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Sample records for ball-rolling scarabaeini gymnopleurini

  1. Precession of a Spinning Ball Rolling down an Inclined Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    A routine problem in an introductory physics course considers a rectangular block at rest on a plane inclined at angle a to the horizontal. In order for the block not to slide down the incline, the coefficient of sliding friction, µ, must be at least tan a. The situation is similar for the case of a ball rolling down an inclined plane. In order…

  2. Neural extrapolation of motion for a ball rolling down an inclined plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Scaleia, Barbara; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Zago, Myrka

    2014-01-01

    It is known that humans tend to misjudge the kinematics of a target rolling down an inclined plane. Because visuomotor responses are often more accurate and less prone to perceptual illusions than cognitive judgments, we asked the question of how rolling motion is extrapolated for manual interception or drawing tasks. In three experiments a ball rolled down an incline with kinematics that differed as a function of the starting position (4 different positions) and slope (30°, 45° or 60°). In Experiment 1, participants had to punch the ball as it fell off the incline. In Experiment 2, the ball rolled down the incline but was stopped at the end; participants were asked to imagine that the ball kept moving and to punch it. In Experiment 3, the ball rolled down the incline and was stopped at the end; participants were asked to draw with the hand in air the trajectory that would be described by the ball if it kept moving. We found that performance was most accurate when motion of the ball was visible until interception and haptic feedback of hand-ball contact was available (Experiment 1). However, even when participants punched an imaginary moving ball (Experiment 2) or drew in air the imaginary trajectory (Experiment 3), they were able to extrapolate to some extent global aspects of the target motion, including its path, speed and arrival time. We argue that the path and kinematics of a ball rolling down an incline can be extrapolated surprisingly well by the brain using both visual information and internal models of target motion.

  3. Neural extrapolation of motion for a ball rolling down an inclined plane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara La Scaleia

    Full Text Available It is known that humans tend to misjudge the kinematics of a target rolling down an inclined plane. Because visuomotor responses are often more accurate and less prone to perceptual illusions than cognitive judgments, we asked the question of how rolling motion is extrapolated for manual interception or drawing tasks. In three experiments a ball rolled down an incline with kinematics that differed as a function of the starting position (4 different positions and slope (30°, 45° or 60°. In Experiment 1, participants had to punch the ball as it fell off the incline. In Experiment 2, the ball rolled down the incline but was stopped at the end; participants were asked to imagine that the ball kept moving and to punch it. In Experiment 3, the ball rolled down the incline and was stopped at the end; participants were asked to draw with the hand in air the trajectory that would be described by the ball if it kept moving. We found that performance was most accurate when motion of the ball was visible until interception and haptic feedback of hand-ball contact was available (Experiment 1. However, even when participants punched an imaginary moving ball (Experiment 2 or drew in air the imaginary trajectory (Experiment 3, they were able to extrapolate to some extent global aspects of the target motion, including its path, speed and arrival time. We argue that the path and kinematics of a ball rolling down an incline can be extrapolated surprisingly well by the brain using both visual information and internal models of target motion.

  4. The Austrian social festival Keep the Ball Rolling in a peripheral region of Upper Styria

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    Gstach Isabell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The “Steirische Eisenstraße” is a region located in the province of Styria in Austria, which has been struggling with a massive shift in population and age structure for some time. In 2012/13 the Austrian social festival Keep the Ball Rolling is taking place in this region. Over a period of 18 months, the social festival is providing opportunities to think of their own environment. Consequently, they can develop and implement ideas for good cohabitation and put these into practice. The main focus of this article is the demographic presentation of the “Steirische Eisenstraße” region, according to population, employment and age structure. The introduction of the social festival is fundamental in initiating successful change processes.

  5. Bearing selection in ball-rolling dung beetles: is it constant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Emily; Byrne, Marcus J; Scholtz, Clarke H; Warrant, Eric J; Dacke, Marie

    2010-11-01

    Ball rolling in dung beetles is thought to have evolved as a means to escape intense inter- and intra-specific competition at the dung pile. Accordingly, dung beetles typically roll along a straight-line path away from the pile, this being the most effective escape strategy for transporting dung to a suitable burial site. In this study, we investigate how individual diurnal dung beetles, Scarabaeus (Kheper) nigroaeneus, select the compass bearing of their straight-line rolls. In particular, we examine whether roll bearings are constant with respect to geographic cues, celestial cues, or other environmental cues (such as wind direction). Our results reveal that the roll bearings taken by individual beetles are not constant with respect to geographic or celestial references. Environmental cues appear to have some influence over bearing selection, although the relationship is not strong. Furthermore, the variance in roll bearing that we observe is not affected by the presence or absence of other beetles. Thus, rather than being constant for individual beetles, bearing selection varies each time a beetle makes a ball and rolls it away from the dung pile. This strategy allows beetles to make an efficient escape from the dung pile while minimizing the chance of encountering competition.

  6. LHC gets the ball rolling

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    1. The multidisciplinary team responsible for the RF ball project to check the interconnections. From left to right: Rhodri Jones (AB/BI), Eva Calvo (AB/BI), Francesco Bertinelli (AT/MCS), Sonia Bartolome Jimenez (TS/IC), Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC), Paul Cruikshank (AT/VAC), Willemjan Maan (AT/VAC), Alain Poncet (AT/MCS), Marek Gasior (AB/BI).2. During the tests the ball is inserted very carefully into the vacuum chamber.1. Le groupe pluridisciplinaire qui a mené le projet de balle RF pour vérifier les interconnexions avec, de gauche à droite, Rhodri Jones (AB/BI), Eva Calvo (AB/BI), Francesco Bertinelli (AT/MCS), Sonia Bartolome Jimenez (TS/IC), Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC), Paul Cruikshank (AT/VAC), Willemjan Maan (AT/VAC), Alain Poncet (AT/MCS) et Marek Gasior (AB/BI).2. Lors des tests, la balle est insérée dans la chambre à vide avec beaucoup de précaution.

  7. LHC gets the ball rolling

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A technique involving a small ball with a transmitter embedded inside it has been successfully tested in Sector 7-8. The ball is sent through the LHC beam pipes to check the LHC interconnections. The multidisciplinary team responsible for the RF ball project to check the interconnections. From left to right: Rhodri Jones (AB/BI), Eva Calvo (AB/BI), Francesco Bertinelli (AT/MCS), Sonia Bartolome Jimenez (TS/IC), Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC), Paul Cruikshank (AT/VAC), Willemjan Maan (AT/VAC), Alain Poncet (AT/MCS), Marek Gasior (AB/BI). During the tests the ball is inserted very carefully into the vacuum chamber.A game of ping-pong at the LHC? On 13 September a rather unusual test was carried out in Sector 7-8 of the accelerator. A ball just a bit smaller than a ping-pong ball was carefully introduced into one of the accelerator’s two vacuum pipes, where it travelled 800 metres in the space of a few mi...

  8. Validation of single ball rolling contact fatigue machine dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Bryan [SKF Aeroengine, Falconer (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Single ball test machines are a common method for accelerated rolling contact fatigue testing of bearing materials. Historically, it has always been assumed that the force applied by the retaining bars is negligible, without any data to support this claim. In this study, strain gauges were placed on the retaining bars to determine the load experienced by the retaining bars. This value was then compared to the applied load. It was found that a load of approximately 4 N was transferred to the retainer by the test ball during steady state operation, when a 8385 N load was applied to the ball via the rings. A simulation of the system was also created and successfully predicted the expected loads with reasonable accuracy. This information, as well as the technique of strain gauging the retaining bars, may be useful in the development of similar testing machinery.

  9. Une espèce nouvelle du genre Scarabaeus d’Afrique du Nord (Coleoptera : Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeini

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    Khalid BOURAADA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of a dedicated entomological survey mission of mobile sandy formations (dunes, nebkhas ... and fixed by various perennial grasses in eastern Morocco, a newly identified specimen of the genus Scarabaeus of male sex has particularly caught our attention. Indeed, the great family of Scarabaeoidea whose species are mostly attracted to dung feces dominates the dune ecosystems in terms of number of species and individuals. The great taxonomic richness is denoted in Bouârfa region. It is the same for the abundance of which the high values are noted in this desertic station (Bouârfa. The low numbers of beetles in Saïdia region is related to the isolation of this type of dune in the region it is due primarily to the influence of the Mediterranean climate.

  10. Charity with an arm twist. Senate hearing starts the ball rolling on tougher community benefits standard, greater federal oversight of not-for-profits.

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    Becker, Cinda

    2006-09-18

    A Senate hearing last week helped boost not-for-profit hospitals' chances of facing a new standard for reporting community benefits. At stake for hospitals are billions in tax breaks. The standard for exemption hasn't been modified since 1969, and "has not kept up with the substantial unfunded health needs of communities," says Nancy Kane, right, a member of MedPAC.

  11. Linear colliders for photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The enthusiasm of the first international workshop on photonphoton colliders and associated physics, held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 28 March - 1 April, could have set a ball rolling. According to proponents of this physics, the particle physics one can study with a high energy linear collider is special and complements that of a hadron supercollider

  12. Poisson structures for reduced non-holonomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Borisov, Mamaev and Kilin have recently found certain Poisson structures with respect to which the reduced and rescaled systems of certain non-holonomic problems, involving rolling bodies without slipping, become Hamiltonian, the Hamiltonian function being the reduced energy. We study further the algebraic origin of these Poisson structures, showing that they are of rank 2 and therefore the mentioned rescaling is not necessary. We show that they are determined, up to a non-vanishing factor function, by the existence of a system of first-order differential equations providing two integrals of motion. We generalize the form of the Poisson structures and extend their domain of definition. We apply the theory to the rolling disc, the Routh's sphere, the ball rolling on a surface of revolution, and its special case of a ball rolling inside a cylinder

  13. Pulmonary function, respiratory symptoms, and dust exposures among workers engaged in early manufacturing processes of tea: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Tzong-Shiun; Chung, Jui-Jung; Wang, Chung-Jing; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Kuo, Yau-Chang; Guo, How-Ran

    2012-02-13

    To evaluate pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in workers engaged in the early manufacturing processes of tea and to identify the associated factors, we conducted a study in a tea production area in Taiwan. We recruited tea workers who engaged in the early manufacturing process in the Mountain Ali area in Taiwan and a comparison group of local office workers who were matched for age, gender, and smoking habits. We performed questionnaire interviews, pulmonary function tests, skin prick tests, and measurement of specific IgE for tea on the participants and assessed tea dust exposures in the tea factories. The 91 participating tea workers had higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms than the comparison group (32 participants). Among tea workers, ball-rolling workers had the highest prevalence of symptoms and the highest exposures of inhalable dusts. At baseline, tea workers had similar pulmonary functions as the comparison group, but compared to the other tea workers ball-rolling workers had a lower ratio of the 1-second forced expiratory volume to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and a lower maximal mid-expiratory flow rate expressed as% of the predicted value--MMF (%pred). A total of 58 tea workers participated in the on-site investigation and the cross-shift lung function measurements. We found ball-rolling yielded the highest inhalable dust level, panning yielded the highest respirable dust level, and withering yielded the lowest levels of both dusts. Ball-rolling also yielded the highest coarse fraction (defined as inhalable dusts minus respirable dusts), which represented exposures from nose to tracheobronchial tract. During the shift, we observed significant declines in pulmonary function, especially in ball-rolling workers. Multiple regressions showed that age, height, work tasks, coarse fraction, and number of months working in tea manufacturing each year were independent predictors of certain pulmonary function parameters in tea workers. Tea

  14. Definition of criteria for estimating alternative technologies of increasing quality of rotor shaft neck by electroerosive alloying and surface plastic deformation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsynkovskyy, V.; Kirik, G.; Tarelnyk, V.; Zharkov, P.; Konoplianchenko, Ie; Dovzhyk, M.

    2017-08-01

    There are represented the results of influence of the surface plastic deformation (SPD) methods, namely, diamond smoothing (DS) and ball-rolling surface roughness generation (BSRG) ones on the qualitative parameters (residual stresses, fatigue strength and wear resistance values) of the steel substrate surface layers formed by the electroerosive alloying (EEA) method. There are proposed the most rational methods of deformation and also the composition for electroerosive coatings providing the presence of the favorable residual compressive stresses in the surface layer, increasing fatigue strength and wear resistance values. There are stated the criteria for estimating the alternative variants of the combined technologies and choosing the most rational ones thereof.

  15. Anatomical organization of the brain of a diurnal and a nocturnal dung beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Esa-Ville; Dacke, Marie; Heinze, Stanley; El Jundi, Basil

    2017-06-01

    To avoid the fierce competition for food, South African ball-rolling dung beetles carve a piece of dung off a dung-pile, shape it into a ball and roll it away along a straight line path. For this unidirectional exit from the busy dung pile, at night and day, the beetles use a wide repertoire of celestial compass cues. This robust and relatively easily measurable orientation behavior has made ball-rolling dung beetles an attractive model organism for the study of the neuroethology behind insect orientation and sensory ecology. Although there is already some knowledge emerging concerning how celestial cues are processed in the dung beetle brain, little is known about its general neural layout. Mapping the neuropils of the dung beetle brain is thus a prerequisite to understand the neuronal network that underlies celestial compass orientation. Here, we describe and compare the brains of a day-active and a night-active dung beetle species based on immunostainings against synapsin and serotonin. We also provide 3D reconstructions for all brain areas and many of the fiber bundles in the brain of the day-active dung beetle. Comparison of neuropil structures between the two dung beetle species revealed differences that reflect adaptations to different light conditions. Altogether, our results provide a reference framework for future studies on the neuroethology of insects in general and dung beetles in particular. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dynamics of non-holonomic systems with stochastic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, D. D.; Putkaradze, V.

    2018-01-01

    This paper formulates a variational approach for treating observational uncertainty and/or computational model errors as stochastic transport in dynamical systems governed by action principles under non-holonomic constraints. For this purpose, we derive, analyse and numerically study the example of an unbalanced spherical ball rolling under gravity along a stochastic path. Our approach uses the Hamilton-Pontryagin variational principle, constrained by a stochastic rolling condition, which we show is equivalent to the corresponding stochastic Lagrange-d'Alembert principle. In the example of the rolling ball, the stochasticity represents uncertainty in the observation and/or error in the computational simulation of the angular velocity of rolling. The influence of the stochasticity on the deterministically conserved quantities is investigated both analytically and numerically. Our approach applies to a wide variety of stochastic, non-holonomically constrained systems, because it preserves the mathematical properties inherited from the variational principle.

  17. Control design and robustness analysis of a ball and plate system by using polynomial chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colón, Diego [University of São Paulo, Polytechnic School, LAC -PTC, São Paulo (Brazil); Balthazar, José M. [São Paulo State University - Rio Claro Campus, Rio Claro (Brazil); Reis, Célia A. dos [São Paulo State University - Bauru Campus, Bauru (Brazil); Bueno, Átila M.; Diniz, Ivando S. [São Paulo State University - Sorocaba Campus, Sorocaba (Brazil); Rosa, Suelia de S. R. F. [University of Brasilia, Brasilia (Brazil)

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model of a ball and plate system, a control law and analyze its robustness properties by using the polynomial chaos method. The ball rolls without slipping. There is an auxiliary robot vision system that determines the bodies' positions and velocities, and is used for control purposes. The actuators are to orthogonal DC motors, that changes the plate's angles with the ground. The model is a extension of the ball and beam system and is highly nonlinear. The system is decoupled in two independent equations for coordinates x and y. Finally, the resulting nonlinear closed loop systems are analyzed by the polynomial chaos methodology, which considers that some system parameters are random variables, and generates statistical data that can be used in the robustness analysis.

  18. A modern Galileo tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Stefano; Moauro, Francesco; Siccardi, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    The year 2014 marked the four-hundred-and-fiftieth anniversary of Galileo’s birth, making it the perfect occasion to present and illustrate a GeoGebra applet which reproduces some of Galileo’s celebrated experiments on the uniformly accelerated motion, as reported on in ‘Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Relating to Two New Sciences’. Our applet is inexpensive, makes up for the lack of a fully-fledged physics lab and can be used as an accompanying activity in an (open) online course. The version we present allows for an ‘empirical’ test of three of the most relevant theorems in the third day of Galileo’s Discourses. By three different experimental setups, students can see a ball roll down a slope, take measures and perform data analysis, following Galileo’s footsteps. The applet is made freely available on the internet, so it can be downloaded and modified to cater for different students’ needs.

  19. Ready, set, go! Low anticipatory response during a dyadic task in infants at high familial risk for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Landa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD demonstrate a host of motor impairments that may share a common developmental basis with ASD core symptoms. School-age children with ASD exhibit particular difficulty with hand-eye coordination and appear to be less sensitive to visual feedback during motor learning. Sensorimotor deficits are observable as early as 6 months of age in children who later develop ASD; yet the interplay of early motor, visual and social skill development in ASD is not well understood. Integration of visual input with motor output is vital for the formation of internal models of action. Such integration is necessary not only to master a wide range of motor skills, but also to imitate and interpret the actions of others. Thus, closer examination of the early development of visual-motor deficits is of critical importance to ASD. In the present study of infants at high risk (HR and low risk (LR for ASD, we examined visual-motor coupling, or action anticipation, during a dynamic, interactive ball-rolling activity. We hypothesized that, compared to LR infants, HR infants would display decreased anticipatory response (perception-guided predictive action to the approaching ball. We also examined visual attention before and during ball rolling to determine whether attention engagement contributed to differences in anticipation. Results showed that LR and HR infants demonstrated context appropriate looking behavior, both before and during the ball’s trajectory toward them. However, HR infants were less likely to exhibit context appropriate anticipatory motor response to the approaching ball (moving their arm/hand to intercept the ball than LR infants. This finding did not appear to be driven by differences in motor skill between risk groups at 6 months of age and was extended to show an atypical predictive relationship between anticipatory behavior at 6 months and preference for looking at faces compared to objects at age 14

  20. Expanding Newton Mechanics with Neutrosophy and Quadstage Method ──New Newton Mechanics Taking Law of Conservation of Energy as Unique Source Law

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    Fu Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophy is a new branch of philosophy, and "Quad-stage" (Four stages is the expansion of Hegel’s triad thesis, antithesis, synthesis of development. Applying Neutrosophy and "Quad-stage" method, the purposes of this paper are expanding Newton Mechanics and making it become New Newton Mechanics (NNW taking law of conservation of energy as unique source law. In this paper the examples show that in some cases other laws may be contradicted with the law of conservation of energy. The original Newton's three laws and the law of gravity, in principle can be derived by the law of conservation of energy. Through the example of free falling body, this paper derives the original Newton's second law by using the law of conservation of energy, and proves that there is not the contradiction between the original law of gravity and the law of conservation of energy; and through the example of a small ball rolls along the inclined plane (belonging to the problem cannot be solved by general relativity that a body is forced to move in flat space, derives improved Newton's second law and improved law of gravity by using law of conservation of energy. Whether or not other conservation laws (such as the law of conservation of momentum and the law of conservation of angular momentum can be utilized, should be tested by law of conservation of energy. When the original Newton's second law is not correct, then the laws of conservation of momentum and angular momentum are no longer correct; therefore the general forms of improved law of conservation of momentum and improved law of conservation of angular momentum are presented. In the cases that law of conservation of energy cannot be used effectively, New Newton Mechanics will not exclude that according to other theories or accurate experiments to derive the laws or formulas to solve some specific problems. For example, with the help of the result of general relativity, the improved Newton's formula of universal

  1. Ideas for Use of an IPad in Introductory Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurora, Tarlok S.

    2014-03-01

    Mobile devices such as an IPad, tablet computers and smartphones offer an opportunity to collect information to facilitate physics teaching and learning. The data collected with built-in sensors, such as a video camera, may be analyzed on the mobile device itself or on a desktop computer. In this work, first, the circular motion of a steel ball rolling in a cereal bowl was analyzed to show that it consisted of two simple harmonic motions, in perpendicular directions. Secondly, motion of two balls-one dropped vertically down, and the other one launched as a projectile - was analyzed. Data was analyzed with Logger Pro software, and value of g was determined graphically. Details of the work, its limitations and additional examples will be described. The material so obtained may be used as a demonstration, in a classroom, to clarify physics concepts. In a school, where students are required to have such portable devices, one may assign such activities as homework, to enhance student engagement in learning physics. The author is thankful to USciences for the IPad; and Rich Cosgriff, Phyllis Blumberg and Elia Eschenazi for useful discussions.

  2. The coefficient of friction of UHMWPE along an entire walking cycle using a ball-on-disc tribometer under arthrokinematics and loading conditions prescribed by ISO 14243-3:2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceinas-Sanchez, J D O; Alvarez-Vera, M; Montoya-Santiyanes, L A; Dominguez-Lopez, I; Garcia-Garcia, A L

    2017-01-01

    The observation of tribological phenomena occurring in total knee replacement (TKR) simulators may be obscured by the intrinsic complexity of their operation: the dynamics and kinematics prescribed by the ISO 14243-3:2014 standard, and the geometry of the surfaces involved. On the other hand, evaluating the individual performance of the tribosystem elements may be carried out in simpler apparatuses. An experimental method is presented here, by means of which the arthrokinematics and loading conditions prescribed by the said standard are adapted to a ball-on-disc configuration in order to observe the behavior of the coefficient of friction along an entire walking cycle, using the contact point of an AISI 316L stainless steel ball rolling/sliding on an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disc, lubricated by a solution of fetal bovine serum, at 37°C. The method was tried on two different testing fluids prepared with protein concentrations of 20g/L, according to the said standard, and 36g/L, as received. The statistical model obtained for the behavior of the COF during the entire walking cycle may be used in numerical simulations of UHMWPE wear, under the conditions established by ISO 14243-3:2014. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Social Hostility in Soccer and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doesum, Niels J.; Van Prooijen, Jan-Willem; Verburgh, Lot; Van Lange, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Social hostility is seldom expressed overtly. More often than not, individuals try to get their hostile message across without risking violent altercations. However, subtle and relatively covert hostility is not easy to research. We suggest a novel way with the SoMi paradigm, a social decision making task that offers participants the opportunity to be socially mindful or socially hostile by leaving or limiting choice to others. Sampling a general population we find that, relative to friends and strangers, foes are indeed met with greater social hostility (Study 1). Focusing on the highly competitive environment of youth soccer, we find that rival team members elicit social hostility, whereas teammates elicit social mindfulness (Study 2). We conclude that social mindfulness and social hostility play a subtle role in the dynamics of interpersonal and/or intergroup relationships, in which leaving or limiting choice is one of the subtle ways to express benevolent versus hostile intentions; the SoMi paradigm may thus be helpful in identifying which way the ball rolls. PMID:27077379

  4. Spectral information as an orientation cue in dung beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jundi, Basil; Foster, James J; Byrne, Marcus J; Baird, Emily; Dacke, Marie

    2015-11-01

    During the day, a non-uniform distribution of long and short wavelength light generates a colour gradient across the sky. This gradient could be used as a compass cue, particularly by animals such as dung beetles that rely primarily on celestial cues for orientation. Here, we tested if dung beetles can use spectral cues for orientation by presenting them with monochromatic (green and UV) light spots in an indoor arena. Beetles kept their original bearing when presented with a single light cue, green or UV, or when presented with both light cues set 180° apart. When either the UV or the green light was turned off after the beetles had set their bearing in the presence of both cues, they were still able to maintain their original bearing to the remaining light. However, if the beetles were presented with two identical green light spots set 180° apart, their ability to maintain their original bearing was impaired. In summary, our data show that ball-rolling beetles could potentially use the celestial chromatic gradient as a reference for orientation. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. A Snapshot-Based Mechanism for Celestial Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jundi, Basil; Foster, James J; Khaldy, Lana; Byrne, Marcus J; Dacke, Marie; Baird, Emily

    2016-06-06

    In order to protect their food from competitors, ball-rolling dung beetles detach a piece of dung from a pile, shape it into a ball, and roll it away along a straight path [1]. They appear to rely exclusively on celestial compass cues to maintain their bearing [2-8], but the mechanism that enables them to use these cues for orientation remains unknown. Here, we describe the orientation strategy that allows dung beetles to use celestial cues in a dynamic fashion. We tested the underlying orientation mechanism by presenting beetles with a combination of simulated celestial cues (sun, polarized light, and spectral cues). We show that these animals do not rely on an innate prediction of the natural geographical relationship between celestial cues, as other navigating insects seem to [9, 10]. Instead, they appear to form an internal representation of the prevailing celestial scene, a "celestial snapshot," even if that scene represents a physical impossibility for the real sky. We also find that the beetles are able to maintain their bearing with respect to the presented cues only if the cues are visible when the snapshot is taken. This happens during the "dance," a behavior in which the beetle climbs on top of its ball and rotates about its vertical axis [11]. This strategy for reading celestial signals is a simple but efficient mechanism for straight-line orientation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diurnal dung beetles use the intensity gradient and the polarization pattern of the sky for orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Jundi, Basil; Smolka, Jochen; Baird, Emily; Byrne, Marcus J; Dacke, Marie

    2014-07-01

    To escape competition at the dung pile, a ball-rolling dung beetle forms a piece of dung into a ball and rolls it away. To ensure their efficient escape from the dung pile, beetles rely on a 'celestial compass' to move along a straight path. Here, we analyzed the reliability of different skylight cues for this compass and found that dung beetles rely not only on the sun but also on the skylight polarization pattern. Moreover, we show the first evidence of an insect using the celestial light-intensity gradient for orientation. Using a polarizer, we manipulated skylight so that the polarization pattern appeared to turn by 90 deg. The beetles then changed their bearing close to the expected 90 deg. This behavior was abolished if the sun was visible to the beetle, suggesting that polarized light is hierarchically subordinate to the sun. When the sky was depolarized and the sun was invisible, the beetles could still move along straight paths. Therefore, we analyzed the use of the celestial light-intensity gradient for orientation. Artificial rotation of the intensity pattern by 180 deg caused beetles to orient in the opposite direction. This light-intensity cue was also found to be subordinate to the sun and could play a role in disambiguating the polarization signal, especially at low sun elevations. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Effects of physical randomness training on virtual and laboratory golf putting performance in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, T C; Lamb, P F

    2018-06-01

    External randomness exists in all sports but is perhaps most obvious in golf putting where robotic putters sink only 80% of 5 m putts due to unpredictable ball-green dynamics. The purpose of this study was to test whether physical randomness training can improve putting performance in novices. A virtual random-physics golf-putting game was developed based on controlled ball-roll data. Thirty-two subjects were assigned a unique randomness gain (RG) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0-times real-world randomness. Putter face kinematics were measured in 5 m laboratory putts before and after five days of virtual training. Performance was quantified using putt success rate and "miss-adjustment correlation" (MAC), the correlation between left-right miss magnitude and subsequent right-left kinematic adjustments. Results showed no RG-success correlation (r = -0.066, p = 0.719) but mildly stronger correlations with MAC for face angle (r = -0.168, p = 0.358) and clubhead path (r = -0.302, p = 0.093). The strongest RG-MAC correlation was observed during virtual training (r = -0.692, p golf putting kinematics. Adaptation to external physical randomness during virtual training may therefore help golfers adapt to external randomness in real-world environments.

  8. Indirect interception actions by blind and visually impaired perceivers: echolocation for interceptive actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernat, Jean-Philippe; Gordon, Michael S

    2010-02-01

    This research examined the acoustic information used to support interceptive actions by the blind. Congenitally blind and severely visually impaired participants (all wearing an opaque, black eye-mask) were asked to listen to a target ball rolling down a track. In response, participants rolled their own ball along a perpendicular path to intercept the target. To better understand what information was used the echoic conditions and rolling dynamics of the target were varied across test sessions. In addition the rolling speed of the target and the distance of the participant from the target were varied across trials. Results demonstrated that participants tended to perform most accurately at moderate speeds and distances, overestimating the target's arrival at the fastest speed, and underestimating it at the slowest speed. However, changes to the target's dynamics, that is, the amount of deceleration it underwent on approach, did not strongly influence performance. Echoic conditions were found to affect performance, as participants were slightly more accurate in conditions with faster, higher-intensity echoes. Based on these results blind individuals in this research seemed to be using spatial and temporal cues to coordinate their interceptive actions.

  9. Application of powder metallurgy techniques to produce improved bearing elements for liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moracz, D. J.; Shipley, R. J.; Moxson, V. S.; Killman, R. J.; Munson, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to apply powder metallurgy techniques for the production of improved bearing elements, specifically balls and races, for advanced cryogenic turbopump bearings. The materials and fabrication techniques evaluated were judged on the basis of their ability to improve fatigue life, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant bearings over the currently used 440C. An extensive list of candidate bearing alloys in five different categories was considered: tool/die steels, through hardened stainless steels, cobalt-base alloys, and gear steels. Testing of alloys for final consideration included hardness, rolling contact fatigue, cross cylinder wear, elevated temperature wear, room and cryogenic fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking, and five-ball (rolling-sliding element) testing. Results of the program indicated two alloys that showed promise for improved bearing elements. These alloys were MRC-2001 and X-405. 57mm bearings were fabricated from the MRC-2001 alloy for further actual hardware rig testing by NASA-MSFC.

  10. Bubbling away

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-10-15

    Bubble chambers may have almost vanished from the front line of physics research, but the vivid memory of their intricate and sometimes beautiful patterns of particle tracks lives on, and has greatly influenced the computer graphics of track reconstruction in today's big experiments. 'Seeing' an interaction makes it more understandable. Bubble chambers, with their big collaborations of physicists from many widely scattered research institutes, started another ball rolling. The groups formed are even now only surpassed in size by the big collaborations working on today's major detectors at colliding beam machines. From 14-16 July, about 130 physicists gathered at CERN to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the invention of the bubble chamber by Donald Glaser. The meeting, organized by Derek C. Colley from Birmingham, gave a comprehensive overview of bubble chamber contributions to physics, their challenging technology, and the usefulness of bubble chamber photographs in education, both for physics and the public at large. After opening remarks by CERN Director Carlo Rubbia, Donald Glaser began with a brief review of the work which led to his invention - there was much more to it than idly watching beer bubbles rise up the wall of the glass - before turning to his present line of research, biophysics, also very visually oriented.

  11. Bubbling away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Bubble chambers may have almost vanished from the front line of physics research, but the vivid memory of their intricate and sometimes beautiful patterns of particle tracks lives on, and has greatly influenced the computer graphics of track reconstruction in today's big experiments. 'Seeing' an interaction makes it more understandable. Bubble chambers, with their big collaborations of physicists from many widely scattered research institutes, started another ball rolling. The groups formed are even now only surpassed in size by the big collaborations working on today's major detectors at colliding beam machines. From 14-16 July, about 130 physicists gathered at CERN to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the invention of the bubble chamber by Donald Glaser. The meeting, organized by Derek C. Colley from Birmingham, gave a comprehensive overview of bubble chamber contributions to physics, their challenging technology, and the usefulness of bubble chamber photographs in education, both for physics and the public at large. After opening remarks by CERN Director Carlo Rubbia, Donald Glaser began with a brief review of the work which led to his invention - there was much more to it than idly watching beer bubbles rise up the wall of the glass - before turning to his present line of research, biophysics, also very visually oriented

  12. Development of a Dung Beetle Robot and Investigation of Its Dung-Rolling Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Wei Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a bio-inspired dung beetle robot was developed that emulated the dung rolling motion of the dung beetle. Dung beetles, which can roll objects up to 1000 times their own body weight, are one of the strongest insect species in the world. While the locomotion of many insects, such as cockroaches, inchworms, and butterflies, has been studied widely, the locomotion of dung beetles has rarely been given attention. Here, we report on the development of a dung beetle robot made specifically to investigate dung-rolling behavior and to determine and understand the underlying mechanism. Two versions of the robot were built, and the leg trajectories were carefully designed based on kinematic analysis. Cylinder and ball rolling experiments were conducted, and the results showed that the dung beetle robot could successfully and reliably roll objects. This further suggests that the dung beetle robot, with its current morphology, is capable of reliably rolling dung without the need for complex control strategies.

  13. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Scarabaeinae (dung beetles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Michael T; Inward, Daegan J G; Hunt, Toby; Vogler, Alfried P

    2007-11-01

    The dung beetles (Scarabaeinae) include ca. 5000 species and exhibit a diverse array of morphologies and behaviors. This variation presumably reflects the adaptation to a diversity of food types and the different strategies used to avoid competition for vertebrate dung, which is the primary breeding environment for most species. The current classification gives great weight to the major behavioral types, separating the ball rollers and the tunnelers, but existing phylogenetic studies have been based on limited taxonomic or biogeographic sampling and have been contradictory. Here, we present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 214 species of Scarabaeinae, representing all 12 traditionally recognized tribes and six biogeographical regions, using partial gene sequences from one nuclear (28S) and two mitochondrial (cox1, rrnL) genes. Length variation in 28S (588-621 bp) and rrnL (514-523 bp) was subjected to a thorough evaluation of alternative alignments, gap-coding methods, and tree searches using model-based (Bayesian and likelihood), maximum parsimony, and direct optimization analyses. The small-bodied, non-dung-feeding Sarophorus+Coptorhina were basal in all reconstructions. These were closely related to rolling Odontoloma+Dicranocara, suggesting an early acquisition of rolling behavior. Smaller tribes and most genera were monophyletic, while Canthonini and Dichotomiini each consisted of multiple paraphyletic lineages at hierarchical levels equivalent to the smaller tribes. Plasticity of rolling and tunneling was evidenced by a lack of monophyly (S-H test, p > 0.05) and several reversals within clades. The majority of previously unrecognized clades were geographical, including the well-supported Neotropical Phanaeini+Eucraniini, and a large Australian clade of rollers as well as tunneling Coptodactyla and Demarziella. Only three lineages, Gymnopleurini, Copris+Microcopris and Onthophagus, were widespread and therefore appear to be dispersive at a global scale. A

  14. Who's bringing you hot ideas and how are you responding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thomas H; Prusak, Laurence; Wilson, H James

    2003-02-01

    There's an unsung hero in your organization. It's the person who's bringing in new ideas from the outside about how to manage better. These aren't your product and service innovators--those people are celebrated loudly and often. This is the manager who, for instance, first uttered the phrase "balance scorecard" in your hallways, or "real options," or "intellectual capital." Managerial innovation is an increasingly important source of competitive advantage--especially given the speed with which product innovations are copied--but it doesn't happen automatically. It takes a certain kind of person to welcome new management ideas and usher them into an organization. The authors recently studied 100 such people to find out how they translate new ideas into action in their organizations. They discovered that they are a distinct type of practitioner; that is to say, they resemble their counterparts in other organizations more than they resemble their own colleagues, and they share a common way of working. "Idea practitioners," as the authors call them, begin by scouting for ideas. All of them are avid readers of management literature and enthusiastic participants in business conferences; many are friendly with business gurus. Once they've identified an idea that seems to hold promise, they tailor it to fit their organizations' specific needs. Next, they actively sell the idea--to senior executives, to the rank and file, to middle managers. And finally, they get the ball rolling by participating in small-scale experiments. But when those take off, they get out of the way and let others execute. In this article, the authors identify the characteristics of idea practitioners and offer strategies for managing them wisely.

  15. A coordination class analysis of college students' judgments about animated motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaden-Koch, Thomas Christian

    The coordination class construct was invented by di5essa and Sherin to clarify what it means to learn and use scientific concepts. A coordination class is defined to consist of readout strategies, which guide observation, and the causal net, which contains knowledge necessary for making inferences from observations. A coordination class, as originally specified, reliably extracts a certain class of information from a variety of situations. The coordination class construct is relatively new. To examine its utility, transcripts of interviews with college students were analyzed in terms of the coordination class construct. In the interviews, students judged the realism of several computer animations depicting balls rolling on a pair of tracks. When shown animations with only one ball, students made judgments consistent with focusing on the ball's speed changes. Adding a second ball to each animation strongly affected judgments made by students taking introductory physics courses, but had a smaller effect on judgments made by students taking a psychology course. Reasoning was described in this analysis as the coordination of readouts about animations with causal net elements related to realistic motion. Decision-making was characterized both for individual students and for groups by the causal net elements expressed, by the types of readouts reported, and by the coordination processes involved. The coordination class construct was found useful for describing the elements and processes of student decision-making, but little evidence was found to suggest that the students studied possessed reliable coordination classes. Students' causal nets were found to include several appropriate expectations about realistic motion. Several students reached judgments that appeared contrary to their expectations and reported mutually incompatible expectations. Descriptions of students' decision-making processes often included faulty readouts, or feedback loops in which causal net

  16. The interstellar carbonaceous aromatic matter as a trap for molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzat, F.; Lattelais, M.; Ellinger, Y.; Minot, C.

    2011-04-01

    We report a theoretical study of the physisorption of molecular hydrogen, H2, on a major component of the interstellar dust, namely, the polyaromatic carbonaceous grains. Going beyond the model of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon freeflyers and its theoretical treatment within the super molecule approach, we consider the graphene surface in a Density Functional Theory periodic approach using plane-wave expansions. The physisorption energy of isolated H2 on that flat and rigid support is determined to be attractive by ˜0.75 kcal mol-1 and practically independent of the orientation with respect to the infinite surface. Since this energy is also not affected by the position (over a ring centre, a carbon atom or the middle of a carbon-carbon bond), we can conclude that H2 is able to move freely like a ball rolling on the graphene support. We also investigate the conditions for multiple physisorption. It leads to a monolayer of H2 molecules where the corresponding interaction energy per H2 amounts to a potential depth of ˜1 kcal mol-1, close to the available experimental estimates ranging from 1.1 to 1.2 kcal mol-1. We show that the most energetically favourable coverage, which corresponds to an arrangement of the H2 molecules, the closest possible to the dimer configuration, leads to a surface density of ˜0.8 × 1015 molecule cm-2. Finally, assuming that 15-20 per cent of the interstellar carbon is locked in aromatic systems, one obtains ˜10-5 of the interstellar hydrogen trapped as H2 on such types of surfaces.

  17. Are inertial forces ever of significance in cricket, golf and other sports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2017-04-01

    In previous papers we investigated the motion of a spherical projectile rotating about an arbitrary axis, subject to a drag force, a lift or Magnus force, and in the presence of a wind. The aim was to determine the motion of balls used in sporting games, primarily cricket. Newton’s laws of motion apply in an inertial (unaccelerated) coordinate system, but the rotating Earth is not an inertial system. In such a non-inertial system two additional forces are present, the Coriolis force which produces a side-ways movement, and the centrifugal force. Generally these two inertial forces produce noticeable effects only on the large scale, when either the time of travel and/or the path length is large. In this paper we have added both of these forces to the equations of motion. In addition, we have also included a ground friction force in order to simulate a ball rolling over a surface or, more generally, a body moving through a resistive medium such as water. Here we quantitatively investigate the magnitude and direction of the effect of the inertial forces in a number of cases. It is found that, as expected, the effects of the inertial forces are generally small for ball games. In cricket the side-ways movement is ≲1 cm for a throw from the boundary and ≲1 mm for a slow bowler’s delivery, and for a long drive in golf it is ≲10 cm. In lawn bowls the side-ways movement can be ∼2.8 cm, which may be significant, given the nature of this sport. The inertial forces are also potentially of relevance in sporting events not employing spherical projectiles. For example, in Olympic rowing we find that the side-ways movement can be more than 40 m for a 2 km race if it is not compensated for, and nearly 20 m for a 4 min mile event in athletics. The effect is also of significance in events such as swimming and horse racing. The importance of this is that athletes may not be aware of the effect and, in the case of rowing for example, may attribute it to side-ways currents

  18. Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based librarianship: we hear about it, we read about it, some of us practice it, some of us aren’t quite sure what it’s allabout. Information about EBL is relatively prolific of late and can be found in numerous journals, websites and books. It is indexed in databases and article indices across the disciplinary board – MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycInfo, DOIS, LISTA, etc. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice is the first journal whose primary focus is on EBL: what it is, how it affects the decisions we make, how we look at and perform research, and how it allows us to make more informed decisions based on the best available evidence. EBLIP, not unlike the practice of EBL, is international in scope and unlimited in its application and utility. Getting EBLIP off the ground has been a fascinating and rewarding experience, and I have several key people to thank for making the process seamless and satisfying. EBLIP is the brainchild of Su Cleyle, of MemorialUniversity of Newfoundland and Denise Koufogiannakis, of the University of Alberta. Su and Denise got the ball rolling early in 2005 while researching EBL on sabbatical and quickly pulled together an enthusiastic team of editors. As original Editor‐in‐Chief, Su’s vision, drive and unbeatable organization resulted in EBLIP becoming a reality more quickly and completely than we could have imagined. As Associate Editor (Evidence Summaries, Denise has begun to compile and disseminate a significant and highly useful collection of critically appraised synopses of research articles. The Evidence Summaries section allows EBLIP to reach well beyond publishing research and adds a component that our field has, until now, been lacking. In addition to her tireless work in this area, I thank Denise for keeping the momentum going throughout the entire start‐up process. EBLIP is published by University of Alberta Learning Services using OJS (Open Journal Systems. We are very