WorldWideScience

Sample records for ball lightning

  1. Ball lightning.

    OpenAIRE

    Stenhoff, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Ball lightning is alleged by some to be a rare atmospheric phenomenon usually associated with thunderstorms, while others hold that it does not exist. This controversy has continued for centuries. This study comprises a critical evaluation of evidence for the existence of ball lightning. An historical review of the controversy is first presented, giving a chronological account of developments in ball lightning theories and of important observations alleged to be of the phenomenon. Other pheno...

  2. Science of Ball Lightning (Fire Ball)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Yoshi-Hiko

    1989-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Preface * Ball Lightning -- The Continuing Challenge * Hungarian Ball Lightning Observations in 1987 * Nature of Ball Lightning in Japan * Phenomenological and Psychological Analysis of 150 Austrian Ball Lightning Reports * Physical Problems and Physical Properties of Ball Lightning * Statistical Analysis of the Ball Lightning Properties * A Fluid-Dynamical Model for Ball Lightning and Bead Lightning * The Lifetime of Hill's Vortex * Electrical and Radiative Properties of Ball Lightning * The Candle Flame as a Model of Ball Lightning * A Model for Ball Lightning * The High-Temperature Physico-Chemical Processes in the Lightning Storm Atmosphere (A Physico-Chemical Model of Ball Lightning) * New Approach to Ball Lightning * A Calculation of Electric Field of Ball Lightning * The Physical Explanation to the UFO over Xinjiang, Northern West China * Electric Reconnection, Critical Ionization Velocity, Ponderomotive Force, and Their Applications to Triggered and Ball Lightning * The PLASMAK™ Configuration and Ball Lightning * Experimental Research on Ball Lightning * Performance of High-Voltage Test Facility Designed for Investigation of Ball Lightning * List of Participants

  3. Birth of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowke, J. J.; Smith, D.; Nelson, K. E.; Crompton, R. W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2012-10-01

    Many observations of ball lightning report a ball of light, about 10 cm in diameter, moving at about walking speed, lasting up to 20 s and frequently existing inside of houses and even aeroplanes. The present paper reports detailed observations of the initiation or birth of ball lightning. In two cases, navigation crew of aircraft saw ball lightning form at the windscreen inside the cockpit of their planes. In the first case, the ball lightning occurred during a thunderstorm, with much lightning activity outside of the plane. In the second case, large "horns" of electrical corona were seen outside of the plane at the surface of the radome, just prior to the formation of the ball lightning. A third case reports ball lightning formed inside of a house, during a thunderstorm, at a closed glass window. It is proposed, based on two-dimensional calculations of electron and ion transport, that ball lightning in these cases is driven and formed by atmospheric ions impinging and collecting on the insulating surface of the glass or Perspex windows. This surface charge can produce electric fields inside of the cockpit or room sufficient to sustain an electric discharge. Charges of opposite sign to those outside of the window accumulate on the inside surface of the glass, leaving a ball of net charge moving inside of the cockpit or room to produce a pulsed discharge on a microsecond time scale.

  4. Ball lightning burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Monstrey, Stan; von Heimburg, Dennis; Hamdi, Mustapha; Van Landuyt, Koen; Blondeel, Phillip

    2003-05-01

    Ball lightning is a rare physical phenomenon, which is not yet completely explained. It is similar to lightning but with different, peculiar characteristics. It can be considered a mix of fire and electricity, concentrated in a fireball with a diameter of 20-cm that most commonly appears suddenly, even in indoor conditions, during a thunderstorm. It moves quickly for several meters, can change direction, and ultimately disappears. During a great storm, a 28-year-old man and his 5-year-old daughter sustained burn wounds after ball lightning came from the outdoors through a chimney. These two patients demonstrated signs of fire and electrical injuries. The father, who lost consciousness, sustained superficial second-degree burn wounds bilaterally on the zygomatic area and deep second-degree burn wounds on his right hand (total body surface area, 4%). His daughter demonstrated superficial second-degree burn wounds on the left part of the face and deep second-degree and third-degree burn wounds (total body surface area, 30%) on the left neck, both upper arms, and the back. In this article, the authors report the first two cases of burn injuries resulting from ball lightning contact indoors. The literature on this rare phenomenon is reviewed to elucidate the nature of ball lightning. Emphasis is placed on the nature of injuries after ball lightning contact, the therapy used, and the long-term complications.

  5. Formation of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberg, P.A. (2833 Lawton Drive, Amarillo, Texas (USA))

    A plasma continuum model for the formation of ball lightning is developed based on a substantial number of reports that the ball is often in the discharge column of a previous lightning stroke. The usual method of setting up the plasma equation for a one-component electron plasma is used. An approximate equation for the plasma is derived from the describing equation which is then solved exactly in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions. The formation of the ball is based on a nonlinearity of the plasma equation which under certain circumstances permits the field to collapse into a small region. This collapse is interpreted to be ball lightning. The approximate equation derived for the plasma has the same form as a previous equation used to describe the formation of the fireball plasma.

  6. Laboratory demonstration of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, Anton I; Stepanov, Sergei I; Shabanov, Gennadii D [B.P. Konstantinov St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Leningrad region, Rusian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2004-01-31

    A common laboratory facility for creating glowing flying plasmoids akin to a natural ball lightning, allowing a number of experiments to be performed to investigate the main properties of ball lightning, is described. (methodological notes)

  7. Ball Lightning Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. L.; Nikitin, A. I.; Dijkhuis, G. C.

    Ball lightning (BL) researches' review and theoretical models of three different authors are presented. The general review covers investigations from 1838 until the present day, and includes a discussion on observation data, experimental modeling, and theoretical approaches. Section 6.1 is written by Bychkov and Nikitin; authors of the sections 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4 are, respectively, Bychkov, Nikitin and Dijkhuis.

  8. Eddy Current Model of Ball Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Eddy Current Model of Ball Lightning Calculations show that high-energy ball lightning may consist of a ball of plasma containing a large circular electric current arising as an eddy current generated by lightning. Synthetic ball lightning might serve as a method of plasma confinement for purposes of nuclear fusion. In this paper, three articles concerning ball lightning and the related phenomenon of large ball lightning are combined to provide insight into this rarely glimpsed occurrence.

  9. SECRET OF A BALL LIGHTNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Savich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A ball lightning is a natural phenomenon that occurs at a streak lightning stroke with its action by thermal and magnetic energy releasing around the streak lightning channel and transforming, in the end, the surrounding air into a steam cloud that transits into ferroelectric state under the magnetic field action.

  10. Ball lightning risk to aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, R.; Keul, A.

    2009-04-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Aircraft are designed to withstand lightning strikes. Research on lightning and aircraft can be called detailed and effective. In the last 57 years, 18 reported lightning aviation disasters with a fatality figure of at least 714 persons occurred. For comparison, the last JACDEC ten-year average fatality figure was 857. The majority encountered lightning in the climb, descent, approach and/or landing phase. Ball lightning, a metastable, rare lightning type, is also seen from and even within aircraft, but former research only reported individual incidents and did not generate a more detailed picture to ascertain whether it constitutes a significant threat to passenger and aircraft safety. Lacking established incident report channels, observations were often only passed on as "air-travel lore". In an effort to change this unsatisfactory condition, the authors have collected a first international dataset of 38 documented ball lightning aircraft incidents from 1938 to 2001 involving 13 reports over Europe, 13 over USA/Canada, and 7 over Russia. 18 (47%) reported ball lightning outside the aircraft, 18 (47%) inside, 2 cases lacked data. 8 objects caused minor damage, 8 major damage (total: 42%), only one a crash. No damage was reported in 18 cases. 3 objects caused minor crew injury. In most cases, ball lightning lasted several seconds. 11 (29%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. A cloud-aircraft lightning flash was seen in only 9 cases (24%) of the data set. From the detailed accounts of air personnel in the last 70 years, it is evident that ball lightning is rarely, but consistently observed in connection with aircraft and can also occur inside the airframe. Reports often came from multiple professional witnesses and in several cases, damages were investigated by civil or military authorities. Although ball lightning is no main air traffic risk, the authors suggest that incident and accident

  11. Unsolved Mystery of Ball Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. L.

    Ball lightning is an unusual phenomenon always drawing attention of people. There are still questions about its origination, features, interaction with environment, and phenomena related to it. On a way of studying this phenomenon, there are a lot of difficulties, the basic of them is insufficiency of authentic, scientific data. The chapter sets as the purpose to interest the reader in the problem, to describe conditions of ball lightning occurrence, theories, and its hypotheses explanation, to include readers in a circle of experimental searches in creation of a ball lightning and its analogues, and to describe fascination of a problem and difficulty of its solution.

  12. Structure of laboratory ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Tamura, Tomoya; Cappelli, Mark A.; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Trajectories of self-sustained laboratory ball lightning, generated by arc discharges with silicon, are investigated for understanding the possibility of buoyant flight. Extremely low apparent densities are found, nearly approaching that of standard air. The freely buoyant balls are observed to survive for about 0.1 s, with significantly buoyant balls surviving for several seconds. These ball lightning objects are found to have a density and size that can easily allow them to be carried by a gentle breeze of a few meters per second. The results are interpreted by a model that is an extension of that first proposed by Abrahamson and Dinniss [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)]. The buoyant behavior of ball lightning seen in our experiments is believed to arise as a result of the formation of a nanoparticle oxide network growing from a molten silicon core.

  13. Plasma theory of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapenko, V.I.; Tolpygo, K.B.

    1984-02-01

    The high-energy density inside the ball lightning is due to existence of intense plasma oscillations and high kinetic and potential energy of electron gas which form a pulsating ball vibrating relative to the nearly stationary ionic ball. At sublight velocities of electrons one can neglect the processes of their scattering and recombination. One obtains a relation between parameters of the plasma ball from the condition of equality of excess pressure of ions and that of Madelung forces. The high lifetime of the ball lighting is connected with small Landau damping for the longest wave vibrations.

  14. Physical nature of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakhanov, I.P.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is made of results obtained from the observations of ball lightning. Principal attention is given to data obtained during the last two decades. A brief critique is also offered on hypotheses about its origin. A more detailed presentation is made of the cluster hypothesis according to which ball lightning consists of complex compounds of ions and neutral molecules. The book is intended for a broad spectrum of readers, but is particularly directed toward those with a knowledge of physics and chemistry. 70 references, 24 figures, 17 tables.

  15. Generation of Laboratory Ball Lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreshko, A G [Moscow Aviation Institute (State Technical University), Volokolamskoe shosse 4, 125871 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The phenomenon of energy conversion in the streams of directed electrons and ions into electromagnetic radiation was found out experimentally and proved theoretically. The direct proofs of the domain mechanism of the charged particles acceleration and mechanism of ball lightning generation were obtained and the theoretical calculations were refined.

  16. A Conjecture Concerning Ball Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Sturrock, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    There is at present no theory that can explain the curious properties of ball lightning. This suggests that we may not be using the most appropriate concepts. The concept of a 'parallel space' may point the way to a valid theory.

  17. Laboratory-produced ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    For 25 years I have actively been searching for the true nature of ball lightning and attempting to reproduce it at will in the laboratory. As one might expect, many unidentified lights in the atmosphere have been called ball lightning, including Texas Maffa lights (automobile headlights), flying saucers (UFOs), swamp gas in Ann Arbor, Michigan, etc. For 15 years I thought ball lightning was strictly a high-voltage phenomenon. It was not until 1984 when I was short-circuiting the electrical output of a diesel electric railroad locomotive that I realized that the phenomenon was related more to a high current. Although I am hoping for some other types of ball lightning to emerge such as strictly electrostatic-electromagnetic manifestations, I have been unlucky in finding laboratory provable evidence. Cavity-formed plasmodes can be made by putting a 2-inch burning candle in a home kitchen microwave oven. The plasmodes float around for as long as the microwave energy is present.

  18. Polymer-composite ball lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V L

    2002-01-15

    Investigations into the state of ball lightning (BL) have been made, and both theory and experiments, related to so-called "polymer-composite" ball lightning, are presented. The properties of such a polymeric BL have been described and are that of a long-lived object capable of storing high energy. Results of experiments, starting with polymeric components in erosive gas discharge experiments, are described and discussed. The model of BL as a highly charged polymer-dielectric structure is described. According to this model BL appears as the result of the aggregation of natural polymers, such as lignin and cellulose, soot, polymeric silica and other natural dust particles. Its ability to glow is explained by the appearance over its perimeter of gas discharges near the highly charged BL surface, and electrical breakdown of some regions on the surface, consisting of polymerized and aggregated threads.

  19. How to create ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedures are given on how to produce ball lightning. Necessary equipment includes a transformer of 150,000 watts capable of providing approximately 10,000 amperes at 15 volts, 60 cycles; thick one inch cables of stranded wire leading into a 3 by 4 by 1 foot plastic tank; a quarter inch thick 4 by 6 inch aluminum plate to be used as one of the discharge electrodes; and another electrode of heavy copper wire with the insulation stripped back 6 inches.

  20. Electric charge of a lightning ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, A. I.; Shiryaeva, S. O.; Petrushov, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    The electric charge of a lightning ball is found by comparing the electrohydrodynamic stabilities of a charged drop in an electrostatic suspension and a lightning ball floating in a superposition of the gravitational field and the surface electric field. It has been assumed that the electric field strength at the surface is limited by a breakdown value. For a lightning ball radius of 15 cm, its charge is estimated as several microcoulombs. Accordingly, the density of electrostatic energy accumulated in the lightning ball is on the order of one-hundredth of a joule per square centimeter. The density of the material that constitutes the lightning ball has been estimated for the case when the electric field strength at the site of its origination is several times higher than that in fine weather. The density of the lightning ball turns out to differ from that of air by only a few percents.

  1. Phenomenon of ball lightning and its outgrowths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torchigin, V.P. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: v_torchigin@mail.ru; Torchigin, A.V. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-03-28

    New physical phenomena deduced from properties of ball lightning are considered under assumption that ball lightning is a light bubble comprising of a thin spherical layer of compressed air where an intense light circulates in all possible directions. Explanation of behavior of autonomous luminous objects produced at gas discharge is presented.

  2. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  3. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H-C

    2016-06-22

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  4. A model for ball lightning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryberger, D.

    1994-10-01

    A model for ball lightning (BL) is described. It is based upon the vorton model for elementary particles, which exploits the symmetry between electricity and magnetism. The core, or driving engine, of BL in this model is comprised of a vorton-antivorton plasma. The energy of BL, which derives from nucleon decay catalyzed by this plasma, leads, through various mechanisms, to BL luminosity as well as to other BL features. It is argued that this model could also be a suitable explanation for other luminous phenomena, such as the unidentified atmospheric light phenomena seen at Hessdalen. It is predicted that BL and similar atmospheric luminous phenomena should manifest certain features unique to this model, which would be observable with suitable instrumentation

  5. Secret of a ball lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Савич, Эдуард Владимирович

    2013-01-01

    Шаровая молния – явление природы, происходящее при ударе линейной молнии с ее воздействием тепловой и магнитной энергии, возникающей вокруг канала линейной молнии и в результате образующей из окружающего воздуха облако пара, переходящего под воздействием магнитного поля сегнетоэлектрическое состояние. A ball lightning is a natural phenomenon that occurs at a streak lightning stroke with its action by thermal and magnetic energy releasing around the streak lightning channel and transforming...

  6. Energy transfer problems of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egely, G.

    1986-04-01

    The paper analyzes the energy transport phenomenon of ball lightnings, but momentum and charge transport phenomena are considered as well. The physical properties as energy density and transfer are investigated using several observers' accounts of interactions with different objects. It is shown that contrary to previous assumptions the ball lightning has negative electric charge, and very high internal energy density. Both internal and external energy source models are analyzed, and it is shown that regardless to the details of a given model neither of them can explain actual observations. This has been validated by a well documented case study, and by several additional observations. An entirely new, testable model is suggested, which is able to stand for all observed properties of ball lightnings, and it explains the cause of rarity of ball lightnings, and the reasons of the unsuccessful experimental efforts. It is shown that the plasma sphere is just a visible side effect of a more important phenomenon.

  7. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    OpenAIRE

    H.-C. Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by partic...

  8. Electrostatic charge bounds for ball lightning models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Karl D [Department of Technology, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)], E-mail: kdstephan@txstate.edu

    2008-03-15

    Several current theories concerning the nature of ball lightning predict a substantial electrostatic charge in order to account for its observed motion and shape (Turner 1998 Phys. Rep. 293 1; Abrahamson and Dinniss 2000 Nature 403 519). Using charged soap bubbles as a physical model for ball lightning, we show that the magnitude of charge predicted by some of these theories is too high to allow for the types of motion commonly observed in natural ball lightning, which includes horizontal motion above the ground and movement near grounded conductors. Experiments show that at charge levels of only 10-15 nC, 3-cm-diameter soap bubbles tend to be attracted by induced charges to the nearest grounded conductor and rupture. We conclude with a scaling rule that can be used to extrapolate these results to larger objects and surroundings.

  9. Electrostatic charge bounds for ball lightning models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2008-03-01

    Several current theories concerning the nature of ball lightning predict a substantial electrostatic charge in order to account for its observed motion and shape (Turner 1998 Phys. Rep. 293 1; Abrahamson and Dinniss 2000 Nature 403 519). Using charged soap bubbles as a physical model for ball lightning, we show that the magnitude of charge predicted by some of these theories is too high to allow for the types of motion commonly observed in natural ball lightning, which includes horizontal motion above the ground and movement near grounded conductors. Experiments show that at charge levels of only 10-15 nC, 3-cm-diameter soap bubbles tend to be attracted by induced charges to the nearest grounded conductor and rupture. We conclude with a scaling rule that can be used to extrapolate these results to larger objects and surroundings.

  10. On the energy characteristics of ball lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, A V; Bychkov, V L; Abrahamson, John

    2002-01-15

    A compilation of 17 observations of ball lightning showing the most energetic effects is presented along with estimates of their energy content. These observations were chosen from several thousand for the much stronger interaction of each ball lightning on its surroundings, and the method of energy estimation outlined. The case is put that some of the observations show a higher energy than self-contained chemical energy could provide. Comments have been added to the paper, arguing that the energy estimations themselves should be consistent with whatever model is used for ball lightning. For example, the presence of reacting nanoparticles releasing chemical energy may bring about the same observed effects with lower estimated energy.

  11. Interrelation between ball lightning and optically induced forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    Optically induced forces are considered as a key factor for explaining the phenomenon of ball lightning. They can provide not only the existence of ball lightning in the form of self-confined intense white light circulating in a spherical shell of air strongly compressed by the light but also the anomalous motion of ball lightning in the terrestrial atmosphere.

  12. Attempts to create ball lightning with triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan D.; Uman, Martin A.; Stapleton, Michael; Jordan, Douglas M.; Chebaro, Alexander M.; Biagi, Christopher J.

    2010-08-01

    We describe attempts to create ball lightning by directing lightning, triggered from natural thunderclouds using the rocket-and-wire technique, through a variety of materials. Some of the observed phenomena have features in common with natural ball lightning or with laboratory attempts to create it: flame-like luminosity for up to 0.5 s above salt water; constant-luminosity silicon fragments falling for about 1 s under the influence of gravity; a 0.7 m region of stationary luminosity whose bottom was 0.3 m above a stainless steel surface to which arcing had occurred; and a glow for about 0.5 s above pine tree sections.

  13. Burning molten metallic spheres: One class of ball lightning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.; Massey, Nathan

    2008-08-01

    Abrahamson and Dinniss [2000. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil. Nature 403, 519-521] proposed a theory of ball lighting in which silicon nanoparticles undergo slow oxidation and emit light. Paiva et al. [2007. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon. Physical Review Letters 98, 048501] reported that an electric arc to silicon produced long-lasting luminous white spheres showing many characteristics of ball lightning. We show experimentally that these consist of burning molten silicon spheres with diameters in the 0.1-1 mm range. The evidence of our experiments leads us to propose that a subset of ball lightning events may consist of macro-scale molten spheres of burning metallic materials likely to be ejected from a conventional lightning strike to earth.

  14. Spherical microwave confinement and ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, William Richard

    This dissertation presents the results of research done on unconventional energy technologies from 1995 to 2009. The present civilization depends on an infrastructure that was constructed and is maintained almost entirely using concentrated fuels and ores, both of which will run out. Diffuse renewable energy sources rely on this same infrastructure, and hence face the same limitations. I first examined sonoluminescence directed toward fusion, but demonstrated theoretically that this is impossible. I next studied Low Energy Nuclear Reactions and developed methods for improving results, although these have not been implemented. In 2000, I began Spherical Microwave Confinement (SMC), which confines and heats plasma with microwaves in a spherical chamber. The reactor was designed and built to provide the data needed to investigate the possibility of achieving fusion conditions with microwave confinement. A second objective was to attempt to create ball lightning (BL). The reactor featured 20 magnetrons, which were driven by a capacitor bank and operated in a 0.2 s pulse mode at 2.45 GHz. These provided 20 kW to an icosahedral array of 20 antennas. Video of plasmas led to a redesign of the antennas to provide better coupling of the microwaves to the plasma. A second improvement was a grid at the base of the antennas, which provided corona electrons and an electric field to aid quick formation of plasmas. Although fusion conditions were never achieved and ball lightning not observed, experience gained from operating this basic, affordable system has been incorporated in a more sophisticated reactor design intended for future research. This would use magnets that were originally planned. The cusp geometry of the magnetic fields is suitable for electron cyclotron resonance in the same type of closed surface that in existing reactors has generated high-temperature plasmas. Should ball lightning be created, it could be a practical power source with nearly ideal

  15. A proposed experiment on ball lightning model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatovich, Vladimir K., E-mail: v.ignatovi@gmail.com [Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ignatovich, Filipp V. [1565 Jefferson Rd., 420, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: → We propose to put a glass sphere inside an excited gas. → Then to put a light ray inside the glass in a whispering gallery mode. → If the light is resonant to gas excitation, it will be amplified at every reflection. → In ms time the light in the glass will be amplified, and will melt the glass. → A liquid shell kept integer by electrostriction forces is the ball lightning model. -- Abstract: We propose an experiment for strong light amplification at multiple total reflections from active gaseous media.

  16. Are Perytons Signatures of Ball Lightning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-10-01

    The enigmatic downchirped signals, called "perytons," that are detected by radio telescopes in the GHz frequency range may be produced by an atmospheric phenomenon known as ball lightning (BL). If BLs act as nonstationary radio frequency cavities, their characteristic emission frequencies and evolution timescales are consistent with peryton observations, and so are general patterns in which BLs are known to occur. Based on this evidence, testable predictions are made that can confirm or rule out a causal connection between perytons and BLs. In either case, how perytons are searched for in observational data may warrant reconsideration because existing procedures may be discarding events that have the same nature as known perytons.

  17. Analysis of Conditions favorable for Ball Lightning Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Boerner, H.

    2016-01-01

    This report uses a few well documented cases of Ball Lightning (or BL for short) observations to demonstrate a correlation between BL and positive lightning, especially strong positive lightning. This allows to draw conclusions and predictions about future BL observations and the pro- duction of these objects in the laboratory. Contrary to many current BL theories, these objects can be created without direct contact to a lightning channel. Very high electric fields appear to be essential for ...

  18. Ball lightning observation: an objective video-camera analysis report

    OpenAIRE

    Sello, Stefano; Viviani, Paolo; Paganini, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a video-camera recording of a (probable) ball lightning event and both the related image and signal analyses for its photometric and dynamical characterization. The results strongly support the BL nature of the recorded luminous ball object and allow the researchers to have an objective and unique video document of a possible BL event for further analyses. Some general evaluations of the obtained results considering the proposed ball lightning models conclude the paper.

  19. Ball lightning with the nonrelativistic electrons of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2015-08-01

    The lifetimes, volume densities of energy, electron and ion densities and other parameters of ball lightning cores with the nonrelativistic electrons are estimated. The model according to which the motion of the electrons of the ball lightning core is the superposition of the oscillatory motion and the thermal motion in the directions perpendicular to those of the oscillations is proposed. Some problems related to isolation of the ball lightning core from the atmosphere and the transfer of the atmospheric pressure on it are considered.

  20. A general theory for ball lightning structure and light output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, R.

    2018-03-01

    A general theory for free-floating ball lightning is presented which unifies the phantom plasma ball theory involving the production of very little light, with theories for ball lightning involving light output produced by burning particles from the soil. The mechanism for the formation of plasma balls is shown to be quite general, producing very similar plasma balls independent of initial ion densities over four orders of magnitude. All that is required is an excess of positive ions in the initial ball of ions. The central plasma density after 1 s is shown to be the reciprocal of the ion neutralization coefficient for all cases, both analytically and computationally. Further, the plasma region has zero electric field in all cases. Surrounding the plasma ball is a sphere of positive ions moving away from the centre via their own space-charge field; this space-charge field, which is the same in all cases near the plasma ball, drives negative ions and negative particles towards the plasma centre. The connection with burning particle theories is the proposition that the burning particles are highly-charged which is very likely after a lightning strike. Burning negatively charged particles would be driven into the plasma ball region and trapped while any positively charged particles would be driven away. The plasma ball structure is shown to last more than 10 s and the ‘burnout time’ for a typical coal particle (as an example) has been measured at 5–10 s this is comparable with the lifetimes observed for ball lightning. The light output from a few hundred particles is estimated to be ~1 W, a typical output for ball lightning. Finally, suggestions are made for the generation of ball lightning in the laboratory.

  1. Are perytons signatures of ball lightning?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The enigmatic downchirped signals, called 'perytons', that are detected by radio telescopes in the GHz frequency range may be produced by an atmospheric phenomenon known as ball lightning (BL). If BLs act as nonstationary radio frequency cavities, their characteristic emission frequencies and evolution timescales are consistent with peryton observations, and so are general patterns in which BLs are known to occur. Based on this evidence, testable predictions are made that can confirm or rule out a causal connection between perytons and BLs. In either case, how perytons are searched for in observational data may warrant reconsideration because existing procedures may be discarding events that have the same nature as known perytons.

  2. Sources and components of ball lightning theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. I.; Bychkov, V. L.; Nikitina, T. F.; Velichko, A. M.; Abakumov, V. I.

    2018-03-01

    The article describes the cases when ball lightning (BL) exhibited an extremely high specific energy store (up to 1010 J/m3), a presence of uncompensated electric charge (up to 10‑3 C) and an ability to generate high frequency pulses (up to 10 MW). It is shown that the realization of a combination of these properties of BL is possible if to consider it as a heterogeneous system consisting of a unipolarly charged core and a dielectric shell. In the electric field of the core charge, arises a force owing to the polarization of the shell that opposes the Coulomb repulsion force of the charges. BL models constructed according to the indicated principle are described: the electrodynamic model and the chemical-thermal model, which treats BL as a hollow sphere filled with steam. The requirement to take into account the main three properties of BL makes it possible to reduce the number of models of this natural phenomenon. Detailed cases of observations of high-energy lightning are analyzed.

  3. The Riddle of Ball Lightning: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Donoso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most intriguing and enduring scientific challenges is to find an explanation for ball lightning, the shining fireballs that sometimes appear near lightning strokes. Although many theoretical ideas have been proposed and much experimental work has been performed, there is not yet an accepted explanation of their amazing properties. They are surprisingly stable, lasting up to 10 s, even minutes in some rare cases. By night, their appearance can be spectacular, but their brilliance is just similar to that of a home electric bulb. Most of the time, their motion is smooth and horizontal, but it can also be erratic and chaotic; they can penetrate indoors through window panes. We review here some of the most discussed approaches, including both theoretical models to find an explanation as well as experimental efforts to reproduce them in the laboratory. We distinguish between chemical and physical models, depending on whether their stability is mainly based on their chemical composition or on purely physical phenomena involving electromagnetic fields and plasmas.

  4. Production of Ball-Lightning-Like Luminous Balls by Electrical Discharges in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim, Jr.; Felisberto da Silva, Eronides, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation.

  5. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim; da Silva, Eronides Felisberto

    2007-01-26

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation.

  6. The fragmented science of ball lightning (with comment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D J

    2002-01-15

    All the apparent anomalies in ball lightning behaviour seem to result from electrochemical processes which arise at the surface of a wet air plasma. The structure and stability of an established lightning ball are maintained by these processes and the ball operates as a thermochemical heat pump powered by the electric field of a thunderstorm. Movements result from asymmetries in the various fields which control the structure. In addition to electric, electromagnetic and gravitational fields, temperature, pressure and compositional gradients can be involved. Electrochemistry provides a framework within which specific properties can be considered using better developed or more appropriate disciplines. Several commonly made assumptions and approximations are identified which can be invalid under the specific conditions which favour ball lightning stability. If any of these limitations is ignored, seriously misleading conclusions may result. The range of power associated with lightning balls is ill defined but may vary continuously between that of globes which lack a bright centre and that of normal lightning. Our failure to contain plasmas electrochemically for more than a few seconds probably reflects our inability to balance (or even measure) the various fields which govern a ball's stability. All the fields may need to be controlled before electrochemistry can usefully be employed to contain plasmas.

  7. Study on the luminous characteristics of a natural ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yuan, Ping; Cen, Jianyong; Liu, Guorong

    2018-02-01

    According to the optical images of the whole process of a natural ball lightning recorded by two slit-less spectrographs in the Qinghai plateau of China, the simulated observation experiment on the luminous intensity of the spherical light source was carried out. The luminous intensity and the optical power of the natural ball lightning in the wavelength range of 400-690 nm were estimated based on the experimental data and the Lambert-Beer Law. The results show that the maximum luminous intensity was about 1.24 × 105 cd in the initial stage of the natural ball lightning, and the maximum luminous intensity and the maximum optical power in most time of its life were about 5.9 × 104 cd and 4.2 × 103 W, respectively.

  8. Observation of the Optical and Spectral Characteristics of Ball Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Jianyong; Yuan, Ping; Xue, Simin

    2014-01-01

    Ball lightning (BL) has been observed with two slitless spectrographs at a distance of 0.9 km. The BL is generated by a cloud-to-ground lightning strike. It moves horizontally during the luminous duration. The evolution of size, color, and light intensity is reported in detail. The spectral analysis indicates that the radiation from soil elements is present for the entire lifetime of the BL.

  9. Evidence of microscopic ball lightning in cold fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, E.H. [PO Box 2013, Champaign, IL 61825 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    There is evidence of microscopic ball lightning in several methods of cold fusion and transmutation. Thus far the experiments of Matsumoto, Miley, Shoulders, Savvatimova, and Urutskoev et al. have shown evidence of these objects that range in size from sub-atomic to about 1 mm in diameter. This article presents pictures and evidence collected by these groups, summarizes the evidence found by other groups, and discusses the significance of microscopic ball lightning. The implications for atomic physics and physics in general are discussed. (author)

  10. Ball lightning dynamics and stability at moderate ion densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, R.

    2017-10-01

    A general mechanism is presented for the dynamics and structure of ball lightning and for the maintenance of the ball lightning structure for several seconds. Results are obtained using a spherical geometry for air at atmospheric pressure, by solving the continuity equations for electrons, positive ions and negative ions coupled with Poisson’s equation. A lightning strike can generate conditions in the lightning channel with a majority of positive nitrogen ions, and a minority of negative oxygen ions and electrons. The calculations are initiated with electrons included; however, at the moderate ion densities chosen the electrons are rapidly lost to form negative ions, and after 1 µs their influence on the ion dynamics is negligible. Further development after 1 µs is followed using a simpler set of equations involving only positive ions and negative ions, but including ion diffusion. The space-charge electric field generated by the majority positive ions drives them from the centre of the distribution and drives the minority negative ions and electrons towards the centre of the distribution. In the central region the positive and negative ion distributions eventually overlap exactly and their space-charge fields cancel resulting in zero electric field, and the plasma ball formed is quite stable for a number of seconds. The formation of such plasma balls is not critically dependent on the initial diameter of the ion distributions, or the initial density of minority negative ions. The ion densities decrease relatively slowly due to mutual neutralization of positive and negative ions. The radiation from this neutralization process involving positive nitrogen ions and negative oxygen ions is not sufficient to account for the reported luminosity of ball lightning and some other source of luminosity is shown to be required; the plasma ball model used could readily incorporate other ions in order to account for the luminosity and range of colours reported for ball

  11. Recent Lightning Experiments at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing: From Ball Lightning to Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uman, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent lightning data and the instrumentation used to acquire it at the UF-FIT International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, located on about 1 square kilometer of flat ground at the Camp Blanding Army National Guard Base in north-central Florida, are discussed. The progress of several on-going studies is reviewed: (1) understanding the physics of the "classical" rocket-and-wire triggering of lightning from natural overhead thunderclouds, (2) attempting to generate ball lightning by allowing triggered-lightning to strike various materials and objects (e.g., tree-trunk sections, pools of salt water, silicon powder), (3) measuring the very close (100 m to 1 km) electric and magnetic fields of natural cloud-to-ground lightning, and (4) probing the relationship between lightning processes and the x-rays and gamma-rays associated with them.

  12. Ball lightning from a water beaker; Kugelblitze aus dem Wasserbecher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehrke, T.

    2008-07-01

    The very existence of these balls of light is the subject of controversy. People who have seen them say they can move along power lines and even go through window panes. Until recently, there was no way to get closer to ball lightning by scientific means. But now, GERD FUSSMANN from the MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR PLASMA PHYSICS and BERLIN'S HUMBOLDT UNIVERSITY has managed to create blazing balls of plasma in his lab - and they may just help explain the phenomenon. (orig.)

  13. James L. Tuck Los Alamos ball lightning pioneer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1999-07-01

    James Tuck was well known for starting the Project Sherwood group at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1952. This group was formed to study and develop concepts for controlled fusion energy. In his later years after retiring from Controlled Fusion Division, he continued research at Los Alamos on the topic of ball lightning. He traveled widely giving lectures on both observations of others and his own experimental efforts. He collected anecdotal observations obtained from those in his lecture audiences during his travels and from responses from newspaper articles where he asked for specific information from ball lightning observers. He finally cut off this collection of data when the number of responses became overwhelming. The author's primary publication on ball lightning was a short laboratory report. He planned on publishing a book on the subject but this was never completed before his death. Tuck focused his experimental effort on attempting to duplicate the production of plasma balls claimed to be observed in US Navy submarines when a switch was opened under overload conditions with battery power. During lunch breaks he made use of a Los Alamos N-division battery bank facility to mock up a submarine power pack and switch gear. This non-funded effort was abruptly terminated when an explosion occurred in the facility. An overview of Tuck's research and views will be given. The flavor Jim's personality as well as a ball produced with his experimental apparatus will be shown using video chips.

  14. Extension of Relativistic-Microwave Theory of Ball Lightning Including Long-term Losses And Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2016-01-01

    After centuries, the long-standing problem of the nature of ball lightning may be closer to a solution. The relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning recently proposed by Wu accounts for many of the leading characteristics of ball lightning, which most previous theories have failed to do. It involves the impact of a lightning-caused relativistic electron bunch to soil, producing an EM pulse that forms a plasma bubble. While the theory presents a plausible account of ball-lightning forma...

  15. Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Gerson S; Ferreira, Joacy V; Bastos, Cristiano C; Dos Santos, Marcus V; Pavao, Antonio C [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2010-05-11

    The energy density of a luminous silicon ball [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 048501 (2007)] is calculated for a model with a metal core surrounded by an atmosphere of silicon oxides. Experimental data combined with the molecular orbital calculations of the oxidation enthalpy lead to a mean energy density of 3.9 MJ m{sup -3}, which is within the range of estimates from other ball lightning models. This result provides good evidence to support the silicon-based model. (methodological notes)

  16. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Gerson S.; Ferreira, Joacy V.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; dos Santos, Marcus V.; Pavão, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    The energy density of a luminous silicon ball [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 048501 (2007)] is calculated for a model with a metal core surrounded by an atmosphere of silicon oxides. Experimental data combined with the molecular orbital calculations of the oxidation enthalpy lead to a mean energy density of 3.9 MJ m-3, which is within the range of estimates from other ball lightning models. This result provides good evidence to support the silicon-based model.

  17. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson; Dinniss

    2000-02-03

    Observations of ball lightning have been reported for centuries, but the origin of this phenomenon remains an enigma. The 'average' ball lightning appears as a sphere with a diameter of 300 mm, a lifetime of about 10 s, and a luminosity similar to a 100-W lamp. It floats freely in the air, and ends either in an explosion, or by simply fading from view. It almost invariably occurs during stormy weather. Several energy sources have been proposed to explain the light, but none of these models has succeeded in explaining all of the observed characteristics. Here we report a model that potentially accounts for all of those properties, and which has some experimental support. When normal lightning strikes soil, chemical energy is stored in nanoparticles of Si, SiO or SiC, which are ejected into the air as a filamentary network. As the particles are slowly oxidized in air, the stored energy is released as heat and light. We investigated this basic process by exposing soil samples to a lightning-like discharge, which produced chain aggregates of nanoparticles: these particles oxidize at a rate appropriate for explaining the lifetime of ball lightning.

  18. Ball lightning as a force-free magnetic knot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranada; Soler; Trueba

    2000-11-01

    The stability of fireballs in a recent model of ball lightning is studied. It is shown that the balls shine while relaxing in an almost quiescent expansion, and that three effects contribute to their stability: (i) the formation in each one during a process of Taylor relaxation of a force-free magnetic field, a concept introduced in 1954 in order to explain the existence of large magnetic fields and currents in stable configurations of astrophysical plasmas; (ii) the so called Alfven conditions in magnetohydrodynamics; and (iii) the approximate conservation of the helicity integral. The force-free fields that appear are termed "knots" because their magnetic lines are closed and linked.

  19. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NEGATIVE POINT-PLANE CORONA AND ITS RELATION TO BALL LIGHTNING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Existing theories of ball lightning are briefly discussed. the corona discharge from a negative point flows in a series of regular pulses called...trichel pulses. based on the theoretical relationship between corona discharge (trichel pulses) and ball lightning , an experimental program is developed...pulse-repetition frequencies of a few mc/s have been the highest attained in the course of the experiments. the results obtained are then discussed as they concern ball lightning .

  20. An investigation of the generation and properties of laboratory-produced ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshko, A. G.

    2015-06-01

    The experiments revealed that ball lightning is a self-confining quasi-neutral in a whole plasma system that rotates around its axis. Ball lightning has a structure of a spherical electric domain, consisting of a kernel with excess negative charge and an external spherical layer with excess positive charge. The excess of charges of one sort and the lack of charges of the other sort in the kernel or in the external spherical layer significantly reduces the possibility of electron capture by means of an electric field, created by the nearest ions and leads to a drastic slowdown of recombination process. Direct proof has been obtained that inside of ball lightning - in an external spherical layer that rotates around the axis - there is a circular current of sub-relativistic particles. This current creates and maintains its own poloidal magnetic field of ball lightning, i.e. it carries out the function of magnetic dynamo. The kernel of ball lightning is situated in a region with minimum values of induction of the magnetic field. The inequality of positive and negative charges in elements of ball lightning also significantly reduces losses of the charged plasma on bremsstrahlung. Ball lightning generation occurs in a plasmic vortex. The ball lightning energy in the region of its generation significantly differs from the ball lightning energy, which is drifting in space. The axial component of kinetic energy of particles slightly exceeds 100 keV and the rotational component of the ions energy is a bit greater than 1 MeV. Ball lightning is `embedded' in atmosphere autonomous accelerator of charged particles of a cyclotron type due to self-generation of strong crossed electric and magnetic fields. A discussion of the conditions of stability and long-term existence of ball lightning is given.

  1. Investigation of polymer ball lightning objects in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychkov, V.L. [Inst. for High Temperature, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, A.I. [Moscow Radiotechnical Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The generation and evolution of power intensive Ball Lightning Objects (BLO) or polymer plasmoids in air were investigated. The experimental arrangement consisted of electric discharge gun (EDG), capacitor storage with energy stored up to 5.6 kJ, electron trigger, limiting inductance 100-1000 {mu}H. EDG represented cone discharge tube 5 cm length, with cone opening 30-120{degrees}. Inner wall was covered by candle wax. Diameter of tube outlet was 10-30 mm. Time of pulse was about 30 ms, its amplitude was not higher than 60 A.

  2. Possible scenarios for the initial acceleration of electrons of the core of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    > A model for the initial acceleration of electrons of the core of ball lightning is presented, according to which this acceleration occurs on screening of the strong electric field of the positive charge injected into the atmosphere. Several scenarios for such injection, the factors favourable for the formation of ball lightning and possible experiments on such formation are considered.

  3. Radio spectrum measurements of artificial ball lightning and testing the hypothesis on its plasmochemical nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral measurements of radiowaves emitted by artificial ball lightning are presented. The measurements were carried out using two different facilities: a pulsed power generator (PPG) and a three-contour Tesla transformer. The results of these measurements confirm the hypothesis that ball lightning is a self-oscillator of high-voltage pulses in the radio range.

  4. Possible precursors of ball lightning. Observation of closed loops in high voltage discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeff, I.; Rader, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Several hundred photographs of ultrahigh voltage discharges have been obtained that show closed current loops. These closed current loops may be precursors of ball lightning. One feature of these discharges may explain why observations of ball lightning may be infrequent; that is, there is a distinct threshold in voltage and/or current below which the closed loops do not occur. This threshold current fits other experimental data but is well above the usually observed currents in natural lightning. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Force-free field model of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2001-03-01

    Due to the nature that the force-free magnetic field, whose current carried by the conducting plasma is everywhere parallel to the magnetic field it generates, is the minimum energy configuration under the constraint of magnetic helicity conservation, ball lightning is considered as a self-organized phenomenon with a plasma fireball immersed in a spherical force-free magnetic field. Since this field does not exert force on the plasma, the plasma pressure, by itself, is in equilibrium with the surrounding environment, and the force-free magnetic field can take on any value without affecting the plasma. Due to this second feature, singular solutions of the magnetic field that are otherwise excluded are allowed, which enable a large amount of energy to be stored to sustain the ball lightning. The singularity is truncated only by the physical limit of current density that a plasma can carry. Scaling the customary soccer-size fireball to larger dimensions could account for day and night sightings of luminous objects in the sky.

  6. Fluorescence caused by ionizing radiation from ball lightning: Observation and quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.; Krajcik, Rozlyn; Martin, Rolf J.

    2016-10-01

    Ball lightning is a rare phenomenon, typically appearing as a glowing sphere associated with thunderstorms. In 2008 one of the authors witnessed a blue ball-lightning object hover in front of a glass window that appeared to glow yellow. Calibrated quantitative fluorometry measurements of the window show that the glow was probably due to fluorescence caused by ionizing radiation (UV or possibly X rays). Based on the measurements performed, estimates of the total ionizing-radiation power emitted by the object range upward from about 10 W. These are among the most reliable semi-quantitative measurements so far of ionizing-radiation output from a ball-lightning object.

  7. Ball lightning from atmospheric discharges via metal nanosphere oxidation: from soils, wood or metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, John

    2002-01-15

    The slow (diffusion-limited) oxidation of metal nanoparticles has previously been proposed as the mechanism for ball lightning energy release, and argued to be the result of a normal lightning strike on soil. Here this basic model of networked nanoparticles is detailed further, and extended to lightning strikes on metal structures, and also to the action of other storm-related discharges or man-made discharges. The basic model predicted the important properties of "average" observed ball lightning, and the extension in this paper also covers high-energy examples of ball lightning. Laboratory checks of the theory are described, and predictions given of what conditions are necessary for observing ball lightning in the laboratory. Key requirements of the model are a sheltered region near the strike foot and starting materials which can generate a metal vapour under intensive heating, including soil, wood or a metal structure. The evolution of hydrocarbons (often plastics) along with metal vapour can ensure the local survival of the metal vapour even in an oxidizing atmosphere. Subsequent condensation of this vapour to metallic nanoparticles in networks provides the coherence of a ball structure, which also releases light over an extended time. Also discussed is the passage of ball lightning through a sheet of building material, including glass, and its occasional charring of flesh on close contact.

  8. An Analysis of Ball Lightning-Aircraft Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, R. K.; Keul, A. G.; Bychkov, V.

    2009-12-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Research and design have created aircraft that withstand average lightning strikes. Ball lightning (BL), a metastable, rare lightning type, is also observed from (and within) aircraft. Science and the media focused on individual BL incidents and did not analyze general patterns. Lacking established incident reporting channels, most BL observations are still passed on as “aviation lore”. To overcome this unsatisfactory condition, the authors collected and analyzed an international data bank of 87 BL-aircraft case histories from 1938 to 2007. 37 Russian military and civil BL reports were provided by the third author. Of the whole sample, 36 (41%) cases occurred over Russia/RF/SU, 24 (28%) over USA/Canada, 23 (26%) over Europe, and 4 (5%) over Asia/Pacific. Various types of military (US: C-54/141, B-52, KC-97/135 Stratotankers, C130, P-3 Orion, RF/SU: PO-2, IL, SU, TU, MIG; Nimrod, Saab-105) and civilian aircraft (US: DC-3/6, Metroliner, B-727/737/757/777, RF/SU: AN, TU; VC-10, Fokker F-28, CRJ-200), as well as general aviation (C-172, Falcon-20), were involved. BL reports show a flat annual April to August maximum. At BL impact, 15 aircraft were climbing, 7 descending; most were at cruising altitude. 42 (48%) reported BL outside the aircraft, 37 (43%) inside, 7 (8%) both in-and outside. No damage was reported in 34 (39%) cases, 39 objects (45%) caused minor damage, 11 major damage (13%), 3 even resulted in military aircraft losses. 3 objects caused minor, 1 major crew injury. 23 damage cases were associated with BL inside the fuselage; all 4 crew injury cases were of that BL type. Mean size is described as 25 cm, sometimes over 1 m, color 30% in the yellow-red, 10% in the blue-green spectral region, 8% white, duration around 10 seconds, sometimes over 1 minute. 33 (38%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. Thunderstorm conditions were reported by 25 (29%) of the observers, 9 (10%) said there

  9. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Muldrew

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ball lightning (BL is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941. It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon – a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  10. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldrew, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, ball lightning (BL) is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM) field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941). It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon - a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  11. Formation Mechanism and Characteristics Research of Ball Lightning Based on Vortex Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Cheng; Yang, Guo-Hua

    2011-05-01

    The strange characteristics of ball lightning are considered as a question hard to explain. In order to solve the problem, in this paper a complete model of plasma vortex is presented for the ball lightning. By ideal MHD equations, through imposing disturbance to plasma column, the possibility of sausage and kink instability of the lightning channel is analyzed from the perspective the minimum potential energy. The conclusion is that the kink instability (m = 1) is most prone to occur. And when instability occurs, because of the difference of the magnetic field in the twisted area, the magnetic pressure makes the trend further and therefore forming the plasma vortex that may eventually turn into ball lightning if the energy of the vortex is large enough. The existence of the vortex makes ball lightning have a short period of time stability. By the proposed model, the ball lightning features that are hard to understand in the past are explained. In this paper, the reason for bead lightning is also explained from the perspective of the sausage instability.

  12. Properties of short-living ball lightning produced in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A. I.; Stepanov, S. I.

    2008-06-01

    An experimental setup for highly reproducible generation of artificial ball lightnings is implemented. Thousands of floating glowing plasmoids 12-20 cm in diameter are produced. Research facilities for studying the plasmoids are developed. It is found that short-lived ball lightnings live for about 1 s and carry an electric charge. The lightnings are shown to have a complex structure: a central kernel containing a rich variety of hydrated ions and aerosol of decay products is surrounded by a thin negatively charged shell.

  13. Ball lightning passage through a glass without breaking it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, Vladimir L.; Nikitin, Anatoly I.; Ivanenko, Ilia P.; Nikitina, Tamara F.; Velichko, Alexander M.; Nosikov, Igor A.

    2016-12-01

    In long history of ball lightning (BL) theory development there is a struggle of two concepts. According to the first one, BL - is a high frequency electrical discharge, burning in the air due to action of alternating electric field or a continuous current generated by an external source of energy. According to the second one, the BL is a material body, storing energy within itself. Data banks of BL observations give evidence that BL can pass through glasses, leaving no traces on them. Supporters of the first concept consider this as the proof of the correctness of the "electric field" BL nature. Representation of BL as a material body with internal source of energy explains most of its features, but has difficulties in explanation of BL penetration through glasses. We describe results of research of the glass, through which BL freely passed, that was observed by one of the authors. They proved the presence of traces left by BL. With a help of optical and scanning microscopes and laser beam probing of the glass, that experienced action of 20 cm BL, we have found traces in it: in the glass we found a region of 1-2 mm, at the center of which a cavity of 0.24 mm diameter is located. This gives evidence to a "material" nature of BL. BL possibility to pass through small holes and its ability to "make" such holes poses a number of difficult issues to researchers indicated in the article.

  14. Ball lightning. What nature is trying to tell the plasma research community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, J.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Ball lightning has been extensively observed in atmospheric air, usually in association with thunderstorms, by untrained observers who were not in a position to make careful observations. These chance sightings have been documented by polling observers, who constitute perhaps 5% of the adult U.S. population. Unfortunately, ball lightning is not accessible to scientific analysis because it cannot be reproduced in the laboratory under controlled conditions. Natural ball lightning has been observed to last longer than 90 s and to have diameters from 1 cm to several meters. The energy density of a few lightning balls has been observed to be as high as 20000 J/cm{sup 3}, well above the limit of chemical energy storage of, for example, TNT at 2000 J/cm{sup 3}. Such observations suggest a plasma-related phenomenon with significant magnetic energy storage. If this is the case, ball lightning should have very interesting implications for fusion research, industrial plasma engineering, and military applications, as well as being of great theoretical and practical interest to the plasma research community. 20 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Charge on luminous bodies resembling natural ball lightning produced via electrical arcs through lump silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christina L.; Miley, Galen P.; Griffiths, David J.; Sánchez, Erik

    2014-12-01

    A phenomenon resembling natural ball lightning can be produced via electrical arcing through silicon. We use lump silicon instead of silicon wafers to achieve higher production rates and larger, longer-lived luminous balls than previously reported. The luminous balls consist of a silicon core surrounded by a porous network of loosely bound silicon dioxide nanoparticles. We find that the balls carry a small net charge on the order of 10-12 C and propose that the nanoparticles are electrostatically bound to the core due to this charge.

  16. OH Radical and a Drizzling Water Jet Production from the Ball-Lightning Discharge in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeyama, Mitsuaki; Tanaka, Yasutomo

    The ball lightning, or fireball discharge using the typical electrode configuration was reported to produce a long-living spherical plasmoid with radius exceed 10 cm at atmospheric pressure. In this study, we investigated the relationship between a optical output emitted from OH radicals and discharge conditions of the ball-lightning electrode configuration, and discussed its possibility to the water treatment process. As a results, in both polarity cases of the charged voltage V0, a ball-lightning discharge and the optical emission from OH radicals as a major radiation can be generated on the condition |V0| > 4 kV in tap water. Furthermore, an intensive upward water jet from the rod electrode is observed in case of positive polarity and in 0.2% NaCl solution, which is composed of drizzling water drops near the rod electrode.

  17. Implications of the visual appearance of ball lightning for luminosity mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2012-11-01

    Observations of ball lightning continue to pose one of the more difficult unsolved problems in atmospheric physics. Lack of quantitative data has frustrated attempts to explain how the objects emit light. We examine three leading theories for the immediate cause of light emission: excitation of plasma, small hot individual particles suspended in air, and hot fractal clusters of small particles. Using radiative transport theory, we find quantitative values for the ranges of particle density and temperature required to produce luminous intensities consistent with the bulk of reported observations, as well as estimates of power requirements for each mechanism. We conclude that all of these mechanisms are consistent with many ball-lightning observations, and that more than one of them may be involved in the luminosity of ball lightning.

  18. Ball lightning as a spherical plasma configuration of relevance to industrial plasma engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most interesting spherical plasma configurations found in nature is ball lightning, which has been extensively observed in atmospheric air, usually in association with thunderstorms. If the physical processes responsible for ball lightning were understood, this knowledge would have very interesting implications not only for fusion research, but also for industrial plasma engineering. The ability to create a steady-state atmospheric glow discharge would allow many surface modification and other plasma processing applications to be carried out under atmospheric conditions, rather than in expensive vacuum systems which enforce batch processing operations. The existence of ball lightning offers encouragement for the belief that a steady-state atmospheric glow discharge may be possible. Much progress has been made in theoretical attempts to understand ball lightning, perhaps the most comprehensive of which is the Koloc model. This and related models have not satisfactorily dealt with the long plasma lifetimes in the face of electron scattering at atmospheric density. This leads to an unsatisfactory aspect of the Koloc model, the requirement of a shell of relativistic electrons with very low Coulomb scattering cross sections. This last major conceptual roadblock in understanding ball lightning may have been removed by the recent suggestion of Witalis who pointed out that atmospheric gases, or their products, can exhibit the Ramsauer effect, extremely low electron scattering cross sections at low electron kinetic temperatures, on the order of one eV. This recent progress in ball lightning models has stimulated research aimed at producing a steady state glow discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. Such a glow discharge in argon with a few ppm of acetone has been reported by Kanda, et al. At the UTK Plasma Science Laboratory, the authors have generated at 2.8 liter plasma in a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge in helium and other gases

  19. Extreme ball lightning event of August 6, 1868 in County Donegal, Ireland.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanDevender, J. Pace; McGinley, Niall (Ardaturr, Donegal, Ireland); van Doorn, Peter (Tornado and Storm Research Organization, TORRO, Thelwall, Warrington, UK); Wilson, Peter (University of Ulster, Northern Ireland, UK); VanDevender, Aaron P. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO)

    2008-04-01

    Although laboratory experiments have produced glowing balls of light that fade in <1 s after external power is removed and theories have been proposed to explain low-energy events, energetic ball lightning is not understood. A seminal event that illuminates the fundamental nature of ball lightning is needed to advance our understanding of the phenomenon. We report such a seminal event: the energetic ball lightning event of August 6, 1868, in County Donegal, Ireland, extensively reported to the Royal Society by M. Fitzgerald. It lasted for 20 minutes, left a 6 m square hole and a 100 m long by 1.2 m deep trench, tore away a 25 m long and 1.5 m deep stream bank that diverted the course of the stream, and terminated by producing a shallow cave in the opposite bank of the stream. We found and characterized the site and show that the geomorphology and carbon dating support the account by M. Fitzgerald. We find that the excavation is not consistent with chemical, nuclear, or electrostatic forces but is consistent with Analysis of the event and the local conditions in 2006 is consistent with magnetic induction at {approx} 1 MHz frequency expelling the moderately conductive, water saturated peat down to the underlying clay/rock layer. The 60-cm diameter--which diminished to 10 cm diameter without reducing the impact of the ball lightning on the environment--and the size of the depressions, the yield strength of the peat, and the lack of any mention of smoke or steam in Fitzgerald's report would be consistent with the core of the ball lightning being a magnetically levitated mini black hole weighing more than 20,000 kg. The results suggest that such energetic ball lightning should be detectable at great distances by its electromagnetic emissions, which might provide a characteristic signature to reveal the source of the energy and the equilibrium configuration of the contained currents. Unexplained intermittent emissions in the MHz range are necessary but not

  20. Ball Lightning Aerosol Electrochemical Power Source or A Cloud of Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, Oleg

    2007-07-01

    Despite numerous attempts, an adequate theoretical and experimental simulation of ball lightning still remains incomplete. According to the model proposed here, the processes of electrochemical oxidation within separate aerosol particles are the basis for this phenomenon, and ball lightning is a cloud of composite nano or submicron particles, where each particle is a spontaneously formed nanobattery which is short-circuited by the surface discharge because it is of such a small size. As free discharge-shorted current loops, aerosol nanobatteries are exposed to a powerful mutual magnetic dipole dipole attraction. The gaseous products and thermal energy produced by each nanobattery as a result of the intra-particle self-sustaining electrochemical reactions, cause a mutual repulsion of these particles over short distances and prevent their aggregation, while a collectivization of the current loops of separate particles, due to the electric arc overlapping between adjacent particles, weakens their mutual magnetic attraction over short distances. Discharge currents in the range of several amperes to several thousand amperes as well as the pre-explosive mega ampere currents, generated in the reduction oxidation reactions and distributed between all the aerosol particles, explain both the magnetic attraction between the elements of the ball lightning substance and the impressive electromagnetic effects of ball lightning.

  1. The Proton Conductivity of Condensed Phases of Water:. Implications on Linear and Ball Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakone, Kirthi

    2006-06-01

    Ice is a proton conductor, with conductivities ranging from 10-6 to 10-9 S m-1 depending on the purity of the sample. Electronically ice is highly insulating with conductivity of the order 10-12 S m-1 or below. Mobile protons in ice originate from disruption of hydrogen bonds and strong electric fields enhance bond breakage. Ice particle acquires electrification during formation of thunder clouds and ice play a crucial in role charge separation leading to lightning. It is suggested that charges of ice particles in clouds originates from inductive charge separation and transfer of the mobile positive charge to the streaming air. Thus ice particles gain a negative charge and moist air drifting upwards becomes more positive. Consequently, most thunder clouds have a negative charge in the region closer to the ground. Although many explanations are proposed, the elusive phenomenon of ball lightning continues to resist theoretical understanding and laboratory reproduction. Ball lightning originates in the electrical active atmosphere as a luminous sphere drifting in air with the capability of bouncing from walls and penetrating openings smaller than the ball. It is suggested that ball lightning is a negatively charged sphere constituted of an outer shell of ice. Water dipoles are oriented radially by the electric field and protons acquire a high mobility in the tangential direction. As the electron conductivity of the shell in radial direction is very small, the charge slowly leaks to the atmosphere as a corona discharge. Model naturally explains how the ball could penetrate a hole or bounce from a surface as a differential electrostatic stress could develop in the ball as result of the proton conductivity. Details of the models and suggestions for experimental verification of the proposed concepts will be presented.

  2. Ball lightning caused by a semi-relativistic runaway electron avalanche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Geron S.; Taft, Carlton A.; Furtado, Nelson C. C. P.; Carvalho, Marcos C.; Hering, Eduardo N.; Vinícius, Marcus; Ronaldo, F. L.; De la Cruz, Neil M.

    2014-12-01

    Ball lightning (BL) is observed as a luminous sphere in regions of thunderstorm activity. There are many reports of BL forming in total absence of thunderclouds, associated with earthquakes and volcanoes. In this latter case, BL has been known to appear out of “nowhere”. In this work, a hypothesis on BL formation is presented involving the interaction between very low frequency (VLF) radio waves and atmospheric plasmas. High-velocity light balls are produced by ionic acoustic waves (IAWs) interacting with a stationary plasma. Several physical properties (color, velocity, and fragmentation) observed in the BL phenomenon can be explained through this model.

  3. Some of the ball lightning observations could be phosphenes induced by energetic radiation from thunderstorms and lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, G. K.; Cooray, G. V.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Ball Lightning was seen and described since antiquity and recorded in many places. However, so far no one has managed to generate them in the laboratory. It is possible that many different phenomena are grouped together and categorized simply as ball lightning. One such phenomenon could be the phosphenes induced in humans by energetic radiation and particles from lightning and thunderstorms. A phosphene is a visual sensation that is characterized by perceiving luminous phenomena without light entering the eye. Phosphenes are generated when electrical signals are created in the retina or the optical nerve by other means in the absence of light stimuli. The fact that energetic radiation produced by radium can give rise to phosphenes was first noted by Giesel in 1899 [1]. A resurge of studies related to the creation of phosphenes by energetic radiation took place after the reports of phosphenes observed in space by Apollo astronauts and first reported by Buzz Aldrin after the Apollo 11 flight to the moon in 1969 [2]. The shapes of the phosphenes observed by astronauts were either rods, comet shaped, or comprised of a single dot, several dots or blobs. The colors were mostly white, but some had been colored yellow, orange, blue, green or red. The majority of the astronauts had perceived some kind of motion in association with the phosphenes. Most of the time, they were moving horizontally (from the periphery of the vision to the center) and sometimes diagonally, but never vertically. Subsequent studies conducted in space and ground confirmed the creation of phosphenes by energetic radiation. From these studies the threshold energy dissipation in the eye tissue necessary for phosphenes induction was estimated to be 10 MeV/cm. In the present study a quantitative analysis of the energetic radiation generated in the form of X-rays, Gamma rays and relativistic electrons by thunderstorms and lightning was made to investigate whether this radiation is strong enough to induce

  4. A Discussion On A Physical Model Of Ball Lightning And UFO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan L. Bajak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed that the ball lightning and UFO are analogous objects. The variety of different observations is explained. It is proposed on a uniform basis using a hypothesis that the ball lightning and UFO are created like a spherical capacitor filled by polar molecules mainly and in some cases by various chemicals which influence the final manifest of the object. A mechanism of a formation of the spherical capacitor is discussed. A peculiar behavior like e.g. sudden change of direction of motion shape of disc and possible penetration through wall is explained as a consequence of internal structure of the object. Finally an experimental verification of the hypothesis is suggested.

  5. A Ball Lightning Model as a Possible Explanation of Recently Reported Cavity Lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryberger, David; /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    The salient features of cavity lights, in particular, mobile luminous objects (MLO's), as have been experimentally observed in superconducting accelerator cavities, are summarized. A model based upon standard electromagnetic interactions between a small particle and the 1.5 GHz cavity excitation field is described. This model can explain some features of these data, in particular, the existence of particle orbits without wall contact. While this result is an important success for the model, it is detailed why the model as it stands is incomplete. It is argued that no avenues for a suitable extension of the model through established physics appear evident, which motivates an investigation of a model based upon a more exotic object, ball lightning. As discussed, further motivation derives from the fact that there are significant similarities in many of the qualitative features of ball lightning and MLO's, even though they appear in quite different circumstances and differ in scale by orders of magnitude. The ball lightning model, which incorporates electromagnetic charges and currents, is based on a symmetrized set of Maxwell's equations in which the electromagnetic sources and fields are characterized by a process called dyality rotation. It is shown that a consistent mathematical description of dyality rotation as a physical process can be achieved by adding suitable (phenomenological) current terms to supplement the usual current terms in the symmetrized Maxwell's equations. These currents, which enable the conservation of electric and magnetic charge, are called vacuum currents. It is shown that the proposed ball lightning model offers a good qualitative explanation of the perplexing aspects of the MLO data. Avenues for further study are indicated.

  6. Micro ball lightning and its accelerator proposed to control natural phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Taka-aki [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Micro Ball Lightning (BL) was recently discovered in laboratory. It was also observed during natural phenomena such as volcanic eruption and earthquake. This paper described a brief review of micro BL observed in laboratory as well as during two natural phenomena. Being based on a hypothesis of that those natural phenomena could have been caused by explosive reactions of micro BL, a potential accelerator of micro BL was proposed to control the natural phenomena. (author)

  7. Micro ball lightning and its accelerator proposed to control natural phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T A

    2002-01-01

    Micro Ball Lightning (BL) was recently discovered in laboratory. It was also observed during natural phenomena such as volcanic eruption and earthquake. This paper described a brief review of micro BL observed in laboratory as well as during two natural phenomena. Being based on a hypothesis of that those natural phenomena could have been caused by explosive reactions of micro BL, a potential accelerator of micro BL was proposed to control the natural phenomena. (author)

  8. Further Insight into the Nature of Ball-Lightning-Like Atmospheric Pressure Plasmoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, David M.; Broughton, Peter B.; Lee, Tanner A.; Schutz, Garrett A.; Betz, Jeremiah N.; Lindsay, C. Michael

    2013-10-01

    Known since antiquity, ball lightning is a natural, long-lived plasma-like phenomenon associated with thunderstorms and is not well understood due to its rarity and unpredictability. A recently discovered laboratory phenomenon with striking similarity to ball lightning is observed when a high-power spark is discharged from a cathode protruding from a grounded electrolyte solution. Whereas several investigations of these long-lived plasmas have been reported over the past decade, the underlying chemical and physical processes are still unknown. The present work attempts to gain further insight into this phenomenon by examining the effect of electrolyte pH on the plasmoid and observing the chemical and physical structure of the plasmoid using high-speed schlieren videography and FTIR absorption spectroscopy. The results indicate that the lifetime and size of the plasmoid slightly increase as the pH of isoohmic electrolyte solutions deviate from neutrality. The observed absorption spectra of the plasmoids exhibit absorption cross sections in the 620-700, 1500-1560, 2280-2390, and 3650-4000 cm-1 ranges, the last attributed to the presence of water clusters. Finally, schlieren images revealed a single, sharp density gradient at the boundary layer of the top and sides of the expanding ball-shaped plasmoid, and turbulent mixing below the ball.

  9. Ball Lightning With Spiking and Cold Emission in the Maser-Caviton Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, P. H.; Carlson, G. A.; Leitner, J.

    2007-05-01

    The nonlinear system of maser and cold plasma caviton can sustain spiking oscillations around the stationary state. This is shown here in the linearized limit of small oscillations. The role of ionization and cold emission effects is considered, and the case of large spiking amplitudes is discussed qualitatively on this basis. This calculation allows us to predict the frequency of the often observed humming of ball lightning. Furthermore, four basic experiments are suggested, that should be performed in order to verify and further develop the present Maser-Soliton theory of ball lightning: comparative atmospheric absorption spectroscopy in thunderstorm conditions, electric field pulse experiment, wind tunnel experiment and laboratory ball lightning generation experiment. The latter experiment suggested is based on a 10-20KW Klystron amplifier with negative feedback, trying to simulate the behavior of the atmospheric maser. The klystron is connected through a directional coupler to a tuned resonator that serves as discharge chamber. From there, a wave guide completes the loop. An optical feedback strengthens the natural tendency of the klystron to spike almost instantaneously when the load decreases. The discharge sought is a glow at atmospheric pressure, at much lower temperature than the lowest temperature arch discharge ever obtained so far at normal pressure. At these low temperatures there are no electrons that could sustain the discharge. However, right when the discharge is dying, a powerful klystron spike is automatically caused by the sudden decrease of the load. This extracts electrons through cold (Fowler) emission, and rekindles the discharge. However, like in the case of the atmospheric maser, the presence of the large spike automatically stops the klystron power. The optical feedback is responsible in part for the fast reaction. Then the spiking cycle repeats itself. Our Maser-Soliton BL theory allows for the first time not only to understand the

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of a Low-Temperature Atmospheric Plasmoid Analogous to Ball Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; Friday, David M.; Peters, Kevin C.; Perry, Richard H.; Zhao, Zhangji; Deutsch, Bradley; Bhargava, Rohit; Liu, Jui-Nung; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure, low-temperature plasmas exist in nature in the form of ball lightning, and last year a natural ball lightning event was finally observed with scientific equipment. Production of ball lightning in the laboratory dates back to Tesla's work at Colorado Springs. Today, Tesla's ``fireballs" are easily produced in the laboratory by discharging kiloJoules of energy slightly above an electrolyte solution via a metal electrode. For the sake of clarity, those plasmas produced using this technique are referred to as ``plasmoids." Valuable information is obtained from previous experiments, such as the identification of water clusters and the temperature of the interior of plasmoids.c We perform mass spectrometry and Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy in an effort to characterize these plasmoids. We present, to our knowledge, the first mass spectrometric data and infrared emission spectra of plasmoid discharges. Mass spectrometry reveals the presence of small protonated water clusters [H+(H_2O)_2, H+(H_2O)_3] and nitrogen-containing molecules [NO+, NO+-H_2O]. IR spectra exhibit signals observed in the water emission region (1300-2000 cm-1, 3000-4000 cm-1), and signals in several other regions of interest. Fundamental properties of these plasmoids including the electron energy distribution function, component densities, and collisional cross sections will be discussed. Cen, J.; Yuan, P.; Xue, S. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 035001 Tesla, N. Colorado Springs Notes 1899-1900; Marinčić, A., Ed.; Nolit: Beograd, Yugoslavia, 1978; pp 368-370 Friday, D.M.; Broughton, P.B.; Lee, T.A.; Schutz, G.A.; Betz, J.N.; Lindsay, C.M. J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117 (39), 9931-9940

  11. Recently reported sightings of ball lightning: observations collected by correspondence and Russian and Ukrainian sightings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, John; Bychkov, A V; Bychkov, V L

    2002-01-15

    The observations in the first section of this paper were sent to John Abrahamson in response to the publication of a recent paper on ball lightning, with the correspondents either reading the original paper, or reports of it in popular science articles. A selection of the cases has been made, including those which showed interesting detail possibly useful in debating ball lightning mechanisms. Any inserted text within parenthesis is the observer's response to follow-up queries from J.A. The age of the observer (where noted) is that at the time of the observation. Three observations (1 q-s) did not show motion independent of their surroundings, but have been included because of their other similarities to ball lightning. It is interesting to note the high proportion (greater than 0.5) of scientifically or technically trained observers in this collection. The data presented in the second section of this paper come from both letters and interviews. Our interview questionnaire consisted of 46 questions and was mostly carried out in quiet conditions. Observations in 2 a, e, h, l, m, q-t were corrected during several (two or three) interviews. Heading each observation case we note the most unusual property of the object. Ball lightning appears in Russia and the Ukraine usually in summer (June-August), and more rarely in spring (March-May), or autumn (September-November). It appears usually during the daytime, 13:00-17:00 h, when most summer thunderstorms take place. Observers in their descriptions usually use the term "morning" to describe the period from 06:00 to 11:00 h, "daytime" for 12:00-18:00 h, and "evening" for 19:00-21:00 h. The term "time' means the local time, and sometimes it is difficult to compare it with the local geographic time due to frequent official state summer-winter time changes. The decree time in Russia can in general differ from the geographic time by 1-2 h.

  12. Drift motion of the magnetic monopole of Poljakov-'t Hooft in the air and the ball-lightning phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, V.K. (Korshunov Valentin Konstantinovich, Krupskoy Street 78-A, 614077 PERM-77 (SU))

    1990-08-30

    In this paper by virtue of theoretical investigations of V. Rubakov on nucleons and nuclei decay with monopole-nucleon interaction, a qualitative analysis of the drift motion of the mon in the air is conducted. The physical picture obtained coincided in detail with the descriptions of the ball-lightning, for which reason ball- lightning is considered evidence for the magnetic monopole.

  13. SOME RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH ON ARTIFICIAL BALL LIGHTNING LOW-ENERGY PLASMOIDS IN A HIGH-VOLTAGE LABORATORY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First results of experimental laboratory-scale reproduction of spheroidal low-energy plasmoids of an artificial ball lightning are given. The data obtained indicate a possibility in principle of reliable generation of such plasmoids in the air atmosphere via the discharge circuit of a high-voltage installation comprising a curved arc discharge channel between a graphite electrode and technical water surface. The artificial 0.3m-diameter ball lightning plasmoid lifetime was less than 0.6 s in the experiments conducted.

  14. The similarities between the hallucinations associated with the partial epileptic seizures of the occipital lobe and ball lightning observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, G. K.; Cooray, V.

    2007-12-01

    Ball Lightning was seen and described since antiquity and recorded in many places. Ball lightning is usually observed during thunderstorms but large number of ball lightning observations is also reported during fine weather without any connection to thunderstorms or lightning. However, so far no one has managed to generate them in the laboratory. It is photographed very rarely and in many cases the authenticity of them is questionable. It is possible that many different phenomena are grouped together and categorized simply as ball lightning. Indeed, the visual hallucinations associated with simple partial epileptic seizures, during which the patient remains conscious, may also be categorized by a patient unaware of his or her condition as ball lightning observation. Such visual hallucinations may occur as a result of an epileptic seizure in the occipital, temporo-occipital or temporal lobes of the cerebrum [1,2,3]. In some cases the hallucination is perceived as a coloured ball moving horizontally from the periphery to the centre of the vision. The ball may appear to be rotating or spinning. The colour of the ball can be red, yellow, blue or green. Sometimes, the ball may appear to have a solid structure surrounded by a thin glow or in other cases the ball appears to generate spark like phenomena. When the ball is moving towards the centre of the vision it may increase its intensity and when it reaches the centre it can 'explode' illuminating the whole field of vision. During the hallucinations the vision is obscured only in the area occupied by the apparent object. The hallucinations may last for 5 to 30 seconds and rarely up to a minute. Occipital seizures may spread into other regions of the brain giving auditory, olfactory and sensory sensations. These sensations could be buzzing sounds, the smell of burning rubber, pain with thermal perception especially in the arms and the face, and numbness and tingling sensation. In some cases a person may experience only

  15. Lightning ball: experiments on creation and hypotheses (comment on 'Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls' by G S Paiva, J V Ferreira, C C Bastos, M V P dos Santos, A C Pavao)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabanov, Gennadii D [B P Konstantinov St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Leningrad region (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-11

    The problems addressed in this paper include estimating: the energy density of luminous silicon balls, the density range of a natural lightning ball, and whether and how the object created and described in the commented paper (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 180 218 (2010) [Phys. Usp. 53 (2) 209 (2010)]) corresponds to the natural phenomenon. (letters to the editors)

  16. LETTERS TO THE EDITORS: Lightning ball: experiments on creation and hypotheses(comment on "Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls" by G S Paiva, J V Ferreira, C C Bastos, M V P dos Santos, A C Pavão)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanov, Gennadii D.

    2010-05-01

    The problems addressed in this paper include estimating: the energy density of luminous silicon balls, the density range of a natural lightning ball, and whether and how the object created and described in the commented paper (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 180 218 (2010) [Phys. Usp. 53 (2) 209 (2010)]) corresponds to the natural phenomenon.

  17. IMPROVEMENT OF A MICRODIPOLE MODEL OF A BALL LIGHTNING AND ELECTRODYNAMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE THEORY OF THIS PHENOMENON.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new electrodynamic model of a ball lightning (BL containing an internal toroidal high-temperature energy core and an external electro-neutral highly-polarized water shell is introduced. The BL energy core is formed by electron and proton microtori with intrinsic oppositely directed elementary spiral-circular currents. The BL core spiral-circular electron currents of conductivity create an enveloping strong pulsed azimuth magnetic field and a superstrong vortex radial electrical field.

  18. Observations of Ball-Lightning-Like Plasmoids Ejected from Silicon by Localized Microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sztucki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental characterization of plasmoids (fireballs obtained by directing localized microwave power (<1 kW at 2.45 GHz onto a silicon-based substrate in a microwave cavity. The plasmoid emerges up from the hotspot created in the solid substrate into the air within the microwave cavity. The experimental diagnostics employed for the fireball characterization in this study include measurements of microwave scattering, optical spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Various characteristics of these plasmoids as dusty plasma are drawn by a theoretical analysis of the experimental observations. Aggregations of dust particles within the plasmoid are detected at nanometer and micrometer scales by both in-situ SAXS and ex-situ SEM measurements. The resemblance of these plasmoids to the natural ball-lightning (BL phenomenon is discussed with regard to silicon nano-particle clustering and formation of slowly-oxidized silicon micro-spheres within the BL. Potential applications and practical derivatives of this study (e.g., direct conversion of solids to powders, material identification by breakdown spectroscopy (MIBS, thermite ignition, and combustion are discussed.

  19. Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampe, William R.

    1970-01-01

    Presents basic physical theory for movement of electric charges in clouds, earth, and air during production of lightning and thunder. Amount of electrical energy produced and heating effects during typical thunderstorms is described. Generalized safety practices are given. (JM)

  20. Ball lightning as a self-organizing process of a plasma-plasma interface and El Naschie's {epsilon}{sup ({approx})} space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agop, M. [Department of Physics, Technical ' Gh. Asachi' University, Blvd. Mangeron No. 64, Iasi 700029 (Romania)]. E-mail: magop@phys.tuiasi.ro; Murgulet, C. [Faculty of Physics, ' Al.I.Cuza' University, Blvd. Carol I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2007-08-15

    In the fractal space-time theories, some properties of a ball lightning (BL) are established: the oscillation regimes, the hysteresis, the distributions of the potential, field and charge etc. In such a context, the Feynman-El Naschie hypothesis on the universality of the dipole-dipole interaction is confirmed and a connection between El Naschie's {epsilon}{sup ({approx})} space-time and Feigenbaum-Goldfain conjecture is given.

  1. A Model of Ball Lightning as a Formation of Water Molecules Confining an Electric Charge and the Classical Theory of the Electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakone, K.

    2012-04-01

    Ball lightning or faintly luminous floating spheres with radii of the order of ten centimeters appearing transiently in air notably during stormy weather continue to remain an unresolved phenomenon. It is suggested that these objects are organized structures constituted of an electrically charged spherical thin shell of electro-frozen dipole oriented water molecules carrying an electric charge, balanced by the internal negative pressure and outward electrostatic stress. A model presented, resembling the classical theory of the electron with Poincare stresses explain almost all observed attributes of this phenomenon. The possibility of realizing macroscopic spherical surface charge distributions in the vacuum and their implication on the problem of electron are commented.

  2. Electron-Ionic Model of Ball Lightening

    OpenAIRE

    Fedosin, Sergey G.; Kim, Anatolii S.

    2001-01-01

    The model of ball lightning is presented where outside electron envelope is kept by inside volume of positive charges. The moving of electron in outside envelope is a reason of strong magnetic field, which controls the state of hot ionized air inside of ball lightning. The conditions of origins of ball lightning are investigated and the values of parameters for ball lightning of maximum power are calculated.

  3. Great balls of fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhoff, Mark; reader01; jjherrera

    2014-03-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news article “Burning soil fuels ball lightning” (9 January, http://ow.ly/tl8aO) on evidence that a burning core of soil acts as an energy source for ball lightning.

  4. Charge-Dipole Acceleration of Polar Gas Molecules towards Charged Nanoparticles: Involvement in Powerful Charge-Induced Catalysis of Heterophase Chemical Reactions and Ball Lightning Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In humid air, the substantial charge-dipole attraction and electrostatic acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by electrostatically accelerated polar water vapour molecules rather than nonaccelerated nonpolar oxygen gas molecules. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged combustible nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide-based shells into the hydroxide-based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into reductant/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intraparticle field and thermionic emission. Partially synchronized electron emission breakdowns within trillions of nanoparticles-nanobatteries turn a cloud of charged nanoparticles-nanobatteries into a powerful radiofrequency aerosol generator. Electrostatic oxidative hydration and charge-catalyzed oxidation of charged combustible nanoparticles also contribute to a self-oscillating thermocycling process of evolution and periodic autoignition of inflammable gases near to the nanoparticle's surface. The described effects might be of interest for the improvement of certain nanotechnological heterophase processes and to better understand ball lightning phenomenon.

  5. Grounding, Bonding, Shielding, and Lightning Bibliography 1972 to 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    channel. The interaction of lightning and aircraft is included. A discussion of ball lightning is included. H. H. Hoshiko, "Helical Channel Multiplier...project Telsa which produced artificial ball lightning with potentials as large as 20 million volts and provides a brief explanation of the hazards of... ball lightning . S. Stoller, "In-Plant Generation-Design Considerations for Industrial Facilities," IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications, vol. IA-12

  6. Handel's Maser-Soliton Theory of ball lightning: The creation of stable three-dimensional cavitons by an atmospheric maser within an open resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Glenn Andrew

    This dissertation develops details of Handel's Maser-Soliton Theory of ball lightning. The atmosphere between a thundercloud and the Earth's surface is modeled as an idealized stable open resonator with water vapor as the active medium and the thundercloud and Earth's surface as reflecting surfaces. The stable resonator generates a maser beam that narrows to the beam waist at the Earth's surface, which is assumed to be planar. Two candidate rotational transitions are identified within the ν1ν 2ν3 = 010 vibrational band of water having wavelengths of 13.9 cm and 1.12 cm, and relevant spectroscopic parameters are retrieved from the HITRAN 2008 molecular spectroscopic database. The maser is modeled as a continuously pumped four-level maser that includes the effects of nonradiative relaxation due to molecular collisions and of microwave absorption in atmospheric oxygen. Since maser spiking is highly unlikely to occur due to the high rate of collisional relaxation at normal atmospheric pressure, the electrical breakdown of air must be achieved by the steady state output of the atmospheric maser. A parametric analysis is performed to relate the size of the atmospheric maser to the pumping rate needed to create a steady state population inversion sufficient to generate maser radiation intense enough at the beam waist to result in the electrical breakdown of air. The analysis suggests that electric field intensities at the beam waist sufficient to cause electrical breakdown of air could only be created through huge pumping rates (˜105 to 107 times the critical pumping rate) and only for the most highly curved clouds (g ≈ 0) that give the narrowest beam waists.

  7. Fusion characteristics of ball lighting like configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanduloviciu, M.; Lozneanu, E. [Universitatea A1. I. Cuza, Iasi (Romania)

    1997-12-31

    Assuming that an already proposed self-organization physical scenario is at the origin of both ball lightnings as well as fireballs produced in high intensity electrical discharges, we suggest a new possibility to create fusion relevant ball lightning like configurations in laboratory. Perhaps this becomes possible by prolonging in a controllable way their lifetime and energy content. (author)

  8. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries.

  9. The physics of lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.; Uman, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    of upward connecting leaders from those objects or from the ground? What is the physics of compact intra-cloud discharges (CIDs) (that produce a narrow bipolar wideband electric field pulse, a narrow bipolar event or NBE, apparently multiple-reflecting propagating waves within 1 km height, and copious HF and VHF radiation)? How are CIDs related to other types of preliminary breakdown pulses? Are CIDs related to the Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) observed on orbiting satellites or to the Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) photographed above cloud tops, particularly to so-called “gigantic jets”? By what physical mechanisms do lightning leaders emit pulses of X-rays? Do the X-rays play a role in lightning propagation? By what mechanism do thunderclouds generate relatively-steady internal X-rays? Do X-rays and other high energy radiation affect cloud electrification and play a role in lightning initiation? By what physical mechanisms are Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) produced? Do TGFs pose a hazard to individuals in aircraft? How do cloud-to-ground and intra-cloud lightning affect the upper atmosphere and ionosphere? What are the physics of the Transient Luminous Events (TLEs), “Sprites”, “jets”, and “elves”? What is the energy input into the ionosphere/magnetosphere from lightning? How exactly does rocket-and-wire (“classical” with a grounded wire and “altitude” with a floating wire) triggering of lightning work? Are there other possible and practical triggering techniques such as laser triggering? Can triggering reduce or eliminate the local occurrence of natural lightning? What are the power and energy of the component processes of lightning flashes and how are they distributed among electromagnetic processes (DC to light), thermal processes, mechanical (acoustic) processes, and relativistic (high energy) processes (runaway electrons, runaway positrons, X-ray, and gamma rays)? What is the physics of ball lightning? Is there more than

  10. Solving ball lightning—A reply to Stefan and Massey (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Peter Francis

    2009-06-01

    Comments are made on the ball lightning paper of Stephan and Massey [Stefan, K.D., Massey, N., 2008. Burning molten metallic sphere: One class of ball lightning? Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 70, 1589-1596] that describes their [`]welding drop' theory. An alternative theory is offered based on combustion inside an atmospheric vortex. The [`]vortex fireball' hypothesis has good explanatory capability in regard to published ball lightning properties.

  11. Lightning Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to electrical equipment or telephone lines inside a house. Lightning can injure a person several ways: Lightning ... a feathering, branching pattern, consist of clusters of tiny pinpoint spots like a cigarette burn, or consist ...

  12. Lightning Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    thunder . The thunder signals were recorded on a second FM magnetic tape channel. In this manner, the time of occurrence, the nature of the lightning ...from the Kiva to the lightning cur- rent element of interest is based on the assumption that the time from flash to thunder multiplied by the speed of...some corona-like discharges before the main lightning event. The acoustically determined (per section 4) thunder sources are displayed in figure 5.4

  13. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  14. Atmospheric Electricity Hazards Analytical Model Development and Application. Volume I. Lightning Environment Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Library, Signet, 1964. Battan, L.J., Radar observation of the atmosphere, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1973. Barry, J.D., Ball lightning and...B.F.J., The flight of thunderbolts, 2nd (ed.), Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1964. Singer, S., The nature of ball lightning , Plenum Press, New York, 1971

  15. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  16. Lightning Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News) Small Study Uncovers Brain Disease in Former Soccer Players (Video) Anterior Cruciate Ligament (Video) Resisted Finger Abduction and Extension With Putty Additional Content Medical News Lightning Injuries By Daniel P. Runde, MD, MME, Assistant Clinical ...

  17. Lightning Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Kit-built airplanes are more affordable because they are assembled by the owner and do not require Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification. The Glasair III, is an advanced technology homebuilt, constructed of a fiberglass and graphite fiber composite material, and equipped with digital instruments. Both technologies make the airplane more susceptible to lightning effects. When Glasair manufacturer, Stoddard-Hamilton, decided that lightning protection would enable more extensive instrument flight and make the plane more marketable, they proposed a joint development program to NASA Langley Research Center (LAR). Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Langley contractors designed and tested a lightning protection system, and the Glasair III-LP became the first kit-built composite aircraft to be lightning tested and protection-verified under FAA guidelines for general aviation aircraft.

  18. Lightning strikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, B.

    1982-01-01

    If a nuclear weapon were struck by a powerful lightning flash, what would happen Scientists have assembled a simulator to produce exceptionally powerful discharges to try to find the answer to this question by practical test. The Sandia facility enables the extremely powerful lightning discharges which occur only once in every hundred lightning strokes to be duplicated. A bolt is composed of a series of strokes between two clouds or between one cloud and the earth. The simulator consists of four circuits, an inductor, a resistor and a special crowbar-switch developed at Sandia. The crowbar is for accuracy in the simulation of a lightning stroke. The test data is conveyed to computers for analysis by means of fibre-optic links. The first series of tests involve the warhead for the Air-Launched Cruise Missile

  19. Theory of the Motion of Ball Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Peter

    2008-04-01

    The Maser-Soliton Theory of BL predicts the dynamics of each of the harmonic waves in the wave packet that feeds and in fact defines the Langmuir plasma soliton that is observed as BL. The frequencies in the wave packet are in a narrow window f that corresponds in the case of open air BL to the diameter of the area in which the damage caused by the final explosion of the BL is observed. This is usually of the order of δx=30 m roughly, in rms. The corresponding wave vector interval is δk=(1/2)(1/30m)=0.017/m in rms. At the same time, k is of the order of 6/m, yielding k/δk=360. This pronounced line-narrowing is obtained due to the large gain of the atmospheric maser when it generates the Kapitsa standing wave. Phase differences between the waves that make up the electromagnetic field that couples with the electrostatic field of the soliton are determined by the frequency dependence of gain and dissipation. They are influenced less by the motion of the air, than by the maser dynamics and by the boundary conditions shaping the electromagnetic field, i.e. the individual photonic wave-packet. The paper presents the equations that determine the phase dynamics and therefore also the observed motion of BL. A similar phase dynamics is expected to be applicable to the special case of UFO motions.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium of a self-confined elliptical plasma ball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H. (CCAST (World Laboratory) P. O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 and Institute of Mechanics, Academia Sinica, Beijing, People' s Republic of China (CN)); Oakes, M.E. (Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (USA))

    1991-08-01

    A variational principle is applied to the problem of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium of a self-contained elliptical plasma ball, such as elliptical ball lightning. The principle is appropriate for an approximate solution of partial differential equations with arbitrary boundary shape. The method reduces the partial differential equation to a series of ordinary differential equations and is especially valuable for treating boundaries with nonlinear deformations. The calculations conclude that the pressure distribution and the poloidal current are more uniform in an oblate self-confined plasma ball than that of an elongated plasma ball. The ellipticity of the plasma ball is obviously restricted by its internal pressure, magnetic field, and ambient pressure. Qualitative evidence is presented for the absence of sighting of elongated ball lightning.

  1. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  2. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torchigin, V.P., E-mail: v_torchigin@mail.r [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278, Moscow (Russian Federation); Torchigin, A.V. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-11

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  3. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  4. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  5. Lightning Bugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 9. Lightning Bugs. B Gajendra Babu M Kannan. General Article Volume 7 Issue 9 September 2002 pp 49-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/09/0049-0055. Keywords.

  6. HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES FLUX ORIGIN IN THE CLOUDS, DARK LIGHTNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov, V.V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem of high-energy particles flux origin in clouds is discussed. Conditions in which dark lightning preceding the ordinary one and creating additional ionization, fluxes of fast electrons with MeV energy prior to the earthquake detected among lightning initiating ball-lightning, glow, sprites are considered. All above phenomena appear to be of general nature founded on quantum entanglement of hydrogen bonds protons in water clasters inside clouds.

  7. From an electron avalanche to the lightning discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalikhanov, B. Zh.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work is to describe qualitatively the physics of processes which begin with an electron avalanche and finish in a lightning discharge. A streamer model is considered that is based on studies of the recently discovered processes occurring in the prestreamer region. The investigation and analysis of these processes enabled making the conclusion that they are, in essence, the attendant processes, which ensure the electron avalanche-to-streamer transition, and may be interpreted as a manifestation of properties of a double charge layer exposed to the external electric field. The pressing problems of physical processes which form a lightning discharge are considered from the standpoint of new ideas about the mechanism of the streamer formation and growth. Causes of the emergence of coherent super-high-frequency radiation of a leader and the neutron production in a lightning discharge are revealed that have not been explained so far in the theory of gas discharge. Based also on new ideas about the lightning discharge, a simple ball-lightning model, providing answers to almost allquestions formulated from numerous observations on the behavior of ball lightning, is offered, and the need of a new design of lightning protection instead of the traditional rod is discussed.

  8. Characterization and Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Ball Plasmoid Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas at atmospheric pressure serve many purposes, from ionization sources for ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) to plasma-assisted wound healing. Of the many naturally occurring ambient plasmas, ball lightning is one of the least understood; there is currently no solid explanation in the literature for the formation and lifetime of natural ball lightning. With the first measurements of naturally occurring ball lightning being reported last year, we have worked to replicate the natural phenomenon in order to elucidate the physical and chemical processes by which the plasma is sustained at ambient conditions. We are able to generate ball-shaped plasmoids (self-sustaining plasmas) that are analogous to natural ball lightning using a high-voltage, high-current, pulsed DC system. Improvements to the discharge electronics used in our laboratory and characterization of the plasmoids that are generated from this system will be described. Infrared emission spectroscopy of these plasmoids reveals emission from water and hydroxyl radical -- fitting methods for these molecular species in the complex experimental spectra will be presented. Rotational temperatures for the stretching and bending modes of H2O along with that of OH will be presented, and the non-equilibrium nature of the plasmoid will be discussed in this context. Cen, J.; Yuan, P,; Xue, S. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 035001. Dubowsky, S.E.; Friday, D.M.; Peters, K.C.; Zhao, Z.; Perry, R.H.; McCall, B.J. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 376, 39-45.

  9. Slow Lightning in Water Plasmoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl; Dumas, Shelby; McMinn, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Water plasmoids are produced when a capacitor is discharged into a cathode at the surface of a weakly conducting water electrolyte. The resulting plasma jet forms a glowing spherical plasmoid which persists in air for up to 0.3 s and resembles ball lightning in some respects. This study shows that during the plasmoid's formation stage, surface discharges with unusual characteristics carry the large instantaneous discharge current. The liquid-surface discharges have some characteristics of both conventional solid-surface discharges (branching, fractal structure) and glow discharges (approximately constant current density from the discharge plasma to the water surface over a wide range of current). Dynamically, the surface discharge resembles a two-dimensional version of a lightning leader, but develops at much lower speeds: a maximum of about 0.3 m/s for the surface discharges in this study, compared to lightning leader speeds of 100 to 100,000 m/s. The low conductivity of the water used (about 20 mS/m) means that the surface discharges are interacting with a resistive barrier, which allows a significant tangential electric field on the surface. High-speed photography of the discharges is supplemented by spectroscopic and other experimental studies.

  10. Technique for the comparison of light spectra from natural and laboratory generated lightning current arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchard, D.; Clark, D.; Carr, D.; Haddad, A.

    2016-08-01

    A technique was developed for the comparison of observed emission spectra from lightning current arcs generated through self-breakdown in air and the use of two types of initiation wire, aluminum bronze and nichrome, against previously published spectra of natural lightning events. A spectrograph system was used in which the wavelength of light emitted by the lightning arc was analyzed to derive elemental interactions. A lightning impulse of up to 100 kA was applied to a two hemispherical tungsten electrode configuration which allowed the effect of the lightning current and lightning arc length to be investigated. A natural lightning reference spectrum was reconstructed from literature, and generated lightning spectra were obtained from self-breakdown across a 14.0 mm air gap and triggered along initiation wires of length up to 72.4 mm. A comparison of the spectra showed that the generated lightning arc induced via self-breakdown produced a very similar spectrum to that of natural lightning, with the addition of only a few lines from the tungsten electrodes. A comparison of the results from the aluminum bronze initiation wire showed several more lines, whereas results from the nichrome initiation wire differed greatly across large parts of the spectrum. This work highlights the potential use for spectrographic techniques in the study of lightning interactions with surrounding media and materials, and in natural phenomena such as recently observed ball lightning.

  11. Technique for the comparison of light spectra from natural and laboratory generated lightning current arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchard, D., E-mail: mitcharddr@cardiff.ac.uk; Clark, D.; Carr, D.; Haddad, A. [Morgan-Botti Lightning Laboratory, Advanced High Voltage Research Centre, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, CF24 3AA Wales (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-29

    A technique was developed for the comparison of observed emission spectra from lightning current arcs generated through self-breakdown in air and the use of two types of initiation wire, aluminum bronze and nichrome, against previously published spectra of natural lightning events. A spectrograph system was used in which the wavelength of light emitted by the lightning arc was analyzed to derive elemental interactions. A lightning impulse of up to 100 kA was applied to a two hemispherical tungsten electrode configuration which allowed the effect of the lightning current and lightning arc length to be investigated. A natural lightning reference spectrum was reconstructed from literature, and generated lightning spectra were obtained from self-breakdown across a 14.0 mm air gap and triggered along initiation wires of length up to 72.4 mm. A comparison of the spectra showed that the generated lightning arc induced via self-breakdown produced a very similar spectrum to that of natural lightning, with the addition of only a few lines from the tungsten electrodes. A comparison of the results from the aluminum bronze initiation wire showed several more lines, whereas results from the nichrome initiation wire differed greatly across large parts of the spectrum. This work highlights the potential use for spectrographic techniques in the study of lightning interactions with surrounding media and materials, and in natural phenomena such as recently observed ball lightning.

  12. The lightning flash

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Vernon

    2014-01-01

    With contributions from today's leading lightning engineers and researchers, this updated 2nd edition of Vernon Cooray's classic text, The Lightning Flash provides the reader with an essential introduction to lightning and its impact on electrical and electronic equipment. Providing the reader with a thorough background into almost every aspect of lightning and its impact on electrical and electronic equipment, this new edition is updated throughout and features eight new chapters that bring the science up to date.

  13. Lightning safety of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Chandima

    2012-11-01

    This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed.

  14. Ban Deodorant Ball Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, D. Rae, Jr.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a demonstration of vertical collision of two balls. Shows the theoretical height ratio using mathematical expression and diagrams. Compares it with researchers' experimental results. Expands the two-ball collision to multi-ball system. (YP)

  15. A Familiar Plasma: Lightning 3. A Recipe of Science Education; Scientific Demonstrations of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi; Ihara, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tohru; Sugiyama, Toshiki

    Four scientific demonstrative presentations concerning a lightning are presented in this article. All presentations can be easily performed on the scientific events held in educational and/or research institutions, such as university, college, research center, elementary, secondary and high schools. The first topic is long gap discharge which shows the model of the lightning from lightning clouds to ground. The high voltage is generated using an impulse voltage generator, which consists five capacitors, gap switches, and dc high-voltage power supply. Human shaped wet sponges were employed in the presentation as a human-body. The second topic is turning-on a fluorescent lamp without direct power supply using Tesla coil as electromagnetic wave radiation source. We show not only some commercial products of Tesla coil but also show how to construct the Tesla coil with much higher output voltage than the merchandise. The third demonstration is a ball lightning using a microwave. Finally, we show a handicraft of small lightning generation on the name card using a piezoelectric crystal in an electric throwaway lighter.

  16. FOUR BALL BEST BALL 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Pollard

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a four-ball-best-ball (4BBB model for pairs of golf players is set up. The 4BBB match-play scoring system is seen to satisfy a basic requirement of fairness. It is shown that it is not strictly possible to rate individual players as 4BBB players. However, a (reasonably broad class of individual players is identified such that it is possible to rate them individually as 4BBB players. The capacity of an individual to play birdies is seen to be a very important determinant in being a successful member of a 4BBB pair, but there are other minor factors as well. Consideration is given to equal and unequal 4BBB pairs. The transitive law is seen to apply for 4BBB pairs. Thus, if pair A is better than pair B, and pair B is better than pair C, then pair A must be better than pair C. Correspondingly, if pair A is equal to pair B, and pair B is equal to pair C, then pair A is equal to pair C. Consideration is given to some strategic issues in 4BBB match-play golf. For example, the conditions under which a player should take a greater risk and have a higher probability of obtaining a bogie in order to achieve a higher probability of scoring a birdie, are determined. Also, the conditions under which a player, noting that his partner is about to have a ‘bad’ hole and score only a par or a bogie, should ‘play safe’, are determined. Thirdly, players who can interact in certain ways are seen to have an advantage over those pairs that cannot do this. Finally, one pair’s optimal strategy when they see that their opponents are about to score a par or a bogie, but not a birdie, is analyzed

  17. Lightning and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E.

    2012-12-01

    Lightning is of interest in the domain of climate change for several reasons: (1) thunderstorms are extreme forms of moist convection, and lightning flash rate is a sensitive measure of that extremity, (2) thunderstorms are deep conduits for delivering water substance from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and stratosphere, and (3) global lightning can be monitored continuously and inexpensively within a natural framework (the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and Schumann resonances). Lightning and temperature, and lightning and upper tropospheric water vapor, are positively correlated on weather-related time scales (diurnal, semiannual, and annual) with a lightning temperature sensitivity of order 10% per oC. Lightning also follows temperature variations on the ENSO time scale, both locally and globally. The response of lightning in some of its extreme forms (exceptional flash rates and the prevalence of sprite-producing mesoscale lightning, for example) to temperature variations will be addressed. Consistently obtained records of lightning activity on longer time scales are scarce as stable detection networks are uncommon. As a consequence, thunder day data have been used to extend the lightning record for climate studies, with evidence for increases over decades in urban areas. Global records of lightning following Schumann resonance intensity and from space-based optical sensors (OTD and LIS) are consistent with the record of ionospheric potential representing the global electrical circuit in showing flat behavior over the few decades. This flatness is not well understood, though the majority of all lightning flashes are found in the tropics, the most closely regulated portion of the atmosphere. Other analysis of frequency variations of Schumann resonances in recent decades shows increased lightning in the northern hemisphere, where the global warming is most pronounced. The quantity more fundamental than temperature for lightning control is cloud buoyancy

  18. Lightning injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritenour, Amber E; Morton, Melinda J; McManus, John G; Barillo, David J; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2008-08-01

    Lightning is an uncommon but potentially devastating cause of injury in patients presenting to burn centers. These injuries feature unusual symptoms, high mortality, and significant long-term morbidity. This paper will review the epidemiology, physics, clinical presentation, management principles, and prevention of lightning injuries.

  19. Lightning Often Strikes Twice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Contrary to popular misconception, lightning often strikes the same place twice. Certain conditions are just ripe for a bolt of electricity to come zapping down; and a lightning strike is powerful enough to do a lot of damage wherever it hits. NASA created the Accurate Location of Lightning Strikes technology to determine the ground strike point of lightning and prevent electrical damage in the immediate vicinity of the Space Shuttle launch pads at Kennedy Space Center. The area surrounding the launch pads is enmeshed in a network of electrical wires and components, and electronic equipment is highly susceptible to lightning strike damage. The accurate knowledge of the striking point is important so that crews can determine which equipment or system needs to be retested following a strike. Accurate to within a few yards, this technology can locate a lightning strike in the perimeter of the launch pad. As an added bonus, the engineers, then knowing where the lightning struck, can adjust the variables that may be attracting the lightning, to create a zone that will be less susceptible to future strikes.

  20. Lightning Injury: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    as a moving, floating ball ranging in size from that of a golf ball to that of a basketball. A variety of theories have been proposed to explain ball...ACLS), and defibrillation techniques are recommended [38–40,43]. In addition, respiratory arrest – due to respiratory center suppression and thoracic

  1. Having a Ball with Fitness Balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Fitness programs can be greatly enhanced with the addition of fitness balls. They are a fun, challenging, economical, and safe way to incorporate a cardiovascular, strength, and stretching program for all fitness levels in a physical education setting. The use of these balls has become more popular during the last decade, and their benefits and…

  2. The Goldenrod Ball Gall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1974-01-01

    The paper presents a generalized life history of the goldenrod ball gall, a ball-shaped swelling found almost exclusively on the Canada goldenrod, Solidago canadensis, and caused by a peacock fly know as Eurosta soldiaginis. (KM)

  3. Infrasound Observations from Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Edens, H. E.; Thomas, R. J.; Jones, K. R.

    2008-12-01

    To provide additional insight into the nature of lightning, we have investigated its infrasound manifestations. An array of three stations in a triangular configuration, with three sensors each, was deployed during the Summer of 2008 (July 24 to July 28) in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico, to monitor infrasound (below 20 Hz) sources due to lightning. Hyperbolic formulations of time of arrival (TOA) measurements and interferometric techniques were used to locate lightning sources occurring over and outside the network. A comparative analysis of simultaneous Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data and infrasound measurements operating in the same area was made. The LMA locates the sources of impulsive RF radiation produced by lightning flashes in three spatial dimensions and time, operating in the 60 - 66 MHz television band. The comparison showed strong evidence that lightning does produce infrasound. This work is a continuation of the study of the frequency spectrum of thunder conducted by Holmes et al., who reported measurements of infrasound frequencies. The integration of infrasound measurements with RF source localization by the LMA shows great potential for improved understanding of lightning processes.

  4. Lightning in aeronautics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lago, F

    2014-01-01

    It is generally accepted that a civilian aircraft is struck, on average, once or twice per year. This number tends to indicate that a lightning strike risk is far from being marginal and so requires that aircraft manufacturers have to demonstrate that their aircraft is protected against lightning. The first generation of aircrafts, which were manufactured mainly in aluminium alloy and had electromechanical and pneumatic controls, had a natural immunity to the effects of lightning. Nowadays, aircraft structures are made primarily with composite materials and flight controls are mostly electronic. This aspect of the ''more composite and more electric'' aircraft demands to aircraft manufacturers to pay a particular attention to the lightning protection and to its certification by testing and/or analysis. It is therefore essential to take this risk into account when designing the aircraft. Nevertheless, it is currently impossible to reproduce the entire lightning phenomenon in testing laboratories and the best way to analyse the lightning protection is to reproduce its effects. In this context, a number of standards and guides are produced by standards committees to help laboratories and aircraft manufacturers to perform realistic tests. Although the environment of a laboratory is quite different from those of a storm cloud, the rules of aircraft design, the know-how of aircraft manufacturers, the existence of international work leading to a better understanding of the lightning phenomenon and standards more precise, permit, today, to consider the risk as properly controlled

  5. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  6. Simulating lightning tests to radar system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The risk of destruction due to lightning makes simulating the effects of lightning strikes a necessity. We modeled a radar enclosure and simulated the effect of a lightning strike. The results have been validated using full threat lightning current tests.

  7. Investigation of a Plasma Ball using a High Speed Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, James; Zweben, Stewart; Raitses, Yevgeny; Zwicker, Andrew; Kaganovich, Igor

    2008-11-01

    The physics of how a plasma ball works is not clearly understood. A plasma ball is a commercial ``toy'' in which a center electrode is charged to a high voltage and lightning-like discharges fill the ball with many plasma filaments. The ball uses high voltage applied on the center electrode (˜5 kV) which is covered with glass and capacitively coupled to the plasma filaments. This voltage oscillates at a frequency of ˜26 kHz. A Nebula plasma ball from Edmund Scientific was filmed with a Phantom v7.3 camera, which can operate at speeds up to 150,000 frames per second (fps) with a limit of >=2 μsec exposure per frame. At 100,000 fps the filaments were only visible for ˜5 μsec every ˜40 μsec. When the plasma ball is first switched on, the filaments formed only after ˜800 μsec and initially had a much larger diameter with more chaotic behavior than when the ball reached its final plasma filament state at ˜30 msec. Measurements are also being made of the final filament diameter, the speed of the filament propagation, and the effect of thermal gradients on the filament density. An attempt will be made to explain these results from plasma theory and movies of these filaments will be shown. Possible theoretical models include streamer-like formation, thermal condensation instability, and dielectric barrier discharge instability.

  8. Upward Lightning in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, C.; Saba, M. M.; Alves, J.; Warner, T. A.; Albrecht, R. I.; Bie, L. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of upward lightning from tall objects have been reported since 1939. Interest in this subject has grown recently, some of it because of the rapid expansion of wind power generation. Also, with the increasing number of tall buildings and towers, there will be a corresponding increase in the number of upward lightning flashes from these structures. Reports from recent field observations are beginning to address the nature of upward lightning initiation, but much still needs to be learned. Examples are studies of upward lightning from towers in winter thunderstorms in Japan (Wang and Takagi, 2010; and Lu et al., 2009) and summer thunderstorms in Europe (Miki et al., 2005; Flache et al., 2008; and Diendorfer et al., 2009; Zhou et al., 2011) and in North America (Mazur and Ruhnke, 2011; Hussein et al., 2011; Warner, 2011, and Warner et al., 2011). Up to January 2012, no upward flash had ever been registered in Brazil. With the help of some video cameras, we recorded 15 upward lightning which started from one of the towers located on Peak Jaraguá in the city of São Paulo. This paper describes the first results of this field campaign. A combination of high-speed video and standard definition video were used to record upward lightning flashes from multiple towers in Sao Paulo, Brazil, a city located in southeastern Brazil with a population over 10 million people, an average elevation of around 800 meters above sea level, and a flash density of 15 flashes/km2/year. Observations of 15 upward flashes made with these assets were analyzed along with BrasilDAT Lightning Detection Network and a lightning mapping array (LMA) and electric field sensors.

  9. The Physics of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakov, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    An overview of the physics of cloud-to-ground lightning is given, including its initiation, propagation, and attachment to ground. Discharges artificially initiated (triggered) from natural thunderclouds using the rocket-and-wire technique are discussed with a view toward studying properties of natural lightning. Both conventional and runaway breakdown mechanisms of lightning initiation in thunderclouds are reviewed, as is the role of the lower positive charge region in facilitating different types of lightning. New observations of negative-leader stepping and its attachment to ground are compared to similar processes in long laboratory sparks. The mechanism and parameters of compact intracloud lightning discharges that are thought to be the most intense natural producers of HF-VHF (3-300 MHz) radiation on Earth are reviewed. The M-component mode of charge transfer to ground and its difference from the leader/return-stroke mode are discussed. Lightning interaction with the ionosphere and the production of energetic radiation (X-rays and gamma radiation) by cloud-to-ground leaders are considered.

  10. Situational Lightning Climatologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred

    2010-01-01

    Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. It was believed there were two flow systems, but it has been discovered that actually there are seven distinct flow regimes. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) has recalculated the lightning climatologies for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and the eight airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) County Warning Area (CWA) using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The software determines the location of each CG lightning strike with 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-nmi (.9.3-, 18.5-, 37-, 55.6-km) radii from each airfield. Each CG lightning strike is binned at 1-, 3-, and 6-hour intervals at each specified radius. The software merges the CG lightning strike time intervals and distance with each wind flow regime and creates probability statistics for each time interval, radii, and flow regime, and stratifies them by month and warm season. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface (GUI) with the new data.

  11. The start of lightning: Evidence of bidirectional lightning initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Montany?, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar; Williams, Earle R.

    2015-01-01

    Lightning flashes are known to initiate in regions of strong electric fields inside thunderstorms, between layers of positively and negatively charged precipitation particles. For that reason, lightning inception is typically hidden from sight of camera systems used in research. Other technology such as lightning mapping systems based on radio waves can typically detect only some aspects of the lightning initiation process and subsequent development of positive and negative leader...

  12. LOFAR lightning imaging: Mapping lightning with nanosecond precision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Hare; O. Scholten; A. Bonardi; S. Buitink; A. Corstanje; U. M. Ebert (Ute); H. Falcke; J.R. Hörandel (Jörg); H. Leijnse; P. Mitra; K. Mulrey; A. Nelles; J.P. Rachen; L. Rossetto; C. Rutjes (Casper); P. Schellart; S. Thoudam; T.N.G. Trinh (Gia); S. ter Veen (Sander); T. Winchen

    2018-01-01

    textabstractLightning mapping technology has proven instrumental in understanding lightning. In this work we present a pipeline that can use lightning observed by the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope to construct a 3D map of the flash. We show that LOFAR has unparalleled precision, on the

  13. Ball lightning: a Renaissance account from Zafra (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Vaquero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is given of the account of a globe of fire observed in Zafra (Spain in the middle of the 16th century. During a strong storm, Conde Don Pedro observed what he described as a globe of fire that was directed against the city and abruptly changed course. He attributed the change in course to a miracle. He described neither any damage nor sound.

  14. Ball lightning: a Renaissance account from Zafra (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, José M.

    2017-06-01

    An analysis is given of the account of a globe of fire observed in Zafra (Spain) in the middle of the 16th century. During a strong storm, Conde Don Pedro observed what he described as a globe of fire that was directed against the city and abruptly changed course. He attributed the change in course to a miracle. He described neither any damage nor sound.

  15. Emergency Preparedness and Response - Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Pet Owners Frequently Asked Questions Additional Information Lightning Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... you know what to do when you see lightning or when you hear thunder as a warning. ...

  16. Ball Lightning–Aerosol Electrochemical Power Source or A Cloud of Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Despite numerous attempts, an adequate theoretical and experimental simulation of ball lightning still remains incomplete. According to the model proposed here, the processes of electrochemical oxidation within separate aerosol particles are the basis for this phenomenon, and ball lightning is a cloud of composite nano or submicron particles, where each particle is a spontaneously formed nanobattery which is short-circuited by the surface discharge because it is of such a small size. As free discharge-shorted current loops, aerosol nanobatteries are exposed to a powerful mutual magnetic dipole–dipole attraction. The gaseous products and thermal energy produced by each nanobattery as a result of the intra-particle self-sustaining electrochemical reactions, cause a mutual repulsion of these particles over short distances and prevent their aggregation, while a collectivization of the current loops of separate particles, due to the electric arc overlapping between adjacent particles, weakens their mutual magnetic attraction over short distances. Discharge currents in the range of several amperes to several thousand amperes as well as the pre-explosive mega ampere currents, generated in the reduction–oxidation reactions and distributed between all the aerosol particles, explain both the magnetic attraction between the elements of the ball lightning substance and the impressive electromagnetic effects of ball lightning.

  17. Ball Lightning–Aerosol Electrochemical Power Source or A Cloud of Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshcheryakov Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDespite numerous attempts, an adequate theoretical and experimental simulation of ball lightning still remains incomplete. According to the model proposed here, the processes of electrochemical oxidation within separate aerosol particles are the basis for this phenomenon, and ball lightning is a cloud of composite nano or submicron particles, where each particle is a spontaneously formed nanobattery which is short-circuited by the surface discharge because it is of such a small size. As free discharge-shorted current loops, aerosol nanobatteries are exposed to a powerful mutual magnetic dipole–dipole attraction. The gaseous products and thermal energy produced by each nanobattery as a result of the intra-particle self-sustaining electrochemical reactions, cause a mutual repulsion of these particles over short distances and prevent their aggregation, while a collectivization of the current loops of separate particles, due to the electric arc overlapping between adjacent particles, weakens their mutual magnetic attraction over short distances. Discharge currents in the range of several amperes to several thousand amperes as well as the pre-explosive mega ampere currents, generated in the reduction–oxidation reactions and distributed between all the aerosol particles, explain both the magnetic attraction between the elements of the ball lightning substance and the impressive electromagnetic effects of ball lightning.

  18. The spinning ball spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupeux, Guillaume; Le Goff, Anne; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the trajectory of a fast revolving solid ball moving in a fluid of comparable density. As the ball slows down owing to drag, its trajectory follows an exponential spiral as long as the rotation speed remains constant: at the characteristic distance L where the ball speed is significantly affected by the drag, the bending of the trajectory increases, surprisingly. Later, the rotation speed decreases, which makes the ball follow a second kind of spiral, also described in the paper. Finally, the use of these highly curved trajectories is shown to be relevant to sports.

  19. Lightning incidents in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myagmar Doljinsuren

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies that has been conducted in Mongolia on the distribution of lightning incidents. The study covers a 10-year period from 2004 to 2013. The country records a human death rate of 15.4 deaths per 10 million people per year, which is much higher than that of many countries with similar isokeraunic level. The reason may be the low-grown vegetation observed in most rural areas of Mongolia, a surface topography, typical to steppe climate. We suggest modifications to Gomes–Kadir equation for such countries, as it predicts a much lower annual death rate for Mongolia. The lightning incidents spread over the period from May to August with the peak of the number of incidents occurring in July. The worst lightning affected region in the country is the central part. Compared with impacts of other convective disasters such as squalls, thunderstorms and hail, lightning stands as the second highest in the number of incidents, human deaths and animal deaths. Economic losses due to lightning is only about 1% of the total losses due to the four extreme weather phenomena. However, unless precautionary measures are not promoted among the public, this figure of losses may significantly increase with time as the country is undergoing rapid industrialization at present.

  20. The start of lightning: Evidence of bidirectional lightning initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar; Williams, Earle R

    2015-10-16

    Lightning flashes are known to initiate in regions of strong electric fields inside thunderstorms, between layers of positively and negatively charged precipitation particles. For that reason, lightning inception is typically hidden from sight of camera systems used in research. Other technology such as lightning mapping systems based on radio waves can typically detect only some aspects of the lightning initiation process and subsequent development of positive and negative leaders. We report here a serendipitous recording of bidirectional lightning initiation in virgin air under the cloud base at ~11,000 images per second, and the differences in characteristics of opposite polarity leader sections during the earliest stages of the discharge. This case reveals natural lightning initiation, propagation and a return stroke as in negative cloud-to-ground flashes, upon connection to another lightning channel - without any masking by cloud.

  1. Ball Collision Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  2. Punjab Ball Menu

    OpenAIRE

    Hobday, E, fl. 1905, artist

    2003-01-01

    A photograph of the exterior of a menu from the 'Punjab Ball'. The menu is decorated on both the inside and outside with illustrations by 'E. Hobday'. Inside the menu, in pen, is written: 'Lahore, Ball in Montgomery Hall, Nov 30th. 1905'.

  3. Produce documents and media information. [on lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzmann, Melanie A.; Miller, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lightning data and information were collected from the United States, Germany, France, Brazil, China, and Australia for the dual purposes of compiling a global lightning data base and producing publications on the Marshall Space Flight Center's lightning program. Research covers the history of lightning, the characteristics of a storm, types of lightningdischarges, observations from airplanes and spacecraft, the future fole of planes and spacecraft in lightning studies, lightning detection networks, and the relationships between lightning and rainfall. Descriptions of the Optical Transient Dectector, the Lightning Imaging Sensor, and the Lightning Mapper Sensor are included.

  4. Happy Balls, Unhappy Balls, and Newton's Cradle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The intricacies of Newton's Cradle are well covered in the literature going as far back as the time of Newton! These discussions generally center on the highly elastic collisions of metal spheres. Thanks to the invention of happy and unhappy balls, you can build and study the interaction of less elastic systems (see Fig. 1).

  5. Free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Ticos, C.; Wang, Z.; Wurden, C. J. V.

    2007-11-01

    A long-lived (0.3 second, 10-20 cm diameter) ball plasma floating in the air above a water surface has been formed and studied in the laboratory. A 0.4 - 1 mF capacitor is charged to 4-5 kV, and subsequently discharged (30-60 Amps, 20-50 msec duration) into central copper cathode held fixed just below the surface of a bucket of water (with a weak solution of various salts in distilled water, such as CuSO4 or CuCl2, LiCl or NaCl). An underwater ring anode completes the circuit. A bubble of hot vapor from the water surface rises up in the first few milliseconds, and changes from a mushroom cloud with stalk, to a detached quasi-spherical object, finally evolving into a vortex ring. The plasma consists of ionized water vapor, with positive salts and OH- radicals, as well as molecular species, and it completely excludes nitrogen or oxygen from the rising plasma structure. A fine boundary layer is visible in orange, in contrast to a green ball interior when using Cu/CuSO4, and filamentary structures are visible at late times. Finally, a whisp of smoke ring is observed as a residue. A variety of visible and infrared imaging (both video and still cameras) are used, along with 200-800 nm time & space resolved spectroscopy, to identify features of this laboratory analog to ball lightning. Possible applications include a windowless ball- plasma powered pulsed copper vapor laser operating at 510 nm.

  6. Lightning Imaging with LOFAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholten Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that LOFAR can be used as a lightning mapping array with a resolution that is orders of magnitude better than existing arrays. In addition the polarization of the radiation can be used to track the direction of the stepping discharges.

  7. Compact Q-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Losano, L.; Marques, M.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58297-000 Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970 Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Rocha, R. da [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil)

    2016-07-10

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space–time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  8. OLS ANALOG DERIVED LIGHTNING V11

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OLS Analog Derived Lightning dataset consists of global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System...

  9. Lightning protection of PV systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pons, Enrico; Tommasini, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Lightning strikes can affect photovoltaic (PV) generators and their installations, involving also the inverter's electronics. It is therefore necessary to evaluate the risk connected to lightning strikes in order to adopt the correct protective measures for the system. The Standard IEC (EN) 62305-2 reports the procedures for the risk calculation and for the choice of proper lightning protection systems. Usually the technical guidelines suggest protecting with SPDs (surge protective devices) b...

  10. Fiber ball imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jens H; Russell Glenn, G; Helpern, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    By modeling axons as thin cylinders, it is shown that the inverse Funk transform of the diffusion MRI (dMRI) signal intensity obtained on a spherical shell in q-space gives an estimate for a fiber orientation density function (fODF), where the accuracy improves with increasing b-value provided the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficient. The method is similar to q-ball imaging, except that the Funk transform of q-ball imaging is replaced by its inverse. We call this new approach fiber ball imaging. The fiber ball method is demonstrated for healthy human brain, and fODF estimates are compared to diffusion orientation distribution function (dODF) approximations obtained with q-ball imaging. The fODFs are seen to have sharper features than the dODFs, reflecting an enhancement of the higher degree angular frequencies. The inverse Funk transform of the dMRI signal intensity data provides a simple and direct method of estimating a fODF. In addition, fiber ball imaging leads to an estimate for the ratio of the fraction of MRI visible water confined to the intra-axonal space divided by the square root of the intra-axonal diffusivity. This technique may be useful for white matter fiber tractography, as well as other types of microstructural modeling of brain tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring of lightning discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'ev, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a brief description of a lightning discharge recording system developed at the NPO 'Monitoring Techniques' under the direction of V.M. Moskolenko (Moscow). The system provides information about dangerous environmental occurrences such as tornados and hurricanes, making the forecast of extreme situations possible, especially in the areas of dangerous industries and objects. The created automatic system can be useful in solving the tasks relating to nuclear test monitoring. (author)

  12. The bowling balls

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    10 November 1972: CERN’s Bent Stumpe places an order for 12 bowling balls for a total cost of 95 US dollars. Although not evident at first sight, he is buying the heart of some of the first tracking devices to be used in the SPS control room. Today, Bent Stumpe’s device would be called a desktop mouse…   The first order for 4 bowling balls later changed to 12 balls. The bowling balls became the heart of Bent Stumpe's mouse. Almost 40 years ago, the web, Wikipedia and Google did not exist and it was much more difficult to know whether other people in other parts of the world or even in the same laboratory were facing the same problems or developing the same tools. At that time, Bent Stumpe was an electronics engineer, newly recruited to work on developments for the SPS Central Control room. One of the things his supervisor asked him to build as soon as possible was a device to control a pointer on a screen, also called a tracker ball. The heart of the device was the...

  13. Lightning injuries during snowy conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cherington, M.; Breed, D. W.; Yarnell, P. R.; Smith, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    Skiers and other snow sports enthusiasts can become lightning casualties. Two such accidents are reported, one being fatal. There are fewer warning signals of impending lightning strikes in winter-like conditions. However, outdoor activists should be aware of at least two suspicious clues: the appearance of convective clouds, and the presence of graupel (snow pellets) during precipitation. 






  14. Lightning injuries during snowy conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherington, M; Breed, D W; Yarnell, P R; Smith, W E

    1998-12-01

    Skiers and other snow sports enthusiasts can become lightning casualties. Two such accidents are reported, one being fatal. There are fewer warning signals of impending lightning strikes in winter-like conditions. However, outdoor activists should be aware of at least two suspicious clues: the appearance of convective clouds, and the presence of graupel (snow pellets) during precipitation.

  15. 14 CFR 25.581 - Lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning protection. 25.581 Section 25.581... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Lightning Protection § 25.581 Lightning protection. (a) The airplane must be protected against catastrophic effects from lightning. (b) For metallic...

  16. Ball game popularity

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorič, Vanja

    2011-01-01

    In the diploma thesis I present ball games and how they are popular among children of 4th and 5th form of primary school. Sport activities play an important role when growing up and it is up to adults to provide children a certain amount of exercise in the pre-school period and during their schooling. It is important that one considers child's age and that the activities are represented through playing. Ball games are included in the curriculum in one of the sets in the first three years. In ...

  17. Lightning NOx Estimates from Space-Based Lightning Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.

    2017-01-01

    The intense heating of air by a lightning channel, and subsequent rapid cooling, leads to the production of lightning nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) as discussed in Chameides [1979]. In turn, the lightning nitrogen oxides (or "LNOx" for brevity) indirectly influences the Earth's climate because the LNOx molecules are important in controlling the concentration of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the atmosphere. Climate is most sensitive to O3 in the upper troposphere, and LNOx is the most important source of NOx in the upper troposphere at tropical and subtropical latitudes; hence, lightning is a useful parameter to monitor for climate assessments. The National Climate Assessment (NCA) program was created in response to the Congressionally-mandated Global Change Research Act (GCRA) of 1990. Thirteen US government organizations participate in the NCA program which examines the effects of global change on the natural environment, human health and welfare, energy production and use, land and water resources, human social systems, transportation, agriculture, and biological diversity. The NCA focuses on natural and human-induced trends in global change, and projects major trends 25 to 100 years out. In support of the NCA, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to assess lightning-climate inter-relationships. This activity applies a variety of NASA assets to monitor in detail the changes in both the characteristics of ground- and space- based lightning observations as they pertain to changes in climate. In particular, changes in lightning characteristics over the conterminous US (CONUS) continue to be examined by this author using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Lightning Imaging Sensor. In this study, preliminary estimates of LNOx trends derived from TRMM/LIS lightning optical energy observations in the 17 yr period 1998-2014 are provided. This represents an important first step in testing the ability to make remote retrievals

  18. The lightning climatology of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morné Gijben

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, the South African Weather Service installed a state-of-the-art cloud-to-ground lightning detection network across the country. The data recorded by this network in 2006 was utilised in the development of an initial lightning climatology of South Africa. Until 2010, this climatology was based on data from a single year. This paper updates this climatology with the lightning data for the 2006–2010 period, which is the first actual lightning climatology by the South African Weather Service based on data covering 5 years. A number of different maps were created from these lightning data. These were lightning ground flash density, median peak kiloampere, percentage positive and average flash multiplicity maps. These four maps were in turn used to develop lightning intensity risk, positive lightning risk and total lightning risk maps. Analysis of the maps showed that the highest concentrations of lightning are found over the central to northern interior of the country, with areas along the northern parts of the eastern escarpment experiencing the highest flash densities and falling within the extreme risk category. Both the positive and total lightning risks are severe for almost the entire country. Only towards the west of the country does the lightning risk decrease. This lightning climatology can now be used throughout South Africa for various disciplines. It will be especially useful for setting lightning safety standards and identifying priority areas for installing lightning conductors and conducting public awareness campaigns.

  19. Using Total Lightning Observations to Enhance Lightning Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning is often the underrated threat faced by the public when it comes to dangerous weather phenomena. Typically, larger scale events such as floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes receive the vast majority of attention by both the general population and the media. This comes from the fact that these phenomena are large, longer lasting, can impact a large swath of society at one time, and are dangerous events. The threat of lightning is far more isolated on a case by case basis, although millions of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes hit this United States each year. While attention is given to larger meteorological events, lightning is the second leading cause of weather related deaths in the United States. This information raises the question of what steps can be taken to improve lightning safety. Already, the meteorological community s understanding of lightning has increased over the last 20 years. Lightning safety is now better addressed with the National Weather Service s access to the National Lightning Detection Network data and enhanced wording in their severe weather warnings. Also, local groups and organizations are working to improve public awareness of lightning safety with easy phrases to remember, such as "When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors." The impacts can be seen in the greater array of contingency plans, from airports to sports stadiums, addressing the threat of lightning. Improvements can still be made and newer technologies may offer new tools as we look towards the future. One of these tools is a network of sensors called a lightning mapping array (LMA). Several of these networks exist across the United States. NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT), part of the Marshall Spaceflight Center, has access to three of these networks from Huntsville, Alabama, the Kennedy Space Center, and Washington D.C. The SPoRT program s mission is to help transition unique products and observations into the operational forecast environment

  20. Frictional performance of ball screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ferre, Gregoire Robing [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Grantcharov, Vesselin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Krishnapriyan, Aditi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Le Thien, Minh Quan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lim, Jonathan Ng [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Low, Thaddeus Song En [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lystrom, Levi Aaron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Nguyen, Hong T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Pogue, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Orandle, Zoe Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Revard, Benjamin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Roy, Julien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Sandor, Csanad [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Slavkova, Kalina Polet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Weichman, Kathleen Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Wu, Fei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Yang, Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  2. 2017 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Abeywardhana, Jayalath AMM [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Colin Mackenzie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carter, Austin Lewis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ducru, Pablo Philippe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Duignan, Thomas John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gifford, Brendan Joel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hills, Benjamin Hale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hoffman, Kentaro Jack [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Khair, Adnan Ibne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kochanski, Kelly Anne Pribble [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ledwith, Patrick John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leveillee, Joshua Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Sina Genevieve [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Merians, Hugh Drake [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Bryan Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nijjar, Parmeet Kaur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oles, Vladyslav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olszewski, Maciej W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Philipbar, Brad Montgomery [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roberts, David Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rufa, Dominic Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sifain, Andrew E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Justin Steven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Lauren Taylor Wisbey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svolos, Lampros [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thibault, Joshua Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ushijima-Mwesigwa, Hayato Montezuma [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weaver, Claire Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Witzen, Wyatt Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zentgraf, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alred, John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-06

    All members of the T Division Community, students, staff members, group leaders, division management, and other interested individuals are invited to come and support the following student(s) as they present their Lightning Talks.

  3. Acoustic localization of triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, Rene O.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Edens, Harald E.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Rison, William

    2011-05-01

    We use acoustic (3.3-500 Hz) arrays to locate local (thunder produced by triggered lightning in the Magdalena Mountains of central New Mexico. The locations of the thunder sources are determined by the array back azimuth and the elapsed time since discharge of the lightning flash. We compare the acoustic source locations with those obtained by the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) from Langmuir Laboratory, which is capable of accurately locating the lightning channels. To estimate the location accuracy of the acoustic array we performed Monte Carlo simulations and measured the distance (nearest neighbors) between acoustic and LMA sources. For close sources (6 km) the error increases to 800 m for the nearest neighbors and 650 m for the Monte Carlo analysis. This work shows that thunder sources can be accurately located using acoustic signals.

  4. Characterization of infrasound from lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assink, J. D.; Evers, L. G.; Holleman, I.; Paulssen, H.

    2008-08-01

    During thunderstorm activity in the Netherlands, electromagnetic and infrasonic signals are emitted due to the process of lightning and thunder. It is shown that correlating infrasound detections with results from a electromagnetic lightning detection network is successful up to distances of 50 km from the infrasound array. Infrasound recordings clearly show blastwave characteristics which can be related to cloud-ground discharges, with a dominant frequency between 1-5 Hz. Amplitude measurements of CG discharges can partly be explained by the beam pattern of a line source with a dominant frequency of 3.9 Hz, up to a distance of 20 km. The ability to measure lightning activity with infrasound arrays has both positive and negative implications for CTBT verification purposes. As a scientific application, lightning studies can benefit from the worldwide infrasound verification system.

  5. Ball check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1978-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear reactor having an instrument assembly sheathed in a metallic tube which is extended vertically upward into the reactor core by traversing a metallic guide tube which is welded to the wall of the vessel is described. Sensors in each instrument assembly are connected to instruments outside the vessel to manifest the conditions within the core. Each instrument assembly probe is moved into position within a metallic guide channel. The guide channel penetrates the wall of the vessel and forms part of the barrier to the environment within the pressure vessel. Each channel includes a ball check valve which is opened by the instrument assembly probe when the probe passes through the valve. A ball valve element is moved from its seat by the probe to a position lateral of the bore of the channel and is guided to its seat along a sloped path within the valve body when the probe is removed. 5 claims, 3 figures

  6. Ground Optical Lightning Detector (GOLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John, Jr.; Simmons, David

    A photometer developed to characterize lightning from the ground is discussed. The detector and the electronic signal processing and data storage systems are presented along with field data measured by the system. The discussion will include improvements that will be incorporated to enhance the measurement of lightning and the data storage capability to record for many days without human involvement. Finally, the calibration of the GOLD system is presented.

  7. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP), which consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field...

  9. NAMMA ATD LIGHTNING DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA ATD Lightning data provided by the UK Meterological Office from multiple outstations contains lightning stroke data, latitude and longitude, accuracy and...

  10. Lightning NOx and Impacts on Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lee T.

    2016-01-01

    Lightning generates relatively large but uncertain quantities of nitrogen oxides, critical precursors for ozone and hydroxyl radical (OH), the primary tropospheric oxidants. Lightning nitrogen oxide strongly influences background ozone and OH due to high ozone production efficiencies in the free troposphere, effecting small but non-negligible contributions to surface pollutant concentrations. Lightning globally contributes 3-4 ppbv of simulated annual-mean policy-relevant background (PRB) surface ozone, comprised of local, regional, and hemispheric components, and up to 18 ppbv during individual events. Feedbacks via methane may counter some of these effects on decadal time scales. Lightning contributes approximately 1 percent to annual-mean surface particulate matter, as a direct precursor and by promoting faster oxidation of other precursors. Lightning also ignites wildfires and contributes to nitrogen deposition. Urban pollution influences lightning itself, with implications for regional lightning-nitrogen oxide production and feedbacks on downwind surface pollution. How lightning emissions will change in a warming world remains uncertain.

  11. GAI LIGHTNING GROUND STRIKES V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is restricted to EOS affiliated researchers. The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial lightning detection network operated by...

  12. GAI LONG RANGE LIGHTNING NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The US National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial network that records the time, polarity, signal strength, and number of cloud-to-ground lightning flashes...

  13. NAMMA LIGHTNING ZEUS DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Lightning ZEUS data is provided by World-ZEUS Long Range Lightning Monitoring Network Data obtained from radio atmospheric signals located at thirteen...

  14. Multivariate Statistical Inference of Lightning Occurrence, and Using Lightning Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccippio, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    Two classes of multivariate statistical inference using TRMM Lightning Imaging Sensor, Precipitation Radar, and Microwave Imager observation are studied, using nonlinear classification neural networks as inferential tools. The very large and globally representative data sample provided by TRMM allows both training and validation (without overfitting) of neural networks with many degrees of freedom. In the first study, the flashing / or flashing condition of storm complexes is diagnosed using radar, passive microwave and/or environmental observations as neural network inputs. The diagnostic skill of these simple lightning/no-lightning classifiers can be quite high, over land (above 80% Probability of Detection; below 20% False Alarm Rate). In the second, passive microwave and lightning observations are used to diagnose radar reflectivity vertical structure. A priori diagnosis of hydrometeor vertical structure is highly important for improved rainfall retrieval from either orbital radars (e.g., the future Global Precipitation Mission "mothership") or radiometers (e.g., operational SSM/I and future Global Precipitation Mission passive microwave constellation platforms), we explore the incremental benefit to such diagnosis provided by lightning observations.

  15. Z-M in lightning forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Machina, Alexia J.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Frozen hydrometeors are required for a storm to produce lightning. Previous research has made strong correlations between ice mass and lightning flash rate and lightning flash density. This study attempted to correlate ice mass to lightning potential Operational interest is centered at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station/Kennedy Space Center where accurate weather forecasting is vital to mission requirements, resource protection, and pe...

  16. BLEACHING NEPTUNE BALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONET Maria Angeles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Posidonia Oceanic is a seaweed from Mediterranean Sea and it is more concentrated at the Balerian SEA. This implies the Valencian Community also. It forms vaste underwater meadows in the sea and are part of the Mediterranean ecosystem. It is a sea-grass specie with fruits and flowers. Leaves are ribbon-like and they grow in winter and at the end of summer some of them are separated and arrive to some sea line. Fuit is separated and can floate, it is known as “the olive of the sea” mainly in Italy, or as the Neptune Balls. As it can be used in different fields, it is is being studied in order ro have the precitice tests. Some authors have reported the manufacturing of fully bio-based comites with a gluten matrix by hot-press molding. And it has been considered as an effective insulator for building industry or even though to determine the presence of mercure in the Mediterranean sea some years ago. As many applications can be designed from that fibers, it has been considered to be bleached in order to used them in fashionable products. Consequently, its original brown color is not the most suitable one and it should be bleached as many other cellulosic fibers. The aim of this paper is to bleache neptune balls however, the inner fibers were not accessible at all and it implied not to bleach the inner fibers in the neptune ball. Further studiesd will consider bleaching the individualized fibers.

  17. Individual ball possession in soccer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Link

    Full Text Available This paper describes models for detecting individual and team ball possession in soccer based on position data. The types of ball possession are classified as Individual Ball Possession (IBC, Individual Ball Action (IBA, Individual Ball Control (IBC, Team Ball Possession (TBP, Team Ball Control (TBC und Team Playmaking (TPM according to different starting points and endpoints and the type of ball control involved. The machine learning approach used is able to determine how long the ball spends in the sphere of influence of a player based on the distance between the players and the ball together with their direction of motion, speed and the acceleration of the ball. The degree of ball control exhibited during this phase is classified based on the spatio-temporal configuration of the player controlling the ball, the ball itself and opposing players using a Bayesian network. The evaluation and application of this approach uses data from 60 matches in the German Bundesliga season of 2013/14, including 69,667 IBA intervals. The identification rate was F = .88 for IBA and F = .83 for IBP, and the classification rate for IBC was κ = .67. Match analysis showed the following mean values per match: TBP 56:04 ± 5:12 min, TPM 50:01 ± 7:05 min and TBC 17:49 ± 8:13 min. There were 836 ± 424 IBC intervals per match and their number was significantly reduced by -5.1% from the 1st to 2nd half. The analysis of ball possession at the player level indicates shortest accumulated IBC times for the central forwards (0:49 ± 0:43 min and the longest for goalkeepers (1:38 ± 0:58 min, central defenders (1:38 ± 1:09 min and central midfielders (1:27 ± 1:08 min. The results could improve performance analysis in soccer, help to detect match events automatically, and allow discernment of higher value tactical structures, which is based on individual ball possession.

  18. Individual ball possession in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Daniel; Hoernig, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes models for detecting individual and team ball possession in soccer based on position data. The types of ball possession are classified as Individual Ball Possession (IBC), Individual Ball Action (IBA), Individual Ball Control (IBC), Team Ball Possession (TBP), Team Ball Control (TBC) und Team Playmaking (TPM) according to different starting points and endpoints and the type of ball control involved. The machine learning approach used is able to determine how long the ball spends in the sphere of influence of a player based on the distance between the players and the ball together with their direction of motion, speed and the acceleration of the ball. The degree of ball control exhibited during this phase is classified based on the spatio-temporal configuration of the player controlling the ball, the ball itself and opposing players using a Bayesian network. The evaluation and application of this approach uses data from 60 matches in the German Bundesliga season of 2013/14, including 69,667 IBA intervals. The identification rate was F = .88 for IBA and F = .83 for IBP, and the classification rate for IBC was κ = .67. Match analysis showed the following mean values per match: TBP 56:04 ± 5:12 min, TPM 50:01 ± 7:05 min and TBC 17:49 ± 8:13 min. There were 836 ± 424 IBC intervals per match and their number was significantly reduced by -5.1% from the 1st to 2nd half. The analysis of ball possession at the player level indicates shortest accumulated IBC times for the central forwards (0:49 ± 0:43 min) and the longest for goalkeepers (1:38 ± 0:58 min), central defenders (1:38 ± 1:09 min) and central midfielders (1:27 ± 1:08 min). The results could improve performance analysis in soccer, help to detect match events automatically, and allow discernment of higher value tactical structures, which is based on individual ball possession.

  19. 14 CFR 35.38 - Lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning strike. 35.38 Section 35.38... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.38 Lightning strike. The applicant must demonstrate, by... lightning strike without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. The limit to which the propeller has...

  20. 14 CFR 420.71 - Lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning protection. 420.71 Section 420.71... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.71 Lightning protection. (a) Lightning protection. A licensee shall ensure that the public is not exposed to hazards due...

  1. Relating lightning data to fire occurrence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.H. Koch

    2009-01-01

    Lightning disturbance can affect forest health at various scales. Lightning strikes may kill or weaken individual trees. Lightning-damaged trees may in turn function as epicenters of pest outbreaks in forest stands, as is the case with the southern pine beetle and other bark beetles (Rykiel and others 1988).

  2. 49 CFR 176.120 - Lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lightning protection. 176.120 Section 176.120 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.120 Lightning protection. A lightning conductor...

  3. Wind turbine with lightning protection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a wind turbine comprising a lightning protection system comprising a waveguide interconnecting a communication device and a signal-carrying structure. In other aspects, the present invention relates to the use of a waveguide in a lightning protection system...... of a wind turbine, a power splitter and its use in a lightning protection system of a wind turbine....

  4. Lightning Protection for Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, G. O.

    1985-01-01

    Lightning protection system consisting of two layers of aluminum foil separated by layer of dielectric material protects graphite/epoxy composite structures on aircraft. Protective layer is secondarily applied lightning protection system, prime advantage of which is nullification of thermal and right angle effect of lightning arc attachment to graphite/epoxy laminate.

  5. Positive lightning and severe weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, C.; Murphy, B.

    2003-04-01

    In recent years researchers have noticed that severe weather (tornados, hail and damaging winds) are closely related to the amount of positive lightning occurring in thunderstorms. On 4 July 1999, a severe derecho (wind storm) caused extensive damage to forested regions along the United States/Canada border, west of Lake Superior. There were 665,000 acres of forest destroyed in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Canada, with approximately 12.5 million trees blown down. This storm resulted in additional severe weather before and after the occurrence of the derecho, with continuous cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning occurring for more than 34 hours during its path across North America. At the time of the derecho the percentage of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning measured by the Canadian Lightning Detection Network (CLDN) was greater than 70% for more than three hours, with peak values reaching 97% positive CG lightning. Such high ratios of +CG are rare, and may be useful indicators for short-term forecasts of severe weather.

  6. Tropic lightning: myth or menace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2014-11-01

    Lightning is one of the leading causes of death related to environmental disaster. Of all lightning fatalities documented between 2006 and 2012, leisure activities contributed the largest proportion of deaths, with water-associated, sports, and camping being the most common. Despite the prevalence of these activities throughout the islands, Hawai'i has had zero documented lightning fatalities since weather data tracking was initiated in 1959. There is a common misconception that lightning does not strike the ground in Hawai'i. This myth may contribute to a potentially dangerous false sense of security, and recognition of warning signs and risk factor modification remain the most important prevention strategies. Lightning damage occurs on a spectrum, from minor burns to multi-organ dysfunction. After injury, initial treatment should focus on "reverse triage" and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation when indicated, followed by transfer to a healthcare facility. Definitive treatment entails monitoring and management of potential sequelae, to include cardiovascular, neurologic, dermatologic, ophthalmologic, audiovestibular, and psychiatric complications.

  7. Localized plasma balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueras, Pau; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-04

    In this paper we numerically construct localized black hole solutions in the IR end of the confining geometry of the AdS soliton, Witten’s early holographic model for confinement. These black holes should be thought of as finite size analogues of the domain wall solutions that have appeared previously in the literature. From the dual CFT point of view, these black holes correspond to finite size balls of deconfined plasma surrounded by the confining vacuum. The plasma ball solutions are parametrized by the temperature. For temperatures well above the deconfinement transition, the dual black holes are small and round and they are well-described by the asymptotically flat Schwarzschild solution. On the other hand, as the temperature approaches the deconfinement temperature, these these black holes spread out in the directions parallel to IR end of the space-time, whilst their extent in the holographic radial direction remains finite. In these new black hole backgrounds, we compute various probes of confinement/deconfinement such as temporal Wilson loops and entanglement entropy.

  8. Localized plasma balls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueras, Pau; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we numerically construct localized black hole solutions in the IR end of the confining geometry of the AdS soliton, Witten’s early holographic model for confinement. These black holes should be thought of as finite size analogues of the domain wall solutions that have appeared previously in the literature. From the dual CFT point of view, these black holes correspond to finite size balls of deconfined plasma surrounded by the confining vacuum. The plasma ball solutions are parametrized by the temperature. For temperatures well above the deconfinement transition, the dual black holes are small and round and they are well-described by the asymptotically flat Schwarzschild solution. On the other hand, as the temperature approaches the deconfinement temperature, these these black holes spread out in the directions parallel to IR end of the space-time, whilst their extent in the holographic radial direction remains finite. In these new black hole backgrounds, we compute various probes of confinement/deconfinement such as temporal Wilson loops and entanglement entropy

  9. New Physical Mechanism for Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artekha, Sergey N.; Belyan, Andrey V.

    2018-02-01

    The article is devoted to electromagnetic phenomena in the atmosphere. The set of experimental data on the thunderstorm activity is analyzed. It helps to identify a possible physical mechanism of lightning flashes. This mechanism can involve the formation of metallic bonds in thunderclouds. The analysis of the problem is performed at a microphysical level within the framework of quantum mechanics. The mechanism of appearance of metallic conductivity includes the resonant tunneling of electrons along resonance-percolation trajectories. Such bonds allow the charges from the vast cloud charged subsystems concentrate quickly in lightning channel. The formation of metal bonds in the thunderstorm cloudiness is described as the second-order phase transition. A successive mechanism for the process of formation and development of the lightning channel is suggested. This mechanism is associated with the change in the orientation of crystals in growing electric field. Possible consequences of the quantum-mechanical mechanism under discussion are compared with the results of observations.

  10. Lightning mapper development: Status and requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility for the detection and location of lightning on a continuous basis using a sensor in geostationary orbit was established. Measurements of the optical characteristics of lightning and the capabilities of solid state mosaic focal plane arrays, indicate that the question is how high a detection efficiency can be achieved. The lightning mapper development to strengthen the scientific justification for placing a lightning sensor in geostationary orbit is discussed. The U-2 and ground based lightning research, modeling, and theoretical studies are reported.

  11. Behaviour of a Bouncing Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    The bounce of a ball is a seemingly innocuous event that can be used to illustrate many aspects of elementary and even advanced mechanics. Both normal and oblique bounces on a rigid surface are considered in this article, emphasizing qualitative features of the bounce process. If the ball bounces at an oblique angle then it can slide throughout…

  12. Reflections on a Bouncing Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jim; Lopez, Veronica; Rohr, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    While observing the bounce heights of various kinds of sports balls dropped from different heights onto a variety of surfaces, we thought of the following question: Could measurements of drop and bounce heights of balls of different diameters, but of the same material, falling from different heights, but on the same surface, be expressed by a…

  13. Lightning and Life on Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Paul; Ardaseva, Aleksandra; Hodosan, Gabriella; Helling, Christiane

    2016-07-01

    Miller and Urey performed a ground-breaking experiment, in which they discovered that electric discharges through a low redox ratio gas of methane, ammonia, water vapor and hydrogen produced a variety of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Since this experiment, there has been significant interest on the connection between lightning chemistry and the origin of life. Investigation into the atmosphere of the Early Earth has generated a serious challenge for this project, as it has been determined both that Earth's early atmosphere was likely dominated by carbon dioxide and molecular nitrogen with only small amounts of hydrogen, having a very high redox ratio, and that discharges in gases with high redox ratios fail to yield more than trace amounts of biologically relevant products. This challenge has motivated several origin of life researchers to abandon lightning chemistry, and to concentrate on other pathways for prebiotic synthesis. The discovery of over 2000 exoplanets includes a handful of rocky planets within the habitable zones around their host stars. These planets can be viewed as remote laboratories in which efficient lightning driven prebiotic synthesis may take place. This is because many of these rocky exoplanets, called super-Earths, have masses significantly greater than that of Earth. This higher mass would allow them to more retain greater amounts hydrogen within their atmosphere, reducing the redox ratio. Discharges in super-Earth atmospheres can therefore result in a significant yield of amino acids. In this talk, I will discuss new work on what lightning might look like on exoplanets, and on lightning driven chemistry on super-Earths. Using a chemical kinetics model for a super-Earth atmosphere with smaller redox ratios, I will show that in the presence of lightning, the production of the amino acid glycine is enhanced up to a certain point, but with very low redox ratios, the production of glycine is again inhibited. I will conclude

  14. Prediction of tar ball formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of small tar balls ranging in size from less than a millimetre to 60 centimetres have been observed during cleanup assessment operations following accidental oil spills on water. The tar balls are composed of heavy oil residues and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the water column. They can be found on shorelines, settled on the seafloor and floating at or near the water surface. Their abundance on the shorelines varies from site to site and depends on the conditions of the spill and mixing conditions. Aggregation between SPM and micro-sized oil droplets occurs naturally in coastal waters and enhances the dispersion of spilled oil. Although tar balls are among the important end states of spilled oil in the marine environment, no model exists to estimate the percentage of the spilled oil that becomes tar balls. This paper offered some insight into the modeling of tar ball formation. Current modeling understanding of oil-SPM aggregate formation was used to predict tar ball formation. The formation of oil droplets was examined with respect to a range of conditions under which the formation of large droplets is expected. The role of aggregation was then presented to demonstrate the effects of concentration and type of SPM on the buoyancy of tar balls. Good agreement was found between modeling results and field data reported in the literature regarding the size and density of tar balls. Oil viscosity and mixing energy were found to be the main factors controlling the formation of tar balls. The aggregation of tar balls with SPM and shoreline material results in significant increases or decreases in density, depending on the type and concentration of SPM. 42 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  15. LRAT: Lightning Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we extend to cloud physics the work done for single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves. We consider the scattering of light, visible or infrared, by a spherical cloud represented by a statistically homogeneous ensemble of configurations of N identical spherical water droplets whose centers are uniformly distributed in its volume V. The ensemble is specified by the average number rho of scatterers in unit volume and by rho f(R) with f(R) as the distribution function for separations R of pairs. The incident light, vector-phi(sub 0) a plane electromagnetic wave with harmonic time dependence, is from outside the cloud. The propagation parameter kappa(sub 0) and the index of refraction eta(sub 0) determine physically the medium outside the distribution of scatterers. We solve the interior problem separately to obtain the bulk parameters for the scatterer equivalent to the ensemble of spherical droplets. With the interior solution or the equivalent medium approach, the multiple scattering problem is reduced to that of an equivalent single scatterer excited from outside illumination. A dispersion relation which determines the bulk propagation parameter K and the bulk index of refraction eta of the cloud is given in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude vector-G and the dyadic scattering amplitude tilde-g of the single object in isolation. Based on this transfer model we will have the ability to consider clouds composed of inhomogeneous distribution of water and/or ice particles and we will be able to take into account particle size distributions within the cloud. We will also be able to study the effects of cloud composition (i.e., particle shape, size, composition, orientation, location) on the polarization of the single or the multiple scattered waves. Finally, this study will provide a new starting point for studying the problem of lightning radiative transfer.

  16. Crystal Ball at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Bulos, F.; Luke, D.; Peck, C.; Strauch, K.

    1975-01-01

    The modifications to the SPEAR version of the Crystal Ball required by the higher energies at PEP are discussed. Since the hadron multiplicity is expected to rise as log s, their average energy must rise. On the other hand, if the hadrons are produced in jets, the low energy part of their spectrum is not heavily depleted. This implies that modifications for high energy particles should not deteriorate low energy performance. An external iron calorimeter for measuring the high energy hadrons, charged and neutral, is considered. To improve the angular resolution on γ's, an active internal converter has been studied, estimates have been made of its expected performance, and difficulties requiring further study have been outlined

  17. Total Lightning as an Indicator of Mesocyclone Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Sarah M.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Apparent relationship between total lightning (in-cloud and cloud to ground) and severe weather suggests its operational utility. Goal of fusion of total lightning with proven tools (i.e., radar lightning algorithms. Preliminary work here investigates circulation from Weather Suveilance Radar- 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) coupled with total lightning data from Lightning Mapping Arrays.

  18. Emission Spectroscopy of Atmospheric-Pressure Ball Plasmoids: Higher Energy Reveals a Rich Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; Rose, Amber Nicole; Glumac, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2017-06-01

    Ball plasmoids (self-sustaining spherical plasmas) are a particularly unique example of a non-equilibrium air plasma. These plasmoids have lifetimes on the order of hundreds of milliseconds without an external power source, however, current models dictate that a ball plasmoid should recombine in a millisecond or less. Ball plasmoids are considered to be a laboratory analogue of natural ball lightning, a phenomenon that has eluded scientific explanation for centuries. We are searching for the underlying physicochemical mechanism(s) by which ball plasmoids and (by extension) ball lightning are stabilized using a variety of diagnostic techniques. This presentation will focus on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) of ball plasmoid discharges between 190-850 nm. The previous generation of OES measurements of this system showed emission from only a few atomic and molecular species, however, the energy available for the discharges in these experiments was limited by the size of the capacitor banks and voltages to which the capacitor banks were charged. We are capable of generating plasmoids at much higher energies, and as a result we are the first to report a very rich chemistry previously not observed in ball plasmoids. We have identified signals from species including NO A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, OH A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, NH A^{3}Π→X^{3}Σ^{-}, AlO A^{2}Π→X^{2}Σ^{+}, NH^{+} B^{2}Δ→X^{2}Π, W I, Al I, Cu I, and H_{α}, all of which have not yet been reported for this system. Analysis of the emission spectra and fitting procedures will be discussed, rotational temperatures of constituent species will be reported, and theories of ball plasmoid stabilization based upon these new results will be presented. Versteegh, A.; Behringer, K.; Fantz, U.; Fussman, G.; Jüttner, B.; Noack, S. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2008, 17(2), 024014 Stephan, K. D.; Dumas, S.; Komala-Noor, L.; McMinn, J. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2013, 22(2), 025018

  19. Lightning protection of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, T.; Brask, M.H. [DEFU (Denmark); Jensen, F.V.; Raben, N. [SEAS (Denmark); Saxov, J. [Nordjyllandsvaerket (Denmark); Nielsen, L. [Vestkraft (Denmark); Soerensen, P.E. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Lightning damage to wind turbines is a serious problem for Danish power companies, who have experienced some cases with very costly lightning damage and a large number of cases with minor damage. The most costly cases include one catastrophic damage to an entire wind turbine, and several cases of destruction of blades, main bearings, generators and control systems. Over the years there have been several hundreds of cases with minor damage - typically damage and interruptions of the control and communication systems, or the power systems. The Danish power companies anticipate that the lightning threat will be even bigger for the large off-shore wind turbine installations that are currently being planned in Denmark. Furthermore, it is known from the off-shore wind turbines at Vindeby in Denmark that the costs of inspection and particularly repair work must be expected to be much higher off-shore as compared to wind turbines on land. These considerations was the background for a two year project concerned with investigation of lighting damages and with the formulation of a DEFU Recommendation for lightning protection of wind turbines, which was published in January 1999. The project was funded by the Danish power companies Elsam, Eltra, Elkraft and by DEFU. (au)

  20. Measurement of RF lightning emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, G. K., Jr.; Honnell, M. A.; Shumpert, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    A lightning radio emission observation laboratory is described. The signals observed and recorded include HF, VHF and UHF radio emissions, optical signature, electric field measurements, and thunder. The objectives of the station, the equipment used, and the recording methods are discussed.

  1. The Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rodeheffer, D.; Fuchs, B.

    2012-12-01

    A fifteen station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was installed in northern Colorado in the spring of 2012. While the driving force for the array was to produce 3-dimensional lightning data to support the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment (Barth, this conference), data from the array are being used for several other projects. These include: electrification studies in conjunction with the CSU CHILL radar (Lang et al, this conference); observations of the parent lightning discharges of sprites (Lyons et al, this conference); trying to detect upward discharges triggered by wind turbines, characterizing conditions in which aircraft flying through clouds produce discharges which can be detected by the LMA, and other opportunities, such as observations of lightning in pyrocumulus clouds produced by the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO. All the COLMA stations are solar-powered, and use broadband cellular modems for data communications. This makes the stations completely self-contained and autonomous, allowing a station to be installed anywhere a cellular signal is available. Because most of the stations were installed well away from anthropogenic noise sources, the COLMA is very sensitive. This is evidenced by the numerous plane tracks detected in its the vicinity. The diameter, D, of the COLMA is about 100 km, significantly larger than other LMAs. Because the error in the radial distance r is proportional to (r/D)2, and the error in the altitude z is proportional to (z/D)2, the larger array diameter greatly expands the usable range of the COLMA. The COLMA is able to detect and characterize lighting flashes to a distance of about 350 km from the array center. In addition to a web-based display (lightning.nmt.edu/colma), geo-referenced images are produced and updated at one-minute intervals. These geo-referenced images can be used to overlay the real-time lightning data on Google Earth and other mapping software. These displays were used by the DC3

  2. Lightning Location Using Acoustic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, E.; Arechiga, R. O.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-05-01

    In the summer of 2011 and 2012 a network of acoustic arrays was deployed in the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico to locate lightning flashes. A Times-Correlation (TC) ray-tracing-based-technique was developed in order to obtain the location of lightning flashes near the network. The TC technique, locates acoustic sources from lightning. It was developed to complement the lightning location of RF sources detected by the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) developed at Langmuir Laboratory, in New Mexico Tech. The network consisted of four arrays with four microphones each. The microphones on each array were placed in a triangular configuration with one of the microphones in the center of the array. The distance between the central microphone and the rest of them was about 30 m. The distance between centers of the arrays ranged from 500 m to 1500 m. The TC technique uses times of arrival (TOA) of acoustic waves to trace back the location of thunder sources. In order to obtain the times of arrival, the signals were filtered in a frequency band of 2 to 20 hertz and cross-correlated. Once the times of arrival were obtained, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was applied to locate the spatial coordinates (x,y, and z) of thunder sources. Two techniques were used and contrasted to compute the accuracy of the TC method: Nearest-Neighbors (NN), between acoustic and LMA located sources, and standard deviation from the curvature matrix of the system as a measure of dispersion of the results. For the best case scenario, a triggered lightning event, the TC method applied with four microphones, located sources with a median error of 152 m and 142.9 m using nearest-neighbors and standard deviation respectively.; Results of the TC method in the lightning event recorded at 18:47:35 UTC, August 6, 2012. Black dots represent the results computed. Light color dots represent the LMA data for the same event. The results were obtained with the MGTM station (four channels). This figure

  3. TRMM-Based Lightning Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded climatologies of total lightning flash rates seen by the spaceborne Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) have been updated. OTD collected data from May 1995 to March 2000. LIS data (equatorward of about 38 deg) has been added for 1998-2010. Flash counts from each instrument are scaled by the best available estimates of detection efficiency. The long LIS record makes the merged climatology most robust in the tropics and subtropics, while the high latitude data is entirely from OTD. The mean global flash rate from the merged climatology is 46 flashes per second. The peak annual flash rate at 0.5 deg scale is 160 fl/square km/yr in eastern Congo. The peak monthly average flash rate at 2.5 scale is 18 fl/square km/mo, from early April to early May in the Brahmaputra Valley of far eastern India. Lightning decreases in this region during the monsoon season, but increases further north and west. A monthly average peak from early August to early September in northern Pakistan also exceeds any monthly averages from Africa, despite central Africa having the greatest yearly average. Most continental regions away from the equator have an annual cycle with lightning flash rates peaking in late spring or summer. The main exceptions are India and southeast Asia, with springtime peaks in April and May. For landmasses near the equator, flash rates peak near the equinoxes. For many oceanic regions, the peak flash rates occur in autumn. This is particularly noticeable for the Mediterranean and North Atlantic. Landmasses have a strong diurnal cycle of lightning, with flash rates generally peaking between 3-5 pm local solar time. The central United States flash rates peak later, in late evening or early night. Flash rates peak after midnight in northern Argentina. These regions are known for large, intense, long-lived mesoscale convective systems.

  4. On the Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past decade, considerable uncertainties still exist with the quantification of lightning NOX production and distribution in the troposphere. It is even more challenging for regional chemistry and transport models to accurately parameterize lightning NOX production and distribution in time and space. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) parameterizes the lightning NO emissions using local scaling factors adjusted by the convective precipitation rate that is predicted by the upstream meteorological model; the adjustment is based on the observed lightning strikes from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). For this parameterization to be valid, the existence of an a priori reasonable relationship between the observed lightning strikes and the modeled convective precipitation rates is needed. In this study, we will present an analysis leveraged on the observed NLDN lightning strikes and CMAQ model simulations over the continental United States for a time period spanning over a decade. Based on the analysis, new parameterization scheme for lightning NOX will be proposed and the results will be evaluated. The proposed scheme will be beneficial to modeling exercises where the obs

  5. US COMPOSITE LIGHTNING DAILY TOTAL FROM NATL LIGHTNING NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Hydrology Resource Center generates a cloud-to-ground lightning product from the data collected from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network, a...

  6. US COMPOSITE LIGHTNING 15MIN TOTAL FROM NATL LIGHTNING NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) Science Computing Facility (SCF) generates a cloud-to-ground lightning product from the data collected from the U.S. National...

  7. Lightning Attachment Estimation to Wind Turbines by Utilizing Lightning Location Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stephan; Holbøll, Joachim; Lopez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The goal of a lightning exposure assessment is to identify the number, type and characteristics of lightning discharges to a certain structure. There are various Lightning Location System (LLS) technologies available, each of them are characterized by individual performance characteristics....... In this work, these technologies are reviewed and evaluated in order to obtain an estimation of which technologies are eligible to perform a lightning assessment to wind turbines. The results indicate that ground-based mid-range low frequency (LF) LLS systems are most qualified since they combine a wide...... coverage with a good accuracy for downward lightning. Furthermore, advances in the technology indicate the detection of certain upward lightning events. A correlation between the size of the uncertainty ellipse and the peak current of the lightning detections is presented. Furthermore, lightning data from...

  8. Lightning attachment process to common buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, M. M. F.; Paiva, A. R.; Schumann, C.; Ferro, M. A. S.; Naccarato, K. P.; Silva, J. C. O.; Siqueira, F. V. C.; Custódio, D. M.

    2017-05-01

    The physical mechanism of lightning attachment to grounded structures is one of the most important issues in lightning physics research, and it is the basis for the design of the lightning protection systems. Most of what is known about the attachment process comes from leader propagation models that are mostly based on laboratory observations of long electrical discharges or from observations of lightning attachment to tall structures. In this paper we use high-speed videos to analyze the attachment process of downward lightning flashes to an ordinary residential building. For the first time, we present characteristics of the attachment process to common structures that are present in almost every city (in this case, two buildings under 60 m in São Paulo City, Brazil). Parameters like striking distance and connecting leaders speed, largely used in lightning attachment models and in lightning protection standards, are revealed in this work.Plain Language SummarySince the time of Benjamin Franklin, no one has ever recorded high-speed video images of a lightning connection to a common building. It is very difficult to do it. Cameras need to be very close to the structure chosen to be observed, and long observation time is required to register one lightning strike to that particular structure. Models and theories used to determine the zone of protection of a lightning rod have been developed, but they all suffer from the lack of field data. The submitted manuscript provides results from high-speed video observations of lightning attachment to low buildings that are commonly found in almost every populated area around the world. The proximity of the camera and the high frame rate allowed us to see interesting details that will improve the understanding of the attachment process and, consequently, the models and theories used by lightning protection standards. This paper also presents spectacular images and videos of lightning flashes connecting lightning rods that

  9. INVESTIGATION OF ANGULAR BALL BEARING WEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Savchenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Wearing process of balls in an angular ball bearing has been investigated in the paper. Force affecting a separator from the side of balls is determined theoretically. Wear rate may be calculated with a formula for abrasive wear while substituting numerical parameter values of the investigated ball bearing for formula symbols.

  10. Utilizing Four Dimensional Lightning and Dual-Polarization Radar to Develop Lightning Initiation Forecast Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    lightning based on size and composite Z alone. Since the focus was airmass thunderstorms, any days with complex areas or lines of thunder - storms...Doppler radar signatures of developing thunder - storms and their potential to indicate the onset of cloud-to-ground lightning . Mon. Wea. Rev., 122...UTILIZING FOUR DIMENSIONAL LIGHTNING AND DUAL-POLARIZATION RADAR TO DEVELOP LIGHTNING INITIATION FORECAST GUIDANCE THESIS Andrew J. Travis, Captain

  11. Inscribed Balls and Their Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    A ball of maximal radius inscribed in a convex closed bounded set with a nonempty interior is considered in the class of uniformly convex Banach spaces. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the centers of inscribed balls form a uniformly continuous (as a set function) set-valued mapping in the Hausdorff metric. In a finite-dimensional space of dimension n, the set of centers of balls inscribed in polyhedra with a fixed collection of normals satisfies the Lipschitz condition with respect to sets in the Hausdorff metric. A Lipschitz continuous single-valued selector of the set of centers of balls inscribed in such polyhedra can be found by solving n + 1 linear programming problems.

  12. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey; Chronis, Themis

    2015-01-01

    Using satellite-based methods that provide accurate 0-1 hour convective initiation (CI) nowcasts, and rely on proven success coupling satellite and radar fields in the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS; operated and developed at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory), to subsequently monitor for first-flash lightning initiation (LI) and later period lightning trends as storms evolve. Enhance IR-based methods within the GOES-R CI Algorithm (that must meet specific thresholds for a given cumulus cloud before the cloud is considered to have an increased likelihood of producing lightning next 90 min) that forecast LI. Integrate GOES-R CI and LI fields with radar thresholds (e.g., first greater than or equal to 40 dBZ echo at the -10 C altitude) and NWP model data within the WDSS-II system for LI-events from new convective storms. Track ongoing lightning using Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data to assess per-storm lightning trends (e.g., as tied to lightning jumps) and outline threat regions. Evaluate the ability to produce LI nowcasts through a "lightning threat" product, and obtain feedback from National Weather Service forecasters on its value as a decision support tool.

  13. Lightning transient analysis in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Holbøll, Joachim; Madsen, Søren Find

    2013-01-01

    The transient behavior of lightning surges in the lightning protection system of wind turbine blades has been investigated in this paper. The study is based on PSCAD models consisting of electric equivalent circuits with lumped and distributed parameters involving different lightning current...... waveforms. The aim of the PSCAD simulations is to study the voltages induced by the lightning current in the blade that may cause internal arcing. With this purpose, the phenomenon of current reflections in the lightning down conductor of the blade and the electromagnetic coupling between the down conductor...... and other internal conductive elements of the blade is studied. Finally, several methods to prevent internal arcing are discussed in order to improve the lightning protection of the blade....

  14. LHC gets the ball rolling

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A technique involving a small ball with a transmitter embedded inside it has been successfully tested in Sector 7-8. The ball is sent through the LHC beam pipes to check the LHC interconnections. The multidisciplinary team responsible for the RF ball project to check the interconnections. From left to right: Rhodri Jones (AB/BI), Eva Calvo (AB/BI), Francesco Bertinelli (AT/MCS), Sonia Bartolome Jimenez (TS/IC), Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC), Paul Cruikshank (AT/VAC), Willemjan Maan (AT/VAC), Alain Poncet (AT/MCS), Marek Gasior (AB/BI). During the tests the ball is inserted very carefully into the vacuum chamber.A game of ping-pong at the LHC? On 13 September a rather unusual test was carried out in Sector 7-8 of the accelerator. A ball just a bit smaller than a ping-pong ball was carefully introduced into one of the accelerator’s two vacuum pipes, where it travelled 800 metres in the space of a few mi...

  15. CAMEX-3 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-3 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset contains electrical field measurements of lightning within storms studied during the Convection And Moisture...

  16. Lightning Applications in Weather and Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin G.

    2013-11-01

    Thunderstorms, and lightning in particular, are a major natural hazard to the public, aviation, power companies, and wildfire managers. Lightning causes great damage and death every year but also tells us about the inner working of storms. Since lightning can be monitored from great distances from the storms themselves, lightning may allow us to provide early warnings for severe weather phenomena such as hail storms, flash floods, tornadoes, and even hurricanes. Lightning itself may impact the climate of the Earth by producing nitrogen oxides (NOx), a precursor of tropospheric ozone, which is a powerful greenhouse gas. Thunderstorms themselves influence the climate system by the redistribution of heat, moisture, and momentum in the atmosphere. What about future changes in lightning and thunderstorm activity? Many studies show that higher surface temperatures produce more lightning, but future changes will depend on what happens to the vertical temperature profile in the troposphere, as well as changes in water balance, and even aerosol loading of the atmosphere. Finally, lightning itself may provide a useful tool for tracking climate change in the future, due to the nonlinear link between lightning, temperature, upper tropospheric water vapor, and cloud cover.

  17. The lightning climatology of South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Morné Gijben

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the South African Weather Service installed a state-of-the-art cloud-to-ground lightning detection network across the country. The data recorded by this network in 2006 was utilised in the development of an initial lightning climatology of South Africa. Until 2010, this climatology was based on data from a single year. This paper updates this climatology with the lightning data for the 2006–2010 period, which is the first actual lightning climatology by the South African Weather Serv...

  18. Geological Effects on Lightning Strike Distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Berdahl, J. Scott

    2016-05-16

    Recent advances in lightning detection networks allow for detailed mapping of lightning flash locations. Longstanding rumors of geological influence on cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning distribution and recent commercial claims based on such influence can now be tested empirically. If present, such influence could represent a new, cheap and efficient geophysical tool with applications in mineral, hydrothermal and oil exploration, regional geological mapping, and infrastructure planning. This project applies statistical analysis to lightning data collected by the United States National Lightning Detection Network from 2006 through 2015 in order to assess whether the huge range in electrical conductivities of geological materials plays a role in the spatial distribution of CG lightning. CG flash densities are mapped for twelve areas in the contiguous United States and compared to elevation and geology, as well as to the locations of faults, railroads and tall towers including wind turbines. Overall spatial randomness is assessed, along with spatial correlation of attributes. Negative and positive polarity lightning are considered separately and together. Topography and tower locations show a strong influence on CG distribution patterns. Geology, faults and railroads do not. This suggests that ground conductivity is not an important factor in determining lightning strike location on scales larger than current flash location accuracies, which are generally several hundred meters. Once a lightning channel is established, however, ground properties at the contact point may play a role in determining properties of the subsequent stroke.

  19. OLS ANALOG DERIVED LIGHTNING V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) have been analyzed from the filmstrip imagery....

  20. Optical characteristics of lightning and thunderstorm currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krider, E. P.; Blakeslee, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Researchers determined that lightning can be used to determine the diurnal variations of thunderstorms, i.e., storms that produce audible thunder, and that these variations are also in good agreement with diurnal variations in rainfall and convective activity. Measurements of the Maxwell current density, J sub m, under active thunderstorms show that this physical quantity is quasi-steady between lightning discharges and that lightning does not produce large changes in J sub m. Maps of J sub m show contours of iso-current density that are consistent with the locations of radar echos and the locations of where lightning has altered the cloud charge distribution.

  1. Lightning Strike in Pregnancy With Fetal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, Kellen; Hodnick, Ryan; Berkeley, Ross P

    2016-06-01

    Injuries from lightning strikes are an infrequent occurrence, and are only rarely noted to involve pregnant victims. Only 13 cases of lightning strike in pregnancy have been previously described in the medical literature, along with 7 additional cases discovered within news media reports. This case report presents a novel case of lightning-associated injury in a patient in the third trimester of pregnancy, resulting in fetal ischemic brain injury and long-term morbidity, and reviews the mechanics of lightning strikes along with common injury patterns of which emergency providers should be aware. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. OPTICAL TRANSIENT DETECTOR (OTD) LIGHTNING V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Transient Detector (OTD) records optical measurements of global lightning events in the daytime and nighttime. The data includes individual point...

  3. Lightning Protection and Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Szatkowski, George N. (Inventor); Woodard, Marie (Inventor); Nguyen, Truong X. (Inventor); Ely, Jay J. (Inventor); Wang, Chuantong (Inventor); Mielnik, John J. (Inventor); Koppen, Sandra V. (Inventor); Smith, Laura J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A lightning protection and detection system includes a non-conductive substrate material of an apparatus; a sensor formed of a conductive material and deposited on the non-conductive substrate material of the apparatus. The sensor includes a conductive trace formed in a continuous spiral winding starting at a first end at a center region of the sensor and ending at a second end at an outer corner region of the sensor, the first and second ends being open and unconnected. An electrical measurement system is in communication with the sensor and receives a resonant response from the sensor, to perform detection, in real-time, of lightning strike occurrences and damage therefrom to the sensor and the non-conductive substrate material.

  4. Indirect Lightning Safety Assessment Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, M M; Perkins, M P; Brown, C G; Crull, E W; Streit, R D

    2009-04-24

    Lightning is a safety hazard for high-explosives (HE) and their detonators. In the However, the current flowing from the strike point through the rebar of the building The methodology for estimating the risk from indirect lighting effects will be presented. It has two parts: a method to determine the likelihood of a detonation given a lightning strike, and an approach for estimating the likelihood of a strike. The results of these two parts produce an overall probability of a detonation. The probability calculations are complex for five reasons: (1) lightning strikes are stochastic and relatively rare, (2) the quality of the Faraday cage varies from one facility to the next, (3) RF coupling is inherently a complex subject, (4) performance data for abnormally stressed detonators is scarce, and (5) the arc plasma physics is not well understood. Therefore, a rigorous mathematical analysis would be too complex. Instead, our methodology takes a more practical approach combining rigorous mathematical calculations where possible with empirical data when necessary. Where there is uncertainty, we compensate with conservative approximations. The goal is to determine a conservative estimate of the odds of a detonation. In Section 2, the methodology will be explained. This report will discuss topics at a high-level. The reasons for selecting an approach will be justified. For those interested in technical details, references will be provided. In Section 3, a simple hypothetical example will be given to reinforce the concepts. While the methodology will touch on all the items shown in Figure 1, the focus of this report is the indirect effect, i.e., determining the odds of a detonation from given EM fields. Professor Martin Uman from the University of Florida has been characterizing and defining extreme lightning strikes. Using Professor Uman's research, Dr. Kimball Merewether at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque calculated the EM fields inside a Faraday-cage type

  5. Saturn’s visible lightning, its radio emissions, and the structure of the 2009–2011 lightning storms

    OpenAIRE

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Porco, Carolyn C.; Fischer, Georg; Yair, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Visible lightning on Saturn was first detected by the Cassini camera in 2009 at ∼35° South latitude. We report more lightning observations at ∼35° South later in 2009, and lightning in the 2010–2011 giant lightning storm at ∼35° North. The 2009 lightning is detected on the night side of Saturn in a broadband clear filter. The 2011 lightning is detected on the day side in blue wavelengths only. In other wavelengths the 2011 images lacked sensitivity to detect lightning, which leaves the lightn...

  6. Launch pad lightning protection effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmann, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Using the striking distance theory that lightning leaders will strike the nearest grounded point on their last jump to earth corresponding to the striking distance, the probability of striking a point on a structure in the presence of other points can be estimated. The lightning strokes are divided into deciles having an average peak current and striking distance. The striking distances are used as radii from the points to generate windows of approach through which the leader must pass to reach a designated point. The projections of the windows on a horizontal plane as they are rotated through all possible angles of approach define an area that can be multiplied by the decile stroke density to arrive at the probability of strokes with the window average striking distance. The sum of all decile probabilities gives the cumulative probability for all strokes. The techniques can be applied to NASA-Kennedy launch pad structures to estimate the lightning protection effectiveness for the crane, gaseous oxygen vent arm, and other points. Streamers from sharp points on the structure provide protection for surfaces having large radii of curvature. The effects of nearby structures can also be estimated.

  7. Preliminary lightning observations over Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis, Themis G.

    2012-02-01

    The first Precision Lightning Network, monitoring the Cloud-to-Ground (CG) lightning stroke activity over Greece and surrounding waters is operated and maintained by the Hellenic National Meteorological Service. This paper studies the regional (land/water interface), seasonal and diurnal variability of the CG strokes as a function of density, polarity and peak current. Additional investigation uniquely links the CG stroke current to sea surface salinity and cloud electrical capacitance. In brief, this study's major findings area as follows: (1) The seasonal maps of thunder days agree well with the regional climatic convective characteristics of the study area, (2) the CG diurnal variability is consistent with the global lightning activity observations over land and ocean, (3) the maxima of monthly averaged CG counts are located over land and water during typical summer and fall months respectively for both polarities, (4) CG peak currents show a distinct seasonality with larger currents during relatively colder months and smaller currents during summer months, and (5) strong linear trends between -CGs and sea surface salinity; (6) this trend is absent for +CGs data analysis of the employed database relate to the thunderstorm's RC constant and agrees with previous numerical modeling studies.

  8. Lightning Burns and Electrical Trauma in a Couple Simultaneously Struck by Lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Eyerly-Webb

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available More people are struck and killed by lightning each year in Florida than any other state in the United States. This report discusses a couple that was simultaneously struck by lightning while walking arm-in-arm. Both patients presented with characteristic lightning burns and were admitted for hemodynamic monitoring, serum labs, and observation and were subsequently discharged home. Despite the superficial appearance of lightning burns, serious internal electrical injuries are common. Therefore, lightning strike victims should be admitted and evaluated for cardiac arrhythmias, renal injury, and neurological sequelae.

  9. [Lightning strikes and lightning injuries in prehospital emergency medicine. Relevance, results, and practical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, J; Spelten, O; Wetsch, W A

    2013-01-01

    Up to 32.2% of patients in a burn center suffer from electrical injuries. Of these patients, 2-4% present with lightning injuries. In Germany, approximately 50 people per year are injured by a lightning strike and 3-7 fatally. Typically, people involved in outdoor activities are endangered and affected. A lightning strike usually produces significantly higher energy doses as compared to those in common electrical injuries. Therefore, injury patterns vary significantly. Especially in high voltage injuries and lightning injuries, internal injuries are of special importance. Mortality ranges between 10 and 30% after a lightning strike. Emergency medical treatment is similar to common electrical injuries. Patients with lightning injuries should be transported to a regional or supraregional trauma center. In 15% of all cases multiple people may be injured. Therefore, it is of outstanding importance to create emergency plans and evacuation plans in good time for mass gatherings endangered by possible lightning.

  10. ASSESSMENT TO EFFECTIVENESS OF THE NEW EARLY STREAMER EMISSION LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chen, Yen-Hong; Lin, Kai-Jan; M. Li, Yu-Chu

    2017-01-01

    A novel early streamer emission (ESE) lightning air terminal system is designed and fabricated. By comparing the intercepted artificial lightning striking numbers of the new ESE lightning protection device and the conventional lightning rod (CLR) lightning protection device in laboratory, the effectiveness of intercepting the artificial lightning strokes by the new ESE lightning protection device is superior to that by the conventional lightning rod lightning protection device. A modified Tes...

  11. When Lightning Strikes a Second Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kent

    2017-01-01

    The chances of lightning striking twice are infinitesimal, at best. What are the odds, in middle age, of being struck with a jarring bolt of figurative lightning, then a few months later being an eyewitness as the same sizzle in the sky jolts a group of students--those decision-makers of tomorrow? The author describes two experiences that proved…

  12. A model for lightning in littoral areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The littoral or coastal areas are different compared to the maritime or continental areas considering lightning. Only the last years some research about these areas has been carried out. The need for a model, regarding the lightning activity in these areas is much needed. And now, with the changes

  13. Lightning protecting materials used on radar system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Damstra, Geert C.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Because of the extensive use in modern systems of very sensitive electronic components, lightning strikes does not represent only a threat, but something that cannot be neglected anymore and safety hazards caused by direct and indirect lightning to the aircraft or naval industry. Everyday new

  14. Lightning-caused fires in Central Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto Solana, Hector; Aguado, Inmaculada; García, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    a high occurrence. The research was conducted between May and September, which happens to be the most lightning-fire prone period in Spain, for a three year interval starting in 2002 up to 2004. A time-invariant model for lightning-caused fire occurrence was developed for each region at a spatial...

  15. Berkeley High-Resolution Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Criteria for a high-resolution γ-ray system are discussed. Desirable properties are high resolution, good response function, and moderate solid angle so as to achieve not only double- but triple-coincidences with good statistics. The Berkeley High-Resolution Ball involved the first use of bismuth germanate (BGO) for anti-Compton shield for Ge detectors. The resulting compact shield permitted rather close packing of 21 detectors around a target. In addition, a small central BGO ball gives the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity, as well as the angular pattern of the γ rays. The 21-detector array is nearly complete, and the central ball has been designed, but not yet constructed. First results taken with 9 detector modules are shown for the nucleus 156 Er. The complex decay scheme indicates a transition from collective rotation (prolate shape) to single- particle states (possibly oblate) near spin 30 h, and has other interesting features

  16. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, Boris; MIPP Collaboration

    2009-10-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in Main Injector Particle Production (MIPP)) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 μs, respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 s spill and read them out in ˜50 s between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front-End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  17. Lightning enhancement over major oceanic shipping lanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Joel A.; Virts, Katrina S.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Mitchell, Todd P.

    2017-09-01

    Using 12 years of high-resolution global lightning stroke data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), we show that lightning density is enhanced by up to a factor of 2 directly over shipping lanes in the northeastern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea as compared to adjacent areas with similar climatological characteristics. The lightning enhancement is most prominent during the convectively active season, November-April for the Indian Ocean and April-December in the South China Sea, and has been detectable from at least 2005 to the present. We hypothesize that emissions of aerosol particles and precursors by maritime vessel traffic lead to a microphysical enhancement of convection and storm electrification in the region of the shipping lanes. These persistent localized anthropogenic perturbations to otherwise clean regions are a unique opportunity to more thoroughly understand the sensitivity of maritime deep convection and lightning to aerosol particles.

  18. Mathematical physics approaches to lightning discharge problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrala, A.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical physics arguments useful for lightning discharge and generation problems are pursued. A soliton Ansatz for the lightning stroke is treated including a charge generation term which is the ultimate source for the phenomena. Equations are established for a partially ionized plasma inding the effects of pressure, magnetic field, electric field, gravitation, viscosity, and temperature. From these equations is then derived the non-stationary generalized Ohm's Law essential for describing field/current density relationships in the horizon channel of the lightning stroke. The discharge initiation problem is discussed. It is argued that the ionization rate drives both the convective current and electric displacement current to increase exponentially. The statistical distributions of charge in the thundercloud preceding a lightning dischage are considered. The stability of the pre-lightning charge distributions and the use of Boltzmann relaxational equations to determine them are discussed along with a covered impedance path provided by the aircraft.

  19. Lightning injuries in sports and recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Eric M; Howard, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The powers of lightning have been worshiped and feared by all known human cultures. While the chance of being struck by lightning is statistically very low, that risk becomes much greater in those who frequently work or play outdoors. Over the past 2 yr, there have been nearly 50 lightning-related deaths reported within the United States, with a majority of them associated with outdoor recreational activities. Recent publications primarily have been case studies, review articles, and a discussion of a sixth method of injury. The challenge in reducing lightning-related injuries in organized sports has been addressed well by both the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association in their guidelines on lightning safety. Challenges remain in educating the general population involved in recreational outdoor activities that do not fall under the guidelines of organized sports.

  20. Progress towards a lightning ignition model for the Northern Rockies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Sopko; Don Latham

    2010-01-01

    We are in the process of constructing a lightning ignition model specific to the Northern Rockies using fire occurrence, lightning strike, ecoregion, and historical weather, NFDRS (National Fire Danger Rating System), lightning efficiency and lightning "possibility" data. Daily grids for each of these categories were reconstructed for the 2003 fire season (...

  1. Acoustic Manifestations of Natural versus Triggered Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Eack, K.; Eastvedt, E. M.; Aulich, G. D.; Trueblood, J.

    2010-12-01

    Positive leaders are rarely detected by VHF lightning detection systems; positive leader channels are usually outlined only by recoil events. Positive cloud-to-ground (CG) channels are usually not mapped. The goal of this work is to study the types of thunder produced by natural versus triggered lightning and to assess which types of thunder signals have electromagnetic activity detected by the lightning mapping array (LMA). Towards this end we are investigating the lightning detection capabilities of acoustic techniques, and comparing them with the LMA. In a previous study we used array beam forming and time of flight information to locate acoustic sources associated with lightning. Even though there was some mismatch, generally LMA and acoustic techniques saw the same phenomena. To increase the database of acoustic data from lightning, we deployed a network of three infrasound arrays (30 m aperture) during the summer of 2010 (August 3 to present) in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico, to monitor infrasound (below 20 Hz) and audio range sources due to natural and triggered lightning. The arrays were located at a range of distances (60 to 1400 m) surrounding the triggering site, called the Kiva, used by Langmuir Laboratory to launch rockets. We have continuous acoustic measurements of lightning data from July 20 to September 18 of 2009, and from August 3 to September 1 of 2010. So far, lightning activity around the Kiva was higher during the summer of 2009. We will present acoustic data from several interesting lightning flashes including a comparison between a natural and a triggered one.

  2. The Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Status and Recent Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Khan, Maudood; Peterson, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) are discussed. Recent results from an August 2006 run of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system that employs LNOM lightning NOx (= NO + NO2) estimates are provided. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NOx. The latest LNOM estimates of (a) lightning channel length distributions, (b) lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and (c) the vertical profile of NOx are presented. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NOx on CMAQ output is discussed.

  3. Lightning - Apollo to Shuttle. [case histories and spacecraft protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrett, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    The history of lightning striking NASA spacecraft and the development of lightning protection systems is reviewed from the Apollo 12 flight, involving a lightning strike thirty six seconds after launch, to the present date. Particular attention is paid to problems that may arise in this field in the context of planning and implementing the Space Shuttle program. The lightning protection design for Apollo is described: a folding mast mounted on top of the hammerhead crane on top of the Launcher Umbilical Tower, with a lightning rod on top. The effect of lightning storms on the launches of Apollos 12 through 17 is examined, as is the effect of lightning in the Skylab program. The lightning problems encountered by the Apollo-Soyuz mission and by the two unmanned Viking launches to Mars are discussed. The Lightning Detection And Ranging system for detecting RF emission from lightning discharges is described.

  4. Spatial Variation of the Correlated Color Temperature of Lightning Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Shimoji, Nobuaki; Aoyama, Ryoma

    2014-01-01

    In present work, we propose the analysis method of lightning based on the color analysis. We analyzed the digital still images in which the cloud-to-ground (CG) and intracloud (IC) lightning flashes are shown. Applying some digital image processing techniques, we extracted lightning channels. Then, the correlated color temperature (CCT) of the extracted lightning channels was obtained by mapping digital pixels of the extracted lightning channels to CIE 1931 xy-chromaticity diagram. Our result...

  5. Device Rotates Bearing Balls For Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, R. K.

    1988-01-01

    Entire surface of ball inspected automatically and quickly. Device holds and rotates bearing ball for inspection by optical or mechanical surface-quality probe, eddy-current probe for detection of surface or subsurface defects, or circumference-measuring tool. Ensures entire surface of ball moves past inspection head quickly. New device saves time and increases reliability of inspections of spherical surfaces. Simple to operate and provides quick and easy access for loading and unloading of balls during inspection.

  6. Reflections on a Disco Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2016-01-01

    A disco ball is a spherical object covered with small plane mirrors. When light reflects on these mirrors, it is scattered in many directions, producing a novel effect. The mirror globe is usually set to rotate, creating a profusion of moving spots (Fig. 1). In this article, we present a geometrical description of the movement of these spots and…

  7. LHC gets the ball rolling

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    1. The multidisciplinary team responsible for the RF ball project to check the interconnections. From left to right: Rhodri Jones (AB/BI), Eva Calvo (AB/BI), Francesco Bertinelli (AT/MCS), Sonia Bartolome Jimenez (TS/IC), Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC), Paul Cruikshank (AT/VAC), Willemjan Maan (AT/VAC), Alain Poncet (AT/MCS), Marek Gasior (AB/BI).2. During the tests the ball is inserted very carefully into the vacuum chamber.1. Le groupe pluridisciplinaire qui a mené le projet de balle RF pour vérifier les interconnexions avec, de gauche à droite, Rhodri Jones (AB/BI), Eva Calvo (AB/BI), Francesco Bertinelli (AT/MCS), Sonia Bartolome Jimenez (TS/IC), Sylvain Weisz (TS/IC), Paul Cruikshank (AT/VAC), Willemjan Maan (AT/VAC), Alain Poncet (AT/MCS) et Marek Gasior (AB/BI).2. Lors des tests, la balle est insérée dans la chambre à vide avec beaucoup de précaution.

  8. Eddy-Current Inspection of Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, B.

    1985-01-01

    Custom eddy-current probe locates surface anomalies. Low friction air cushion within cone allows ball to roll easily. Eddy current probe reliably detects surface and near-surface cracks, voids, and material anomalies in bearing balls or other spherical objects. Defects in ball surface detected by probe displayed on CRT and recorded on strip-chart recorder.

  9. Total Lightning Activity Associated with Tornadic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis; Hodanish, Stephen; Sharp, David; Williams, Earle; Boldi, Bob; Matlin, Anne; Weber, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Severe storms often have high flash rates (in excess of one flash per second) and are dominated by intracloud lightning activity. In addition to the extraordinary flash rates, there is a second distinguishing lightning characteristic of severe storms that seems to be important. When the total lightning history is examined, one finds sudden increases in the lightning rate, which we refer to as lightning "jumps," that precede the occurrence of severe weather by ten or more minutes. These jumps are typically 30-60 flashes/min, and are easily identified as anomalously large derivatives in the flash rate. This relationship is associated with updraft intensification and updraft strength is an important factor in storm severity (through the accumulation of condensate aloft and the stretching of vorticity). In several cases, evidence for diminishment of midlevel rotation and the descent of angular momentum from aloft is present prior to the appearance of the surface tornado. Based on our experience with severe and tornadic storms in Central Florida, we believe the total lightning may augment the more traditional use of NEXRAD radars and storm spotters. However, a more rigorous relation of these jumps to storm kinematics is needed if we are to apply total lightning in a decision tree that leads to improved warning lead times and decreased false alarm rates.

  10. A simple lightning assimilation technique for improving ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convective rainfall is often a large source of error in retrospective modeling applications. In particular, positive rainfall biases commonly exist during summer months due to overactive convective parameterizations. In this study, lightning assimilation was applied in the Kain-Fritsch (KF) convective scheme to improve retrospective simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The assimilation method has a straightforward approach: force KF deep convection where lightning is observed and, optionally, suppress deep convection where lightning is absent. WRF simulations were made with and without lightning assimilation over the continental United States for July 2012, July 2013, and January 2013. The simulations were evaluated against NCEP stage-IV precipitation data and MADIS near-surface meteorological observations. In general, the use of lightning assimilation considerably improves the simulation of summertime rainfall. For example, the July 2012 monthly averaged bias of 6 h accumulated rainfall is reduced from 0.54 to 0.07 mm and the spatial correlation is increased from 0.21 to 0.43 when lightning assimilation is used. Statistical measures of near-surface meteorological variables also are improved. Consistent improvements also are seen for the July 2013 case. These results suggest that this lightning assimilation technique has the potential to substantially improve simulation of warm-season rainfall in retrospective WRF applications. The

  11. On the possibility of phosphenes being generated by the energetic radiation from lightning flashes and thunderstorms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooray, Vernon, E-mail: Vernon.Cooray@angstrom.uu.se [Division for Electricity, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Cooray, Gerald [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Dwyer, Joseph [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2011-10-03

    After the first report of this phenomenon by Apollo 11 astronauts, experiments conducted in space and on the ground confirmed the creation of phosphenes by the interaction of energetic radiation with the human visual system. The aim of this Letter is to show that the energetic radiation generated in the form of X-rays, gamma rays, electrons and neutrons by thunderstorms and lightning is strong enough for the creation of phosphenes in humans. It is also pointed out that some of the visual observations reported during thunderstorms might be attributable to phosphenes excited by this energetic radiation. -- Highlights: → Radiation in space consists of X-rays, γ-rays, protons, neutrons and electrons. → Studies of NASA confirm creation of phosphene in humans by such energetic radiation. → Energetic radiation also exists in the vicinity of thunderstorms and lightning. → It is shown that this radiation is strong enough to generate phosphene in humans. → Some of these visual experiences could be misinterpreted as ball lightning.

  12. Recent Advancements in Lightning Jump Algorithm Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past year, the primary objectives were to show the usefulness of total lightning as compared to traditional cloud-to-ground (CG) networks, test the lightning jump algorithm configurations in other regions of the country, increase the number of thunderstorms within our thunderstorm database, and to pinpoint environments that could prove difficult for any lightning jump configuration. A total of 561 thunderstorms have been examined in the past year (409 non-severe, 152 severe) from four regions of the country (North Alabama, Washington D.C., High Plains of CO/KS, and Oklahoma). Results continue to indicate that the 2 lightning jump algorithm configuration holds the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, with a probability of detection (POD) at 81%, a false alarm rate (FAR) of 45%, a critical success index (CSI) of 49% and a Heidke Skill Score (HSS) of 0.66. The second best performing algorithm configuration was the Threshold 4 algorithm, which had a POD of 72%, FAR of 51%, a CSI of 41% and an HSS of 0.58. Because a more complex algorithm configuration shows the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, accurate thunderstorm cell tracking work must be undertaken to track lightning trends on an individual thunderstorm basis over time. While these numbers for the 2 configuration are impressive, the algorithm does have its weaknesses. Specifically, low-topped and tropical cyclone thunderstorm environments are present issues for the 2 lightning jump algorithm, because of the suppressed vertical depth impact on overall flash counts (i.e., a relative dearth in lightning). For example, in a sample of 120 thunderstorms from northern Alabama that contained 72 missed events by the 2 algorithm 36% of the misses were associated with these two environments (17 storms).

  13. Lightning mapper and the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    A trade-off analysis was completed that reveals how the lightning mapper detection efficiency will change as a function of interference filter bandwidth, pixel field of view, and telescope aperture. It is shown that the critical parameter on which we have minimum flexibility is filter band-width. The problem is that too narrow a filter bandwidth is incompatible with wide areal coverage. The trade-off analysis demonstrates that an 80 percent lightning detection efficiency will technically be relatively straight-forward, while a 90 percent detection efficiency will apparently be difficult to achieve. Three focal plane designs are currently under consideration. One would use a single large, solid state silicon integrating array with multiple output channels and off-the-focal-plane analog, time domain, background removing fibers. A second design would use the same technology, but the sensor would consist of up to four virtually independent focal plane arrays. This design reduces the areal coverage of each detector. Thus narrower interference filters could be utilized. Superior performance would be realized at a probable increase in cost. The final design would use a three-dimensional focal plane in order to perform background removal at the focal plane. Superior performance would be achieved along with reduced weight and power requirements. Unfortunately, this focal plane technology is still under development.

  14. Spatio-temporal dimension of lightning flashes based on three-dimensional Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Jesús A.; Pineda, Nicolau; Montanyà, Joan; Velde, Oscar van der; Fabró, Ferran; Romero, David

    2017-11-01

    3D mapping system like the LMA - Lightning Mapping Array - are a leap forward in lightning observation. LMA measurements has lead to an improvement on the analysis of the fine structure of lightning, allowing to characterize the duration and maximum extension of the cloud fraction of a lightning flash. During several years of operation, the first LMA deployed in Europe has been providing a large amount of data which now allows a statistical approach to compute the full duration and horizontal extension of the in-cloud phase of a lightning flash. The "Ebro Lightning Mapping Array" (ELMA) is used in the present study. Summer and winter lighting were analyzed for seasonal periods (Dec-Feb and Jun-Aug). A simple method based on an ellipse fitting technique (EFT) has been used to characterize the spatio-temporal dimensions from a set of about 29,000 lightning flashes including both summer and winter events. Results show an average lightning flash duration of 440 ms (450 ms in winter) and a horizontal maximum length of 15.0 km (18.4 km in winter). The uncertainties for summer lightning lengths were about ± 1.2 km and ± 0.7 km for the mean and median values respectively. In case of winter lightning, the level of uncertainty reaches up to 1 km and 0.7 km of mean and median value. The results of the successful correlation of CG discharges with the EFT method, represent 6.9% and 35.5% of the total LMA flashes detected in summer and winter respectively. Additionally, the median value of lightning lengths calculated through this correlative method was approximately 17 km for both seasons. On the other hand, the highest median ratios of lightning length to CG discharges in both summer and winter were reported for positive CG discharges.

  15. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita N Bhargava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered.

  16. Lightning on jupiter: rate, energetics, and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J S

    1980-12-19

    Voyager data on the optical and radio-frequency detection of lightning discharges in the atmosphere of Jupiter suggest a stroke rate significantly lower than on the earth. The efficiency of conversion of atmospheric convective energy flux into lightning is almost certainly less than on the earth, probably near 10(-7) rather than the terrestrial value of 10(-4). At this level the rate of production of complex organic molecules by lightning and by thunder shock waves is negligible compared to the rates of known photochemical processes for forming colored inorganic solids.

  17. Lightning on Jupiter - Rate, energetics, and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Voyager data on the optical and radio-frequency detection of lightning discharges in the atmosphere of Jupiter suggest a stroke rate significantly lower than on the earth. The efficiency of conversion of atmospheric convective energy flux into lightning is almost certainly less than on the earth, probably near 10 to the -7th rather than the terrestrial value of 10 to the -4th. At this level the rate of production of complex organic molecules by lightning and by thunder shock waves is negligible compared to the rates of known photochemical processes for forming colored inorganic solids.

  18. ENSO Related Inter-Annual Lightning Variability from the Full TRMM LIS Lightning Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Austin; Cecil, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) contributes to inter-annual variability of lightning production more than any other atmospheric oscillation. This study further investigated how ENSO phase affects lightning production in the tropics and subtropics using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). Lightning data were averaged into mean annual warm, cold, and neutral 'years' for analysis of the different phases and compared to model reanalysis data. An examination of the regional sensitivities and preliminary analysis of three locations was conducted using model reanalysis data to determine the leading convective mechanisms in these areas and how they might respond to the ENSO phases

  19. Improvements of condenser performance with granulate balls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratthaell, L.

    1986-05-01

    At the nuclear power plant Oskarshamn has during time Nov 1983 - Apr 1985 test series been done to investigate the improvements of condensor performance with granulate balls. This type of ball is a normal sponge rubber ball coated with granulated plastic material. This material is, different from carborundum and pumice not abrasive to the tube material. The test results show that granulate balls give an improvement of the overall heat transfer coefficient of 5-7 percent compared to continous cleaning with normal sponge rubber balls. Granulate balls remove the utmost thin coating of organic material that the spong rubber balls are not able to remove and a practically metallic clean surface is established. This has been verified by laboratory inspection of tubes withdrawn from the tube bundle and site inspections of the condenser. When the condenser is cleaned by granulate balls during a period of about three days it is possible to keep the performance at a high level for a long time with continous cleaning with normal sponge rubber balls. After about three days the plastic layer on the balls is practically worned out. The balls have during that time fulfilled their function. The improvement in condenser temperature is 1,0-1,5 degree C. For the 02-turbine this means additional delivered energy of about 15000 MWh per year. (author)

  20. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauler, A.L.; Pasieka, D.F.

    1983-11-15

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball. 6 figs.

  1. Ceramic Rail-Race Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Mark A.; Mungas, Greg S.; Peters, Gregory H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-lubricated ball bearings featuring rail races have been proposed for use in mechanisms that are required to function in the presence of mineral dust particles in very low-pressure, dry environments with extended life. Like a conventional ball bearing, the proposed bearing would include an inner and an outer ring separated by balls in rolling contact with the races. However, unlike a conventional ball bearing, the balls would not roll in semi-circular or gothic arch race grooves in the rings: instead, the races would be shaped to form two or more rails (see figure). During operation, the motion of the balls would push dust particles into the spaces between the rails where the particles could not generate rolling resistance for the balls

  2. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  3. Lightning activity during the 1999 Superior derecho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin G.; Murphy, Brian P.

    2002-12-01

    On 4 July 1999, a severe convective windstorm, known as a derecho, caused extensive damage to forested regions along the United States/Canada border, west of Lake Superior. There were 665,000 acres of forest destroyed in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Canada, with approximately 12.5 million trees blown down. This storm resulted in additional severe weather before and after the occurrence of the derecho, with continuous cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning occurring for more than 34 hours during its path across North America. At the time of the derecho the percentage of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning measured by the Canadian Lightning Detection Network (CLDN) was greater than 70% for more than three hours, with peak values reaching 97% positive CG lightning. Such high ratios of +CG are rare, and may be useful indicators of severe weather.

  4. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field sensors along with a central computer to record and monitor the instruments....

  5. Lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, D. W.; Uman, M. A.; Wilcox, C. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A commercial lightning-locating system (LLS) was employed in the study of lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. The LLS output included the time, location, number of strokes per flash, and initial peak magnetic field value of first strokes for lightning ground flashes lowering negative charge. Attention is given to the design and the operation of the LLS, and the experimental results. Measured properties of each of 111 storms are given in a number of tables. It was observed that the apparent motion associated with the lightning activity in storm systems was not due to the motion of the individual single-peak and multiple-peak storms but rather to the successive growth of new storms near previously active storms.

  6. Central hyperadrenergic state after lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Ahlskog, J Eric; Singer, Wolfgang; Gelfman, Russell; Sheldon, Seth H; Seime, Richard J; Craft, Jennifer M; Staab, Jeffrey P; Kantor, Birgit; Low, Phillip A

    2013-08-01

    To describe and review autonomic complications of lightning strike. Case report and laboratory data including autonomic function tests in a subject who was struck by lightning. A 24-year-old man was struck by lightning. Following that, he developed dysautonomia, with persistent inappropriate sinus tachycardia and autonomic storms, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and functional neurologic problems. The combination of persistent sinus tachycardia and episodic exacerbations associated with hypertension, diaphoresis, and agitation was highly suggestive of a central hyperadrenergic state with superimposed autonomic storms. Whether the additional PTSD and functional neurologic deficits were due to a direct effect of the lightning strike on the central nervous system or a secondary response is open to speculation.

  7. Lightning protection for wind turbines in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuan Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy has become increasingly important in the total electrical energy supply mix in Vietnam over the last few years. Small, kW turbines were installed in isolated areas a decade ago, while wind farms of several MW to few hundred MW are now being connected directly to national grid, with many additional projects in planning or under construction to fulfill an objective of 6% of the total installed capacity by 2030 (approximately 6200 MW of wind energy component. The increase in wind farm generation results in increased damage from lightning. In this paper, the annual frequency of lightning strikes to wind turbines in Vietnam is calculated using electrogeometric model. Reported lightning incidents to three major wind farms in Vietnam are summarized. Possible causes of failure are discussed, and an EMTP simulation for each incident was performed accordingly. The simulations suggest the failure mechanisms as well the potential of improved grounding to reduce lightning induced damage in future windfarms.

  8. Measurements of drag and lift on smooth balls in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2017-07-01

    Measurements are presented on the drag and lift coefficients for three relatively smooth balls launched in air and tracked with two cameras separated horizontally by 6.4 m. The ball spin was varied in order to investigate whether the Magnus force would increase or decrease when the ball spin was increased. For one ball, the Magnus force increased. For another ball, the Magnus force decreased almost to zero after reaching a maximum. For the third ball, the Magnus force was negative at low ball spins and positive at high ball spins. For one of the balls, the ball spin increased with time as it travelled through the air.

  9. Lightning protection system for a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Daniel P [Chelsea, VT; Petter, Jeffrey K [Williston, VT

    2008-05-27

    In a wind turbine (104, 500, 704) having a plurality of blades (132, 404, 516, 744) and a blade rotor hub (120, 712), a lightning protection system (100, 504, 700) for conducting lightning strikes to any one of the blades and the region surrounding the blade hub along a path around the blade hub and critical components of the wind turbine, such as the generator (112, 716), gearbox (708) and main turbine bearings (176, 724).

  10. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  11. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  12. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-28

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  13. The Elusive Evidence of Volcanic Lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K; Gharghabi, P; Gafford, J; Mazzola, M

    2017-11-14

    Lightning strikes are known to morphologically alter and chemically reduce geologic formations and deposits, forming fulgurites. A similar process occurs as the result of volcanic lightning discharge, when airborne volcanic ash is transformed into lightning-induced volcanic spherules (LIVS). Here, we adapt the calculations used in previous studies of lightning-induced damage to infrastructure materials to determine the effects on pseudo-ash samples of simplified composition. Using laboratory high-current impulse experiments, this research shows that within the lightning discharge channel there is an ideal melting zone that represents roughly 10% or less of the total channel radius at which temperatures are sufficient to melt the ash, regardless of peak current. The melted ash is simultaneously expelled from the channel by the heated, expanding air, permitting particles to cool during atmospheric transport before coming to rest in ash fall deposits. The limited size of this ideal melting zone explains the low number of LIVS typically observed in volcanic ash despite the frequent occurrence of lightning during explosive eruptions.

  14. Rationales for the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, John C. (Editor); Merceret, Francis J. (Editor); Krider, E. Philip; O'Brien, T. Paul; Dye, James E.; Walterscheid, Richard L.; Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Cummins, Kenneth; Christian, Hugh J.; Madura, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Since natural and triggered lightning are demonstrated hazards to launch vehicles, payloads, and spacecraft, NASA and the Department of Defense (DoD) follow the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) for launches from Federal Ranges. The LLCC were developed to prevent future instances of a rocket intercepting natural lightning or triggering a lightning flash during launch from a Federal Range. NASA and DoD utilize the Lightning Advisory Panel (LAP) to establish and develop robust rationale from which the criteria originate. The rationale document also contains appendices that provide additional scientific background, including detailed descriptions of the theory and observations behind the rationales. The LLCC in whole or part are used across the globe due to the rigor of the documented criteria and associated rationale. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) adopted the LLCC in 2006 for commercial space transportation and the criteria were codified in the FAA's Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for Safety of an Expendable Launch Vehicle (Appendix G to 14 CFR Part 417, (G417)) and renamed Lightning Flight Commit Criteria in G417.

  15. On the initiation of lightning in thunderclouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Chilingaryan, Suren; Karapetyan, Tigran; Kozliner, Lev; Khanikyants, Yeghia; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Pokhsraryan, David; Soghomonyan, Suren

    2017-05-02

    The relationship of lightning and elementary particle fluxes in the thunderclouds is not fully understood to date. Using the particle beams (the so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements - TGEs) as a probe we investigate the characteristics of the interrelated atmospheric processes. The well-known effect of the TGE dynamics is the abrupt termination of the particle flux by the lightning flash. With new precise electronics, we can see that particle flux decline occurred simultaneously with the rearranging of the charge centers in the cloud. The analysis of the TGE energy spectra before and after the lightning demonstrates that the high-energy part of the TGE energy spectra disappeared just after lightning. The decline of particle flux coincides on millisecond time scale with first atmospheric discharges and we can conclude that Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches (RREA) in the thundercloud assist initiation of the negative cloud to ground lightning. Thus, RREA can provide enough ionization to play a significant role in the unleashing of the lightning flash.

  16. Lightning protection design external tank /Space Shuttle/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A.; Mumme, E.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of lightning striking the Space Shuttle during liftoff is considered and the lightning protection system designed by the Martin Marietta Corporation for the external tank (ET) portion of the Shuttle is discussed. The protection system is based on diverting and/or directing a lightning strike to an area of the spacecraft which can sustain the strike. The ET lightning protection theory and some test analyses of the system's design are reviewed including studies of conductivity and thermal/stress properties in materials, belly band feasibility, and burn-through plug grounding and puncture voltage. The ET lightning protection system design is shown to be comprised of the following: (1) a lightning rod on the forward most point of the ET, (2) a continually grounded, one inch wide conductive strip applied circumferentially at station 371 (belly band), (3) a three inch wide conductive belly band applied over the TPS (i.e. the insulating surface of the ET) and grounded to a structure with eight conductive plugs at station 536, and (4) a two inch thick TPS between the belly bands which are located over the weld lands.

  17. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  18. Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ Part I – Using Hourly NLDN Lightning Strike Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  19. Lightning Performance on Overhead Distribution Lines : After Improvement Field Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Zoro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two feeders of 20 kV overhead distribution lines which are located in a high lightning density area are chosen to be observed as a field study due to their good lightning performance after improvement of lightning protection system. These two feeders used the new overhead ground wire and new line arrester equipped with lightning counter on the main lines. The significant reduced of lines outages are reported. Study was carried out to observe these improvements by comparing to the other two feeders line which are not improved and not equipped yet with the ground wire and line arrester. These two feeders located in the nearby area. Two cameras were installed to record the trajectory of the lightning strikes on the improved lines. Lightning peak currents are measured using magnetic tape measurement system installed on the grounding lead of lightning arrester. Lightning overvoltage calculations are carried out by using several scenarios based on observation results and historical lightning data derived from lightning detection network. Lightning overvoltages caused by indirect or direct strikes are analyzed to get the lightning performance of the lines. The best scenario was chosen and performance of the lines were improved significantly by installing overhead ground wire and improvement of lightning arrester installation.

  20. ENSO Related Interannual Lightning Variability from the Full TRMM LIS Lightning Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Austin; Cecil, Daniel J.

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown that the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) contributes to inter-annual variability of lightning production in the tropics and subtropics more than any other atmospheric oscillation. This study further investigated how ENSO phase affects lightning production in the tropics and subtropics. Using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI) for ENSO phase, lightning data were averaged into corresponding mean annual warm, cold, and neutral 'years' for analysis of the different phases. An examination of the regional sensitivities and preliminary analysis of three locations was conducted using model reanalysis data to determine the leading convective mechanisms in these areas and how they might respond to the ENSO phases. These processes were then studied for inter-annual variance and subsequent correlation to ENSO during the study period to best describe the observed lightning deviations from year to year at each location.

  1. Frequency domain analysis of lightning protection using four lightning protection rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javor Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the lightning discharge channel is modeled as a vertical monopole antenna excited by a pulse generator at its base. The lightning electromagnetic field of a nearby lightning discharge in the case of lightning protection using four vertical lightning protection rods was determined in the frequency domain. Unknown current distributions were determined by numerical solving of a system of integral equations of two potentials using the Point Matching Method and polynomial approximation of the current distributions. The influence of the real ground, treated as homogeneous loss half-space of known electrical parameters, expressed through a Sommerfeld integral kernel, was modeled using a new Two-image approximation which gives good results in both near and far fields.

  2. Fluid Mechanics of Cricket and Tennis Balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.

    2009-11-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in defining the flight of a ball that is struck or thrown through the air in almost all ball sports. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can often deviate from its initial straight path, resulting in a curved, or sometimes an unpredictable, flight path. It is particularly fascinating that that not all the parameters that affect the flight of a ball are always under human influence. Lateral deflection in flight, commonly known as swing, swerve or curve, is well recognized in cricket and tennis. In tennis, the lateral deflection is produced by spinning the ball about an axis perpendicular to the line of flight, which gives rise to what is commonly known as the Magnus effect. It is now well recognized that the aerodynamics of sports balls are strongly dependent on the detailed development and behavior of the boundary layer on the ball's surface. A side force, which makes a ball curve through the air, can also be generated in the absence of the Magnus effect. In one of the cricket deliveries, the ball is released with the seam angled, which trips the laminar boundary layer into a turbulent state on that side. The turbulent boundary layer separates relatively late compared to the laminar layer on the other side, thereby creating a pressure difference and hence side force. The fluid mechanics of a cricket ball become very interesting at the higher Reynolds numbers and this will be discussed in detail. Of all the round sports balls, a tennis ball has the highest drag coefficient. This will be explained in terms of the contribution of the ``fuzz" drag and how that changes with Reynolds number and ball surface wear. It is particularly fascinating that, purely through historical accidents, small disturbances on the ball surface, such as the stitching on cricket balls and the felt cover on tennis balls are all about the right size to affect boundary layer transition and development in the Reynolds numbers of interest. The fluid

  3. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on TRMM Backgrounds V4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) Backgrounds was collected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), which was an instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement...

  4. Multiparameter Investigation of Significant Lightning Producing Storms in Northeastern Colorado

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gauthier, Michael

    1999-01-01

    We present a regional, summer season, climatology of cloud to ground (CG) lightning immediately east of the central Rocky mountains from 1996-98 using data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN...

  5. CAMEX-4 DC-8 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 DC-8 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP), which allows the vector components of the...

  6. LIGHTNING DETECTION AND RANGING (LDAR) RAW DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) Raw data consists of level 1 lightning data collected from February 25, 1997 through June 11, 2008. The LDR system is located...

  7. Analysis of Simulated Aircraft Lightning Strikes and Their Electromagnetic Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gruden, James

    2001-01-01

    To survive the intense electromagnetic fields associated with a lightning strike, proper design of aircraft electrical control systems requires knowledge of the transient current pulse associated with a lightning strike...

  8. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on TRMM Science Data V4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) Science Data was collected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), which was an instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement...

  9. Lightning: Nature's Probe of Severe Weather for Research and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Lightning, the energetic and broadband electrical discharge produced by thunderstorms, provides a natural remote sensing signal for the study of severe storms and related phenomena on global, regional and local scales. Using this strong signal- one of nature's own probes of severe weather -lightning measurements prove to be straightforward and take advantage of a variety of measurement techniques that have advanced considerably in recent years. We briefly review some of the leading lightning detection systems including satellite-based optical detectors such as the Lightning Imaging Sensor, and ground-based radio frequency systems such as Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), long range lightning detection systems, and the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) networks. In addition, we examine some of the exciting new research results and operational capabilities (e.g., shortened tornado warning lead times) derived from these observations. Finally we look forward to the next measurement advance - lightning observations from geostationary orbit.

  10. OLS DIGITAL DERIVED LIGHTNING FROM DMSP F10 V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OLS Digital Derived Lightning from DMSP F10 dataset consists of global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational...

  11. TRMM-LBA LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TRMM-LBA Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the ER-2 Lightning Instrument Package (ER-2 LIP), which measures the electric field above,...

  12. VAISALA US NLDN LIGHTNING FLASH DATA V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial lightning detection network operated by Vaisala. A network of over 100 antennae are connected to a...

  13. Multifractal properties of ball milling dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budroni, M. A., E-mail: mabudroni@uniss.it; Pilosu, V.; Rustici, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Via Vienna 2, Sassari 07100 (Italy); Delogu, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Chimica, e dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, via Marengo 2, Cagliari 09123 (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    This work focuses on the dynamics of a ball inside the reactor of a ball mill. We show that the distribution of collisions at the reactor walls exhibits multifractal properties in a wide region of the parameter space defining the geometrical characteristics of the reactor and the collision elasticity. This feature points to the presence of restricted self-organized zones of the reactor walls where the ball preferentially collides and the mechanical energy is mainly dissipated.

  14. Lightning chemistry on Earth-like exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaseva, Aleksandra; Rimmer, Paul B.; Waldmann, Ingo; Rocchetto, Marco; Yurchenko, Sergey N.; Helling, Christiane; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    We present a model for lightning shock-induced chemistry that can be applied to atmospheres of arbitrary H/C/N/O chemistry, hence for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. The model couples hydrodynamics and the STAND2015 kinetic gas-phase chemistry. For an exoplanet analogue to the contemporary Earth, our model predicts NO and NO2 yields in agreement with observation. We predict height-dependent mixing ratios during a storm soon after a lightning shock of NO ≈10-3 at 40 km and NO2 ≈10-4 below 40 km, with O3 reduced to trace quantities (≪10-10). For an Earth-like exoplanet with a CO2/N2 dominated atmosphere and with an extremely intense lightning storm over its entire surface, we predict significant changes in the amount of NO, NO2, O3, H2O, H2 and predict a significant abundance of C2N. We find that, for the Early Earth, O2 is formed in large quantities by lightning but is rapidly processed by the photochemistry, consistent with previous work on lightning. The chemical effect of persistent global lightning storms are predicted to be significant, primarily due to NO2, with the largest spectral features present at ˜3.4 and ˜6.2 μm. The features within the transmission spectrum are on the order of 1 ppm and therefore are not likely detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope. Depending on its spectral properties, C2N could be a key tracer for lightning on Earth-like exoplanets with a N2/CO2 bulk atmosphere, unless destroyed by yet unknown chemical reactions.

  15. An Operational Perspective of Total Lightning Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, David J.; Darden, Christopher B.; Stano, Geoffrey; Buechler, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The close and productive collaborations between the NWS Warning and Forecast Office, the Short Term Prediction and Research Transition Center at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville have provided a unique opportunity for science sharing and technology transfer. One significant technology transfer that has provided immediate benefits to NWS forecast and warning operations is the use of data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array. This network consists of ten VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama and a base station located at the National Space Science and Technology Center. Preliminary investigations done at WFO Huntsville, along with other similar total lightning networks across the country, have shown distinct correlations between the time rate-of-change of total lightning and trends in intensity/severity of the parent convective cell. Since May 2003 when WFO HUN began receiving these data - in conjunction with other more traditional remotely sensed data (radar, satellite, and surface observations) -- have improved the situational awareness of the WFO staff. The use of total lightning information, either from current ground based systems or future space borne instrumentation, may substantially contribute to the NWS mission, by enhancing severe weather warning and decision-making processes. Operational use of the data has been maximized at WFO Huntsville through a process that includes forecaster training, product implementation, and post event analysis and assessments. Since receiving these data, over 50 surveys have been completed highlighting the use of total lightning information during significant events across the Tennessee Valley. In addition, around 150 specific cases of interest have been archived for collaborative post storm analysis. From these datasets, detailed trending information from radar and total lightning can be compared to corresponding damage reports. This presentation will emphasize

  16. Smart CMOS image sensor for lightning detection and imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rolando, Sébastien; Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Molina, Romain; Tulet, Michel; Bréart-de-Boisanger, Michel; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Guiry, Saïprasad; Larnaudie, Franck; Leone, Bruno; Perez-Cuevas, Leticia; Zayer, Igor

    2013-01-01

    We present a CMOS image sensor dedicated to lightning detection and imaging. The detector has been designed to evaluate the potentiality of an on-chip lightning detection solution based on a smart sensor. This evaluation is performed in the frame of the predevelopment phase of the lightning detector that will be implemented in the Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite for the European Space Agency. The lightning detection process is performed by a smart detector combining an in-pixel fra...

  17. Reproduction of Lightning Incidence Resulted in Line Surge Arrester Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hironao; Kozuka, Masahiro; Itamoto, Naoki; Ishii, Masaru

    There is possibility that lightning strokes to transmission lines with large peaks and/or long duration of currents cause arrester failures. Hence it is important to evaluate reliability of transmission lines considering arrester failures caused by lightning strokes. Actually, arrester failures were caused by a winter lightning stroke to the tower top of one circuit transmission line. In this letter, the lightning stroke associated with the arrester failures is evaluated based on observation of electromagnetic field and analysis by EMTP simulation.

  18. The Soccer-Ball Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    The idea that Lorentz-symmetry in momentum space could be modified but still remain observer-independent has received quite some attention in the recent years. This modified Lorentz-symmetry, which has been argued to arise in Loop Quantum Gravity, is being used as a phenomenological model to test possibly observable effects of quantum gravity. The most pressing problem in these models is the treatment of multi-particle states, known as the 'soccer-ball problem'. This article briefly reviews the problem and the status of existing solution attempts.

  19. Crystal ball data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chestnut, R.; Kiesling, C.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Gaiser, J.; Godfrey, G.; Oreglia, M.; Partridge, R.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.; Aschman, D.; Cavali-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Kollmann, W.; Richardson, M.

    1979-01-01

    The data acquisition system for the Crystal Ball project at SLAC is described. A PDP-11/t55 using RSX-11M connected to the SLAC Triplex is the basis of the system. A ''physics pipeline'' allows physicists to write their own equipment-monitoring or physics tasks which require event sampling. As well, an interactive analysis package (MULTI) is in the pipeline. Histogram collection and display on the PDP are implemented using the Triplex histogramming package. Various interactive event displays are also implemented

  20. Influence of line isolation overlappings on formation of lightning overvoltages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antropov I. M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The model of substation protection against lightning waves with considered multiple overlappings of line isolation has been presented. Influence of multiple overlapping of isolation on line support on formation of lightning overvoltages has been shown. Ambiguity of determination of lightning current dangerous parameters at the fixed length of its front has been revealed

  1. A Performance Evaluation of Lightning-NO Algorithms in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQv5.2) model, we have implemented two algorithms for lightning NO production; one algorithm is based on the hourly observed cloud-to-ground lightning strike data from National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to replace the previous m...

  2. 14 CFR 23.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 23.954... Fuel System § 23.954 Fuel system lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a...

  3. 30 CFR 57.12065 - Short circuit and lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short circuit and lightning protection. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12065 Short circuit and lightning protection. Powerlines, including trolley wires, and telephone circuits shall be protected against short circuits and lightning. ...

  4. 30 CFR 56.12065 - Short circuit and lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short circuit and lightning protection. 56... Electricity § 56.12065 Short circuit and lightning protection. Powerlines, including trolley wires, and telephone circuits shall be protected against short circuits and lightning. ...

  5. 14 CFR 29.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 29.954... lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a high probability of stroke...

  6. Estimate Of Positive Ground Lightning Flashes In Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Positive ground lightning flashes have been monitored for a period of one year in Ibadan, Nigeria. The instrument used was lightning flash counter designed to isolate only positive lightning discharges at average radiation field change of 5.0 v/m and peak frequency response of 17.0kHz with 3dB attenuation and effective ...

  7. 14 CFR 27.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 27.954... lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a high probability of stroke...

  8. 14 CFR 25.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 25.954... lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a high probability of stroke...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1316 - System lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false System lightning protection. 25.1316... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1316 System lightning... systems to perform these functions are not adversely affected when the airplane is exposed to lightning...

  10. Ball Nut Preload Diagnosis of the Hollow Ball Screw through Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the diagnostic results of hollow ball screws with different ball nut preload through the support vector machine (SVM process. The method is testified by considering the use of ball screw pretension and different ball nut preload. SVM was used to discriminate the hollow ball screw preload status through the vibration signals and servo motor current signals. Maximum dynamic preloads of 2%, 4%, and 6% ball screws were predesigned, manufactured, and conducted experimentally. Signal patterns with different preload features are separatedby SVM. The irregularity development of the ball screw driving motion current and rolling balls vibration of the ball screw can be discriminated via SVM based on complexity perception. The experimental results successfully show that the prognostic status of ball nut preload can be envisaged by the proposed methodology. The smart reasoning for the health of the ball screw is available based on classification of SVM. This diagnostic method satisfies the purposes of prognostic effectiveness on knowing the ball nut preload status

  11. A Comparative Study of Two Types of Ball-on-Ball Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Colin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes three methods of measuring the coefficient of restitution (CoR) for two different types of ball-on-ball collision. The first collision type (for which two different CoR measurement procedures are described) is a static, hanging steel ball forming part of a Newton's cradle arrangement, which is then hit by its adjacent…

  12. The Sandia transportable triggered lightning instrumentation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzer, George H.; Fisher, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility (SATTLIF) was motivated by a requirement for the in situ testing of a munitions storage bunker. Transfer functions relating the incident flash currents to voltages, currents, and electromagnetic field values throughout the structure will be obtained for use in refining and validating a lightning response computer model of this type of structure. A preliminary shakedown trial of the facility under actual operational conditions was performed during summer of 1990 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) rocket-triggered lightning test site. A description is given of the SATTLIF, which is readily transportable on a single flatbed truck of by aircraft, and its instrumentation for measuring incident lightning channel currents and the responses of the systems under test. Measurements of return-stroke current peaks obtained with the SATTLIF are presented. Agreement with data acquired on the same flashes with existing KSC instrumentation is, on average, to within approximately 7 percent. Continuing currents were measured with a resolution of approximately 2.5 A. This field trial demonstrated the practicality of using a transportable triggered lightning facility for specialized test applications.

  13. Solar wind modulation of UK lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chris; Harrison, Giles; Lockwood, Mike; Owens, Mathew; Barnard, Luke

    2013-04-01

    The response of lightning rates in the UK to arrival of high speed solar wind streams at Earth is investigated using a superposed epoch analysis. The fast solar wind streams' arrivals are determined from modulation of the solar wind Vy component, measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. Lightning rate changes around these event times are then determined from the very low frequency Arrival Time Difference (ATD) system of the UK Met Office. Arrival of high speed streams at Earth is found to be preceded by a decrease in total solar irradiance and an increase in sunspot number and Mg II emissions. These are consistent with the high speed stream's source being co-located with an active region appearing on the Eastern solar limb and rotating at the 27 day rate of the Sun. Arrival of the high speed stream at Earth also coincides with a rapid decrease in cosmic ray flux and an increase in lightning rates over the UK, persisting for around 40 days. The lightning rate increase is corroborated by an increase in the total number of thunder days observed by UK Met stations, again for around 40 days after the arrival of a high speed solar wind stream. This increase in lightning may be beneficial to medium range forecasting of hazardous weather.

  14. Lightning flash sizes relative to storm structure and turbulence during the Kinematic Texture and Lightning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, E. C.; Salinas, V.; Berkseth, S.; Chmielewski, V.; Brothers, M.

    2016-12-01

    Ongoing work as part of the Kinematic Texture and Lightning Experiment at Texas Tech University has quantified the lightning flash size, rate, and energy alongside the turbulent structure of thunderclouds. 2016 was the final year of observations, which fielded two high-resolution mobile Ka-band radars and mobile environmental soundings. Lightning measurements were made by a VHF Lightning Mapping Array. In order to enhance the detection of the smallest lightning discharges in the turbulent portions of the thundercloud, a rapidly-deployable mobile Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) station augmented a traditional fixed LMA. This capability of targeting particular storm complexes with LMA measurements will be described, and the improved detection capability quantified. The complete set of field measurements from 2014-16 sampled numerous individual cells and storm complexes, ranging in intensity from multicellular convection to supercells and mesoscale convective systems. Flash measurements coincident with radar observations included deep, highly turbulent convective cores and extensive anvil regions. Comparison of flash characteristics across these storm morphologies will be shown, with a focus on the dynamical organization of storms and the turbulent kinematics that drive differences in lightning flash sizes and rates.

  15. Lightning NOx Statistics Derived by NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) Data Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold

    2013-01-01

    What is the LNOM? The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) [Koshak et al., 2009, 2010, 2011; Koshak and Peterson 2011, 2013] analyzes VHF Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN) data to estimate the lightning nitrogen oxides (LNOx) produced by individual flashes. Figure 1 provides an overview of LNOM functionality. Benefits of LNOM: (1) Does away with unrealistic "vertical stick" lightning channel models for estimating LNOx; (2) Uses ground-based VHF data that maps out the true channel in space and time to < 100 m accuracy; (3) Therefore, true channel segment height (ambient air density) is used to compute LNOx; (4) True channel length is used! (typically tens of kilometers since channel has many branches and "wiggles"); (5) Distinction between ground and cloud flashes are made; (6) For ground flashes, actual peak current from NLDN used to compute NOx from lightning return stroke; (7) NOx computed for several other lightning discharge processes (based on Cooray et al., 2009 theory): (a) Hot core of stepped leaders and dart leaders, (b) Corona sheath of stepped leader, (c) K-change, (d) Continuing Currents, and (e) M-components; and (8) LNOM statistics (see later) can be used to parameterize LNOx production for regional air quality models (like CMAQ), and for global chemical transport models (like GEOS-Chem).

  16. Visual Analytics approach for Lightning data analysis and cell nowcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stefan; Meng, Liqiu; Betz, Hans-Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Thunderstorms and their ground effects, such as flash floods, hail, lightning, strong wind and tornadoes, are responsible for most weather damages (Bonelli & Marcacci 2008). Thus to understand, identify, track and predict lightning cells is essential. An important aspect for decision makers is an appropriate visualization of weather analysis results including the representation of dynamic lightning cells. This work focuses on the visual analysis of lightning data and lightning cell nowcasting which aim to detect and understanding spatial-temporal patterns of moving thunderstorms. Lightnings are described by 3D coordinates and the exact occurrence time of lightnings. The three-dimensionally resolved total lightning data used in our experiment are provided by the European lightning detection network LINET (Betz et al. 2009). In all previous works, lightning point data, detected lightning cells and derived cell tracks are visualized in 2D. Lightning cells are either displayed as 2D convex hulls with or without the underlying lightning point data. Due to recent improvements of lightning data detection and accuracy, there is a growing demand on multidimensional and interactive visualization in particular for decision makers. In a first step lightning cells are identified and tracked. Then an interactive graphic user interface (GUI) is developed to investigate the dynamics of the lightning cells: e.g. changes of cell density, location, extension as well as merging and splitting behavior in 3D over time. In particular a space time cube approach is highlighted along with statistical analysis. Furthermore a lightning cell nowcasting is conducted and visualized. The idea thereby is to predict the following cell features for the next 10-60 minutes including location, centre, extension, density, area, volume, lifetime and cell feature probabilities. The main focus will be set to a suitable interactive visualization of the predicted featured within the GUI. The developed visual

  17. Plant cytoplasm preserved by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X

    2004-10-01

    Usually only an organism with hard parts may be preserved in the fossil record. Cytoplasm, which is a physiologically active part of a plant, is rarely seen in the fossil record. Two Cretaceous plant fossils older than 100 million years with exceptional preservation of cytoplasm are reported here. Some cytoplasm is well preserved with subcellular details while other cytoplasm is highly hydrolyzed in the cortex of the same fossil even though both of preservations may be less than 2 microm away. The unique preservation pattern, sharp contrast of preservation in adjacent cells and the exceptional preservation of cytoplasm in the cortex suggest that lightning should play an important role in the preservation of cytoplasm and that cytoplasmic membranes may be more stable than the cell contents. Interpreting the preservation needs knowledge scattering in several formerly unrelated fields of science, including geophysics, botany, biophysics, cytology and microwave fixation technology. This new interpretation of fossilization will shed new light on preservation of cytoplasm and promote cytoplasm fossils from a position of rarity to a position of common research objects available for biological research. The importance of the identification of cytoplasm in fossil lies not in itself but in how much it influences the future research in paleobotany.

  18. Characterization of Lightning Occurrence in Alaska Using Various Weather Indices for Lightning Forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Farukh, Murad Ahmed; Hayasaka, Hiroshi; Kimura, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    Alaska lost 10% of its forest area due to vigorous forest fires in 2004 and 2005. Repeated lightning-caused forest fires annoy residents and influencing earth’s atmosphere in every fire season. The authors have reported on the weather conditions of Alaska’s most severe lightning occurrence in mid June 2005. This paper examines a range of weather indices like soar, instability, ‘dry lightning’ and others to the factors that could clearly explain lightning characteristics in Alaska. First, ligh...

  19. Conceptual design of a spaceborne lightning sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, W. L.; Nagler, M.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design of a broad-area optical lightning telescope sensor (BOLTS) designed to provide full-time (day/night) coverage of the continental United States from a geosynchronous orbit is described. Variations are discussed that could cover the whole globe from four to five geosynchronous satellites or cover only smaller areas with a high (2.5 km) resolution. The design is based on research results of the initial phase of a NASA-sponsored program. The ground resolution will be 8 x 8 km. The focal plane is an 800 x 800 pixel CCD array, electronically subdivided to allow for the high data rates (1000 frames per sec) imposed by the characteristics of lightning flashes. It will detect lightning strokes whose optical power is greater than 10 million watts, with a probability of detection of 0.9, and a false alarm rate of 0.1.

  20. Lightning and severe thunderstorms in event management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Katie M

    2012-01-01

    There are a few national position stands/guidelines that address environmental conditions in athletics, yet they do not govern all outdoor sports. Extreme heat and cold, lightning, and severe wind can all be fatal, yet the majority of outdoor sports have no published guidelines addressing these conditions in relation to activity. Available research on extreme heat and cold conditions in athletics provides prevention strategies, to include acclimatization. Lightning and severe wind are two environmental conditions to which humans cannot accommodate, and they both can be deadly. There are strong positions on extreme heat/cold and lightning safety in athletics, but none affiliated with severe winds. Medical personnel involved in planning large outdoor sporting events must know of the presence of nationally published weather-related documents and apply them to their event. In addition, research needs to be expanded in the realm of establishing guidelines for safety to participants and spectators in severe wind conditions.

  1. Structural and dynamical properties of Yukawa balls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, D; Kroll, M; Arp, O; Piel, A; Kaeding, S; Ivanov, Y; Melzer, A; Henning, C; Baumgartner, H; Ludwig, P; Bonitz, M

    2007-01-01

    To study the structural and dynamical properties of finite 3D dust clouds (Yukawa balls) new diagnostic tools have been developed. This contribution describes the progress towards 3D diagnostics for measuring the particle positions. It is shown that these diagnostics are capable of investigating the structural and dynamical properties of Yukawa balls and gaining insight into their basic construction principles

  2. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  3. Protecting a Ball-Bearing-Deflection Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhr, George A.

    1987-01-01

    Deflectometer probe monitors deflection of ball-bearing race in liquid oxygen with aid of small window or diaphragm. Diaphragm or window isolates optical deflectometer from liquid oxygen or other fluid in ball bearing. At high pressures, diaphragm integral part of housing preferable to window, since there would be no leakage.

  4. Flicker Ball, Physical Education: 5551.34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Paul L.

    This course outline is a guide for teaching skills of flicker ball in grades 7-12. The course format includes lectures, game situations, class tournaments, and tests that focus on mastery of skills, understanding of rules, and development of techniques in shooting and passing. Course content includes the following: (a) history of flicker ball, (b)…

  5. Spatial variability of correlated color temperature of lightning channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Shimoji

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the spatial variability of the correlated color temperature of lightning channel shown in a digital still image. In order to analyze the correlated color temperature, we calculated chromaticity coordinates of the lightning channels in the digital still image. From results, the spatial variation of the correlated color temperature of the lightning channel was confirmed. Moreover, the results suggest that the correlated color temperature and peak current of the lightning channels are related to each other. Keywords: Lightning, Color analysis, Correlated color temperature, Chromaticity coordinate, CIE 1931 xy-chromaticity diagram

  6. The principal time balls of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinns, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Accurate time signals in New Zealand were important for navigation in the Pacific. Time balls at Wellington and Lyttelton were noted in the 1880 Admiralty list of time signals, with later addition of Otago. The time ball service at Wellington started in March 1864 using the first official observatory in New Zealand, but there was no Wellington time ball service during a long period of waterfront redevelopment during the 1880s. The time ball service restarted in November 1888 at a different harbour location. The original mechanical apparatus was used with a new ball, but the system was destroyed by fire in March 1909 and was never replaced. Instead, a time light service was inaugurated in 1912. The service at Lyttelton, near Christchurch, began in December 1876 after construction of the signal station there. It used telegraph signals from Wellington to regulate the time ball. By the end of 1909, it was the only official time ball in New Zealand, providing a service that lasted until 1934. The Lyttelton time ball tower was an iconic landmark in New Zealand that had been carefully restored. Tragically, the tower collapsed in the 2011 earthquakes and aftershocks that devastated Christchurch. A daily time ball service at Port Chalmers, near Dunedin, started in June 1867, initially using local observatory facilities. The service appears to have been discontinued in October 1877, but was re-established in April 1882 as a weekly service, with control by telegraph from Wellington. The service had been withdrawn altogether by the end of 1909. Auckland never established a reliable time ball service, despite provision of a weekly service for mariners by a public-spirited citizen between August 1864 and June 1866. A time ball was finally installed on the Harbour Board building in 1901, but the signal was unreliable and it ceased in 1902. Complaints from ships' masters led to various proposals to re-establish a service. These concluded with erection of a time ball on the new

  7. Study of soccer ball flight trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javorova Juliana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the trajectories of a soccer ball for the most important kicks in the football game - a corner kick and a direct free kick are studied. The soccer ball is modelled as an ideal rigid hollow spherical body with six degrees of freedom, which performs a general motion in an immovable air environment with constant parameters. The ball 3D orientation is determined by the three Cardan angles. The aerodynamic forces and moments with which the air environment acts to the ball are taken into account. Two of the most dangerous areas of the football goal are defined. Differential equations which describe the motion of the soccer ball are solved numerically by MatLab-Simulink.

  8. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  9. Artificial Neural Network applied to lightning flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, R. B.; Guedes, D.; Bianchi, R.

    2013-05-01

    The development of video cameras enabled cientists to study lightning discharges comportment with more precision. The main goal of this project is to create a system able to detect images of lightning discharges stored in videos and classify them using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN)using C Language and OpenCV libraries. The developed system, can be split in two different modules: detection module and classification module. The detection module uses OpenCV`s computer vision libraries and image processing techniques to detect if there are significant differences between frames in a sequence, indicating that something, still not classified, occurred. Whenever there is a significant difference between two consecutive frames, two main algorithms are used to analyze the frame image: brightness and shape algorithms. These algorithms detect both shape and brightness of the event, removing irrelevant events like birds, as well as detecting the relevant events exact position, allowing the system to track it over time. The classification module uses a neural network to classify the relevant events as horizontal or vertical lightning, save the event`s images and calculates his number of discharges. The Neural Network was implemented using the backpropagation algorithm, and was trained with 42 training images , containing 57 lightning events (one image can have more than one lightning). TheANN was tested with one to five hidden layers, with up to 50 neurons each. The best configuration achieved a success rate of 95%, with one layer containing 20 neurons (33 test images with 42 events were used in this phase). This configuration was implemented in the developed system to analyze 20 video files, containing 63 lightning discharges previously manually detected. Results showed that all the lightning discharges were detected, many irrelevant events were unconsidered, and the event's number of discharges was correctly computed. The neural network used in this project achieved a

  10. The Submicrosecond Structure of Lightning Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    lighting Technology , NASA Conf. Pub. 2128 and x iA-RD-80-30, pp. 39-82, 1980. 11. C. E. Baum, E. L. Breen, F. L. Pitts, G. D. Sower, and M. E. Thomas, "The Measurement of Lightning Environmental Parameters Related to Interaction with Electronic Systems", IEEE Trans, on EMC, Vol. EMC-24, pp. 123-137, 1982. 12. CD. Weidman and E. P. Krider, "The Radiation Field Waveforms Produced by Intra- cloud Lightning Discharge Processes", J. Geo- phys. Res., Vol. 84, pp. 3159-3164, 1979. 13. W. Beasley, M. A. Uman, and P. L. Rustan, Jr.,

  11. Evidence for solar wind modulation of lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Barnard, L.

    2014-05-01

    The response of lightning rates over Europe to arrival of high speed solar wind streams at Earth is investigated using a superposed epoch analysis. Fast solar wind stream arrival is determined from modulation of the solar wind V y component, measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft. Lightning rate changes around these event times are determined from the very low frequency arrival time difference (ATD) system of the UK Met Office. Arrival of high speed streams at Earth is found to be preceded by a decrease in total solar irradiance and an increase in sunspot number and Mg II emissions. These are consistent with the high speed stream’s source being co-located with an active region appearing on the Eastern solar limb and rotating at the 27 d period of the Sun. Arrival of the high speed stream at Earth also coincides with a small (˜1%) but rapid decrease in galactic cosmic ray flux, a moderate (˜6%) increase in lower energy solar energetic protons (SEPs), and a substantial, statistically significant increase in lightning rates. These changes persist for around 40 d in all three quantities. The lightning rate increase is corroborated by an increase in the total number of thunder days observed by UK Met stations, again persisting for around 40 d after the arrival of a high speed solar wind stream. This result appears to contradict earlier studies that found an anti-correlation between sunspot number and thunder days over solar cycle timescales. The increase in lightning rates and thunder days that we observe coincides with an increased flux of SEPs which, while not being detected at ground level, nevertheless penetrate the atmosphere to tropospheric altitudes. This effect could be further amplified by an increase in mean lightning stroke intensity that brings more strokes above the detection threshold of the ATD system. In order to remove any potential seasonal bias the analysis was repeated for daily solar wind triggers occurring during the summer

  12. Visual Analysis for Nowcasting of Multidimensional Lightning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Peters

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Globally, most weather-related damages are caused by thunderstorms. Besides floods, strong wind, and hail, one of the major thunderstorm ground effects is lightning. Therefore, lightning investigations, including detection, cluster identification, tracking, and nowcasting are essential. To enable reliable decisions, current and predicted lightning cluster- and track features as well as analysis results have to be represented in the most appropriate way. Our paper introduces a framework which includes identification, tracking, nowcasting, and in particular visualization and statistical analysis of dynamic lightning data in three-dimensional space. The paper is specifically focused on enabling users to conduct the visual analysis of lightning data for the purpose of identification and interpretation of spatial-temporal patterns embedded in lightning data, and their dynamics. A graphic user interface (GUI is developed, wherein lightning tracks and predicted lightning clusters, including their prediction certainty, can be investigated within a 3D view or within a Space-Time-Cube. In contrast to previous work, our approach provides insight into the dynamics of past and predicted 3D lightning clusters and cluster features over time. We conclude that an interactive visual exploration in combination with a statistical analysis can provide new knowledge within lightning investigations and, thus, support decision-making in weather forecast or lightning damage prevention.

  13. Nowcasting and forecasting of lightning activity: the Talos project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagouvardos, Kostas; Kotroni, Vassiliki; Kazadzis, Stelios; Giannaros, Theodore; Karagiannidis, Athanassios; Galanaki, Elissavet; Proestakis, Emmanouil

    2015-04-01

    Thunder And Lightning Observing System (TALOS) is a research program funded by the Greek Ministry of Education with the aim to promote excellence in the field of lightning meteorology. The study focuses on exploring the real-time observations provided by the ZEUS lightning detection system, operated by the National Observatory of Athens since 2005, as well as the 10-year long database of the same system. More precisely the main research issues explored are: - lightning climatology over the Mediterranean focusing on lightning spatial and temporal distribution, on the relation of lightning with topographical features and instability and on the importance of aerosols in lightning initiation and enhancement. - nowcasting of lightning activity over Greece, with emphasis on the operational aspects of this endeavour. The nowcasting tool is based on the use of lightning data complemented by high-time resolution METEOSAT imagery. - forecasting of lightning activity over Greece based on the use of WRF numerical weather prediction model. - assimilation of lightning with the aim to improve the model precipitation forecast skill. In the frame of this presentation the main findings of each of the aforementioned issues are highlighted.

  14. La balle et la plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Marquis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fin octobre 2008, la nouvelle fit l’effet d’une bombe : Barack Obama, alors candidat à la présidence américaine, demanda à la chaîne câblée Fox News de retarder le début du sixième match de la World Series de base-ball afin de diffuser un spot de campagne. Son adversaire, John McCain, soutenu par le camp républicain et une partie de la population, monta aussitôt au créneau pour dénoncer l’hérésie : s’arroger le droit de perturber cette grande finale du championnat au déroulement immuable reve...

  15. Combining satellite-based fire observations and ground-based lightning detections to identify lightning fires across the conterminous USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Massada, A.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Stewart, S.I.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning fires are a common natural disturbance in North America, and account for the largest proportion of the area burned by wildfires each year. Yet, the spatiotemporal patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US are not well understood due to limitations of existing fire databases. Our goal here was to develop and test an algorithm that combined MODIS fire detections with lightning detections from the National Lightning Detection Network to identify lightning fires across the conterminous US from 2000 to 2008. The algorithm searches for spatiotemporal conjunctions of MODIS fire clusters and NLDN detected lightning strikes, given a spatiotemporal lag between lightning strike and fire ignition. The algorithm revealed distinctive spatial patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US While a sensitivity analysis revealed that the algorithm is highly sensitive to the two thresholds that are used to determine conjunction, the density of fires it detected was moderately correlated with ground based fire records. When only fires larger than 0.4 km2 were considered, correlations were higher and the root-mean-square error between datasets was less than five fires per 625 km2 for the entire study period. Our algorithm is thus suitable for detecting broad scale spatial patterns of lightning fire occurrence, and especially lightning fire hotspots, but has limited detection capability of smaller fires because these cannot be consistently detected by MODIS. These results may enhance our understanding of large scale patterns of lightning fire activity, and can be used to identify the broad scale factors controlling fire occurrence.

  16. Does lightning destroy rocks?: Results from a laboratory lightning experiment using an impulse high-current generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasa, Sachi A.; Nishimura, Seisuke; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2012-08-01

    To understand the destruction of rocks and changes to landforms by lightning strikes, laboratory experiments of lightning strikes were performed using three kinds of rock samples as targets. Artificial lightning with known electric current was simulated by an impulse high-current generator in the laboratory. The artificial lightning is different to natural lightning. The high-current generator can generate up to 20 kA of electric current equal to 50% of the value of natural lightning, but up to 50 kV of electric voltage which is a tenth to hundredth that of natural lightning. Experimental results showed that the rock samples with low mechanical resistance, tuff and rhyolite, were destroyed, while the rock sample with high mechanical resistance, i.e., granite, was not broken by lightning strikes. These results indicate that natural lightning causes rocks and bedrock to break. These imply that lightning might change landforms, for example gnammas and fractures on tors and mountain peaks where lightning tends to strike.

  17. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  18. BALL - biochemical algorithms library 1.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöckel Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Biochemical Algorithms Library (BALL is a comprehensive rapid application development framework for structural bioinformatics. It provides an extensive C++ class library of data structures and algorithms for molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics. Using BALL as a programming toolbox does not only allow to greatly reduce application development times but also helps in ensuring stability and correctness by avoiding the error-prone reimplementation of complex algorithms and replacing them with calls into the library that has been well-tested by a large number of developers. In the ten years since its original publication, BALL has seen a substantial increase in functionality and numerous other improvements. Results Here, we discuss BALL's current functionality and highlight the key additions and improvements: support for additional file formats, molecular edit-functionality, new molecular mechanics force fields, novel energy minimization techniques, docking algorithms, and support for cheminformatics. Conclusions BALL is available for all major operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and MacOS X. It is available free of charge under the Lesser GNU Public License (LPGL. Parts of the code are distributed under the GNU Public License (GPL. BALL is available as source code and binary packages from the project web site at http://www.ball-project.org. Recently, it has been accepted into the debian project; integration into further distributions is currently pursued.

  19. Global reactive nitrogen deposition from lightning NOx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shepon, A.; Gildor, H.; Labrador, L.J.; Butler, T.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lawrence, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of the deposition of nitrogen compounds formed from lightning (LNO x ) using the global chemical transport Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry¿Max Planck Institute for Chemistry version. The model indicates an approximately equal deposition of LNO x in both terrestrial

  20. Lightning spectra at 100,000 fps

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, M. G.; Harley, J.; Haaland, R. K.; Edens, H. E.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental understanding of lightning can be inferred from the spectral emissions resulting from the leader and return stroke channel. We examine an event recorded at 00:58:07 on 19 July 2015 at Langmuir Laboratory. We recorded lightning spectra using a 100 line per mm grating in front of a Phantom V2010 camera with an 85mm Nikon lens recording at 100,000 frames per second. Coarse resolution spectra (approximately 5nm resolution) are produced from approximately 400 nm to 800 nm for each frame. Electric field data from the Langmuir Electric Field Array for the 03:19:19 event show 10 V/m changes in the electric field associated with multiple return strokes visible in the spectral data. We used the spectral data to compare temperatures at the top, middle and bottom of the lightning channel. Lightning Mapping Array data at Langmuir for the 00:58:07 event show a complex flash extending 10 km in the East-West plane and 6 km in the North-South plane. The imagery data imply that this is a bolt-from-the-blue event.

  1. Lightning detection and exposure algorithms for smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haixin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Lin; Su, Laili; Huang, Yining

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the key theory of lightning detection, exposure and the experiments. Firstly, the algorithm based on differential operation between two adjacent frames is selected to remove the lightning background information and extract lighting signal, and the threshold detection algorithm is applied to achieve the purpose of precise detection of lightning. Secondly, an algorithm is proposed to obtain scene exposure value, which can automatically detect external illumination status. Subsequently, a look-up table could be built on the basis of the relationships between the exposure value and average image brightness to achieve rapid automatic exposure. Finally, based on a USB 3.0 industrial camera including a CMOS imaging sensor, a set of hardware test platform is established and experiments are carried out on this platform to verify the performances of the proposed algorithms. The algorithms can effectively and fast capture clear lightning pictures such as special nighttime scenes, which will provide beneficial supporting to the smartphone industry, since the current exposure methods in smartphones often lost capture or induce overexposed or underexposed pictures.

  2. The relation between TGF and lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostgaard, N.; Gjesteland, T.; Hansen, R. S.; Carlson, B. E.; Collier, A.

    2012-12-01

    Based on TGF observation from space and radio emissions from lightning there seems to be growing evidence that TGFs are related to positive intracloud lightning bringing negative charges upward. On the other hand, short bursts of X-rays and gammarays observed on the ground have been associated with negative cloud to ground discharges bringing negative charges downward. X-rays are also observed in laboratory experiments during the (negative) leader formation prior to the return stroke. All these observations may indicate that X- and gamma-ray production is a natural consequence of the electrical discharge in thunderstorms and that TGFs are more common than previously believed. This is partly supported by the identification of more than twice as many TGFs in the RHESSI dataset (Gjesteland et al., 2012). An analysis of the TGF distribution as seen from space (Østgaard et al., 2012) concluded that we can not rule out the idea that all lightning discharges produce TGFs. In this paper we will present some new data relating TGFs to the lightning discharge. The observations will be discussed in the context of existing theories for X- and gamma-ray production in thunderstorms.

  3. Bringing Thunder and Lightning Indoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials convert mechanical energy into electrical energy and electrical energy into mechanical energy. They generate electrical charges in response to mechanical stress and generate mechanical displacement and/or force when subjected to an electric current. Scientists at Langley Research Center have developed a piezoelectric device that is superior in many ways to those that used to be the only ones commercially available. It is tougher, has far greater displacement and greater mechanical load capacity for a comparative voltage operation, can be easily produced at a relatively low cost, and lends itself well to mass production. The NASA-developed piezoelectric device is also unique in that it is more efficient in extracting electrical energy from the mechanical energy that goes in. It works on a simple principle. A thin ceramic piezoelectric wafer is sandwiched between an aluminum sheet and a steel sheet and held together with LaRC-SI, an amorphous thermoplastic adhesive with special properties created by NASA at Langley. The sandwich is heated in an autoclave, and the adhesive melts. When the sandwich cools, the adhesive bonds the parts together into one piezoelectric element. While they cool, the components of the element contract at different rates, since they are made of different materials. This differential shrinkage causes the element to warp in either a convex or concave shape, depending on which way it is oriented. The shrinking of the outside metal layers places the inside piezoelectric ceramic under mechanical stress. If the element is cantilevered by clamping one side and then plucked, it reverberates like a diving board that has just ejected a diver. This way, a small amount of mechanical energy can result in a relatively long period of electrical generation. When the piezoelectric element is used for the creation of electricity, it is called Lightning. This same sandwiched piezoelectric wafer can also convert electrical energy into

  4. Assessing Operational Total Lightning Visualization Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Darden, Christopher B.; Nadler, David J.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2003, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program successfully provided total lightning data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) to the National Weather Service (NWS) office in Huntsville, Alabama. The major accomplishment was providing the observations in real-time to the NWS in the native Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) decision support system. Within days, the NALMA data were used to issue a tornado warning initiating seven years of ongoing support to the NWS' severe weather and situational awareness operations. With this success, SPoRT now provides real-time NALMA data to five forecast offices as well as working to transition data from total lightning networks at Kennedy Space Center and the White Sands Missile Range to the surrounding NWS offices. The only NALMA product that has been transitioned to SPoRT's partner NWS offices is the source density product, available at a 2 km resolution in 2 min intervals. However, discussions with users of total lightning data from other networks have shown that other products are available, ranging from spatial and temporal variations of the source density product to the creation of a flash extent density. SPoRT and the Huntsville, Alabama NWS are evaluating the utility of these variations as this has not been addressed since the initial transition in 2003. This preliminary analysis will focus on what products will best support the operational warning decision process. Data from 19 April 2009 are analyzed. On this day, severe thunderstorms formed ahead of an approaching cold front. Widespread severe weather was observed, primarily south of the Tennessee River with multiple, weak tornadoes, numerous severe hail reports, and wind. This preliminary analysis is the first step in evaluation which product(s) are best suited for operations. The ultimate goal is selecting a single product for use with all total lightning networks to streamline training and

  5. Acute transient hemiparesis induced by lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Seyed Hesam; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Jahangard, Samira

    2015-07-01

    According to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,in the years from 1959 to 1994, lightning was responsible for more than 3000 deaths and nearly 10,000 casualties. The most important characteristic features of lightning injuries are multisystem involvement and widely variable severity. Lightning strikes are primarily a neurologic injury that affects all 3 components of the nervous system: central, autonomic,and peripheral. Neurologic complications of lightning strikes vary from transient benign symptoms to permanent disability. Many patients experience a temporary paralysis called keraunoparalysis. Here we reported a 22-year-old mountaineer man with complaining of left sided hemiparesis after being hit by a lightning strike in the mountain 3 hours ago. There was no loss of consciousness at hitting time. On arrival the patient was alert, awake and hemodynamically stable. In neurologic examination cranial nerves were intact, left sided upper and lower extremity muscle force was I/V with a combination of complete sensory loss, and right-sided muscle force and sensory examination were normal. There is not any evidence of significant vascular impairment in the affected extremities. Brain MRI and CT scan and cervical MRI were normal. During 2 days of admission, with intravenous hydration, heparin 5000 unit SC q12hr and physical therapy of the affected limbs, motor and sensory function improved and was normal except mild paresthesia. He was discharged 1 day later for outpatient follow up while vitamin B1 100mg orally was prescribed.Paresthesia improved after 3 days without further sequels.

  6. A projected decrease in lightning under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Declan L.; Doherty, Ruth M.; Wild, Oliver; Stevenson, David S.; MacKenzie, Ian A.; Blyth, Alan M.

    2018-02-01

    Lightning strongly influences atmospheric chemistry1-3, and impacts the frequency of natural wildfires4. Most previous studies project an increase in global lightning with climate change over the coming century1,5-7, but these typically use parameterizations of lightning that neglect cloud ice fluxes, a component generally considered to be fundamental to thunderstorm charging8. As such, the response of lightning to climate change is uncertain. Here, we compare lightning projections for 2100 using two parameterizations: the widely used cloud-top height (CTH) approach9, and a new upward cloud ice flux (IFLUX) approach10 that overcomes previous limitations. In contrast to the previously reported global increase in lightning based on CTH, we find a 15% decrease in total lightning flash rate with IFLUX in 2100 under a strong global warming scenario. Differences are largest in the tropics, where most lightning occurs, with implications for the estimation of future changes in tropospheric ozone and methane, as well as differences in their radiative forcings. These results suggest that lightning schemes more closely related to cloud ice and microphysical processes are needed to robustly estimate future changes in lightning and atmospheric composition.

  7. The ball SITE sign: Ball sports-induced targetoid erythema in a racquetball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2015-07-01

    Cutaneous injury following impact of a high velocity ball to the skin may result in either erythema or purpura or both. The lesion typically appears as an annular ring of erythema with or without accompanying ecchymosis when the skin is contacted by a paintball, a ping pong ball, a racquetball or a squash ball. To describe a girl with targetoid erythema following impact of a racquetball on her flank and back and to review other sports associated with this response to skin injury. PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: ball, erythema, paint, ping pong, purpura, racquetball, sign, site, sports, squash, targetoid. All papers were reviewed and relevant manuscripts, along with their reference citations, were evaluated. A 13-year-old girl developed an annular red ring surrounding a central area of normal appearing skin on her right flank and upper back where a racquetball traveling at a high velocity contacted her skin. Similar appearing lesions of targetoid erythema have been described at the cutaneous impact sites of either paintballs, ping pong balls, squash balls; in addition to erythema, purpura may also concurrently appear or subsequently develop at the contact location of the ball with the skin. Targetoid erythema is a pathognomonic cutaneous presentation resulting from the impact of either a paintball, ping pong ball, racquetball or squash ball-that is traveling at a high velocity-with a sport participant's skin. The ball SITE (sports-induced targetoid erythema) sign is suggested as a unifying nomenclature to designate this unique, ball sport-associated, cutaneous dermatosis in athletes participating in sports in which high velocity impact of the ball with the skin may occur.

  8. How Magnus Bends the Flying Ball--Experimenting and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timková, V.; Ješková, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Students are well aware of the effect of the deflection of sports balls when they have been given a spin. A volleyball, tennis, or table tennis ball served with topspin results in an additional downward force that makes the ball difficult to catch and return. In soccer, the effect of sidespin causes the ball to curve unexpectedly sideways,…

  9. Flexible timing of eye movements when catching a ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moliner, Joan; Brenner, Eli

    2016-01-01

    In ball games, one cannot direct ones gaze at the ball all the time because one must also judge other aspects of the game, such as other players' positions. We wanted to know whether there are times at which obtaining information about the ball is particularly beneficial for catching it. We recently found that people could catch successfully if they saw any part of the ball's flight except the very end, when sensory-motor delays make it impossible to use new information. Nevertheless, there may be a preferred time to see the ball. We examined when six catchers would choose to look at the ball if they had to both catch the ball and find out what to do with it while the ball was approaching. A catcher and a thrower continuously threw a ball back and forth. We recorded their hand movements, the catcher's eye movements, and the ball's path. While the ball was approaching the catcher, information was provided on a screen about how the catcher should throw the ball back to the thrower (its peak height). This information disappeared just before the catcher caught the ball. Initially there was a slight tendency to look at the ball before looking at the screen but, later, most catchers tended to look at the screen before looking at the ball. Rather than being particularly eager to see the ball at a certain time, people appear to adjust their eye movements to the combined requirements of the task.

  10. Studies on an Electromagnetic Transient Model of Offshore Wind Turbines and Lightning Transient Overvoltage Considering Lightning Channel Wave Impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the rapid development of offshore wind turbines (WTs, the problem of lightning strikes has become more and more prominent. In order to reduce the failure rate caused by the transient overvoltage of lightning struck offshore WTs, the influencing factors and the response rules of transient overvoltage are analyzed. In this paper, a new integrated electromagnetic transient model of offshore WTs is established by using the numerical calculation method of the electromagnetic field first. Then, based on the lightning model and considering the impedance of the lightning channel, the transient overvoltage of lightning is analyzed. Last, the electromagnetic transient model of offshore WTs is simulated and analyzed by using the alternative transients program electro-magnetic transient program (ATP-EMTP software. The influence factors of lightning transient overvoltage are studied. The main influencing factors include the sea depth, the blade length, the tower height, the lightning flow parameters, the lightning strike point, and the blade rotation position. The simulation results show that the influencing factors mentioned above have different effects on the lightning transient overvoltage. The results of the study have some guiding significance for the design of the lightning protection of the engine room.

  11. Static Load Distribution in Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A numerical procedure for computing the internal loading distribution in statically loaded, single-row, angular-contact ball bearings when subjected to a known combined radial and thrust load is presented. The combined radial and thrust load must be applied in order to avoid tilting between inner and outer rings. The numerical procedure requires the iterative solution of Z + 2 simultaneous nonlinear equations - where Z is the number of the balls - to yield an exact solution for axial and radial deflections, and contact angles. Numerical results for a 218 angular-contact ball bearing have been compared with those from the literature and show significant differences in the magnitudes of the ball loads, contact angles, and the extent of the loading zone.

  12. Crystal ball single event display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosnick, D.; Gibson, A.; Allgower, C.; Alyea, J.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1997-01-01

    The Single Event Display (SED) is a routine that is designed to provide information graphically about a triggered event within the Crystal Ball. The SED is written entirely in FORTRAN and uses the CERN-based HICZ graphing package. The primary display shows the amount of energy deposited in each of the NaI crystals on a Mercator-like projection of the crystals. Ten different shades and colors correspond to varying amounts of energy deposited within a crystal. Information about energy clusters is displayed on the crystal map by outlining in red the thirteen (or twelve) crystals contained within a cluster and assigning each cluster a number. Additional information about energy clusters is provided in a series of boxes containing useful data about the energy distribution among the crystals within the cluster. Other information shown on the event display include the event trigger type and data about π o 's and η's formed from pairs of clusters as found by the analyzer. A description of the major features is given, along with some information on how to install the SED into the analyzer

  13. Middle finger and ball movements around ball release during baseball fastball pitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Tomoyuki; Jinji, Tsutomu; Hirayama, Daisaku; Nasu, Daiki; Ozaki, Hiroki; Kumagawa, Daisuke

    2017-02-28

    The objectives of this study were to investigate middle finger movements and dynamics of ball movements around the instant of ball release during baseball pitching. Baseball pitching from an indoor mound among 14 semi-professional pitchers was captured using a motion capture system with 16 high-speed cameras (1,000 Hz). Kinematics of middle finger joints, ball rotation, and force applied to the ball were calculated. The proximal and distal interphalangeal joints continued to extend until the instant of ball release, then abruptly flexed. The abrupt flexion lasted for only several milliseconds, followed by a short extension phase. The finger made a quick double cycle of extension-flexion movement, suggesting that it attained high stiffness resulting from co-contraction. The ball began to roll up to the tip of the finger 8 ± 1 ms before ball release owing to the start of extension or the increased angular velocity of extension for the proximal interphalangeal joint. A mean force of 195 ± 27 N was applied in the proximal direction of the hand at the same time as the beginning of ball rolling, and a mean force of 109 ± 22 N was applied to the throwing direction just before ball release.

  14. Dolphin underwater bait-balling behaviors in relation to group and prey ball sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin L; Muzi, Elisa; Richardson, Jessica L; Fox, Gabriella J; Hansen, Lauren N; Salley, Alyce M; Dudzinski, Kathleen M; Würsig, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    We characterized dusky dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) feeding behaviors recorded on underwater video, and related behaviors to variation in prey ball sizes, dolphin group sizes, and study site (Argentina versus New Zealand, NZ). Herding behaviors most often involved dolphins swimming around the side or under prey balls, but dolphins in Argentina more often swam under prey balls (48% of passes) than did dolphins in NZ (34% of passes). This result may have been due to differences in group sizes between sites, since groups are larger in Argentina. Additionally, in NZ, group size was positively correlated with proportion of passes that occurred under prey balls (pdolphins in Argentina more often swam through prey balls (8% of attempts) than did dolphins in NZ (4% of attempts). This result may have been due to differences in prey ball sizes between sites, since dolphins fed on larger prey balls in Argentina (>74m(2)) than in NZ (maximum 33m(2)). Additionally, in NZ, dolphins were more likely to swim through prey balls to capture fish when they fed on larger prey balls (p=0.025). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermoelastoplastic Deformation of a Multilayer Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashkin, E. V.; Dats, E. P.

    2017-09-01

    The problem of centrally symmetric deformation of a multilayer elastoplastic ball in the process of successive accretion of preheated layers to its outer surface is considered in the framework of small elastoplastic deformations. The problems of residual stress formation in the elastoplastic ball with an inclusion and a cavity are solved under various mechanical boundary conditions on the inner surface and for prescribed thermal compression distributions. The graphs of residual stress and displacement fields are constructed.

  16. Effects of bushings characteristics on suspension ball joint travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaobo

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, a short-long arm type front suspension is represented using multi-body dynamics model established with ADAMS®, where the suspension bushings modelled as linear and nonlinear elements, respectively, are integrated with a flexible cradle and other suspension components. A ball joint travel, defined as the angular displacement between the two parts connected with the ball joint, is calculated, where the measured wheel loads and spindle accelerations from a proving ground severe durability test schedule serve as the input data. The ball joints considered in this study include lower ball joints, upper ball joints, outer tierod ball joints, and inner tierod ball joints. The results clearly illustrate that the bushing stiffness and nonlinearity are important for an accurate prediction of ball joint travels and the ball joint travel sensitivities to considered design variables are important for engineers to understand and ensure reliable designs of ball joints.

  17. Lightning protection of flap system for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Madsen, Søren Find

    The aim of this PhD project was to investigate the behaviour of a Controllable Rubber Trailing Edge Flap (CRTEF) in a wind turbine blade when it is exposed to lightning discharges, and find the best technical solution to protect the CRTEF and the controlling system against lightning, based......, the current transmission, including the study of the induced electromagnetic fields, and the effects of degradation of the flap material due to the exposure to the lightning high electric fields. The main tools for this analysis were the simulation by the finite elements method and testing in the high voltage......, as well as general the general principles of lightning protection and the experience acquired in the analysis of lightning damages in field performed during the PhD, were the base for the design and validation of an vi effective and reliable lightning protection for the flap. Regarding the design...

  18. Weekly Cycle of Lightning: Evidence of Storm Invigoration by Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2009-01-01

    We have examined summertime 1998 2009 U.S. lightning data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to look for weekly cycles in lightning activity. As was found by Bell et al. (2008) for rain over the southeast U.S., there is a significant weekly cycle in afternoon lightning activity that peaks in the middle of the week there. The weekly cycle appears to be reduced over population centers. Lightning activity peaks on weekends over waters near the SE U.S. The statistical significance of weekly cycles over the western half of the country is generally small. We found no evidence of a weekly cycle of synoptic-scale forcing that might explain these patterns. The lightning behavior is entirely consistent with the explanation suggested by Bell et al. (2008) for the cycles in rainfall and other atmospheric data from the SE U.S., that aerosols can cause storms to intensify in humid, convectively unstable environments.

  19. Chasing Lightning: Sferics, Tweeks and Whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P. A.; Franzen, K.; Garcia, L.; Schou, P.; Rous, P.

    2008-12-01

    We all know what lightning looks like during a thunderstorm, but the visible flash we see is only part of the story. This is because lightning also generates light with other frequencies that we cannot perceive with our eyes, but which are just as real as visible light. Unlike the visible light from lightning, these other frequencies can carry the lightning's energy hundreds or thousands of miles across the surface of the Earth in the form of special signals called "tweeks" and "sferics". Some of these emissions can even travel tens of thousands of miles out into space before returning to the Earth as "whistlers". The INSPIRE Project, Inc is a non-profit scientific and educational corporation whose beginning mission was to bring the excitement of observing these very low frequency (VLF) natural radio waves emissions from lightning to high school students. Since 1989, INSPIRE has provided specially designed radio receiver kits to over 2,600 participants around the world to make observations of signals in the VLF frequency range. Many of these participants are using the VLF data they collect in very creative projects that include fiction, music and art exhibitions. During the Fall 2008 semester, the first INSPIRE based university-level course was taught at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) as part of its First-Year Seminar (FYS) series. The FYS classes are limited to 20 first-year students per class and are designed to create an active-learning environment that encourages student participation and discussion that might not otherwise occur in larger first-year classes. This presentation will cover the experiences gained from using the INSPIRE kits as the basis of a university course. This will include the lecture material that covers the basic physics of lightning, thunderstorms and the Earth's atmosphere, as well as the electronics required to understand the basic workings of the VLF kit. It will also cover the students assembly of the kit in an

  20. Investigation of Lightning and EMI Shielding Properties of SWNT Buckypaper Nanocomposites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Ben; Liang, Richard; Zhang, Chuck; Kramer, Leslie; Funchess, Percy

    2005-01-01

    ... EMI and lightning strike protection properties. The EMI shielding and lightning strike attenuation properties of the composites with the surface layer of SWNT buckypaper nanocomposite were preliminarily characterized...

  1. Lightning Protection System to the Indian Satellite Launch Pad

    OpenAIRE

    Nagabushana, GR; Thomas, Joy; Kumar, Udaya; Rao, Venkateshwara D; Rao, Panduranga PV

    1999-01-01

    Any satellite launch mission forms a complex and expensive process. Intensive care and precautions are to be taken for a safe and successful launch. Also, the satellite launch system forms a tall structure standing on a plane terrain. As a result, a lightning strike rate to it becomes more probable. Therefore, extensive care needs to be taken in shielding the launch system against natural lightning. Lightning protection systems built with differing principles have been in use at different lau...

  2. When lightning strikes: bolting down the facts & fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usatch, Ben

    2009-04-01

    MYTH: There's no danger from lightning until the rain starts. FACT: Lightning often precedes the storm by up to 10 miles. A reasonable guideline is the "30-30 rule," by which you count the seconds between the flash and the thunder. If the time span is less than 30 seconds, seek shelter. Additionally, wait a full 30 minutes from last lightning flash to resume outdoor activities.

  3. Numerical tools for lightning protection of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Mieritz, Casper Falkenstrøm; Candela Garolera, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The present paper presents the different numerical tools used for lightning protection analysis. Initially the risk assessment considering attachment point distribution and location of vulnerable points on the wind turbine will be discussed, where also the term Lightning Protection Coordination...... locations and requirements to insulation levels, equipotential bondings, indirect effects protection etc. Finally the lightning current arrives to the nacelle, where the principles of modelling magnetic fields, induced voltages, required shielding of panels etc. will be discussed....

  4. NEW APPROACH OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS OF THE LIGHTNING DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Dib Djalel; Mordjaoui Mourad; Hocine Labar

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significant developments in the protection means of electrical and electronic systems against the lightning and its effects. With its unpredictability and aggress if character, the lightning is the most dangerous phenomenon for electrical systems, which requires more interest and greater effort by researchers and designers means of protection. We present in this study a new analytic model of transient electromagnetic fields radiated by the lightning channel. To better estimate our...

  5. Lightning Radio Source Retrieval Using Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of tile measurements mentioned above. Tests of the retrieval method are provided using computer-simulated data sets. We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. In the absence of measurement errors, quadratic root degeneracy (no source location ambiguity) is shown to exist exactly on the outer sensor baselines for arbitrary non-collinear network geometries. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer generated data sets. The results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg. We also note some of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods over the nonlinear method of chi(sup 2) minimization employed by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and discussed in Cummins et al.(1993, 1995, 1998).

  6. A first look at lightning energy determined from GLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, P. M.; Burchfield, J. C.; Brunner, K. N.

    2017-12-01

    The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) was launched in November 2016 onboard GOES-16 has been undergoing post launch and product post launch testing. While these have typically focused on lightning metrics such as detection efficiency, false alarm rate, and location accuracy, there are other attributes of the lightning discharge that are provided by GLM data. Namely, the optical energy radiated by lightning may provide information useful for lightning physics and the relationship of lightning energy to severe weather development. This work presents initial estimates of the lightning optical energy detected by GLM during this initial testing, with a focus on observations during field campaign during spring 2017 in Huntsville. This region is advantageous for the comparison due to the proliferation of ground-based lightning instrumentation, including a lightning mapping array, interferometer, HAMMA (an array of electric field change meters), high speed video cameras, and several long range VLF networks. In addition, the field campaign included airborne observations of the optical emission and electric field changes. The initial estimates will be compared with previous observations using TRMM-LIS. In addition, a comparison between the operational and scientific GLM data sets will also be discussed.

  7. Lightning, IT Diffusion and Economic Growth across US States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Bentzen, Jeanet; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars

    Empirically, a higher frequency of lightning strikes is associated with slower growth in labor productivity across the 48 contiguous US states after 1990; before 1990 there is no correlation between growth and lightning. Other climate variables (e.g., temperature, rainfall and tornadoes) do...... adversely affect the speed of IT diffusion. We find that lightning indeed seems to have slowed IT diffusion, conditional on standard controls. Hence, an increasing macroeconomic sensitivity to lightning may be due to the increasing importance of digital technologies for the growth process....

  8. Nowcasting of Lightning-Related Accidents in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrlich, Laura; Price, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Tropical Africa is the world capital of thunderstorm activity with the highest density of strikes per square kilometer per year. As a result it is also the continent with perhaps the highest casualties and injuries from direct lightning strikes. This region of the globe also has little lightning protection of rural homes and schools, while many casualties occur during outdoor activities (e.g. farming, fishing, sports, etc.) In this study we investigated two lightning-caused accidents that got wide press coverage: A lightning strike to a Cheetah Center in Namibia which caused a huge fire and great destruction (16 October 2013), and a plane crash in Mali where 116 people died (24 July 2014). Using data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) we show that the lightning data alone can provide important early warning information that can be used to reduce risks and damages and loss of life from lightning strikes. We have developed a now-casting scheme that allows for early warnings across Africa with a relatively low false alarm rate. To verify the accuracy of our now-cast, we have performed some statistical analysis showing relatively high skill at providing early warnings (lead time of a few hours) based on lightning alone. Furthermore, our analysis can be used in forensic meteorology for determining if such accidents are caused by lightning strikes.

  9. Unusual features caused by lightning impact in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, P.; Abrahamsen, N.; Rasmussen, T.

    2006-01-01

       Two lightning impacts are described from an area near the Inland Ice in West Greenland. The first lightning blasted an outcrop of metacherts. It subsequently split into two branches, which traversed rock outcrops and boulders, leaving behind two white almost straight lines, 30 m and 14 m long...... that a strong electric current indeed traversed the boulder. A few years later a second lightning impacted on a mountaintop close to the first impact. The second lightning left a trail on the rock surface covered by a thin layer of glass. The glass displays spectacular colours ranging from metallic blue, to red...

  10. Cochlear implantation for severe sensorineural hearing loss caused by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Il-Woo; Goh, Eui-Kyung; Kong, Soo-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Lightning strike can produce an array of clinical symptoms and injuries. It may damage multiple organs and cause auditory injuries ranging from transient hearing loss and vertigo to complete disruption of the auditory system. Tympanic-membrane rupture is relatively common in patients with lightning injury. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of auditory lesions in lightning survivors have not been fully elucidated. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss caused by a lightning strike, who was successfully rehabilitated after a cochlear implantation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. "Thunderstruck": penetrating thoracic injury from lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waes, Oscar J F; van de Woestijne, Pieter C; Halm, Jens A

    2014-04-01

    Lightning strike victims are rarely presented at an emergency department. Burns are often the primary focus. This case report describes the improvised explosive device like-injury to the thorax due to lightning strike and its treatment, which has not been described prior in (kerauno)medicine. Penetrating injury due to blast from lightning strike is extremely rare. These "shrapnel" injuries should however be ruled out in all patients struck by lightning. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Urban Influences on Convection and Lightning Over Houston

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gauthier, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    The research presented in this dissertation addresses a fundamental question regarding urban, ultimately anthropogenic, influences on convection as it relates to lightning production and precipitation structure...

  13. The detection of lightning from geostationary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Hugh J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of the Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS), a space sensor capable of mapping intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning discharges from geostationary orbit during day and night. The LMS is expected to have a spatial resolution of 10 km and a detection efficiency of 90 percent. The LMS combines modern solid state mosaic focal planes with extensive on-board signal processing to make it possible to detect weak background-contaminated signals. The LMS is planned to have a 10.5 degree field of view covering all of the continental U.S. The characteristics and design of the LMS are described, noting the possible applications of the sensor.

  14. Ionospheric effects of thunderstorms and lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, Erin H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Tropospheric thunderstorms have been reported to disturb the lower ionosphere (~65-90 km) by convective atmospheric gravity waves and by electromagnetic field changes produced by lightning discharges. However, due to the low electron density in the lower ionosphere, active probing of its electron distribution is difficult, and the various perturbative effects are poorly understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that by using remotely-detected ?me waveforms of lightning radio signals it is possible to probe the lower ionosphere and its fluctuations in a spatially and temporally-resolved manner. Here we report evidence of gravity wave effects on the lower ionosphere originating from the thunderstorm. We also report variations in the nighttime ionosphere atop a small thunderstorm and associate the variations with the storm’s electrical activity. Finally, we present a data analysis technique to map ionospheric acoustic waves near thunderstorms.

  15. An Assessment of Land Surface and Lightning Characteristics Associated with Lightning-Initiated Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, James; Schultz, Christopher J.; Case, Jonathan L.

    2017-01-01

    Can we use modeled information of the land surface and characteristics of lightning beyond flash occurrence to increase the identification and prediction of wildfires? Combine observed cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes with real-time land surface model output, and Compare data with areas where lightning did not start a wildfire to determine what land surface conditions and lightning characteristics were responsible for causing wildfires. Statistical differences between suspected fire-starters and non-fire-starters were peak-current dependent 0-10 cm Volumetric and Relative Soil Moisture comparisons were statistically dependent to at least the p = 0.05 independence level for both polarity flash types Suspected fire-starters typically occurred in areas of lower soil moisture than non-fire-starters. GVF value comparisons were only found to be statistically dependent for -CG flashes. However, random sampling of the -CG non-fire starter dataset revealed that this relationship may not always hold.

  16. Lightning Protection for the Orion Space Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Orion space vehicle is designed to requirements for both direct attachment and indirect effects of lightning. Both sets of requirements are based on a full threat 200kA strike, in accordance with constraints and guidelines contained in SAE ARP documents applicable to both commercial and military aircraft and space vehicles. This paper describes the requirements as levied against the vehicle, as well as the means whereby the design shows full compliance.

  17. Acoustic Location of Lightning Using Interferometric Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erives, H.; Arechiga, R. O.; Stock, M.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic arrays have been used to accurately locate thunder sources in lightning flashes. The acoustic arrays located around the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico produce locations which compare quite well with source locations provided by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array. These arrays utilize 3 outer microphones surrounding a 4th microphone located at the center, The location is computed by band-passing the signal to remove noise, and then computing the cross correlating the outer 3 microphones with respect the center reference microphone. While this method works very well, it works best on signals with high signal to noise ratios; weaker signals are not as well located. Therefore, methods are being explored to improve the location accuracy and detection efficiency of the acoustic location systems. The signal received by acoustic arrays is strikingly similar to th signal received by radio frequency interferometers. Both acoustic location systems and radio frequency interferometers make coherent measurements of a signal arriving at a number of closely spaced antennas. And both acoustic and interferometric systems then correlate these signals between pairs of receivers to determine the direction to the source of the received signal. The primary difference between the two systems is the velocity of propagation of the emission, which is much slower for sound. Therefore, the same frequency based techniques that have been used quite successfully with radio interferometers should be applicable to acoustic based measurements as well. The results presented here are comparisons between the location results obtained with current cross correlation method and techniques developed for radio frequency interferometers applied to acoustic signals. The data were obtained during the summer 2013 storm season using multiple arrays sensitive to both infrasonic frequency and audio frequency acoustic emissions from lightning. Preliminary results show that

  18. [Auricular consequences of lightning (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveillé-Nizerolle, M; Lintzer, J P; Bérézin, A

    1978-01-01

    Auricular accidents provoqued by lightning and induced by telephone are extremely rare. The authors of this paper relate the case of a young lady suffering from an inflammation of the external auditive canal and of an irritation of the tympanic membrane with an perception's hypacusis of 30 db. A physiological explanation is proposed and two factors come into account:--The acoustic traumatism induced by the thunder;--The burn produced by the electrical current.

  19. Photonuclear reactions triggered by lightning discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Wada, Yuuki; Furuta, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yuasa, Takayuki; Okuda, Kazufumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Sato, Mitsuteru; Sato, Yousuke; Nakano, Toshio; Umemoto, Daigo; Tsuchiya, Harufumi

    2017-11-01

    Lightning and thunderclouds are natural particle accelerators. Avalanches of relativistic runaway electrons, which develop in electric fields within thunderclouds, emit bremsstrahlung γ-rays. These γ-rays have been detected by ground-based observatories, by airborne detectors and as terrestrial γ-ray flashes from space. The energy of the γ-rays is sufficiently high that they can trigger atmospheric photonuclear reactions that produce neutrons and eventually positrons via β+ decay of the unstable radioactive isotopes, most notably 13N, which is generated via 14N + γ → 13N + n, where γ denotes a photon and n a neutron. However, this reaction has hitherto not been observed conclusively, despite increasing observational evidence of neutrons and positrons that are presumably derived from such reactions. Here we report ground-based observations of neutron and positron signals after lightning. During a thunderstorm on 6 February 2017 in Japan, a γ-ray flash with a duration of less than one millisecond was detected at our monitoring sites 0.5-1.7 kilometres away from the lightning. The subsequent γ-ray afterglow subsided quickly, with an exponential decay constant of 40-60 milliseconds, and was followed by prolonged line emission at about 0.511 megaelectronvolts, which lasted for a minute. The observed decay timescale and spectral cutoff at about 10 megaelectronvolts of the γ-ray afterglow are well explained by de-excitation γ-rays from nuclei excited by neutron capture. The centre energy of the prolonged line emission corresponds to electron-positron annihilation, providing conclusive evidence of positrons being produced after the lightning.

  20. Effect of a ball skill intervention on children's ball skills and cognitive functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp-Haverdings, Marieke; Houwen, Suzanne; Hartman, Esther; Mombarg, Remo; Smith, Joanne; Visscher, Chris

    Purpose: This study examined the effect of a 16-wk ball skill intervention on the ball skills, executive functioning (in terms of problem solving and cognitive flexibility), and in how far improved executive functioning leads to improved reading and mathematics performance of children with learning

  1. Keeping Your Eyes Continuously on the Ball While Running for Catchable and Uncatchable Fly Balls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Dees B. W.; den Otter, A. Rob; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    When faced with a fly ball approaching along the sagittal plane, fielders need information for the control of their running to the interception location. This information could be available in the initial part of the ball trajectory, such that the interception location can be predicted from its

  2. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2013-12-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through a wind tunnel test and ball trajectory simulations, this study shows that the aerodynamic resistance of the new 32-panel soccer ball is larger in the high-speed region and lower in the middle-speed region than that of the previous 14- and 8-panel balls. The critical Reynolds number of the Roteiro, Teamgeist II, Jabulani, and Tango 12 was ~2.2 × 10(5) (drag coefficient, C d  ≈ 0.12), ~2.8 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), ~3.3 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), and ~2.4 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.15), respectively. The flight trajectory simulation suggested that the Tango 12, one of the newest soccer balls, has less air resistance in the medium-speed region than the Jabulani and can thus easily acquire large initial velocity in this region. It is considered that the critical Reynolds number of a soccer ball, as considered within the scope of this experiment, depends on the extended total distance of the panel bonds rather than the small designs on the panel surfaces.

  3. Acoustic vs Interferometric Measurements of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Erives, H.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Jensen, D.; Morris, K.

    2015-12-01

    During the summer of 2015 we acquired acoustic and RF data on severalflashes from thunderstorms over Fort Morgan CO. and Langmuir Laboratoryin the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico. The acoustic arrayswere located at a distance of roughly 150 m from the interferometers.Lightning mapping array and slow antenna data were also obtained. Theacoustic arrays consist of arrays of five audio-range and six infrasoundmicrophones operating at 50 KHz and 1 KHz respectively. The lightninginterferometer at Fort Morgan CO. consists of three flat-plate, 13" diameterantennas at the vertices of an equilateral 50 m per side triangle. Theinterferometer at Langmuir Laboratory consists of three 13" dishes separatedby about 15 m. Both interferometers, operating at 180 Megasamples persecond, use the analysis software and digitizer hardware pioneered byStanley, Stock et al. The high data rate allows for excellent spatialresolution of high speed (and typically high current) processes such asK-changes, return strokes and dart-leaders. In previous studies, we haveshown the usefulness of acoustic recordings to locate thunder sources aswell as infrasound pulses from lightning. This work will present acomparison of Acoustic and Interferometric measurements from lightning,using some interesting flashes, including a positive cloud to ground,that occurred in these campaigns.

  4. Impact of lightning strikes on hospital functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Van Springel, Gert L J; Van Boxstael, Sam; Herrijgers, Jan; Hoflacks, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    Two regional hospitals were struck by lightning during a one-month period. The first hospital, which had 236 beds, suffered a direct strike to the building. This resulted in a direct spread of the power peak and temporary failure of the standard power supply. The principle problems, after restoring standard power supply, were with the fire alarm system and peripheral network connections in the digital radiology systems. No direct impact on the hardware could be found. Restarting the servers resolved all problems. The second hospital, which had 436 beds, had a lightning strike on the premises and mainly experienced problems due to induction. All affected installations had a cable connection from outside in one way or another. The power supplies never were endangered. The main problem was the failure of different communication systems (telephone, radio, intercom, fire alarm system). Also, the electronic entrance control went out. During the days after the lightening strike, multiple software problems became apparent, as well as failures of the network connections controlling the technical support systems. There are very few ways to prepare for induction problems. The use of fiber-optic networks can limit damage. To the knowledge of the authors, these are the first cases of lightning striking hospitals in medical literature.

  5. An Optical Lightning Simulator in an Electrified Cloud-Resolving Model to Prepare the Future Space Lightning Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovalo, Christophe; Defer, Eric; Pinty, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The future decade will see the launch of several space missions designed to monitor the total lightning activity. Among these missions, the American (Geostationary Lightning Mapper - GLM) and European (Lightning Imager - LI) optical detectors will be onboard geostationary satellites (GOES-R and MTG, respectively). For the first time, the total lightning activity will be monitored over the full Earth disk and at a very high temporal resolution (2 and 1 ms, respectively). Missions like the French Tool for the Analysis of Radiation from lightNIng and Sprites (TARANIS) and ISS-LIS will bring complementary information in order to better understand the lightning physics and to improve the weather prediction (nowcasting and forecasting). Such missions will generate a huge volume of new and original observations for the scientific community and weather prediction centers that have to be prepared. Moreover, before the launch of these missions, fundamental questions regarding the interpretation of the optical signal property and its relation to cloud optical thickness and lightning discharge processes need to be further investigated. An innovative approach proposed here is to use the synergy existing in the French MesoNH Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM). Indeed, MesoNH is one of the only CRM able to simulate the lifecycle of electrical charges generated within clouds through non-inductive charging process (dependent of the 1-moment microphysical scheme). The lightning flash geometry is based on a fractal law while the electrical field is diagnosed thanks to the Gauss' law. The lightning optical simulator is linked to the electrical scheme as the lightning radiance at 777.4 nm is a function of the lightning current, approximated by the charges neutralized along the lightning path. Another important part is the scattering of this signal by the hydrometeors (mainly ice particles) that is taken into account. Simulations at 1-km resolution are done over the Langmuir Laboratory (New

  6. Simulation of Meteosat Third Generation-Lightning Imager through tropical rainfall measuring mission: Lightning Imaging Sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, Daniele; De Leonibus, Luigi; Laquale, Paolo; Labate, Demetrio; Zauli, Francesco; Melfi, Davide

    2008-08-01

    The Centro Nazionale di Meteorologia e Climatologia Aeronautica recently hosted a fellowship sponsored by Galileo Avionica, with the intent to study and perform a simulation of Meteosat Third Generation - Lightning Imager (MTG-LI) sensor behavior through Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Lightning Imaging Sensor data (TRMM-LIS). For the next generation of earth observation geostationary satellite, major operating agencies are planning to insert an optical imaging mission, that continuously observes lightning pulses in the atmosphere; EUMETSAT has decided in recent years that one of the three candidate mission to be flown on MTG is LI, a Lightning Imager. MTG-LI mission has no Meteosat Second Generation heritage, but users need to evaluate the possible real time data output of the instrument to agree in inserting it on MTG payload. Authors took the expected LI design from MTG Mission Requirement Document, and reprocess real lightning dataset, acquired from space by TRMM-LIS instrument, to produce a simulated MTG-LI lightning dataset. The simulation is performed in several run, varying Minimum Detectable Energy, taking into account processing steps from event detection to final lightning information. A definition of the specific meteorological requirements is given from the potential use in meteorology of lightning final information for convection estimation and numerical cloud modeling. Study results show the range of instrument requirements relaxation which lead to minimal reduction in the final lightning information.

  7. Characterizing the Relationships Among Lightning and Storm Parameters: Lightning as a Proxy Variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, S. J.; Raghavan, R.; William, E.; Weber, M.; Boldi, B.; Matlin, A.; Wolfson, M.; Hodanish, S.; Sharp. D.

    1997-01-01

    We have gained important insights from prior studies that have suggested relationships between lightning and storm growth, decay, convective rain flux, vertical distribution of storm mass and echo volume in the region, and storm energetics. A study was initiated in the Summer of 1996 to determine how total (in-cloud plus ground) lightning observations might provide added knowledge to the forecaster in the determination and identification of severe thunderstorms and weather hazards in real-time. The Melbourne Weather Office was selected as a primary site to conduct this study because Melbourne is the only site in the world with continuous and open access to total lightning (LDAR) data and a Doppler (WSR-88D) radar. A Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Demonstration (LISDAD) system was integrated into the forecaster's workstation during the Summer 1996 to allow the forecaster to interact in real-time with the multi-sensor data being displayed. LISDAD currently ingests LDAR data, the cloud-to-ground National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) data, and the Melbourne radar data in f real-time. The interactive features provide the duty forecaster the ability to perform quick diagnostics on storm cells of interest. Upon selection of a storm cell, a pop-up box appears displaying the time-history of various storm parameters (e.g., maximum radar reflectivity, height of maximum reflectivity, echo-top height, NLDN and LDAR lightning flash rates, storm-based vertically integrated liquid water content). This product is archived to aid on detailed post-analysis.

  8. Performance assessment of Beijing Lightning Network (BLNET) and comparison with other lightning location networks across Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhay; Tian, Ye; Qie, Xiushu; Wang, Dongfang; Sun, Zhuling; Yuan, Shanfeng; Wang, Yu; Chen, Zhixiong; Xu, Wenjing; Zhang, Hongbo; Jiang, Rubin; Su, Debin

    2017-11-01

    The performances of Beijing Lightning Network (BLNET) operated in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei urban cluster area have been evaluated in terms of detection efficiency and relative location accuracy. A self-reference method has been used to show the detection efficiency of BLNET, for which fast antenna waveforms have been manually examined. Based on the fast antenna verification, the average detection efficiency of BLNET is 97.4% for intracloud (IC) flashes, 73.9% for cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes and 93.2% for the total flashes. Result suggests the CG detection of regional dense network is highly precise when the thunderstorm passes over the network; however it changes day to day when the thunderstorms are outside the network. Further, the CG stroke data from three different lightning location networks across Beijing are compared. The relative detection efficiency of World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) and Chinese Meteorology Administration - Lightning Detection Network (CMA-LDN, also known as ADTD) are approximately 12.4% (16.8%) and 36.5% (49.4%), respectively, comparing with fast antenna (BLNET). The location of BLNET is in middle, while WWLLN and CMA-LDN average locations are southeast and northwest, respectively. Finally, the IC pulses and CG return stroke pulses have been compared with the S-band Doppler radar. This type of study is useful to know the approximate situation in a region and improve the performance of lightning location networks in the absence of ground truth. Two lightning flashes occurred on tower in the coverage of BLNET show that the horizontal location error was 52.9 m and 250 m, respectively.

  9. Effect of a ball skill intervention on children's ball skills and cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westendorp, Marieke; Houwen, Suzanne; Hartman, Esther; Mombarg, Remo; Smith, Joanne; Visscher, Chris

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the effect of a 16-wk ball skill intervention on the ball skills, executive functioning (in terms of problem solving and cognitive flexibility), and in how far improved executive functioning leads to improved reading and mathematics performance of children with learning disorders. Ninety-one children with learning disorders (age 7-11 yr old) were recruited from six classes in a Dutch special-needs primary school. The six classes were assigned randomly either to the intervention or to the control group. The control group received the school's regular physical education lessons. In the intervention group, ball skills were practiced in relative static, simple settings as well as in more dynamic and cognitive demanding settings. Both groups received two 40-min lessons per week. Children's scores on the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (ball skills), Tower of London (problem solving), Trail Making Test (cognitive flexibility), Dutch Analysis of Individual Word Forms (reading), and the Dutch World in Numbers test (mathematics) at pretest, posttest, and retention test were used to examine intervention effects. The results showed that the intervention group significantly improved their ball skills, whereas the control group did not. No intervention effects were found on the cognitive parameters. However, within the intervention group, a positive relationship (r = 0.41, P = 0.007) was found between the change in ball skill performance and the change in problem solving: the larger children's improvement in ball skills, the larger their improvement in problem solving. The present ball skill intervention is an effective instrument to improve the ball skills of children with learning disorders. Further research is needed to examine the effect of the ball skill intervention on the cognitive parameters in this population.

  10. Estimates of lightning NOx production from GOME satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Boersma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric NO2 column retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite spectrometer are used to quantify the source strength and 3-D distribution of lightning produced nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2. A sharp increase of NO2 is observed at convective cloud tops with increasing cloud top height, consistent with a power-law behaviour with power 5±2. Convective production of clouds with the same cloud height are found to produce NO2 with a ratio 1.6/1 for continents compared to oceans. This relation between cloud properties and NO2 is used to construct a 10:30 local time global lightning NO2 production map for 1997. An extensive statistical comparison is conducted to investigate the capability of the TM3 chemistry transport model to reproduce observed patterns of lightning NO2 in time and space. This comparison uses the averaging kernel to relate modelled profiles of NO2 to observed NO2 columns. It exploits a masking scheme to minimise the interference of other NOx sources on the observed total columns. Simulations are performed with two lightning parameterizations, one relating convective preciptation (CP scheme to lightning flash distributions, and the other relating the fifth power of the cloud top height (H5 scheme to lightning distributions. The satellite-retrieved NO2 fields show significant correlations with the simulated lightning contribution to the NO2 concentrations for both parameterizations. Over tropical continents modelled lightning NO2 shows remarkable quantitative agreement with observations. Over the oceans however, the two model lightning parameterizations overestimate the retrieved NO2 attributed to lightning. Possible explanations for these overestimations are discussed. The ratio between satellite-retrieved NO2 and modelled lightning NO2 is used to rescale the original modelled lightning NOx production. Eight estimates of the lightning NOx production in 1997 are obtained from spatial and temporal

  11. Quantification and identification of lightning damage in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Gora, Evan M; Burchfield, Jeffrey M; Bitzer, Phillip M; Detto, Matteo

    2017-07-01

    Accurate estimates of tree mortality are essential for the development of mechanistic forest dynamics models, and for estimating carbon storage and cycling. However, identifying agents of tree mortality is difficult and imprecise. Although lightning kills thousands of trees each year and is an important agent of mortality in some forests, the frequency and distribution of lightning-caused tree death remain unknown for most forests. Moreover, because all evidence regarding the effects of lightning on trees is necessarily anecdotal and post hoc, rigorous tests of hypotheses regarding the ecological effects of lightning are impossible. We developed a combined electronic sensor/camera-based system for the location and characterization of lightning strikes to the forest canopy in near real time and tested the system in the forest of Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Cameras mounted on towers provided continuous video recordings of the forest canopy that were analyzed to determine the locations of lightning strikes. We used a preliminary version of this system to record and locate 18 lightning strikes to the forest over a 3-year period. Data from field surveys of known lightning strike locations (obtained from the camera system) enabled us to develop a protocol for reliable, ground-based identification of suspected lightning damage to tropical trees. In all cases, lightning damage was relatively inconspicuous; it would have been overlooked by ground-based observers having no knowledge of the event. We identified three types of evidence that can be used to consistently identify lightning strike damage in tropical forests: (1) localized and directionally biased branch mortality associated with flashover among tree and sapling crowns, (2) mortality of lianas or saplings near lianas, and (3) scorched or wilting epiphytic and hemiepiphytic plants. The longitudinal trunk scars that are typical of lightning-damaged temperate trees were never observed in this study. Given the

  12. Novel mathematical model to estimate ball impact force in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Takahito; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Sano, Shinya; Sato, Nahoko; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2017-11-22

    To assess ball impact force during soccer kicking is important to quantify from both performance and chronic injury prevention perspectives. We aimed to verify the appropriateness of previous models used to estimate ball impact force and to propose an improved model to better capture the time history of ball impact force. A soccer ball was fired directly onto a force platform (10 kHz) at five realistic kicking ball velocities and ball behaviour was captured by a high-speed camera (5,000 Hz). The time history of ball impact force was estimated using three existing models and two new models. A new mathematical model that took into account a rapid change in ball surface area and heterogeneous ball deformation showed a distinctive advantage to estimate the peak forces and its occurrence times and to reproduce time history of ball impact forces more precisely, thereby reinforcing the possible mechanics of 'footballer's ankle'. Ball impact time was also systematically shortened when ball velocity increases in contrast to practical understanding for producing faster ball velocity, however, the aspect of ball contact time must be considered carefully from practical point of view.

  13. Laser Sintering Technology and Balling Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyar, Perihan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the balling phenomenon which occurs typically in Selective Laser Sintering (SLS). The balling phenomenon is a typical SLS defect, and observed in laser sintered powder, significantly reduces the quality of SLS, and hinders the further development of SLS Technology. Electronic database searches were performed using Google Scholar. The keywords "laser sintering, selective laser sintering, direct metal laser melting, and balling phenomenon" were searched in title/abstract of publications, limited to December 31, 2016. The inclusion criteria were SLS, balling phenomenon, some alloys (such as Cr-Co, iron, stainless steel, and Cu-based alloys) mechanical properties, microstructure and bond strength between metal-ceramic crown, laboratory studies, full text, and in English language. A total of 100 articles were found the initial search and yielded a total of 50 studies, 30 of which did not fulfill the inclusion criteria and were therefore excluded. In addition, 20 studies were found by screening the reference list of all included publications. Finally, 40 studies were selected for this review. The method in question is regulated by powder material characteristics and the conditions of laser processing. The procedure of formation, affecting factors, and the mechanism of the balling effect are very complex.

  14. Using the VAHIRR Radar Algorithm to Investigate Lightning Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2012-01-01

    Accurately determining the threat posed by lightning is a major area for improved operational forecasts. Most efforts have focused on the initiation of lightning within a storm, with far less effort spent investigating lightning cessation. Understanding both components, initiation and cessation, are vital to improving lightning safety. Few organizations actively forecast lightning onset or cessation. One such organization is the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45WS has identified that charged anvil clouds remain a major threat of continued lightning and can greatly extend the window of a potential lightning strike. Furthermore, no discernable trend of total lightning activity has been observed consistently for all storms. This highlights the need for more research to find a robust method of knowing when a storm will cease producing lightning. Previous lightning cessation work has primarily focused on forecasting the cessation of cloud-to -ground lightning only. A more recent, statistical study involved total lightning (both cloud-to-ground and intracloud). Each of these previous works has helped the 45WS take steps forward in creating improved and ultimately safer lightning cessation forecasts. Each study has either relied on radar data or recommended increased use of radar data to improve cessation forecasts. The reasoning is that radar data is able to either directly or by proxy infer more about dynamical environment leading to cloud electrification and eventually lightning cessation. The authors of this project are focusing on a two ]step approach to better incorporate radar data and total lightning to improve cessation forecasts. This project will utilize the Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR) algorithm originally developed during the Airborne Field Mill II (ABFM II) research project. During the project, the VAHIRR product showed a trend of increasing

  15. Lightning Sensors for Observing, Tracking and Nowcasting Severe Weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Price

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe and extreme weather is a major natural hazard all over the world, oftenresulting in major natural disasters such as hail storms, tornados, wind storms, flash floods,forest fires and lightning damages. While precipitation, wind, hail, tornados, turbulence,etc. can only be observed at close distances, lightning activity in these damaging stormscan be monitored at all spatial scales, from local (using very high frequency [VHF]sensors, to regional (using very low frequency [VLF] sensors, and even global scales(using extremely low frequency [ELF] sensors. Using sensors that detect the radio wavesemitted by each lightning discharge, it is now possible to observe and track continuouslydistant thunderstorms using ground networks of sensors. In addition to the number oflightning discharges, these sensors can also provide information on lightningcharacteristics such as the ratio between intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning, thepolarity of the lightning discharge, peak currents, charge removal, etc. It has been shownthat changes in some of these lightning characteristics during thunderstorms are oftenrelated to changes in the severity of the storms. In this paper different lightning observingsystems are described, and a few examples are provided showing how lightning may beused to monitor storm hazards around the globe, while also providing the possibility ofsupplying short term forecasts, called nowcasting.

  16. Lightning stroke and neuropsychological impairment : cases and questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, AH; ten Duis, HJ; Minderhoud, JM; Sipma, M

    Objective-To objectify neuropsychological impairments in survivors of lightning stroke with lasting complaints about poor concentration and inability to divide their attention. Design-A series of six cases of lightning stroke were studied. All patients had lost consciousness and reported amnesia of

  17. Assessments of Total Lightning Data Utility in Weather Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Dennis E.; Goodman, Steve; LaCasse, Katherine; Blakeslee, Richard; Darden, Chris

    2005-01-01

    National Weather Service forecasters in Huntsville, Alabama have had access to total lightning data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) since 2003. Forecasters can monitor real-time total lightning observations on their AWIPS (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) workstations. The lightning data is used to supplement other observations such as radar and satellite data. The lightning data is updated every 2 min, providing more timely evidence of storm growth or decay than is available from 5 min radar scans. Total lightning observations have been used to positively impact warning decisions in a number of instances. A number of approaches are being pursued to assess the usefulness of total lightning measurements to the operational forecasting community in the warning decision process. These approaches, which include both qualitative and quantitative assessment methods, will be discussed. submitted to the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Conference on Meteorological Applications of Lightning Data to be held in San Diego, CA January 9-13,2005. This will be a presentation and an extended abstract will be published on a CD available from the AMS.

  18. Comparison of Jovian and Terrestrial Lightning as Observed from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Boccippio, Dennis; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We compare the images of Jovian lightning taken by Galileo spacecraft with the images of terrestrial lightning observed by Lightning Imaging Spectrometer (LIS) onboard the TERRA spacecraft. Both data sets have good spatial resolution: Galileo's pixel is 25 km, or about half the atmospheric scale height, LIS pixel is 3-6 km, also about half of the scale height. This good resolution allows us to see that both Jovian and terrestrial lightning spots look diffuse because of the scattering in the clouds above. Previously we used the appearance of the diffuse spots on Jupiter to model lightning depths and the opacity and shape of the overlying clouds (Dyudina and Ingersoll, 2000). The comparison with LIS data allowed us to verify that the model is valid for terrestrial lightning. The irregular shapes of large terrestrial lightning suggests 30-km scale horizontal bolts. On Jupiter the spots, projected onto the horizontal plane, are nearly circular suggesting that the large size of the spots is mostly due to the horizontal diffusion of the photons scattered in the clouds. Unlike the Galileo observations, LIS has fine temporal resolution of 2 ms, or about 250 frames per single lightning flash. We will discuss the temporal evolution of terrestrial flashes and its implications for Jupiter.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation to Estimate Likelihood of Direct Lightning Strikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos; Medelius, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    A software tool has been designed to quantify the lightning exposure at launch sites of the stack at the pads under different configurations. In order to predict lightning strikes to generic structures, this model uses leaders whose origins (in the x-y plane) are obtained from a 2D random, normal distribution.

  20. Lightning signature as an index for the determination of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West African rains are mainly due to the squall-line activities. Squall lines are groups of active thunderstorm clouds that are aligned with the ITCZ in front. The clouds are electrically active and 90% of lightning recorded occurs during squall lines associated thunderstorms. The results of measurements of lightning count from ...

  1. Lightning characteristics of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mace L.; Franks, John R.; Suranovic, Katelyn R.; Barbachem, Brent; Cannon, Declan; Cooper, Stonie R.

    2016-06-01

    Derechos, or widespread, convectively induced wind storms, are a common warm season phenomenon in the Central and Eastern United States. These damaging and severe weather events are known to sweep quickly across large spatial regions of more than 400 km and produce wind speeds exceeding 121 km h-1. Although extensive research concerning derechos and their parent mesoscale convective systems already exists, there have been few investigations of the spatial and temporal distribution of associated cloud-to-ground lightning with these events. This study analyzes twenty warm season (May through August) derecho events between 2003 and 2013 in an effort to discern their lightning characteristics. Data used in the study included cloud-to-ground flash data derived from the National Lightning Detection Network, WSR-88D imagery from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and damaging wind report data obtained from the Storm Prediction Center. A spatial and temporal analysis was conducted by incorporating these data into a geographic information system to determine the distribution and lightning characteristics of the environments of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems. Primary foci of this research include: (1) finding the approximate size of the lightning activity region for individual and combined event(s); (2) determining the intensity of each event by examining the density and polarity of lightning flashes; (3) locating areas of highest lightning flash density; and (4) to provide a lightning spatial analysis that outlines the temporal and spatial distribution of flash activity for particularly strong derecho producing thunderstorm episodes.

  2. 14 CFR 27.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection....610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft must be protected against... static electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of...

  3. 14 CFR 29.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection... § 29.610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft structure must be protected... electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of electric...

  4. Lightning current tests on radars and similar structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Damstra, G.C.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2010-01-01

    A lightning stroke presents a real challenge due to its potential to cause irreversible damage on electronics. Future systems are packaged in composite shielding materials, which give little or no protection with respect to the electromagnetic fields caused by a nearby strike. A direct lightning

  5. Narrow-band filters for the lightning imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegari, Angela; Di Sarcina, Ilaria; Grilli, Maria Luisa; Menchini, Francesca; Scaglione, Salvatore; Sytchkova, Anna; Zola, Danilo; Cuevas, Leticia P.

    2017-11-01

    The study of lightning phenomena will be carried out by a dedicated instrument, the lightning imager, that will make use of narrow-band transmission filters for separating the Oxygen emission lines in the clouds, from the background signal. The design, manufacturing and testing of these optical filters will be described here.

  6. Wind Turbine Lightning Protection Project: 1999-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiff, B.

    2002-05-01

    A lightning protection research and support program was instituted by NREL to help minimize lightning damage to wind turbines in the United States. This paper provides the results of a field test program, an evaluation of protection on selected turbines, and a literature search as well as the dissemination of the accumulated information.

  7. On longevity of I-ball/oscillon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukaida, Kyohei [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Takimoto, Masahiro [Theory Center, KEK,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 7610001 (Israel); Yamada, Masaki [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University,Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2017-03-23

    We study I-balls/oscillons, which are long-lived, quasi-periodic, and spatially localized solutions in real scalar field theories. Contrary to the case of Q-balls, there is no evident conserved charge that stabilizes the localized configuration. Nevertheless, in many classical numerical simulations, it has been shown that they are extremely long-lived. In this paper, we clarify the reason for the longevity, and show how the exponential separation of time scales emerges dynamically. Those solutions are time-periodic with a typical frequency of a mass scale of a scalar field. This observation implies that they can be understood by the effective theory after integrating out relativistic modes. We find that the resulting effective theory has an approximate global U(1) symmetry reflecting an approximate number conservation in the non-relativistic regime. As a result, the profile of those solutions is obtained via the bounce method, just like Q-balls, as long as the breaking of the U(1) symmetry is small enough. We then discuss the decay processes of the I-ball/oscillon by the breaking of the U(1) symmetry, namely the production of relativistic modes via number violating processes. We show that the imaginary part is exponentially suppressed, which explains the extraordinary longevity of I-ball/oscillon. In addition, we find that there are some attractor behaviors during the evolution of I-ball/oscillon that further enhance the lifetime. The validity of our effective theory is confirmed by classical numerical simulations. Our formalism may also be useful to study condensates of ultra light bosonic dark matter, such as fuzzy dark matter, and axion stars, for instance.

  8. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, John Eric [Department of Physics, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Carre, Matt J, E-mail: goff@lynchburg.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  9. Characterizing wind turbine system response to lightning activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiff, B.; LaWhite, N. [McNiff Light Industry, Harborside, ME (United States); Muljadi, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-07-01

    A lightning protection research program was instituted by National Renewable Energy Laboratory to minimize lightning damage to wind turbines and to further the understanding of effective damage mitigation techniques. To that end, a test program is under way to observe lightning activity, protection system response, and damage at a wind power plant in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Turbine Verification Program. The authors installed Lightning activated surveillance cameras along with a special storm tracking device to observe the activity in the wind plant area. They instrumented the turbines with lightning and ground current detection devices to log direct and indirect strike activity at each unit. They installed a surge monitor on the utility interface to track incoming activity from the transmission lines. Maintenance logs are used to verify damage and determine downtime and repair costs. Actual strikes to turbines were recorded on video and ancillary devices. The test setup and some results are discussed in this paper.

  10. Dynamics of branching of negative downward lightning leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Zhu, Yujie; Gu, Shanqiang; He, Jinliang

    2017-11-01

    The branching of negative downward lightning leaders is of both theoretical insterest and practical importance. In the lightning protection of ground structures, a clearer understanding of the mechanism and dynamics of leader branching is needed to identify possible lightning strike locations as well as vulnerable parts of the protection systems. In this work, we start with the image analysis of a lightning leader process recorded with a high-speed camera and to show that the anode-directed streamer zone developed from space stems in front of a leader tip needs be smaller in size (electric field at the discharge front, which may result in new bursts of streamers. This model, if further verified, could be the foundation of inferring the structure and dynamics of the streamer zone from the morphology of the leader channel, which would significantly advance the knowledge of the streamer zone in negative lightning leaders.

  11. Location and analysis of acoustic infrasound pulses in lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, R.; Stock, M.; Thomas, R.; Erives, H.; Rison, W.; Edens, H.; Lapierre, J.

    2014-07-01

    Acoustic, VHF, and electrostatic measurements throw new light onto the origin and production mechanism of the thunder infrasound signature (lightning. This signature, composed of an initial compression followed by a rarefaction pulse, has been the subject of several unconfirmed theories and models. The observations of two intracloud flashes which each produced multiple infrasound pulses were analyzed for this work. Once the variation of the speed of sound with temperature is taken into account, both the compression and rarefaction portions of the infrasound pulses are found to originate very near lightning channels mapped by the Lightning Mapping Array. We found that none of the currently proposed models can explain infrasound generation by lightning, and thus propose an alternate theory: The infrasound compression pulse is produced by electrostatic interaction of the charge deposited on the channel and in the streamer zone of the lightning channel.

  12. Modulation of UK lightning by heliospheric magnetic field polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.; Scott, C. J.; Lockwood, M.; Barnard, L.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K.; Watt, C.; Bennett, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Observational studies have reported solar magnetic modulation of terrestrial lightning on a range of time scales, from days to decades. The proposed mechanism is two-step: lightning rates vary with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux incident on Earth, either via changes in atmospheric conductivity and/or direct triggering of lightning. GCR flux is, in turn, primarily controlled by the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) intensity. Consequently, global changes in lightning rates are expected. This study instead considers HMF polarity, which doesn't greatly affect total GCR flux. Opposing HMF polarities are, however, associated with a 40-60% difference in observed UK lightning and thunder rates. As HMF polarity skews the terrestrial magnetosphere from its nominal position, this perturbs local ionospheric potential at high latitudes and local exposure to energetic charged particles from the magnetosphere. We speculate as to the mechanism(s) by which this may, in turn, redistribute the global location and/or intensity of thunderstorm activity.

  13. Integration of Lightning- and Human-Caused Wildfire Occurrence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilar, Lara; Nieto Solana, Hector; Martín, M. Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Fire risk indices are useful tools for fire prevention actions by fire managers. A fire ignition is either the result of lightning or human activities. In European Mediterranean countries most forest fires are due to human activities. However, lightning is still an important fire ignition source...... in some regions. Integration of lightning and human fire occurrence probability into fire risk indices would be necessary to have a complete picture of the causal agents and their relative importance in fire occurrence. We present two methods for the integration of lightning and human fire occurrence...... probability models at 1 × 1 km grid cell resolution in two regions of Spain: Madrid, which presents a high fire incidence due to human activities; and Aragón, one of the most affected regions in Spain by lightning-fires. For validation, independent fire ignition points were used to compute the Receiver...

  14. The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and the Global Observing System for Total Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Koshak, W.; Buechler, D.; Carey, L.; Chronis, T.; Mach, D.; Bateman, M.; Peterson, H.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; hide

    2014-01-01

    for the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. New and improved instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution for the next generation Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The GLM will map total lightning continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product latency of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency among a number of potential applications. The GLM will help address the National Weather Service requirement for total lightning observations globally to support warning decision-making and forecast services. Science and application development along with pre-operational product demonstrations and evaluations at NWS national centers, forecast offices, and NOAA testbeds will prepare the forecasters to use GLM as soon as possible after the planned launch and check-out of GOES-R in 2016. New applications will use GLM alone, in combination with the ABI, or integrated (fused) with other available tools (weather radar and ground strike networks, nowcasting systems, mesoscale analysis, and numerical weather prediction models) in the hands of the forecaster responsible for issuing more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings.

  15. Multiple Lightning Discharges in Wind Turbines Associated with Nearby Cloud-to-Ground Lightning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Madsen, Søren Find

    2015-01-01

    -triggering video cameras were correlated with data from the U.S. National Lighting Detection Network. In all five events, the correlation showed that a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning stroke with high peak current struck the ground within 10 km of the affected turbines at the time of the currents in the wind...

  16. 76 FR 43825 - Launch Safety: Lightning Criteria for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 417 RIN 2120-AJ84 Launch Safety: Lightning Criteria for... flight criteria for mitigating against naturally occurring lightning and lightning triggered by the... therefore is issued as a direct final rulemaking. Because the changes to the lightning commit criteria will...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12069 - Lightning protection for telephone wires and ungrounded conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning protection for telephone wires and... AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12069 Lightning protection for telephone wires and... exposed to lightning shall be equipped with suitable lightning arrestors of approved type within 100 feet...

  18. 30 CFR 56.12069 - Lightning protection for telephone wires and ungrounded conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning protection for telephone wires and... NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12069 Lightning protection for telephone wires and ungrounded conductors... lightning shall be equipped with suitable lightning arrestors of approved type within 100 feet of the point...

  19. Simulation study on the lightning overvoltage invasion control transformer intelligent substation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Chuyan; Hao, Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2018-04-01

    By simulating lightning on substation line of one intelligent substation, research the influence of different lightning points on lightning invasion wave overvoltage, and the necessity of arrester for the main transformer. The results show, in a certain lightning protection measures, the installation of arrester nearby the main transformer can effectively reduce the overvoltage value of bus and the main transformer [1].

  20. On the Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates Parameterization of Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  1. Improving Lightning and Precipitation Prediction of Severe Convection Using Lightning Data Assimilation With NCAR WRF-RTFDDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoliang; Liu, Yubao; Cheng, William Y. Y.; Zhao, Tianliang; Xu, Mei; Liu, Yuewei; Shen, Si; Calhoun, Kristin M.; Fierro, Alexandre O.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a lightning data assimilation (LDA) scheme was developed and implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Weather Research and Forecasting-Real-Time Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation system. In this LDA method, graupel mixing ratio (qg) is retrieved from observed total lightning. To retrieve qg on model grid boxes, column-integrated graupel mass is first calculated using an observation-based linear formula between graupel mass and total lightning rate. Then the graupel mass is distributed vertically according to the empirical qg vertical profiles constructed from model simulations. Finally, a horizontal spread method is utilized to consider the existence of graupel in the adjacent regions of the lightning initiation locations. Based on the retrieved qg fields, latent heat is adjusted to account for the latent heat releases associated with the formation of the retrieved graupel and to promote convection at the observed lightning locations, which is conceptually similar to the method developed by Fierro et al. Three severe convection cases were studied to evaluate the LDA scheme for short-term (0-6 h) lightning and precipitation forecasts. The simulation results demonstrated that the LDA was effective in improving the short-term lightning and precipitation forecasts by improving the model simulation of the qg fields, updrafts, cold pool, and front locations. The improvements were most notable in the first 2 h, indicating a highly desired benefit of the LDA in lightning and convective precipitation nowcasting (0-2 h) applications.

  2. A lightning climatology of the South-West Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bovalo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN data have been used to perform a lightning climatology in the South-West Indian Ocean (SWIO region from 2005 to 2011. Maxima of lightning activity were found in the Maritime Continent and southwest of Sri Lanka (>50 fl km−2 yr−1 but also over Madagascar and above the Great Lakes of East Africa (>10–20 fl km−2 yr−1. Lightning flashes within tropical storms and tropical cyclones represent 50 % to 100 % of the total lightning activity in some oceanic areas of the SWIO (between 10° S and 20° S.

    The SWIO is characterized by a wet season (November to April and a dry season (May to October. As one could expect, lightning activity is more intense during the wet season as the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ is present over all the basin. Flash density is higher over land in November–December–January with values reaching 3–4 fl km−2 yr−1 over Madagascar. During the dry season, lightning activity is quite rare between 10° S and 25° S. The Mascarene anticyclone has more influence on the SWIO resulting in shallower convection. Lightning activity is concentrated over ocean, east of South Africa and Madagascar.

    A statistical analysis has shown that El Niño–Southern Oscillation mainly modulates the lightning activity up to 56.8% in the SWIO. The Indian Ocean Dipole has a significant contribution since ~49% of the variability is explained by this forcing in some regions. The Madden–Julian Oscillation did not show significative impact on the lightning activity in our study.

  3. Broadband RF Interferometric and Polarization Observations of Lightning Discharge Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X. M.; Ho, C.; Caffrey, M.; Graham, P.; Haynes, H.; Dingus, B.

    2017-12-01

    Broadband radio frequency interferometry was first introduced in 1996 for detailed lightning mapping studies [Shao et al., 1996], and the technique has since been improved significantly and has been increasingly widely used in the lightning research community. Due to continuously advancing data acquisition and computer capabilities, it is now possible to capture and process continuous broadband interferometer data for individual lightning flashes. In addition to the interferometric mapping of the lightning sources, we now introduce a broadband polarization capability that measures simultaneously the full polarization state of the corresponding broadband RF sources. Polarization observation provides another level of understanding of the discharge processes. For instance, a coherent breakdown process (e.g., relativistic runaway electron avalanches) is expected to produce highly polarized RF emissions, while an incoherent process related to thermal electrons is expected to produce randomly polarized RF emissions. For polarized emissions, the direction of the polarization is expected to aligned with the direction of the local electric field, and therefore can be used to understand the electric field structure at the breakdown locations. In the early summer of 2017, this new lightning system was tested in Los Alamos with a number of nearby lightning storms, and the system will be deployed in the late summer to the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico at an altitude of 4.1km. HAWC is designed to observe high energy celestial gamma rays and cosmic rays with hundreds of water tanks. The goal of the collaborative lightning and HAWC observations is to understand the physics behind the lightning-related gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and the initiation of the lightning discharges. We will report the new results from both the test observations and the HAWC observations. *Shao, X., D. Holden, and C. Rhodes

  4. Using cloud ice flux to parametrise large-scale lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Finney

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lightning is an important natural source of nitrogen oxide especially in the middle and upper troposphere. Hence, it is essential to represent lightning in chemistry transport and coupled chemistry–climate models. Using ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis data we compare the lightning flash density distributions produced using several existing lightning parametrisations, as well as a new parametrisation developed on the basis of upward cloud ice flux at 440 hPa. The use of ice flux forms a link to the non-inductive charging mechanism of thunderstorms. Spatial and temporal distributions of lightning flash density are compared to tropical and subtropical observations for 2007–2011 from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM satellite. The well-used lightning flash parametrisation based on cloud-top height has large biases but the derived annual total flash density has a better spatial correlation with the LIS observations than other existing parametrisations. A comparison of flash density simulated by the different schemes shows that the cloud-top height parametrisation has many more instances of moderate flash densities and fewer low and high extremes compared to the other parametrisations. Other studies in the literature have shown that this feature of the cloud-top height parametrisation is in contrast to lightning observations over certain regions. Our new ice flux parametrisation shows a clear improvement over all the existing parametrisations with lower root mean square errors (RMSEs and better spatial correlations with the observations for distributions of annual total, and seasonal and interannual variations. The greatest improvement with the new parametrisation is a more realistic representation of the zonal distribution with a better balance between tropical and subtropical lightning flash estimates. The new parametrisation is appropriate for testing in chemistry transport and chemistry

  5. National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement: lightning safety for athletics and recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Katie M; Cooper, Mary Ann; Holle, Ron; Rakov, Vladimir A; Roeder, William P; Ryan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To present recommendations for the education, prevention, and management of lightning injuries for those involved in athletics or recreation. Lightning is the most common severe-storm activity encountered annually in the United States. The majority of lightning injuries can be prevented through an aggressive educational campaign, vacating outdoor activities before the lightning threat, and an understanding of the attributes of a safe place from the hazard. This position statement is focused on supplying information specific to lightning safety and prevention and treatment of lightning injury and providing lightning-safety recommendations for the certified athletic trainer and those who are involved in athletics and recreation.

  6. Daylight time-resolved photographs of lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qrville, R E; Lala, G G; Idone, V P

    1978-07-07

    Lightning dart leaders and return strokes have been recorded in daylight with both good spatial resolution and good time resolution as part of the Thunder-storm Research International Program. The resulting time-resolved photographs are apparently equivalent to the best data obtained earlier only at night. Average two-dimensional return stroke velocities in four subsequent strokes between the ground and a height of 1400 meters were approximately 1.3 x 10(8) meters per second. The estimated systematic error is 10 to 15 percent.

  7. Paddle Angle and Ball Spin in Table Tennis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binvant Broca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the impact angle of a table tennis ball with respect to the paddle and angular velocity of the ball leaving the paddle was investigated. A table tennis ball was dropped onto a paddle oriented at impact angles ranging from 10° to 80°. It was found that the sine of the impact angle is proportional to the angular velocity of the ball as it leaves the paddle for all impact angles tested.

  8. First Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Timing Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's LSP, GSDO and other programs use the probability of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning occurrence issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) in their daily and weekly lightning probability forecasts. These organizations use this information when planning potentially hazardous outdoor activities, such as working with fuels, or rolling a vehicle to a launch pad, or whenever personnel will work outside and would be at-risk from lightning. These organizations would benefit greatly if the 45 WS could provide more accurate timing of the first CG lightning strike of the day. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) has made significant improvements in forecasting the probability of lightning for the day, but forecasting the time of the first CG lightning with confidence has remained a challenge. To address this issue, the 45 WS requested the AMU to determine if flow regimes, wind speed categories, or a combination of the two could be used to forecast the timing of the first strike of the day in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) lightning warning circles. The data was stratified by various sea breeze flow regimes and speed categories in the surface to 5,000-ft layer. The surface to 5,000-ft layer was selected since that is the layer the 45 WS uses to predict the behavior of sea breeze fronts, which are the dominant influence on the occurrence of first lightning in Florida during the warm season. Due to small data sample sizes after stratification, the AMU could not determine a statistical relationship between flow regimes or speed categories and the time of the first CG strike.. As expected, although the amount and timing of lightning activity varies by time of day based on the flow regimes and speed categories, there are extended tails of low lightning activity making it difficult to specify times when the threat of the first lightning flash can be avoided. However, the AMU developed a graphical user interface with input from the 45 WS

  9. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  10. From a Ball Game to Incompleteness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    theory of computation, logic, and linear algebra. He has authored three books in these areas. We present a ball game that can be continued as long as we wish. It looks as though the game would never end. But by applying a result on trees, we show that the game nonetheless ends in some finite number of moves. We then ...

  11. On the dynamics of ball bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    This investigation on the dynamic behaviour of ball bearings was motivated by the demand for silent bearings in noise-sensitive applications, especially in the household appliance and automotive industry. The present investigations are intended to provide a clear understanding of the role of the

  12. From a Ball Game to Incompleteness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a ball game that can be continued as long as wewish. It looks as though the game would never end. But byapplying a result on trees, we show that the game nonethelessends in some finite number of moves. We then point out somedeep results on the natural number system connected withthe game.

  13. Computed Tomography Analysis of NASA BSTRA Balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, R L; Schneberk, D J; Thompson, R R

    2004-10-12

    Fifteen 1.25 inch BSTRA balls were scanned with the high energy computed tomography system at LLNL. This system has a resolution limit of approximately 210 microns. A threshold of 238 microns (two voxels) was used, and no anomalies at or greater than this were observed.

  14. Renal fungus ball: a challenging clinical problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Phin; Turba, Ulku C; Deane, Leslie A

    2017-04-28

    We describe a case of renal pelvi-ureteric fungus ball managed with placement of two nephrostomy tubes and amphotericin B irrigation through a nephrostomy tube with the other to free drain. A 46-year-old man with uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes mellitus was referred to the urology clinic for workup of recurrent urinary tract infection. Urine culture grew Candida albicans. The patient was started on oral fluconazole therapy. Cystoscopy and cystogram revealed a grade 3 left vesicoureteral reflux and right retrograde pyelogram revealed a filling defect in the right renal pelvis extending into the proximal ureter with severe hydroureteronephrosis. Two nephrostomy tubes were placed (mid-pole and lower pole) to ensure that the system was not obstructed. Amphotericin B (50 mg/1000 ml normal saline) irrigation was then instilled through the mid-pole nephrostomy tube at a rate of 30 ml/h with the lower pole nephrostomy tube to free drain. An antegrade nephrostogram was performed after 5 days of amphotericin B instillation, showing complete resolution of the fungus ball. The patient is awaiting definitive minimally invasive management of the distal ureteral narrowing. Renal and pelvi-ureteric fungus ball is a challenging clinical entity. It must be addressed promptly and efficiently to be successful. We describe a minimally invasive approach that was tolerated well and resulted in complete clearance of the fungus ball in a relatively short time frame.

  15. 4 π physics with the plastic ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Loehner, H.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Renner, T.; Riedesel, H.; Ritter, H.G.; Warwick, A.; Weik, F.; Wieman, H.

    1982-10-01

    4 π data taken with the Plastic Ball show that cluster production in relativistic nuclear collisions depends on both the size of the participant volume and the finite size of the cluster. The measurement of the degree of thermalization and the search for collective flow will permit the study of the applicability of macroscopic concepts such as temperature and density

  16. Tennis Ball Flight under Strong Wind

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    playing tennis ball cricket or soccer. So go out, play, learn and kick up some dust. But, make sure it does not boomerang in your face! Hurry up before television and third umpires corrupt this great IndIan pastime. Dedication: This article is dedicated to the memory of. Indian cricket legend M L Jaisimha (1939-1999).

  17. A plasma ball in the Microcosm museum

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Plasma balls, like the one shown here, are displayed in the Microcosm exhibition where families can visit to learn more about the experiments carried out in a research institute like CERN. Hands-on activities allow visitors to get a step closer to the research activities carried out at CERN.

  18. Entry Times Distribution for Dynamical Balls on Metric Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, N.; Yang, F.

    2017-04-01

    We show that the entry and return times for dynamical balls (Bowen balls) is exponential for systems that have an α -mixing invariant measure with certain regularities. We also show that systems modeled by Young's tower has exponential entry time distribution for dynamical balls. We also apply the results to conformal maps and expanding maps on the interval.

  19. Flexible timing of eye movements when catching a ball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López-Moliner, Joan; Brenner, Eli

    2016-01-01

    In ball games, one cannot direct ones gaze at the ball all the time because one must also judge other aspects of the game, such as other players' positions. We wanted to know whether there are times at which obtaining information about the ball is particularly beneficial for catching it. We recently

  20. Temperature and Coefficient of Restitution of a Table Tennis Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonyoung Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coefficient of restitution (COR of a bouncing table tennis ball was measured at varying ball temperatures with a Motion Detector. It was found that there is a negative linear relationship between the COR and the temperature of the table tennis ball for temperatures ranging from 5 to 56 ̊C.

  1. Validity and Reliability of a Medicine Ball Explosive Power Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbrugger, Barry A.; Haennel, Robert G.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the validity and reliability of a medicine ball throw test to evaluate explosive power. Data on competitive sand volleyball players who performed a medicine ball throw and a standard countermovement jump indicated that the medicine ball throw test was a valid and reliable way to assess explosive power for an analogous total-body movement…

  2. Temperature and Coefficient of Restitution of a Table Tennis Ball

    OpenAIRE

    Yoonyoung Chang

    2016-01-01

    The coefficient of restitution (COR) of a bouncing table tennis ball was measured at varying ball temperatures with a Motion Detector. It was found that there is a negative linear relationship between the COR and the temperature of the table tennis ball for temperatures ranging from 5 to 56 ̊C.

  3. Neutrons and the crystal ball experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyea, J.; Grosnick, D.; Koetke, D.; Manweiler, R.; Spinka, H.; Stanislaus, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Crystal Ball detector, as originally constructed, consisted of a set of 672 optically-isolated NaI crystals, forming an approximately spherical shell and each crystal viewed by a photomultiplier, a charged-particle tracker within the NaI shell, and two endcaps to cover angles close to two colliding beams. The detector geometry subtends a solid angle of about 93% of 4π st (20 degree le θ le 160degree and 0degree le φ le 360degree) from the center. The Crystal Ball detector was used for two long series of experiments at the e + e - colliding beam accelerators SPEAR [1, 2, 3, 4] at SLAC and DORIS [5, 6, 7, 8] at DESY. A new set of measurements using the Crystal Ball detector is planned at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotrons (BNL AGS). These new experiments will use the 672 NaI crystals from the original detector, but neither the tracker nor endcaps. The ''Crystal Ball'' in this note will refer only to the set of NaI crystals. Initially, the reactions to be studied will include π - pr a rrow neutrals with pion beam momenta approximately400-750 MeV/c and K - pr a rrow neutrals with kaon beam momenta approximately600-750 MeV/c. Each of these reactions will include a neutron in the final state. whereas the fraction of e + e - interactions with neutrons at SLAC or DESY was quite small. Consequently, there is relatively little experience understanding the behavior of neutrons in the Crystal Ball

  4. NASA storm hazards research in lightning strikes to aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, B. D.; Brown, P. W.; Plumer, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The lightning strike condition data gathered in the 1980-1984 period are presented, together with the lightning attachment point analysis for the NASA F-106B research aircraft are presented. The analysis of the experienced 637 direct lightning strikes shows that the highest strike rates (2.1 strikes/min and 13 strikes/penetration) occurred at altitudes between 38,000 and 40,000 ft. The regions of highest risk for an aircraft to experience a direct lightning strike were the areas of thunderstorms where the ambient temperature was colder than -40 C and where the relative turbulence and precipitation intensities were characterized as negligible to light. The presence and location of lightning, therefore, did not necessarily indicate the presence and location of hazardous precipitation and turbulence. The total onboard data show that the lightning attachment patterns on this aircraft fall into four general categories, although the 1984 data suggest that the entire surface of the F-106B may be susceptible to lightning attachment.

  5. Extensive air showers, lightnings and thunderstorm ground enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Hovsepyan, G.; Kozliner, L.

    2016-01-01

    For the lightning research, we monitor the particle fluxes from thunderclouds, the so called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) initiated by the runaway electrons, and Extensive Air Showers (EASs) originated from high energy protons or fully stripped nuclei that enter the Earth’s atmosphere. Besides, we monitor the near-surface electric field and the atmospheric discharges with the help of a network of electric field mills. The Aragats “electron accelerator” produced plenty of TGE and lightning events in spring 2015. Using 1-sec time series, we investigated the relation of lightnings and particle fluxes. Lightning flashes often terminated the particle flux; during some of TGEs the lightning would terminate the particle flux 3 times after successive recovery. It was postulated that a lightning terminates a particle flux mostly in the beginning of TGE or on the decay phase of it; however, we observed two events (19 October 2013 and 20 April 2015) when the huge particle flux was terminated just on a maximum of its development. We discuss the possibility that a huge EAS facilitates lightning leader to find its path to the ground. (author)

  6. A Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Upward Triggered Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballweber, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Alana Ballweber, John H. Helsdon Jr., and Tom A. Warner South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Ten tall communication towers lining the ridge in Rapid City, South Dakota provide a unique opportunity to study the phenomenon of lightning-triggered upward lightning. The Upward Lightning Triggering Study (UPLIGHTS), seeks to determine if upward positive leaders are triggered from these towers by: (1) the approach of horizontally propagating negative stepped leaders associated with either intracloud development or following a positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) return stroke, and/or (2) a +CG return stroke as it propagates through a previously formed leader network near the towers. As part of the UPLIGHTS research, two separate lightning mapping devices were used to aid in a 3D re-creation of the triggering flash, a 3D digital interferometer and a Lightning Mapping Array. Through the use of these two devices, we present findings founded on the analysis of data collected from these assets during the 2013 storm season. Specifically, we quantify the spatial and temporal relationship of the triggering flash leader activity relative to the tall objects when upward leaders develop and when upward leaders fail to develop. Furthermore, the lightning mapping devices were correlated with high-speed optical and electrical field observations to provide a further insight as to why certain flashes trigger upward lightning from tall structures and others do not.

  7. The Evolution and Structure of Extreme Optical Lightning Flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael; Rudlosky, Scott; Deierling, Wiebke

    2017-12-27

    This study documents the composition, morphology, and motion of extreme optical lightning flashes observed by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). The furthest separation of LIS events (groups) in any flash is 135 km (89 km), the flash with the largest footprint had an illuminated area of 10,604 km 2 , and the most dendritic flash has 234 visible branches. The longest-duration convective LIS flash lasted 28 s and is overgrouped and not physical. The longest-duration convective-to-stratiform propagating flash lasted 7.4 s, while the longest-duration entirely stratiform flash lasted 4.3 s. The longest series of nearly consecutive groups in time lasted 242 ms. The most radiant recorded LIS group (i.e., "superbolt") is 735 times more radiant than the average group. Factors that impact these optical measures of flash morphology and evolution are discussed. While it is apparent that LIS can record the horizontal development of the lightning channel in some cases, radiative transfer within the cloud limits the flash extent and level of detail measured from orbit. These analyses nonetheless suggest that lightning imagers such as LIS and Geostationary Lightning Mapper can complement ground-based lightning locating systems for studying physical lightning phenomena across large geospatial domains.

  8. The Evolution and Structure of Extreme Optical Lightning Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael; Rudlosky, Scott; Deierling, Wiebke

    2017-12-01

    This study documents the composition, morphology, and motion of extreme optical lightning flashes observed by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). The furthest separation of LIS events (groups) in any flash is 135 km (89 km), the flash with the largest footprint had an illuminated area of 10,604 km2, and the most dendritic flash has 234 visible branches. The longest-duration convective LIS flash lasted 28 s and is overgrouped and not physical. The longest-duration convective-to-stratiform propagating flash lasted 7.4 s, while the longest-duration entirely stratiform flash lasted 4.3 s. The longest series of nearly consecutive groups in time lasted 242 ms. The most radiant recorded LIS group (i.e., "superbolt") is 735 times more radiant than the average group. Factors that impact these optical measures of flash morphology and evolution are discussed. While it is apparent that LIS can record the horizontal development of the lightning channel in some cases, radiative transfer within the cloud limits the flash extent and level of detail measured from orbit. These analyses nonetheless suggest that lightning imagers such as LIS and Geostationary Lightning Mapper can complement ground-based lightning locating systems for studying physical lightning phenomena across large geospatial domains.

  9. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Bradley G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Suszcynsky, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamlin, Timothy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeffery, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Kyle C [TEXAS TECH U.; Orville, R E [TEXAS A& M

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  10. Case Report: Mass Casualty Lightning Strike at Ranger Training Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Shannon N; Wilson, Zachary W; Cole, Christopher B; Kennedy, Andrew R; Aycock, Ryan D

    2017-05-01

    Although lightning strikes are a rare occurrence, their significance cannot be ignored given military operations in the field during all types of weather. With proper medical management, patients with lightning injuries can return to duty. Information for this case report comes from eyewitness account at the 6th Ranger Training Battalion and from review of physician documentation from the 96th Medical Group, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. A lightning strike injured 44 Ranger School participants during a training exercise on August 12, 2015, at Camp Rudder, Florida. These patients were triaged in the field and transported to emergency department of Eglin Air Force Base. Of the 44 casualties, 20 were admitted. All were returned to duty the following day. One patient had cardiac arrest. This patient, along with two others, was admitted to the intensive care unit. Seventeen other patients were admitted for observation for rhabdomyolysis and/or cardiac arrhythmias. One patient was admitted with suspected acute kidney injury indicated by an elevated creatinine. All patients, including those admitted to the intensive care unit, were released on the day following the lightning strike without restrictions and were allowed to return to duty with increased medical monitoring. This case report highlights the need for proper triage and recognition of lightning strike injury, coordination of care between field operations and emergency department personnel, and close follow-up for patients presenting with lightning injury. Symptoms, physical exam, and laboratory findings from rigorous training can be difficult to distinguish from those resulting from lightning injury. Secondary injuries resulting from blunt trauma from falls may have been prevented by the use of the lightning strike posture. Further analysis of procedures and standard operating protocols to mitigate risk during thunderstorms may be required to prevent lightning's effects on large groups of military personnel

  11. Anna Sangadzhi-Goryaeva, A Legend About Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Kovaeva, Bair; Babaev, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Anna’s mother was born in the village of Khar-Tolga in Yashkul’skiy rayon. There, lightning, thunder and dust storms were frequent occurrences. Anna heard from her mother that she should not be afraid of lightning. According to a legend, once upon a time a god descended on earth but could not ascent back to the skies. He was helped by a pair of helping hands from Anna’s maternal clan. Since then lightning never harms people from this clan. One day when Anna lived in the village of Chilgir lig...

  12. Remarkable rates of lightning strike mortality in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Msalu, Lameck; Caro, Tim; Salerno, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Livingstone's second mission site on the shore of Lake Malawi suffers very high rates of consequential lightning strikes. Comprehensive interviewing of victims and their relatives in seven Traditional Authorities in Nkhata Bay District, Malawi revealed that the annual rate of consequential strikes was 419/million, more than six times higher than that in other developing countries; the rate of deaths from lightning was 84/million/year, 5.4 times greater than the highest ever recorded. These remarkable figures reveal that lightning constitutes a significant stochastic source of mortality with potential life history consequences, but it should not deflect attention away from the more prominent causes of mortality in this rural area.

  13. Intelligence Support for the F-35A Lightning II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    106 | Air & Space Power Journal Intelligence Support for the F-35A Lightning II Capt Stephanie Anne Fraioli, USAF Disclaimer: The views and opinions...reproduced in whole or in part without permission. If it is reproduced, the Air and Space Power Journal requests a courtesy line. The F-35 Lightning II is...airspace. Specifi- cally, the F-35 Lightning II is advertised as a multirole follow-on to the A-10, AV-8B, F-16, and F/A-18A/B/C/D aircraft. The F-35 is

  14. Apparatus and method for inspecting a bearing ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, B. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for inspecting the surface of a ball bearing is disclosed which includes a base having a high friction non-abrasive base scanning surface. A holding device includes a cone-shaped cup recess in which a ball element is received. Air is introduced through a passage to relieve friction between the wall of the recess and the ball element and facilitate rolling of the ball over the high friction base surface. The holding device is moved over the base scanning surface in a predetermined pattern such that the entire surface of the ball element is inspected byan eddy current probe which detects any surface defects.

  15. Automated Storm Tracking and the Lightning Jump Algorithm Using GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Elise V; Schultz, Christopher J; Carey, Lawrence D; Cecil, Daniel J; Bateman, Monte

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a fully automated lightning jump system encompassing objective storm tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper proxy data, and the lightning jump algorithm (LJA), which are important elements in the transition of the LJA concept from a research to an operational based algorithm. Storm cluster tracking is based on a product created from the combination of a radar parameter (vertically integrated liquid, VIL), and lightning information (flash rate density). Evaluations showed that the spatial scale of tracked features or storm clusters had a large impact on the lightning jump system performance, where increasing spatial scale size resulted in decreased dynamic range of the system's performance. This framework will also serve as a means to refine the LJA itself to enhance its operational applicability. Parameters within the system are isolated and the system's performance is evaluated with adjustments to parameter sensitivity. The system's performance is evaluated using the probability of detection (POD) and false alarm ratio (FAR) statistics. Of the algorithm parameters tested, sigma-level (metric of lightning jump strength) and flash rate threshold influenced the system's performance the most. Finally, verification methodologies are investigated. It is discovered that minor changes in verification methodology can dramatically impact the evaluation of the lightning jump system.

  16. Automated Storm Tracking and the Lightning Jump Algorithm Using GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Christopher Joseph; Carey, Lawrence D.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Bateman, Monte

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a fully automated lightning jump system encompassing objective storm tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper proxy data, and the lightning jump algorithm (LJA), which are important elements in the transition of the LJA concept from a research to an operational based algorithm. Storm cluster tracking is based on a product created from the combination of a radar parameter (vertically integrated liquid, VIL), and lightning information (flash rate density). Evaluations showed that the spatial scale of tracked features or storm clusters had a large impact on the lightning jump system performance, where increasing spatial scale size resulted in decreased dynamic range of the system's performance. This framework will also serve as a means to refine the LJA itself to enhance its operational applicability. Parameters within the system are isolated and the system's performance is evaluated with adjustments to parameter sensitivity. The system's performance is evaluated using the probability of detection (POD) and false alarm ratio (FAR) statistics. Of the algorithm parameters tested, sigma-level (metric of lightning jump strength) and flash rate threshold influenced the system's performance the most. Finally, verification methodologies are investigated. It is discovered that minor changes in verification methodology can dramatically impact the evaluation of the lightning jump system.

  17. Aerodynamic effects of dimples on soccer ball surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungchan; Asai, Takeshi

    2017-10-01

    Recently, the shape and design of the panel on the official ball used in the FIFA World Cup was considerably different from that of a conventional soccer ball (having 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels). Depending on the number of different panels and their orientation, the aerodynamic force experienced by a ball is believed to change, which in turn changes the ball trajectory. However, not much is known about the impact of the surface forms of a ball on its aerodynamics. Therefore, in the present study, 10 different types of soccer balls were produced and their aerodynamic properties were studied by wind tunnel experiments. The results confirmed that the aerodynamic force acting on the ball varied considerably depending on the existence of dimples on the ball surface. In addition, the 4 types of soccer balls, which had different kinds of roughness, revealed that even balls having the same number and shapes of panels experienced greatly varying aerodynamic forces depending on the surface form of the balls.

  18. The strange flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizota, Taketo; Kurogi, Kouhei; Ohya, Yuji; Okajima, Atsushi; Naruo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-05-01

    The strange three-dimensional flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls is one of the most interesting and unknown phenomenon associated with the trajectories of sports balls. Many spectators have experienced numerous exciting and emotional instances while observing the curious flight behaviour of these balls. We examine the aerodynamic mechanisms of erratic ball behaviours through real flight observations, unsteady force measurements and flow pattern visualisations. The strange behaviour is elucidated by the relationship between the unsteady forces on the ball and the wake flow. The irregular changes in position for twin longitudinal vortices have already been discovered in the supercritical Reynolds number region of a sphere with a smooth surface. This finding is applicable to the strange behaviour of the flight of soccer balls with this supercritical flow. The players, spectators, and television viewers will gain greater insight into the effects of soccer ball flights.

  19. Characteristics of Lightning within Electrified Snowfall Events using Total Lightning Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, C. J.; Bruning, E. C.; Lang, T. J.; Kuhlman, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Lightning within heavy snowfall indicates the presence of heavy snowfall rates. Most studies within the literature examine this phenomenon using ground based networks that are primarily designed for identifying cloud to ground flashes. Thus, very little study of the three dimensional structure of the lightning flashes within heavy snowfall has been accomplished. Herein, total lightning mapping arrays, interferometers and ground based networks like the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are utilized to document the characteristics of these flashes, including flash size, polarity, flash initiation location and inferred charge structure. A total of six events are examined, resulting in a total of approximately 80 flashes. Both individual case studies and overall population statistics will be used to characterize flashes within this winter environment. Many of these flashes are found to initiate from tall objects like television and radio communication towers, and come to ground in multiple locations along their path, resulting in one LMA derived flash containing multiple NLDN identified flashes. Cloud-to-ground flashes of both polarities are noted within the 80 flash sample. In one case, 3 separate flashes which resulted in ground flashes of both polarities were observed coming out of the same overall charge structure. This structure exhibited a highly sloped nature in the LMA data from east to west, and both +IC and -IC components of flashes were observed by the NLDN in the same region where the flashes initiated. A decrease in flash size is noted with time in at least three of these events due to weaker updraft (compared to their summertime thunderstorm counter parts) and smaller available of supercooled liquid water as inferred through trends in radar observations. These limiting factors are hypothesized to result in slower charging rates, and smaller flash sizes with time. Several flashes also exhibit sloped structures that match reflectivity

  20. Lightning related fatalities in livestock: veterinary expertise and the added value of lightning location data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, E; Weyens, P; Poelman, D R; Chiers, K; Deprez, P; Pardon, B

    2015-01-01

    Although lightning strike is an important cause of sudden death in livestock on pasture and among the main reasons why insurance companies consult an expert veterinarian, scientific information on this subject is limited. The aim of the present study was to provide objective information on the circumstantial evidence and pathological findings in lightning related fatalities (LRF), based on a retrospective analysis of 410 declarations, examined by a single expert veterinarian in Flanders, Belgium, from 1998 to 2012. Predictive logistic models for compatibility with LRF were constructed based on anamnestic, environmental and pathological factors. In addition, the added value of lightning location data (LLD) was evaluated. Pathognomonic singe lesions were present in 84/194 (43%) confirmed reports. Factors which remained significantly associated with LRF in the multivariable model were age, presence of a tree or open water in the near surroundings, tympany and presence of feed in the oral cavity at the time of investigation. This basic model had a sensitivity (Se) of 53.8% and a specificity (Sp) of 88.2%. Relying only on LLD to confirm LRF in livestock resulted in a high Se (91.3%), but a low Sp (41.2%), leading to a high probability that a negative case would be wrongly accepted as an LRF. The best results were obtained when combining the model based on the veterinary expert investigation (circumstantial evidence and pathological findings), together with the detection of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning at the time and location of death (Se 89.1%; Sp 66.7%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ball Machine Usage in Tennis: Movement Initiation and Swing Timing While Returning Balls from a Ball Machine and from a Real Server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Carboch, Vladimir Süss, Tomas Kocib

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Practicing with the use of a ball machine could handicap a player compared to playing against an actual opponent. Recent studies have shown some differences in swing timing and movement coordination, when a player faces a ball projection machine as opposed to a human opponent. We focused on the time of movement initiation and on stroke timing during returning tennis serves (simulated by a ball machine or by a real server. Receivers’ movements were measured on a tennis court. In spite of using a serving ball speed from 90 kph to 135 kph, results showed significant differences in movement initiation and backswing duration between serves received from a ball machine and serves received from a real server. Players had shorter movement initiation when they faced a ball machine. Backswing duration was longer for the group using a ball machine. That demonstrates different movement timing of tennis returns when players face a ball machine. Use of ball machines in tennis practice should be limited as it may disrupt stroke timing.

  2. Electrostatic protection of the solar power satellite and rectenna. Part 2: Lightning protection of the rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations and laboratory tests were used to evaluate the hazard posed by lightning flashes to ground on the Solar Power Satellite rectenna and to make recommendations on a lightning protection system for the rectenna. The distribution of lightning over the lower 48 of the continental United States was determined, as were the interactions of lightning with the rectenna and the modes in which those interactions could damage the rectenna. Lightning protection was both required and feasible. Several systems of lightning protection were considered and evaluated. These included two systems that employed lightning rods of different lengths and placed on top of the rectenna's billboards and a third, distribution companies; it consists of short lightning rods all along the length of each billboard that are connected by a horizontal wire above the billboard. The distributed lightning protection system afforded greater protection than the other systems considered and was easier to integrate into the rectenna's structural design.

  3. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  4. Simulation of Quasi-Linear Mesoscale Convective Systems in Northern China: Lightning Activities and Storm Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanli, Li

    2017-04-01

    Two intense quasi-linear mesoscale convective systems (QLMCSs) in northern China were simulated using the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model and the 3D-Var (three-dimensional variational) analysis system of the ARPS (Advanced Regional Prediction System) model. A new method in which the lightning density is calculated using both the precipitation and non-precipitation ice mass was developed to reveal the relationship between the lightning activities and QLMCS structures. Results indicate that, compared with calculating the results using two previous methods, the lightning density calculated using the new method presented in this study is in better accordance with observations. Based on the calculated lightning densities using the new method, it was found that most lightning activity was initiated on the right side and at the front of the QLMCSs, where the surface wind field converged intensely. The CAPE was much stronger ahead of the southeastward progressing QLMCS than to the back it, and their lightning events mainly occurred in regions with a large gradient of CAPE. Comparisons between lightning and non-lightning regions indicated that lightning regions featured more intense ascending motion than non-lightning regions; the vertical ranges of maximum reflectivity between lightning and non-lightning regions were very different; and the ice mixing ratio featured no significant differences between the lightning and non-lightning regions.

  5. Casimir Energies for Isorefractive or Diaphanous Balls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the Casimir self-energy of a homogeneous dielectric ball is divergent, although a finite self-energy can be extracted through second order in the deviation of the permittivity from the vacuum value. The exception occurs when the speed of light inside the spherical boundary is the same as that outside, so the self-energy of a perfectly conducting spherical shell is finite, as is the energy of a dielectric-diamagnetic sphere with ε μ = 1 , a so-called isorefractive or diaphanous ball. Here we re-examine that example and attempt to extend it to an electromagnetic δ -function sphere, where the electric and magnetic couplings are equal and opposite. Unfortunately, although the energy expression is superficially ultraviolet finite, additional divergences appear that render it difficult to extract a meaningful result in general, but some limited results are presented.

  6. From a Ball Game to Incompleteness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tree is a tree in which each node has a finite number of children. In a rooted tree, the sequence of nodes from the root to a leaf, where the (j + 1)th node is a child of the jth node, is called a. 'path'. For instance, in the above tree, the root contains 2, and all leafs are the nodes that contain 0. Since any ball is replaced with a fi-.

  7. Testing general relativity using a bouncing ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuan-Ni Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article (Liang and Lan, (2011, we showed that the trajectories predicted by general-relativistic and Newtonian mechanics from the same parameters and initial conditions for a low-speed weak-gravity bouncing ball system will rapidly disagree completely if the trajectories are chaotic. Here, we determine how accurate the parameters and initial conditions of the system must be known so that the two different calculated chaotic trajectories are sufficiently accurate for an empirical test.

  8. Ball-thrower's fracture of the humerus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaghan, Eric B.; Bennett, D. Lee; El-Khoury, Georges Y.; Ohashi, Kenjirou

    2004-01-01

    A relatively rare case of ball-thrower's fracture of the humerus is presented. Severe muscular action is an uncommon cause of humeral fractures but has been well documented in the orthopedic literature. To our knowledge, this fracture has not been described in the radiology literature, and awareness of this entity could preclude further unnecessary workup. The mechanism of injury and its typical radiographic appearance is described. (orig.)

  9. Effect of Changing Table Tennis Ball Material from Celluloid to Plastic on the Post-Collision Ball Trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaba Yuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The official material used in table tennis balls was changed from celluloid to plastic, a material free of celluloid, in 2014. The purpose of this study was to understand the differences and similarities in the two types of ball materials by comparing their behavior upon collision with a table. The behavior of the balls before and after collision with a table, at various initial speeds ranging from 15 to 115 km/h, was captured using high-speed cameras. Velocities and spin rates before collision and velocities after collision were computed to calculate the coefficients of restitution and friction. Based on the computed variables, the post-collision trajectories of both balls were calculated by integrating the equation of motion of the ball for simulated service, smash and drive conditions with respect to time. The coefficients of restitution were higher for the plastic balls than the celluloid ones when the initial vertical velocities were higher. The coefficients of friction were higher for plastic balls when the initial horizontal contact point velocities were slower. Because of the differences in the material characteristics, the plastic ball trajectories of services with backspin and drives with great topspin were expected to be different from those of celluloid balls. Since the extent of differences between the two ball types varied depending on the initial conditions, testing at various initial conditions was suggested for comparing and understanding the characteristics of the balls.

  10. Effect of Changing Table Tennis Ball Material from Celluloid to Plastic on the Post-Collision Ball Trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Yuki; Tamaki, Sho; Ikebukuro, Haruhiko; Yamada, Koshi; Ozaki, Hiroki; Yoshida, Kazuto

    2017-01-01

    The official material used in table tennis balls was changed from celluloid to plastic, a material free of celluloid, in 2014. The purpose of this study was to understand the differences and similarities in the two types of ball materials by comparing their behavior upon collision with a table. The behavior of the balls before and after collision with a table, at various initial speeds ranging from 15 to 115 km/h, was captured using high-speed cameras. Velocities and spin rates before collision and velocities after collision were computed to calculate the coefficients of restitution and friction. Based on the computed variables, the post-collision trajectories of both balls were calculated by integrating the equation of motion of the ball for simulated service, smash and drive conditions with respect to time. The coefficients of restitution were higher for the plastic balls than the celluloid ones when the initial vertical velocities were higher. The coefficients of friction were higher for plastic balls when the initial horizontal contact point velocities were slower. Because of the differences in the material characteristics, the plastic ball trajectories of services with backspin and drives with great topspin were expected to be different from those of celluloid balls. Since the extent of differences between the two ball types varied depending on the initial conditions, testing at various initial conditions was suggested for comparing and understanding the characteristics of the balls.

  11. LIGHTNING IMAGING SENSOR (LIS) SCIENCE DATA V4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is an instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission satellite (TRMM) used to detect the distribution and variability of...

  12. CAMEX-4 DC-8 LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The DC-8 Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) allows the vector components of the electric field (i.e, Ex,Ey, Ez )to be readily obtained, and thus, greatly improves...

  13. Electromagnetic computation methods for lightning surge protection studies

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    This book is the first to consolidate current research and to examine the theories of electromagnetic computation methods in relation to lightning surge protection. The authors introduce and compare existing electromagnetic computation methods such as the method of moments (MOM), the partial element equivalent circuit (PEEC), the finite element method (FEM), the transmission-line modeling (TLM) method, and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The application of FDTD method to lightning protection studies is a topic that has matured through many practical applications in the past decade, and the authors explain the derivation of Maxwell's equations required by the FDTD, and modeling of various electrical components needed in computing lightning electromagnetic fields and surges with the FDTD method. The book describes the application of FDTD method to current and emerging problems of lightning surge protection of continuously more complex installations, particularly in critical infrastructures of e...

  14. The Distribution of Lightning Channel Lengths in Northern Alabama Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, H. S.; Koshak, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Lightning is well known to be a major source of tropospheric NOx, and in most cases is the dominant natural source (Huntreiser et al 1998, Jourdain and Hauglustaine 2001). Production of NOx by a segment of a lightning channel is a function of channel segment energy density and channel segment altitude. A first estimate of NOx production by a lightning flash can be found by multiplying production per segment [typically 104 J/m; Hill (1979)] by the total length of the flash s channel. The purpose of this study is to determine average channel length for lightning flashes near NALMA in 2008, and to compare average channel length of ground flashes to the average channel length of cloud flashes.

  15. Lightning Forecasts and Data Assimilation into Numerical Weather Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGorman, D. R.; Mansell, E. R.; Fierro, A.; Ziegler, C.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation reviews two aspects of lightning in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models: forecasting lightning and assimilating lightning data into NWP models to improve weather forecasts. One of the earliest routine forecasts of lightning was developed for fire weather operations. This approach used a multi-parameter regression analysis of archived cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data and archived NWP data to optimize the combination of model state variables to use in forecast equations for various CG rates. Since then, understanding of how storms produce lightning has improved greatly. As the treatment of ice in microphysics packages used by NWP models has improved and the horizontal resolution of models has begun approaching convection-permitting scales (with convection-resolving scales on the horizon), it is becoming possible to use this improved understanding in NWP models to predict lightning more directly. An important role for data assimilation in NWP models is to depict the location, timing, and spatial extent of thunderstorms during model spin-up so that the effects of prior convection that can strongly influence future thunderstorm activity, such as updrafts and outflow boundaries, can be included in the initial state of a NWP model run. Radar data have traditionally been used, but systems that map lightning activity with varying degrees of coverage, detail, and detection efficiency are now available routinely over large regions and reveal information about storms that is complementary to the information provided by radar. Because data from lightning mapping systems are compact, easily handled, and reliably indicate the location and timing of thunderstorms, even in regions with little or no radar coverage, several groups have investigated techniques for assimilating these data into NWP models. This application will become even more valuable with the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on the GOES-R satellite, which will extend routine

  16. Investigating the risk of lightning's pressure blast wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Blumenthal�

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the pathology of human trauma associated with lightning's pressure blast wave. Within what range is a human at risk and what are the risks? Two theories for the trauma currently exist: the flash moisture vaporisation theory and the sixth mechanism theory. We performed a simple proof-of-concept experiment in a high-voltage laboratory to determine which theory makes for better predictions. The experiment confirmed the existence of a non-discriminant pressure blast wave around a spark in air. The lightning data were compared with the known medical data. Findings may now help explain some of the more curious lightning injury patterns seen on lightning-strike victims.

  17. Simultaneous Observation of Lightning and Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnussirat, S.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.; Burchfield, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The relative timing between TGFs and lightning optical emissions is a critical parameter that may elucidate the production mechanism(s) of TGFs. In this work, we study the correlation between optical emissions detected by the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and TGFs triggered by the Fermi-GBM. The GLM is the only instrument that detects total lightning activities (IC and CG) continuously (day and night) over a large area of the Earth, with very high efficiency and location accuracy. The unique optical emission data from the GLM will enable us to study, for the first time, the lightning activity before and after the TGF production. From this investigation, we hope to clarify the production mechanism of TGFs and the characteristics of thundercloud cells that produce them. A description of the GLM concept and operation will be presented and as well as the preliminary results of the TGF-optical emission correlation.

  18. Chemical Safety Alert: Lightning Hazard to Facilities Handling Flammable Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raises awareness about lightning strikes, which cause more death/injury and damage than all other environmental elements combined, so industry can take proper precautions to protect equipment and storage or process vessels containing flammable materials.

  19. Effects of Lightning Injection on Power-MOSFETs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightning induced damage is one of the major concerns in aircraft health monitoring. Such short-duration high voltages can cause significant damage to electronic...

  20. Electrical Characterizations of Lightning Strike Protection Techniques for Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Mielnik, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The growing application of composite materials in commercial aircraft manufacturing has significantly increased the risk of aircraft damage from lightning strikes. Composite aircraft designs require new mitigation strategies and engineering practices to maintain the same level of safety and protection as achieved by conductive aluminum skinned aircraft. Researchers working under the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project are investigating lightning damage on composite materials to support the development of new mitigation, diagnosis & prognosis techniques to overcome the increased challenges associated with lightning protection on composite aircraft. This paper provides an overview of the electrical characterizations being performed to support IVHM lightning damage diagnosis research on composite materials at the NASA Langley Research Center.