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Sample records for balantidiasis

  1. [Colonic balantidiasis].

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    González de Canales Simón, P; del Olmo Martínez, L; Cortejoso Hernández, A; Arranz Santos, T

    2000-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a Protozoa that is not usually pathogenic in man, although epidemics have been described in tropical areas. It mainly affects the colon and clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic forms to severe dysenteric syndromes. We present a case of endoscopically diagnosed colonic balantidiasis and review the most important characteristics of this parasite-induced disease. PMID:10804691

  2. Balantidiasis in a dromedarian camel

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    Tajik, Javad; Fard, Saeid R Nourollahi; paidar, Amin; Anousheh, Samaneh; Dehghani, Elahe

    2013-01-01

    A 3 years old male dromedarian camel was examined because of anorexia and diarrhea. The affected camel was depressed, tachycardic, eupnic, and had a body temperature of 38.8 °C. Mucous membranes were hyperemic and faeces was soft and mucous coated but of normal colour and odour. Faecal examination revealed a large number of Balantidium coli trophozoites and cysts (15 000/g) and no other parasite could be detected in faecal sample. Seven days after the onset of treatment using intramuscular antibiotic (ampicillin) and anti inflammatory agent (flunixin meglumine), the food consumption, clinical signs and faecal consistency were normal, and faecal examination revealed no parasite. Presence of no other pathogen in faecal samples, and concurrent disappearance of clinical signs and absence of the parasite in the faeces confirmed a diagnosis of balantidiasis. There are only two previous reports about the balantidiasis in camel and the current report is the first report of camel balantidiasis in Iran and supports the proposed role of camels as a reservoir host for Balantidium coli in Iran.

  3. Urinary balantidiasis: A rare incidental finding in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Balantidiasis is a rare zoonotic disease in humans. Balantidium coli is the causative ciliated protozoan. We present a case of urinary balantidiasis in a patient having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD who was on steroids for a long time. He has no symptoms of bowel or urinary involvement. We are reporting this case because of its rarity in human urine and also for future references.

  4. Prevalence, hematology, and treatment of balantidiasis among donkeys in and around Lahore, Pakistan.

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    Khan, A; Khan, M S; Avais, M; Ijaz, M; Ali, M M; Abbas, T

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of Balantidium coli among donkeys in Lahore and adjoining areas was surveyed and a trial conducted to determine the efficacy of two antiprotozoal drugs: secnidazole (Dysen Forte) and Kalonji (Nigella sativa). Four-hundred donkeys were examined, and 73 (18.3%) were found positive for Balantidium coli. A slight decrease in PCV and an increase in Hb values of infected donkeys were found after antiprotozoal treatment. Secnidazole was 89.5% effective for the treatment of equine balantidiasis compared to 40.0% for Nigella sativa. This is the first report of balantidiasis in equines from Pakistan. It is not known if balantidiasis is an emerging problem in equines or whether it is a newly reported infection. PMID:23394797

  5. A rare case of urinary balantidiasis in an elderly renal failure patient.

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    Karuna, T; Khadanga, Sagar

    2014-01-01

    Balantidium coli is the largest ciliated protozoa infecting humans by the feco-oral transmission from pigs. Large gut is the most common site of involvement. Symptomatology varies from asymptomatic carrier to invasive dysentery. Extra-intestinal infections can occur in liver, lung and urogenital tract. There are very few case reports of urinary balantidiasis. We present a case of urinary balantidiasis in an elderly farmer having diabetes and chronic kidney disease. This case is reported for its rarity and future references. PMID:24754028

  6. A case report of an uncommon parasitic infection of human balantidiasis.

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    Kumar, Manochitra; Rajkumari, Nonika; Mandal, Jharna; Parija, S C

    2016-01-01

    Balantidium coli, a large, ciliated pathogen, is known to cause balantidiasis in humans. We report a case of B. coli infection in a 37-year-old male with tuberculosis and presenting with fever, anorexia, mild abdominal pain, and episodes of loose stools for 1 week. PMID:26998438

  7. Summarize of inspection and quarantine technology of balantidiasis%小袋纤毛虫病检疫技术概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军骅

    2013-01-01

      小袋纤毛虫病是由结肠小袋纤毛虫侵入肠壁引起的一种动物源性寄生虫病,寄生于人体的结肠引起的一种以腹泻为主要症状的肠道原虫病。本虫是人体内最大的寄生原虫,本病呈世界性分布,我国的云南、广西、广东等省,均有病例发生,引起巨大的经济损失,并威胁公共卫生安全。本文对小袋纤毛虫病的产地检疫技术、屠宰检疫技术和实验室检疫技术进行简要概述。%Balantidiasis is a kind of parasitosis caused by the invading of the intes-tinal wall of the Balantidium coli, which parasitize in the colon arousing diar-rhea. This parasite is the largest in the human body and distribute all over the world. Many area in China has a prevalence of this disease, make a huge economic losses and a big threat of public health security. In this article producing area quarantine inspection technology, slaughter inspection technology and lab inspec-tion technology is described.

  8. Urinary balantidiasis: diagnosis at a glance by urine sediment examination.

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    Maino, Alberto; Garigali, Giuseppe; Grande, Romualdo; Messa, Piergiorgio; Fogazzi, Giovanni B

    2010-01-01

    A 56-year-old Caucasian man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, who had previously been treated with prolonged intensive chemotherapy, was hospitalized for an acute and reversible kidney injury of multifactorial origin. The urinary sediment examination, performed daily, demonstrated the presence of renal tubular cells and renal tubular cell casts. Surprisingly, it also showed the presence of trophozoites of the protozoan Balantidium coli, which were identified on the basis of its characteristic morphology and rapid movements across the slide, and transient leukocyturia. The patient was asymptomatic, his medical history was negative for gastrointestinal disease, and no Balantidium coli was found in the feces. In spite of this, due to the previous chemotherapy, the patient was treated with oral metrodinazole. Only one other case with Balantidium coli in the urine sediment has been described so far and this paper stresses the importance of the examination of the urinary sediment. PMID:20349417

  9. Balantidiasis in Aymara children from the northern Bolivian Altiplano.

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    Esteban, J G; Aguirre, C; Angles, R; Ash, L R; Mas-Coma, S

    1998-12-01

    Balantidium coli infection was coprologically studied in 2,124 Aymara children 5-19 years of age from the schools of 22 communities of the northern Bolivian Altiplano over a five-year period. Infection with B. coli was found in 11 of the communities surveyed, with prevalences of 1.0-5.3% (overall prevalence=1.2%). The prevalences observed are some of the highest reported and did not differ significantly among the various age groups or between boys and girls. These prevalences, the apparent absence of symptoms or signs of illness due to this parasite in the schoolchildren surveyed at the time of stool sampling, and the consistency of stool samples of the infected students suggest that they are apparently asymptomatic carriers. Infection with B. coli must be considered as an endemic anthropozoonosis in the area studied. A relationship between B. coli infection and Altiplanic pigs is suggested.

  10. Balantidiasis in the gastric lymph nodes of Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia): an incidental finding.

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    Cho, Ho-Seong; Shin, Sung-Shik; Park, Nam-Yong

    2006-06-01

    A 4-year-old female Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia) was found dead in the Gwangju Uchi Park Zoo. The animal had previously exhibited weakness and lethargy, but no signs of diarrhea. The carcass was emaciated upon presentation. The main gross lesion was characterized by severe serous atrophy of the fat tissues of the coronary and left ventricular grooves, resulting in the transformation of the fat to a gelatinous material. The rumen was fully distended with food, while the abomasum evidenced mucosal corrugation with slight congestion. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of Balantidium coli trophozoites within the lymphatic ducts of the gastric lymph node and the abdominal submucosa. On rare occasions, these organisms may invade extra-intestinal organs, in this case the gastric lymph nodes and abomasum. PMID:16645350

  11. Balantidium coli pneumonia in an immunocompromised patient.

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    Vasilakopoulou, Alexandra; Dimarongona, Kyriaki; Samakovli, Anastasia; Papadimitris, Konstantinos; Avlami, Athina

    2003-01-01

    A fatal case is reported of Balantidium coli pneumonia in a 71-y-old woman suffering from anal cancer. The diagnosis was made by the discovery of motile trophozoites in a wet mount from bronchial secretions. The usual habitat of the parasite is the colon; lung balantidiasis is very rare. PMID:12693570

  12. Parasite-related diarrhoeas*

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    This article reviews available knowledge on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, immunology, diagnosis, and therapy of parasite-related diarrhoeas of public health importance, primarily amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, balantidiasis, coccidioses, schistosomiasis, and capillariasis. Research priorities are recommended in each of these fields with the aim of developing better means of prevention and treatment.

  13. Hubungan Tingkat Pengetahuan, Sikap dan Tindakan Tentang Higiene dengan Infeksi Balantidium coli di Masyarakat Sekitar Peternakan Babi di Namorambe

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Hajar Binti Shamsudin

    2011-01-01

    Balantidiasis is an infection which is caused by cyst of protozoa Balantidium coli. Balantidium coli is the only one of the family member from ciliate division which is known as the pathogen to human and it also is the biggest protozoa. In this moment, Balantidium coli is distributed to worldwide, but less than 1% from human population has been infected. Pig is the main reservoir from the parasite, and human infection more common in where pig and human has interacted. Reported in Medan, t...

  14. Novel insights into the genetic diversity of Balantidium and Balantidium-like cyst-forming ciliates

    OpenAIRE

    Kateřina Pomajbíková; Miroslav Oborník; Aleš Horák; Petrželková, Klára J.; J Norman Grim; Bruno Levecke; Angelique Todd; Martin Mulama; John Kiyang; David Modrý

    2013-01-01

    Balantidiasis is considered a neglected zoonotic disease with pigs serving as reservoir hosts. However, Balantidium coli has been recorded in many other mammalian species, including primates. Here, we evaluated the genetic diversity of B. coli in non-human primates using two gene markers (SSrDNA and ITS1-5.8SDNA-ITS2). We analyzed 49 isolates of ciliates from fecal samples originating from 11 species of captive and wild primates, domestic pigs and wild boar. The phylogenetic trees were compu...

  15. Amebae and ciliated protozoa as causal agents of waterborne zoonotic disease.

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    Schuster, Frederick L; Visvesvara, Govinda S

    2004-12-01

    The roles free-living amebae and the parasitic protozoa Entamoeba histolytica and Balantidium coli play as agents of waterborne zoonotic diseases are examined. The free-living soil and water amebae Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Balamuthia mandrillaris are recognized etiologic agents of mostly fatal amebic encephalitides in humans and other animals, with immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts among the victims. Acanthamoeba spp. are also agents of amebic keratitis. Infection is through the respiratory tract, breaks in the skin, or by uptake of water into the nostrils, with spread to the central nervous system. E. histolytica and B. coli are parasitic protozoa that cause amebic dysentery and balantidiasis, respectively. Both intestinal infections are spread via a fecal-oral route, with cysts as the infective stage. Although the amebic encephalitides can be acquired by contact with water, they are not, strictly speaking, waterborne diseases and are not transmitted to humans from animals. Non-human primates and swine are reservoirs for E. histolytica and B. coli, and the diseases they cause are acquired from cysts, usually in sewage-contaminated water. Amebic dysentery and balantidiasis are examples of zoonotic waterborne infections, though human-to-human transmission can occur. The epidemiology of the diseases is examined, as are diagnostic procedures, anti-microbial interventions, and the influence of globalization, climate change, and technological advances on their spread. PMID:15567581

  16. Discrepancies in the occurrence of Balantidium coli between wild and captive African great apes.

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    Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Petrželková, Klára J; Profousová, Ilona; Petrášová, Jana; Modrý, David

    2010-12-01

    Balantidium coli is a ciliate reported in many mammalian species, including African great apes. In the former, asymptomatic infections as well as clinical balantidiasis have been reported in captivity. We carried out a cross-sectional study of B. coli in African great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, and both species of gorillas) and examined 1,161 fecal samples from 28 captive facilities in Europe, plus 2 sanctuaries and 11 wild sites in Africa. Samples were analyzed with the use of Sheather's flotation and merthiolate-iodine-formaldehyde (MIFC) sedimentation. MIFC sedimentation was the more sensitive technique for diagnostics of B. coli in apes. Although not detected in any wild-ape populations, B. coli was diagnosed in 52.6% of captive individuals. Surprisingly, in the apes' feces, trophozoites of B. coli were commonly detected, in contrast with other animals, e.g., Old World monkeys, pigs, etc. Most likely reservoirs for B. coli in captive apes include synantropic rats. High starch diets in captive apes are likely to exacerbate the occurrence of balantidiasis in captive apes. PMID:21158624

  17. Pulmonary Balantidium coli infection in a leukemic patient.

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    Anargyrou, K; Petrikkos, G L; Suller, M T E; Skiada, A; Siakantaris, M P; Osuntoyinbo, R T; Pangalis, G; Vaiopoulos, G

    2003-07-01

    A 59-year-old woman suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia developed pulmonary lesions; bronchoalveolar lavage was performed for possible systemic fungal infection. However, direct microscopic analysis revealed ciliated protozoa identified as Balantidium coli. B. coli is the only known pathogenic ciliate, and is usually associated with intestinal infection in areas associated with pig rearing. On very rare occasions the organisms may invade extra-intestinal organs, in this case the lungs of an immunocompromised patient. This case is unusual as balantidiasis is rare in Europe, the patient had no obvious contact with pigs, and there was no history of diarrhea prior to pulmonary colonization. Metronidazole was rapidly administered, and the condition improved after 24-48 hr. PMID:12827655

  18. Preliminary insights into the impact of dietary starch on the ciliate, Neobalantidium coli, in captive chimpanzees.

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    Kateřina Schovancová

    Full Text Available Infections caused by the intestinal ciliate Neobalantidium coli are asymptomatic in most hosts. In humans and captive African great apes clinical infections occasionally occur, manifested mainly by dysentery; however, factors responsible for development of clinical balantidiasis have not been fully clarified. We studied the effect of dietary starch on the intensities of infection by N. coli in two groups of captive chimpanzees. Adult chimpanzees infected by N. coli from the Hodonín Zoo and from the Brno Zoo, Czech Republic, were fed with a high starch diet (HSD (average 14.7% of starch for 14 days, followed by a five-day transition period and subsequently with a period of low starch diet (LoSD (average 0.1% of starch for another 14 days. We collected fecal samples during the last seven days of HSD and LoSD and fixed them in 10% formalin. We quantified trophozoites of N. coli using the FLOTAC method. The numbers of N. coli trophozoites were higher during the HSD (mean ± SD: 49.0 ± 134.7 than during the LoSD (3.5 ± 6.8. A generalized linear mixed-effects model revealed significantly lower numbers of the N. coli trophozoites in the feces during the LoSD period in comparison to the HSD period (treatment contrast LoSD vs. HSD: 2.7 ± 0.06 (SE, z = 47.7; p<<0.001. We conclude that our data provide a first indication that starch-rich diet might be responsible for high intensities of infection of N. coli in captive individuals and might predispose them for clinically manifested balantidiasis. We discuss the potential nutritional modifications to host diets that can be implemented in part to control N. coli infections.

  19. Neglected tropical diseases of Oceania: review of their prevalence, distribution, and opportunities for control.

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    Kevin Kline

    Full Text Available Among Oceania's population of 35 million people, the greatest number living in poverty currently live in Papua New Guinea (PNG, Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands. These impoverished populations are at high risk for selected NTDs, including Necator americanus hookworm infection, strongyloidiasis, lymphatic filariasis (LF, balantidiasis, yaws, trachoma, leprosy, and scabies, in addition to outbreaks of dengue and other arboviral infections including Japanese encephalitis virus infection. PNG stands out for having the largest number of cases and highest prevalence for most of these NTDs. However, Australia's Aboriginal population also suffers from a range of significant NTDs. Through the Pacific Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis, enormous strides have been made in eliminating LF in Oceania through programs of mass drug administration (MDA, although LF remains widespread in PNG. There are opportunities to scale up MDA for PNG's major NTDs, which could be accomplished through an integrated package that combines albendazole, ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine, and azithromycin, in a program of national control. Australia's Aboriginal population may benefit from appropriately integrated MDA into primary health care systems. Several emerging viral NTDs remain important threats to the region.

  20. Novel insights into the genetic diversity of Balantidium and Balantidium-like cyst-forming ciliates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Pomajbíková

    Full Text Available Balantidiasis is considered a neglected zoonotic disease with pigs serving as reservoir hosts. However, Balantidium coli has been recorded in many other mammalian species, including primates. Here, we evaluated the genetic diversity of B. coli in non-human primates using two gene markers (SSrDNA and ITS1-5.8SDNA-ITS2. We analyzed 49 isolates of ciliates from fecal samples originating from 11 species of captive and wild primates, domestic pigs and wild boar. The phylogenetic trees were computed using Bayesian inference and Maximum likelihood. Balantidium entozoon from edible frog and Buxtonella sulcata from cattle were included in the analyses as the closest relatives of B. coli, as well as reference sequences of vestibuliferids. The SSrDNA tree showed the same phylogenetic diversification of B. coli at genus level as the tree constructed based on the ITS region. Based on the polymorphism of SSrDNA sequences, the type species of the genus, namely B. entozoon, appeared to be phylogenetically distinct from B. coli. Thus, we propose a new genus Neobalantidium for the homeothermic clade. Moreover, several isolates from both captive and wild primates (excluding great apes clustered with B. sulcata with high support, suggesting the existence of a new species within this genus. The cysts of Buxtonella and Neobalantidium are morphologically indistinguishable and the presence of Buxtonella-like ciliates in primates opens the question about possible occurrence of these pathogens in humans.

  1. Novel insights into the genetic diversity of Balantidium and Balantidium-like cyst-forming ciliates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Oborník, Miroslav; Horák, Aleš; Petrželková, Klára J; Grim, J Norman; Levecke, Bruno; Todd, Angelique; Mulama, Martin; Kiyang, John; Modrý, David

    2013-01-01

    Balantidiasis is considered a neglected zoonotic disease with pigs serving as reservoir hosts. However, Balantidium coli has been recorded in many other mammalian species, including primates. Here, we evaluated the genetic diversity of B. coli in non-human primates using two gene markers (SSrDNA and ITS1-5.8SDNA-ITS2). We analyzed 49 isolates of ciliates from fecal samples originating from 11 species of captive and wild primates, domestic pigs and wild boar. The phylogenetic trees were computed using Bayesian inference and Maximum likelihood. Balantidium entozoon from edible frog and Buxtonella sulcata from cattle were included in the analyses as the closest relatives of B. coli, as well as reference sequences of vestibuliferids. The SSrDNA tree showed the same phylogenetic diversification of B. coli at genus level as the tree constructed based on the ITS region. Based on the polymorphism of SSrDNA sequences, the type species of the genus, namely B. entozoon, appeared to be phylogenetically distinct from B. coli. Thus, we propose a new genus Neobalantidium for the homeothermic clade. Moreover, several isolates from both captive and wild primates (excluding great apes) clustered with B. sulcata with high support, suggesting the existence of a new species within this genus. The cysts of Buxtonella and Neobalantidium are morphologically indistinguishable and the presence of Buxtonella-like ciliates in primates opens the question about possible occurrence of these pathogens in humans. PMID:23556024

  2. Parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar

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    Ilić Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild ruminants and wild boar belong to the order Artiodactyla, the suborders Ruminantia and Nonruminantia and are classified as wild animals for big game hunting, whose breeding presents a very important branch of the hunting economy. Diseases caused by protozoa are rarely found in wild ruminants in nature. Causes of coccidiosis, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, sarcocystiosis, giardiasis, babesiosis, and theileriosis have been diagnosed in deer. The most significant helminthoses in wild ruminants are fasciosis, dicrocoeliasis, paramphistomosis, fascioloidosis, cysticercosis, anoplocephalidosis, coenurosis, echinococcosis, pulmonary strongyloidiasis, parasitic gastroenteritis, strongyloidiasis and trichuriasis, with certain differences in the extent of prevalence of infection with certain species. The most frequent ectoparasitoses in wild deer and doe are diseases caused by ticks, mites, scabies mites, and hypoderma. The most represented endoparasitoses in wild boar throughout the world are coccidiosis, balantidiasis, metastrongyloidiasis, verminous gastritis, ascariasis, macracanthorhynchosis, trichinelosis, trichuriasis, cystecercosis, echinococcosis, and less frequently, there are also fasciolosis and dicrocoeliasis. The predominant ectoparasitoses in wild boar are ticks and scabies mites. Knowledge of the etiology and epizootiology of parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar is of extreme importance for the process of promoting the health protection system for animals and humans, in particular when taking into account the biological and ecological hazard posed by zoonotic infections.