric iodide detector (HgI2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric E. Beogo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For the room temperature nuclear detector application, signal created in the detector depends not only to the energy of the incident photon but also to the position of the interaction. This can bring an incomplete charge collection caused by a deep-trapping or a ballistic deficit of charge carrier. Many scientists used to demonstrate their impact on the global efficiency of the charge collection. Here we show this effect, not globally but separately, according to the position where holes and electrons are created. It permits us to see the contribution of each kind of carrier in the signal formation. An analytical model of charge collection is developed firstly to take into account the deep-trapping only. Secondly, this model is improved adding the ballistic deficit effect. The deep-trapping contributes to reduce the efficiency of hole above all on thicker detector. In the other part, ballistic deficit reduce electron efficiency above all near anode in the negatively polarized detector.

  3. Chloride ingress profiles measured by electron probe micro analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Coats, Alison M.; Glasser, Fred P.

    1996-01-01

    Traditional techniques for measuring chloride ingress profiles do not apply well to high performance cement paste systems; the geometric resolution of the traditional measuring techniques is too low. In this paper measurements by Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) are presented. EPMA is demonst......Traditional techniques for measuring chloride ingress profiles do not apply well to high performance cement paste systems; the geometric resolution of the traditional measuring techniques is too low. In this paper measurements by Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) are presented. EPMA...

  4. Heat transport and electron cooling in ballistic normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Vasenko, Andrey S.; Ozaeta, Asier; Bergeret, Sebastian F.; Hekking, Frank W.J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate electron cooling based on a clean normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junction. Due to the suppression of the Andreev reflection by the spin-filter effect, the cooling power of the system is found to be extremely higher than that for conventional normal-metal/nonmagnetic-insulator/superconductor coolers. Therefore we can extract large amount of heat from normal metals. Our results strongly indicate the practical usefulness of the spin-filter effect for cooling detectors, sensors, and quantum bits

  5. Probe method of measuring the electron energy distribution in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    The function for the velocity distribution of electrons in plasma in a basic function associated with various phenomena. The probe method gives the distribution by a simple technique to insert a micro-electrode into plasma, and has good spatial resolution. It is specifically useful for weakly ionized, low temperature plasma. The purpose of this paper is to assist experimenters so that they can easily use this method for various phenomena by starting at its basic principle and explaining the scope of application and actual measuring techniques. The scope of application is considered by dividing it into the problems of sheath thickness, collision effect, the energy distribution of beam, the influence of probe end, probe surface phenomenon, magnetized plasma, the measurement of high energy tail, etc. For sheath thickness, it is accepted if the difference between sheath radius and probe radius is shorter than mean free path, and this is a measure for the application limit. The probe method is applicable as far as the beam density is far smaller than plasma density, and the symmetry of positive ion sheath is not disturbed. The surface area of a counter electrode should be 10 4 .Rc/lambda times or more of the probe surface area, where Rc is the radius of a counter electrode. The differentiation method of the probe characteristics includes A.C. method, high speed sweep measurement or digital method, and some applications are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Probing electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in Momentum Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleuze, M S; Hajgato, B; Morini, F; Knippenberg, S, E-mail: michael.deleuze@uhasselt.b [Research Group of Theoretical Chemistry, Department SBG, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, B3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2010-02-01

    Orbital imaging experiments employing Electron Momentum Spectroscopy are subject to many complications, such as distorted wave effects, conformational mobility in the electronic ground state, ultra-fast nuclear dynamics in the final state, or a dispersion of the ionization intensity over electronically excited (shake-up) configurations of the cation. The purpose of the present contribution is to illustrate how a proper treatment of these complications enables us to probe in momentum space the consequences of electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in neutral and cationic states.

  7. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... NMR Probe for Electrons in. Semiconductor. Mesoscopic Structures. Vikram Tripathi. TIFR, Mumbai. IInd Platinum Jubilee Meeting. Indian Academy of Sciences. Bangalore ... We showed NMR techniques can be very useful in such circumstances. .... Exploit the main physical difference. Low energy (long ...

  8. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique us- ing an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle. EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such ...

  9. Terminal ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively discusses essential aspects of terminal ballistics, combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. Employing a unique approach to numerical simulations as a measure of sensitivity for the major physical parameters, the new edition also includes the following features: new figures to better illustrate the problems discussed; improved explanations for the equation of state of a solid and for the cavity expansion process; new data concerning the Kolsky bar test; and a discussion of analytical modeling for the hole diameter in a thin metallic plate impacted by a shaped charge jet. The section on thick concrete targets penetrated by rigid projectiles has now been expanded to include the latest findings, and two new sections have been added: one on a novel approach to the perforation of thin concrete slabs, and one on testing the failure of thin metallic plates using a hydrodynamic ram.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules

  11. Integral and local density of states of InAs quantum dots in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure observed by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy near one-electron ground state

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walachová, Jarmila; Zelinka, Jiří; Leshkov, Sergey; Šroubek, Filip; Pangrác, Jiří; Vaniš, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2013), s. 61-65 ISSN 1386-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P824; GA ČR GAP102/10/1201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985556 Keywords : quantum dots * scanning tunneling microscopy * ballistic transport Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.856, year: 2013

  12. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  13. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  14. Optical spectrometer for an electron-probe microanalyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamoryanskaya, M.V.; Zamoryanskij, A.N.; Vajnshenker, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Optical spectrometer for the ''Kamebax'' electron-probe microanalyzer permitting to carry out cathodoluminescence analysis together with X-ray diffraction analysis of a sample microvolume, is described. The use of the optical spectrometer in certain cases permits to increase the sensitivity of microanalysis by 2-3 orders, to determine the valency of luminescenting impurities, to study structural defects of microvolumes. The optical spectrometer has the resolution not worse than 0.1 nm over the whole visible region of spectrum (35-750 nm). The spectrometer is used for the study of cathodoluminescence spectra of mineral microvolumes when solving certain problems of technological mineralogy

  15. Calculation of concentration depth profiles in electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrae, M.

    1996-03-01

    The intention of this thesis is to calculate concentration depth-profiles with Electron Probe Microanalysis. In order to conclude the structure of the sample from the measured intensity of radiation, it is necessary to have an accurate correction procedure. In the first part of the thesis all physical quantities needed for the multiple reflection model are described in detail. There will be more possibilities to compare theoretical predictions with the experiment, if the correction procedure is also valid for tilted specimens. Therefore the model hat to generalize for oblique electron incidence. Several quantities in the multiple reflection model tilted specimens (transmission, coefficient, angular distribution of transmitted electrons most probable angle of transmitted electrons etc.) had to be derived. The possibility extending this model comparatively easily to the analysis of layered specimens is one advantage of this model. The alteration of the important quantities in this case is described. Measurements of some specimens with one layer on a substrate proved that the mean deviation of calculated thicknesses is about 10 %. In order to calculate depth profiles gold and copper were evaporated with Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) on silver foils. The thicknesses of evaporated films for gold were 50 nm and 100 nm and for copper 65 nm and 130 nm. Then the specimens were annealed with a temperature of approximately 400 degree C. Finally the concentration depth profiles were quantified with Electron Probe Microanalysis. The shape of the profiles was derived from a simple diffusion model valid for the samples under consideration. In order to check the shape of obtained functions a comparison with measurement by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) was performed. Errors of calculated, depth profiles resulting from approximations of the multiple reflection model and the unknown mass of diffused substances of the samples, are estimated. (author)

  16. Electron probe analysis of biological fluids: Possibilities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roinel, N.

    1984-01-01

    Physical methods of investigation have become essential to investigations at the cellular or subcellular level. Nuclear magnetic resonance is the most recent and striking example, since it is not only a tool for fundamental physicists and organic chemists, but also an extraordinary powerful imaging tool for physicians. The absorption properties of X rays were used immediately after their discovery to image the bones of skeletons. Later, X rays were also found to be extremely efficient in the measurement of the elemental content of microvolumes irradiated by electron probes. The electron probe analyzer (EPA) was immediately adopted by numerous laboratories of metallurgy, geology, and mineral sciences. In the last fifteen years, since the use of this instrument was suggested for liquid analysis, and a preparative technique was developed, the EPA has been used by an increasing number of biological laboratories for measuring the concentrations of the elements contained in subnanoliter volumes of biological fluids. The so-called microdroplet technique has become a routine laboratory method, the only one able to measure the concentrations of an unlimited number of elements in a single 0.1-nl sample. This explains its use in fields as various as renal, reproductive, digestive, and plant physiology, zoology, etc. Several review papers discuss these applications. The possibilities and limitations of the technique are discussed below

  17. ProbeZT: Simulation of transport coefficients of molecular electronic junctions under environmental effects using Büttiker's probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Roman; Kilgour, Michael; Segal, Dvira

    2018-03-01

    We present our in-house quantum transport package, ProbeZT. This program provides linear response coefficients: electrical and electronic thermal conductances, as well as the thermopower of molecular junctions in which electrons interact with the surrounding thermal environment. Calculations are performed based on the Büttiker probe method, which introduces decoherence, energy exchange and dissipation effects phenomenologically using virtual electrode terminals called probes. The program can realize different types of probes, each introducing various environmental effects, including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons. The molecular system is described by an arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonian, allowing the study of different geometries beyond simple one-dimensional wires. Applications of the program to study the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions are illustrated. The program also has a built-in functionality to simulate electron transport in double-stranded DNA molecules based on a tight-binding (ladder) description of the junction.

  18. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  19. Sample Preparation for Electron Probe Microanalysis—Pushing the Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Joseph D.; Engle, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    There are two fundamental considerations in preparing samples for electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The first one may seem obvious, but we often find it is overlooked. That is, the sample analyzed should be representative of the population from which it comes. The second is a direct result of the assumptions in the calculations used to convert x-ray intensity ratios, between the sample and standard, to concentrations. Samples originate from a wide range of sources. During their journey to being excited under the electron beam for the production of x rays there are many possibilities for sample alteration. Handling can contaminate samples by adding extraneous matter. In preparation, the various abrasives used in sizing the sample by sawing, grinding and polishing can embed themselves. The most accurate composition of a contaminated sample is, at best, not representative of the original sample; it is misleading. Our laboratory performs EPMA analysis on customer submitted samples and prepares over 250 different calibration standards including pure elements, compounds, alloys, glasses and minerals. This large variety of samples does not lend itself to mass production techniques, including automatic polishing. Our manual preparation techniques are designed individually for each sample. The use of automated preparation equipment does not lend itself to this environment, and is not included in this manuscript. The final step in quantitative electron probe microanalysis is the conversion of x-ray intensities ratios, known as the “k-ratios,” to composition (in mass fraction or atomic percent) and/or film thickness. Of the many assumptions made in the ZAF (where these letters stand for atomic number, absorption and fluorescence) corrections the localized geometry between the sample and electron beam, or takeoff angle, must be accurately known. Small angular errors can lead to significant errors in the final results. The sample preparation technique then becomes very

  20. Sample Preparation for Electron Probe Microanalysis-Pushing the Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Joseph D; Engle, Paul D

    2002-01-01

    There are two fundamental considerations in preparing samples for electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The first one may seem obvious, but we often find it is overlooked. That is, the sample analyzed should be representative of the population from which it comes. The second is a direct result of the assumptions in the calculations used to convert x-ray intensity ratios, between the sample and standard, to concentrations. Samples originate from a wide range of sources. During their journey to being excited under the electron beam for the production of x rays there are many possibilities for sample alteration. Handling can contaminate samples by adding extraneous matter. In preparation, the various abrasives used in sizing the sample by sawing, grinding and polishing can embed themselves. The most accurate composition of a contaminated sample is, at best, not representative of the original sample; it is misleading. Our laboratory performs EPMA analysis on customer submitted samples and prepares over 250 different calibration standards including pure elements, compounds, alloys, glasses and minerals. This large variety of samples does not lend itself to mass production techniques, including automatic polishing. Our manual preparation techniques are designed individually for each sample. The use of automated preparation equipment does not lend itself to this environment, and is not included in this manuscript. The final step in quantitative electron probe microanalysis is the conversion of x-ray intensities ratios, known as the "k-ratios," to composition (in mass fraction or atomic percent) and/or film thickness. Of the many assumptions made in the ZAF (where these letters stand for atomic number, absorption and fluorescence) corrections the localized geometry between the sample and electron beam, or takeoff angle, must be accurately known. Small angular errors can lead to significant errors in the final results. The sample preparation technique then becomes very

  1. Direct Determination of Energy Level Alignment and Charge Transport at Metal/ Alq 3 Interfaces via Ballistic-Electron-Emission Spectroscopy (BEES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J. S.; Pearson, J. E.; Bader, S. D.

    2011-03-01

    In organic electronic devices, the difference between the electrode work function and the organic lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) or highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) is a crucial parameter in determining the nature of charge transport. However, experimental determination of LUMO is challenging. For the archetypal electroluminescent organic semiconductor tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq 3), various techniques gave significantly different HOMO-LUMO gap values. Using BEES, we directly determined the energy barrier for electron injection at clean interfaces of Alq 3 with Al and Fe to be 2.1 eV and 2.2 eV, respectively. We quantitatively modeled the sub-barrier BEES spectra with an accumulated space charge layer, and found that the transport of non-ballistic electrons is consistent with random hopping over the injection barrier. Supported by U.S. DOE Office of Science Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. J. C. Scott, J. Vac. Sci. Tech, A 21, 521 (2003).

  2. Electron-beam-induced-current and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast with aberration-corrected electron probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Myung-Geun, E-mail: mghan@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Garlow, Joseph A. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marshall, Matthew S.J.; Tiano, Amanda L. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Cheong, Sang-Wook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) are demonstrated in STEM mode combined with in situ electrical biasing in a TEM. • Electrostatic potential maps in ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC data. • Simultaneous EBIC and active SE-VC performed with atomic resolution STEM are demonstrated. - Abstract: The ability to map out electrostatic potentials in materials is critical for the development and the design of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices in modern industry. Electron holography has been an important tool for revealing electric and magnetic field distributions in microelectronics and magnetic-based memory devices, however, its utility is hindered by several practical constraints, such as charging artifacts and limitations in sensitivity and in field of view. In this article, we report electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) with an aberration-corrected electron probe in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), as complementary techniques to electron holography, to measure electric fields and surface potentials, respectively. These two techniques were applied to ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals. Electrostatic potential maps obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC to show that these techniques can be used as a complementary approach to validate quantitative results obtained from electron holography analysis.

  3. Reproducibility of the cutoff probe for the measurement of electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J., E-mail: sjyou@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, J. H.; You, K. H.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H., E-mail: jhkim86@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.-S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Since a plasma processing control based on plasma diagnostics attracted considerable attention in industry, the reproducibility of the diagnostics using in this application has become a great interest. Because the cutoff probe is one of the potential candidates for this application, knowing the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement becomes quit important in the cutoff probe application research. To test the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement, in this paper, a comparative study among the different cutoff probe measurements was performed. The comparative study revealed remarkable result: the cutoff probe has a great reproducibility for the electron density measurement, i.e., there are little differences among measurements by different probes made by different experimenters. The discussion including the reason for the result was addressed via this paper by using a basic measurement principle of cutoff probe and a comparative experiment with Langmuir probe.

  4. Non-monotonic magnetoresistance in an AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor structure in the ballistic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Woo, Tak-Pong; Lo, S.-T.; Kim, Gil-Ho; Liang, Chi-Te

    2014-05-01

    In this report, we will discuss the nonmonotonic magnetoresistance (MR) in an AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) in a perpendicular magnetic field B in the ballistic region ( kBTτ/ħ constant, temperature, elastic scattering time, reduced Planck constant, Fermi wave vector and mean free path, respectively. The MR shows a local maximum between the weak localization (WL) and the Shubnikov-de Haas regions. In the low magnetic field regime, the quantum correction to the conductivity is proportional to T -3/2, which is consistent with a recent theory [T. A. Sedrakyan, and M. E. Raikh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106806 (2008)]. According to our results, as the temperature is increased, the position of the MR maximum in B increases. These results cannot be explained by present theories. Moreover, in the high-magnetic-field regime, neither the magnetic and nor the temperature dependences of the observed MR is consistent with present theories. We, therefore, suggest that while some features of the observed nonmonotonic MR can be successfully explained, further experimental and theoretical studies are necessary to obtain a thorough understanding of the MR effects.

  5. Measurement of electron density in the atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet by using a dielectric probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Bing; Zhou Qiujiao; Pan Lizhu; Zhang Mengdie; Huang Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The electron densities in the atmospheric pressure helium plasma were calculated by means of electron drift velocity and the jet velocity respectively. The electron velocity and jet velocity can be calculated by means of helium plasma jet current measured by a dielectric probe and plasma discharge current signal measured by voltage probes. The results show that the estimated electron densities of the helium plasma jet calculated from electron drift velocity and the jet velocity are in the order of 10 11 cm -3 and they increase with applied voltage. There is a little fluctuation in the value of the electron density along the jet axis of the plasma. This result is the same as the measured electron density in atmospheric pressure helium non-thermal plasma jet by using a Rogowski coil and a Langmuir probe. This is in one order lower than the electron density measured by microwave antenna. (authors)

  6. Electronic properites of electron-doped cuprate superconductors probed by high-field magnetotransport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Toni

    2013-09-18

    In the present work the normal-state properties of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (NCCO) are investigated for a broad doping range, covering almost the whole phase diagram of this material. Magnetotransport measurements in the world's highest non-destructive magnetic fields were used as a spectroscopic tool for probing the electronic structure of single-crystalline NCCO as a function of the carrier concentration x. Quantum and semiclassical oscillations in the magnetoresistance provided new insights into various properties of the Fermi surface and the nature of the ground state in the system. The detailed investigations of the field- and temperature-dependent transport and its dependence on the field orientation have revealed a close correlation between symmetry-breaking ordering instabilities and the superconducting state.

  7. Electronic properites of electron-doped cuprate superconductors probed by high-field magnetotransport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, Toni

    2013-01-01

    In the present work the normal-state properties of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd 2-x Ce x CuO 4 (NCCO) are investigated for a broad doping range, covering almost the whole phase diagram of this material. Magnetotransport measurements in the world's highest non-destructive magnetic fields were used as a spectroscopic tool for probing the electronic structure of single-crystalline NCCO as a function of the carrier concentration x. Quantum and semiclassical oscillations in the magnetoresistance provided new insights into various properties of the Fermi surface and the nature of the ground state in the system. The detailed investigations of the field- and temperature-dependent transport and its dependence on the field orientation have revealed a close correlation between symmetry-breaking ordering instabilities and the superconducting state.

  8. Measurement of plasma potential and electron temperature by ball-pen probes in RFX-MOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotankova, J.; Adamek, J.; Stockel, J.; Martines, E.; Spolaore, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Serianni, G.; Vianello, N.; Zuin, M.

    2009-01-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) is an innovative electric probe for direct measurements of the plasma potential. This probe was developed in IPP Prague and it is based on the Katsumata probe concept. Combined measurements of the plasma potential by a BPP and floating potential by a Langmuir probe provide also the value of the electron temperature. First test of the BPP on the RFX-mod reversed field pinch in Padova has been performed in November 2006. The BPP head, made of boron nitride, is equipped with four graphite collectors, which are positioned at four different radial positions h inside four shafts hollow into the probe head. The radial profile of the plasma potential and also the electron temperature were measured

  9. Electronic structure effects in catalysis probed by X-ray and electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, Sarp; Friebel, Daniel [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Ogasawara, Hirohito [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Anniyev, Toyli [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Nilsson, Anders, E-mail: nilsson@slac.stanford.edu [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Strain, ligand and uncoordinated sites allow for fine-tuning the electronic structure of catalyst material. •XES and XAS provide means to project out the electronic structure in an atom specific way. •HERFD XAS allows for detail probing of the electronic structure of platinum catalyst during the oxygen reduction reaction. -- Abstract: Here we review some recent developments in using electron and X-ray spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the chemical bond formation on catalyst surfaces used in chemical energy transformations. The d-band model allows a simple understanding of the bond strength of oxygen atom interacting with transition metals in terms of the energy position of the d-band. It is in particular the population of the antibonding states appearing through the interaction of the d-band with the O 2p orbitals that determines the bond strength. We demonstrate how we can fine tune the d-band position and population of antibonding states for strained Pt films on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) and ligand affected Pt surfaces due to either Ni, Co or Fe in the subsurface layer. We show the effect of nanostructuring in Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on a Rh(1 1 1) single-crystal substrate on the adsorption strength of chemisorbed species using In situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection X-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS) at the Pt L{sub 3} edge.

  10. Blinded Comparison between an In-Air Reverberation Method and an Electronic Probe Tester in the Detection of Ultrasound Probe Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Nicholas J; Woolley, Darren J

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a blinded trial, comparing the results of a visual inspection of the in-air reverberation pattern with the results of an electronic probe tester in detecting ultrasound probe faults. Sixty-two probes were tested. A total of 28 faults were found, 3 only by in-air reverberation assessment and 2 only by the electronic probe tester. The electronic probe tester provided additional information regarding the location of the fault in 74% of the cases in which both methods detected a fault. It is possible to detect the majority of probe faults by visual inspection and in-air reverberation assessment. The latter provides an excellent first-line test, easily performed on a daily basis by equipment users. An electronic probe tester is required if detailed evaluation of faults is necessary. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. All rights reserved.

  11. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie [Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France and Fondation STAE, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234-31432, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-15

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40{+-}1 eV.

  12. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40±1 eV.

  13. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  14. Is there ballistic transport in metallic nano-objects? Ballistic versus diffusive contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N; Bai Ming; Lu Yonghua; Munoz, M; Cheng Hao; Levanyuk, A P

    2007-01-01

    When discussing the resistance of an atomic-or nanometre-size contact we should consider both its ballistic and its diffusive contributions. But there is a contribution of the leads to the resistance of the contact as well. In this context, the geometry and the roughness of the surfaces limiting the system will contribute to the resistance, and these contributions should be added to the ideal ballistic resistance of the nanocontact. We have calculated, for metallic materials, the serial resistance of the leads arising from the roughness, and our calculations show that the ohmic resistance is as important as the ballistic resistance of the constriction. The classical resistance is a lower limit to the quantum resistance of the leads. Many examples of earlier experiments show that the mean free path of the transport electrons is of the order of the size of the contacts or the leads. This is not compatible with the idea of ballistic transport. This result may put in serious difficulties the current, existing interpretation of experimental data in metals where only small serial resistances compared with the ballistic component of the total resistance have been taken into account. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is also discussed and the serial corrections appear to be smaller than for metals. Experiments with these last systems are proposed that may reveal new interesting aspects in the physics of ballistic and diffusive transport

  15. Is there ballistic transport in metallic nano-objects? Ballistic versus diffusive contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, N [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Bai Ming [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Lu Yonghua [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Munoz, M [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Cheng Hao [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Levanyuk, A P [Fisintec Innovacion Tecnologica, Miraflores 65, Alcobendas, Madrid 28100 (Spain)

    2007-01-10

    When discussing the resistance of an atomic-or nanometre-size contact we should consider both its ballistic and its diffusive contributions. But there is a contribution of the leads to the resistance of the contact as well. In this context, the geometry and the roughness of the surfaces limiting the system will contribute to the resistance, and these contributions should be added to the ideal ballistic resistance of the nanocontact. We have calculated, for metallic materials, the serial resistance of the leads arising from the roughness, and our calculations show that the ohmic resistance is as important as the ballistic resistance of the constriction. The classical resistance is a lower limit to the quantum resistance of the leads. Many examples of earlier experiments show that the mean free path of the transport electrons is of the order of the size of the contacts or the leads. This is not compatible with the idea of ballistic transport. This result may put in serious difficulties the current, existing interpretation of experimental data in metals where only small serial resistances compared with the ballistic component of the total resistance have been taken into account. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is also discussed and the serial corrections appear to be smaller than for metals. Experiments with these last systems are proposed that may reveal new interesting aspects in the physics of ballistic and diffusive transport.

  16. Reconstruction of electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanbekov, R.R.; Kolokolov, N.B.; Kudryavtsev, A.A.; Khromov, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Kinetic theory of electron current on a probe, enabling essentially broaden the area of application of a probe method for determination of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) onto the areas of intermediate and high pressures. Method of quadrature summs makes it possible to reconstruct EEDF from integral equation for arbitrary energy dependences of diffusion parameter at any given energy interval. High efficiency of the method is demonstrated by solution of model as well as experimental tasks

  17. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J. [Middle Tennessee State University; Levit, M. Creon [Nasa Ames Research Center

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  18. Calcium measurements with electron probe X-ray and electron energy loss analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeFurgey, A.; Ingram, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a broad survey of the rationale for electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA) and the various methods for obtaining qualitative and quantitative information on the distribution and amount of elements, particularly calcium, in cryopreserved cells and tissues. Essential in an introductory consideration of microanalysis in biological cryosections is the physical basis for the instrumentation, fundamentals of X-ray spectrometry, and various analytical modes such as static probing and X-ray imaging. Some common artifacts are beam damage and contamination. Inherent pitfalls of energy dispersive X-ray systems include Si escape peaks, doublets, background, and detector calibration shifts. Quantitative calcium analysis of thin cryosections is carried out in real time using a multiple least squares fitting program on filtered X-ray spectra and normalizing the calcium peak to a portion of the continuum. Recent work includes the development of an X-ray imaging system where quantitative data can be retrieved off-line. The minimum detectable concentration of calcium in biological cryosections is approximately 300 mumole kg dry weight with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 A. The application of electron energy loss (EELS) techniques to the detection of calcium offers the potential for greater sensitivity and spatial resolution in measurement and imaging. Determination of mass thickness with EELS can facilitate accurate calculation of wet weight concentrations from frozen hydrated and freeze-dried specimens. Calcium has multiple effects on cell metabolism, membrane transport and permeability and, thus, on overall cell physiology or pathophysiology. Cells can be rapidly frozen for EPXMA during basal or altered functional conditions to delineate the location and amount of calcium within cells. 72 references

  19. Analysis of quantum ballistic electron transport in ultrasmall silicon devices including space-charge and geometric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, S. E.; Kumar, A.; Fischetti, M. V.

    2004-05-01

    A two-dimensional device simulation program which self consistently solves the Schrödinger and Poisson equations with current flow is described in detail. Significant approximations adopted in this work are the absence of scattering and a simple six-valley, parabolic band structure for silicon. A modified version of the quantum transmitting boundary method is used to describe open boundary conditions permitting current flow in device solutions far from equilibrium. The continuous energy spectrum of the system is discretized by temporarily imposing two different forms of closed boundary conditions, resulting in energies which sample the density-of-states and establish the wave function normalization conditions. These standing wave solutions ("normal modes") are decomposed into their traveling wave constituents, each of which represents injection from only one of the open boundary contacts ("traveling eigencomponents"). These current-carrying states are occupied by a drifted Fermi distribution associated with their injecting contact and summed to form the electron density in the device. Holes are neglected in this calculation. The Poisson equation is solved on the same finite element computational mesh as the Schrödinger equation; devices of arbitrary geometry can be modeled. Computational performance of the program including characterization of a "Broyden+Newton" algorithm employed in the iteration for self consistency is described. Device results are presented for a narrow silicon resonant tunneling diode (RTD) and many variants of idealized silicon double-gate field effect transistors (DGFETs). The RTD results show two resonant conduction peaks, each of which demonstrates hysteresis. Three 7.5 nm channel length DGFET structures with identical intrinsic device configurations but differing access geometries (straight, taper and "dog bone") are studied and found to have differing current flows owing to quantum-mechanical reflection in their access regions

  20. Ballistic transport in semiconductor nanostructures: From quasi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By suitable design it is possible to achieve quasi-ballistic transport in semiconductor nanostructures over times up to the ps-range. Monte-Carlo simulations reveal that under these conditions phase-coherent real-space oscillations of an electron ensemble, generated by fs-pulses become possible in wide potential wells.

  1. Ballistic transport in semiconductor nanostructures: From quasi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. By suitable design it is possible to achieve quasi-ballistic transport in semi- conductor nanostructures over times up to the ps-range. Monte-Carlo simulations reveal that under these conditions phase-coherent real-space oscillations of an electron ensem- ble, generated by fs-pulses become possible in wide ...

  2. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... Strongly correlated electron systems: Overview. Problem: How to detect the electronic state in nanoscale structures. Two examples where the usual methods don't work. Solution: We showed NMR techniques can be very useful in such circumstances. Outline ...

  3. Electron ring diagnostics with magnetic probes during roll-out and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, U.; Ulrich, M.

    1976-03-01

    Different methods using magnetic field probes to determine the properties of electron rings during their compression, roll-out and acceleration are presented. The results of the measurements of the electron number and the axial velocity and acceleration of the rings, as obtained with the various diagnostic devices, are discussed and compared. (orig.) [de

  4. Probing momentum distributions in magnetic tunnel junctions via hot-electron decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.; Banerjee, T.; Park, B.G.; Lodder, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The tunnel momentum distribution in a (magnetic) tunnel junction is probed by analyzing the decay of the hot electrons in the Co metal anode after tunneling, using a three-terminal transistor structure in which the hot-electron attenuation is sensitive to the tunnel momentum distribution. Solid

  5. Simulation of Probe Position-Dependent Electron Energy-Loss Fine Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, M. P.; Kapetanakis, M. D.; Prange, Micah P.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-03-31

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating probe-position-dependent electron energy-loss near-edge structure for the scanning transmission electron microscope by combining density functional theory with dynamical scattering theory. We show how simpler approaches to calculating near-edge structure fail to include the fundamental physics needed to understand the evolution of near-edge structure as a function of probe position and investigate the dependence of near-edge structure on probe size. It is within this framework that density functional theory should be presented, in order to ensure that variations of near-edge structure are truly due to local electronic structure and how much from the diffraction and focusing of the electron beam.

  6. Reconstruction of the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanbekov, R.R.; Kolokolov, N.B.; Kudryavtsev, A.A.; Khromov, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gorbunov et al. have developed a kinetic theory of the electron current drawn by a probe, which substantially extends the region of applicability of the probe method for determining the electron energy distribution function, enabling probes to be used for intermediate and high pressures (up to p ≤ 0.5 atm for monatomic gases). They showed that for λ var-epsilon >> a + d (where a is the probe radius, d is the sheath thickness, and λ var-epsilon is the electron energy relaxation length) the current density j e (V) drawn by the probe is related to the unperturbed distribution function by an integral equation involving the distribution function. The kernal of the integral equation can be written as a function of the diffusion parameter. In the present paper the method of quadrature sums is employed in order to obtain the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures. This technique enables them to recover the distribution function from the integral equation when the diffusion parameter has an arbitrary energy dependence ψ 0 (var-epsilon) in any given energy range. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by application to both model problems and experimental data

  7. Electron beam sounding rocket experiments for probing the distant magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Electron accelerators on sounding rockets have injected 8-40-keV electrons on closed magnetospheric tail field lines near 250 km altitude in the northern auroral zone. These beams mirrored at the southern conjugate point ad returned as 'echoes' which were detected on the rocket system. The 20 percent of the beam that returned was sufficient to measure field line lengths and verify magnetospheric magnetic models, to measure fluctuating electric fields, and electron pitch angle scattering (6-10) R(E) distant, and to identify 10-100 V field-aligned potentials above the rocket. The experiment gives new insight into the motion of natural electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt.

  8. Probing SEP Acceleration Processes With Near-relativistic Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, Dennis K.; Roelof, Edmond C.

    2009-01-01

    Processes in the solar corona are prodigious accelerators of near-relativistic electrons. Only a small fraction of these electrons escape the low corona, yet they are by far the most abundant species observed in Solar Energetic Particle events. These beam-like energetic electron events are sometimes time-associated with coronal mass ejections from the western solar hemisphere. However, a significant number of events are observed without any apparent association with a transient event. The relationship between solar energetic particle events, coronal mass ejections, and near-relativistic electron events are better ordered when we classify the intensity time profiles during the duration of the beam-like anisotropies into three broad categories: 1) Spikes (rapid and equal rise and decay); 2) Pulses (rapid rise, slower decay); and 3) Ramps (rapid rise followed by a plateau). We report on the results of a study that is based on our catalog (covering nearly the complete Solar Cycle 23) of 216 near-relativistic electron events and their association with: solar electromagnetic emissions, shocks driven by coronal mass ejections, models of the coronal magnetic fields and energetic protons. We conclude that electron events with time-intensity profiles of Spikes and Pulses are associated with explosive events in the low corona while events with time-intensity profiles of Ramps are associated with the injection/acceleration process of the CME driven shock.

  9. Electron-probe microanalysis: x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The main principles on X-ray, energy and wave length dispersive spectroscopy are reviewed. In order to allow the choice of the best operating conditions, the importance of the regulation and control systems is underlined. Emission theory, X-rays nature and its interaction with matter and electrons in the matter is shown. The structure, operating procedures and necessary electronics (single channel - analysis chain) automatic-control system for the threshold-energies discrimination and the energy distribution visualization) associated to the wavelength dispersive spectroscopy are described. The focusing control, resolution, influence of chemical bonds and multilayer-structure monochromators relaled to wavelength dispersive spectroscopy are studied. Concerning the energy-dispersive spectroscopy, the detector, preamplifier, amplifier, analog-digital converter, as well as the utilization and control of the spectrometer are described. Problems and instrumental progress on energy-dispersive spectroscopy related to the electronic-noise control, charge collection and light-elements detection are discussed [fr

  10. Probe diagnostics of electron distributions in plasma with spatial and angular resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034, Russia and ITMO University, Kronverkskiy pr. 49, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15

    This paper discusses the spatial resolution that is required to study inhomogeneous, low-temperature plasmas and is based on a review of low-temperature plasma electron kinetics and methods for probe measurements of electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs). It is stated that EEDFs can be extracted from probe measurements by applying an appropriate probe theory. The Druyvesteyn formula is most commonly used for this extraction and has been used in numerous publications, but more general theory can be used for a wider range of gas pressures. It is demonstrated that the Druyvesteyn formula can be obtained from the general theory as a limiting case. This paper justifies the application of wall probes in plasma studies of an energetic part of EEDFs. This justification is made for an idealized probe. We briefly review the methods for studying anisotropic plasmas and their usefulness in plasma research. It is demonstrated that to determine anisotropic electron energy distribution functions, a planar, one-sided probe is most convenient.

  11. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric ...

  12. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    The complexity of molecules found in space varies widely. On one end of the scale of molecular complexity is the hydrogen molecule H2 . Its formation from H atoms is if not understood than at least thoroughly investigated[1]. On the other side of said spectrum the precursors to biopolymers can be found, such as amino acids[2,3], sugars[4], lipids, cofactors[5], etc, and the kerogen-like organic polymer material in carbonaceous meteorites called "black stuff" [6]. These have also received broad attention in the last decades. Sitting in the middle between these two extremes are simple molecules that are observed by radio astronomy throughout the Universe. These are molecules like methane (CH4 ), methanol (CH3 OH), formaldehyde (CH2 O), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and many many others. So far more than 40 such species have been identified.[7] They are often used in laboratory experiments to create larger complex molecules on the surface of simulated interstellar dust grains.[2,8] The mechanisms of formation of these observed starting materials for prebiotic chemistry is however not always clear. Also the exact mechanisms of formation of larger molecules in photochemical experiments are largely unclear. This is mostly due to the very complex chemistry going on which involves many different radicals and ions. The creation of radicals and ions can be studied in detail in laboratory simulations. They can be created in a setup mimicking interstellar grain chemistry using slow electrons. There is no free electron radiation in space. What can be found though is a lot of radiation of different sorts. There is electromagnetic radiation (UV light, X-Rays, rays, etc.) and there is particulate radiation as well in the form of high energy ions. This radiation can provide energy that drives chemical reactions in the ice mantles of interstellar dust grains. And while the multitude of different kinds of radiation might be a little confusing, they all have one thing in common: Upon

  13. Gun Internal Ballistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An approximate method of analysis is formulated for gun internal ballistics. The method is incorporated in a digital computer program which is...described. The validity of the method of analysis and computational procedure is substantiated by comparison of theoretical results with experimental

  14. Preliminary comparison of ballistic electron emission spectroscopy measurements on InAs quantum dots in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure grown by MBE and MOVPE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaniš, Jan; Zelinka, Jiří; Malina, Václav; Henini, M.; Pangrác, Jiří; Melichar, Karel; Hulicius, Eduard; Šroubek, Filip; Walachová, Jarmila

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2009), s. 496-498 ISSN 0026-2692 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : quantum dots * ballistic transport * semiconductor heterojunction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2009

  15. Study of InAs quantum dots in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure by ballistic electron emission microscopy/spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walachová, Jarmila; Zelinka, Jiří; Malina, Václav; Vaniš, Jan; Šroubek, Filip; Pangrác, Jiří; Melichar, Karel; Hulicius, Eduard

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 4 (2007), 042110.1-042110.3 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z10750506; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : quantum dots * ballistic transport * semiconductor heterojunctions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.596, year: 2007

  16. Ballistic electron emission spectroscopy/microscopy of self-assembled InAs quantum dots of different sizes embedded in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walachová, Jarmila; Zelinka, Jiří; Malina, Václav; Vaniš, Jan; Šroubek, Filip; Pangrác, Jiří; Melichar, Karel; Hulicius, Eduard

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 12 (2008), 012101.1-012101.3 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z10750506; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : quantum dots * ballistic transport * semiconductor heterojunctions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.726, year: 2008

  17. Novel probe for determining the size and position of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzechowski, T.J.; Koehler, H.; Edwards, W.; Nelson, M.; Marshall, B.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine the size and position of a relativistic electron beam inside the wiggler magnetic field of a Free Electron Laser (FEL), we have developed a new probe which intercepts the electron beam on a high Z target and monitors the resulting bremsstrahlung radiation. The probe is designed to move along the entire three meters of the wiggler. This FEL is designed to operate in the microwave region (2 to 8 mm) and the interaction region is an oversized waveguide with a cross section 3 cm x 9.8 cm. The axial probe moves inside this waveguide. The probe stops the electron beam on a Tantalum target and the resulting x-rays are scattered in the forward direction. A scintillator behind the beam stop reacts to the x-rays and emits visible light in the region where the x-rays strike. An array of fiber optics behind the scintillator transmits the visible light to a Reticon camera system which images the visible pattern from the scintillator. Processing the optical image is done by digitizing and storing the image and/or recording the image on video tape. Resolution and performance of this probe will be discussed

  18. Probing few nucleon systems with photons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the interesting radiative and electron scattering processes involving few nucleon systems at medium energies are discussed, with emphasis on what is interesting about the reaction, what is currently known both theoretically and experimentally, and what should be done next. One body systems yield fundamental particle properties, two-body (A = 2) systems fix the interaction between nucleons, and their couplings. The next goal is then to predict properties of A > 2 system in terms of dynamical theories whose parameters are determined by A ≤2 systems. Reactions with photons and electrons have been singled out because electromagnetic interaction is sufficiently well understood, it is weak and hence can be treated as perturbation. Failures to reproduce experimental results raises questions about the correctness of theoretical technique used, presence of three body forces and even to speculations that explicit quark degrees of freedom might be required. (author). 24 refs., 7 figs

  19. Probing Transient Electron Dynamics Using Ultrafast X Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucksbaum, Philip

    2016-05-01

    Linear x-ray absorption in atoms or molecules creates highly excited multi-electron quantum systems, which relax rapidly by fluorescence or Auger emission. These relaxation rates are usually less than a few femtoseconds in duration, and so they can reveal transient elecronic states in molecules as they undergo photo-induced transformations. I will show recent results from femtosecond x-ray experiments that display this phenomenon. There are efforts underway to push the temporal resolving power of ultrafast x-ray pulses into the attosecond regime, using stronger fields to initiate nonlinear absorption processes such as transient stimulated electronic Raman scattering. I will discuss current progress and future prospects for research in this area. This research is supported through Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Lab by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Science Program.

  20. Probing Spin Accumulation induced Magnetocapacitance in a Single Electron Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teik-Hui; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2015-09-08

    The interplay between spin and charge in solids is currently among the most discussed topics in condensed matter physics. Such interplay gives rise to magneto-electric coupling, which in the case of solids was named magneto-electric effect, as predicted by Curie on the basis of symmetry considerations. This effect enables the manipulation of magnetization using electrical field or, conversely, the manipulation of electrical polarization by magnetic field. The latter is known as the magnetocapacitance effect. Here, we show that non-equilibrium spin accumulation can induce tunnel magnetocapacitance through the formation of a tiny charge dipole. This dipole can effectively give rise to an additional serial capacitance, which represents an extra charging energy that the tunneling electrons would encounter. In the sequential tunneling regime, this extra energy can be understood as the energy required for a single spin to flip. A ferromagnetic single-electron-transistor with tunable magnetic configuration is utilized to demonstrate the proposed mechanism. It is found that the extra threshold energy is experienced only by electrons entering the islands, bringing about asymmetry in the measured Coulomb diamond. This asymmetry is an unambiguous evidence of spin accumulation induced tunnel magnetocapacitance, and the measured magnetocapacitance value is as high as 40%.

  1. Miniaturized ultrasound imaging probes enabled by CMUT arrays with integrated frontend electronic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Yakub, B T; Oralkan, Omer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Wygant, Ira O; Zhuang, Steve; Gencel, Mustafa; Choe, Jung Woo; Stephens, Douglas N; de la Rama, Alan; Chen, Peter; Lin, Feng; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Mahajan, Aman; Seo, Chi Hyung; O'Donnell, Matthew; Truong, Uyen; Sahn, David J

    2010-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays are conveniently integrated with frontend integrated circuits either monolithically or in a hybrid multichip form. This integration helps with reducing the number of active data processing channels for 2D arrays. This approach also preserves the signal integrity for arrays with small elements. Therefore CMUT arrays integrated with electronic circuits are most suitable to implement miniaturized probes required for many intravascular, intracardiac, and endoscopic applications. This paper presents examples of miniaturized CMUT probes utilizing 1D, 2D, and ring arrays with integrated electronics.

  2. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  3. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christoper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins. PMID:29464211

  4. Attosecond electron emission probes of ultrafast nanolocalized fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Ongoing experimental and theoretical work on the temporal and spatial characterization of nanolocalized plasmonic fields will be presented. Because of their broad spectral bandwidth, plasmons in metal nanoparticles undergo ultrafast dynamics with timescales as short as a few hundred attoseconds. So far, the spatiotemporal dynamics of optical fields localized on the nanoscale has been hidden from direct access in the real space and time domain. Our ultimate goal is to characterize the nanoplasmonic fields not only on a nanometer spatial scale but also on ~100 attosecond temporal scale. Information about the nanoplasmonic fields, which are excited by few-cycle laser pulses with stable electric field waveform, can be obtained by the measurement of photoemitted electrons. We will present recent results on the large acceleration of recollision electrons in nanolocalized fields near dielectric nanoparticles following the excitation by 5-fs near-infrared laser pulses with controlled electric field waveforms. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Th. Fennel (University of Rostock), E. Ruehl (FU Berlin), and M.I. Stockman (GSU Atlanta). We acknowledge support by the DFG via Emmy-Noether program and SPP1391.

  5. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J; Lutz, Christoper P

    2018-02-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T 2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T 2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins.

  6. Probing low-energy hyperbolic polaritons in van der Waals crystals with an electron microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Govyadinov, Alexander A.

    2017-07-14

    Van der Waals materials exhibit intriguing structural, electronic, and photonic properties. Electron energy loss spectroscopy within scanning transmission electron microscopy allows for nanoscale mapping of such properties. However, its detection is typically limited to energy losses in the eV range-too large for probing low-energy excitations such as phonons or mid-infrared plasmons. Here, we adapt a conventional instrument to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, a representative van der Waals material. The boron nitride spectra depend on the flake thickness and on the distance of the electron beam to the flake edges. To explain these observations, we developed a classical response theory that describes the interaction of fast electrons with (anisotropic) van der Waals slabs, revealing that the electron energy loss is dominated by excitation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons, and not of bulk phonons as often reported. Thus, our work is of fundamental importance for interpreting future low-energy loss spectra of van der Waals materials.Here the authors adapt a STEM-EELS system to probe energy loss down to 100 meV, and apply it to map phononic states in hexagonal boron nitride, revealing that the electron loss is dominated by hyperbolic phonon polaritons.

  7. Manual and electronic probing of the periodontal attachment level in untreated periodontitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Boghossian, Carina M; Amaral, Cristine S F; Maia, Lucianne C; Luiz, Ronir R; Colombo, Ana Paula V

    2008-08-01

    A systematic review of clinical trials has been performed to evaluate the reproducibility of manual (MP) and electronic probes (EP) in the measurement of clinical periodontal attachment level (AL) in untreated periodontitis subjects. Systematic electronic (PubMed Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Science--LILACS literature databases) and hand searches (English, Spanish and Portuguese languages; search terms "periodontitis diagnosis", "clinical attachment level measurements", "clinical attachment level detection", "clinical diagnosis of periodontitis", "manual probe", "electronic probe", "periodontitis or periodontal disease or attachment level or clinical attachment level") were performed to identify clinical trials involving CAL measurements, MP and EP in untreated periodontitis subjects. Quality and external validity were determined for selected studies. The initial search identified 37 articles. Ten studies met the initial eligibility, but eight were excluded after thorough analysis. The results from those two selected studies showed that the average variance and the absolute mean difference of CAL measurements for both types of probes cannot be considered different. "Based on this systematic review, MP and EP probes showed a tendency to have similar reliability in the measurement of CAL in untreated periodontitis subjects when used by a calibrated examiner. However, this finding is not supported by strong evidence.

  8. Electron spin relaxation in organic semiconductors probed through {mu}SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccio, L; Willis, M; Drew, A J [Queen Mary University of London, Department of Physics, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Schulz, L; Bernhard, C [Department of Physics and FriMat, University of Fribourg, Ch. du Musee 3, 1700 Fribourg, CH (Germany); Pratt, F L [ISIS Muon Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Heeney, M; Stingelin, N, E-mail: l.nuccio@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    Muon spin spectroscopy and in particular the avoided level crossing technique is introduced, with the aim of showing it as a very sensitive local probe for electron spin relaxation in organic semiconductors. Avoided level crossing data on TMS-pentacene at different temperatures are presented, and they are analysed to extract the electron spin relaxation rate, that is shown to increase on increasing the temperature from 0.02 MHz to 0.33 MHz at 3 K and 300 K respectively.

  9. The Probe Profile and Lateral Resolution of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Thick Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Hendrix; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Drouin, Dominique; de Jonge, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Lateral profiles of the electron probe of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were simulated at different vertical positions in a micrometers-thick carbon sample. The simulations were carried out using the Monte Carlo method in the CASINO software. A model was developed to fit the probe profiles. The model consisted of the sum of a Gaussian function describing the central peak of the profile, and two exponential decay functions describing the tail of the profile. Calculations were performed to investigate the fraction of unscattered electrons as function of the vertical position of the probe in the sample. Line scans were also simulated over gold nanoparticles at the bottom of a carbon film to calculate the achievable resolution as function of the sample thickness and the number of electrons. The resolution was shown to be noise limited for film thicknesses less than 1 μm. Probe broadening limited the resolution for thicker films. The validity of the simulation method was verified by comparing simulated data with experimental data. The simulation method can be used as quantitative method to predict STEM performance or to interpret STEM images of thick specimens. PMID:22564444

  10. Mach probe interpretation in the presence of supra-thermal electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuchs, Vladimír; Gunn, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2007), 032501-1 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Mach probes * supra -thermal electrons * quasi-neutral PIC codes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2007

  11. Two-resonance probe for measuring electron density in low-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for measuring double-checked electron density using two types of microwave resonance is presented. Simultaneous measurement of the resonances (plasma and quarter-wavelength resonator resonances), which were used for the cutoff probe (CP) and hairpin probe (HP), was achieved by the proposed microwave resonance probe. The developed two-resonance probe (TRP) consists of parallel separated coaxial cables exposing the radiation and detection tips. The structure resembles that of the CP, except the gapped coaxial cables operate not only as a microwave feeder for the CP but also as a U- shaped quarter-wavelength resonator for the HP. By virtue of this structure, the microwave resonances that have typically been used for measuring the electron density for the CP and HP were clearly identified on the microwave transmission spectrum of the TRP. The two types of resonances were measured experimentally under various power and pressure conditions for the plasma. A three-dimensional full-wave simulation model for the TRP is also presented and used to investigate and reproduce the resonances. The electron densities inferred from the resonances were compared and showed good agreement. Quantitative differences between the densities were attributed to the effects of the sheath width and spatial density gradient on the resonances. This accessible technique of using the TRP to obtain double-checked electron densities may be useful for comparative study and provides complementary uses for the CP and HP.

  12. Electron Temperature Measurement in a Premixed Flat Flame Using the Double Probe Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wild, J.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.; Nevrlý, V.; Střižík, M.; Bitala, P.; Filipi, B.; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 8 (2012), s. 692-698 ISSN 0863-1042 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk LD12020 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : double probe method * electron temperature * atmospheric premixed flame Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.934, year: 2012

  13. Electron transfer reactions to probe the electrode/solution interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitanio, F.; Guerrini, E.; Colombo, A.; Trasatti, S. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Dept. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2008-07-01

    The reactions that occur at the interface between an electrode and an electrolyte were examined with particular reference to the interaction of different electrode surfaces with redox couples. A semi-integration or convolution technique was used to study the kinetics of electron transfer on different electrode materials with different hydrophilic behaviour, such as Boron-Doped-Diamond (BDD), Au and Pt. Standard reversible redox couples were also investigated, including (Fe3+/2+, Fe(CN)63-/4-, Ru(NH3)63+/2+, Co(NH3)63+/2+, Ir4+/3+, V4+/5+ and V3+/2+). The proposed method proved to be simple, straightforward and reliable since the obtained kinetic information was in good agreement with data in the literature. It was concluded that the kinetics of the electrode transfer reactions depend on the chemical nature of the redox couple and electrode material. The method should be further extended to irreversible couples and other electrode materials such as mixed oxide electrodes. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Firearms and Ballistics

    OpenAIRE

    BOLTON-KING, Rachel; Schulze, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 7 of the book entitled 'Practical Veterinary Forensics' aims to introduce forensic veterinarians to the scientific concepts underpinning the field of firearms and ballistics. This introduction will enable practitioners to understand wound formation depending on the firearm and ammunition used. \\ud \\ud Various types of firearms, modern firing mechanisms and ammunition will be explained, together with an introduction to the physical concepts underpinning the four main constituents of th...

  15. Supra-ballistic phonons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, F.M.

    1989-05-01

    Energetic particles moving with a solid, either from nuclear reactions or externally injected, deposit energy by inelastic scattering processes which eventually appears as thermal energy. If the transfer of energy occurs in a crystalline solid then it is possible to couple some of the energy directly to the nuclei forming the lattice by generating phonons. In this paper the transfer of energy from a compound excited nucleus to the lattice is examined by introducing a virtual particle Π. It is shown that by including a Π in the nuclear reaction a substantial amount of energy can be coupled directly to the lattice. In the lattice this particle behaves as a spatially localized phonon of high energy, the so-called supra-ballistic phonon. By multiple inelastic scattering the supra-ballistic phonon eventually thermalizes. Because both the virtual particle Π and the equivalent supra-ballistic phonon have no charge or spin and can only exist within a lattice it is difficult to detect other than by its decay into thermal phonons. The possibility of a Π removing excess energy from a compound nucleus formed by the cold fusion of deuterium is examined. (Author)

  16. Ballistic negatron battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, M.S.R. [Koneru Lakshmiah Univ.. Dept. of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Green fields, Vaddeswaram (India)

    2012-07-01

    If we consider the Statistics there is drastic increase in dependence of batteries from year to year, due to necessity of power storage equipment at homes, power generating off grid and on grid Wind, PV systems, etc.. Where wind power is leading in renewable sector, there is a need to look at its development. Considering the scenario in India, most of the wind resource areas are far away from grid and the remaining areas which are near to grid are of low wind currents which is of no use connecting these equipment directly to grid. So, there is a need for a power storage utility to be integrated, such as the BNB (Ballistic Negatron Battery). In this situation a country like India need a battery which should be reliable, cheap and which can be industrialized. So this paper presents the concept of working, design, operation, adaptability of a Ballistic Negatron Battery. Unlike present batteries with low energy density, huge size, more weight, more charging time and low resistant to wear level, this Ballistic Negatron Battery comes with, 1) High energy storage capability (many multiples more than the present most advanced battery). 2) Very compact in size. 3) Almost negligible in weight compared to present batteries. 4) Charges with in very less time. 5) Never exhibits a wear level greater than zero. Seems like inconceivable but adoptable with simple physics. This paper will explains in detail the principle, model, design, construction and practical considerations considered in making this battery. (Author)

  17. A Fresh Twist on The Electron Microscope: Probing Broken Symmetries at a New Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    The introduction of aberration-correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has allowed the realization of Richard Feynman's long sought dream, atom-by-atom structural and elemental identification of materials by simply looking ``at the thing.'' Until now, the goal of aberration-correction in STEM has been to produce the smallest possible electron probes, which essentially corresponds to a near constant phase across the probe. Phases increase the size of electron probes and result in images and spectra with a lower spatial resolution. In this talk, calculations will be presented showing that aberrations in lenses are intrinsic generators of angular momentum, and that phases introduced in atomic-size electron probes can actually be beneficial when studying the symmetry of materials. In particular, examples of mapping magnetic ordering of materials with atomic size electron probes will be shown. Magnetic dichroism is one of the new frontiers where aberration-correction STEM can have a significant impact, and reveal information that is physically out of reach in X-ray and neutron synchrotrons. Current and future limitations in the experiments and requirements to reveal the magnetic moment (orbital and spin), charge ordering, crystal field splitting, spin-orbit-coupling, optical dichroism, and other physical phenomena associated with broken symmetries will be discussed. This research was supported by the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS), which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy. Collaborators: J. Rusz, J. Spiegelberg, M.A. McGuire, C.T. Symons, R.R. Vatsavai, C. Cantoni and A.R. Lupini.

  18. Electron temperature and heat load measurements in the COMPASS divertor using the new system of probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, J.; Seidl, J.; Horacek, J.; Komm, M.; Eich, T.; Panek, R.; Cavalier, J.; Devitre, A.; Peterka, M.; Vondracek, P.; Stöckel, J.; Sestak, D.; Grover, O.; Bilkova, P.; Böhm, P.; Varju, J.; Havranek, A.; Weinzettl, V.; Lovell, J.; Dimitrova, M.; Mitosinkova, K.; Dejarnac, R.; Hron, M.; The COMPASS Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-11-01

    A new system of probes was recently installed in the divertor of tokamak COMPASS in order to investigate the ELM energy density with high spatial and temporal resolution. The new system consists of two arrays of rooftop-shaped Langmuir probes (LPs) used to measure the floating potential or the ion saturation current density and one array of Ball-pen probes (BPPs) used to measure the plasma potential with a spatial resolution of ~3.5 mm. The combination of floating BPPs and LPs yields the electron temperature with microsecond temporal resolution. We report on the design of the new divertor probe arrays and first results of electron temperature profile measurements in ELMy H-mode and L-mode. We also present comparative measurements of the parallel heat flux using the new probe arrays and fast infrared termography (IR) data during L-mode with excellent agreement between both techniques using a heat power transmission coefficient γ  =  7. The ELM energy density {{\\varepsilon }\\parallel } was measured during a set of NBI assisted ELMy H-mode discharges. The peak values of {{\\varepsilon }\\parallel } were compared with those predicted by model and with experimental data from JET, AUG and MAST with a good agreement.

  19. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered......The electrical properties of semiconductor surfaces have played a decisive role in one of the most important discoveries of the last century, transistors. In the 1940s, the concept of surface states-new electron energy levels characteristic of the surface atoms-was instrumental in the fabrication...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  20. Advances in Ultrafast Control and Probing of Correlated-Electron Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Simon [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Clarendon Lab.; Rini, Matteo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dhesi, Sarnjeet S. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Harwell Campus, Oxford (United Kingdom). Diamond Light Source, Ltd.; Schoenlein, Robert W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Cavalleri, Andrea [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Clarendon Lab.; Univ. of Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Research Dept. for Structural Dynamics

    2011-02-24

    Here in this paper, we present recent results on ultrafast control and probing of strongly correlated-electron materials. We focus on magnetoresistive manganites, applying excitation and probing wavelengths that cover the mid-IR to the soft X-rays. In analogy with near-equilibrium filling and bandwidth control of phase transitions, our approach uses both visible and mid-IR pulses to stimulate the dynamics by exciting either charges across electronic bandgaps or specific vibrational resonances. Lastly, x-rays are used to unambiguously measure the microscopic electronic, orbital, and structural dynamics. Our experiments dissect and separate the nonequilibrium physics of these compounds, revealing the complex interplay and evolution of spin, lattice, charge, and orbital degrees of freedoms in the time domain.

  1. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Dharmadhikari, Chandrakant V.

    2018-02-01

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of 10 kΩ. It was found that I-V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I-V cycles until reproducible I-V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I-V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F-N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.

  2. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Dharmadhikari, Chandrakant V.

    2018-03-01

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of 10 kΩ. It was found that I-V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I-V cycles until reproducible I-V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I-V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F-N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.

  3. Investigation of Electron Transport Across Vertically Grown CNTs Using Combination of Proximity Field Emission Microscopy and Scanning Probe Image Processing Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2018-02-26

    Field emission from nanostructured films is known to be dominated by only small number of localized spots which varies with the voltage, electric field and heat treatment. It is important to develop processing methods which will produce stable and uniform emitting sites. In this paper we report a novel approach which involves analysis of Proximity Field Emission Microscopic (PFEM) images using Scanning Probe Image Processing technique. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitters have been deposited on tungsten foil by water assisted chemical vapor deposition. Prior to the field electron emission studies, these films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM images of the samples show bristle like structure, the size of bristle varying from 80 to 300 nm. The topography images were found to exhibit strong correlation with current images. Current–Voltage (I–V) measurements both from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Conducting-AFM mode suggest that electron transport mechanism in imaging vertically grown CNTs is ballistic rather than usual tunneling or field emission with a junction resistance of ~10 kΩ. It was found that I–V curves for field emission mode in PFEM geometry vary initially with number of I–V cycles until reproducible I–V curves are obtained. Even for reasonably stable I–V behavior the number of spots was found to increase with the voltage leading to a modified Fowler–Nordheim (F–N) behavior. A plot of ln(I/V3) versus 1/V was found to be linear. Current versus time data exhibit large fluctuation with the power spectral density obeying 1/f2 law. It is suggested that an analogue of F–N equation of the form ln(I/Vα) versus 1/V may be used for the analysis of field emission data, where α may depend on nanostructure configuration and can be determined from the dependence of emitting spots on the voltage.Graphical Abstract

  4. Dynamics of valence-shell electrons and nuclei probed by strong-field holography and rescattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, Samuel G.; Bhargava Ram, Niraghatam; Atala, Marcos; Shvetsov-Shilovski, Nikolay I; von Conta, Aaron; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Lein, Manfred; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Strong-field photoelectron holography and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) are two powerful emerging methods for probing the ultrafast dynamics of molecules. However, both of them have remained restricted to static systems and to nuclear dynamics induced by strong-field ionization. Here we extend these promising methods to image purely electronic valence-shell dynamics in molecules using photoelectron holography. In the same experiment, we use LIED and photoelectron holography simultaneously, to observe coupled electronic-rotational dynamics taking place on similar timescales. These results offer perspectives for imaging ultrafast dynamics of molecules on femtosecond to attosecond timescales. PMID:28643771

  5. Analysis of Scanned Probe Images for Magnetic Focusing in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Philip; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2017-07-01

    We have used cooled scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to study electron motion in nanoscale devices. The charged tip of the microscope was raster-scanned at constant height above the surface as the conductance of the device was measured. The image charge scatters electrons away, changing the path of electrons through the sample. Using this technique, we imaged cyclotron orbits that flow between two narrow contacts in the magnetic focusing regime for ballistic hBN-graphene-hBN devices. We present herein an analysis of our magnetic focusing imaging results based on the effects of the tip-created charge density dip on the motion of ballistic electrons. The density dip locally reduces the Fermi energy, creating a force that pushes electrons away from the tip. When the tip is above the cyclotron orbit, electrons are deflected away from the receiving contact, creating an image by reducing the transmission between contacts. The data and our analysis suggest that the graphene edge is rather rough, and electrons scattering off the edge bounce in random directions. However, when the tip is close to the edge, it can enhance transmission by bouncing electrons away from the edge, toward the receiving contact. Our results demonstrate that cooled SPM is a promising tool to investigate the motion of electrons in ballistic graphene devices.

  6. Plasma diagnostics by electron guns and electric field probes on ISEE-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, A.

    1982-01-01

    The use of electron guns to control the potential of a satellite with conductive surfaces is discussed with reference to the results of the ISEE-1 satellite experiment. The two electron guns carried by the satellite can emit electrons with energies up to 48 eV, and the emitted electron current has a maximum value of 0.5-1.0 mA. The satellite potential, with or without gun operation, can be measured with reference to one or two spherical electric field probes positioned on booms at a distance of 36 m from the satellite. The probes are biased with a negative current from a high-impedance source to be slightly positive (0.5-1.0 V) relative to the plasma, and the spacecraft is normally several volts more positive and can be further positively charged by operating the electron gun. Plasma diagnostics can be carried out by appropriate sweeps of gun currents and energy of emitted electrons to obtain information about density and characteristic energy of ambient electrons. 9 references

  7. Advanced prepreg ballistic composites for military helmets

    OpenAIRE

    Dimeski, Dimko; Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2014-01-01

    With the advancement of ballistic materials and technologies, the ballistic prepregs are becoming an essential construction technique for getting the maximum performance out of the high performance fibers. The ballistic prepregs help to maximize the engagement between fibers and high speed projectiles penetrating the ballistic material, thus reducing the amount of ballistic material required to defeat the projectiles. The backbone of lightweight ballistic materials is high perform...

  8. Multipoint observations of energetic electron injections with MMS and Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B.; Li, W.; Kletzing, C.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Between March and September of 2016, the orbits of NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes missions overlapped on the dawn side of the near-equatorial magnetosphere, a region ideal for studying injections of 10s to 100s of keV electrons from the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere. During this period, the four MMS spacecraft also underwent a series of conjunctions with both Van Allen Probes, including several in which all six spacecraft were within 1 Earth radii of each other. From such multipoint observations, we investigate the connection between Earth's magnetotail and inner magnetosphere via dipolarization events and the energetic particle injections associated with them. Using the multipoint MMS data, we show how dipolarization fronts surge earthwards through the tail at 100s of kilometers per second, corresponding to strong electric fields that accelerate energetic particles and transport them earthward. Combining MMS with Van Allen Probes, we are able to estimate the transport of particles over larger spatial scales (macroscopic view) and multipoint observations of wave activity during close conjunctions (microscopic view). With such observations, we examine and report on new perspectives concerning the role of energetic electron injections as the seed populations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons as well as the relationship between freshly injected electrons and chorus and ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave activity.

  9. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  10. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  11. Ballistic Missile Intercept from UCAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    on the DPRK TPD-2 ballistic missile. A 3 degree-of-freedom ( 3DoF ) mathematical model was previously developed and used to simulate the trajectory...Characteristics(estimated) TPD-2 ICBM Data Input to Simulation(From [1]) Figure 3. Reach of TPD-2 Missile A 3DoF ballistic missile

  12. Micro-four-point probes in a UHV scanning electron microscope for in-situ surface-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraki, I.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    For in-situ measurements of surface conductivity in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), we have installed micro-four-point probes (probe spacings down to 4 mum) in a UHV scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with scanning reflection-high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). With the aid of piezoactuators...... for precise positioning of the probes, local conductivity of selected surface domains of well-defined superstructures could be measured during SEM and RHEED observations. It was found that the surface sensitivity of the conductivity measurements was enhanced by reducing the probe spacing, enabling...

  13. Temperature Measurement by a Nanoscale Electron Probe Using Energy Gain and Loss Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Lupini, Andrew R.; Feng, Tianli; Unocic, Raymond R.; Walden, Franklin S.; Gardiner, Daniel S.; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Dellby, Niklas; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Krivanek, Ondrej L.

    2018-03-01

    Heat dissipation in integrated nanoscale devices is a major issue that requires the development of nanoscale temperature probes. Here, we report the implementation of a method that combines electron energy gain and loss spectroscopy to provide a direct measurement of the local temperature in the nanoenvironment. Loss and gain peaks corresponding to an optical-phonon mode in boron nitride were measured from room temperature to ˜1600 K . Both loss and gain peaks exhibit a shift towards lower energies as the sample is heated up. First-principles calculations of the temperature-induced phonon frequency shifts provide insights into the origin of this effect and confirm the experimental data. The experiments and theory presented here open the doors to the study of anharmonic effects in materials by directly probing phonons in the electron microscope.

  14. Quantitative analysis of biological fluids by electron probe and X ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, Chantal

    1986-01-01

    In order to know the kidney normal operation and to have an insight on cellular transport mechanisms and hormonal regulations at the nephron level, a technique based on the use of an electron probe has been developed for the elemental analysis of micro-volumes of biological fluids. This academic document reports applications of this technique on animals on which such fluids have been sampled at different levels of the nephron. As these samples are available in too small volumes to be dosed by conventional methods, they have been quantitatively analysed by using an electronic probe based analyser in order to determine concentrations of all elements with an atomic number greater than that of carbon. After a presentation of the implemented method and hardware, the author thus describes how an analysis is performed, and reports and discusses an example (analysis conditions, data acquisition, data processing, minimum detectable concentration, reasons for measurement scattering)

  15. Electrons and photons: a probe for short distance study of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, A.

    1983-01-01

    Study of nuclear interactions using electron and photon beams between 100 and 700 MeV energy has shown the limitations of the mean field theory, and given unambiguous evidence for meson exchange currents and Δ resonance propagation. Continuing the investigation at higher energies (1-3 GeV) would permit to deepen further these discoveries and probe the short and very short range parts of nuclear interactions, thus specifying the role of quarks in the nuclear dynamics [fr

  16. Nonlocal Response of Metallic Nanospheres Probed by Light, Electrons, and Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss...... blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii...

  17. New global loss model of energetic and relativistic electrons based on Van Allen Probes measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ksenia Orlova; Yuri Shprits; Maria Spasojevic

    2016-01-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument on the Van Allen Probes provides a vast quantity of fully resolved wave measurements below L = 5.5, a critical region for radiation belt acceleration and loss. EMFISIS data show that plasmaspheric hiss waves can be observed at frequencies as low as 20 Hz and provide three-component magnetic field measurements that can be directly used for electron scattering calculations. Updated models of hiss proper...

  18. Ultrafast Electrons and X-rays as Probe of Biomolecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ganesh

    The structure-function relation in Biology suggests that every biological molecule has evolved its structure to carry out a specific function. However, for many of these processes (such as those with catalytic activity) the structure of the biomolecule changes during the course of a reaction. Understanding the structure-function relation thus becomes a question of understanding biomolecular dynamics that span a variety of timescales (from electronic rearrangements in the femtoseconds to side-chain alteration in the microseconds and more). This dissertation deals with the study of biomolecular dynamics in the ultrafast timescales (fs-ns) using electron and X-ray probes in both time and frequency domains. It starts with establishing the limitations of traditional electron diffraction coupled with molecular replacement to study biomolecular structure and proceeds to suggest a pulsed electron source Hollow-Cone Transmission Electron Microscope as an alternative scheme to pursue ultrafast biomolecular imaging. In frequency domain, the use of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy as a tool to access ultrafast nuclear dynamics in the steady state, is detailed with the new monochromated NiON UltraSTEM and examples demonstrating this instrument's capability are provided. Ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to elucidate biomolecular dynamics is presented in studying X-ray as a probe, with the study of the photolysis of Methylcobalamin using time-resolved laser pump--X-ray probe absorption spectroscopy. The analysis in comparison to prior literature as well as DFT based XAS simulations offer good agreement and understanding to the steady state spectra but are so far inadequate in explaining the time-resolved data. However, the trends in the absorption simulations for the transient intermediates show a strong anisotropic dependence on the axial ligation, which would define the direction for future studies on this material to achieve a solution.

  19. Ballistic quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassol, E.; Bonnet, J.; Porcheron, D.; Mazeron, J.J.; Peiffert, D.; Alapetite, C.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the ballistic quality assurance for stereotactic intracranial irradiation treatments delivered with Gamma Knife R either dedicated or adapted medical linear accelerators. Specific and periodic controls should be performed in order to check the mechanical stability for both irradiation and collimation systems. If this step remains under the responsibility of the medical physicist, it should be done in agreement with the manufacturer's technical support. At this time, there are no recent published guidelines. With technological developments, both frequency and accuracy should be assessed in each institution according to the treatment mode: single versus hypo-fractionated dose, circular collimator versus micro-multi-leaf collimators. In addition, 'end-to-end' techniques are mandatory to find the origin of potential discrepancies and to estimate the global ballistic accuracy of the delivered treatment. Indeed, they include frames, non-invasive immobilization devices, localizers, multimodal imaging for delineation and in-room positioning imaging systems. The final precision that could be reasonably achieved is more or less 1 mm. (authors)

  20. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szlachetko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10−18 s to femtoseconds (10−15 s and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS, we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments.

  1. Probing plasma wakefields using electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Wan, Y.; Guo, B.; Hua, J. F.; Pai, C.-H.; Li, F.; Zhang, J.; Ma, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Xu, X. L.; Mori, W. B.; Chu, H.-H.; Wang, J.; Lu, W.; Joshi, C.

    2018-04-01

    We show experimental results of probing the electric field structure of plasma wakes by using femtosecond relativistic electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator. Snapshots of laser-driven linear wakes in plasmas with different densities and density gradients are captured. The spatiotemporal evolution of the wake in a plasma density up-ramp is recorded. Two parallel wakes driven by a laser with a main spot and sidelobes are identified in the experiment and reproduced in simulations. The capability of this new method for capturing the electron- and positron-driven wakes is also shown via 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsen Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS. Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  3. Miniature electrostatic lens for generation of a low-voltage high current electron probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubeck, C.-D.; Fleischmann, A.; Knell, G.; Lutsch, R.Y.; Plies, E.; Winkler, D.

    1999-01-01

    A miniature tetrode system, according to F. Burstert, D. Winkler and B. Lischke [Microelectron. Eng. 31 (1996) 95], for the generation of a low-voltage electron probe was investigated and further developed. The tetrode system consists of a Schottky cathode and a miniaturized lens, composed of three conventional electron microscopical apertures, which are used as electrodes. We tested two configurations with different aperture thicknesses and bore diameters experimentally and also made simulations of these lenses. Two kinds of middle electrodes, a flat and a top-hat aperture, were used. In most cases the experimental data show a good agreement with the theoretically predicted values of the examined tetrode system

  4. Quantum ballistic transistor and low noise HEMT for cryo-electronics lower than 4.2 K; Transistor balistique quantique et HEMT bas-bruit pour la cryoelectronique inferieure a 4.2 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gremion, E

    2008-01-15

    Next generations of cryo-detectors, widely used in physics of particles and physics of universe, will need in the future high-performance cryo-electronics less noisy and closer to the detector. Within this context, this work investigates properties of two dimensional electron gas GaAlAs/GaAs by studying two components, quantum point contact (QPC) and high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). Thanks to quantized conductance steps in QPC, we have realized a quantum ballistic transistor (voltage gain higher than 1), a new component useful for cryo-electronics thanks to its operating temperature and weak power consumption (about 1 nW). Moreover, the very low capacity of this component leads to promising performances for multiplexing low temperature bolometer dedicated to millimetric astronomy. The second study focused on HEMT with very high quality 2DEG. At 4.2 K, a voltage gain higher than 20 can be obtained with a very low power dissipation of less than 100 {mu}W. Under the above experimental conditions, an equivalent input voltage noise of 1.2 nV/{radical}(Hz) at 1 kHz and 0.12 nV/{radical}(Hz) at 100 kHz has been reached. According to the Hooge formula, these noise performances are get by increasing gate capacity estimated to 60 pF. (author)

  5. Plasma potential and electron temperature evaluated by ball-pen and Langmuir probes in the COMPASS tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, M.; Popov, Tsv K.; Adamek, J.; Kovačič, J.; Ivanova, P.; Hasan, E.; López-Bruna, D.; Seidl, J.; Vondráček, P.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Imríšek, M.; Panek, R.; the COMPASS Team

    2017-12-01

    The radial distributions of the main plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer of the COMPASS tokamak are measured during L-mode and H-mode regimes by using both Langmuir and ball-pen probes mounted on a horizontal reciprocating manipulator. The radial profile of the plasma potential derived previously from Langmuir probes data by using the first derivative probe technique is compared with data derived using ball-pen probes. A good agreement can be seen between the data acquired by the two techniques during the L-mode discharge and during the H-mode regime within the inter-ELM periods. In contrast with the first derivative probe technique, the ball-pen probe technique does not require a swept voltage and, therefore, the temporal resolution is only limited by the data acquisition system. In the electron temperature evaluation, in the far scrape-off layer and in the limiter shadow, where the electron energy distribution is Maxwellian, the results from both techniques match well. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface, where the electron energy distribution function is bi-Maxwellian, the ball-pen probe technique results are in agreement with the high-temperature components of the electron distribution only. We also discuss the application of relatively large Langmuir probes placed in parallel and perpendicularly to the magnetic field lines to studying the main plasma parameters. The results obtained by the two types of the large probes agree well. They are compared with Thomson scattering data for electron temperatures and densities. The results for the electron densities are compared also with the results from ASTRA code calculation of the electron source due to the ionization of the neutrals by fast electrons and the origin of the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function is briefly discussed.

  6. Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) Mass Spectrometer for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, H. O.; Skoug, R. M.; Guthrie, A. A.; MacDonald, E. A.; Baldonado, J. R.; Harper, R. W.; Henderson, K. C.; Kihara, K. H.; Lake, J. E.; Larsen, B. A.; Puckett, A. D.; Vigil, V. J.; Friedel, R. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Niehof, J. T.; Reeves, G. D.; Thomsen, M. F.; Hanley, J. J.; George, D. E.; Jahn, J.-M.; Cortinas, S.; De Los Santos, A.; Dunn, G.; Edlund, E.; Ferris, M.; Freeman, M.; Maple, M.; Nunez, C.; Taylor, T.; Toczynski, W.; Urdiales, C.; Spence, H. E.; Cravens, J. A.; Suther, L. L.; Chen, J.

    2013-11-01

    The HOPE mass spectrometer of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission (renamed the Van Allen Probes) is designed to measure the in situ plasma ion and electron fluxes over 4 π sr at each RBSP spacecraft within the terrestrial radiation belts. The scientific goal is to understand the underlying physical processes that govern the radiation belt structure and dynamics. Spectral measurements for both ions and electrons are acquired over 1 eV to 50 keV in 36 log-spaced steps at an energy resolution Δ E FWHM/ E≈15 %. The dominant ion species (H+, He+, and O+) of the magnetosphere are identified using foil-based time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry with channel electron multiplier (CEM) detectors. Angular measurements are derived using five polar pixels coplanar with the spacecraft spin axis, and up to 16 azimuthal bins are acquired for each polar pixel over time as the spacecraft spins. Ion and electron measurements are acquired on alternate spacecraft spins. HOPE incorporates several new methods to minimize and monitor the background induced by penetrating particles in the harsh environment of the radiation belts. The absolute efficiencies of detection are continuously monitored, enabling precise, quantitative measurements of electron and ion fluxes and ion species abundances throughout the mission. We describe the engineering approaches for plasma measurements in the radiation belts and present summaries of HOPE measurement strategy and performance.

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cyclic Hydroxylamine Spin Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Polienko, Yuliya F; Kirilyuk, Igor

    2017-11-17

    Oxidative stress contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions such as development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. A variety of measurements of oxidative stress markers in biological systems have been developed; however, many of these methods are not specific, can produce artifacts, and do not directly detect the free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a unique tool that allows direct measurements of free radical species. Cyclic hydroxylamines are useful and convenient molecular probes that readily react with ROS to produce stable nitroxide radicals, which can be quantitatively measured by EPR. In this work, we critically review recent applications of various cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes in biology to study oxidative stress, their advantages, and the shortcomings. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes have been developed and their successful application for ROS measurement using EPR has been published. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo studies. Although cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes EPR application has been previously described, there has been lack of translation of these new methods into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. This work summarizes "best practice" in applications of cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes to assist with EPR studies of oxidative stress. Additional studies to advance hydroxylamine spin probes from the "basic science" to biomedical applications are needed and could lead to better understanding of pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  8. Probing Grain-Boundary Chemistry and Electronic Structure in Proton-Conducting Oxides by Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel R; Zhu, Huayang; Diercks, David R; Ricote, Sandrine; Kee, Robert J; Almansoori, Ali; Gorman, Brian P; O'Hayre, Ryan P

    2016-11-09

    A laser-assisted atom-probe-tomographic (LAAPT) method has been developed and applied to measure and characterize the three-dimensional atomic and electronic nanostructure at an yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BaZr 0.9 Y 0.1 O 3-δ , BZY10) grain boundary. Proton-conducting perovskites, such as BZY10, are attracting intense interest for a variety of energy conversion applications. However, their implementation has been hindered, in part, because of high grain-boundary (GB) resistance that is attributed to a positive GB space-charge layer (SCL). In this study, LAAPT is used to analyze BZY10 GB chemistry in three dimensions with subnanometer resolution. From this analysis, maps of the charge density and electrostatic potential arising at the GBs are derived, revealing for the first time direct chemical evidence that a positive SCL indeed exists at these GBs. These maps reveal new insights on the inhomogeneity of the SCL region and produce an average GB potential barrier of approximately 580 mV, agreeing with previous indirect electrochemical measurements.

  9. Pressure dependence of electron temperature using rf-floated electrostatic probes in rf plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantin, A.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A new technique, which eliminates ac between probe and plasma by means of a ''follower'', permits electrostatic probes to be used in rf plasmas with a degree of confidence and accuracy which is equal, if not better, to that for a dc discharge. Measurements in argon, using this technique, have shown that electron temperature (T/sub e/) in an rf discharge is not higher than in dc discharge. Moreover the values of T/sub e/ do not agree with von Engel's law, but are in close agreement with a theory based on free diffusion and extrapolated up to values of pR=20 Torr cm (pressure times tube radius). These results are in contradiction with published electrostatic probe results for a positive column, but agree with published results as determined by microwave radiometry and optical spectroscopy. The hypothesis is made that the supporting evidence in favor of von Engel's law, afforded by published electrostatic probe results, could be due to an artifact

  10. Towards fast measurement of the electron temperature in the SOL of ASDEX upgrade using swept Langmuir probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.W.; Rohde, V.; Adamek, J.; Horacek, J.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Mehlmann, F.

    2010-01-01

    On ASDEX Upgrade first experiments were made using single probes with a voltage sweep frequency up to 100kHz. Possibilities and limitations using fast swept probes with a standard diagnostic and analysis tools are discussed. A good agreement between the data derived from fast swept single probe characteristics and floating as well as saturation current measurements was found. In a stationary (non ELMing) plasma the data of the fast swept probe are compared to standard slow swept probes (kHz range) showing an improvement of the measurement by faster sweeping. While ELM filaments already could be resolved the access of electron temperature fluctuations in small scale turbulence still has to be improved. Further comparisons are done in ELMy H-mode with combined ball-pen probe/floating potential measurements which can deliver electron temperatures with 25μs time resolution at reduced spatial resolution compared to pin probes. During ELMs the electron temperatures derived from the ball-pen probe and fast swept single probes agreed (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Ultrafast terahertz probes of transient conducting and insulating phases in an electron-hole gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindl, R A; Carnahan, M A; Hägele, D; Lövenich, R; Chemla, D S

    2003-06-12

    Many-body systems in nature exhibit complexity and self-organization arising from seemingly simple laws. For example, the long-range Coulomb interaction between electrical charges has a simple form, yet is responsible for a plethora of bound states in matter, ranging from the hydrogen atom to complex biochemical structures. Semiconductors form an ideal laboratory for studying many-body interactions of electronic quasiparticles among themselves and with lattice vibrations and light. Oppositely charged electron and hole quasiparticles can coexist in an ionized but correlated plasma, or form bound hydrogen-like pairs called excitons. The pathways between such states, however, remain elusive in near-visible optical experiments that detect a subset of excitons with vanishing centre-of-mass momenta. In contrast, transitions between internal exciton levels, which occur in the far-infrared at terahertz (1012 s(-1)) frequencies, are independent of this restriction, suggesting their use as a probe of electron-hole pair dynamics. Here we employ an ultrafast terahertz probe to investigate directly the dynamical interplay of optically-generated excitons and unbound electron-hole pairs in GaAs quantum wells. Our observations reveal an unexpected quasi-instantaneous excitonic enhancement, the formation of insulating excitons on a 100-ps timescale, and the conditions under which excitonic populations prevail.

  12. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  13. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  14. Note: Deep UV-pump THz-probe spectroscopy of the excess electron in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Arian; Savolainen, Janne; Shalit, Andrey; Hamm, Peter

    2017-06-28

    In the work of Savolainen et al. [Nat. Chem. 6, 697 (2014)], we studied the excess (hydrated) electron in water with the help of transient THz spectroscopy, which is a sensitive probe of its delocalization length. In that work, we used laser pulses at 800 nm, 400 nm, and 267 nm for photoionization. While the detachment mechanism for 400 nm and 267 nm is complicated and requires a concerted nuclear rearrangement, we provided evidence that 800 nm pumping excites the excess electron directly and vertically into the conduction band, despite a highly nonlinear field-ionization process. In the present note, we extend that work to 200 nm pumping, which provides a much cleaner way to reach the conduction band. We show that the detachment pathways upon 200 nm and 800 nm pumping are in essence the same, as indicated by the same initial size of the electron wavefunction and the same time scales for the collapse of the wavefunction and geminate recombination.

  15. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...... a direct measurement of the surface electronic transport on a bulk topological insulator. The surface state conductivity and mobility are obtained. Apart from transport properties, we also investigate the atomic structure of the Bi2Se3(111) surface via surface x-ray diraction and low-energy electron...

  16. Defects in electron irradiated vitreous SiO2 probed by positron annihiliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Kawano, Takao; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    1994-01-01

    Defects in 3 MeV electron irradiated vitreous SiO 2 (v-SiO 2 ) were probed by the positron annihilation technique. For unirradiated v-SiO 2 specimens, almost all positrons were found to annihilate from positronium (Ps) states. This high formation probability of Ps was attributed to the trapping of positrons by open-space defects. The formation probability of Ps was decreased by the electron irradiation. The observed inhibition of the Ps formation was attributed to the trapping of positrons by point defects introduced and/or activated by the irradiation. From measurements of the lifetime distribution of Ps, it was found that, by the electron irradiation, the mean size of open-space defects was decreased and the size distribution of such defects was broadened. (Author)

  17. Defects in electron irradiated vitreous SiO[sub 2] probed by positron annihiliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science); Kawano, Takao (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Radioisotope Centre); Itoh, Hisayoshi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1994-10-10

    Defects in 3 MeV electron irradiated vitreous SiO[sub 2] (v-SiO[sub 2]) were probed by the positron annihilation technique. For unirradiated v-SiO[sub 2] specimens, almost all positrons were found to annihilate from positronium (Ps) states. This high formation probability of Ps was attributed to the trapping of positrons by open-space defects. The formation probability of Ps was decreased by the electron irradiation. The observed inhibition of the Ps formation was attributed to the trapping of positrons by point defects introduced and/or activated by the irradiation. From measurements of the lifetime distribution of Ps, it was found that, by the electron irradiation, the mean size of open-space defects was decreased and the size distribution of such defects was broadened. (Author).

  18. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugesan; Cook; Devasahayam

    1997-01-01

    , Recent advances in radiofrequency (RF) electronics have enabled the generation of pulses of the order of 10-50 ns. Such short pulses provide adequate spectral coverage for EPR studies at 300 MHz resonant frequency. Acquisition of free induction decays (FID) of paramagnetic species possessing...... inhomogeneously broadened narrow lines after pulsed excitation is feasible with an appropriate digitizer/averager. This report describes the use of time-domain RF EPR spectrometry and imaging for in vivo applications. FID responses were collected from a water-soluble, narrow line width spin probe within phantom...... samples in solution and also when infused intravenously in an anesthetized mouse. Using static magnetic field gradients and back-projection methods of image reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the spin-probe distribution were obtained in phantom samples as well as in a mouse. The resolution...

  19. Pulsed floating-type Langmuir probe for measurements of electron energy distribution function in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ikjin; Kim, Aram; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2017-01-01

    A floating type Langmuir probe was studied to measure the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in plasmas. This method measures the current (I)-voltage (V) curve with rising and falling variations based on a floating potential by using charge-discharge characteristics of the series capacitor when a square-pulse voltage is applied. In addition, this method measures the EEDF by using the alternating current (ac) superposition method. The measured EEDFs were in good agreement with results from a conventional single Langmuir probe. This technique could be applied as a plasma diagnostic method in the capacitively coupled plasma where the plasma potential is extremely high or the processing plasma where the deposition gas is used.

  20. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  1. Observations Directly Linking Relativistic Electron Microbursts to Whistler Mode Chorus: Van Allen Probes and FIREBIRD II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A. W.; Crew, A.; Sample, J.; Klumpar, D.; Johnson, A.; Agapitov, O.; Shumko, M.; Turner, D. L.; Santolik, O.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Thaller, S.; Blake, B.; Spence, H.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2017-11-01

    We present observations that provide the strongest evidence yet that discrete whistler mode chorus packets cause relativistic electron microbursts. On 20 January 2016 near 1944 UT the low Earth orbiting CubeSat Focused Investigations of Relativistic Electron Bursts: Intensity, Range, and Dynamics (FIREBIRD II) observed energetic microbursts (near L = 5.6 and MLT = 10.5) from its lower limit of 220 keV, to 1 MeV. In the outer radiation belt and magnetically conjugate, Van Allen Probe A observed rising-tone, lower band chorus waves with durations and cadences similar to the microbursts. No other waves were observed. This is the first time that chorus and microbursts have been simultaneously observed with a separation smaller than a chorus packet. A majority of the microbursts do not have the energy dispersion expected for trapped electrons bouncing between mirror points. This confirms that the electrons are rapidly (nonlinearly) scattered into the loss cone by a coherent interaction with the large amplitude (up to ˜900 pT) chorus. Comparison of observed time-averaged microburst flux and estimated total electron drift shell content at L = 5.6 indicate that microbursts may represent a significant source of energetic electron loss in the outer radiation belt.

  2. Transport of electrons in the tunnel of an ion sensitive probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Adámek, Jiří; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Pekárek, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2011), 015005-015005 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430901; GA MŠk 7G09042; GA MŠk LA08048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * plasma * katsumata probe * ExB drift * ion temperature * tunnel * electron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/1/015005/pdf/0741-3335_53_1_015005.pdf

  3. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y H; Yang, X Y; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  4. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugesan; Cook; Devasahayam

    1997-01-01

    , Recent advances in radiofrequency (RF) electronics have enabled the generation of pulses of the order of 10-50 ns. Such short pulses provide adequate spectral coverage for EPR studies at 300 MHz resonant frequency. Acquisition of free induction decays (FID) of paramagnetic species possessing...... samples in solution and also when infused intravenously in an anesthetized mouse. Using static magnetic field gradients and back-projection methods of image reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the spin-probe distribution were obtained in phantom samples as well as in a mouse. The resolution...

  5. Electron temperature and heat load measurements in the COMPASS divertor using the new system of probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Jiří; Seidl, Jakub; Horáček, Jan; Komm, Michael; Eich, T.; Pánek, Radomír; Cavalier, J.; Devitre, A.; Peterka, Matěj; Vondráček, Petr; Stöckel, Jan; Šesták, David; Grover, Ondřej; Bílková, Petra; Böhm, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Havránek, Aleš; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Lovell, J.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Mitošinková, Klára; Dejarnac, Renaud; Hron, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 116017. ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14228S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : COMPASS * divertor * heat load * ELM * electron temperature * Ball-pen probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa7e09

  6. On modified finite difference method to obtain the electron energy distribution functions in Langmuir probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Choi, Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Se-Hun; Yoo, Tae-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-06-01

    A modified central difference method (MCDM) is proposed to obtain the electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in single Langmuir probes. Numerical calculation of the EEDF with MCDM is simple and has less noise. This method provides the second derivatives at a given point as the weighted average of second order central difference derivatives calculated at different voltage intervals, weighting each by the square of the interval. In this paper, the EEDFs obtained from MCDM are compared to those calculated via the averaged central difference method. It is found that MCDM effectively suppresses the noises in the EEDF, while the same number of points are used to calculate of the second derivative.

  7. On modified finite difference method to obtain the electron energy distribution functions in Langmuir probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222, Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Se-Hun; Yoo, Tae-Ho [Seoul Science High School, 63, Hyehwa-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-530 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A modified central difference method (MCDM) is proposed to obtain the electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in single Langmuir probes. Numerical calculation of the EEDF with MCDM is simple and has less noise. This method provides the second derivatives at a given point as the weighted average of second order central difference derivatives calculated at different voltage intervals, weighting each by the square of the interval. In this paper, the EEDFs obtained from MCDM are compared to those calculated via the averaged central difference method. It is found that MCDM effectively suppresses the noises in the EEDF, while the same number of points are used to calculate of the second derivative.

  8. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si structures; Ballistische Elektronen Emissions Mikroskopie (BEEM) an Au/Si und Au/Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si-Strukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauch, I.

    2007-05-15

    This thesis describes Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) measurements of Au/Si(111) and Au/Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si(111) structures. This technique is based on Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM). It measures the ballistic transport of hot electrons through parts of the sample and across an interface, which provides a potential barrier. One part of this work was to modify the BEEM apparatus and to implement a lock in method, which modulates the tunnel current with a small frequency. In this way it is possible to study samples with very low resistance (as low as 30 k{omega}), which widely enlarges the number of samples which are appropriate for BEEM measurement at room temperature. Both types of samples studied in this thesis had low resistance and were therefore studied using the lock in method. For the classical BEEM system Au/Si(111), we observed a pronounced dependence of the sample resistance of Au/Si(111)-7 x 7 on the preparation temperature. We developed a model for the resistance of thermal prepared Au/Si(111)-7 x 7 samples. The model identifies that the low resistance is due to the surface conductivity of the reconstructed silicon surface. If the surface is prepared at a lower temperature (but still high enough that the surface is cleaned and the silicon dioxide desorbed) rough areas remain on the surface, which reduce the surface conductivity. For BEEM measurements flat areas of the sample surface are selected. The low temperature prepared samples we were able to obtain BEEM spectra as well as images at room temperature using the lock in method. The sesquioxide of praseodymium (Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is currently discussed as a possible candidate for a gate oxide in semiconductor devices, since it has some of the required material properties such as a high dielectric constant, low leakage current and epitaxial growth on Si(100). We have for the first time performed BEEM measurement of praseodymium oxide. Despite a low resistance of the structures we

  9. Crystallographic analysis of thin film surfaces using micro-probe reflexion high-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Masakazu; Doi, Takahisa; Hayakawa, Kazunobu

    1984-01-01

    Micro-probe reflexion high-energy electron diffraction using an electron beam having a 20nm beam diameter at a beam current of 8 nA, has been developed for performing crystallographic analyses of thin film and bulk crystal surfaces. High spatial resolution and high brightness have made it possible to perform analyses of thin films on substrates having fine structures without such sample preparation as thinning. A dark field imaging method using part of the diffraction spot intensity has also been developed. Using this method, it was found that atomic steps and dislocations on bulk and material-deposited Si surfaces can be observed. This shows the usefulness of the technique for studying crystal growth of thin films with mono-layer depth resolution. (author)

  10. Experimental Route to Scanning Probe Hot Electron Nanoscopy (HENs) Applied to 2D Material

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-06-09

    This paper presents details on a new experimental apparatus implementing the hot electron nanoscopy (HENs) technique introduced for advanced spectroscopies on structure and chemistry in few molecules and interface problems. A detailed description of the architecture used for the laser excitation of surface plasmons at an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is provided. The photogenerated current from the tip to the sample is detected during the AFM scan. The technique is applied to innovative semiconductors for applications in electronics: 2D MoS2 single crystal and a p-type SnO layer. Results are supported by complementary scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, traditional conductive AFM, and Raman measurements. New features highlighted by HEN technique reveal details of local complexity in MoS2 and polycrystalline structure of SnO at nanometric scale otherwise undetected. The technique set in this paper is promising for future studies in nanojunctions and innovative multilayered materials, with new insight on interfaces.

  11. Note: Microelectrode-shielding tip for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Zhean; Xu, Chunkai; Liu, Jian; Xu, Chunye; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-04-01

    We report a novel microelectrode-shielding tip (ME tip) for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy (SPEES). The shielding effect of this tip is studied through comparing the detection efficiency with the normal tip by both experiment and simulation. The results show that the backscattering count rate detected by the SPEES instrument using the normal tip begins to decrease as the tip approaches to the sample surface within 21 μm, while that using the ME tip only starts to drop off within 1 μm. This indicates that the electron energy spectra can be measured with the ME tip at a much closer tip-sample distance. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that the ME tip can be used to obtain topography of the sample surface in situ simultaneously.

  12. Correlated microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis of calcifications in an odontoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoba, T.; Yoshioka, C.; Yagi, T.

    1980-01-01

    Using microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis, a correlated morphologic and crystallographic study was performed on dysplastic enamel in a compound odontoma. The tumor was found in the lateral incisor-canine region of the left mandible of a 36-year-old woman. A conspicuous feature was the presence of hypomineralized areas, which were situated in the proximity of enamel surface and distinctly demarcated from the adjacent enamel. X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron microanalysis showed that these lesions have a lower crystallinity and a higher concentration of magnesium as compared with the adjacent enamel. In addition, the present study revealed the presence of two other types of calcifications: 1) calcified structures within the fissure or on the enamel surface, which include lacunae of varying size and which resemble a form of coronal cementum, and 2) spherical calcifications which may be an epithelial product. (author)

  13. Ballistic Trauma of Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamah, Léopold; Keita, Damany; Marie Camara, Ibrahima; Lamine Bah, Mohamed; Sory, Sidimé; Diallo, Mamadou Moustapha

    2017-01-01

    The objective of our study was to report the management and follow-up of a particular case of ballistic trauma and to do the literature review. Observation: A 35-year-old patient, a trader who was the victim of a firearm accident under not very clear circumstances. He was admitted to the emergency department after 3 hours. Clinically, the patient had significant bleeding in the arm and was in a state of clouding of consciousness. We could notice on the right arm, a posterior large transfixing wound of 1 cm and a 6 cm one on the antero-internal side. The limb was cold with a small and thready pulse. Sensitivity was decreased in the radial nerve area. The radiograph showed bone comminution from the middle 1/3 to the superior 1/3 of the humeral diaphysis. The treatment was orthopedic (after debridement) by scapula-brachio-ante-brachiopalmar plaster splint with thoracic strap. The wound healed in 46 days and the patient resumed his activities after 11 months and 2 weeks. Conclusion: The authors presented the value of using the scapulo-brachio-palmar plaster splints with thoracic strap in some severe upper limb trauma in the absence of the external fixator. PMID:28567155

  14. Monitoring Chemical and Biological Electron Transfer Reactions with a Fluorogenic Vitamin K Analogue Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Mei-Ni; Godin, Robert; Durantini, Andrés M; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-12-21

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and characterization of a two-segment fluorogenic analogue of vitamin K, B-VK Q , prepared by coupling vitamin K 3 , also known as menadione (a quinone redox center), to a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore (a lipophilic reporter segment). Oxidation-reduction reactions, spectroelectrochemical studies, and enzymatic assays conducted in the presence of DT-diaphorase illustrate that the new probe shows reversible redox behavior on par with that of vitamin K, provides a high-sensitivity fluorescence signal, and is compatible with biological conditions, opening the door to monitor remotely (i.e., via imaging) redox processes in real time. In its oxidized form, B-VK Q is non-emissive, while upon reduction to the hydroquinone form, B-VK QH 2 , BODIPY fluorescence is restored, with emission quantum yield values of ca. 0.54 in toluene. Density functional theory studies validate a photoinduced electron transfer intramolecular switching mechanism, active in the non-emissive quinone form and deactivated upon reduction to the emissive dihydroquinone form. Our results highlight the potential of B-VK Q as a fluorogenic probe to study electron transfer and transport in model systems and biological structures with optimal sensitivity and desirable chemical specificity. Use of such a probe may enable a better understanding of the role that vitamin K plays in biological redox reactions ubiquitous in key cellular processes, and help elucidate the mechanism and pathological significance of these reactions in biological systems.

  15. Spin polarized auger electron spectroscopy (SPAES): An element specific local magnetization probe of magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilturk, Onder S.

    Spin Polarized Auger Electron Spectroscopy (SPAES) is found to have application for investigating fundamental properties as well as element specific local magnetization information on magnetic materials. By using the uniqueness of the UTA-SEMPA tool, one can obtain the surface magnetic domain microstructure and also perform SPAES studies by probing a single domain at the surface. In the current study, knowing the probed domain, spin polarization of electrons from super Coster-Kronig MVV Auger emissions on 3%Si-Fe sheets have been investigated. It is observed that on both sides of 180° domains, separated by a domain wall with an out-of-plane component of magnetization, the spin polarized Auger spectra exhibit similar distributions with high polarization structures, which are consistent with the published data. The element specificity of the system is applied to Gd-Co composite system. Details of 4d core hole initiated Auger transitions showed that the 5d states have enhanced spin polarization, confirming the coupling of moments in the composite system via 5d states of Gd. It is also unambiguously observed that Co magnetic moments are indeed aligned antiparallel to the Gd ones via 4f-5d positive exchange and 3d-5d hybridization.

  16. Measurement of total calcium in neurons by electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2013-11-20

    In this article the tools, techniques, and instruments appropriate for quantitative measurements of intracellular elemental content using the technique known as electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) are described. Intramitochondrial calcium is a particular focus because of the critical role that mitochondrial calcium overload plays in neurodegenerative diseases. The method is based on the analysis of X-rays generated in an electron microscope (EM) by interaction of an electron beam with the specimen. In order to maintain the native distribution of diffusible elements in electron microscopy specimens, EPMA requires "cryofixation" of tissue followed by the preparation of ultrathin cryosections. Rapid freezing of cultured cells or organotypic slice cultures is carried out by plunge freezing in liquid ethane or by slam freezing against a cold metal block, respectively. Cryosections nominally 80 nm thick are cut dry with a diamond knife at ca. -160 °C, mounted on carbon/pioloform-coated copper grids, and cryotransferred into a cryo-EM using a specialized cryospecimen holder. After visual survey and location mapping at ≤-160 °C and low electron dose, frozen-hydrated cryosections are freeze-dried at -100 °C for ~30 min. Organelle-level images of dried cryosections are recorded, also at low dose, by means of a slow-scan CCD camera and subcellular regions of interest selected for analysis. X-rays emitted from ROIs by a stationary, focused, high-intensity electron probe are collected by an energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer, processed by associated electronics, and presented as an X-ray spectrum, that is, a plot of X-ray intensity vs. energy. Additional software facilitates: 1) identification of elemental components by their "characteristic" peak energies and fingerprint; and 2) quantitative analysis by extraction of peak areas/background. This paper concludes with two examples that illustrate typical EPMA applications, one in which mitochondrial calcium analysis

  17. Near?Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ? 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)?A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50?m...

  18. Electroreflectance spectroscopy as a probe of the electronic structure at the metal-electronic interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.M.; Liu, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a surface is influenced by the surface electronic structure. In particular, the existence of surface states in band gaps can lead to optical absorption below the bulk interband threshold. However, such effects are usually too small to be observed because while surface states are localized within several atomic layers near the surface, light waves can penetrate at least hundreds of layers into the metal. One way to enhance the surface effect for a metallic surface is to make use of electromodulation techniques. When a metal is placed in an electrolyte, an intense electric field (approx. 10/sup 7/ volts/cm) can be induced at the metal-electrolyte boundary with the application of a bias voltage of less than a volt. Electroreflectance (ER) experiments modulate the bias voltage and measure the resultant modulations in the optical reflectivity. Since the static electric field is highly localized at the interface (the Fermi-Thomas screening length for typical metals is of the order of Angstroms) we expect the ER effect to be highly surface sensitive. Sensitivities in ..delta..R/R up to 10/sup -6/ can be achieved in such experiments. 12 references.

  19. Probe measurements of penning electron spectra in the afterglow of nonlocal helium microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Belskiy, Denis; Gutsev, Sergey; Kosykh, Nikolay; Kryukov, Anton

    2012-10-01

    Method PLES [Blagoev A.B., Kolokolov, N.B., Kudryavtsev. Physica Scripta, 1994, v.50, p.371] is based on identification of atoms and molecules of impurities M by selective registration of groups of fast electrons e(f) created in Penning ionization: He(m) + M -> He +M+ + e(f). The electron energy spectrum e(f) contains discrete peaks corresponding to the difference between the energy 19.8 eV of metastable helium atoms He(m) and the ionization energies Ei of impurities M. Since the ionization potential Ei of each type of atom or molecule is a well-known, it is possible to identify the atoms or molecules M of the unknown impurity by their ionization potential Ei. Probe registration of the energy spectra of penning electrons is carried out in the nonlocal afterglow plasma of pulsed microdischarge in helium and its mixtures with argon, krypton and air. In helium, the non-local plasma condition corresponds to p xL < 5 Torr x cm, where p is the gas pressure and L is the plasma volume size. It is demonstrated that the obtained maxima appear at the characteristic energies corresponding exactly to the expected maxima for penning electrons of the known gas impurities used.

  20. Calibration Results and Anticipated Science Ops for the Parker Solar Probe's SWEAP/SPAN-Electron Analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey, P. L.; Larson, D. E.; Livi, R.; Abiad, R.; Parker, C.; Halekas, J. S.; Kasper, J. C.; Korreck, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    We present the SPAN-E calibration results and science operation plans this instrument on the Parker Solar Probe mission. SPAN-E is a pair of highly configurable ESA sensors, one on the RAM side of the spacecraft (SPAN-Ae) and one on anti-RAM (SPAN-B). Together, SPAN-E will jointly measure the full 3D thermal and suprathermal electron distribution function at cadences as fast as 4.58Hz. Joined with the SPAN-Ai and SPC instruments that are part of the Solar Wind Electrons, Alphas, and Protons (SWEAP) suite, SPAN-E will measure the solar coronal plasma across a range of energies and densities with a FOV over >90% of the sky, returning data over a 7 year long PSP mission lifetime. The SPAN-E instruments have passed environmental testing at the instrument level, and the final instrument calibrations are complete. This presentation details the final instrument calibration results as performed at UCB/SSL after environmental testing, and details the planned configurations for PSP's first orbit. In addition, the PSP spacecraft's magnetic fields are expected to distort the measured electron VDFs at low energies, thus we present a novel computer vision method of measuring and modeling the spacecraft magnetic fields as seen during an observatory-level "swing" test. Ultimately, the model will feed into an algorithm for ground corrections to electron VDFs distorted by these stray spacecraft magnetic fields.

  1. Electron probe microanalysis for clinical investigations: Microdrop and soft tissue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, M.J.; Ingram, F.D.

    1984-01-01

    The most important advantage offered by electron probe microanalysis (EPA) for clinical investigations is the ability to analyze smaller volumes of tissue than is possible with conventional techniques. The sample can be a biological soft tissue specimen, which involves subcellular localization, or a picoliter fluid droplet. In either case, the analysis can be nondestructive and permit multiple analyses for a number of elements in a given sample. The most highly developed electron microprobe analytical technique is fluid drop analysis, popularly referred to as microdrop analysis. This method provides the investigator with an analytic capability that has an accuracy of measurement often 1% or better on 20 to 30 picoliter fluid droplets. Electron microprobe techniques have been used for studies of animal hard tissue and for studies that involve insoluble inclusions. However, the development of techniques for studies of labile constituents in animal soft tissue has been much slower. It has been necessary not only to develop appropriate methods of tissue preparation, but also to establish sound techniques for tissue collection. Although there are adequate methods for collection of most types of tissue from laboratory animals, many of these methods are not suitable for human subjects. In order to provide the reader with a better understanding of the capabilities and potential for the application of electron microprobe methodology to problems in clinical medicine, the authors discuss some of their experiences with liquid droplet analysis and quantitative electrolyte distribution measurements in animal soft tissue

  2. Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles by Electron Probe X-Ray Microanalysis and Electron Energy - Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhoffer, Chris

    All facilities of EPXMA were used for the source apportionment of more than 25,000 individual aerosol particles detected above the North Sea and in bulk- and microlayer -seawater. Differences in chemical composition of the particles were studied on the basis of the abundance variations by using principal component analysis and by conditional selectioning of particles. Also in this work, an attempt is made to explore the characteristics of EELS for single particle analysis. A multi-image method was developed and successfully applied in order to reduce uncertainties of the background parameters. The totality of the EELS and ESI methodology, together with its typical problems, were illustrated within different domains of individual particle analysis. Exhaust aerosols in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry were generated from different ceramic powder suspensions (Al_2 O_3, ZrO_2 and SiC) and investigated for their chemical composition. Polydisperse standard aerosols of NaCl, (NH_4)_2 SO_4, and KNO_3 are beam sensitive and therefore special precautions are necessary. A methodology is proposed for serially recording electron energy-loss spectra from sub-micrometer salt particles. As a last topic, carbonaceous particles present in the Phoenix urban atmosphere were investigated by EELS and ESI. The observed particles have widely diverse origins and, as a consequence, a considerably range in structures and morphologies. EELS affords the opportunity of exploring-micrometer sized materials in far greater detail than was previously possible and such information cannot be obtained from bulk elemental analysis only.

  3. Thermoplastic composites for ballistic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, John Whachong

    2003-08-01

    Systematic studies of thermoplastic composites on ballistic impact failure and kinetic energy absorption mechanisms were examined on both semicrystalline and amorphous polymer matrix composites. By taking advantages of the nature of thermoplastic polymers, the main objective of this research was to develop armor grade composites with thermoplastic resin matrices through a understanding of the microscopic as well as macroscopic characteristics of the composites. In both semicrystalline neat resin and composites, the crystal formation and the degree of crystallinity of the polymer matrix were greatly influenced by processing conditions, especially, the cooling rate. As the cooling rate is decreased, more perfect crystal formation and amorphous rearrangements were evident vs cooling at higher rates. The relative degree of crystallinity of semicrystalline matrix composites was calculated using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). These values were in good agreement with neat resin values obtained via differantial scanning calorimeter (DSC). Unfortunately, the morphological perfection of the semicrystalline matrix exhibits negligible advantage on ballistic impact resistance. Failure of the composites under ballistic impact was localized and the kinetic energy absorption was low. Amorphous polymers were also greatly influenced by processing conditions. Furthermore, amorphous polymers exhibit large processing windows in terms of processing temperature, which allows the various processing manipulations for ballistic composite fabrication. As increasing processing temperature, glass transition temperature of the polymer and stiffness of the composite increased due to the morphological perfection and level of wetting, respectively. Ballistic impact resistance was found to be inversely proportional to the stiffness of the composites. Fiber wetting characteristics and polymer morphology changes during the cooling process are considered to be major contributors of this behavior

  4. Ballistic spin filtering across the ferromagnetic-semiconductor interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.H. Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ballistic spin-filter effect from a ferromagnetic metal into a semiconductor has theoretically been studied with an intention of detecting the spin polarizability of density of states in FM layer at a higher energy level. The physical model for the ballistic spin filtering across the interface between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductor superlattice is developed by exciting the spin polarized electrons into n-type AlAs/GaAs superlattice layer at a much higher energy level and then ballistically tunneling through the barrier into the ferromagnetic film. Since both the helicity-modulated and static photocurrent responses are experimentally measurable quantities, the physical quantity of interest, the relative asymmetry of spin-polarized tunneling conductance, could be extracted experimentally in a more straightforward way, as compared with previous models. The present physical model serves guidance for studying spin detection with advanced performance in the future.

  5. Probing Hot Electron Flow Generated on Pt Nanoparticles with Au/TiO2 Schottky Diodes during Catalytic CO Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Y.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Renzas, J. Russell; Zhang, Yawen; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-05-01

    Hot electron flow generated on colloid platinum nanoparticles during exothermic catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation was directly detected with Au/TiO{sub 2} diodes. Although Au/TiO{sub 2} diodes are not catalytically active, platinum nanoparticles on Au/TiO{sub 2} exhibit both chemicurrent and catalytic turnover rate. Hot electrons are generated on the surface of the metal nanoparticles and go over the Schottky energy barrier between Au and TiO{sub 2}. The continuous Au layer ensures that the metal nanoparticles are electrically connected to the device. The overall thickness of the metal assembly (nanoparticles and Au thin film) is comparable to the mean free path of hot electrons, resulting in ballistic transport through the metal. The chemicurrent and chemical reactivity of nanoparticles with citrate, hexadecylamine, hexadecylthiol, and TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide) capping agents were measured during catalytic CO oxidation at pressures of 100 Torr O{sub 2} and 40 Torr CO at 373-513 K. We found that chemicurrent yield varies with each capping agent, but always decreases with increasing temperature. We suggest that this inverse temperature dependence is associated with the influence of charging effects due to the organic capping layer during hot electron transport through the metal-oxide interface.

  6. Ballistic materials in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.S.; Hurst, G.C.; Duerk, J.L.; Diaz, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the most common ballistic materials available in the urban setting studied for deflection force, rotation, heating, and imaging artifact at 1.5 T to determine potential efficacy and safety for imaging patients with ballistic injuries. Twenty-eight missiles were tested, covering the range of bullet types and materials suggested by the Cleveland Police Department. Deflection force was measured by the New method. Rotation was studied by evaluating bullets in a 10% (W/W) ballistic gelating after 30 minutes with the long axis of the bullet placed parallel and perpendicular to the z axis. Heating was measured with alcohol thermometers imaged for 1 hour alternately with FESUM and spin-echo sequences (RF absorption w/Kg and 0.033 w/Kg). Image artifact evaluation of routine sequences was performed

  7. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qianlang [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States); March, Katia [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bâtiment 510, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Crozier, Peter A., E-mail: CROZIER@asu.edu [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO{sub 2} anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO{sub 2} showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60 nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1 eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. - Highlights: • Bandgap states detected with aloof beam monochromated EELS on oxide nanoparticle surfaces. • Dielectric theory applied to simulate the spectra and interpret surface structure. • Density of states models also be employed to understand the surface electronic structure. • In MgO, one states associate with water species was found close to the valence band edge. • In anatase, two mid-gap states associated with point defects were found.

  8. Direct imaging of defect formation in strained organic flexible electronics by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Tobias; Travaglini, Lorenzo; Lai, Stefano; Patruno, Luca; de Miranda, Stefano; Bonfiglio, Annalisa; Cosseddu, Piero; Fraboni, Beatrice

    2016-12-02

    The development of new materials and devices for flexible electronics depends crucially on the understanding of how strain affects electronic material properties at the nano-scale. Scanning Kelvin-Probe Microscopy (SKPM) is a unique technique for nanoelectronic investigations as it combines non-invasive measurement of surface topography and surface electrical potential. Here we show that SKPM in non-contact mode is feasible on deformed flexible samples and allows to identify strain induced electronic defects. As an example we apply the technique to investigate the strain response of organic thin film transistors containing TIPS-pentacene patterned on polymer foils. Controlled surface strain is induced in the semiconducting layer by bending the transistor substrate. The amount of local strain is quantified by a mathematical model describing the bending mechanics. We find that the step-wise reduction of device performance at critical bending radii is caused by the formation of nano-cracks in the microcrystal morphology of the TIPS-pentacene film. The cracks are easily identified due to the abrupt variation in SKPM surface potential caused by a local increase in resistance. Importantly, the strong surface adhesion of microcrystals to the elastic dielectric allows to maintain a conductive path also after fracture thus providing the opportunity to attenuate strain effects.

  9. Electron Beam-Induced Deposition for Atom Probe Tomography Specimen Capping Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, David R; Gorman, Brian P; Mulders, Johannes J L

    2017-04-01

    Six precursors were evaluated for use as in situ electron beam-induced deposition capping layers in the preparation of atom probe tomography specimens with a focus on near-surface features where some of the deposition is retained at the specimen apex. Specimens were prepared by deposition of each precursor onto silicon posts and shaped into sub-70-nm radii needles using a focused ion beam. The utility of the depositions was assessed using several criteria including composition and uniformity, evaporation behavior and evaporation fields, and depth of Ga+ ion penetration. Atom probe analyses through depositions of methyl cyclopentadienyl platinum trimethyl, palladium hexafluoroacetylacetonate, and dimethyl-gold-acetylacetonate [Me2Au(acac)] were all found to result in tip fracture at voltages exceeding 3 kV. Examination of the deposition using Me2Au(acac) plus flowing O2 was inconclusive due to evaporation of surface silicon from below the deposition under all analysis conditions. Dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co2(CO)8] and diiron nonacarbonyl [Fe2(CO)9] depositions were found to be effective as in situ capping materials for the silicon specimens. Their very different evaporation fields [36 V/nm for Co2(CO)8 and 21 V/nm for Fe2(CO)9] provide options for achieving reasonably close matching of the evaporation field between the capping material and many materials of interest.

  10. Investigation of electronically excited indole relaxation dynamics via photoionization and fragmentation pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, T. J.; Yu, Hui; Ullrich, Susanne

    2014-07-01

    The studies herein investigate the involvement of the low-lying 1La and 1Lb states with 1ππ* character and the 1πσ* state in the deactivation process of indole following photoexcitation at 201 nm. Three gas-phase, pump-probe spectroscopic techniques are employed: (1) Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), (2) hydrogen atom (H-atom) time-resolved kinetic energy release (TR-KER), and (3) time-resolved ion yield (TR-IY). Each technique provides complementary information specific to the photophysical processes in the indole molecule. In conjunction, a thorough examination of the electronically excited states in the relaxation process, with particular focus on the involvement of the 1πσ* state, is afforded. Through an extensive analysis of the TR-PES data presented here, it is deduced that the initial excitation of the 1Bb state decays to the 1La state on a timescale beyond the resolution of the current experimental setup. Relaxation proceeds on the 1La state with an ultrafast decay constant (IY experiments, both specifically probing 1πσ* dynamics, exhibit similar decay constants, further validating these observations.

  11. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn; Chi, Li-Feng, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn; Wang, Sui-Dong, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process.

  12. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin; Chi, Li-Feng; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process

  13. Novel electronic ferroelectricity in an organic charge-order insulator investigated with terahertz-pump optical-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Morimoto, T.; Yada, H.; Kinoshita, Y.; Sotome, M.; Kida, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Iwano, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Shimoi, Y.; Suda, M.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Mori, H.; Okamoto, H.

    2016-01-01

    In electronic-type ferroelectrics, where dipole moments produced by the variations of electron configurations are aligned, the polarization is expected to be rapidly controlled by electric fields. Such a feature can be used for high-speed electric-switching and memory devices. Electronic-type ferroelectrics include charge degrees of freedom, so that they are sometimes conductive, complicating dielectric measurements. This makes difficult the exploration of electronic-type ferroelectrics and the understanding of their ferroelectric nature. Here, we show unambiguous evidence for electronic ferroelectricity in the charge-order (CO) phase of a prototypical ET-based molecular compound, α-(ET)2I3 (ET:bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene), using a terahertz pulse as an external electric field. Terahertz-pump second-harmonic-generation(SHG)-probe and optical-reflectivity-probe spectroscopy reveal that the ferroelectric polarization originates from intermolecular charge transfers and is inclined 27° from the horizontal CO stripe. These features are qualitatively reproduced by the density-functional-theory calculation. After sub-picosecond polarization modulation by terahertz fields, prominent oscillations appear in the reflectivity but not in the SHG-probe results, suggesting that the CO is coupled with molecular displacements, while the ferroelectricity is electronic in nature. The results presented here demonstrate that terahertz-pump optical-probe spectroscopy is a powerful tool not only for rapidly controlling polarizations, but also for clarifying the mechanisms of ferroelectricity. PMID:26864779

  14. Cathodoluminescence, laser ablasion inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis and electron paramagnetic resonance analyses of natural sphalerite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, M.; Hagni, R.D.; Koenig, A.; Ciftc, E.

    2008-01-01

    Natural sphalerite associated with copper, silver, lead-zinc, tin and tungsten deposits from various world-famous mineral deposits have been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL), laser ablasion inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the relationship between trace element type and content and the CL properties of sphalerite. In general, sphalerite produces a spectrum of CL colour under electron bombardment that includes deep blue, turquoise, lime green, yellow-orange, orange-red and dull dark red depending on the type and concentration of trace quantities of activator ions. Sphalerite from most deposits shows a bright yellow-orange CL colour with ??max centred at 585 nm due to Mn2+ ion, and the intensity of CL is strongly dependent primarily on Fe2+ concentration. The blue emission band with ??max centred at 470-490 nm correlates with Ga and Ag at the Tsumeb, Horn Silver, Balmat and Kankoy mines. Colloform sphalerite from older well-known European lead-zinc deposits and late Cretaceous Kuroko-type VMS deposits of Turkey shows intense yellowish CL colour and their CL spectra are characterised by extremely broad emission bands ranging from 450 to 750 nm. These samples are characterised by low Mn (Balmat-Edwards district. Amber, lime-green and red-orange sphalerite produced weak orange-red CL at room temperatures, with several emission bands centred at 490, 580, 630, 680, 745, with ??max at 630 nm being the strongest. These emission bands are well correlated with trace quantities of Sn, In, Cu and Mn activators. Sphalerite from the famous Ogdensburg and Franklin mines exhibited brilliant deep blue and orange CL colours and the blue CL may be related to Se. Cathodoluminescence behaviour of sphalerite serves to characterise ore types and help detect technologically important trace elements.

  15. Specimen preparation for correlating transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of mesoscale features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorne, Matthew I; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N; Taheri, Mitra L

    2014-12-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) provides atomic-scale spatial and compositional resolution that is ideally suited for the analysis of grain boundaries. The small sample volume analyzed in APT presents, however, a challenge for capturing mesoscale features, such as grain boundaries. A new site-specific method utilizing transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the precise selection and isolation of mesoscale microstructural features in a focused-ion-beam (FIB) microscope lift-out sample, from below the original surface of the bulk sample, for targeted preparation of an APT microtip by FIB-SEM microscopy is presented. This methodology is demonstrated for the targeted extraction of a prior austenite grain boundary in a martensitic steel alloy; it can, however, be easily applied to other mesoscale features, such as heterophase interfaces, precipitates, and the tips of cracks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Accurate prediction of the ammonia probes of a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of 14NH3, 15NH3, 14ND3 and 15ND3 is carried out variationally using the TROVE approach. Variational calculations are robust and accurate, offering a new way to compute sensitivity coefficients. Particular attention is paid to the Δk = ±3 transitions between the accidentally coinciding rotation-inversion energy levels of the ν2 = 0+, 0-, 1+ and 1- states, and the inversion transitions in the ν4 = 1 state affected by the `giant' l-type doubling effect. These transitions exhibit highly anomalous sensitivities, thus appearing as promising probes of a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ. Moreover, a simultaneous comparison of the calculated sensitivities reveals a sizeable isotopic dependence which could aid an exclusive ammonia detection.

  17. Probing local order in glasses from limited-volume electron and x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, A. C. Y.; Tabor, R. F.; Bourgeois, L.; de Jonge, M. D.; Mudie, S. T.; Petersen, T. C.

    2016-05-01

    It has long been recognised that spatial fluctuations in local order in disordered assemblies of particles can be probed using limited-volume diffraction measurements. These measurements have unique advantages over broad-beam diffraction experiments that isotropically average over many structural configurations and result in one-dimensional intensity curves, requiring modelling to interpret. Despite the advantages of limiting illumination to a low number of particle configurations, obtaining quantitative measurements of local order from such experiments remains a challenge. The effects on the diffraction pattern of changing the beam energy, lateral size, aberrations and coherence and the specimen thickness have only recently been clarified. We review theoretical and experimental efforts in this direction in the fields of both electron and x-ray diffraction and identify promising areas of future development.

  18. Local probe studies on lattice distortions and electronic correlations in manganites

    CERN Document Server

    lopes, Armandina; Correia, João Guilherme

    This thesis presents an experimental study on lattice distortions and electronic correlations in colossal magnetoresistive magnetic oxides. The Perturbed Angular Correlation local probe technique is used to study selected manganite systems in order to obtain relevant insight into microscopic phenomena responsible for their macroscopic pr operties. Complementary structural, magnetic and electric characterization was performed. The work is focused on the following aspects: \\\\Lattice distortions and polaron clusters in LaMnO$_{3+ \\Delta}$ system. A study of the electric field gradi ent and magnetic hyperfine field was performed in representative samples of the LaMnO$_{3+ \\Delta}$ system, and correlated with macroscopic information obtained in the same samples. Particular attention was given to the LaMnO$_{3.12}$ sample since this compound is a prototype of a ferromagnetic-insulat or manganite, presenting a rhombohedric- orthorhombic structural phase transition near room temperature. We found that random distribu...

  19. Probing the pairing symmetry of the iron pnictides with electronic Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.R.

    2010-04-29

    An important issue in the study of the iron-arsenic based superconductors is the symmetry of the superconducting gap, a problem complicated by multiple gaps on different Fermi surface sheets. Electronic Raman scattering is a flexible bulk probe which allows one in principle to determine gap magnitudes and test for gap nodes in different regions of the Brillouin zone by employing different photon polarization states. Here we calculate the clean Raman intensity for A{sub 1g}, B{sub 1g} and B{sub 2g} polarizations, and discuss the peak structures and low-energy power laws which might be expected for several popular models of the superconducting gap in these systems.

  20. Micro Raman Spectroscopy and Electron Probe Microanalysis of Graphite Spherulites and Flakes in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S. K.; Nayak, B. B.; Mohapatra, B. K.; Mishra, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    In this investigation, the evolution and formation of graphitized microstructure of cast iron has been studied by using micro Raman spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The samples were prepared by carbothermic reduction of iron ore powder by plasma smelting in an extended arc thermal plasma reactor. Magnesium was added in the ladle to spherodize the graphite. Elemental mapping of the sample across the spherulites and flakes was performed by EPMA. Raman scattering data were collected at different positions across graphite spherulites and flakes. Micro Raman analysis shows graphite peaks at 1350 cm-1 (D), 1580 cm-1 (G), and higher order graphite peaks for both spherulites and flakes. Additional peaks between 200 and 800 cm-1 are found to be present only in the case of spherulites. These extra peaks originate from cementite (Fe3C) present in and around the spherulites. It is inferred from the available experimental data that graphite spherulites are formed in areas richer in cementite.

  1. A study of back-trap mottle in coated papers using electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, T.; Whalen-Shaw, M.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper methodology is been developed for analyzing both the surface and cross-sectional distributions for coating components using electron probe microanalysis and image analysis technology. Actual light and dark areas of print mottle are physically separated and analyzed to provide an unequivocal relationship between the distribution of coating components and the physical structure of the coating in areas of print mottle. Areas of low ink density were found to have higher surface latex concentration, greater mean coating thickness, and greater mean rawstock roughness. Furthermore, the difference in surface concentration of CaCO 3 within areas of, low and high ink density was established as a new and additional probable cause of back-trap mottle

  2. Electric field measurements on Cluster: comparing the double-probe and electron drift techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Eriksson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The four Cluster satellites each carry two instruments designed for measuring the electric field: a double-probe instrument (EFW and an electron drift instrument (EDI. We compare data from the two instruments in a representative sample of plasma regions. The complementary merits and weaknesses of the two techniques are illustrated. EDI operations are confined to regions of magnetic fields above 30 nT and where wave activity and keV electron fluxes are not too high, while EFW can provide data everywhere, and can go far higher in sampling frequency than EDI. On the other hand, the EDI technique is immune to variations in the low energy plasma, while EFW sometimes detects significant nongeophysical electric fields, particularly in regions with drifting plasma, with ion energy (in eV below the spacecraft potential (in volts. We show that the polar cap is a particularly intricate region for the double-probe technique, where large nongeophysical fields regularly contaminate EFW measurments of the DC electric field. We present a model explaining this in terms of enhanced cold plasma wake effects appearing when the ion flow energy is higher than the thermal energy but below the spacecraft potential multiplied by the ion charge. We suggest that these conditions, which are typical of the polar wind and occur sporadically in other regions containing a significant low energy ion population, cause a large cold plasma wake behind the spacecraft, resulting in spurious electric fields in EFW data. This interpretation is supported by an analysis of the direction of the spurious electric field, and by showing that use of active potential control alleviates the situation.

  3. Absence of ballistic charge transport in the half-filled 1D Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Nemati, S.; Prosen, T.

    2018-05-01

    Whether in the thermodynamic limit of lattice length L → ∞, hole concentration mηz = - 2Sηz / L = 1 -ne → 0, nonzero temperature T > 0, and U / t > 0 the charge stiffness of the 1D Hubbard model with first neighbor transfer integral t and on-site repulsion U is finite or vanishes and thus whether there is or there is no ballistic charge transport, respectively, remains an unsolved and controversial issue, as different approaches yield contradictory results. (Here Sηz = - (L -Ne) / 2 is the η-spin projection and ne =Ne / L the electronic density.) In this paper we provide an upper bound on the charge stiffness and show that (similarly as at zero temperature), for T > 0 and U / t > 0 it vanishes for mηz → 0 within the canonical ensemble in the thermodynamic limit L → ∞. Moreover, we show that at high temperature T → ∞ the charge stiffness vanishes as well within the grand-canonical ensemble for L → ∞ and chemical potential μ →μu where (μ -μu) ≥ 0 and 2μu is the Mott-Hubbard gap. The lack of charge ballistic transport indicates that charge transport at finite temperatures is dominated by a diffusive contribution. Our scheme uses a suitable exact representation of the electrons in terms of rotated electrons for which the numbers of singly occupied and doubly occupied lattice sites are good quantum numbers for U / t > 0. In contrast to often less controllable numerical studies, the use of such a representation reveals the carriers that couple to the charge probes and provides useful physical information on the microscopic processes behind the exotic charge transport properties of the 1D electronic correlated system under study.

  4. Self-powered detector probes for electron and gamma-ray beam monitoring in high-power industrial accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    A self-powered detector (SPD) is a simple passive device that consists of a coaxial probe with a metallic outer sleeve, a mineral oxide insulating layer, and a metallic inner core. SPDs are used in nuclear reactors for monitoring neutron and gamma ray fields. Responses of various SPDs to electron and gamma ray beams from industrial accelerators were investigated with Monte Carlo simulations. By judicious choice of transmission filters, threshold SPD probes were investigated for on-line monitoring of the beam energy spectrum of the high-power IMPELA industrial electron accelerator. (Author) (14 figs, 16 refs.)

  5. Characterization of InAs/AlSb tunneling double barrier heterostructure by ballistic electron emission microscope with InAs as based electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaniš, Jan; Chow, D. H.; Pangrác, Jiří; Šroubek, Filip; McGill, T. C.; Walachová, Jarmila

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 0, č. 3 (2003), s. 986-991 ISSN 1610-1634. [EXMATEC 2002 - International Workshop on Expert Evaluation & Control of Compounds Semiconductor Materials & Technologies /6./. Budapest, 26.05.2002-29.05.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1010104 Projekt 04/01:4045 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : field emission electron microscopy * semiconductor quantum wells * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  6. Van Allen Probes observations of prompt MeV radiation belt electron acceleration in nonlinear interactions with VLF chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt recovery of MeV (millions of electron Volts) electron populations in the poststorm core of the outer terrestrial radiation belt involves local acceleration of a seed population of energetic electrons in interactions with VLF chorus waves. Electron interactions during the generation of VLF rising tones are strongly nonlinear, such that a fraction of the relativistic electrons at resonant energies are trapped by waves, leading to significant nonadiabatic energy exchange. Through detailed examination of VLF chorus and electron fluxes observed by Van Allen Probes, we investigate the efficiency of nonlinear processes for acceleration of electrons to MeV energies. We find through subpacket analysis of chorus waveforms that electrons with initial energy of hundreds of keV to 3 MeV can be accelerated by 50 keV-200 keV in resonant interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 ms.

  7. BALLISTIC RESISTANT ARTICLES COMPRISING TAPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VAN DER EEM, JORIS; HARINGS, JULES; JANSE, GERARDUS; TJADEN, HENDRIK

    2015-01-01

    The invention pertains to a ballistic-resistant moulded article comprising a compressed stack of sheets comprising reinforcing tapes having a tensile strength of at least 1.0 GPa, a tensile modulus of at least 40 GPa, and a tensile energy-to-break of at least 15 J/g, the direction of the tapes

  8. Optimization theory for ballistic conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo; Versluis, Andreas Michel; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    The growing demand of renewable energy stimulates the exploration of new materials and methods for clean energy. We recently demonstrated a high efficiency and power density energy conversion mechanism by using jetted charged microdroplets, termed as ballistic energy conversion. Hereby, we model and

  9. High-spatial-resolution electron density measurement by Langmuir probe for multi-point observations using tiny spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, H.; Røed, K.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Trondsen, E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Miloch, W. J.; Moen, J. I.

    2017-11-01

    A method for evaluating electron density using a single fixed-bias Langmuir probe is presented. The technique allows for high-spatio-temporal resolution electron density measurements, which can be effectively carried out by tiny spacecraft for multi-point observations in the ionosphere. The results are compared with the multi-needle Langmuir probe system, which is a scientific instrument developed at the University of Oslo comprising four fixed-bias cylindrical probes that allow small-scale plasma density structures to be characterized in the ionosphere. The technique proposed in this paper can comply with the requirements of future small-sized spacecraft, where the cost-effectiveness, limited space available on the craft, low power consumption and capacity for data-links need to be addressed. The first experimental results in both the plasma laboratory and space confirm the efficiency of the new approach. Moreover, detailed analyses on two challenging issues when deploying the DC Langmuir probe on a tiny spacecraft, which are the limited conductive area of the spacecraft and probe surface contamination, are presented in the paper. It is demonstrated that the limited conductive area, depending on applications, can either be of no concern for the experiment or can be resolved by mitigation methods. Surface contamination has a small impact on the performance of the developed probe.

  10. Focussed ion beam thin sample microanalysis using a field emission gun electron probe microanalyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Field emission gun electron probe microanalysis (FEG-EPMA) in conjunction with wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry using a low acceleration voltage (V acc) allows elemental analysis with sub-micrometre lateral spatial resolution (SR). However, this degree of SR does not necessarily meet the requirements associated with increasingly miniaturised devices. Another challenge related to performing FEG-EPMA with a low V acc is that the accuracy of quantitative analyses is adversely affected, primarily because low energy X-ray lines such as the L- and M-lines must be employed and due to the potential of line interference. One promising means of obtaining high SR with FEG-EPMA is to use thin samples together with high V acc values. This mini-review covers the basic principles of thin-sample FEG-EPMA and describes an application of this technique to the analysis of optical fibres. Outstanding issues related to this technique that must be addressed are also discussed, which include the potential for electron beam damage during analysis of insulating materials and the development of methods to use thin samples for quantitative analysis.

  11. Lateral homogeneity of the electronic properties in pristine and ion-irradiated graphene probed by scanning capacitance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannazzo Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, a scanning probe method based on nanoscale capacitance measurements was used to investigate the lateral homogeneity of the electron mean free path both in pristine and ion-irradiated graphene. The local variations in the electronic transport properties were explained taking into account the scattering of electrons by charged impurities and point defects (vacancies. Electron mean free path is mainly limited by charged impurities in unirradiated graphene, whereas an important role is played by lattice vacancies after irradiation. The local density of the charged impurities and vacancies were determined for different irradiated ion fluences.

  12. Characterisation of corrosion processes of using electron micro-probe, scanning probe microscopy and synchrotron-generated x-ray fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, A.K.; Cole, I.S.; Furman, S.A.; Isaacs, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: With recent advances in computerized technology, the study of chemical reactions can now be visualized as they occur in real time and has resulted in analytical techniques with orders of magnitude greater sensitivity and resolution. This ability offers the corrosion scientist a unique opportunity to study the processes relevant to degradation science which could only be theoretically considered. Neufeld el al (1,2) have attempted to explain in great detail the mechanism of corrosion initiation of zinc by using X-ray micro-probe, Scanning Kelvin probe, and more recently by using synchrotron-generated X-rays and X-ray fluorescence imaging. New results are presented from the synchrotron studies where the transport of ions in-situ has been investigated. The synthesis of information from the techniques will also be discussed in its relevance to atmospheric corrosion processes. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  13. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  14. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço-Martins, Hugo; Kociak, Mathieu

    2017-10-01

    Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London) 514, 209 (2014), 10.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London) 543, 529 (2017), 10.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014), 10.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989), 10.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015), 10.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  15. Imaging ballistic carrier trajectories in graphene using scanning gate microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Dou, Ziwei; Wang, Shu-Wei; Smith, Charles G.; Connolly, Malcolm R., E-mail: mrc61@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Machida, Tomoki, E-mail: tmachida@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-12-14

    We use scanning gate microscopy to map out the trajectories of ballistic carriers in high-mobility graphene encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride and subject to a weak magnetic field. We employ a magnetic focusing geometry to image carriers that emerge ballistically from an injector, follow a cyclotron path due to the Lorentz force from an applied magnetic field, and land on an adjacent collector probe. The local electric field generated by the scanning tip in the vicinity of the carriers deflects their trajectories, modifying the proportion of carriers focused into the collector. By measuring the voltage at the collector while scanning the tip, we are able to obtain images with arcs that are consistent with the expected cyclotron motion. We also demonstrate that the tip can be used to redirect misaligned carriers back to the collector.

  16. Probing individal subcells of fully printed and coated polymer tandem solar cells using multichromatic opto-electronic characterization methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Dam, Henrik Friis

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a method to opto-electronically probe the individual junctions and carrier transport across interfaces in fully printed and coated tandem polymer solar cells is described, enabling the identification of efficiency limiting printing/coating defects. The methods used are light beam...

  17. Coherent Response of Two Dimensional Electron Gas probed by Two Dimensional Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jagannath

    Advent of ultrashort lasers made it possible to probe various scattering phenomena in materials that occur in a time scale on the order of few femtoseconds to several tens of picoseconds. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy techniques, such as pump-probe, transient four wave mixing (TFWM), etc., are very common to study the carrier dynamics in various material systems. In time domain, the transient FWM uses several ultrashort pulses separated by time delays to obtain the information of dephasing and population relaxation times, which are very important parameters that govern the carrier dynamics of materials. A recently developed multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy is an enhanced version of TFWM which keeps track of two time delays simultaneously and correlate them in the frequency domain with the aid of Fourier transform in a two dimensional map. Using this technique, the nonlinear complex signal field is characterized both in amplitude and phase. Furthermore, this technique allows us to identify the coupling between resonances which are rather difficult to interpret from time domain measurements. This work focuses on the study of the coherent response of a two dimensional electron gas formed in a modulation doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well both at zero and at high magnetic fields. In modulation doped quantum wells, the excitons are formed as a result of the inter- actions of the charged holes with the electrons at the Fermi edge in the conduction band, leading to the formation of Mahan excitons, which is also referred to as Fermi edge singularity (FES). Polarization and temperature dependent rephasing 2DFT spectra in combination with TI-FWM measurements, provides insight into the dephasing mechanism of the heavy hole (HH) Mahan exciton. In addition to that strong quantum coherence between the HH and LH Mahan excitons is observed, which is rather surprising at this high doping concentration. The binding energy of Mahan excitons is expected to be greatly

  18. Ultrafast Phase Transition in Vanadium Dioxide Driven by Hot-Electron Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasankumar R. P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel all-optical method of triggering the phase transition in vanadium dioxide by means of ballistic electrons injected across the interface between a mesh of Au nanoparticles coveringd VO2 nanoislands. By performing non-degenerate pump-probe transmission spectroscopy on this hybrid plasmonic/phase-changing nanostructure, structural and electronic dynamics can be retrieved and compared.

  19. A hot-wire probe for thermal measurements of nanowires and nanotubes inside a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dames, C; Chen, S; Harris, C T; Huang, J Y; Ren, Z F; Dresselhaus, M S; Chen, G

    2007-10-01

    A hot wire probe has been developed for use inside a transmission electron microscope to measure the thermal resistance of individual nanowires, nanotubes, and their contacts. No microfabrication is involved. The probe is made from a platinum Wollaston wire and is pretensioned to minimize the effects of thermal expansion, intrinsic thermal vibrations, and Lorentz forces. An in situ nanomanipulator is used to select a particular nanowire or nanotube for measurement, and contacts are made with liquid metal droplets or by electron-beam induced deposition. Detailed thermal analysis shows that for best sensitivity, the thermal resistance of the hot-wire probe should be four times that of the sample, but a mismatch of more than two orders of magnitude may be acceptable. Data analysis using the ratio of two ac signals reduces the experimental uncertainty. The range of detectable sample thermal resistances spans from approximately 10(3) to 10(9) KW. The probe can also be adapted for measurements of the electrical conductance and Seebeck coefficient of the same sample. The probe was used to study a multiwalled carbon nanotube with liquid Ga contacts. The measured thermal resistance of 3.3 x 10(7) KW had a noise level of approximately +/-3% and was repeatable to within +/-10% upon breaking and re-making the contact.

  20. Near-Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R; Cattell, Cynthia A; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Funsten, Herbert O; Spence, Harlan E; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-16

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ∼ 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ∼40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ∼3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt ( L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  1. Results from the magnetic electron ion spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Joseph; O'Brien, Paul; Roeder, James; Reeves, Geoffrey; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Spence, Harlan; Blake, Bernard

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  2. Initial Results from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) Instruments Aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Van Allen Probes ECT Team

    2013-05-01

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of initial results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  3. Ballistic study of Tensylon®–based panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L-C. Alil

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic protection is a matter of interest requested by civilian as well as military needs. The last decade has witnessed an increase in the use of light weight and efficient armour systems. These panels may be used for body protection as well as light vehicle protection against small calibres or to enhance the protection level of heavier vehicles with decreasing or maintaining their weight penalty. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene is a material of interest for light weight armour applications. The authors designed panels made of hot–pressed Tensylon® in different configurations with thin steel sheets as a backing and shield protection. Comparison of their ballistic performance to the theory predictions reveals the improved ballistic response of the panels. In addition, a non–pressed Tensylon® panel has been tested in order to facilitate the observations of the failure mechanisms inside the panels. Even if not suitable for practical use, such non–pressed panels clearly reveal the dynamic processes at micro–scale that occur during the impact. The failure mechanisms of the material under bullet penetration are discussed based on photography, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The supposed effects of the panel pressing are discussed based on the observed difference between pressed and non–pressed structures ballistic response.

  4. Ultra-Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy and Pump-Probe Microscopy of Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokoyny, Boris M.

    Ultrafast spectroscopy offers an unprecedented view on the dynamic nature of chemical reactions. From charge transfer in semiconductors to folding and isomerization of proteins, these all important processes can now be monitored and in some instances even controlled on real, physical timescales. One of the biggest challenges of ultrafast science is the incredible energetic complexity of most systems. It is not uncommon to encounter macromolecules or materials with absorption spectra spanning significant portions of the visible spectrum. Monitoring a multitude of electronic and vibrational transitions, all dynamically interacting with each other on femtosecond timescales poses a truly daunting experimental task. The first part of this thesis deals with the development of a novel Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy (2DES) and its associated, advanced detection methodologies. Owing to its ultra-broadband implementation, this technique enables us to monitor femtosecond chemical dynamics that span the energetic landscape of the entire visible spectrum. In order to demonstrate the utility of our method, we apply it to two laser dye molecules, IR-144 and Cresyl Violet. Variation of photophysical properties on a microscopic scale in either man-made or naturally occurring systems can have profound implications on how we understand their macroscopic properties. Recently, inorganic hybrid perovskites have been tapped as the next generation solar energy harvesting materials. Their remarkable properties include low exciton binding energy, low exciton recombination rates and long carrier diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, considerable variability in device properties made with nearly identical preparation methods has puzzled the community. In the second part of this thesis we use non-linear pump probe microscopy to study the heterogeneous nature of femtosecond carrier dynamics in thin film perovskites. We show that the local morphology of the perovskite thin films has a

  5. Characteristics of short distance field of a source radiating at electronic frequencies in a ionospheric plasma. Applications to density and electron temperature measurement by mutual impedance probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrie, R.

    1983-06-01

    Realization of a new type of radio-frequency probe, the mutual-impedance probe (or the quadrupole probe) is developed. Theoretical results obtained with a cold plasma description of the ionized medium with static magnetic field. Transfer impedance between two dipoles in an homogeneous hot and isotope plasma is then calculated. In equatorial ionosphere, measurements made by the H.F. quadrupole probe, in the Veronique rocket, during the Cisaspe experiment, have been interpreted with this hot plasma theory. The influence of a plasma drift with respect to the emitter dipole is analyzed. The influence of a static magnetic field in hot and homogeneous plasma, on the frequency response curve of the mutual impedance is studied. For, in ionospheric plasmas of auroral and polar zones, the earth magnetic field is no more negligible and gives to the plasma dielectric, strongly anisotropic, properties well described by the microscopic theory in hot magnetoplasma. The space time fast evolution of characteristics of plasma encountered in space experiments has been shown up with a new method of measurement the self-oscillating quadrupole probe. The work synthesis is put in a concrete form on the polar satellite Aureol-3 the first results of which are presented. This satellite allows a precise study of ionosphere auroral zones. At last, it is shown that methods developed for electron density and temperature measurements can be transposed in low frequency. In this case, measurements with quadrupole probe allow to get the ion average mass by lower hybrid frequency excitation [fr

  6. Spectroscopic and probe measurements of the electron temperature in the plasma of a pulse-periodic microwave discharge in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V. V., E-mail: vvandreev@mail.ru; Vasileska, I., E-mail: ivonavasileska@yahoo.com; Korneeva, M. A., E-mail: korneevama@mail.ru [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    A pulse-periodic 2.45-GHz electron-cyclotron resonance plasma source on the basis of a permanent- magnet mirror trap has been constructed and tested. Variations in the discharge parameters and the electron temperature of argon plasma have been investigated in the argon pressure range of 1 × 10{sup –4} to 4 × 10{sup –3} Torr at a net pulsed input microwave power of up to 600 W. The plasma electron temperature in the above ranges of gas pressures and input powers has been measured by a Langmuir probe and determined using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) from the intensity ratios of spectral lines. The OES results agree qualitatively and quantitatively with the data obtained using the double probe.

  7. Van Allen Probes show that the inner radiation zone contains no MeV electrons: ECT/MagEIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; O'Brien, T. P.; Clemmons, J. H.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-03-01

    We present Van Allen Probe observations of electrons in the inner radiation zone. The measurements were made by the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma/Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) sensors that were designed to measure electrons with the ability to remove unwanted signals from penetrating protons, providing clean measurements. No electrons >900 keV were observed with equatorial fluxes above background (i.e., >0.1 el/(cm2 s sr keV)) in the inner zone. The observed fluxes are compared to the AE9 model and CRRES observations. Electron fluxes electrons in the inner zone while current radiation belt models and previous publications do.

  8. Modeling the Proton Radiation Belt With Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Li, X.

    2018-01-01

    An empirical model of the proton radiation belt is constructed from data taken during 2013-2017 by the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescopes on the Van Allen Probes satellites. The model intensity is a function of time, kinetic energy in the range 18-600 MeV, equatorial pitch angle, and L shell of proton guiding centers. Data are selected, on the basis of energy deposits in each of the nine silicon detectors, to reduce background caused by hard proton energy spectra at low L. Instrument response functions are computed by Monte Carlo integration, using simulated proton paths through a simplified structural model, to account for energy loss in shielding material for protons outside the nominal field of view. Overlap of energy channels, their wide angular response, and changing satellite orientation require the model dependencies on all three independent variables be determined simultaneously. This is done by least squares minimization with a customized steepest descent algorithm. Model uncertainty accounts for statistical data error and systematic error in the simulated instrument response. A proton energy spectrum is also computed from data taken during the 8 January 2014 solar event, to illustrate methods for the simpler case of an isotropic and homogeneous model distribution. Radiation belt and solar proton results are compared to intensities computed with a simplified, on-axis response that can provide a good approximation under limited circumstances.

  9. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Electron Acceleration During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. I will discuss measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  10. Study of Solid-State Diffusion of Bi in Polycrystalline Sn Using Electron Probe Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhaise, André M.; Perovic, Doug D.

    2018-03-01

    Current lead-free solders such as SAC305 exhibit degradation in microstructure, properties, and reliability. Current third-generation alloys containing bismuth (Bi) demonstrate preservation of strength after aging; this is accompanied by homogenization of the Bi precipitates in the tin (Sn) matrix, driven via solid-state diffusion. This study quantifies the diffusion of Bi in Sn. Diffusion couples were prepared by mating together polished samples of pure Sn and Bi. Couples were annealed at one of three temperatures, viz. 85°C for 7 days, 100°C for 2 days, or 125°C for 1 day. After cross-sectioning the couples to examine the diffusion microstructure and grain size, elemental analysis was performed using electron probe microanalysis. For this study, it was assumed that the diffusivity of Bi in Sn is concentration dependent, therefore inverse methods were used to solve Fick's non-steady-state diffusion equation. In addition, Darken analysis was used to extract the impurity diffusivity of Bi in Sn at each temperature, allowing estimation of the Arrhenius parameters D 0 and k A.

  11. Electron probe micro-analysis of irradiated Triso-coated UO2 particles, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kosaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1983-11-01

    The Triso-coated low-enriched UO 2 particles were subjected to the post-irradiation electron probe micro-analysis. Observations and analyses on the amoeba effect, inclusions and solutes in the UO 2 matrix were made. In the cooler side of the particle which suffered extensive kernel migration, two significant features were observed: (1) the wake of minute particles, presumably UO 2 , left by the moving kernel in the carbon phase and (2) carbon precipitation in the pores and along the grain boundaries of the UO 2 kernel. Both features could be hardly explained by the gas-phase mechanism of carbon transport and rather suggest the solid state mechanism. Two-types of 4d-transition metal inclusions were observed: the one which was predominantly Mo with a fraction of Tc and another which was enriched with Ru and containing significant amount of Si. The Mo and Si were also found in the UO 2 matrix; the observation led to the discussion of the oxygen potential in the irradiated Triso-coated UO 2 particle. (author)

  12. Ballistic thermoelectric transport in a Luttinger liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Y V

    2010-01-01

    The Seebeck and Peltier coefficients of a homogeneous Luttinger liquid are calculated in the ballistic regime. Nonlinearity of the electron spectrum is taken into account. It is shown that, in the framework of the defined approximations, the thermoelectric power of a Luttinger liquid is equal to zero, in agreement with the exponentially small thermopower of a one-dimensional degenerate Fermi gas. The Peltier coefficient is controlled by a nonequilibrium state of the system. It is finite and renormalized by the interaction in the case of a convective flow of a Luttinger liquid. The zero modes of bosonic excitations and the dispersion-induced contribution to the electric current operator are taken into account in calculations.

  13. Ballistic transport in gold [110] nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurui, Yoshihiko; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Okamoto, Masakuni; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2009-03-01

    Conductance of gold nanowire elongated along the [110] direction (gold [110] nanowire) was measured during many breaking procedures, while simultaneously acquiring transmission electron microscope images. The conductance histogram exhibits a series of peaks whose conductance values increased nearly in steps of the conductance quantum, G0 =2e^2/h. However thick nanowires above 10G0 showed dequantization, where the increment was only 0.9G0. The structure for each peak was determined to be either an atomic sheet or a hexagonal prism. The number of conductance channels calculated for each atomic structure by first principles theory, coincided well with the peak index in the conductance histogram. The present study shows that the [110] nanowire behave as ballistic conductors, and a conductance peak appears whenever a conductance channel is opened.

  14. Plasma potential and electron temperature evaluated by ball-pen and Langmuir probes in the COMPASS tokamak.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dimitrova, Miglena; Popov, Tsv.K.; Adámek, Jiří; Kovačič, J.; Ivanova, P.; Hasan, E.; López-Bruna, D.; Seidl, Jakub; Vondráček, Petr; Dejarnac, Renaud; Stöckel, Jan; Imríšek, Martin; Pánek, Radomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 12 (2017), č. článku 125001. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma potential * electron temperature * bi-Maxwellian EEDF * ball-pen probe * Langmuir probe * COMPASS tokamak * last closed flux surface Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016

  15. Ballistic Evaluation of 2060 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    compared with other ballistic- grade AAs, namely AA2195 and AA2139. The results of these experiments were used to derive the acceptance tables for AA2060...contributions of the following people who made this work possible: program lead Brian Placzankis of ARL’s Coatings, Corrosion and Engineered Polymers Branch...properties as the AA2195 alloy and therefore became the basis for a fiscal year 2012 OSD-funded DAC program to fully validate and ultimately transition

  16. Electron-nuclear spin dynamics of Ga centers in GaAsN dilute nitride semiconductors probed by pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Santana, J. C.; Ibarra-Sierra, V. G.; Azaizia, S.; Carrère, H.; Bakaleinikov, L. A.; Kalevich, V. K.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Marie, X.; Amand, T.; Balocchi, A.; Kunold, A.

    2018-03-01

    We propose an experimental procedure to track the evolution of electronic and nuclear spins in Ga2+ centers in GaAsN dilute semiconductors. The method is based on a pump-probe scheme that enables to monitor the time evolution of the three components of the electronic and nuclear spin variables. In contrast to other characterization methods, as nuclear magnetic resonance, this one only needs moderate magnetic fields (B≈ 10 mT), and does not require microwave irradiation. Specifically, we carry out a series of tests for different experimental conditions in order to optimize the procedure for maximum sensitivity in the measurement of the circular degree of polarization. Based on previous experimental results and the theoretical calculations presented here, we estimate that the method could yield a time resolution of about 10ps.

  17. Radiation belt electron dynamics at low L (<4): Van Allen Probes era versus previous two solar cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Baker, D. N.; Zhao, H.; Zhang, K.; Jaynes, A. N.; Schiller, Q.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Temerin, M.

    2017-05-01

    Long-term (>2 solar cycles) measurements reveal that MeV electron fluxes, solar wind speed, and geomagnetic activity have been extremely low during this current solar cycle, including years before and during the Van Allen Probes era. This study examines solar wind speed, the geomagnetic storm index (Dst), >2 MeV electrons at geostationary orbit, and 2 MeV electrons across various L shells measured by Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer in low Earth orbit (LEO) and by the Van Allen Probes/Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) in a geotransfer-like orbit; the latter measurements are normalized to LEO based on comparison with Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment/Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) measurements in LEO. The average ratio of REPTile/REPT varies in a systematic manner with L, 16% at L = 2.7, decreasing with L and reaching 0.7% at L = 4.7, and increasing again with L though with greater uncertainty. We show that there have been no 2 MeV electron enhancements inside L 2.6 since 2006, prior to which numerous penetrations of 2 MeV electrons into L periods of stronger solar wind conditions (in terms of high-speed solar wind, magnitude of interplanetary magnetic field, B, and a sustained southward Bz) and thus stronger geomagnetic activity. We conclude that results from the Van Allen Probes, which have been providing the finest measurements but in operation during a quiet solar activity period, may not be representative of radiation belt dynamics, particularly for the inner edge of the outer belt, during other solar cycle phases.

  18. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  19. Probing Novel Properties of Nucleons and Nuclei via Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado, Luis [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This thesis reports on two experiments conducted by the HAPPEx (Hall A Proton Parity Experiment) collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For both, the weak neutral current interaction (WNC, mediated by the Z0 boson) is used to probe novel properties of hadronic targets. The WNC interaction amplitude is extracted by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons o unpolarized target hadrons. HAPPEx-III, conducted in the Fall of 2009, used a liquid hydrogen target at a momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.62 GeV2. The measured asymmetry was used to set new constraints on the contribution of strange quark form factors (GsE,M ) to the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. A value of APV = -23.803±} 0.778 (stat)± 0.359 (syst) ppm resulted in GsE + 0.517GsM = 0.003± 0.010 (stat)± 0.004 (syst)± 0.009 (FF). PREx, conducted in the Spring of 2010, used a polarized electron beam on a 208Pb target at a momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.009 GeV2. This parity-violating asymmetry can be used to obtain a clean measurement of the root-mean-square radius of the neutrons in the 208Pb nucleus. The Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons; the neutron weak charge is much larger than that of the proton. The value of this asymmetry is at the sub-ppm level and has a projected experimental fractional precision of 3%. We will describe the accelerator setup used to set controls on helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis methods for finding the raw asymmetry for HAPPEx-III. We will also discuss in some detail the preparations to meet the experimental challenges associated with measuring such a small asymmetry with the degree of precision required for PREx.

  20. Trace element associations with Fe- and Mn-oxides in soil nodules: Comparison of selective dissolution with electron probe microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neaman, Alexander [Area de Medio Ambiente, Facultad de Agronomia, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4-D, Quillota (Chile); Centro Regional de Estudios en Alimentos Saludables, Region de Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: alexander.neaman@ucv.cl; Martinez, Carmen Enid [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Trolard, Fabienne; Bourrie, Guilhem [INRA, UR 1119, Geochimie des Sols et des Eaux, BP 80, 13545 Aix-en-Provence cedex 04 (France)

    2008-04-15

    Selective dissolution methods have been largely used to get insight on trace element association with solid phases. Modern instrumental techniques offer many tools to test the validity of selective dissolution methods and should be systematically used to this end. The association of trace elements with Fe- and Mn-oxides in soil nodules has been studied here by electron probe microanalysis. The results were compared with findings from an earlier study on selective dissolution of the same nodules by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, acidified hydrogen peroxide, and Na-citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite. Electron probe microanalysis results were consistent with previous findings using selective dissolution and showed that P, As and Cr were mainly present in Fe-oxides, while Co was mainly associated with Mn-oxide phases. These results support the applicability of the studied selective dissolution methods for fractionation of trace elements in soils and sediments containing appreciable amounts of Fe and Mn-oxide phases.

  1. Development of an improved Kelvin probe force microscope for accurate local potential measurements on biased electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, N B; Giraudet, L; Simonetti, O; Molinari, M

    2017-09-01

    An improved setup for accurate near-field surface potential measurements and characterisation of biased electronic devices using the Kelvin Probe method has been developed. Using an external voltage source synchronised with the raster-scan of the KPFM-AM, this setup allows to avoid potential measurement errors of the conventional Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in the case of in situ measurements on biased electronic devices. This improved KPFM-AM setup has been tested on silicon-based devices and organic semiconductor-based devices such as organic field effect transistors (OFETs), showing differences up to 25% compared to the standard KPFM-AM lift-mode measurement method. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Performance of Plain Woven Jute Fabric-Reinforced Polyester Matrix Composite in Multilayered Ballistic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ballistic performance of plain woven jute fabric-reinforced polyester matrix composites was investigated as the second layer in a multilayered armor system (MAS. Volume fractions of jute fabric, up to 30 vol %, were mixed with orthophthalic polyester to fabricate laminate composites. Ballistic tests were conducted using high velocity 7.62 mm ammunition. The depth of penetration caused by the bullet in a block of clay witness, simulating a human body, was used to evaluate the MAS ballistic performance according to the international standard. The fractured materials after tests were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results indicated that jute fabric composites present a performance similar to that of the much stronger Kevlar™, which is an aramid fabric laminate, as MAS second layer with the same thickness. The mechanism of this similar ballistic behavior as well as the comparative advantages of the jute fabric composites over the Kevlar™ are discussed.

  3. Natural Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Ballistic Armor Against Class III-A Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Holanda, Luane Isquerdo Ferreira; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol pct of continuous and aligned natural mallow fibers were for the first time ballistic tested as personal armor against class III-A 9 mm FMJ ammunition. The ballistic efficiency of these composites was assessed by measuring the dissipated energy and residual velocity after the bullet perforation. The results were compared to those in similar tests of aramid fabric (Kevlar™) commonly used in vests for personal protections. Visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy analysis of impact-fractured samples revealed failure mechanisms associated with fiber pullout and rupture as well as epoxy cracking. As compared to Kevlar™, the mallow fiber composite displayed practically the same ballistic efficiency. However, there is a reduction in both weight and cost, which makes the mallow fiber composites a promising material for personal ballistic protection.

  4. Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their Effects on radiation belt electron dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, W; Ma, Q; Thorne, RM; Bortnik, J; Kletzing, CA; Kurth, WS; Hospodarsky, GB; Nishimura, Y

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. Plasmaspheric hiss is known to play an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons inside the plasmasphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data, which provide excellent coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we evaluate the global distribution of the hiss wave frequency spectrum and wave intensity for different levels of substorm activity. Our statistical results show that observed hiss peak ...

  5. Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, GOES, and Cluster observations of EMIC waves, ULF pulsations, and an electron flux dropout

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sigsbee, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R.; Spence, H.; Reeves, G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Green, J. C.; Singer, H. J.; Carr, C.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 3 (2016), s. 1990-2008 ISSN 2169-9380 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : EMIC waves * ULF pulsations * electron flux dropouts * Dst effect * magnetopause shadowing * Van Allen Probes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020877/full

  6. Modelling attosecond probing of electron wavepacket dynamics in non-aligned molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J; Yakovlev, V S; Goulielmakis, E

    2008-01-01

    We propose and simulate an attosecond pump-probe scheme applied to an ensemble of non-aligned (or partially aligned) diatomic molecules. Non-dissociative dynamics initiated by an ultraviolet pump pulse are probed by photoionizing the molecule with an attosecond extreme-ultraviolet probe pulse. Photoelectron spectra recorded for different delays between the pulses exhibit signatures of streaking and sub-femtosecond quantum beating. If more than one vibrational state is excited, the nuclear motion modulates the visibility of quantum interference effects

  7. Microfour-point probe for studying electronic transport through surface states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Grey, Francois; Shiraki, I.

    2000-01-01

    Microfour-point probes integrated on silicon chips have been fabricated with probe spacings in the range 4-60 mum. They provide a simple robust device for electrical transport measurements at surfaces, bridging the gap between conventional macroscopic four-point probes and scanning tunneling...... microscopy. Measurements on Si(111) surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum reveal that the Si(111)-root 3x root3-Ag structure induced by a monolayer of Ag atoms has a four-point resistance two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Si(111)-7x7 clean surface. We attribute this remarkable difference to direct...

  8. Combining structural and chemical information at the nanometer scale by correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, M; Choi, P; Raabe, D

    2015-06-01

    In many cases, the three-dimensional reconstructions from atom probe tomography (APT) are not sufficiently accurate to resolve crystallographic features such as lattice planes, shear bands, stacking faults, dislocations or grain boundaries. Hence, correlative crystallographic characterization is required in addition to APT at the exact same location of the specimen. Also, for the site-specific preparation of APT tips containing regions of interest (e.g. grain boundaries) correlative electron microscopy is often inevitable. Here we present a versatile experimental setup that enables performing correlative focused ion beam milling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and APT under optimized characterization conditions. The setup was designed for high throughput, robustness and practicability. We demonstrate that atom probe tips can be characterized by TEM in the same way as a standard TEM sample. In particular, the use of scanning nanobeam diffraction provides valuable complementary crystallographic information when being performed on atom probe tips. This technique enables the measurement of orientation and phase maps as known from electron backscattering diffraction with a spatial resolution down to one nanometer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Toward an accurate quantification in atom probe tomography reconstruction by correlative electron tomography approach on nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Isabelle; Printemps, Tony; Grenier, Adeline; Gambacorti, Narciso; Pinna, Elisa; Tiddia, Mariavitalia; Vacca, Annalisa; Mula, Guido

    2017-11-01

    In this contribution, we propose a protocol for analysis and accurate reconstruction of nanoporous materials by atom probe tomography (APT). The existence of several holes in porous materials makes both the direct APT analysis and reconstruction almost inaccessible. In the past, a solution has been proposed by filling pores with electron beam-induced deposition. Here, we present an alternative solution using an electro-chemical method allowing to fill even small and dense pores, making APT analysis possible. Concerning the 3D reconstruction, the microstructural features observed by electron tomography are used to finely calibrate the APT reconstruction parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation of Radiation Belt Content Indices and total electron energy During Magnetic Storms Based On Van Allen Probe Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y.; Xie, L.; Chen, L.; Pu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the variability of the RBC indices and total electron energy for varying energies within outer belt during 42 isolate magnetic storms based on the electron flux data from MagEIS and REPT onboard Van Allen Probe-A spacecraft. Van Allan Probes travel throughout the entire radiation belt twice during each orbit, providing an excellent opportunity to measure the electron's pitch angle distributions near the magnetic equatorial plane which is essential to calculate the RBC index accurately. Instead of assuming an isotropic electron pitch angle distribution which is widely used in previous studies, we develop a new and reliable technique to infer the equatorial pitch angle distributions based on the off-equator measurements. The statistic results show that the total electron energy in outer belt increase in 80% storms and has a positive correlation with median value of AE during recovery phase and minimum -Dst. The possibility of observing RBC depletion increase at high energies. The upper limit energy of RBC enhancement has a positive correlation with median value of AE and Vsw during recovery phase and a negative correlation with median value of Nsw during storm, which is consist of the balance of acceleration by chorus waves and loss by EMIC waves.

  11. Prompt injections of highly relativistic electrons induced by interplanetary shocks: A statistical study of Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Q.; Kanekal, S. G.; Jian, L. K.; Li, X.; Jones, A.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A.; Spence, H. E.

    2016-12-01

    We conduct a statistical study on the sudden response of outer radiation belt electrons due to interplanetary (IP) shocks during the Van Allen Probes era, i.e., 2012 to 2015. Data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instrument on board Van Allen Probes are used to investigate the highly relativistic electron response (E > 1.8 MeV) within the first few minutes after shock impact. We investigate the relationship of IP shock parameters, such as Mach number, with the highly relativistic electron response, including spectral properties and radial location of the shock-induced injection. We find that the driving solar wind structure of the shock does not affect occurrence for enhancement events, 25% of IP shocks are associated with prompt energization, and 14% are associated with MeV electron depletion. Parameters that represent IP shock strength are found to correlate best with highest levels of energization, suggesting that shock strength may play a key role in the severity of the enhancements. However, not every shock results in an enhancement, indicating that magnetospheric preconditioning may be required.

  12. Artifacts that mimic ballistic magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhoff, W.F. . E-mail : egelhoff@nist.gov; Gan, L.; Ettedgui, H.; Kadmon, Y.; Powell, C.J.; Chen, P.J.; Shapiro, A.J.; McMichael, R.D.; Mallett, J.J.; Moffat, T.P.; Stiles, M.D.; Svedberg, E.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circumstances underlying recent reports of very large values of ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR) in nanocontacts between magnetic wires. We find that the geometries used are subject to artifacts due to motion of the wires that distort the nanocontact thereby changing its electrical resistance. Since these nanocontacts are often of atomic scale, reliable experiments would require stability on the atomic scale. No method for achieving such stability in macroscopic wires is apparent. We conclude that macroscopic magnetic wires cannot be used to establish the validity of the BMR effect

  13. Signatures of Ultrarelativistic Electron Loss in the Heart of the Outer Radiation Belt Measured by Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, N. A.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Drozdov, A. Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Usanova, M. E.; Wang, D.; Zhelavskaya, I. S.

    2017-10-01

    Up until recently, signatures of the ultrarelativistic electron loss driven by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the Earth's outer radiation belt have been limited to direct or indirect measurements of electron precipitation or the narrowing of normalized pitch angle distributions in the heart of the belt. In this study, we demonstrate additional observational evidence of ultrarelativistic electron loss that can be driven by resonant interaction with EMIC waves. We analyzed the profiles derived from Van Allen Probe particle data as a function of time and three adiabatic invariants between 9 October and 29 November 2012. New local minimums in the profiles are accompanied by the narrowing of normalized pitch angle distributions and ground-based detection of EMIC waves. Such a correlation may be indicative of ultrarelativistic electron precipitation into the Earth's atmosphere caused by resonance with EMIC waves.

  14. Energetic, Relativistic and Ultra-Relativistic Electrons: Comparison of Long-term VERB Code Simulations with Van Allen Probes Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Orlova, K.; Kellerman, A. C.; Subbotin, D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we compare long-term simulations performed by the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code with observations from the MagEIS and REPT instruments on the Van Allen Probes. The model takes into account radial, energy, pitch-angle and mixed diffusion, losses into the atmosphere, and magnetopause shadowing. We consider the energetic (>100 KeV), relativistic (~0.5-1 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (>2 MeV) electrons. One year of relativistic electron measurements (μ=700 MeV/G) from October 1, 2012 to October 1, 2013 are well reproduced by the simulation during a period of the various geomagnetic activity. However, for ultra-relativistic energies (μ=3500 MeV/G), the VERB code simulation overestimates electron phase space density (PSD). These results indicate that an additional loss mechanism is operational and efficient for these high energies. We discuss possible solutions for improving the modeling of the radiation belts dynamics.

  15. Long-term VERB code simulations of ultra-relativistic electrons and comparison with Van Allen Probes measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam; Usanova, Maria; Aseev, Nikita; Baker, Daniel; Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoff

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we compare long-term simulations performed by the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code with the Van Allen Probes observations. The model takes into account radial, energy, pitch-angle and mixed diffusion, losses into the atmosphere, and magnetopause shadowing. We include scattering by hiss and chorus based on a recently developed statistical models of VLF/ELF waves obtained from EMFISIS instrument. We consider the energetic (>100 KeV), relativistic (~0.5-1 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (>2 MeV) electrons. One year of relativistic electron measurements are well reproduced by the simulation during a period of the various geomagnetic activity. However, for ultra-relativistic energies, the VERB code simulation significantly overestimates electron phase space density. Since the additional loss is required only at very high energies we conclude that EMIC waves is the most likely additional source of scattering that could explain observed decay rates.

  16. The Cooperative Ballistic Missile Defence Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.; Barros, A.I.; Monsuur, H.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction poses new risks worldwide. For a threatened nation and given the characteristics of this threat a layered ballistic missile defence system strategy appears to be the preferred solution. However, such a strategy

  17. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Ballistic Phonon Penetration Depth in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Zhiguang; Gerboth, Matthew; Zhao, Yang; Xu, Terry T; Walker, D Greg; Li, Deyu

    2017-12-13

    Thermal transport in amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO 2 ) is traditionally treated as random walks of vibrations owing to its greatly disordered structure, which results in a mean free path (MFP) approximately the same as the interatomic distance. However, this picture has been debated constantly and in view of the ubiquitous existence of thin a-SiO 2 layers in nanoelectronic devices, it is imperative to better understand this issue for precise thermal management of electronic devices. Different from the commonly used cross-plane measurement approaches, here we report on a study that explores the in-plane thermal conductivity of double silicon nanoribbons with a layer of a-SiO 2 sandwiched in-between. Through comparing the thermal conductivity of the double ribbon samples with that of corresponding single ribbons, we show that thermal phonons can ballistically penetrate through a-SiO 2 of up to 5 nm thick even at room temperature. Comprehensive examination of double ribbon samples with various oxide layer thicknesses and van der Waals bonding strengths allows for extraction of the average ballistic phonon penetration depth in a-SiO 2 . With solid experimental data demonstrating ballistic phonon transport through a-SiO 2 , this work should provide important insight into thermal management of electronic devices.

  19. Ballistic representation for kinematic access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    This work uses simple two-body orbital dynamics to initially determine the kinematic access for a ballistic vehicle. Primarily this analysis was developed to assess when a rocket body might conjunct with an orbiting satellite platform. A family of access opportunities can be represented as a volume for a specific rocket relative to its launch platform. Alternately, the opportunities can be represented as a geographical footprint relative to aircraft or satellite position that encompasses all possible launcher locations for a specific rocket. A thrusting rocket is treated as a ballistic vehicle that receives all its energy at launch and follows a coasting trajectory. To do so, the rocket's burnout energy is used to find its equivalent initial velocity for a given launcher's altitude. Three kinematic access solutions are then found that account for spherical Earth rotation. One solution finds the maximum range for an ascent-only trajectory while another solution accommodates a descending trajectory. In addition, the ascent engagement for the descending trajectory is used to depict a rapid access scenario. These preliminary solutions are formulated to address ground-, sea-, or air-launched vehicles.

  20. In-Situ Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Plasma Potential Determination Using an Emissive Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Fred W; Liu, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, real-time, in-situ, plasma potential measurements are reported for an ECR ion source and correlated with extracted beam characteristics. The local real-time plasma potential of the ORNL CAPRICE ECR ion source was measured using an emissive probe, which was inserted perpendicularly from the plasma chamber wall at the mid-plane of the ECR zone between one of the six radial loss cones of the magnetic field structure, where perturbation of the main ECR plasma is expected to be small. Slots machined through the plasma- and puller-electrodes at the plasma chamber wall radius permitted insertion of the probe from the extraction side of the ECR source without perturbation of the coaxial microwave injection. The emissive probe technique permits plasma potential determination independent of plasma conditions and avoids problems related to probe geometry. The probe loop tip was pointed toward the chamber center in a radial plane and was located about 5 mm outside of the ECR zone. Details of the measuremen...

  1. Electron energy distribution function, plasma potential and electron density measured by Langmuir probe in tokamak edge plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popov, Tsv.K.; Ivanova, P.; Stöckel, Jan; Dejarnac, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2009), 065014-065014 ISSN 0741-3335 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Probes * First Derivative * Distribution Function * Plasma Potential * Temperature Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.409, year: 2009 www.iop.org/EJ/article/0741-3335/51/6/065014/ppcf9_6_065014.pdf

  2. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, B.T.V.

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10 4 -10 6 K) and high density plasmas (10 22 -10 24 cm -3 ) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10 13 - 10 15 W/cm 2 ) and subpicosecond (10 -12 -10 -13 s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (∼40eV) super-critical density (∼10 23 /cm 3 ) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (∼10 18 /cm 3 ) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films

  3. Understanding the ballistic event : Methodology and observations relevant to ceramic armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Adam

    The only widely-accepted method of gauging the ballistic performance of a material is to carry out ballistic testing; due to the large volume of material required for a statistically robust test, this process is very expensive. Therefore a new test, or suite of tests, that employ widely-available and economically viable characterisation methods to screen candidate armour materials is highly desirable; in order to design such a test, more information on the armour/projectile interaction is required. This work presents the design process and results of using an adapted specimen configuration to increase the amount of information obtained from a ballistic test. By using a block of ballistic gel attached to the ceramic, the fragmentation generated during the ballistic event was captured and analysed. In parallel, quasi-static tests were carried out using ring-on-ring biaxial disc testing to investigate relationships between quasi-static and ballistic fragment fracture surfaces. Three contemporary ceramic armour materials were used to design the test and to act as a baseline; Sintox FA alumina, Hexoloy SA silicon carbide and 3M boron carbide. Attempts to analyse the post-test ballistic sample non-destructively using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) were unsuccessful due to the difference in the density of the materials and the compaction of fragments. However, the results of qualitative and quantitative fracture surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed similarities between the fracture surfaces of ballistic fragments at the edges of the tile and biaxial fragments; this suggests a relationship between quasi-static and ballistic fragments created away from the centre of impact, although additional research will be required to determine the reason for this. Ballistic event-induced porosity was observed and quantified on the fracture surfaces of silicon carbide samples, which decreased as distance from centre of impact increased; upon further analysis this

  4. Low-Power Receive-Electronics for a Miniature 3D Ultrasound Probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Z.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the design of a front-end application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), which will be put into the tip of a miniature ultrasound probe for 3D Trans-Esophageal Echocardiography (TEE). To enable 3D TEE, a matrix piezoelectric ultrasound transducer with more than 2000 elements

  5. Energetic electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora: EISCAT and Van Allen Probe observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.; Saito, S.; Kurita, S.; Fujiwara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Ebihara, Y.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G.; Santolík, Ondřej; Clilverd, M.; Rodger, C. J.; Turunen, E.; Tsuchiya, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2015), s. 2754-2766 ISSN 2169-9380 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : pulsating aurora * EISCAT * Van Allen Probes * pitch angle scattering Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020690/abstract

  6. Comparative study of electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy in photosynthetic research

    OpenAIRE

    MATĚNOVÁ, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the ability of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualize individual protein complexes. The principle of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy is explained. For comparision of these methods well characterized photosynthetic complexes LH1, LH2, PSI and PSII were selected.

  7. Energetic, relativistic, and ultrarelativistic electrons: Comparison of long-term VERB code simulations with Van Allen Probes measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, A. Y.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Orlova, K. G.; Kellerman, A. C.; Subbotin, D. A.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we compare long-term simulations performed by the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code with observations from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes satellites. The model takes into account radial, energy, pitch angle and mixed diffusion, losses into the atmosphere, and magnetopause shadowing. We consider the energetic (>100 keV), relativistic (~0.5-1 MeV), and ultrarelativistic (>2 MeV) electrons. One year of relativistic electron measurements (μ = 700 MeV/G) from 1 October 2012 to 1 October 2013 are well reproduced by the simulation during varying levels of geomagnetic activity. However, for ultrarelativistic energies (μ = 3500 MeV/G), the VERB code simulation overestimates electron fluxes and phase space density. These results indicate that an additional loss mechanism is operational and efficient for these high energies. The most likely mechanism for explaining the observed loss at ultrarelativistic energies is scattering by the electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  8. Assessment of Ballistic Performance for Transparent Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim M. Fadhil

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A finite element method was used to investigate the ballistic behavior of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA under impact loading by spherical steel projectile with different ranges of velocities. Three different target thicknesses were used in the experimental and the numerical works. A mathematical model has been used for the ballistic limit based on the experimental results. It has been found that projectile velocity and target thickness play an important role in the ballistic behavior of PMMA. A good agreement was found between the numerical, experimental, and the analytical result.

  9. Decay of the electron number density in the nitrogen afterglow using a hairpin resonator probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sands, Brian L.; Hebner, Greg A.

    2006-01-01

    A hairpin resonator was used to measure the electron number density in the afterglow of a nitrogen glow discharge (p=0.25-0.75 Torr). Electron number densities were measured using a time-dependent approach similar to the approach used by Spencer et al. [J. Phys. D 20, 923 (1987)]. The decay time of the electron number density was used to determine the electron temperature in the afterglow, assuming a loss of electrons via ambipolar diffusion to the walls. The electron temperature in the near afterglow remained between 0.4 and 0.6 eV, depending on pressure. This confirms the work by Guerra et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma. Sci. 31, 542 (2003)], who demonstrated experimentally and numerically that the electron temperature stays significantly above room temperature via superelastic collisions with highly vibrationally excited ground state molecules and metastables, such as A 3 Σ u +

  10. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  11. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  12. Mass determination based on electron scattering in electron probe X-ray microanalysis of thin biological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linders, P.W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a method for mass determination of thin biological objects by quantitative electron microscopy. The practical realization of the mass determination consists of photographical recording with subsequent densitometry. (Auth.)

  13. Correlating Atom Probe Tomography with Atomic-Resolved Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy: Example of Segregation at Silicon Grain Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffers, Andreas; Barthel, Juri; Liebscher, Christian H; Gault, Baptiste; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Scheu, Christina; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-04-01

    In the course of a thorough investigation of the performance-structure-chemistry interdependency at silicon grain boundaries, we successfully developed a method to systematically correlate aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The correlative approach is conducted on individual APT and TEM specimens, with the option to perform both investigations on the same specimen in the future. In the present case of a Σ9 grain boundary, joint mapping of the atomistic details of the grain boundary topology, in conjunction with chemical decoration, enables a deeper understanding of the segregation of impurities observed at such grain boundaries.

  14. Flicker Noise as a Probe of Electronic Interaction at Metal-Single Molecule Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Olgun; Rosenthal, Ethan; Meisner, Jeffery; Andrade, Erick F; Pasupathy, Abhay N; Nuckolls, Colin; Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-06-10

    Charge transport properties of metal-molecule interfaces depend strongly on the character of molecule-electrode interactions. Although through-bond coupled systems have attracted the most attention, through-space coupling is important in molecular systems when, for example, through-bond coupling is suppressed due to quantum interference effects. To date, a probe that clearly distinguishes these two types of coupling has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the origin of flicker noise in single molecule junctions and demonstrate how the character of the molecule-electrode coupling influences the flicker noise behavior of single molecule junctions. Importantly, we find that flicker noise shows a power law dependence on conductance in all junctions studied with an exponent that can distinguish through-space and through-bond coupling. Our results provide a new and powerful tool for probing and understanding coupling at the metal-molecule interface.

  15. Probing collective oscillation of d -orbital electrons at the nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhall, Rohan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA; Vigil-Fowler, Derek [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA; Houston Dycus, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA; Kirste, Ronny [Adroit Materials, Inc., Cary, North Carolina 27518, USA; Mita, Seiji [Adroit Materials, Inc., Cary, North Carolina 27518, USA; Sitar, Zlatko [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA; Collazo, Ramon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA; LeBeau, James M. [Adroit Materials, Inc., Cary, North Carolina 27518, USA

    2018-02-05

    Here, we demonstrate that high energy electrons can be used to explore the collective oscillation of s, p, and d orbital electrons at the nanometer length scale. Using epitaxial AlGaN/AlN quantum wells as a test system, we observe the emergence of additional features in the loss spectrum with the increasing Ga content. A comparison of the observed spectra with ab-initio theory reveals that the origin of these spectral features lies in excitations of 3d-electrons contributed by Ga. We find that these modes differ in energy from the valence electron plasmons in Al1-xGaxN due to the different polarizabilities of the d electrons. Finally, we study the dependence of observed spectral features on the Ga content, lending insights into the origin of these spectral features, and their coupling with electron-hole excitations.

  16. Photoelectron spectra as a probe of double-core resonsance in two-electron atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobe, R.; Haan, S.L.; Eberly, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The authors calculate photoelectron spectra for a two-electron atom under the influence of two external driving fields, using an essential states formalism. They focus on the regime of so-called coherence transfer, in which electron-electron correlation transfers field-induced photo-coherence from one electron to the other. In the case studied here, two laser fields are resonant with coupled atomic transitions, in the manner familiar from three-level dark-state spectroscopy. Dynamical two electron effects are monitored via the photoelectron energy spectrum. The authors show that the distribution of the photoelectron energies can be singly, doubly or triply peaked depending on the relative laser intensities. The electron spectra are independent of the turn-on sequence of the fields

  17. Substorm Injected Energetic Electrons and Ions Deeply into the Inner Magnetosphere Observed by BD-IES and Van Allan Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Qiugang

    2017-04-01

    When substorm injections are observed simultaneously with multiple spacecraft, they help elucidate potential mechanisms for particle transport and energization, a topic of great importance for understanding and modeling the magnetosphere. In the present paper, by using the data return from the BeiDa- IES (BD-IES) instrument onboard an inclined (55◦) geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) satellite together with geo-transfer orbit (GTO) Van Allen Probe A&B satellite, we analysis a substorm injection event occurred on Oct 16, 2015. During the substorm injection, the IES onboard IGSO is outbound while both Van Allen Probe A&B satellites are inbound. This configuration of multiple satellite trajectories provides a unique opportunity to investigate the inward and outward radial propagation of the substorm injection simultaneously. This substorm as indicated by AE/AL indices is closely related an IMF/solar wind discontinuity with a sharp change in the IMF Bz direction (northward turning). The innermost signature of this substorm injection has been detected by the Van Allen Probes A & B at L 3.7. The outermost signature, observed by the BD-IES, is found to be at L 10. This indicated that this substorm have a rather global effect rather than just a local effect. Further, we suggest that the electric fields carried by fast-mode compressional waves around the substorm injection are the most likely mechanism candidate for the injection signatures of electrons observed in the innermost and outermost inner magnetosphere.

  18. Radial Propagation of Magnetospheric Substorm Injected Energetic Electrons Observed by BD-IES and Van Allan Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Q.

    2016-12-01

    When substorm injections are observed simultaneously with multiple spacecraft, they help elucidate potential mechanisms for particle transport and energization, a topic of great importance for understanding and modeling the magnetosphere. In the present paper, by using the data return from the BeiDa- IES (BD-IES) instrument onboard an inclined (55°) geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) satellite together with geo-transfer orbit (GTO) Van Allen Probe A&B satellite, we analysis a substorm injection event occurred on Oct 16, 2015. During the substorm injection, the IES onboard IGSO is outbound while both Van Allen Probe A&B satellites are inbound. This configuration of multiple satellite trajectories provides a unique opportunity to investigate the inward and outward radial propagation of the substorm injection simultaneously. This substorm as indicated by AE/AL indices is closely related an IMF/solar wind discontinuity with a sharp change in the IMF Bz direction (northward turning). The innermost signature of this substorm injection has been detected by the Van Allen Probes A & B at L 3.7. The outermost signature, observed by the BD-IES, is found to be at L 10. This indicated that this substorm have a rather global effect rather than just a local effect. Further, we suggest that the electric fields carried by fast-mode compressional waves around the substorm injection are the most likely mechanism candidate for the injection signatures of electrons observed in the innermost and outermost inner magnetosphere.

  19. Coulomb drag: a probe of electron interactions in coupled quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1996-01-01

    As semiconductor devices shrink in size and in dimensionality, interactions between charge carriers become more and more important. There is a simple physical reason behind this behavior: fewer carriers lead to less effective screening, and hence stronger effective interactions. A point in case...... are one-dimensional systems (quantum wires): there electron-electron interactions may lead to a behavior, which is qualitatively different from the standard Fermi liquid picture (Luttinger liquids). Electron-electron interactions also play a central role in the fractional quantum Hall effect, which...... be the study of quantum wires: there the interactions may lead to even more dramatic effects...

  20. Athermal electron distribution probed by femtosecond multiphoton photoemission from image potential states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrini, Gabriele; Giannetti, Claudio; Pagliara, Stefania; Banfi, Francesco; Galimberti, Gianluca; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2005-01-01

    Image potential states are populated through indirect, scattering-mediated multiphoton absorption induced by femtosecond laser pulses and revealed by single-photon photoemission. The measured effective mass is significantly different from that obtained with direct, resonant population. These features reveal a strong coupling of the electrons residing in the image potential state, outside the solid, with the underlying hot electron population created by the laser pulse. The coupling is mediated by a many-body scattering interaction between the image potential state electrons and bulk electrons in highly excited states

  1. Van Allen Probes observation of a 360° phase shift in the flux modulation of injected electrons by ULF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.-R.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Blake, J. Bernard; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present Van Allen Probe observation of drift-resonance interaction between energetic electrons and ultralow frequency (ULF) waves on 29 October 2013. Oscillations in electron flux were observed at the period of ˜450 s, which is also the dominant period of the observed ULF magnetic pulsations. The phase shift of the electron fluxes (˜50 to 150 keV) across the estimated resonant energy (˜104 keV) is ˜360°. This phase relationship is different from the characteristic 180° phase shift as expected from the drift-resonance theory. We speculate that the additional 180° phase difference arises from the inversion of electron phase space density (PSD) gradient, which in turn is caused by the drift motion of the substorm injected electrons. This PSD gradient adjusts the characteristic particle signatures in the drift-resonance theory, which indicates a coupling effect between the magnetotail and the radiation belt and helps to better understand the wave-particle interaction in the magnetosphere.

  2. On the Effect of Geomagnetic Storms on Relativistic Electrons in the Outer Radiation Belt: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Pablo S.; Pinto, Víctor A.; Sibeck, David G.; Kanekal, Shrikanth G.; Baker, Daniel N.

    2017-11-01

    Using Van Allen Probes Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma-Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (ECT-REPT) observations, we performed a statistical study on the effect of geomagnetic storms on relativistic electrons fluxes in the outer radiation belt for 78 storms between September 2012 and June 2016. We found that the probability of enhancement, depletion, and no change in flux values depends strongly on L and energy. Enhancement events are more common for ˜2 MeV electrons at L ˜ 5, and the number of enhancement events decreases with increasing energy at any given L shell. However, considering the percentage of occurrence of each kind of event, enhancements are more probable at higher energies, and the probability of enhancement tends to increases with increasing L shell. Depletion are more probable for 4-5 MeV electrons at the heart of the outer radiation belt, and no-change events are more frequent at L 4.5 the probability of enhancement, depletion, or no-change response presents little variation for all energies. Because these probabilities remain relatively constant as a function of radial distance in the outer radiation belt, measurements obtained at geosynchronous orbit may be used as a proxy to monitor E≥1.8 MeV electrons in the outer belt.

  3. A discussion on the usefulness of a shared European ballistic image database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ceuster, J; Hermsen, R; Mastaglio, M; Nennstiel, R

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of electronic systems into the comparison of weapon marks in the mid 1990s caused a revolution in the discipline of "forensic ballistics". Most European states now use this technology to search their national open case files. Globalisation of crime and the loss of effective border controls have made the idea of a unified European ballistic system seem logical. The article critically considers the requirements and possible outcomes of such a system. Based on the experience of forensic practitioners it seems probable that a shared European electronic ballistic system will be of a very limited value at present. Further improvements of existing systems to reach compatibility are encouraged. Copyright © 2011 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ballistic Rail Gun Soft Recovery Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Rail Gun Soft Recovery Facility accommodates a 155mm Howitzer, fired horizontally into a 104-foot long water trough to slow the projectile and recover...

  5. Heat Coulomb blockade of one ballistic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivre, E.; Anthore, A.; Parmentier, F. D.; Cavanna, A.; Gennser, U.; Ouerghi, A.; Jin, Y.; Pierre, F.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum mechanics and Coulomb interaction dictate the behaviour of small circuits. The thermal implications cover fundamental topics from quantum control of heat to quantum thermodynamics, with prospects of novel thermal machines and an ineluctably growing influence on nanocircuit engineering. Experimentally, the rare observations thus far include the universal thermal conductance quantum and heat interferometry. However, evidence for many-body thermal effects paving the way to markedly different heat and electrical behaviours in quantum circuits remains wanting. Here we report on the observation of the Coulomb blockade of electronic heat flow from a small metallic circuit node, beyond the widespread Wiedemann-Franz law paradigm. We demonstrate this thermal many-body phenomenon for perfect (ballistic) conduction channels to the node, where it amounts to the universal suppression of precisely one quantum of conductance for the transport of heat, but none for electricity. The inter-channel correlations that give rise to such selective heat current reduction emerge from local charge conservation, in the floating node over the full thermal frequency range (<~temperature × kB/h). This observation establishes the different nature of the quantum laws for thermal transport in nanocircuits.

  6. Electronic properties of dioctylterthiophene-based organic thin-film transistors: A Kelvin probe force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afsharimani, N.; Nysten, B.

    2013-01-01

    It appeared in the past decades that semi-conducting organic liquid crystals could be used as the active layer in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). They can be processed by simple methods such as inkjet printing, which paves the way to applications for cheap plastic electronics such as electronic tags, biosensors, and flexible screens. However, the measured field-effect mobility in these OTFTs is relatively low compared to inorganic devices. Generally, such low field-effect mobility values result from extrinsic effects such as grain boundaries or imperfect interfaces with source and drain electrodes. It has been shown that reducing the number of grain boundaries between the source and drain electrodes improves the field effect mobility. Therefore, it is important to understand the transport mechanisms by studying the local structure and electronic properties of organic thin films within the channel and at the interfaces with source and drain electrodes in order to improve the field-effect mobility in OTFTs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is an ideal tool for that purpose since it allows to simultaneously investigate the local structure and the electrical potential distribution in electronic devices. In this work, the structure and the electrical properties of OTFTs based on dioctylterthiophene (DOTT) were studied. The transistors were fabricated by spin-coating DOTT on the transistor structures with untreated and treated (silanized) channel silicon oxide. The potential profiles across the channel and at the metal-electrode interfaces were measured by KPFM. The effect of surface treatment on the electrical properties, charge trapping phenomenon and hysteresis effects is demonstrated and analyzed. - Highlights: • Kelvin probe force microscopy study of organic thin film transistors. • Cost and time savings by using solution processable molecules as active layers. • Smaller crystals and less charge trapping effects in silanized devices. • Decrement

  7. Wave Optical Calculation of Probe Size in Low Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radlička, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 212-217 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscope * optical calculation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  8. Fundamental insights into the radium uptake into barite by atom probe tomography and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Juliane

    2017-10-01

    -of-the-art high-resolution microscopy techniques was used to answer the questions regarding (1) the internal microstructure of the initial barite (2) the role of this internal microstructure during the Ra uptake and (3) t he changes in the Ra distribution within the barite. This study comprises the first characterization of barite by atom probe tomography (APT). By combining APT and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods, pores covering the size range from a few nanometers to a few micrometers were identified in the SL barite. The pores were organized in layers parallel to the outer crystal faces. High resolution chemical analysis indicated that the pores contain a solution of water and sodium chloride. By focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, it was revealed that open macropores of several micrometers size are present as well within the SL barite. These partially connected macropores are distributed within the complete barite particles. Therefore, the macropores provide a direct pathway for Ra-containing aqueous fluid to enter the SL barite particles by diffusion within the aqueous solution. In addition, pores were also identified in the AL barite by TEM characterization. The entrapment of solution during mineral precipitation is known for several minerals at high supersaturation. As barite only precipitates at high supersaturation, nanoscale fluid inclusions as well as macropores probably were entrapped during the particle growth by precipitation. A microstructure similar to the one of the barite type used in this study was previously reported for other barites. In Ra-free reference experiment, no microstructural changes were noted over recrystallization times of up to 898 days. In prior studies, three different stages of Ra uptake were described based on macroscopic results. Ra-containing barite samples from all three stages were characterized to understand the role of the internal barite microstructure. At the beginning, the nano-scale fluid inclusions disappeared

  9. Fundamental insights into the radium uptake into barite by atom probe tomography and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Juliane

    2017-01-01

    answer the questions regarding (1) the internal microstructure of the initial barite (2) the role of this internal microstructure during the Ra uptake and (3) t he changes in the Ra distribution within the barite. This study comprises the first characterization of barite by atom probe tomography (APT). By combining APT and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods, pores covering the size range from a few nanometers to a few micrometers were identified in the SL barite. The pores were organized in layers parallel to the outer crystal faces. High resolution chemical analysis indicated that the pores contain a solution of water and sodium chloride. By focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, it was revealed that open macropores of several micrometers size are present as well within the SL barite. These partially connected macropores are distributed within the complete barite particles. Therefore, the macropores provide a direct pathway for Ra-containing aqueous fluid to enter the SL barite particles by diffusion within the aqueous solution. In addition, pores were also identified in the AL barite by TEM characterization. The entrapment of solution during mineral precipitation is known for several minerals at high supersaturation. As barite only precipitates at high supersaturation, nanoscale fluid inclusions as well as macropores probably were entrapped during the particle growth by precipitation. A microstructure similar to the one of the barite type used in this study was previously reported for other barites. In Ra-free reference experiment, no microstructural changes were noted over recrystallization times of up to 898 days. In prior studies, three different stages of Ra uptake were described based on macroscopic results. Ra-containing barite samples from all three stages were characterized to understand the role of the internal barite microstructure. At the beginning, the nano-scale fluid inclusions disappeared, probably due to coalescing to new macropores. This was

  10. Optical probing of spin dynamics of two-dimensional and bulk electrons in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizo, P. J.; Pugzlys, A.; Slachter, A.; Denega, S. Z.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; van der Wal, C. H.

    2010-01-01

    The electron spin dynamics in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction system containing a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) have been studied in this paper by using pump-probe time-resolved Kerr rotation experiments. Owing to the complex layer structure of this material, the transient Kerr

  11. Momentum mapping spectrometer for probing the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raj; Bhatt, Pragya; Yadav, Namita; Shanker, R

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new experimental setup for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by the impact of keV electrons using the well-known technique of recoil ion momentum spectroscopy. The apparatus consists of mainly a time- and position-sensitive multi-hit particle detector for ion analysis and a channel electron multiplier detector for detecting the ejected electrons. Different components of the setup and the relevant electronics for data acquisition are described in detail with their working principles. In order to verify the reliable performance of the setup, we have recorded the collision-induced ionic spectra of the CO 2 molecule by the impact of keV electrons. Information about the ion pairs of CO + :O + , C + :O + and O + :O + resulting from dissociative ionizing collisions of 20 and 26 keV electrons with a dilute gaseous target of CO 2 molecules has been obtained. Under conditions of the present experiment, the momentum resolutions of the spectrometer for the combined momenta of CO + and O + ions in the direction of the time-of-flight axis and perpendicular to the direction of an electron beam are found to be 10.0 ± 0.2 and 15.0 ± 0.3 au, respectively

  12. Quantum transport through ballistic chaotic cavities: a statistical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    The problem of quantum chaotic scattering is addressed by means of a statistical model for the scattering matrix. The model, introduced in the past in the context of nuclear physics, describes the problem in terms of a prompt and an equilibrated component: it incorporates the average value of the scattering matrix to describe the prompt processes and satisfies the requirements of flux conservation, causality and ergodicity. The model is applied to the analysis of electronic transport through ballistic mesoscopic cavities: it describes well the results arising form the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation for two-dimensional cavities. (Author)

  13. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmaier, A.; Aboulfadl, H.; Pfaff, M.; Mücklich, F.; Motz, C.

    2015-01-01

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. PMID:26523113

  14. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Krok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001-c(8 × 2-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons.

  15. PVO VENUS ELECT TEMP PROBE CALIB HIGH RES ELECTRONS VER 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Resolution Ne File. These data are based on measurements of the electron saturation current or the ion saturation current taken from as many voltampere...

  16. Electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of MWCNT/nickel nanocomposites: hydrazine and diethylaminoethanethiol as analytical probes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of chemically-synthesized nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) platforms. Successful modification...

  17. Electron probe microanalysis of Ni-silicides at low voltage: difficulties and possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Heikinheimo, E.; Pinard, Philippe T.; Richter, Silvia; Llovet, X.; Louhenkilpi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the use of EPMA at low voltage has grown considerably in recent years, mainly because of the availability of electron-beam instruments equipped with field-emission guns. However, EPMA at low voltage is marred by both experimental and analytical problems which may affect the accuracy of quantitative results. In the case of the analysis of transition elements, both the emission and absorption of X-rays are still poorly understood when they originate from electron transitions involvi...

  18. Temperature-dependent electronic decay profiles in CZT: probe of bulk and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessick, Royal; Maupin, Hugh; Tepper, Gary C.; Szeles, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    The electronic performance of CZT-based gamma radiation spectrometers is governed by a synergism of bulk and surface properties. Compensation is used to increase the bulk resistivity of Cd1-xZnxTe (x~0.1), but the same electronic states that are introduced to increase the material resistivity can also trap charge and reduce the carrier lifetime. Electrical and mechanical surface defects introduced during or subsequent to crystal harvesting are also known to interfere with device performance. Using a contactless, pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation technique, electronic decay profiles were studied in high pressure Bridgman CZT as a function of temperature. The electronic decay profile was found to depend very strongly on temperature and was modeled using a function consisting of two exponential terms with temperature-dependent amplitudes and time constants. The model was used to relate the observed temperature dependent decay kinetics in CZT to specific trap energies. It was found that, at low temperatures, the electronic decay process is dominated by a deep trap with an energy of approximately 0.69 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. As the temperature is increased, the charge trapping becomes dominated by a second trap with an energy of approximately 0.60 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. Surface damage introduces additional charge traps that significantly alter the decay kinetics particularly at low temperatures.

  19. Probing the longitudinal momentum spread of the electron wave packet at the tunnel exit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Pfeiffer, Adrian; Cirelli, Claudio; S. Landsman, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    We present an ellipticity resolved study of momentum distributions arising from strong-field ionization of Helium at constant intensity. The influence of the ion potential on the departing electron is considered within a semi-classical model consisting of an initial tunneling step and subsequent...... classical propagation. We find that the momentum distribution can be explained by the presence of a longitudinal momentum spread of the electron at the exit from the tunnel. Our combined experimental and theoretical study provides an estimate of this momentum spread....

  20. Critical currents in ballistic two-dimensional InAs-based superconducting weak links

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, J.P.; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.; Borghs, G.

    1999-01-01

    The critical supercurrent Ic carried by a short (0.3 to 0.8 µm) ballistic two-dimensional InAs-based electron gas between superconducting niobium electrodes is studied. In relating the maximum value to the resistance of the weak link in the normal state Rn a much lower value is found than

  1. Surface sensitivity effects with local probe scanning Auger-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Agterveld, DTL; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM; Bentley, J; Allen, C; Dahmen, U; Petrov,

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-high-vacuum segregation studies on in-situ fractured Cu-Sb alloys were performed in terms of nanometer scale scanning Auger/Electron microscopy. S contamination leads to the formation Of Cu2S precipitates which, upon removal due to fracture, expose pits with morphology that depends on the

  2. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  3. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron

  4. HOM electronics and code to probe beam centring on 3.9 GHz cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P

    2014-01-01

    The work within sub-task 10.5.1 was aimed at developing electronics for beam position monitoring (BPM) based on Higher-Order Modes (HOM) excited by electron beams in 3.9 GHz cavities in the FLASH linac at DESY, Hamburg, defining realistic specifications and proving that these signals can be used for beam centering. A series of measurements with devices like a fast oscilloscopes and a real-time spectrum analyzer, as well as with specially designed test electronics. These measurements in conjunction with the simulations made by the other 2 sub-tasks have enabled us to find two spectra regions suitable for use as BPM: modes with strong coupling to the beam around 5.4 GHz, enabling precise monitoring (resolution of ca 20 μm rms) within the whole 4-cavity module, and localized modes at ca.9 GHz for localized measurements in each cavity (resolution of ca 50 mm rms). Various data analysis approaches have been studied. Based on the EuCARD work the HOMBPM electronics has been designed and is now being built at FNAL. ...

  5. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy-dispersive...

  6. X-ray free electron laser as a real-time probe of chemistry on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free electron laser has opened up new possibilities for the study of surface chemical reactions on ultrafast time scale. This article reviews the recent work on the desorption of a molecule from a surface, which is one of the most fundamental surface chemical process. (author)

  7. Probing electronic coupling between adenine bases in RNA strands from synchrotron radiation circular dichroism experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgård; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectra (176–330 nm) of RNA adenine oligomers, (rA)n (n = 1–10, 12, 15, and 20), reveal electronic coupling between two bases in short strands. The number of interacting bases in long strands is more and larger than that reported previously for the corresponding DNA strands....

  8. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    specifically designed oligonucleotide targets that are attached to DNA origami templates. In this way, we use a highly selective approach to compare the efficiency of the electron-induced dissociation of a single disulfide bond with the more complex cleavage of the DNA backbone within a TT dinucleotide...

  9. On the interactions between energetic electrons and lightning whistler waves observed at high L-shells on Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R. H., II; Brundell, J. B.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Jacobson, A. R.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, J.

    2017-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands of kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. A good match has previously been shown between WWLLN sferics and Van Allen Probes lightning whistler waves. It is well known that lightning whistler waves can modify the distribution of energetic electrons in the Van Allen belts by pitch angle scattering into the loss cone, especially at low L-Shells (referred to as LEP - Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation). It is an open question whether lightning whistler waves play an important role at high L-shells. The possible interactions between energetic electrons and lightning whistler waves at high L-shells are considered to be weak in the past. However, lightning is copious, and weak pitch angle scattering into the drift or bounce loss cone would have a significant influence on the radiation belt populations. In this work, we will analyze the continuous burst mode EMFISIS data from September 2012 to 2016, to find out lightning whistler waves above L = 3. Based on that, MAGEIS data are used to study the related possible wave-particle interactions. In this talk, both case study and statistical analysis results will be presented.

  10. Probing single-molecule electron-hole transfer dynamics at a molecule-NiO semiconductor nanocrystalline interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, Bharat; Rao, Vishal Govind; Lu, H Peter

    2017-07-14

    Interfacial charge transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized NiO nanoparticles are being investigated for photocathodes in p-type dye-sensitized solar cells. In the photoreaction, after fast electron transfer from NiO to a molecule, the recombination of the hole in the nanoparticles with the electron in a reduced molecule plays an important role in the charge separation process and solar energy harvesting. Nevertheless, knowledge of the interfacial charge recombination (CR) rate and its mechanism is still limited due to the complex photoinduced electron and hole dynamics and lack of characterization of the inhomogeneity of the dynamics. Here, we report our work on probing interfacial charge recombination dynamics in Zn(ii)-5,10,15,20-tetra(3-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (m-ZnTCPP) dye-sensitized NiO nanoparticles by correlating single-molecule fluorescence blinking dynamics with charge transfer dynamics using single-molecule photon-stamping spectroscopy. The correlated analyses of single-molecule fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and blinking reveal the intrinsic distribution and temporal fluctuation of interfacial charge transfer reactivity, which are closely related to site-specific molecular interactions and dynamics.

  11. NMR Chemical Shift of a Helium Atom as a Probe for Electronic Structure of FH, F-, (FHF)-, and FH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupikina, E Yu; Efimova, A A; Denisov, G S; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-12-21

    In this work, we present the first results of outer electronic shell visualization by using a 3 He atom as a probe particle. As model objects we have chosen F - , FH, and FH 2 + species, as well as the hydrogen-bonded complex FH···F - at various H···F - distances (3.0, 2.5, 2.0, and 1.5 Å and equilibrium at ca. 1.14 Å). The interaction energy of investigated objects with helium atom (CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ) and helium atom chemical shift (B3LYP/pcS-2) surfaces were calculated, and their topological analysis was performed. For comparison, the results of standard quantum mechanical approaches to electronic shell visualization were presented (ESP, ELF, ED, ∇ 2 ED). We show that the Laplacian of helium chemical shift, ∇ 2 δ He , is sensitive to fluorine atom lone pair localization regions, and it can be used for the visualization of the outer electronic shell, which could be used to evaluate the proton accepting ability. The sensitivity of ∇ 2 δ He to lone pairs is preserved at distances as large as 2.0-2.5 Å from the fluorine nucleus (in comparison with the distance to ESP minima, located at 1.0-1.5 Å or maxima of ELF, which are as close as 0.6 Å to the fluorine nucleus).

  12. Electron transfer in reactions of ketones with organolithium reagents. A carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamataka, H.; Fujimura, N.; Kawafuji, Y.; Hanafusa, T.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects have been determined for reactions of ketones labeled with carbon-14 at the carbonyl carbon with MeLi and Me 2 CuLi in diethyl ether at 0 0 C. Observed isotope effects were as follows: (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + MeLi, 12 k/ 14 k = 1.000 +/- 0.002; (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + Me 2 CuLi, 1.029 +/- 0.005; 2,4,6-Me 3 C 6 H 2 COC 6 H 5 + MeLi, 1.023 +/- 0.004. The relative reactivities of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted benzophenones with these reagents were also determined by the competition experiments. These results are consistent with an electron-transfer step which is followed by a carbon-carbon bond-forming step that is or is not rate determining depending on the structure of ketones and reagents. The reaction of benzophenone with MeLi proceeds via rate-determining electron transfer; the change in nucleophile from MeLi to Me 2 CuLi shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination; the change in ketone from benzophenone to 2,4,6-trimethylbenzophenone also shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination because the latter step becomes slower for the more hindered ketone. The extent of the geometrical change of the substrate at the electron-transfer transition state of the reaction of benzophenone with MeLi was estimated to be small on the basis of the magnitude of the KIE and the rho value of the Hammett correlation

  13. Study of vertical Si/SiO2 interface using laser-assisted atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Lee, B H; Kim, Y T; Kim, J J; Lee, S Y; Lee, K P; Park, C G

    2014-03-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe tomography has opened the way to three-dimensional visualization of nanostructures. However, many questions related to the laser-matter interaction remain unresolved. We demonstrate that the interface reaction can be activated by laser-assisted field evaporation and affects the quantification of the interfacial composition. At a vertical interface between Si and SiO2, a SiO2 molecule tends to combine with a Si atom and evaporate as a SiO molecule, reducing the evaporation field. The features of the reaction depend on the direction of the laser illumination and the inner structure of tip. A high concentration of SiO is observed at a vertical interface between Si and SiO2 when the Si column is positioned at the center of the tip, whereas no significant SiO is detected when the SiO2 layer is at the center. The difference in the interfacial compositions of two samples was due to preferential evaporation of the Si layer. This was explained using transmission electron microscopy observations before and after atom probe experiments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of threshold switching of NbO2 using atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Cha, E J; Kim, Y T; Chae, B K; Kim, J J; Lee, S Y; Hwang, H S; Park, C G

    2015-12-01

    Threshold switching is a phenomenon where the resistivity of an insulating material changes and the insulator exhibits metallic behavior. This could be explained by phase transformation in oxide materials; however, this behavior is also seen in amorphous insulators. In this study, through an ex-situ experiment using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we proved that threshold switching of amorphous NbO2 accompanies local crystallization. The change in I-V characteristics after electroforming was examined by evaluating the concentration profile. Atom probe tomography (APT) combined with in-situ TEM probing technique was performed to understand the threshold switching in amorphous NbO2. The local crystallization in amorphous NbO2 was validated by the observed difference in time-of-flight (ToF) between amorphous and crystalline NbO2. We concluded that the slower ToF of amorphous NbO2 (a-NbO2) compared with crystalline NbO2 (c-NbO2) is due to the resistivity difference and trap-assisted recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electronic structure and stability of the SiO2+ dications produced in tomographic atom probe experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanuttini, D.; Blum, I.; Rigutti, L.; Vurpillot, F.; Douady, J.; Jacquet, E.; Anglade, P.-M.; Gervais, B.

    2017-10-01

    The molecular electronic states of the SiO2+ dication have been investigated in a joint theoretical and experimental analysis. The use of a tip-shaped sample for tomographic atom probe analysis offers the unique opportunity to produce and to analyze the lifetime of some excited states of this dication. The perturbation brought by the large electric field of the polarized tip along the ion trajectory is analyzed by means of molecular dynamics simulation. For the typical electric fields used in the experiment, the lowest energy triplet states spontaneously dissociate, while the lowest energy singlet states do not. We show that the emission process leads to the formation of some excited singlet state, which dissociates by means of spin-orbit coupling with lower-energy triplet states to produce specific patterns associated with Si+ + O+ and Si2+ + O dissociation channels. These patterns are recorded and observed experimentally in a correlated time-of-flight map.

  16. Mobility-electron density relation probed via controlled oxygen vacancy doping in epitaxial BaSnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Koustav; Prakash, Abhinav; Jalan, Bharat; Leighton, C.

    2017-05-01

    The recently discovered high room temperature mobility in wide band gap semiconducting BaSnO3 is of exceptional interest for perovskite oxide heterostructures. Critical open issues with epitaxial films include determination of the optimal dopant and understanding the mobility-electron density (μ-n) relation. These are addressed here through a transport study of BaSnO3(001) films with oxygen vacancy doping controlled via variable temperature vacuum annealing. Room temperature n can be tuned from 5 × 1019 cm-3 to as low as 2 × 1017 cm-3, which is shown to drive a weak- to strong-localization transition, a 104-fold increase in resistivity, and a factor of 28 change in μ. The data reveal μ ∝ n0.65 scaling over the entire n range probed, important information for understanding mobility-limiting scattering mechanisms.

  17. Mobility-electron density relation probed via controlled oxygen vacancy doping in epitaxial BaSnO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koustav Ganguly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently discovered high room temperature mobility in wide band gap semiconducting BaSnO3 is of exceptional interest for perovskite oxide heterostructures. Critical open issues with epitaxial films include determination of the optimal dopant and understanding the mobility-electron density (μ-n relation. These are addressed here through a transport study of BaSnO3(001 films with oxygen vacancy doping controlled via variable temperature vacuum annealing. Room temperature n can be tuned from 5 × 1019 cm−3 to as low as 2 × 1017 cm−3, which is shown to drive a weak- to strong-localization transition, a 104-fold increase in resistivity, and a factor of 28 change in μ. The data reveal μ ∝ n0.65 scaling over the entire n range probed, important information for understanding mobility-limiting scattering mechanisms.

  18. Incipient crystallization of transition-metal tungstates under microwaves probed by Raman scattering and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Kisla P. F.; Dias, Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Microwave synthesis was used to produce nanosized transition-metal tungstates in environmentally friendly conditions not yet reported by the literature: 110 and 150 °C, for times of 10 and 20 min. X-ray diffraction evidenced incipient crystallized materials, while transmission electron microscopy indicates nanostructured regions of about 2–5 nm inside an amorphous matrix. Raman spectroscopy was used to probe short-range ordering in the achieved samples and also to obtain a reliable set of spectra containing all the Raman-active bands predicted by group-theory calculations. The vibrational spectra showed no extra feature, indicating that the microwave processing was able to produce short-range ordered materials without tetrahedral distortions. These distortions are frequently reported when commercially modified kitchen microwave units are employed. In this work, the syntheses were conducted in a commercial apparatus especially designed for fully controlled temperature–time–pressure conditions.

  19. Probe measurements of electron energy spectrum and plasma-wall interaction in Helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, S. F.; Demidov, V. I.; Hensley, A. L.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Miles, J. A.; Tolson, B. A.

    2018-02-01

    It is experimentally demonstrated that a wall probe may be a useful instrument for measurement of electron energy spectrum (EES) and the plasma-boundary interaction in a micro-plasma with a nonlocal electron distribution function at atmospheric pressure. The measurements of the EES have been conducted in the plasma of several micro-hollow cathode discharges of differing sizes. The discharges with a flow of Helium gas were exposed to air. Typical results of measurements demonstrate signature of energetic electrons arising due to plasma-chemical reactions. It is experimentally shown that wall probe potential is associated with energetic electrons rather than the ambient electron kinetic energy. The devices may be applicable for developing analytical sensors for extreme environments, including high radiation and high temperatures.

  20. Lattice Location of Radioactive Probes in Semiconductors and Metals by Electron and Positron Channelling

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The channelling effect of decay-electrons and positrons is used for the localization of radioactive impurities implanted into single crystals. Because of the low implantation doses and the variety of different isotopes available at ISOLDE, this technique is especially suited for applications in semiconducting materials. \\\\ \\\\ Channelling measurements in Si, GaAs and GaP implanted with In-, Cd- and Xe-isotopes have demonstrated that impurity lattice sites can be studied directly after implantation without any annealing. The electron-channelling technique can be ideally combined with hyperfine interaction techniques like Moessbauer s This was shown for the formation of In-vacancy complexes in ion-implanted Ni. \\\\ \\\\ We intend to continue the lattice location measurements in semiconductors implanted with various radioactive impurities of Cd, In, Sn, Sb and Te.

  1. Tunnel probes for measurements of the electron and ion temperature in fusion plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunn, J. P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Balan, P.; Ionita, C.; Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Pánek, Radomír; Bařina, O.; Hrach, R.; Vicher, M.; Van Oost, G.; Van Rompuy, T.; Martines, E.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 10 (2004), s. 4328-4330 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/15th./. San Diego, 19.04.2004-22.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0786 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : Tokamak * electron temperature * ion temperature * plasma diagnostics Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  2. Probing collective multi-electron effects with few cycle laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiner, Andrew

    High Harmonic Generation (HHG) enables the production of bursts of coherent soft x-rays with attosecond pulse duration. This process arrises from the nonlinear interaction between intense infrared laser pulses and an ionizing gas medium. Soft x-ray photons are used for spectroscopy of inner-shell electron correlation and exchange processes, and the availability of attosecond pulse durations will enable these processes to be resolved on their natural time scales. The maximum or cutoff photon energy in HHG increases with both the intensity as well as the wavelength of the driving laser. It is highly desirable to increase the harmonic cutoff as this will allow for the generation of shorter attosecond pulses, as well as HHG spectroscopy of increasingly energetic electronic transitions. While the harmonic cutoff increases with laser wavelength, there is a corresponding decrease in harmonic yield. The first part of this thesis describes the experimental measurement of the wavelength scaling of HHG efficiency, which we report alambda-6.5+/-1.1 in xenon, and lambda -6.5+/-1.1 in krypton. To increase the HHG cutoff, we have developed a 1.8 microm source, with stable carrier envelope phase and a pulse duration of caries the signature of the electronic structure of the generating medium. In krypton we observed a Cooper minimum at 85 eV, showing that photoionization cross sections can be measured with HHG. Measurements in xenon lead to the first clear observation of electron correlation effects during HHG, which manifest as a broad peak in the HHG spectrum centred at 100 eV. This thesis also describes several improvements to the HHG experiment including the development of an ionization detector for measuring laser intensity, as well as an investigation into the role of laser mode quality on HHG phase matching and efficiency.

  3. Directed evolution of the periodic table: probing the electronic structure of late actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, M L; Albrecht-Schmitt, T E

    2017-07-25

    Recent investigations of the coordination chemistry and physical properties of berkelium (Z = 97) and californium (Z = 98) have revealed fundamental differences between post-curium elements and lighter members of the actinide series. This review highlights these developments and chronicles key findings and concepts from the last half-century that have helped usher in a new understanding of the evolution of electronic structure in the periodic table.

  4. Dynamical Birefringence: Electron-Hole Recollisions as Probes of Berry Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter B. Banks

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The direct measurement of Berry phases is still a great challenge in condensed-matter systems. The bottleneck has been the ability to adiabatically drive an electron coherently across a large portion of the Brillouin zone in a solid where the scattering is strong and complicated. We break through this bottleneck and show that high-order sideband generation (HSG in semiconductors is intimately affected by Berry phases. Electron-hole recollisions and HSG occur when a near-band-gap laser beam excites a semiconductor that is driven by sufficiently strong terahertz-frequency electric fields. We carry out experimental and theoretical studies of HSG from three GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. The observed HSG spectra contain sidebands up to the 90th order, to our knowledge the highest-order optical nonlinearity reported in solids. The highest-order sidebands are associated with electron-hole pairs driven coherently across roughly 10% of the Brillouin zone around the Γ point. The principal experimental claim is a dynamical birefringence: the intensity and polarization of the sidebands depend on the relative polarization of the exciting near-infrared (NIR and the THz electric fields, as well as on the relative orientation of the laser fields with the crystal. We explain dynamical birefringence by generalizing the three-step model for high-order harmonic generation. The hole accumulates Berry phases due to variation of its internal state as the quasimomentum changes under the THz field. Dynamical birefringence arises from quantum interference between time-reversed pairs of electron-hole recollision pathways. We propose a method to use dynamical birefringence to measure Berry curvature in solids.

  5. Detection of defects in electron-irradiated synthetic silica quartz probed by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watauchi, Satoshi; Uedono, Akira; Ujihira, Yusuke; Yoda, Osamu.

    1994-01-01

    Defects in amorphous SiO 2 films, formed on MOS(metal/oxide/semiconductor) devices as gates, perturb its operation. The positron annihilation techniques, were applied to the study of the annealing behavior of the defects, introduced in the high purity synthetic quartz glass by the irradiation of 3-MeV electrons up to the 1x10 18 e - /cm 2 dosage. It was proved that the positron annihilation techniques were sufficiently sensitive to detect the defects in the electron-irradiated silica glasses. Three types of open-space defects were detected by the positron lifetime measurements. These can be attributed to monovacancy or divacancy type defects, vacancy clusters, and open-volume defects. A high formation probability (∼90%) of positroniums(Ps) was found in unirradiated specimens. These Ps were considered to be formed in open-volume defects. The formation probability of Ps was drastically decreased by the electron irradiation. But the size of open-volume defects was kept unchanged by the irradiation. These facts suggest that vacancy-type defects were introduced by the electron irradiation and that positrons were trapped in these defects. By the isochronal annealing in nitrogen atmosphere, the lifetime component (τ 2 ) and its relative intensity (I 2 ), attributed to positrons trapped in monovacancy or divacancy type defects and annihilated there, changed remarkably. τ 2 was constant in the temperature range up to 300degC, getting slightly shorter between 300degC and 700degC, and constant above 700degC. I 2 decreased gradually up to 300degC, constant between 300degC and 550degC, decreased above 550degC, and constant above 700degC. This revealed that the behavior of the defects, in which positrons were trapped, change by the elevation of the annealing temperature. (author)

  6. The NMR probe of high-Tc materials and correlated electron systems

    CERN Document Server

    Walstedt, Russell E

    2018-01-01

    This new edition updates readers in three areas of NMR studies, namely, recent developments in high-Tc materials, heavy fermion systems and actinide oxides are presented.  The NMR probe has yielded a vast array of data for solid state materials, corresponding to different compounds, ionic sites, and nuclear species, as well as to a wide variety of experimental conditions. The last two parts of the book are completely new in this edition, while the first part has seen major updates. This edition features the latest developments for high-Tc materials, especially the advances in the area of pseudogap studies are reviewed.  An in depth overview of heavy fermion systems is presented in the second part,  notably Kondo lattices, quantum critical points and unconventional superconductivity are areas of intense research recently and are covered extensively. Finally, valuable information from NMR studies with actinide oxides will be provided. Ongoing analysis and discussion of NMR data have resulted in a wealth o...

  7. The NMR probe of high-T{sub c} materials and correlated electron systems. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstedt, Russell E. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2018-03-01

    This new edition updates readers in three areas of NMR studies, namely, recent developments in high-T{sub c} materials, heavy fermion systems and actinide oxides are presented. The NMR probe has yielded a vast array of data for solid state materials, corresponding to different compounds, ionic sites, and nuclear species, as well as to a wide variety of experimental conditions. The last two parts of the book are completely new in this edition, while the first part has seen major updates. This edition features the latest developments for high-T{sub c} materials, especially the advances in the area of pseudogap studies are reviewed. An in depth overview of heavy fermion systems is presented in the second part, notably Kondo lattices, quantum critical points and unconventional superconductivity are areas of intense research recently and are covered extensively. Finally, valuable information from NMR studies with actinide oxides will be provided. Ongoing analysis and discussion of NMR data have resulted in a wealth of important insights into the physics of these exotic systems. The aims of this monograph are manifold. First, it reviews NMR methodology as it has been applied to the different studies. This is addressed to NMR practitioners and to physics laypersons alike. Next, it presents a review of NMR measurements and the wide variety of phenomena which they represent. The third phase is to recount the theoretical model calculations and other proposals which have been put forward to account for these data.

  8. Probing quantum Hall states with single-electron transistors at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Martin; Yankowitz, Matthew; Forsythe, Carlos; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Dean, Cory

    The sequence of fractional quantum Hall states in graphene is not yet fully understood, largely due to disorder-induced limitations of conventional transport studies. Measurements of magnetotransport in other 2D crystals are further complicated by the difficulties in making ohmic contact to the materials. On the other hand, bulk electronic compressibility can provide clear signatures of the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, does not require ohmic contact, and can be localized to regions of low disorder. The single-electron transistor (SET) is a suitable tool for such experiments due to its small size and high charge sensitivity, which allow electric fields penetrating the 2D electron system to be detected locally and with high fidelity. Here we report studies of exfoliated 2D van der Waals materials fully encapsulated in flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. SETs are fabricated lithographically on top of the encapsulation, yielding a structure which lends itself to experiments at high electric and magnetic fields. We demonstrate the method on monolayer graphene, where we observe fractional quantum Hall states at all filling factors ν = n / 3 up to n = 17 and extract their associated energy gaps for magnetic fields up to 31 tesla.

  9. Reaction (γ,2e) and (e,3e) as probe of electron correlation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Cross sections of the (γ,2e) and (e,3e) reactions contain information about the two vacancy-energy spectrum and electron-pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. The simplest mechanisms are discussed, demonstrating some features which await experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and the relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from the nonrelativistic case. The origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms, and possible means of their detection, are discussed. In addition, the role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feshbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are considered, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules, and clusters. The modification of these reactions due to photon emission is discussed. The future of the domain is outlined

  10. Reactions (γ,2e) and (e,3e) as probes of electronic correlations in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1993-01-01

    Cross sections of the (γ,2e) and (e,3e) reactions carry information on two vacancy energy spectrum and on electron pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. Simplest mechanisms of them are discussed, demonstrating some features which are waiting for experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and even to relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from what it is for the nonrelativistic case. Origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms and possible means of their detection are discussed. Role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feschbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are mentioned, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules and clusters. Modification of the type of these reactions due to rather probable emission of the photon is discussed. Future of the domain is outlined. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of nonlocal hot-electron energy dissipation via shot noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qianchun; Komiyama, Susumu; Yang, Le; An, Zhenghua; Chen, Pingping; Biehs, Svend-Age; Kajihara, Yusuke; Lu, Wei

    2018-03-29

    In modern microelectronic devices, hot electrons accelerate, scatter, and dissipate energy in nanoscale dimensions. Despite recent progress in nanothermometry, direct real-space mapping of hot-electron energy dissipation is challenging as existing techniques are restricted to probing the lattice rather than the electrons. We realize electronic nanothermometry by measuring local current fluctuations, or shot noise, associated with ultrafast hot-electron kinetic processes (~21 terahertz). Exploiting a scanning and contact-free tungsten tip as a local noise probe, we directly visualize hot-electron distributions prior to their thermal equilibration with the host GaAs/AlGaAs crystal lattice. With nanoconstriction devices, we reveal unexpected nonlocal energy dissipation at room temperature, which is reminiscent of ballistic transport of low temperature quantum conductors. Copyright © 2018, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Electron transfer driven decomposition of adenine and selected analogs as probed by experimental and theoretical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, T.; Mendes, M.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Eden, S.; García, G.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a combined experimental and theoretical study of electron-transfer-induced decomposition of adenine (Ad) and a selection of analog molecules in collisions with potassium (K) atoms. Time-of-flight negative ion mass spectra have been obtained in a wide collision energy range (6-68 eV in the centre-of-mass frame), providing a comprehensive investigation of the fragmentation patterns of purine (Pu), adenine (Ad), 9-methyl adenine (9-mAd), 6-dimethyl adenine (6-dimAd), and 2-D adenine (2-DAd). Following our recent communication about selective hydrogen loss from the transient negative ions (TNIs) produced in these collisions [T. Cunha et al., J. Chem. Phys. 148, 021101 (2018)], this work focuses on the production of smaller fragment anions. In the low-energy part of the present range, several dissociation channels that are accessible in free electron attachment experiments are absent from the present mass spectra, notably NH2 loss from adenine and 9-methyl adenine. This can be understood in terms of a relatively long transit time of the K+ cation in the vicinity of the TNI tending to enhance the likelihood of intramolecular electron transfer. In this case, the excess energy can be redistributed through the available degrees of freedom inhibiting fragmentation pathways. Ab initio theoretical calculations were performed for 9-methyl adenine (9-mAd) and adenine (Ad) in the presence of a potassium atom and provided a strong basis for the assignment of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals accessed in the collision process.

  13. The detection of sulphur in contamination spots in electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, I.; Dwornik, E.J.; Rose, H.J.

    1962-01-01

    Sulphur has been identified as one of the elements present in the contamination spot which forms under the electron beam in the microprobe. The presence of the sulphur results in a rapid change in intensity measurements causing a loss of observed intensity for elements other than sulphur. The source of sulphur has been traced at least in part to the Apiezon B diffusion pump oil. A comparative X-ray fluorescence study of the Apiezon B and Octoil diffusion pump oils showed substantial amounts of sulphur in the Apiezon B. The Octoil was relatively free of sulphur.

  14. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundhikanjana, W.

    2010-06-02

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.

  15. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Bilan, Stefan; Zotti, Linda A; Arroyo, Carlos R; Agraït, Nicolás; Cuevas, Juan Carlos

    2012-05-15

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron transport through single-molecule junctions formed by a single octanethiol molecule bonded by the thiol anchoring group to a gold electrode and linked to a carbon tip by the methyl group. We observe the presence of conductance plateaus during the stretching of the molecular bridge, which is the signature of the formation of a molecular junction.

  16. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom

    2009-11-11

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Dissociative electron attachment to CO molecule probed by velocity slice imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2017-11-01

    We have studied dissociative electron attachment to CO molecule using the well-established velocity slice imaging spectrometer. We have conclusively determined the symmetries of the TNI states involved in both the channels producing O‑ ions. In contrast to a recent report, we observed additional forwards lobes in the angular distribution data and we claim there is no need to invoke coherent interference between different states as introduced previously. Recent R-matrix calculations and momentum imaging study by other groups strongly support our claims.

  18. Observations Directly Linking Relativistic Electron Microbursts to Whistler Mode Chorus: Van Allen Probes and FIREBIRD II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breneman, A. W.; Crew, A.; Sample, J.; Klumpar, D.; Johnson, A.; Agapitov, O.; Shumko, M.; Turner, D. L.; Santolík, Ondřej; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Thaller, S. A.; Blake, B.; Spence, H.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 22 (2017), s. 11265-11272 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-07027S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : VLF-CHORUS * RADIATION BELT * ZONE ELECTRONS * SOURCE REGION * AURORAL-ZONE * GEM STORMS * PRECIPITATION * ASSOCIATION * RESOLUTION * EMISSIONS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 4.253, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL075001/epdf

  19. Electron spin resonance probing of point defects in Si/high-k structuresand functional oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Clémer, Katrijn

    2007-01-01

    Today, we want our devices based on semiconductor devices to be ever smaller, faster, more multi-functional, and, if possible, also cheaper. For years now industry has been able to meet these demands bringing e.g., tiny cell phones, MP3-players, photo and video cameras, and laptops on the market. The word 'nano' has even surpassed its scientific meaning (unit prefix) and became the magic word to sell electronic devices and even washing-powder. Up to present, the success of semiconduct...

  20. Probing Nuclear Spin Effects on Electronic Spin Coherence via EPR Measurements of Vanadium(IV) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael J; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Freedman, Danna E

    2017-07-17

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has the potential to transform numerous fields from cryptography, to finance, to the simulation of quantum systems. A promising implementation of QIP employs unpaired electronic spins as qubits, the fundamental units of information. Though molecular electronic spins offer many advantages, including chemical tunability and facile addressability, the development of design principles for the synthesis of complexes that exhibit long qubit superposition lifetimes (also known as coherence times, or T 2 ) remains a challenge. As nuclear spins in the local qubit environment are a primary cause of shortened superposition lifetimes, we recently conducted a study which employed a modular spin-free ligand scaffold to place a spin-laden propyl moiety at a series of fixed distances from an S = 1 / 2 vanadium(IV) ion in a series of vanadyl complexes. We found that, within a radius of 4.0(4)-6.6(6) Å from the metal center, nuclei did not contribute to decoherence. To assess the generality of this important design principle and test its efficacy in a different coordination geometry, we synthesized and investigated three vanadium tris(dithiolene) complexes with the same ligand set employed in our previous study: K 2 [V(C 5 H 6 S 4 ) 3 ] (1), K 2 [V(C 7 H 6 S 6 ) 3 ] (2), and K 2 [V(C 9 H 6 S 8 ) 3 ] (3). We specifically interrogated solutions of these complexes in DMF-d 7 /toluene-d 8 with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy and found that the distance dependence present in the previously synthesized vanadyl complexes holds true in this series. We further examined the coherence properties of the series in a different solvent, MeCN-d 3 /toluene-d 8 , and found that an additional property, the charge density of the complex, also affects decoherence across the series. These results highlight a previously unknown design principle for augmenting T 2 and open new pathways for the

  1. 24th International Symposium on Ballistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-26

    2008s.ppt Experimental Set-up Reverse ballistics experiments Flash radiography used to measure position of nose and tail of rod versus time 3 IBS 2008s.ppt...s Ballistic Testing. [VC]max vs Velocity Thorax -Kevlar Thorax -Twaron Thorax -Zylon Abdomen-Kevlar Abdomen-Twaron Abdomen-Zylon 25% Severe Thoracic...Injury 25% Severe Abdominal Injury -20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 D is pl ac em en tm m Time sec Displacement vs Time Thorax

  2. How to probe transverse magnetic anisotropy of a single-molecule magnet by electronic transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Burzuri, E.; Gaudenzi, R.; Park, K.; Leijnse, M.; Wegewijs, M.; Paaske, J.; Cornia, A.; van der Zant, H.

    We propose an approach for in-situ determination of the transverse magnetic anisotropy (TMA) of an individual molecule by electronic transport measurements, see Phys. Rev. B 91, 035442 (2015). We study a Fe4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) captured in a gateable junction, a unique tool for addressing the spin in different redox states of a molecule. We show that, due to mixing of the spin eigenstates of the SMM, the TMA significantly manifests itself in transport. We predict and experimentally observe the pronounced intensity modulation of the Coulomb peak amplitude with the magnetic field in the linear-response transport regime, from which the TMA parameter E can be estimated. Importantly, the method proposed here does not rely on the small induced tunnelling effects and, hence, works well at temperatures and electron tunnel broadenings by far exceeding the tunnel splittings and even E itself. We deduce that the TMA for a single Fe4 molecule captured in a junction is substantially larger than the bulk value. Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  3. Probing of local electron states by laser terahertz radiation in PbTe(Ga)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorova, S.G.; Chernichkin, V.I. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, L.I. [Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Danilov, S.N. [Faculty of Physics, University of Regensburg, Regensburg D-93040 (Germany); Nicorici, A.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Kishinev MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Khokhlov, D.R., E-mail: khokhlov@mig.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • We report on unusual photoconductivity under terahertz laser pulses in PbTe(Ga). • The kinetics and the sign of the photosignal depend on the photoexcitation level. • This is due to formation of local states in the vicinity of the quasi-Fermi level. • These local electron states may lie only on the background of an allowed energy band. - Abstract: We report on unusual photoconductivity under the action of strong terahertz laser pulses in PbTe(Ga) single crystals at low temperatures. The character and even the sign on the photosignal depends on the level of photoexcitation: the photoconductivity is positive and persistent at high degrees of excitation, whereas it is negative and non-persistent at low levels of excitation. We show that this non-trivial photoelectric behaviour is due to formation of local electron states in the close vicinity of the quasi-Fermi level. These local states may be formed only when the quasi-Fermi level lies on the background of an allowed energy band with a relatively high density of states.

  4. Probing Sea Quarks and Gluons: The Electron-Ion Collider Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Tanja

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century holds great promise for reaching a new era for unlocking the mysteries of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the nucleons inside it governed by the theory of strong interactions (QCD. In particular, much remains to be learned about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons. One of the main goals of existing and nearly completed facilities is to map out the spin flavor structure of the nucleons in the valence region. A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge.

  5. Probing Sea Quarks and Gluons: The Electron-Ion Collider Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    The 21st century holds great promise for reaching a new era for unlocking the mysteries of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the nucleons inside it governed by the theory of strong interactions (QCD). In particular, much remains to be learned about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons. One of the main goals of existing and nearly completed facilities is to map out the spin flavor structure of the nucleons in the valence region. A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would be the world's first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world's first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge.

  6. Probing the structural and electronic properties of small vanadium monoxide clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai-Qian; Li, Hui-Fang; Kuang, Xiao-Yu

    2012-04-21

    The structural evolution and bonding of a series of early transition-metal oxide clusters, V(n)O(q) (n = 3-9, q = 0,-1), have been investigated with the aid of previous photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and theoretical calculations. For each vanadium monoxide cluster, many low-lying isomers are generated using the Saunders "Kick" global minimum stochastic search method. Theoretical electron detachment energies (both vertical and adiabatic) were compared with the experimental measurements to verify the ground states of the vanadium monoxide clusters obtained from the DFT calculations. The results demonstrate that the combination of photoelectron spectroscopy experiments and DFT calculation is not only powerful for obtaining the electronic and atomic structures of size-selected clusters, but also valuable in resolving structurally and energetically close isomers. The second difference energies and adsorption energies as a function of the cluster size exhibit a pronounced even-odd alternation phenomenon. The adsorption energies of one O atom on the anionic (6.64 → 8.16 eV) and neutral (6.41 → 8.13 eV) host vanadium clusters are shown to be surprisingly high, suggesting strong capabilities to activate O by structural defects in vanadium oxides. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  7. Oxygen impact on the electronic and vibrational properties of black phosphorus probed by synchrotron infrared nanospectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasseschi, D.; Bahamon, D. A.; Maia, F. C. B.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Freitas, R. O.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) is a layered crystalline structure presenting a thickness-tunable direct bandgap and a high charge carrier mobility, with, therefore, enormous interest to photonics, optoelectronics and electronics. However, BP’s high susceptibility to oxidation when exposed to ambient conditions is a critical challenge for its implementation into functional systems. Here, we investigate the degradation of BP flakes exposed to various environmental conditions by synchrotron infrared nanospectroscopy (SINS). As a near-field based technique, SINS provides sub-diffractional mid-infrared images and spectra from nano-sized domains. Supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, our SINS spectra reveal the formation of nanoscale PO x domains, with x between 0.5 and 1, and a 100 meV red shift in the bandgap of flakes exposed to air for a few minutes. On the other hand, exposure to air for 24 h led to the preferential formation of H3PO4, with complete removal of the electronic transitions from the mid-infrared spectral window, while a long (1 month) exposure to low O2 levels mainly led to the formation of P4O8 and P4O9 species. The SINS analysis allows correlating the morphology of oxidized samples to the oxide type, thus, contributing to a comprehensive characterization of the BP degradation process.

  8. Probing Homogeneous Line Broadening in CdSe Nanocrystals Using Multidimensional Electronic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellen, Tobias A; Lem, Jet; Turner, Daniel B

    2017-05-10

    The finite spectral line width of an ensemble of CdSe nanocrystals arises from size and shape inhomogeneity and the single-nanocrystal spectrum itself. This line width directly limits the performance of nanocrystal-based devices, yet most optical measurements cannot resolve the underlying contributions. We use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) to measure the line width of the band-edge exciton of CdSe nanocrystals as a function of radii and surface chemistry. We find that the homogeneous width decreases for increasing nanocrystal radius and that surface chemistry plays a critical role in controlling this line width. To explore the hypothesis that unpassivated trap states serve to broaden the homogeneous line width and to explain its size-dependence, we use 3D ES to identify the spectral signatures of exciton-phonon coupling to optical and acoustic phonons. We find enhanced coupling to optical phonon modes for nanocrystals that lack electron-passivating ligands, suggesting that localized surface charges enhance exciton-phonon coupling via the Fröhlich interaction. Lastly, the data reveal that spectral diffusion contributes negligibly to the homogeneous line width on subnanosecond time scales.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Ballistic Impact of Layered Aluminum Nitride Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ARL-TR-7416 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Numerical Simulation of Ballistic Impact of Layered Aluminum Nitride Ceramic...of Ballistic Impact of Layered Aluminum Nitride Ceramic by JD Clayton Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...Numerical Simulation of Ballistic Impact of Layered Aluminum Nitride Ceramic 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  10. VLF waves from ground-based transmitters observed by the Van Allen Probes: Statistical model and effects on plasmaspheric electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli; Mourenas, Didier; Li, Wen; Artemyev, Anton; Thorne, Richard M.

    2017-07-01

    Whistler mode very low frequency (VLF) waves from powerful ground-based transmitters can resonantly scatter energetic plasmaspheric electrons and precipitate them into the atmosphere. A comprehensive 4 year statistics of Van Allen Probes measurements is carried out to assess their consequences on the dynamics of the inner radiation belt and slot region. Statistical models of the measured wave electric field power and of the inferred full wave magnetic amplitude are provided as a function of L, magnetic local time, season, and Kp over L = 1-3, revealing the localization of VLF wave intensity and its variation with geomagnetic activity over 2012-2016. Since this VLF wave model can be directly used together with existing hiss and lightning-generated wave models in radiation belt simulation codes, we perform numerical calculations of the corresponding quasi-linear pitch angle diffusion rates, allowing us to demonstrate the crucial role played by VLF waves from transmitters in energetic electron loss at L < 2.5.

  11. Electron reflectometry as a probe of the Martian crust and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Robert James

    This thesis is devoted to the expansion of the technique of electron reflectometry from its prior purpose in mapping lunar crustal magnetic fields to the same purpose at Mars, where the presence of a substantial atmosphere considerably complicates matters. Previous work, using magnetometer data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, established the existence of surprisingly strong crustal remanent magnetic fields and placed important constraints both upon the properties of the crustal magnetic sources responsible for the fields and upon the timing and orientation of Mars's ancient core dynamo. To build upon this work, I have analyzed pitch angle distributions of magnetically reflecting solar wind electrons measured by the MGS Magnetometer/ Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) to create a map of Martian crustal magnetic fields at ~195 km altitude, giving greater spatial resolution and sensitivity than was previously possible using magnetometer data alone. Low magnetic fields measured above most volcanoes indicate thermal demagnetization of the crust by magmatism and underplating after the cessation of the core dynamo, while relatively high fields measured above the Hadriaca Patera volcano imply that Martian volcanism predates this cessation and is significantly older than any exposed volcanic surface. The geographic and size distribution of demagnetization signatures of impact craters and the suggested presence of magnetic edge effects, indicates that (1) crustal magnetization occurs at typically shallower depths in the northern Martian lowlands than in the southern highlands and (2) the typical crustal magnetic coherence scale, is >100 km. A comparison of crater retention ages with magnetic signatures of some of the oldest impact basins on Mars confirms that Mars's core dynamo ceased operating early in the planet's history, >4 billion years ago. Significant differences in magnetization between geologically contemporary basins suggests that the dynamo's final

  12. Probing molecular adsorbates with core-level spectroscopies: Electronic structure and bonding models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlisch, Alexander

    Resonantly excited X-ray emission spectroscopy has been applied to study the valence electronic structure of molecular adsorbates in an atom specific and orbital symmetry selective manner. In combination with ab initio cluster calculations, electronic structure and bonding models have been derived. Existing models of surface chemical bonding have been reviewed and partially revised. Most notably, the bonding mechanism of carbon monoxide (CO) on transition and noble metals has been revised and is found to be the result of a strong covalent interaction between the CO orbitals and the metal bands within each orbital symmetry. A characteristic allylic configuration is found in the π system and strong polarization within the σ system. The equilibrium properties of adsorbed CO are the direct result of a balance between the repulsive σ-interaction and the attractive π-interaction both in terms of the total energy and the local bond properties. The bonding of ammonia (NH3) on the Cu(110) surface is found to be dominated by a large covalent interaction, which contrasts the previous model of a strong electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, adsorbate-adsorbate interaction leads to a tilted adsorption geometry. Ethylene (C2H4) on Cu(110) is adsorbed in the di-σ configuration, according to the generally accepted Dewar Chatt Duncanson model for hydrocarbon adsorption. The application and interpretation of resonantly excited X-ray emission on these systems also required a thorough discussion of the spectroscopic process. Another topic was the vibrational fine structure in the X-ray photoemission core-level main lines of adsorbed molecules. The observation of the vibrational fine structure in molecular adsorbates is remarkable, as it was previously thought impossible to observe due to solid state broadening contributions. A detailed analysis of the vibrational fine structure and the line profile makes it possible to study the electronic and geometric properties of the core

  13. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump–probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoby, Cheyne M., E-mail: scoby@physics.ucla.edu [UCLA Department of Physics, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Li, R.K.; Musumeci, P. [UCLA Department of Physics, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ∼1ps precision.

  14. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  15. Decontamination in the Electron Probe Microanalysis with a Peltier-Cooled Cold Finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Ben; Kearns, Stuart; Clapham, Charles; Hawley, Donovan

    2016-10-01

    A prototype Peltier thermoelectric cooling unit has been constructed to cool a cold finger on an electron microprobe. The Peltier unit was tested at 15 and 96 W, achieving cold finger temperatures of -10 and -27°C, respectively. The Peltier unit did not adversely affect the analytical stability of the instrument. Heat conduction between the Peltier unit mounted outside the vacuum and the cold finger was found to be very efficient. Under Peltier cooling, the vacuum improvement associated with water vapor deposition was not achieved; this has the advantage of avoiding severe degradation of the vacuum observed when warming up a cold finger from liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Carbon contamination rates were reduced as cooling commenced; by -27°C contamination rates were found to be comparable with LN2-cooled devices. Peltier cooling, therefore, provides a viable alternative to LN2-cooled cold fingers, with few of their associated disadvantages.

  16. $^{80}$Br $^{80}$Br-a new electron-gamma PAC probe

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, J G; Araújo, J P; Marques, J G; Soares, J C; Melo, A A

    2001-01-01

    Conversion electron-gamma PAC measurements of the 49-37 keV cascade in /sup 80/Br through the intermediate 2/sup -/ state with T/sub 1/2 /=7.4 ns were performed with a system of two magnetic lens spectrometers and two BaF/sub 2/ scintillation detectors. The parent /sup 80m/Br activity with a halflife of 4.4 hrs was implanted into Ni, Zn and graphite at the ISOLDE separator at CERN. The observed interaction frequency in the nickel matrix is in good agreement with the known value of the hyperfine field for Br in Ni and the magnetic moment of the 2/sup -/ state. From the measured quadrupole interaction in Zn and graphite the electric field gradients at Br were obtained. (7 refs).

  17. $^{80m}$Br/$^{80}$Br a new electron-$\\gamma$ - PAC Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, J G; Araújo, J P; Marques, J G; Soares, J C; Melo, A A

    2001-01-01

    Conversion electron-$\\gamma$ PAC measurements of the 49 keV - 37 keV cascade in $^{80}$Br through the intermediate 2$^{-}$ state with T$_{1/2}$=7.4 ns were performed with a system of two magnetic lens spectrometers and two BaF$_{2}$ scintillation detectors. The parent $^{80m}$Br activity with half-life of 4.4 hrs was implanted into Ni, Zn and graphite at the ISOLDE separator at CERN. The observed interaction frequency in the nickel matrix is in good agreement with the known value of the hyperfine field for Br in Ni and the magnetic moment of the 2$^{-}$ state. From the measured quadrupole interaction in Zn and graphite the electric field gradients at Br were obtained.

  18. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylenedithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS. The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule–electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  19. Linear electron accelerator based pulse radiolysis facility probing radiation - matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2011-01-01

    Since the first report of the chemical effects of radiation by Pierre and Marie Curie, researchers have needed tools to deliver ionizing radiation for their scientific studies in increasingly precise ways. In the mid-20th century, particle (primarily electrons) accelerators took over as the primary tools of radiation chemists. However, the development of pulse radiolysis techniques in the 1960s vastly increased the ability of radiation chemists. We at Radiation and Photochemistry Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre engaged in investigations of different thrust areas of radiation-matter interaction. However, the past twenty five years has seen an explosion of interest because of their pivotal role in physics, chemistry and biology. In the present talk, I would like to share some of the excitements from the first pulse radiolysis facility in the country based on 7 MeV electron LINAC which is the work-horse for Radiation Chemistry Research. After going through the essential hardware and software, we will have glimpses of our R and D programmes which have evolved around this facility. Future plans to make it more versatile facility will also be discussed. In the new frontier, we are in advanced stage of developing a picosecond pulse radiolysis facility employing photocathode RF gun. This will be used apart from radiation chemistry research for radiation damage studies of structural materials; polymers; biological material; charge-carrier dynamics of semiconductors and quantum dots. Further I will touch upon the new ultrafast sources with femtosecond resolution currently being developed internationally which will widen the canvas of radiation chemical research. (author)

  20. Th-U-Pb{sub T} dating by electron probe microanalysis, Part I. Monazite: analytical procedures and data treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlach, Silvio Roberto Farias [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Mineralogia e Geotectonica], e-mail: srfvlach@usp.br

    2010-03-15

    Dating methodology by the electron probe microanalyser (EPMA) of (Th, U)-bearing minerals, highlighting monazite, acquired greater than ever importance in literature, particularly due to its superior spatial resolution, as well as versatility, which allow correlating petrological processes at times registered only in micro-scales in minerals and rocks with absolute ages. Although the accuracy is inferior to the one achieved with conventional isotopic methods in up to an order of magnitude, EPMA is the instrument that allows the best spatial resolution, reaching a few {mu}m{sup 3} in some conditions. Quantification of minor and trace elements with suitable precision and accuracy involves the own instrumental and analytical set-ups and data treatment strategies, significantly more rigorous when compared with those applied in conventional analyses. Th-U-Pb{sub T} dating is an example of these cases. Each EPMA is a unique machine as for its instrumental characteristics and respective automation system. In such a way, analytical procedures ought to be adjusted for laboratory specific cities. The analytical strategies and data treatment adopted in the Electronic Microprobe Laboratory from Instituto de Geociencias of Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil, with a JEOL JXA8600S EPMA, and a ThermoNoran-Voyager 4.3 automation system, are presented and compared with the ones used in other laboratories. The influence of instrumental factors and spectral overlaps on Th, U, and Pb quantification is discussed. Applied procedures to interference correction, error propagation, data treatment, and final chemical age presentation as well as to sampling and analyses are emphasized. Some typical applications are discussed, drawing attention to the most relevant aspects of electron microprobe dating. (author)

  1. Probing the spin-orbit Mott state in Sr3Ir2O7 by electron doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Thomas C.

    Iridium-based members of the Ruddlesden-Popper family of oxide compounds are characterized by a unique combination of energetically comparable effects: crystal-field splitting, spin-orbit coupling, and electron-electron interactions are all present, and the combine to produce a Jeff = 1/2 ground state. In the bilayer member of this series, Sr3Ir2O7, this state manifests as electrically insulating, with unpaired Ir4+ spins aligned along the long axis of the unit cell to produce a G-type antiferromagnet with an ordered moment of 0.36 uB. In this work, this Mott state is destabilized by electron doping via La3+ substitution on the Sr-site to produce (Sr1-x Lax)3Ir2O7. The introduction of carriers initially causes nano-scale phase-separated regions to develop before driving a global insulator-to-metal transition at x=0.04. Coinciding with this transition is the disappearance of evidence of magnetic order in the system in either bulk magnetization or magnetic scattering experiments. The doping also enhances a structural order parameter observed in the parent compound at forbidden reciprocal lattice vectors. A more complete structural solution is proposed to account for this previously unresolved distortion, and also offers an explanation as to the anomalous net ferromagnetism seen prior in bulk measurements. Finally, spin dynamics are probed via a resonant x-ray technique to reveal evidence of spin-dimer-like behavior dominated by inter-plane interactions. This result supports a bond-operator treatment of the interaction Hamiltonian, and also explains the doping dependence of high temperature magnetic susceptibility.

  2. Area Ballistic Missile Defense Coordinator and the Airborne Laser: Creating Ballistic Missile Defense Unity of Effort

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oms, Pedro

    2003-01-01

    Theater Ballistic Missile Defense (TBMD) is a challenging mission area for any Theater Combatant or Joint Task Force Commander, and one he must focus on to mitigate the strategic effects this "terror" weapon can impart...

  3. Probing polyproline structure and dynamics by photoinduced electron transfer provides evidence for deviations from a regular polyproline type II helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Barsch, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2007-10-30

    Polyprolines are well known for adopting a regular polyproline type II helix in aqueous solution, rendering them a popular standard as molecular ruler in structural molecular biology. However, single-molecule spectroscopy studies based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have revealed deviations of experimentally observed end-to-end distances of polyprolines from theoretical predictions, and it was proposed that the discrepancy resulted from dynamic flexibility of the polyproline helix. Here, we probe end-to-end distances and conformational dynamics of poly-l-prolines with 1-10 residues using fluorescence quenching by photoinduced-electron transfer (PET). A single fluorophore and a tryptophan residue, introduced at the termini of polyproline peptides, serve as sensitive probes for distance changes on the subnanometer length scale. Using a combination of ensemble fluorescence and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrate that polyproline samples exhibit static structural heterogeneity with subpopulations of distinct end-to-end distances that do not interconvert on time scales from nano- to milliseconds. By observing prolyl isomerization through changes in PET quenching interactions, we provide experimental evidence that the observed heterogeneity can be explained by interspersed cis isomers. Computer simulations elucidate the influence of trans/cis isomerization on polyproline structures in terms of end-to-end distance and provide a structural justification for the experimentally observed effects. Our results demonstrate that structural heterogeneity inherent in polyprolines, which to date are commonly applied as a molecular ruler, disqualifies them as appropriate tool for an accurate determination of absolute distances at a molecular scale.

  4. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  5. PROBING THE STANDARD MODEL AND NUCLEON STRUCTURE VIA PARITY VIOLATING ELECTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humensky, T

    2003-10-28

    Parity-violating electron scattering has developed over the last 25 years into a tool to study both the structure of electroweak interactions and the structure of nucleons. Work on two parity-violation experiments is reported in this thesis. They are the Hall A Proton Parity EXperiment (HAPPEX), which ran at Jefferson Laboratory in 1998-1999, and SLAC E-158, which had its first physics running in 2002. HAPPEX measured the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at a momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 0.477 GeV{sup 2} and a scattering angle of 12{sup o}. This asymmetry is sensitive to the presence of strange sea quarks in the proton. In particular, it is sensitive to the proton's strange elastic form factors. An asymmetry of A{sub LR}{sup ep} = -15.05 {+-} 0.98 {+-} 0.56 ppm was measured, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. Combining this asymmetry measurement with existing measurements of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and neutron allowed HAPPEX to set new constraints on the strange elastic form factors of the proton G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.025 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.014, where G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} are the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, respectively. The first error is the quadrature sum of the experimental errors and the second error is due to uncertainty in the electromagnetic form factors. This result is consistent with the absence of a contribution from strange quarks. This thesis reports an analysis of the 1999 data set, with a particular focus on the determination of the raw asymmetry and the corrections to the raw asymmetry to account for helicity-correlated asymmetries in properties of the electron beam.

  6. Shot noise in a harmonically driven ballistic graphene transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniyenko, Y.; Shevtsov, O.; Löfwander, T.

    2017-04-01

    We study time-dependent electron transport and quantum noise in a ballistic graphene field effect transistor driven by an ac gate potential. The nonlinear response to the ac signal is computed through Floquet theory for scattering states and Landauer-Büttiker theory for charge current and its fluctuations. Photon-assisted excitation of a quasibound state in the top-gate barrier leads to resonances in transmission that strongly influence the noise properties. For strong doping of graphene under source and drain contacts, when electrons are transmitted through the channel via evanescent waves, the resonance leads to a substantial suppression of noise. The Fano factor is then reduced well below the pseudodiffusive value, F tunneling (total suppression of back-reflection) persists for perpendicular incidence also when the barrier is driven harmonically. Although the transmission is inelastic and distributed among sideband energies, a sum rule leads to total suppression of shot noise.

  7. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  8. Probing the molecular and electronic structure of the lichen metabolite usnic acid: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galasso, V., E-mail: galasso@univ.trieste.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2010-08-23

    Graphical abstract: DFT calculations of structural preferences, acidic properties, carbonyl vibrations, {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts, and absorption spectrum account for the unique structural backbone, chemical behaviour, and spectroscopic properties of usnic acid, the cortical pigment and potent reactive of lichens. - Abstract: The molecular structure of usnic acid was investigated by the density functional theory (DFT). Two keto-enol tautomers are nearly isoenergetic and more stable than other tautomers. Noteworthy is the energy difference among the three intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds. The DFT/PCM calculated dissociation constants account for the acidic sequence of the three OH-groups. The electronic structure was also studied by calculating IR/Raman, NMR, and absorption features. A reliable assignment of the 'fingerprint' carbonyl stretching modes was supported by calculations on related molecules. The calculated NMR chemical shifts fit expectation in terms of a fast interconversion between the two most preferred tautomers. A variety of {pi} {yields} {pi}* and n {yields} {pi}* excitations, localized on a single ring or involving a charge-transfer between the two lateral rings of the molecule, gives rise to the broad UV-absorption bands. This property accounts for the efficient protection against damaging solar radiation provided by usnic acid for lichens.

  9. Impact of vacancies on electronic properties of black phosphorus probed by STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffle, J. V.; Flynn, C.; St. Laurent, B.; Ayotte, C. A.; Caputo, C. A.; Hollen, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) is receiving significant attention because of its direct 0.4-1.5 eV layer-dependent bandgap and high mobility. Because BP devices rely on exfoliation from bulk crystals, there is a need to understand the native impurities and defects in the source material. In particular, samples are typically p-doped, but the source of the doping is not well understood. Here, we use scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to compare the atomic defects of BP samples from two commercial sources. Even though the sources produced crystals with an order of magnitude difference in impurity atoms, we observed a similar defect density and level of p-doping. We attribute these defects to phosphorus vacancies and provide evidence that they are the source of p-doping. We also compare these native defects to those induced by air exposure and show that they are distinct and likely more important for the control of electronic structure. These results indicate that impurities in BP play a minor role compared to vacancies, which are prevalent in commercially available materials, and call for better control of vacancy defects.

  10. Probing Energy and Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Fluorescence Quenching of Biomass Carbon Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zicheng; Kang, Mijeong; Payne, Gregory F; Wang, Xiaohui; Sun, Runcang

    2016-07-13

    The recent discovery of biomass-derived carbon quantum dots (CQDs) offers the potential to extend the sensing and imaging capabilities of quantum dots (QDs) to applications that require biocompatibility and environmental friendliness. Many studies have confirmed the exciting optical properties of CQDs and suggested a range of applications, but realizing the potential of CQDs will require a deeper fundamental understanding of their photophysical behavior. Here, biomass-derived CQDs were synthesized by hydrothermal processing methods from the aminopolysaccharide chitosan, and their fluorescence quenching behaviors were investigated. A family of nitroaromatics with different ring substituents was used to generate systematically varying CQD-quenching behaviors. Experimental evidence including a correlation between quenching constant and spectral overlap, fluorescence lifetime decay, and donor-acceptor distance all demonstrate that the primary mechanism for QCD-quenching is Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and not electron transfer. Spectroelectrochemical studies with redox-dependent quenching molecules and studies with complex dye molecules further support this conclusion. We envision this fundamental understanding of CQDs will facilitate the application of these emerging nanomaterials for sensing and imaging.

  11. Multimodal Probes: Superresolution and Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging of Mitochondria, and Oxygen Mapping of Cells, Using Small-Molecule Ir(III) Luminescent Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewring, Jonathan R; Cankut, Ahmet J; McKenzie, Luke K; Crowston, Bethany J; Botchway, Stanley W; Weinstein, Julia A; Edwards, Elizabeth; Ward, Michael D

    2017-12-18

    We describe an Ir(III)-based small-molecule, multimodal probe for use in both light and electron microscopy. The direct correlation of data between light- and electron-microscopy-based imaging to investigate cellular processes at the ultrastructure level is a current challenge, requiring both dyes that must be brightly emissive for luminescence imaging and scatter electrons to give contrast for electron microscopy, at a single working concentration suitable for both methods. Here we describe the use of Ir(III) complexes as probes that provide excellent image contrast and quality for both luminescence and electron microscopy imaging, at the same working concentration. Significant contrast enhancement of cellular mitochondria was observed in transmission electron microscopy imaging, with and without the use of typical contrast agents. The specificity for cellular mitochondria was also confirmed with MitoTracker using confocal and 3D-structured illumination microscopy. These phosphorescent dyes are part of a very exclusive group of transition-metal complexes that enable imaging beyond the diffraction limit. Triplet excited-state phosphorescence was also utilized to probe the O 2 concentration at the mitochondria in vitro, using lifetime mapping techniques.

  12. Capability of satellite-aided ballistic capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z.-F.; Topputo, F.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we study a special instance of ballistic capture dynamics: the case in which the capture orbit about a planet experiences a close passage to one or more of its natural satellites. The capability of the satellites in improving ballistic capture is assessed. The dynamical framework considers at least the gravitational attractions of the Sun, the planet, and its satellites, all acting on a massless particle. The effect of the satellites is introduced explicitly by modifying a previously developed method, which relies on three-dimensional stable sets and n-body dynamics with precise ephemeris. Once a stability criterium is defined, initial conditions defined over a computational grid are integrated forward and backward. This allows us to classify orbits into different sets. Ballistic capture orbits with prescribed features are generated by manipulating these sets. Two indices, namely the hyperbolic velocity and the stability index, are used to assess the performance of pre- and post-capture portions, respectively. A Pareto frontier is used to extract orbits of practical interest. Case studies are performed in the context of Earth and Jupiter environments. Comparing to the situation with no moons, the satellite-aided ballistic capture can evidently increase the pre-capture energy and post-capture stability, so making it possible to have permanent capture of a particle at zero-cost. This is a desirable feature in mission design.

  13. The Internal Ballistics of an Air Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The internal ballistics of a firearm or artillery piece considers the pellet, bullet, or shell motion while it is still inside the barrel. In general, deriving the muzzle speed of a gunpowder firearm from first principles is difficult because powder combustion is fast and it very rapidly raises the temperature of gas (generated by gunpowder…

  14. Optimization theory for ballistic energy conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo; Versluis, Michel; Van Den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    The growing demand of renewable energy stimulates the exploration of new materials and methods for clean energy. We recently demonstrated a high efficiency and power density energy conversion mechanism by using jetted charged microdroplets, termed as ballistic energy conversion. Hereby, we model and

  15. Cross Comparison of Electron Density and Electron Temperature Observations from the DICE CubeSat Langmuir Probes and the Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C.; Erickson, P. J.; Crowley, G.; Pilinski, M.; Barjatya, A.; Fish, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment (DICE) consists of two identical 1.5U CubeSats deployed simultaneously from a single P-POD (Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deployer) into the same orbit. Several observational campaigns were planned between the DICE CubeSats and the mid-latitude Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) in order to calibrate the DICE measurements of electron density and electron temperature. In this presentation, we compare in-situ observations from the Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment (DICE) and from the Millstone Hill ISR. Both measurements are cross-calibrated against an assimilative model of the global ionospheric electron density. The electron density and electron temperature were obtained for three Millstone Hill DICE overflights (2013-03-12, 2013-03-15, 2013-03-17). We compare the data during quiet and geomagnetically disturbed conditions and find evidence of an storm enhanced density (SED) plume in the topside ionosphere on 2013-03-17 at 19? UTC. During this disturbed interval, American longitude sector high density plasma was convected near 15 SLT towards the noontime cusp. DICE was selected for flight under the NSF "CubeSat-based Science Mission for Space Weather and Atmospheric Research" program. The DICE twin satellites were launched on a Delta II rocket on October 28, 2011. The satellites are flying in a "leader-follower" formation in an elliptical orbit which ranges from 820 to 400 km in altitude. Each satellite carries a fixed-bias DC Langmuir Probe (DCP) to measure in-situ ionospheric plasma densities and a science grade magnetometer to measure DC and AC geomagnetic fields. The purpose of these measurements was to permit accurate identification of storm-time features such as the SED bulge and plume. The mission team combines expertise from ASTRA, Utah State University/Space Dynamics Laboratory (USU/SDL), and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. In this paper we present a comparison of data from DICE and Millstone Hill

  16. Comparing electronic probes for volumetric water content of low-density feathermoss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, P.P.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kane, D.L.; Harden, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - Feathermoss is ubiquitous in the boreal forest and across various land-cover types of the arctic and subarctic. A variety of affordable commercial sensors for soil moisture content measurement have recently become available and are in use in such regions, often in conjunction with fire-susceptibility or ecological studies. Few come supplied with calibrations suitable or suggested for soils high in organics. Aims to test seven of these sensors for use in feathermoss, seeking calibrations between sensor output and volumetric water content. Design/methodology/approach - Measurements from seven sensors installed in live, dead and burned feathermoss samples, drying in a controlled manner, were compared to moisture content measurements. Empirical calibrations of sensor output to water content were determined. Findings - Almost all of the sensors tested were suitable for measuring the moss sample water content, and a unique calibration for each sensor for this material is presented. Differences in sensor design lead to changes in sensitivity as a function of volumetric water content, affecting the spatial averaging over the soil measurement volume. Research limitations/implications - The wide range of electromagnetic sensors available include frequency and time domain designs with variations in wave guide and sensor geometry, the location of sensor electronics and operating frequency. Practical implications - This study provides information for extending the use of electromagnetic sensors to feathermoss. Originality/value - A comparison of volumetric water content sensor mechanics and design is of general interest to researchers measuring soil water content. In particular, researchers working in wetlands, boreal forests and tundra regions will be able to apply these results. ?? Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  17. A Non-perturbing Probe of Coiled Coil Formation Based on Electron Transfer Mediated Fluorescence Quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew D; Peran, Ivan; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2016-07-05

    Coiled coils are abundant in nature, occurring in ∼3% of proteins across sequenced genomes, and are found in proteins ranging from transcription factors to structural proteins. The motif continues to be an important model system for understanding protein-protein interactions and is finding increased use in bioinspired materials and synthetic biology. Knowledge of the thermodynamics of self-assembly, particularly the dissociation constant KD, is essential for the application of designed coiled coils and for understanding the in vivo specificity of natural coiled coils. Standard methods for measuring KD typically rely on concentration dependent circular dichroism (CD). Fluorescence methods are an attractive alternative; however Trp is rarely found in an interior position of a coiled coil, and appending unnatural fluorophores can perturb the system. We demonstrate a simple, non-perturbing method to monitor coiled coil formation using p-cyanophenylalanine (FCN) and selenomethionine (MSe), the Se analogue of Met. FCN fluorescence can be selectively excited and is effectively quenched by electron transfer with MSe. Both FCN and MSe represent minimally perturbing substitutions in coiled coils. MSe quenching of FCN fluorescence is shown to offer a non-perturbing method for following coiled coil formation and for accurately determining dissociation constants. The method is validated using a designed heterodimeric coiled coil. The KD deduced by fluorescence monitored titration is in excellent agreement with the value deduced from concentration dependent CD measurements to within the uncertainty of the measurement. However, the fluorescence approach requires less protein, is less time-consuming, can be applied to lower concentrations and could be applied to high throughput screens.

  18. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaughn, Anthony E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  19. Local probe investigations of the electronic phase diagrams of iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materne, Philipp

    2015-09-24

    In this work, the electronic phase diagrams of Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Fe{sub 1+y}Te were investigated using muon spin relaxation and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Single crystals of Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} with x = 0.00, 0.35, 0.50, and 0.67 were examined. The undoped 122 parent compound CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is a semi metal and shows antiferromagnetic commensurate spin density wave order below 167 K. By hole doping via Na substitution, the magnetic order is suppressed and superconductivity emerges including a Na-substitution level region, where both phases coexist. Upon Na substitution, a tilting of the magnetic moments out of the ab-plane is found. The interaction of the magnetic and superconducting order parameter in this coexistence region was studied and a nanoscopic coexistence of both order parameters is found. This is proven by a reduction of the magnetic order parameter of 7 % in x = 0.50 below the superconducting transition temperature. This reduction was analysed using Landau theory and a systematic correlation between the reduction of the magnetic order parameter and the ratio of the transition temperatures, T{sub c}/T{sub N}, for the 122 family of the iron pnictides is presented. The magnetic phase transition is accompanied by a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition. The lattice dynamics at temperatures above and below this magneto-structural phase transition were studied and no change in the lattice dynamics were found. However, the lattice for finite x is softer than for the undoped compound. For x = 0.67, diluted magnetic order is found. Therefore, the magnetism in Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is persistent even at optimal doping. The superconducting state is investigated by measuring the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth, where two superconducting gaps with a weighting of nearly 50:50 are obtained. A temperature independent anisotropy of the magnetic penetration depth γ{sub

  20. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Yongpeng; Li Changming; Liang Feng; Chen Jianmin; Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin; Luong, John H.T.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 ) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl 2 ) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  1. Anomalous phosphine sensitivity coefficients as probes for a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Špirko, V.

    2018-02-01

    A robust variational approach is used to investigate the sensitivity of the rotation-vibration spectrum of phosphine (PH3) to a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ. Whilst the majority of computed sensitivity coefficients, T, involving the low-lying vibrational states acquire the expected values of T ≈ -1 and T ≈ -1/2 for rotational and ro-vibrational transitions, respectively, anomalous sensitivities are uncovered for the A1 - A2 splittings in the ν2/ν4, ν1/ν3 and 2ν _4^{ℓ=0}/2ν _4^{ℓ=2} manifolds of PH3. A pronounced Coriolis interaction between these states in conjunction with accidentally degenerate A1 and A2 energy levels produces a series of enhanced sensitivity coefficients. Phosphine is expected to occur in a number of different astrophysical environments and has potential for investigating a drifting constant. Furthermore, the displayed behaviour hints at a wider trend in molecules of C_{3v}(M) symmetry, thus demonstrating that the splittings induced by higher-order ro-vibrational interactions are well suited for probing μ in other symmetric top molecules in space, since these low-frequency transitions can be straightforwardly detected by radio telescopes.

  2. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  3. Dopant Distribution in Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO:Al Films Visualized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yizhi; Giddings, A Devin; Verheijen, Marcel A; Macco, Bart; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J; Roozeboom, Fred; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2018-02-27

    The maximum conductivity achievable in Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is limited by the low doping efficiency of Al. To better understand the limiting factors for the doping efficiency, the three-dimensional distribution of Al atoms in the ZnO host material matrix has been examined on the atomic scale using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Although the Al distribution in ZnO films prepared by so-called "ALD supercycles" is often presented as atomically flat δ-doped layers, in reality a broadening of the Al-dopant layers is observed with a full-width-half-maximum of ∼2 nm. In addition, an enrichment of the Al at grain boundaries is observed. The low doping efficiency for local Al densities > ∼1 nm -3 can be ascribed to the Al solubility limit in ZnO and to the suppression of the ionization of Al dopants from adjacent Al donors.

  4. Dopant Distribution in Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO:Al Films Visualized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The maximum conductivity achievable in Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is limited by the low doping efficiency of Al. To better understand the limiting factors for the doping efficiency, the three-dimensional distribution of Al atoms in the ZnO host material matrix has been examined on the atomic scale using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Although the Al distribution in ZnO films prepared by so-called “ALD supercycles” is often presented as atomically flat δ-doped layers, in reality a broadening of the Al-dopant layers is observed with a full-width–half-maximum of ∼2 nm. In addition, an enrichment of the Al at grain boundaries is observed. The low doping efficiency for local Al densities > ∼1 nm–3 can be ascribed to the Al solubility limit in ZnO and to the suppression of the ionization of Al dopants from adjacent Al donors.

  5. Optical beam transport to a remote location for low jitter pump-probe experiments with a free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cinquegrana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a scheme that allows a strong reduction of the timing jitter between the pulses of a free electron laser (FEL and external laser pulses delivered simultaneously at the FEL experimental stations for pump-probe–type experiments. The technique, applicable to all seeding-based FEL schemes, relies on the free-space optical transport of a portion of the seed laser pulse from its optical table to the experimental stations. The results presented here demonstrate that a carefully designed laser beam transport, incorporating also a transverse beam position stabilization, allows one to keep the timing fluctuations, added by as much as 150 m of free space propagation and a number of beam folding mirrors, to less than 4 femtoseconds rms. By its nature our scheme removes the major common timing jitter sources, so the overall jitter in pump-probe measurements done in this way will be below 10 fs (with a margin to be lowered to below 5 fs, much better than the best results reported previously in the literature amounting to 33 fs rms.

  6. Characterization of Precipitation in Al-Li Alloy AA2195 by means of Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna

    2015-05-19

    The microstructure of the commercial alloy AA2195 was investigated on the nanoscale after conducting T8 tempering. This particular thermomechanical treatment of the specimen resulted in the formation of platelet-shaped T 1 Al 2 CuLi / θ ′ Al 2 Cu precipitates within the Al matrix. The electrochemically prepared samples were analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for chemical mapping. The θ ′ platelets, which are less than 2 nm thick, have the stoichiometric composition consistent with the expected Al 2 Cu equilibrium composition. Additionally, the Li distribution inside the θ ′ platelets was found to equal the same value as in the matrix. The equally thin T 1 platelet deviates from the formula (Al 2 CuLi) in its stoichiometry and shows Mg enrichment inside the platelet without any indication of a higher segregation level at the precipitate/matrix interface. The deviation from the (Al 2 CuLi) stoichiometry cannot be simply interpreted as a consequence of artifacts when measuring the Cu and Li concentrations inside the T 1 platelet. The results show rather a strong hint for a true lower Li and Cu contents, hence supporting reasonably the hypothesis that the real chemical composition for the thin T 1 platelet in the T8 tempering condition differs from the equilibrium composition of the thermodynamic stable bulk phase.

  7. Characterization of Precipitation in Al-Li Alloy AA2195 by means of Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Khushaim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of the commercial alloy AA2195 was investigated on the nanoscale after conducting T8 tempering. This particular thermomechanical treatment of the specimen resulted in the formation of platelet-shaped T1Al2CuLi/θ′Al2Cu precipitates within the Al matrix. The electrochemically prepared samples were analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for chemical mapping. The θ′ platelets, which are less than 2 nm thick, have the stoichiometric composition consistent with the expected Al2Cu equilibrium composition. Additionally, the Li distribution inside the θ′ platelets was found to equal the same value as in the matrix. The equally thin T1 platelet deviates from the formula (Al2CuLi in its stoichiometry and shows Mg enrichment inside the platelet without any indication of a higher segregation level at the precipitate/matrix interface. The deviation from the (Al2CuLi stoichiometry cannot be simply interpreted as a consequence of artifacts when measuring the Cu and Li concentrations inside the T1 platelet. The results show rather a strong hint for a true lower Li and Cu contents, hence supporting reasonably the hypothesis that the real chemical composition for the thin T1 platelet in the T8 tempering condition differs from the equilibrium composition of the thermodynamic stable bulk phase.

  8. In situ voltammetric de-alloying of fuel cell catalyst electrode layer: A combined scanning electron microscope/electron probe micro-analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ratndeep; Mani, Prasanna; Strasser, Peter

    In situ voltammetric de-alloying, i.e. partial selective dissolution of less noble alloy components, is a recently proposed, effective strategy to prepare active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) [S. Koh, P. Strasser, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129 (2007) 12624-12625; R. Srivastava, P. Mani, N. Hahn, P. Strasser, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 8988-8991]. However, in situ de-alloying of bimetallics inside electrode layers of membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) seems to defy the requirement of keeping the membrane free of cationic contaminants; yet, when followed by ion exchange, de-alloyed cathodes result in previously unachieved single cell activities of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathode layers of up to 0.4 A mg Pt -1 at 900 mV cell voltage. The effects of voltammetric Cu de-alloying on the MEA have never been studied before. In the present study, we therefore address this issue and report detailed scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of the morphology and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) mapping of a MEA at various stages of the de-alloying and ion-exchange process. We investigate the significant loss of Cu from the cathode particle catalyst after de-alloying, demonstrate how the membrane can be cleaned from Cu-ion contamination using ion exchange with protons from liquid inorganic acids, and show that Cu ion exchange does ultimately not affect the activated catalyst particles inside the cathode layer. We correlate the microscopic study of the MEA with its cyclic voltammetric response curves as well as the single cell polarization data.

  9. Examination of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes by atomic force, Kelvin probe force and electron microscopy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanova, T. E., E-mail: tat-sukhanova@mail.ru; Vylegzhanina, M. E.; Valueva, S. V.; Volkov, A. Ya.; Kutin, A. A. [Institute of Macromolecular Compounds RAS, 199004 Bolshoy Pr., 31, St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Temiryazeva, M. P.; Temiryazev, A. G. [Kotel’nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Fryazino Branch) Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino, Moscow region, 141190 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The morphology and electrical properties of biogenic selenium-containing nanosystems based on polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) were examined using AFM, Kelvin Probe Force and electron microscopy methods. It has been found, that prepared nanostructures significantly differed in their morphological types and parameters. In particular, multilayers capsules can be produced via varying synthesis conditions, especially, the selenium–PEC mass ratio ν. At the “special point” (ν = 0.1), filled and hollow nano- and microcapsules are formed in the system. The multilayer character of the capsules walls is visible in the phase images. Kelvin Probe Force images showed the inhomogeneity of potential distribution in capsules and outside them.

  10. Towards Fast Measurement of the Electron Temperature in the SOL of ASDEX Upgrade Using Swept Langmuir Probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, H. W.; Adámek, Jiří; Horáček, Jan; Ionita, C.; Mehlmann, F.; Rohde, V.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 9 (2010), s. 847-853 ISSN 0863-1042. [International Workshop on Electric Probes in Magnetized Plasmas/8th./. Innsbruck, 21.09.2009-24.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430901; GA ČR GA202/09/1467 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * Langmuir probe * swept probe * ball-pen probe * fast temperature measurement * ELM Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.006, year: 2010 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ctpp.201010144/pdf

  11. The multipole resonance probe: A concept for simultaneous determination of plasma density, electron temperature, and collision rate in low-pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapke, M.; Mussenbrock, T.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2008-01-01

    A diagnostic concept is presented which enables the simultaneous determination of plasma density, electron temperature, and collision rate in low-pressure gas discharges. The proposed method utilizes a radio-frequency driven probe of particular spherical design which is immersed in the plasma to excite a family of spatially bounded surface resonances. An analysis of the measured absorption spectrum S(ω) of the probe provides information on the distribution of the plasma in its vicinity, from which the values of the plasma parameters can be inferred. In its simplest realization, the probe consists of two dielectrically shielded, conducting hemispheres, which are symmetrically driven by an radio-frequency source, and the excited resonances can be classified as multipole fields, which allows an analytical evaluation of the measured signal. The proposed method is robust, calibration free, economical, and can be used for ideal and reactive plasmas alike

  12. Profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade, COMPASS, and ISTTOK tokamak using Thomson scattering, triple, and ball-pen probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, J; Müller, H W; Silva, C; Schrittwieser, R; Ionita, C; Mehlmann, F; Costea, S; Horacek, J; Kurzan, B; Bilkova, P; Böhm, P; Aftanas, M; Vondracek, P; Stöckel, J; Panek, R; Fernandes, H; Figueiredo, H

    2016-04-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) technique is used successfully to make profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment), COMPASS (COMPact ASSembly), and ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Tecnico TOKamak) tokamak. The electron temperature is provided by a combination of the BPP potential (ΦBPP) and the floating potential (Vfl) of the Langmuir probe (LP), which is compared with the Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is obtained for circular and diverted plasmas and different heating mechanisms (Ohmic, NBI, ECRH) in deuterium discharges with the same formula Te = (ΦBPP - Vfl)/2.2. The comparative measurements of the electron temperature using BPP/LP and triple probe (TP) techniques on the ISTTOK tokamak show good agreement of averaged values only inside the separatrix. It was also found that the TP provides the electron temperature with significantly higher standard deviation than BPP/LP. However, the resulting values of both techniques are well in the phase with the maximum of cross-correlation function being 0.8.

  13. Profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade, COMPASS, and ISTTOK tokamak using Thomson scattering, triple, and ball-pen probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamek, J.; Horacek, J.; Bilkova, P.; Böhm, P.; Aftanas, M.; Vondracek, P.; Stöckel, J.; Panek, R.; Müller, H. W.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Figueiredo, H.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Mehlmann, F.; Costea, S.; Kurzan, B.

    2016-01-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) technique is used successfully to make profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment), COMPASS (COMPact ASSembly), and ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Tecnico TOKamak) tokamak. The electron temperature is provided by a combination of the BPP potential (Φ BPP ) and the floating potential (V fl ) of the Langmuir probe (LP), which is compared with the Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is obtained for circular and diverted plasmas and different heating mechanisms (Ohmic, NBI, ECRH) in deuterium discharges with the same formula T e = (Φ BPP − V fl )/2.2. The comparative measurements of the electron temperature using BPP/LP and triple probe (TP) techniques on the ISTTOK tokamak show good agreement of averaged values only inside the separatrix. It was also found that the TP provides the electron temperature with significantly higher standard deviation than BPP/LP. However, the resulting values of both techniques are well in the phase with the maximum of cross-correlation function being 0.8.

  14. Profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade, COMPASS, and ISTTOK tokamak using Thomson scattering, triple, and ball-pen probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, J.; Müller, H. W.; Silva, C.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Mehlmann, F.; Costea, S.; Horacek, J.; Kurzan, B.; Bilkova, P.; Böhm, P.; Aftanas, M.; Vondracek, P.; Stöckel, J.; Panek, R.; Fernandes, H.; Figueiredo, H.

    2016-04-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) technique is used successfully to make profile measurements of the electron temperature on the ASDEX Upgrade (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment), COMPASS (COMPact ASSembly), and ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Tecnico TOKamak) tokamak. The electron temperature is provided by a combination of the BPP potential (ΦBPP) and the floating potential (Vfl) of the Langmuir probe (LP), which is compared with the Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is obtained for circular and diverted plasmas and different heating mechanisms (Ohmic, NBI, ECRH) in deuterium discharges with the same formula Te = (ΦBPP - Vfl)/2.2. The comparative measurements of the electron temperature using BPP/LP and triple probe (TP) techniques on the ISTTOK tokamak show good agreement of averaged values only inside the separatrix. It was also found that the TP provides the electron temperature with significantly higher standard deviation than BPP/LP. However, the resulting values of both techniques are well in the phase with the maximum of cross-correlation function being 0.8.

  15. The Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in late May 1972 former President Richard M. Nixon went to Moscow and signed, among other documents, a Treaty to Limit Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Systems. Under this agreement, both the United States and the Soviet Union made a commitment not to build nationwide ABM defenses against the other's intercontinental and submarine-launched ballistic missiles. They agreed to limit ABM deployments to a maximum of two sites, with no more than 100 launchers per site. Thirteen of the treaty's sixteen articles are intended to prevent any deviation from this. In addition, a joint Standing Consultative Commission to monitor compliance was created. National technical means --- sophisticated monitoring devices on land, sea, and in space --- were to be the primary instruments used to monitor compliance with the treaty. The ABM Treaty was signed in conjunction with an Interim Agreement to Limit Strategic Offensive Arms

  16. Ballistic model to estimate microsprinkler droplet distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Marco Antônio Fonseca

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental determination of microsprinkler droplets is difficult and time-consuming. This determination, however, could be achieved using ballistic models. The present study aimed to compare simulated and measured values of microsprinkler droplet diameters. Experimental measurements were made using the flour method, and simulations using a ballistic model adopted by the SIRIAS computational software. Drop diameters quantified in the experiment varied between 0.30 mm and 1.30 mm, while the simulated between 0.28 mm and 1.06 mm. The greatest differences between simulated and measured values were registered at the highest radial distance from the emitter. The model presented a performance classified as excellent for simulating microsprinkler drop distribution.

  17. Orbital magnetism in ensembles of ballistic billiards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmo, D.; Richter, K.; Jalabert, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic response of ensembles of small two-dimensional structures at finite temperatures is calculated. Using semiclassical methods and numerical calculation it is demonstrated that only short classical trajectories are relevant. The magnetic susceptibility is enhanced in regular systems, where these trajectories appear in families. For ensembles of squares large paramagnetic susceptibility is obtained, in good agreement with recent measurements in the ballistic regime. (authors). 20 refs., 2 figs

  18. Lightweight Multifunctional Linear Cellular Alloy Ballistic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-26

    densities of 10, 15 and 20 % with the dimensions shown in Table 1. The alloy compositions were high strength maraging steel (M200) and Super Invar ... alloys made from LCA processing3 are shown in Table 3. Super Invar in the as-reduced state is a ductile (25-30%) austenitic alloy . When cooled to...Final Report for Lightweight Multifunctional Linear Cellular Alloy Ballistic Structures from Structured Alloys , Inc. Joe K

  19. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur.

  20. Buildings vs. ballistics: Quantifying the vulnerability of buildings to volcanic ballistic impacts using field studies and pneumatic cannon experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. T.; Kennedy, B. M.; Wilson, T. M.; Fitzgerald, R. H.; Tsunematsu, K.; Teissier, A.

    2017-09-01

    Recent casualties in volcanic eruptions due to trauma from blocks and bombs necessitate more rigorous, ballistic specific risk assessment. Quantitative assessments are limited by a lack of experimental and field data on the vulnerability of buildings to ballistic hazards. An improved, quantitative understanding of building vulnerability to ballistic impacts is required for informing appropriate life safety actions and other risk reduction strategies. We assessed ballistic impacts to buildings from eruptions at Usu Volcano and Mt. Ontake in Japan and compiled available impact data from eruptions elsewhere to identify common damage patterns from ballistic impacts to buildings. We additionally completed a series of cannon experiments which simulate ballistic block impacts to building claddings to investigate their performance over a range of ballistic projectile velocities, masses and energies. Our experiments provide new insights by quantifying (1) the hazard associated with post-impact shrapnel from building and rock fragments; (2) the effect of impact obliquity on damage; and (3) the additional impact resistance buildings possess when claddings are struck in areas directly supported by framing components. This was not well identified in previous work which may have underestimated building vulnerability to ballistic hazards. To improve assessment of building vulnerability to ballistics, we use our experimental and field data to develop quantitative vulnerability models known as fragility functions. Our fragility functions and field studies show that although unreinforced buildings are highly vulnerable to large ballistics (> 20 cm diameter), they can still provide shelter, preventing death during eruptions.

  1. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  2. A flexible and accurate quantification algorithm for electron probe X-ray microanalysis based on thin-film element yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalm, O.; Janssens, K.

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative analysis by means of electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA) of low Z materials such as silicate glasses can be hampered by the fact that ice or other contaminants build up on the Si(Li) detector beryllium window or (in the case of a windowless detector) on the Si(Li) crystal itself. These layers act as an additional absorber in front of the detector crystal, decreasing the detection efficiency at low energies (<5 keV). Since the layer thickness gradually changes with time, also the detector efficiency in the low energy region is not constant. Using the normal ZAF approach to quantification of EPXMA data is cumbersome in these conditions, because spectra from reference materials and from unknown samples must be acquired within a fairly short period of time in order to avoid the effect of the change in efficiency. To avoid this problem, an alternative approach to quantification of EPXMA data is proposed, following a philosophy often employed in quantitative analysis of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) data. This approach is based on the (experimental) determination of thin-film element yields, rather than starting from infinitely thick and single element calibration standards. These thin-film sensitivity coefficients can also be interpolated to allow quantification of elements for which no suitable standards are available. The change in detector efficiency can be monitored by collecting an X-ray spectrum of one multi-element glass standard. This information is used to adapt the previously determined thin-film sensitivity coefficients to the actual detector efficiency conditions valid on the day that the experiments were carried out. The main advantage of this method is that spectra collected from the standards and from the unknown samples should not be acquired within a short period of time. This new approach is evaluated for glass and metal matrices and is compared with a standard ZAF method

  3. Learning without knowing: subliminal visual feedback facilitates ballistic motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    received supraliminal as compared to subliminal feedback. In the 0 ms feedback group motor performance increased only slightly indicating an important role of augmented feedback in learning the ballistic task. In the two groups who received subliminal feedback none of the subjects were able to tell what...... by the learner, indeed facilitated ballistic motor learning. This effect likely relates to multiple (conscious versus unconscious) processing of visual feedback and to the specific neural circuitries involved in optimization of ballistic motor performance....

  4. Advances in Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function in magnetized plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popov, Tsv.K.; Dimitrova, Miglena; Ivanova, P.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Stöckel, Jan; Pedrosa, M.A.; López-Bruna, D.; Hidalgo, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 033001. ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/2327; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : COMPASS tokamak * Langmuir probes * magnetized plasma * second-derivative probe techniques * first-derivative probe techniques * plasma potential * EEDF Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0963-0252/25/3/033001/meta

  5. Probing the electronic structure of M-graphene oxide (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) catalysts for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Binhua; Liu, Jinyin; Zhou, Litao [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Long, Dan, E-mail: legend_long@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou 310022 (China); Feng, Kun; Sun, Xuhui [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhong, Jun, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: An interaction between metal and graphene oxide was probed to enhance the hydrolysis efficiency of ammonia borane. - Highlights: • Various metal elements (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) were dispersed on graphene oxide (GO) for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB). • The electronic structure of the hybrids has been probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). • An interfacial interaction between metal and GO was observed which could be related to the hydrolysis performance. • The results provide new insight into the enhanced performance of the M-GO hybrids. - Abstract: Various metal elements (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) were dispersed on graphene oxide (GO) to form the M-GO hybrids by a facile way. The hybrids showed good catalytic activities in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB, NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}), which were significantly enhanced when compared to the metal nanoparticles or GO alone. The electronic structure of the hybrids has been probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The distribution of metal elements was clearly imaged with identical electronic structure. Moreover, an interfacial interaction between metal and GO was observed with the peak intensity proportional to the catalytic performance in the hydrolysis of AB. The results provide new insight into the enhanced performance of the M-GO hybrids and may help for the design of advanced catalysts.

  6. Combining low-energy electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy techniques for surface science: development of a novel sample-holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheynis, F; Leroy, F; Ranguis, A; Detailleur, B; Bindzi, P; Veit, C; Bon, W; Müller, P

    2014-04-01

    We introduce an experimental facility dedicated to surface science that combines Low-Energy Electron Microscopy/Photo-Electron Emission Microscopy (LEEM/PEEM) and variable-temperature Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques. A technical challenge has been to design a sample-holder that allows to exploit the complementary specifications of both microscopes and to preserve their optimal functionality. Experimental demonstration is reported by characterizing under ultrahigh vacuum with both techniques: Au(111) surface reconstruction and a two-layer thick graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). A set of macros to analyze LEEM/PEEM data extends the capabilities of the setup.

  7. Long-term radiation belt relativistic electron simulations with the VERB code using new wave parameterizations derived from Van Allen Probes measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Spasojevic, M.; Kellerman, A. C.; Drozdov, A.

    2016-12-01

    New wave frequency and amplitude models for nightside and dayside chorus waves are developed based on measurement from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument on board Van Allen Probes. New paremetrizations can be used for quiet, moderate and disturbed conditions. The corresponding 3D diffusion coefficients are calculated using the Full Diffusion Code. The new parameterizations result in differences in the diffusion coefficients as a function of both electron energy and pitch angle. Furthermore, one-year 3D simulations are performed using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code. Simulations with new parametrizations show better agreement with observations.

  8. Characterization of electrical properties in axial Si-Ge nanowire heterojunctions using off-axis electron holography and atom-probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Zhaofeng [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA; Perea, Daniel E. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Yoo, Jinkyoung [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; He, Yang [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA; Colby, Robert J. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Barker, Josh E. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Gu, Meng [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Mao, Scott X. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Picraux, S. T. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA; Smith, David J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA; McCartney, Martha R. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA

    2016-09-13

    Doped Si-Ge nanowire (NW) heterojunctions were grown using the vapor-liquid-solid method with AuGa and Au catalyst particles. Transmission electron microscopy and off-axis electron holography (EH) were used to characterize the nanostructure and to measure the electrostatic potential profile across the junction resulting from electrically active dopants, while atom-probe tomography (APT) was used to determine the Si, Ge and total (active and inactive) dopant concentration profiles. A comparison of the measured potential profile with simulations indicated that Ga dopants unintentionally introduced during AuGa catalyst growth were electronically inactive despite APT results that showed considerable amounts of Ga in the Si region. 10% P in Ge and 100% B in Si were estimated to be activated, which was corroborated by in situ electron-holography biasing experiments. This combination of EH, APT, in situ biasing and simulations allows a better knowledge and understanding of the electrically active dopant distributions in NWs.

  9. Probing the Hydrogen Bonding of the Ferrous-NO Heme Center of nNOS by Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astashkin, Andrei V; Chen, Li; Elmore, Bradley O; Kunwar, Deepak; Miao, Yubin; Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L; Roman, Linda J; Feng, Changjian

    2015-06-25

    Oxidation of L-arginine (L-Arg) to nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase (NOS) takes place at the heme active site. It is of current interest to study structures of the heme species that activates O2 and transforms the substrate. The NOS ferrous-NO complex is a close mimic of the obligatory ferric (hydro)peroxo intermediate in NOS catalysis. In this work, pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy was used to probe the hydrogen bonding of the NO ligand in the ferrous-NO heme center of neuronal NOS (nNOS) without a substrate and with L-Arg or N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) substrates. Unexpectedly, no H-bonding interaction connecting the NO ligand to the active site water molecule or the Arg substrate was detected, in contrast to the results obtained by X-ray crystallography for the Arg-bound nNOS heme domain [Li et al. J. Biol. Inorg. Chem. 2006, 11, 753-768]. The nearby exchangeable proton in both the no-substrate and Arg-containing nNOS samples is located outside the H-bonding range and, on the basis of the obtained structural constraints, can belong to the active site water (or OH). On the contrary, in the NOHA-bound sample, the nearby exchangeable hydrogen forms an H-bond with the NO ligand (on the basis of its distance from the NO ligand and a nonzero isotropic hfi constant), but it does not belong to the active site water molecule because the water oxygen atom (detected by (17)O ENDOR) is too far. This hydrogen should therefore come from the NOHA substrate, which is in agreement with the X-ray crystallography work [Li et al. Biochemistry 2009, 48, 10246-10254]. The nearby nonexchangeable hydrogen atom assigned as H(ε) of Phe584 was detected in all three samples. This hydrogen atom may have a stabilizing effect on the NO ligand and probably determines its position.

  10. Block Tridiagonal Matrices in Electronic Structure Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dan Erik

    in the Landauer–Büttiker ballistic transport regime. These calculations concentrate on determining the so– called Green’s function matrix, or portions thereof, which is the inverse of a block tridiagonal general complex matrix. To this end, a sequential algorithm based on Gaussian elimination named Sweeps......This thesis focuses on some of the numerical aspects of the treatment of the electronic structure problem, in particular that of determining the ground state electronic density for the non–equilibrium Green’s function formulation of two–probe systems and the calculation of transmission...... is developed and compared to standard Gaussian elimination, where it is shown to be qualitatively quicker for the task of determining the block tridiagonal portion of the Green’s function matrix. The Sweep algorithm is then parallelized via a straightforward approach in order to enable moderate speedup...

  11. Analysis of behind the armor ballistic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yaoke; Xu, Cheng; Wang, Shu; Batra, R C

    2015-05-01

    The impact response of body armor composed of a ceramic plate with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber-reinforced composite and layers of UHMWPE fibers shielding a block of ballistic gelatin has been experimentally and numerically analyzed. It is a surrogate model for studying injuries to human torso caused by a bullet striking body protection armor placed on a person. Photographs taken with a high speed camera are used to determine deformations of the armor and the gelatin. The maximum depth of the temporary cavity formed in the ballistic gelatin and the peak pressure 40mm behind the center of the gelatin front face contacting the armor are found to be, respectively, ~34mm and ~15MPa. The Johnson-Holmquist material model has been used to simulate deformations and failure of the ceramic. The UHMWPE fiber-reinforced composite and the UHMWPE fiber layers are modeled as linear elastic orthotropic materials. The gelatin is modeled as a strain-rate dependent hyperelastic material. Values of material parameters are taken from the open literature. The computed evolution of the temporary cavity formed in the gelatin is found to qualitatively agree with that seen in experiments. Furthermore, the computed time histories of the average pressure at four points in the gelatin agree with the corresponding experimentally measured ones. The maximum pressure at a point and the depth of the temporary cavity formed in the gelatin can be taken as measures of the severity of the bodily injury caused by the impact; e.g. see the United States National Institute of Justice standard 0101.06-Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ballistic thermoelectric properties of nitrogenated holey graphene nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Xiao, Huaping; Ouyang, Tao; Zhong, Jianxin

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we theoretically investigate the ballistic thermoelectric performance of a new two-dimensional material, nitrogenated holey graphene (NHG), using nonequilibrium Green's function method. The calculations show that compared to graphene, such novel single atomic layer structure exhibits better thermoelectric performance. At room temperature, the stable hole (electron) thermoelectric figure of merit ( Z T ) could approach 0.75 (0.2) and 0.6 (0.2) for zigzag-edged (Z-NHGNRs) and armchair-edged NHGNRs (A-NHGNRs), respectively. To achieve better thermoelectric performance, the effect of geometric engineering (chevron-type nanoribbons and rhomboid quantum dot) on the electronic and phononic transport properties of Z-NHGNRs is further discussed. The results indicate that structure modulation is indeed a viable approach to enhance the thermoelectric properties (the figure of merit could exceed 1.5 and 1.3 for the chevron-type and rhomboid quantum dot system, respectively). On analyzing the transport properties, such improvement on the figure of merit is mainly attributed to the increased Seebeck coefficient and reduced thermal conductance (including both electronic and phononic contributions). Our findings presented in this paper qualify NHG as a promising thermoelectric material and provide theoretical guidance for fabricating the outstanding thermoelectric devices.

  13. Contemporary management of maxillofacial ballistic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Tong, D; Gibbons, A

    2017-09-01

    Ballistic maxillofacial trauma in the UK is fortunately relatively rare, and generally involves low velocity handguns and shotguns. Civilian terrorist events have, however, shown that all maxillofacial surgeons need to understand how to treat injuries from improvised explosive devices. Maxillofacial surgeons in the UK have also been responsible for the management of soldiers evacuated from Iraq and Afghanistan, and in this review we describe the newer types of treatment that have evolved from these conflicts, particularly that of damage-control maxillofacial surgery. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and testing of a flexible ballistic neck protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.; Rensink, P.

    2016-01-01

    Sufficient ballistic protection of the neck area would significantly reduce the vulnerability of an infantry soldier. So far this protection is offered by extensions on the ballistic vest or combat helmet. However, the requirements for head agility and the various body to head positions combined

  15. A ballistic mission to fly by Comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boain, R. J.; Hastrup, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the available options, ballistic trajectory opportunities, and a preliminary reference trajectory that were selected as a basis for spacecraft design studies and programmatic planning for a Halley ballistic intercept mission in 1986. The paper also presents trajectory, performance, and navigation data which support the preliminary selection.

  16. Experiments with Liquid Propellant Jet Ignition in a Ballistic Compressor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birk, Avi

    1998-01-01

    .... The apparatus consists of an inline ballistic compressor and LP injector. The rebound of the ballistic compressor piston was arrested, trapping 40 to 55 MPa of 750 to 8500 C argon for ignition of circular jets in a windowed test chamber...

  17. 76 FR 70165 - Ballistic-Resistant Body Armor Standard Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... of Justice Programs Ballistic-Resistant Body Armor Standard Workshop AGENCY: National Institute of..., Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor, and the discussion is directed toward manufacturers, certification... armor community will be summarized as part of the workshop notes. Contributors of comments will not be...

  18. Towards reliable simulations of ballistic impact on concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoe, Y.S.; Tyler Street, M.D.; Maravalalu Suresh,, R.S.; Weerheijm, J.

    2013-01-01

    Protection against weapon effects like ballistic impacts, fragmenting shells and explosions is the core business of the Explosions, Ballistics and Protection department of TNO (The Netherlands). Experimental and numerical research is performed to gain and maintain the knowledge to support the Dutch

  19. An integrated approach towards future ballistic neck protection materials selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, John; Helliker, Mark; Carr, Debra J

    2013-05-01

    Ballistic protection for the neck has historically taken the form of collars attached to the ballistic vest (removable or fixed), but other approaches, including the development of prototypes incorporating ballistic material into the collar of an under body armour shirt, are now being investigated. Current neck collars incorporate the same ballistic protective fabrics as the soft armour of the remaining vest, reflecting how ballistic protective performance alone has historically been perceived as the most important property for neck protection. However, the neck has fundamental differences from the thorax in terms of anatomical vulnerability, flexibility and equipment integration, necessitating a separate solution from the thorax in terms of optimal materials selection. An integrated approach towards the selection of the most appropriate combination of materials to be used for each of the two potential designs of future neck protection has been developed. This approach requires evaluation of the properties of each potential material in addition to ballistic performance alone, including flexibility, mass, wear resistance and thermal burden. The aim of this article is to provide readers with an overview of this integrated approach towards ballistic materials selection and an update of its current progress in the development of future ballistic neck protection.

  20. ballistic performance of a quenched and tempered steel against

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    conditions. Hardness is an important feature for the materials used for armour strategy [1-3]. Sangoy and others.[5]reported that high hardness of given armour steel directly determines the ballistic performance and perforation mode. Many studies on the ballistic impact behaviour of the steels revealed that relationship exists ...

  1. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/sadh/025/05/0463-0473. Keywords. Aerodynamic heating; ballistic missile; gravity; flat-earth. Abstract. The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the ...

  2. Ballistic performance and microstructure of four armor ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Carton, E.P.

    2013-01-01

    The ballistic behavior of four different armor ceramic materials with thicknesses varying from 3 mm to 14 mm has been investigated. These are two types of alumina Al2O3 armor grades and two types of SiC armor grades produced by different armor ceramic producers. The ballistic study has been

  3. Relaxation dynamics of a polar solvent cage around a nonpolar electronically excited solvent probe. A subpicosecond laser study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialocq, J.C.; Hebert, P.; Baldacchino, G.; Gustavsson, T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show that the LDS 751 unsymmetrical cyanine laser dye, highly polar in the ground state and non polar in the fluorescent excited singlet state, is a suitable solvent probe. Excitation of LDS 751 in a polar solvent with an ultrashort laser pulse suddenly annihilates the permanent dipole moment of the solute and suppresses the forces which orientate the nearby solvent molecules. The subpicosecond analysis of the Time-Dependent Fluorescence Stokes Shift (TDFSS) of LDS 751 thus enables to probe the relaxation of polar solvent molecules which can be considered as free of solute-solvent interactions. (author)

  4. Impacts of Deflection Nose on Ballistic Trajectory Control Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The deflection of projectile nose is aimed at changing the motion of the projectile in flight with the theory of motion control and changing the exterior ballistics so as to change its range and increase its accuracy. The law of external ballistics with the deflectable nose is considered as the basis of the design of a flight control system and an important part in the process of projectile development. Based on the existing rigid external ballistic model, this paper establishes an external ballistic calculation model for deflectable nose projectile and further establishes the solving programs accordingly. Different angle of attack, velocity, coefficients of lift, resistance, and moment under the deflection can be obtained in this paper based on the previous experiments and emulation researches. In the end, the author pointed out the laws on the impaction of external ballistic trajectory by the deflection of nose of the missile.

  5. Field mapping of ballistic pressure pulse sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rad Abtin Jamshidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic pressure pulse sources are used since late 1990s for the extracorporeal treatment of chronic Enthesitis. Newly indications are found in trigger-point-therapy for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In both applications excellent results without relevant side effects were found in clinical trials. The technical principle of pressure pulse source is based on the same techniques used in air guns. A projectile is accelerated by pressurized air and hits the applicator with high kinetic energy. By this a compression wave travels through the material and induces a fast (4..5μs, almost singular pressure pulse of 2..10 MPa, which is followed by an equally short rarefaction phase of about the same amplitude. It is assumed that the pressure pulse accounts for the biomedical effects of the device. The slower inertial motion of the waveguide is damped by elastic stoppers, but still can be measured several micro seconds after the initial pressure pulse. In order to characterize the pressure pulse devices, field mapping is performed on several radial pressure pulse sources using the fiber optic hydrophone and a polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF piezoelectric hydrophone. It could be shown that the current standard (IEC 61846 is not appropriate for characterization of ballistic pressure pulse sources.

  6. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  7. Advanced geometries for ballistic neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanzer, Christian; Boeni, Peter; Filges, Uwe; Hils, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Sophisticated neutron guide systems take advantage of supermirrors being used to increase the neutron flux. However, the finite reflectivity of supermirrors becomes a major loss mechanism when many reflections occur, e.g. in long neutron guides and for long wavelengths. In order to reduce the number of reflections, ballistic neutron guides have been proposed. Usually linear tapered sections are used to enlarge the cross-section and finally, focus the beam to the sample. The disadvantages of linear tapering are (i) an inhomogeneous phase space at the sample position and (ii) a decreasing flux with increasing distance from the exit of the guide. We investigate the properties of parabolic and elliptic tapering for ballistic neutron guides, using the Monte Carlo program McStas with a new guide component dedicated for such geometries. We show that the maximum flux can indeed be shifted away from the exit of the guide. In addition we explore the possibilities of parabolic and elliptic geometries to create point like sources for dedicated experimental demands

  8. Ballistic resistant article, semi-finished product for and method of making a shell for a ballistic resistant article

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harings, Jules; Janse, Gerardus

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a ballistic resistant article, such as a helmet (1), comprising a double curved shell (2) in turn comprising a stack (5) of layers (6) of an oriented anti-ballistic material, the layers (6) comprising one or more plies and having a plurality of cuts (7), the ends of which

  9. Micron-scale mapping of megagauss magnetic fields using optical polarimetry to probe hot electron transport in petawatt-class laser-solid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Robinson, A P L; Blackman, D; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Gizzi, L A; Gray, R J; Green, J S; Koester, P; Kumar, G Ravindra; Labate, L; Lad, Amit D; Lancaster, K L; Pasley, J; Woolsey, N C; Rajeev, P P

    2017-08-21

    The transport of hot, relativistic electrons produced by the interaction of an intense petawatt laser pulse with a solid has garnered interest due to its potential application in the development of innovative x-ray sources and ion-acceleration schemes. We report on spatially and temporally resolved measurements of megagauss magnetic fields at the rear of a 50-μm thick plastic target, irradiated by a multi-picosecond petawatt laser pulse at an incident intensity of ~10 20 W/cm 2 . The pump-probe polarimetric measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution reveal the dynamics of the magnetic fields generated by the hot electron distribution at the target rear. An annular magnetic field profile was observed ~5 ps after the interaction, indicating a relatively smooth hot electron distribution at the rear-side of the plastic target. This is contrary to previous time-integrated measurements, which infer that such targets will produce highly structured hot electron transport. We measured large-scale filamentation of the hot electron distribution at the target rear only at later time-scales of ~10 ps, resulting in a commensurate large-scale filamentation of the magnetic field profile. Three-dimensional hybrid simulations corroborate our experimental observations and demonstrate a beam-like hot electron transport at initial time-scales that may be attributed to the local resistivity profile at the target rear.

  10. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  11. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  12. Current neutralization in ballistic transport of light ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, R.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Ottinger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Intense light ion beams are being considered as drivers to ignite fusion targets in the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). Ballistic transport of these beams from the diode to the target is possible only if the beam current is almost completely neutralized by plasma currents. This paper summarizes related work on relativistic electron beam and heavy ion beam propagation and describes a simple simulation model (DYNAPROP) which has been modified to treat light ion beam propagation. DYNAPROP uses an envelope equation to treat beam dynamics and uses rate equations to describe plasma and conductivity generation. The model has been applied both to the high current, 30 MeV Li +3 beams for LMF as well as low current, 1.2 MeV proton beams which are currently being studied on GAMBLE B at the Naval Research Laboratory. The predicted ratio of net currents to beam current is ∼0.1--0.2 for the GAMBLE experiment and ∼0.01 for LMF. The implications of these results for LMF and the GAMBLE experiments art discussed in some detail. The simple resistive model in DYNAPROP has well-known limitations in the 1 torr regime which arise primarily from the neglect of plasma electron transport. Alternative methods for treating the plasma response are discussed

  13. Probing temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with Raman thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, C.; Pomeroy, J.; Kuball, M.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of confocal Raman thermography using a spatial filter and azimuthal polarization to probe vertical temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of operating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Temperature gradients in the GaN layer are measured by using offset focal planes to minimize the contribution from different regions of the GaN buffer. The measured temperature gradient is in good agreement with a thermal simulation treating the GaN thermal conductivity as homogeneous throughout the layer and including a low thermal conductivity nucleation layer to model the heat flow between the buffer and substrate

  14. Probing temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with Raman thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, C., E-mail: chris.hodges@bristol.ac.uk; Pomeroy, J.; Kuball, M. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-14

    We demonstrate the ability of confocal Raman thermography using a spatial filter and azimuthal polarization to probe vertical temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of operating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Temperature gradients in the GaN layer are measured by using offset focal planes to minimize the contribution from different regions of the GaN buffer. The measured temperature gradient is in good agreement with a thermal simulation treating the GaN thermal conductivity as homogeneous throughout the layer and including a low thermal conductivity nucleation layer to model the heat flow between the buffer and substrate.

  15. Tetragonal fcc-Fe induced by κ -carbide precipitates: Atomic scale insights from correlative electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Christian H.; Yao, Mengji; Dey, Poulumi; Lipińska-Chwalek, Marta; Berkels, Benjamin; Gault, Baptiste; Hickel, Tilmann; Herbig, Michael; Mayer, Joachim; Neugebauer, Jörg; Raabe, Dierk; Dehm, Gerhard; Scheu, Christina

    2018-02-01

    Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory calculations resolve the correlation between elastic strain fields and local impurity concentrations on the atomic scale. The correlative approach is applied to coherent interfaces in a κ -carbide strengthened low-density steel and establishes a tetragonal distortion of fcc-Fe. An interfacial roughness of ˜1 nm and a localized carbon concentration gradient extending over ˜2 -3 nm is revealed, which originates from the mechano-chemical coupling between local strain and composition.

  16. Probing royal demolition explosive (1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazocyclohexane) by low-energy electrons: Strong dissociative electron attachment near 0 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzer, P.; Mauracher, A.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Denifl, S.; Märk, T. D.; Probst, M.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Scheier, P.

    2009-10-01

    Low energy electron attachment to gas phase royal demolition explosive (RDX) (and RDX-A3) has been performed by means of a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment in an electron energy range from 0 to 14 eV with an energy resolution of ˜70 meV. The most intense signals are observed at 102 and 46 amu and assigned to C2H4N3O2- and NO2-, respectively. Anion efficiency curves of 16 anions have been measured. Product ions are observed mainly in the low energy region, near 0 eV arising from surprisingly complex reactions associated with multiple bond cleavages and structural and electronic rearrangement. The remarkable instability of RDX to electron attachment with virtually thermal electrons reflects the highly explosive nature of this compound. The present results are compared to other explosive aromatic nitrocompounds studied in our laboratory recently.

  17. Projectile- and charge-state-dependent electron yields from ion penetration of solids as a probe of preequilibrium stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothard, H.; Schou, Jørgen; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1992-01-01

    by investigating the "transport factor" beta, the energy spectrum of directly ejected recoil electrons and the evolution of ionic charge state inside solids. Estimates of the energy-loss fraction leading to electron emission and the effective charges of the ions near the surface allow a quantitative description......Kinetic electron-emission yields gamma from swift ion penetration of solids are proportional to the (electronic) stopping power gamma approximately Beta-S*, if the preequilibrium evolution of the charge and excitation states of the positively charged ions is taken into account. We show...

  18. Probe tests microweld strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Probe is developed to test strength of soldered, brazed or microwelded joints. It consists of a spring which may be adjusted to the desired test pressure by means of a threaded probe head, and an indicator lamp. Device may be used for electronic equipment testing.

  19. Ballistic penetration test results for Ductal and ultra-high performance concrete samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (KTech)

    2010-03-01

    This document provides detailed test results of ballistic impact experiments performed on several types of high performance concrete. These tests were performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility using a 50 caliber powder gun to study penetration resistance of concrete samples. This document provides test results for ballistic impact experiments performed on two types of concrete samples, (1) Ductal{reg_sign} concrete is a fiber reinforced high performance concrete patented by Lafarge Group and (2) ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) produced in-house by DoD. These tests were performed as part of a research demonstration project overseen by USACE and ERDC, at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research (STAR) facility. Ballistic penetration tests were performed on a single stage research powder gun of 50 caliber bore using a full metal jacket M33 ball projectile with a nominal velocity of 914 m/s (3000 ft/s). Testing was observed by Beverly DiPaolo from ERDC-GSL. In all, 31 tests were performed to achieve the test objectives which were: (1) recovery of concrete test specimens for post mortem analysis and characterization at outside labs, (2) measurement of projectile impact velocity and post-penetration residual velocity from electronic and radiographic techniques and, (3) high-speed photography of the projectile prior to impact, impact and exit of the rear surface of the concrete construct, and (4) summarize the results.

  20. Ballistic and Diffusive Thermal Conductivity of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Riichiro; Masashi, Mizuno; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2018-02-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. Phonon-related thermal conductivity of graphene is calculated as a function of the temperature and sample size of graphene in which the crossover of ballistic and diffusive thermal conductivity occurs at around 100 K. The diffusive thermal conductivity of graphene is evaluated by calculating the phonon mean free path for each phonon mode in which the anharmonicity of a phonon and the phonon scattering by a 13C isotope are taken into account. We show that phonon-phonon scattering of out-of-plane acoustic phonon by the anharmonic potential is essential for the largest thermal conductivity. Using the calculated results, we can design the optimum sample size, which gives the largest thermal conductivity at a given temperature for applying thermal conducting devices.

  1. Ballistic Missile Defense: New Plans, Old Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Zolotukhina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On September 17, 2009—the 70th anniversary of the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939 that marked the beginning of World War II—the Obama Administration announced its intention to shelve plans for the U.S. Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD that had been developed under former President George W. Bush. Pointing to a new intelligence assessment, President Obama argued that his predecessor's plan to deploy an X-band radar station outside of Prague, Czech Republic, and 10 two-stage interceptor missiles in Poland would not adequately protect America and its European allies from the Iranian threat and reiterated his opposition to utilizing unproven technology in any European BMD architecture.

  2. Ballistic energy transport in PEG oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kireev Victor V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy transport between the terminal groups of the azido-PEG-succinimide ester compounds with a number of repeating PEG units of 0, 4, 8, and 12 was studied using relaxation-assisted two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. The through-bond energy transport time, evaluated as the waiting time at which the cross peak maximum is reached, Tmax, was found to be linearly dependent on the chain length for chain lengths up to 60 Å suggesting a ballistic energy transport regime. The through-bond energy transport speed is found to be ca. 500 m/s. The cross-peak amplitude at the maximum decays exponentially with the chain length with a characteristic decay distance of 15.7 ± 1 Å. Substantial mode delocalization across the PEG bridge is found, which can support the energy propagation as a wavepacket.

  3. Statistics of magnetoconductance in ballistic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Ishio, H.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    1995-01-01

    The statistical properties of magnetoconductance in ballistic microcavities are investigated numerically. The distribution of conductance for chaotic cavities is found to follow the renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution suggested by random-matrix theory for the Gaussian ensemble while the conductance distribution of regular cavities in magnetic fields is nonuniversal and shifted towards the maximum value for a given number of open channels. The renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution implies a universal dependence of fluctuation amplitude on the mean conductance for chaotic cavities in the absence of time-reversal symmetry. The fluctuation amplitude for regular cavities is found to be larger than the saturation value of the fluctuation amplitude of chaotic cavities predicted by random-matrix theory. The change of the mean conductance as a function of the external magnetic field is consistent with semiclassical predictions

  4. 19 mm ballistic range: a potpourri of techniques and recipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpluk, G.T.

    1975-01-01

    The expansion of ballistic gun range facilities at LLL has introduced state-of-the-art diagnostic techniques to glovebox-enclosed ballistic guns systems. These enclosed ballistic ranges are designed for the study of one-dimensional shock phenomena in extremely toxic material such as plutonium. The extension of state-of-the-art phtographic and interferometric diagnostic systems to glovebox-enclosed gun systems introduces new design boundaries and performance criteria on optical and mechanical components. A technique for experimentally evaluating design proposals is illustrated, and several specific examples (such as, target alignment, collateral shrapnel damage, and soft recovery) are discussed

  5. Ballistic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Emily H.; Sabino, Jennifer M.; Nanos, George P.; Valerio, Ian L.

    2015-01-01

    Management of upper extremity injuries secondary to ballistic and blast trauma can lead to challenging problems for the reconstructive surgeon. Given the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, advancements in combat-casualty care, combined with a high-volume experience in the treatment of ballistic injuries, has led to continued advancements in the treatment of the severely injured upper extremity. There are several lessons learned that are translatable to civilian trauma centers and future conflicts. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the physics of ballistic injuries and principles in the management of such injuries through experience gained from military involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. PMID:25685099

  6. Synchro-ballistic recording of detonation phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Critchfield, R.R.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.; Davis, W.C.; Ferm, E.N.; Idar, D.J.

    1997-09-01

    Synchro-ballistic use of rotating-mirror streak cameras allows for detailed recording of high-speed events of known velocity and direction. After an introduction to the synchro-ballistic technique, this paper details two diverse applications of the technique as applied in the field of high-explosives research. In the first series of experiments detonation-front shape is recorded as the arriving detonation shock wave tilts an obliquely mounted mirror, causing reflected light to be deflected from the imaging lens. These tests were conducted for the purpose of calibrating and confirming the asymptotic Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory of Bdzil and Stewart. The phase velocities of the events range from ten to thirty millimeters per microsecond. Optical magnification is set for optimal use of the film`s spatial dimension and the phase velocity is adjusted to provide synchronization at the camera`s maximum writing speed. Initial calibration of the technique is undertaken using a cylindrical HE geometry over a range of charge diameters and of sufficient length-to-diameter ratio to insure a stable detonation wave. The final experiment utilizes an arc-shaped explosive charge, resulting in an asymmetric detonation-front record. The second series of experiments consists of photographing a shaped-charge jet having a velocity range of two to nine millimeters per microsecond. To accommodate the range of velocities it is necessary to fire several tests, each synchronized to a different section of the jet. The experimental apparatus consists of a vacuum chamber to preclude atmospheric ablation of the jet tip with shocked-argon back lighting to produce a shadow-graph image.

  7. ν =2 /3 fractional quantum Hall state in an AlAs quantum well probed by electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetilnikov, A. V.; Frolov, D. D.; Nefyodov, Yu. A.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Tiemann, L.; Reichl, C.; Dietsche, W.; Wegscheider, W.

    2017-10-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) of two-dimensional electrons confined in a high-quality, 16-nm AlAs quantum well was investigated near the filling factor ν =2 /3 of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). The spin resonance was robust in the vicinity of the fractional filling ν =2 /3 , indicating that the ν =2 /3 state is at least partially spin polarized. The formation of the 2 /3 FQHE state did not result in any modifications of the ESR linewidth and, hence, of the electron spin relaxation rate. Yet the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate extracted from the time decay of the ESR Overhauser shift demonstrated a strong nonmonotonic dependence on the electron filling factor with a minimum near ν =2 /3 . This observation suggests the enhancement of the energy gap in the spin excitation spectrum of two-dimensional electrons at the ν =2 /3 state.

  8. Complementary Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ Thin-Film Photovoltaic Cells Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, and Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Jung; Lee, Jihye; Jeong, Jeung-Hyun; Lee, Kang-Bong; Kim, Donghwan; Lee, Yeonhee

    2018-05-01

    To enhance the conversion performance of solar cells, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is required. In this study, we determined the average concentration of the major elements (Cu, In, Ga, and Se) in fabricated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and wavelengthdispersive electron probe microanalysis. Depth profiling results for CIGS thin films with different cell efficiencies were obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy to compare the atomic concentrations. Atom probe tomography, a characterization technique with sub-nanometer resolution, was used to obtain three-dimensional elemental mapping and the compositional distribution at the grain boundaries (GBs). GBs are identified by Na increment accompanied by Cu depletion and In enrichment. Segregation of Na atoms along the GB had a beneficial effect on cell performance. Comparative analyses of different CIGS absorber layers using various analytical techniques provide us with understanding of the compositional distributions and structures of high efficiency CIGS thin films in solar cells.

  9. Electron probe microanalysis of a METAPHIX UPuZr metallic alloy fuel irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brémier, S., E-mail: stephan.bremier@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Inagaki, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Capriotti, L.; Poeml, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ogata, T.; Ohta, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The METAPHIX project is a collaboration between CRIEPI and JRC-ITU investigating safety and performance of a closed fuel cycle option based on fast reactor metal alloy fuels containing Minor Actinides (MA). The aim of the project is to investigate the behaviour of this type of fuel and demonstrate the transmutation of MA under irradiation. A UPuZr metallic fuel sample irradiated to a burn-up of 7 at.% was examined by electron probe microanalysis. The fuel sample was extensively characterised qualitatively and quantitatively using elemental X-ray imaging and point analysis techniques. The analyses reveal a significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius highlighting a nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. Numerous rare earth and fission products secondary phases are present in various compositions. Fuel cladding chemical interaction was observed with creation of a number of intermediary layers affecting a cladding depth of 15–20 μm and migration of cladding elements to the fuel. - Highlights: • Electron Probe MicroAnalysis of a UPuZr metallic fuel alloy irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up. • Significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius, nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. • Interactions between the fuel and the cladding with occurrence of a number of intermediary layers and migration of cladding elements to the fuel. • Safe irradiation behaviour of the base alloy fuel.

  10. Dual-MWCNT Probe Thermal Sensor Assembly and Evaluation Based on Nanorobotic Manipulation inside a Field-Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a thermal sensor composed of two multiwalled carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs inside a field-emission-scanning electron microscope. The sensor was assembled using a nanorobotic manipulation system, which was used to construct a probe tip in order to detect the local environment of a single cell. An atomic force microscopy (AFM cantilever was used as a substrate; the cantilever was composed of Si3N4 and both sides were covered with a gold layer. MWCNTs were individually assembled on both sides of the AFM cantilever by employing nanorobotic manipulation. Another AFM cantilever was subsequently used as an end effector to manipulate the MWCNTs to touch each other. Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID was then used to bond the two MWCNTs. The MWCNT probe thermal sensor was evaluated inside a thermostated container in the temperature range from 25°C to 60°C. The experimental results show the positive characteristics of the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR.

  11. Institute for Non-Lethal Defense Technologies Report: Ballistic Gelatin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicholas, N. C; Welsch, J. R

    2004-01-01

    Ballistic gelatin is designed to simulate living soft tissue. It is the standard for evaluating the effectiveness of firearms against humans because of its convenience and acceptability over animal or cadaver testing...

  12. Designing an Innovative Composite Armor System for Affordable Ballistic Protection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ma, Zheng-Dong; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yushun; Rose, Douglas; Socks, Adria; Ostberg, Donald

    2006-01-01

    .... This paper focuses on the frontal armor plate and back plate design problems with demonstration examples, including both results of the virtual prototyping and ballistic testing for proof-of-concept...

  13. North Korean Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hildreth, Steven A

    2007-01-01

    ... so. The Administration will ask the 110th Congress to fund a National Missile Defense (NMD) site in Europe, which some analysts argue is needed because of the threat of North Korean ballistic missiles to Europe...

  14. Auger-electron spectroscopy as a local probe of atomic charge: SiL/sub 2.3/VV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennison, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    Auger-electron spectroscopy is shown to measured something quite different from photoemission: the distribution of atomic (as opposed to overlap) charge populations across the valence bands. While matrix-elements effects must be considered in s-p band materials, their inclusion in calculations still lead to poor agreement with experiment. Good agreement may obtained, however, if one divides the electronic charge into atomic and overlap (bonding) LCAO components and notes that the latter does not contribute to the Auger current

  15. The Modeling and Application of Small Arms Wound Ballistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Components." The Journal of Traurma, vol. 25, pp. 522-529, 1985. 3. Clare, V., W. Ashman, P. Broome, J. Jameson, J. Lewis, J. Merkler, A. Mickiewicz , W...Proving Ground, MD, 1962. 28. Olivier, A., J. Merkler, B. Brown, and A. Mickiewicz . ’Wound Ballistics of the 15.2 Grain Steel Flechette." CRDLR 3132...NWerkler, A. Mickiewicz , W. Sacco, L. Sturdivan, D. Lamb, and F. Sylva,)us. "The ARRADCOM Computer Man - An Automated Approach To Wound Ballistics

  16. Understanding the Ballistic Event: Methodology and Initial Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Healey, Adam; Cotton, J; Maclachlan, S; Smith, Paul; Yeomans, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to accelerate the development of ceramic materials for armour applications, by substantially increasing the information obtained from a high-energy projectile impact event. This has been achieved by modifying an existing test configuration to incorporate a block of ballistic gel, attached to the strike face of a ceramic armour system, to capture fragments generated during the ballistic event such that their final positions are maintained. Three different materials,...

  17. Ballistic Heat Conduction and Mass Disorder in One Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Zhang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that in the disordered harmonic chain, heat conduction is subballistic and the thermal conductivity ($\\kappa$) scales asymptotically as $\\lim_{L\\rightarrow\\infty}\\kappa\\propto L^{0.5}$ where $L$ is the chain length. However, using the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method and analytical modeling, we show that there exists a critical crossover length scale ($L_{C}$) below which ballistic heat conduction ($\\kappa\\propto L$) can coexist with mass disorder. This ballistic...

  18. Ballistic Impact Simulation of Ceramic/Metal Armor Structures

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, Kemal; GÜNEŞ, Recep

    2017-01-01

    The study presents a comparative numericalinvestigation on ballistic performance of ceramic/metal armor structures. 2Daxisymmetric numerical model was developed for ballistic impact simulationsusing LS-DYNA® finite element software. The armor structuresincluded combinations of boron carbide (B4C), Al6061-T6 and 4340steel constituents. The interfaces in the armor structure were modelled with anepoxy resin adhesive. In order to define proper material behavior,Johnson-Holmquist-Ceramics material...

  19. Ultra-reduced phases in Apollo 16 regolith: Combined field emission electron probe microanalysis and atom probe tomography of submicron Fe-Si grains in Apollo 16 sample 61500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopon, Phillip; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Kelly, Thomas F.; Reinhard, David; Prosa, Ty J.; Fournelle, John

    2017-09-01

    The lunar regolith contains a variety of chemically reduced phases of interest to planetary scientists and the most common, metallic iron, is generally ascribed to space weathering processes (Lucey et al. ). Reports of silicon metal and iron silicides, phases indicative of extremely reducing conditions, in lunar samples are rare (Anand et al. ; Spicuzza et al. ). Additional examples of Fe-silicides have been identified in a survey of particles from Apollo 16 sample 61501,22. Herein is demonstrated the utility of low keV electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), using the Fe Ll X-ray line, to analyze these submicron phases, and the necessity of accounting for carbon contamination. We document four Fe-Si and Si0 minerals in lunar regolith return material. The new Fe-Si samples have a composition close to (Fe,Ni)3Si, whereas those associated with Si0 are close to FeSi2 and Fe3Si7. Atom probe tomography of (Fe,Ni)3Si shows trace levels of C (60 ppma and nanodomains enriched in C, Ni, P, Cr, and Sr). These reduced minerals require orders of magnitude lower oxygen fugacity and more reducing conditions than required to form Fe0. Documenting the similarities and differences in these samples is important to constrain their formation processes. These phases potentially formed at high temperatures resulting from a meteorite impact. Whether carbon played a role in achieving the lower oxygen fugacities—and there is evidence of nearby carbonaceous chondritic material—it remains to be proven that carbon was the necessary component for the unique existence of these Si0 and iron silicide minerals.

  20. Probing Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structures in ThO-by Anion Photoelectron Imaging and Theoretical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanli; Zou, Jinghan; Xiong, Xiao-Gen; Su, Jing; Xie, Hua; Fei, Zejie; Tang, Zichao; Liu, Hongtao

    2017-03-16

    Because of renewed research on thorium-based molten salt reactors, there is growing demand and interest in enhancing the knowledge of thorium chemistry both experimentally and theoretically. Compared with uranium, thorium has few chemical studies reported up to the present. Here we report the vibrationally resolved photoelectron imaging of the thorium monoxide anion. The electron affinity of ThO is first reported to be 0.707 ± 0.020 eV. Vibrational frequencies of the ThO molecule and its anion are determined from Franck-Condon simulation. Spectroscopic evidence is obtained for the two-electron transition in ThO - , indicating the strong electron correlation among the (7s σ ) 2 (6d δ ) 1 electrons in ThO - and the (7s σ ) 2 electrons in ThO. These findings are explained by using quantum-chemical calculations including spin-orbit coupling, and the chemical bonding of gaseous ThO molecules is analyzed. The present work will enrich our understanding of bonding capacities with the 6d valence shell.

  1. The application of a calibrated 3D ballistic trajectory model to ballistic hazard assessments at Upper Te Maari, Tongariro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, R. H.; Tsunematsu, K.; Kennedy, B. M.; Breard, E. C. P.; Lube, G.; Wilson, T. M.; Jolly, A. D.; Pawson, J.; Rosenberg, M. D.; Cronin, S. J.

    2014-10-01

    On 6 August, 2012, Upper Te Maari Crater, Tongariro volcano, New Zealand, erupted for the first time in over one hundred years. Multiple vents were activated during the hydrothermal eruption, ejecting blocks up to 2.3 km and impacting ~ 2.6 km of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing (TAC) hiking track. Ballistic impact craters were mapped to calibrate a 3D ballistic trajectory model for the eruption. This was further used to inform future ballistic hazard. Orthophoto mapping revealed 3587 impact craters with a mean diameter of 2.4 m. However, field mapping of accessible regions indicated an average of at least four times more observable impact craters and a smaller mean crater diameter of 1.2 m. By combining the orthophoto and ground-truthed impact frequency and size distribution data, we estimate that approximately 13,200 ballistic projectiles were generated during the eruption. The 3D ballistic trajectory model and a series of inverse models were used to constrain the eruption directions, angles and velocities. When combined with eruption observations and geophysical observations, the model indicates that the blocks were ejected in five variously directed eruption pulses, in total lasting 19 s. The model successfully reproduced the mapped impact distribution using a mean initial particle velocity of 200 m/s with an accompanying average gas flow velocity over a 400 m radius of 150 m/s. We apply the calibrated model to assess ballistic hazard from the August eruption along the TAC. By taking the field mapped spatial density of impacts and an assumption that an average ballistic impact will cause serious injury or death (casualty) over an 8 m2 area, we estimate that the probability of casualty ranges from 1% to 16% along the affected track (assuming an eruption during the time of exposure). Future ballistic hazard and probabilities of casualty along the TAC are also assessed through application of the calibrated model. We model a magnitude larger eruption and illustrate

  2. Probing nuclear dynamics in momentum space: a new interpretation of (e, 2e) electron impact ionization experiments on ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajgató, Balázs; Deleuze, Michael S; Morini, Filippo

    2009-06-25

    Calculations of electron momentum distributions for equilibrium geometries, employing advanced Dyson orbital theories and statistical thermodynamics beyond the RRHO approximation, fail to quantitatively reproduce the outermost momentum distribution profile inferred from (e, 2e) electron impact ionization experiments on ethanol employing high-resolution electron momentum spectroscopy. A very detailed study of the influence on this momentum distribution of nuclear dynamics in the initial ground state and in the final ionized state is presented according to a thermal averaging over exceedingly large sets of model structures as well as Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamical simulations on the potential energy surface of the radical cation. Our results give very convincing albeit qualitative indications that the strong turn-up of the (e, 2e) ionization intensities characterizing the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of ethanol at low electron momenta is the combined result of (1) the extraordinarily flat nature of the conformational energy map of ethanol, which enables significant departures from energy minima in the ground electronic state, (2) strong anomeric interactions between an oxygen lone pair and the central C-C bond for the minor but significant fraction of conformers exhibiting a hydroxyl torsion angle (alpha) at around 90 degrees, and, last but not least, (3) the possibility to observe with this minor conformer fraction ultrafast and highly significant extensions of the central C-C bond, resulting, in turn, in an enhanced delocalization of the HOMO from the oxygen lone pair region onto the methyl group, immediately after the sudden removal of an electron. This charge transfer appears to occur at the very first stages, that is, within an effective time scale on the order of approximately 10 fs, of an ultrafast dissociation of the ethanol radical cation into a methyl radical and a protonated form of formaldehyde.

  3. Probing Young-type interference effect on angular distributions of e-DDCS using fast electrons as projectile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S; Tribedi, L C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Stia, C R; Fojon, O A; Rivarola, R D, E-mail: lokesh@tifr.res.i [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Av. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2009-11-15

    The energy and angular distributions of electron double differential cross sections (DDCS) of H{sub 2} and He are measured for fast electron collision.The measured data are compared with recently developed theoretical calculations. The observed distributions of H{sub 2} are explained in terms of interference effect by comparing with single center He and atomic hydrogen. We show experimentally by comparing with He, that partial constructive interference exists in soft and binary collision regions of H{sub 2} spectra.

  4. Research support for plasma diagnostics on Elmo Bumpy Torus - development of a multichannel Hall-probe based diamagnetic diagnostic instrument and observation and modeling of EBT electron rings. Final report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.H.; Booker, R.H.

    1983-10-01

    Use of multiple Hall effect probes is a cost effective way to observe diamagnetic fields from the hot electron rings in the Elmo Bumpy Torus device at several locations simultaneously. A special diagnostic instrument has been developed having six Hall probe channels with the sensitivity and stability needed for the diamagnetic measurements. The instrument uses an AC carrier system with isolation transformers located remotely from the instrument and near the probe locations. Details of instrument design as well as operating instructions for it are included in this report

  5. Electron exchange between r-keggin tungstoaluminates and a well-defined cluster-anion probe for studies in electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurii V. Geletii; Craig L. Hill; Alan J. Bailey; Kenneth I. Hardcastle; Rajai H. Atalla; Ira A. Weinstock

    2005-01-01

    Fully oxidized [alpha]-AlIIIW12O405-(1ox), and one-electron-reduced [alpha]-AlIIIW12O406-(1red), are well-behaved (stable and free of ion pairing) over a wide range of pH and ionic-strength values at room temperature in water. Having established this, 27Al NMR spectroscopy is used to measure rates of electron exchange between 1ox (27Al NMR: 72.2 ppm relative to Al(H2O)...

  6. The internal dynamics of mini c TAR DNA probed by electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide spin-labels at the lower stem, the loop, and the bulge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Ziwei; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Myers, William K; Liu, Fei; Earle, Keith A; Freed, Jack H; Scholes, Charles P

    2012-10-30

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 236.6 and 9.5 GHz probed the tumbling of nitroxide spin probes in the lower stem, in the upper loop, and near the bulge of mini c TAR DNA. High-frequency 236.6 GHz EPR, not previously applied to spin-labeled oligonucleotides, was notably sensitive to fast, anisotropic, hindered local rotational motion of the spin probe, occurring approximately about the NO nitroxide axis. Labels attached to the 2'-aminocytidine sugar in the mini c TAR DNA showed such anisotropic motion, which was faster in the lower stem, a region previously thought to be partially melted. More flexible labels attached to phosphorothioates at the end of the lower stem tumbled isotropically in mini c TAR DNA, mini TAR RNA, and ψ(3) RNA, but at 5 °C, the motion became more anisotropic for the labeled RNAs, implying more order within the RNA lower stems. As observed by 9.5 GHz EPR, the slowing of nanosecond motions of large segments of the oligonucleotide was enhanced by increasing the ratio of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7 to mini c TAR DNA from 0 to 2. The slowing was most significant at labels in the loop and near the bulge. At a 4:1 ratio of NCp7 to mini c TAR DNA, all labels reported tumbling times of >5 ns, indicating a condensation of NCp7 and TAR DNA. At the 4:1 ratio, pulse dipolar EPR spectroscopy of bilabels attached near the 3' and 5' termini showed evidence of an NCp7-induced increase in the 3'-5' end-to-end distance distribution and a partially melted stem.

  7. Dispersive magnetic and electronic excitations in iridate perovskites probed by oxygen K -edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xingye; Olalde-Velasco, Paul; Huang, Yaobo; Bisogni, Valentina; Pelliciari, Jonathan; Fatale, Sara; Dantz, Marcus; Vale, James G.; Hunter, E. C.; Chang, Johan; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Perry, R. S.; Grioni, Marco; McMorrow, D. F.; Rønnow, Henrik M.; Schmitt, Thorsten

    2018-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments performed at the oxygen K edge on the iridate perovskites Sr2IrO4 and Sr3Ir2O7 reveal a sequence of well-defined dispersive modes over the energy range up to ˜0.8 eV . The momentum dependence of these modes and their variation with the experimental geometry allows us to assign each of them to specific collective magnetic and/or electronic excitation processes, including single and bimagnons, and spin-orbit and electron-hole excitons. We thus demonstrate that dispersive magnetic and electronic excitations are observable at the O K edge in the presence of the strong spin-orbit coupling in the 5 d shell of iridium and strong hybridization between Ir 5 d and O 2 p orbitals, which confirm and expand theoretical expectations. More generally, our results establish the utility of O K -edge RIXS for studying the collective excitations in a range of 5 d materials that are attracting increasing attention due to their novel magnetic and electronic properties. Especially, the strong RIXS response at O K edge opens up the opportunity for investigating collective excitations in thin films and heterostructures fabricated from these materials.

  8. Gridded thermionic gun and integral superconducting ballistic bunch compression cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, Thomas [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medford, NY (United States)

    2015-11-16

    general design is a modified ballistic compression cavity pair with two independently powered cells [3]. The first is a cathode cell that includes the thermionic cathode and grid to provide for beam bunching. The second is a full cell with independent phasing and field levels designed to minimize energy spread. The primary goal for Phase II is to manufacture a superconducting gun with a thermionic cathode and imbedded coil. The system developed here is applicable to many high current electron accelerators. The analysis and design constraints imposed by the magnetized cathode make the cathode system developed here more complicated and limited than one without the magnetized beam constraints. High power ERLs would benefit by a gun with the capabilities shown here, 400 mA or more of current. ERLs hold great promise for electron cooling experiments, advanced light sources and Free Electron Lasers. This high current electron injector is a technological advance that will place the requirements for an ERL capable of providing quality bunches needed for cooling within the MEIC circulator ring within reach. This injector would have application to future ERLs around the world.

  9. Accurate prediction of H3O+ and D3O+ sensitivity coefficients to probe a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Polyansky, O. L.; Ovsyannikov, R. I.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of H316O+, H318O+, and D316O+ is investigated variationally using the nuclear motion program TROVE (Yurchenko, Thiel & Jensen). The calculations utilize new high-level ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Along with the mass dependence, frequency data and Einstein A coefficients are computed for all transitions probed. Particular attention is paid to the Δ|k| = 3 and Δ|k - l| = 3 transitions comprising the accidentally coinciding |J, K = 0, v2 = 0+> and |J, K = 3, v2 = 0-> rotation-inversion energy levels. The newly computed probes exhibit sensitivities comparable to their ammonia and methanol counterparts, thus demonstrating their potential for testing the cosmological stability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio. The theoretical TROVE results are in close agreement with sensitivities obtained using the non-rigid and rigid inverter approximate models, confirming that the ab initio theory used in the present study is adequate.

  10. Allegany Ballistics Lab: sensor test target system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Deran S.

    2011-06-01

    Leveraging the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division's historical experience in weapon simulation, Naval Sea Systems Command commissioned development of a remote-controlled, digitally programmable Sensor Test Target as part of a modern, outdoor hardware-in-the-loop test system for ordnance-related guidance, navigation and control systems. The overall Target system design invokes a sciences-based, "design of automated experiments" approach meant to close the logistical distance between sensor engineering and developmental T&E in outdoor conditions over useful real world distances. This enables operating modes that employ broad spectrum electromagnetic energy in many a desired combination, variably generated using a Jet Engine Simulator, a multispectral infrared emitter array, optically enhanced incandescent Flare Simulators, Emitter/Detector mounts, and an RF corner reflector kit. As assembled, the recently tested Sensor Test Target prototype being presented can capably provide a full array of useful RF and infrared target source simulations for RDT&E use with developmental and existing sensors. Certain Target technologies are patent pending, with potential spinoffs in aviation, metallurgy and biofuels processing, while others are variations on well-established technology. The Sensor Test Target System is planned for extended installation at Allegany Ballistics Laboratory (Rocket Center, WV).

  11. Ballistic Josephson junctions based on CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyi; Gallop, John; Hao, Ling; Romans, Edward

    2018-04-01

    Josephson junctions with graphene as the weak link between superconductors have been intensely studied in recent years, with respect to both fundamental physics and potential applications. However, most of the previous work was based on mechanically exfoliated graphene, which is not compatible with wafer-scale production. To overcome this limitation, we have used graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) as the weak link of Josephson junctions. We demonstrate that very short, wide CVD-graphene-based Josephson junctions with Nb electrodes can work without any undesirable hysteresis in their electrical characteristics from 1.5 K down to a base temperature of 320 mK, and their gate-tuneable critical current shows an ideal Fraunhofer-like interference pattern in a perpendicular magnetic field. Furthermore, for our shortest junctions (50 nm in length), we find that the normal state resistance oscillates with the gate voltage, consistent with the junctions being in the ballistic regime, a feature not previously observed in CVD-graphene-based Josephson junctions.

  12. Rifle bullet penetration into ballistic gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yaoke; Xu, Cheng; Jin, Yongxi; Batra, R C

    2017-03-01

    The penetration of a rifle bullet into a block of ballistic gelatin is experimentally and computationally studied for enhancing our understanding of the damage caused to human soft tissues. The gelatin is modeled as an isotropic and homogeneous elastic-plastic linearly strain-hardening material that obeys a polynomial equation of state. Effects of numerical uncertainties on penetration characteristics are found by repeating simulations with minute variations in the impact speed and the angle of attack. The temporary cavity formed in the gelatin and seen in pictures taken by two high speed cameras is found to compare well with the computed one. The computed time histories of the hydrostatic pressure at points situated 60 mm above the line of impact are found to have "two peaks", one due to the bullet impact and the other due to the bullet tumbling. Contours of the von Mises stress and of the effective plastic strain in the gelatin block imply that a very small region adjacent to the cavity surface is plastically deformed. The angle of attack is found to noticeably affect the penetration depth at the instant of the bullet tumbling through 90°. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of compositional uniformity in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N thin films using atom probe tomography and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang; Huang, Li; Porter, Lisa M.; Davis, Robert F., E-mail: rfd@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Schreiber, Daniel K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Calculated frequency distributions of atom probe tomography reconstructions (∼80 nm field of view) of very thin Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N (0.18 ≤ x ≤ 0.51) films grown via metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on both (0001) GaN/AlN/SiC and (0001) GaN/sapphire heterostructures revealed homogeneous concentrations of Al and chemically abrupt Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN interfaces. The results of scanning transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction corroborated these results and revealed that neither superlattice ordering nor phase separation was present at nanometer length scales.

  14. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3058577 (Japan); Xu, Z., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kvashnin, D. G. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Sorokin, P. B. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutsky Lane 9, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  15. Interfacial chemistry in a ZnTe/CdSe superlattice studied by atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy strain measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonef, B; Haas, B; Rouvière, J-L; André, R; Bougerol, C; Grenier, A; Jouneau, P-H; Zuo, J-M

    2016-05-01

    The atomic scale analysis of a ZnTe/CdSe superlattice grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported using atom probe tomography and strain measurements from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images. CdTe interfaces were grown by atomic layer epitaxy to prevent the spontaneous formation of ZnSe bonds. Both interfaces between ZnTe and CdSe are composed of alloyed layers of ZnSe. Pure CdTe interfaces are not observed and Zn atoms are also visible in the CdSe layers. This information is critical to design superlattices with the expected optoelectronic properties. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Kelvin probe imaging of photo-injected electrons in metal oxide nanosheets from metal sulfide quantum dots under remote photochromic coloration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, A.; Yin, G.; Srinivasan, N.; Atarashi, D.; Sakai, E.; Miyauchi, M.

    2015-07-01

    Metal oxide and quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted considerable recent attention as materials for developing efficient solar cells, photocatalysts, and display devices, thus nanoscale imaging of trapped electrons in these heterostructures provides important insight for developing efficient devices. In the present study, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) of CdS quantum dot (QD)-grafted Cs4W11O362- nanosheets was performed before and after visible-light irradiation. After visible-light excitation of the CdS QDs, the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet surface exhibited a decreased work function in the vicinity of the junction with CdS QDs, even though the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet did not absorb visible light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that W5+ species were formed in the nanosheet after visible-light irradiation. These results demonstrated that excited electrons in the CdS QDs were injected and trapped in the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet to form color centers. Further, the CdS QDs and Cs4W11O362- nanosheet composite films exhibited efficient remote photochromic coloration, which was attributed to the quantum nanostructure of the film. Notably, the responsive wavelength of the material is tunable by adjusting the size of QDs, and the decoloration rate is highly efficient, as the required length for trapped electrons to diffuse into the nanosheet surface is very short owing to its nanoscale thickness. The unique properties of this photochromic device make it suitable for display or memory applications. In addition, the methodology described in the present study for nanoscale imaging is expected to aid in the understanding of electron transport and trapping processes in metal oxide and metal chalcogenide heterostructure, which are crucial phenomena in QD-based solar cells and/or photocatalytic water-splitting systems.Metal oxide and quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted considerable recent attention as materials for developing efficient solar cells

  17. Microscopic and electronic structure of semimetallic Sb and Semiconducting AlSb fabricated by nanoscale electrodeposition: An in situ scanning probe investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, O; Aravinda, C L; Freyland, W

    2006-11-02

    The nanoscale electrocrystallization of pure Sb and the compound semiconductor AlSb on Au(111) has been studied by in situ scanning probe techniques (STM and STS) employing an ionic liquid electrolyte, {AlCl3-[C4mim]+Cl-} (1:1) containing SbCl3. The characteristic changes of the electronic structures with varying potentials have been probed for the first time by normalized differential conductance spectra, (dI/dU)/(I/U). In the underpotential deposition range of Sb the formation of two layers is observed. For the first monolayer a (square root 3 x square root 3)R30 degrees structure is determined from atomically resolved STM images. During the deposition and dissolution of the Sb monolayers characteristic wormlike or spinodal structures appear indicating surface alloying of antimony with the gold substrate. Under overpotential conditions two different Sb structures have been observed. If the deposition potential is continuously stepped to -0.1 V, Sb nanostripes form. On the other hand, randomly dispersed small clusters occur if the potential is jumped from 0.0 to -0.3 V vs Al/Al(III). Both modifications exhibit typical semimetallic behavior as shown by the STS spectra. At -1.1 V the cyclic voltammogram shows a clear reduction wave that is assigned to AlSb compound formation. Deposits in this potential range are characterized by a homogeneous distribution of clusters with diameters of approximately 20 nm. Conductance spectra of these clusters exhibit the main features of the electronic structure of the bulk semiconductor AlSb, with a band gap of 2.0 +/- 0.2 eV. Electrodeposition experiments on both sides of the compound deposition potential show a strong doping effect that is manifest in the corresponding conductance spectra.

  18. Probing Young-type interference effect on angular distributions of e-DDCS using fast electrons as projectile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Kelkar, A. H.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2009-11-01

    We have studied Young-type interference in the energy and angular distributions of double differential cross sections (DDCS) of electrons emitted in single-ionization of H2, induced by 8 keV electron impact. The first-order interference is derived from the energy distribution of DDCS and the resulting ratio-spectra (H2-to-2H) exhibit oscillating behaviour. The signature of first-order interference is also demonstrated in the DDCS-spectra as a function of emission angle. We have shown that the constructive interference prevails in soft- and binary-collision regions. The single differential cross sections obtained by integrating the DDCSs over energy and solid angle also preserve the information on interference.

  19. Electronic structure of ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs probed by sub-gap magneto-optical spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Acbas, G.; Kim, M. -H.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Scarpulla, M. A.; Dubon, O. D.; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, Jairo; Cerne, J.

    2009-01-01

    We employ Faraday and Kerr effect spectroscopy in the infrared range to investigate the electronic structure of Ga1-xMnxAs near the Fermi energy. The band structure of this archetypical dilute-moment ferromagnetic semiconductor has been a matter of controversy, fueled partly by previous measurements of the unpolarized infrared absorption and their phenomenological impurity-band interpretation. The infrared magneto-optical effects we study arise directly from the spin-splitting of the carrier ...

  20. Complex nano-patterning of structural, optical, electrical and electron emission properties of amorphous silicon thin films by scanning probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fait, Jan; Čermák, Jan; Stuchlík, Jiří; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 428, Jan (2018), s. 1159-1165 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01809S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : amorphous silicon * nano-templates * nanostructures * electrical conductivity * electron emission * atomic force microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  1. Topology of electron charge density for chemical bonds from valence bond theory: a probe of bonding types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixian; Ying, Fuming; Wu, Wei; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the nature of bonding we derive the topological properties of the electron charge density of a variety of bonds based on ab initio valence bond methods. The electron density and its associated Laplacian are partitioned into covalent, ionic, and resonance components in the valence bond spirit. The analysis provides a density-based signature of bonding types and reveals, along with the classical covalent and ionic bonds, the existence of two-electron bonds in which most of the bonding arises from the covalent-ionic resonance energy, so-called charge-shift bonds. As expected, the covalent component of the Laplacian at the bond critical point is found to be largely negative for classical covalent bonds. In contrast, for charge-shift bonds, the covalent part of the Laplacian is small or positive, in agreement with the weakly attractive or repulsive character of the covalent interaction in these bonds. On the other hand, the resonance component of the Laplacian is always negative or nearly zero, and it increases in absolute value with the charge-shift character of the bond, in agreement with the decrease of kinetic energy associated with covalent-ionic mixing. A new interpretation of the topology of the total density at the bond critical point is proposed to characterize covalent, ionic, and charge-shift bonding from the density point of view.

  2. Probing charge transfer between shells of double-walled carbon nanotubes sorted by outer-wall electronic type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbac, Martin; Green, Alexander A; Hersam, Mark C; Kavan, Ladislav

    2011-08-22

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with outer metallic (M) or semiconducting (S) shells were sorted by density-gradient ultracentrifugation and examined by Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry. The combination of sorting and the selection of appropriate laser excitation energies allowed the disentanglement of the effects of different variations of the electronic type (M or S) of the inner and outer tubes in DWCNTs on the doping behavior and charge transfer between the inner and outer walls. Charge transfer from the outer tube to the inner tube occurs only if the electronic states of the outer tube are filled with electrons or holes, and if these filled states are higher in energy than those of the inner tube. Therefore, each combination of inner and outer tube (i.e., inner@outer: M@M, M@S, S@M, and S@S) exhibits a distinct behavior. The potential needed to observe the effects of charge transfer between the inner and outer tubes is found to increase in the following order: M@M < S@M < M@S < S@S. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Design of a High-Perveance Electron Gun for Electron Cooling in the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) at CERN and Non-Interceptive Proton Beam Profile Monitors using Ion or Atomic Probe Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulou, Christina

    2002-01-01

    For an efficient electron cooling of the low-energy Pb54+ ions in LEIR a high-perveance (at least 3.6microperv) electron gun had to be designed. The theoretical study of electron guns has shown that the required perveance can be achieved by using a convex cathode. The gun should be immersed in a strong magnetic field (B=2-6kG) in order to obtain a parallel beam with very low transverse energy (typically 0.1 eV). This idea was confirmed by experimental tests at Fermilab. An adiabatic magnetic expansion is foreseen after the gun in order to reduce the magnetic field to accpetable values (0.6-1 kG) in the cooling section. The internal geometry of a convex cathode gun for the LEIR electron cooler together with the parameters of the magnetic expansion are proposed. The scheme fulfils the requirements. In addition, the author has made an important contribution in the field of beam instrumentation for the LHC and other accelerators at CERN. A profile monitor has been developed that uses a Xe ion probe beam that inte...

  4. Comparison of 3D cellular imaging techniques based on scanned electron probes: Serial block face SEM vs. Axial bright-field STEM tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, E L; Rao, A; Zhang, G; Hoyne, J D; Calco, G N; Kuo, B C; He, Q; Prince, A A; Pokrovskaya, I D; Storrie, B; Sousa, A A; Aronova, M A; Leapman, R D

    2018-02-01

    Microscopies based on focused electron probes allow the cell biologist to image the 3D ultrastructure of eukaryotic cells and tissues extending over large volumes, thus providing new insight into the relationship between cellular architecture and function of organelles. Here we compare two such techniques: electron tomography in conjunction with axial bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM), and serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). The advantages and limitations of each technique are illustrated by their application to determining the 3D ultrastructure of human blood platelets, by considering specimen geometry, specimen preparation, beam damage and image processing methods. Many features of the complex membranes composing the platelet organelles can be determined from both approaches, although STEM tomography offers a higher ∼3 nm isotropic pixel size, compared with ∼5 nm for SBF-SEM in the plane of the block face and ∼30 nm in the perpendicular direction. In this regard, we demonstrate that STEM tomography is advantageous for visualizing the platelet canalicular system, which consists of an interconnected network of narrow (∼50-100 nm) membranous cisternae. In contrast, SBF-SEM enables visualization of complete platelets, each of which extends ∼2 µm in minimum dimension, whereas BF-STEM tomography can typically only visualize approximately half of the platelet volume due to a rapid non-linear loss of signal in specimens of thickness greater than ∼1.5 µm. We also show that the limitations of each approach can be ameliorated by combining 3D and 2D measurements using a stereological approach. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanju Gupta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py–1SO3, 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py − Me-NH2 and Pluronic® P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr_LPE are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs namely, monolayer graphene, Gr_LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic® P-123, graphene oxide (GO and its reduced form (rGO on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (kET using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron’s theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical wiring of the redox centers

  6. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sanju, E-mail: sanju.gupta@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd. Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576 (United States); Biotechnology Center, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd. Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576 (United States); Irihamye, Aline [Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd. Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py–1SO{sub 3}), 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py − Me-NH{sub 2}) and Pluronic{sup ®} P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr-LPE) are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy) techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs) namely, monolayer graphene, Gr-LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic{sup ®} P-123), graphene oxide (GO) and its reduced form (rGO) on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c) [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb) [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET) kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (k{sub ET}) using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron’s theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure) upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical

  7. Magnetic anisotropy and anisotropic ballistic conductance of thin magnetic wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirianov, R.

    2006-01-01

    The magnetocrystalline anisotropy of thin magnetic wires of iron and cobalt is quite different from the bulk phases. The spin moment of monatomic Fe wire may be as high as 3.4 μ B , while the orbital moment as high as 0.5 μ B . The magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) was calculated for wires up to 0.6 nm in diameter starting from monatomic wire and adding consecutive shells for thicker wires. I observe that Fe wires exhibit the change sign with the stress applied along the wire. It means that easy axis may change from the direction along the wire to perpendicular to the wire. We find that ballistic conductance of the wire depends on the direction of the applied magnetic field, i.e. shows anisotropic ballistic magnetoresistance. This effect occurs due to the symmetry dependence of the splitting of degenerate bands in the applied field which changes the number of bands crossing the Fermi level. We find that the ballistic conductance changes with applied stress. Even for thicker wires the ballistic conductance changes by factor 2 on moderate tensile stain in our 5x4 model wire. Thus, the ballistic conductance of magnetic wires changes in the applied field due to the magnetostriction. This effect can be observed as large anisotropic BMR in the experiment

  8. Approximate ballistics formulas for spherical pellets in free flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.J. Allen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ballistics equations for spherical pellets in free flight are simplified through appropriate scaling of the pellet velocity and pellet distance. Two different drag coefficient curves are averaged to yield a single curve applicable to shot pellets and round balls. The resulting S-shaped drag coefficient curve is approximated by three straight-line segments. The scaled ballistics equations are then solved exactly and simple formulas are found for the velocity and flight time with respect to trajectory distance. The formulas are applicable to spherical shot pellets and round balls of any composition under any atmospheric conditions. The formulas are amenable to quick and easy computation and may also serve as an aid in understanding and comparing black-box ballistics calculators. For shotshell ballistics, an important assumption in the present investigation is that the pellets are moving as single, free spheres and not as a dense cloud or in a shot column, in particular, the pellets are not interacting during flight. Therefore, the formulas are most appropriate for single round balls, for large shot sizes, and for pellets of small shot size fired from open chokes. The formulas are clear and accessible, and can be implemented by military or law enforcement personnel as well as hunters and shooters. This work differs from previous investigations in that accurate ballistics formulas are derived for spherical projectiles of shotguns and muzzleloaders using realistic drag coefficients.

  9. Transition to ballistic regime for heat transport in helium II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciacca, Michele, E-mail: michele.sciacca@unipa.it [Dipartimento Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, Università degli studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Sellitto, Antonio, E-mail: ant.sellitto@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Informatica ed Economia, Università della Basilicata, Campus Macchia Romana, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Jou, David, E-mail: david.jou@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Catalans, Carme 47, 08001 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-07-04

    The size-dependent and flux-dependent effective thermal conductivity of narrow capillaries filled with superfluid helium is analyzed from a thermodynamic continuum perspective. The classical Landau evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of quiescent superfluid, or the Gorter–Mellinck regime of turbulent superfluids, is extended to describe the transition to ballistic regime in narrow channels wherein the radius R is comparable to (or smaller than) the phonon mean-free path ℓ in superfluid helium. To do so, we start from an extended equation for the heat flux incorporating non-local terms, and take into consideration a heat slip flow along the walls of the tube. This leads from an effective thermal conductivity proportional to R{sup 2} (Landau regime) to another one proportional to Rℓ (ballistic regime). We consider two kinds of flows: along cylindrical pipes and along two infinite parallel plates. - Highlights: • Heat transport in counterflow helium in the ballistic regime. • The one-fluid model based on the Extended Thermodynamics is used. • The transition from the Landau regime to the ballistic regime. • The transition from quantum turbulence to ballistic regime.

  10. Ballistic heat conduction and mass disorder in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Zhang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that in the disordered harmonic chain, heat conduction is subballistic and the thermal conductivity (κ) scales asymptotically as lim L→∞ κ∝L 0.5 where L is the chain length. However, using the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method and analytical modelling, we show that there exists a critical crossover length scale (L C ) below which ballistic heat conduction (κ∝L) can coexist with mass disorder. This ballistic-to-subballistic heat conduction crossover is connected to the exponential attenuation of the phonon transmittance function Ξ i.e. Ξ(ω, L) = exp[−L/λ(ω)], where λ is the frequency-dependent attenuation length. The crossover length can be determined from the minimum attenuation length, which depends on the maximum transmitted frequency. We numerically determine the dependence of the transmittance on frequency and mass composition as well as derive a closed form estimate, which agrees closely with the numerical results. For the length-dependent thermal conductance, we also derive a closed form expression which agrees closely with numerical results and reproduces the ballistic to subballistic thermal conduction crossover. This allows us to characterize the crossover in terms of changes in the length, mass composition and temperature dependence, and also to determine the conditions under which heat conduction enters the ballistic regime. We describe how the mass composition can be modified to increase ballistic heat conduction. (paper)

  11. Terahertz spectroscopy of two-dimensional electron-hole pairs: probing Mott physics of magneto-excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gao, Weilu; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Kono, Junichiro

    2015-03-01

    Density-dependent Coulomb interactions can drive electron-hole (e - h) pairs in semiconductors through an excitonic Mott transition from an excitonic gas into an e - h plasma. Theoretical studies suggest that these interactions can be strongly modified by an external magnetic field, including the absence of inter-exciton interactions in the high magnetic field limit in two dimensions, due to an e - h charge symmetry, which results in ultrastable magneto-excitons. Here, we present a systematic experimental study of e - h pairs in photo-excited undoped GaAs quantum wells in magnetic fields with ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy. We simultaneously monitored the dynamics of the intraexcitonic 1 s-2 p transition (which splits into 1 s-2p+ and 1 s-2p- transitions in a magnetic field) and the cyclotron resonance of unbound electrons and holes up to 10 Tesla. We found that the 1 s-2p- absorption feature is robust at high magnetic fields even under high excitation fluences, indicating magnetically enhanced stability of excitons. We will discuss the Mott physics of magneto-excitons as a function of temperature, e - h pair density, optical pump delay time, as well as magnetic field, and also compare two-dimensional excitons in GaAs quantum wells with three-dimensional excitons in bulk GaAs.

  12. Probing topological electronic effects in catalysis: thiophene adsorption on NiMoS and CoMoS clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges Junior, Itamar; Silva, Alexander M., E-mail: itamar@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia de Defesa

    2012-10-15

    A general two-step theoretical approach to study electronic redistributions in catalytic processes is presented. In the first step, density functional theory (DFT) is used to fully optimize two geometries: the cluster representing the catalyst and the cluster plus adsorbed molecule system. In the second step, the converged electron density is divided into multipoles centered on atomic sites according to a distributed multipole analysis which provides detailed topological information on the charge redistribution of catalyst and molecule before and after adsorption. This approach is applied to thiophene adsorption on the 10{sup -}10 metal edge of Ni(Co)MoS catalysts and compared to the same reaction on bare MoS{sub 2}. Calculated adsorption energies, geometries and multipole analysis indicate weak thiophene chemisorption on both cases. A Coulombic bond model showed that surface metal-sulfur bond strengths in Ni(Co)MoS promoted catalysts are considerably smaller than in bare MoS{sub 2}, thus confirming the origin of the enhancement of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity in these catalysts. (author)

  13. Consecutive Fragmentation Mechanisms of Protonated Ferulic Acid Probed by Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Sabrina M.; Marta, Rick A.; Martens, Jonathan K.; McMahon, Terry B.

    2012-10-01

    Protonated ferulic acid and its principle fragment ion have been characterized using infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory. Due to its extensively conjugated structure, protonated ferulic acid is observed to yield three stable fragment ions in IRMPD experiments. It is proposed that two parallel fragmentation pathways of protonated ferulic acid are being observed. The first pathway involves proton transfer, resulting in the loss of water and subsequently carbon monoxide, producing fragment ions m/z 177 and 149, respectively. Optimization of m/z 177 yields a species containing an acylium group, which is supported by a diagnostic peak in the IRMPD spectrum at 2168 cm-1. The second pathway involves an alternate proton transfer leading to loss of methanol and rearrangement to a five-membered ring.

  14. Electronic states of solids probed by bulk-sensitive high-resolution soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiyama, A

    2003-01-01

    High-energy and high-resolution soft x-ray photoemission studies have been performed on strongly correlated Ce compounds and vanadium oxides at BL25SU of SPring-8. The bulk spectra of CeRu sub 2 are explained by a band-structure calculation (itinerant model) whereas the other Ce 4f spectra are well reproduced by calculations based on the single impurity Anderson model (model from a localized limit). In a strong contrast to so far reported results, the bulk spectral functions are revealed to be insensitive to x for Sr sub 1 sub - sub x Ca sub x VO sub 3. Our study has demonstrated the importance of high-energy and high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy for revealing detailed bulk electronic states of strongly correlated systems. (author)

  15. What Should Be the United States Policy towards Ballistic Missile Defense for Northeast Asia?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delgado, Roberto L

    2005-01-01

    .... The threat of ballistic missiles from Northeast Asia is especially high. China and North Korea are seen as the top threats in the region when it comes to the delivery of WMD through ballistic missiles...

  16. Characterization and Cytotoxic Assessment of Ballistic Aerosol Particulates for Tungsten Alloy Penetrators into Steel Target Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Schuster

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature and constituents of ballistic aerosol created by kinetic energy penetrator rods of tungsten heavy alloys (W-Fe-Ni and W-Fe-Co perforating steel target plates was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These aerosol regimes, which can occur in closed, armored military vehicle penetration, are of concern for potential health effects, especially as a consequence of being inhaled. In a controlled volume containing 10 equispaced steel target plates, particulates were systematically collected onto special filters. Filter collections were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM which included energy-dispersive (X-ray spectrometry (EDS. Dark-field TEM identified a significant nanoparticle concentration while EDS in the SEM identified the propensity of mass fraction particulates to consist of Fe and FeO, representing target erosion and formation of an accumulating debris field. Direct exposure of human epithelial cells (A549, a model for lung tissue, to particulates (especially nanoparticulates collected on individual filters demonstrated induction of rapid and global cell death to the extent that production of inflammatory cytokines was entirely inhibited. These observations along with comparisons of a wide range of other nanoparticulate species exhibiting cell death in A549 culture may suggest severe human toxicity potential for inhaled ballistic aerosol, but the complexity of the aerosol (particulate mix has not yet allowed any particular chemical composition to be identified.

  17. Characterization and Cytotoxic Assessment of Ballistic Aerosol Particulates for Tungsten Alloy Penetrators into Steel Target Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Brenda I.; Murr, Lawrence E.; Suro, Raquel M.; Gaytan, Sara M.; Ramirez, Diana A.; Garza, Kristine M.; Schuster, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    The nature and constituents of ballistic aerosol created by kinetic energy penetrator rods of tungsten heavy alloys (W-Fe-Ni and W-Fe-Co) perforating steel target plates was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These aerosol regimes, which can occur in closed, armored military vehicle penetration, are of concern for potential health effects, especially as a consequence of being inhaled. In a controlled volume containing 10 equispaced steel target plates, particulates were systematically collected onto special filters. Filter collections were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) which included energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometry (EDS). Dark-field TEM identified a significant nanoparticle concentration while EDS in the SEM identified the propensity of mass fraction particulates to consist of Fe and FeO, representing target erosion and formation of an accumulating debris field. Direct exposure of human epithelial cells (A549), a model for lung tissue, to particulates (especially nanoparticulates) collected on individual filters demonstrated induction of rapid and global cell death to the extent that production of inflammatory cytokines was entirely inhibited. These observations along with comparisons of a wide range of other nanoparticulate species exhibiting cell death in A549 culture may suggest severe human toxicity potential for inhaled ballistic aerosol, but the complexity of the aerosol (particulate) mix has not yet allowed any particular chemical composition to be identified. PMID:20948926

  18. Learning without knowing: subliminal visual feedback facilitates ballistic motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    by subconscious (subliminal) augmented visual feedback on motor performance. To test this, 45 subjects participated in the experiment, which involved learning of a ballistic task. The task was to execute simple ankle plantar flexion movements as quickly as possible within 200 ms and to continuously improve...... by the learner, indeed facilitated ballistic motor learning. This effect likely relates to multiple (conscious versus unconscious) processing of visual feedback and to the specific neural circuitries involved in optimization of ballistic motor performance.......). It is a well- described phenomenon that we may respond to features of our surroundings without being aware of them. It is also a well-known principle, that learning is reinforced by augmented feedback on motor performance. In the present experiment we hypothesized that motor learning may be facilitated...

  19. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled and ballistically-controlled reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of diffusion-controlled two-species annihilation, A+B → O and single-species ballistically-controlled annihilation, A+A → O are investigated. For two-species annihilation, we describe the basic mechanism that leads to the formation of a coarsening mosaic of A- and B-domains. The implications of this picture on the distribution of reactants is discussed. For ballistic annihilation, dimensional analysis shows that the concentration and rms velocity decay as c∼t -α and v∼t -β , respectively, with α+β = 1 in any spatial dimension. Analysis of the Boltzmann equation for the evolution of the velocity distribution yields accurate predictions for the kinetics. New phenomena associated with discrete initial velocity distributions and with mixed ballistic and diffusive reactant motion are also discussed. (author)

  20. Ballistic Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Single-Atom Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöneberg, J; Otte, F; Néel, N; Weismann, A; Mokrousov, Y; Kröger, J; Berndt, R; Heinze, S

    2016-02-10

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance, that is, the sensitivity of the electrical resistance of magnetic materials on the magnetization direction, is expected to be strongly enhanced in ballistic transport through nanoscale junctions. However, unambiguous experimental evidence of this effect is difficult to achieve. We utilize single-atom junctions to measure this ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Single Co and Ir atoms are deposited on domains and domain walls of ferromagnetic Fe layers on W(110) to control their magnetization directions. They are contacted with nonmagnetic tips in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope to measure the junction conductances. Large changes of the magnetoresistance occur from the tunneling to the ballistic regime due to the competition of localized and delocalized d-orbitals, which are differently affected by spin-orbit coupling. This work shows that engineering the AMR at the single atom level is feasible.