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Sample records for balantidiasis

  1. Summarize of inspection and quarantine technology of balantidiasis%小袋纤毛虫病检疫技术概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军骅

    2013-01-01

      小袋纤毛虫病是由结肠小袋纤毛虫侵入肠壁引起的一种动物源性寄生虫病,寄生于人体的结肠引起的一种以腹泻为主要症状的肠道原虫病。本虫是人体内最大的寄生原虫,本病呈世界性分布,我国的云南、广西、广东等省,均有病例发生,引起巨大的经济损失,并威胁公共卫生安全。本文对小袋纤毛虫病的产地检疫技术、屠宰检疫技术和实验室检疫技术进行简要概述。%Balantidiasis is a kind of parasitosis caused by the invading of the intes-tinal wall of the Balantidium coli, which parasitize in the colon arousing diar-rhea. This parasite is the largest in the human body and distribute all over the world. Many area in China has a prevalence of this disease, make a huge economic losses and a big threat of public health security. In this article producing area quarantine inspection technology, slaughter inspection technology and lab inspec-tion technology is described.

  2. Balantidiasis in a dromedarian camel

    OpenAIRE

    Tajik, Javad; Fard, Saeid R Nourollahi; paidar, Amin; Anousheh, Samaneh; Dehghani, Elahe

    2013-01-01

    A 3 years old male dromedarian camel was examined because of anorexia and diarrhea. The affected camel was depressed, tachycardic, eupnic, and had a body temperature of 38.8 °C. Mucous membranes were hyperemic and faeces was soft and mucous coated but of normal colour and odour. Faecal examination revealed a large number of Balantidium coli trophozoites and cysts (15 000/g) and no other parasite could be detected in faecal sample. Seven days after the onset of treatment using intramuscular an...

  3. Parasite-related diarrhoeas*

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    This article reviews available knowledge on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, immunology, diagnosis, and therapy of parasite-related diarrhoeas of public health importance, primarily amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, balantidiasis, coccidioses, schistosomiasis, and capillariasis. Research priorities are recommended in each of these fields with the aim of developing better means of prevention and treatment.

  4. Neglected Tropical Diseases of Oceania: Review of Their Prevalence, Distribution, and Opportunities for Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kline, Kevin; James S. McCarthy; Pearson, Mark; Loukas, Alex; Hotez, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Among Oceania's population of 35 million people, the greatest number living in poverty currently live in Papua New Guinea (PNG), Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands. These impoverished populations are at high risk for selected NTDs, including Necator americanus hookworm infection, strongyloidiasis, lymphatic filariasis (LF), balantidiasis, yaws, trachoma, leprosy, and scabies, in addition to outbreaks of dengue and other arboviral infections including Japanese encephalitis virus infection....

  5. Parasitic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; McQuade, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complications, such as perforation or bleeding. Protozoa and helminths (worms) are the two major classes of intestinal parasites. Protozoal intestinal infections include cryptosporidiosis, cystoisosporiasis, cyclosporiasis, balantidiasis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and Chagas disease, while helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, and schistosomiasis. Intestinal parasites are predominantly small intestine pathogens but the large intestine is also frequently involved. This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment. PMID:26034403

  6. Preliminary insights into the impact of dietary starch on the ciliate, Neobalantidium coli, in captive chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Schovancová

    Full Text Available Infections caused by the intestinal ciliate Neobalantidium coli are asymptomatic in most hosts. In humans and captive African great apes clinical infections occasionally occur, manifested mainly by dysentery; however, factors responsible for development of clinical balantidiasis have not been fully clarified. We studied the effect of dietary starch on the intensities of infection by N. coli in two groups of captive chimpanzees. Adult chimpanzees infected by N. coli from the Hodonín Zoo and from the Brno Zoo, Czech Republic, were fed with a high starch diet (HSD (average 14.7% of starch for 14 days, followed by a five-day transition period and subsequently with a period of low starch diet (LoSD (average 0.1% of starch for another 14 days. We collected fecal samples during the last seven days of HSD and LoSD and fixed them in 10% formalin. We quantified trophozoites of N. coli using the FLOTAC method. The numbers of N. coli trophozoites were higher during the HSD (mean ± SD: 49.0 ± 134.7 than during the LoSD (3.5 ± 6.8. A generalized linear mixed-effects model revealed significantly lower numbers of the N. coli trophozoites in the feces during the LoSD period in comparison to the HSD period (treatment contrast LoSD vs. HSD: 2.7 ± 0.06 (SE, z = 47.7; p<<0.001. We conclude that our data provide a first indication that starch-rich diet might be responsible for high intensities of infection of N. coli in captive individuals and might predispose them for clinically manifested balantidiasis. We discuss the potential nutritional modifications to host diets that can be implemented in part to control N. coli infections.

  7. Neglected tropical diseases of Oceania: review of their prevalence, distribution, and opportunities for control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kline

    Full Text Available Among Oceania's population of 35 million people, the greatest number living in poverty currently live in Papua New Guinea (PNG, Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands. These impoverished populations are at high risk for selected NTDs, including Necator americanus hookworm infection, strongyloidiasis, lymphatic filariasis (LF, balantidiasis, yaws, trachoma, leprosy, and scabies, in addition to outbreaks of dengue and other arboviral infections including Japanese encephalitis virus infection. PNG stands out for having the largest number of cases and highest prevalence for most of these NTDs. However, Australia's Aboriginal population also suffers from a range of significant NTDs. Through the Pacific Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis, enormous strides have been made in eliminating LF in Oceania through programs of mass drug administration (MDA, although LF remains widespread in PNG. There are opportunities to scale up MDA for PNG's major NTDs, which could be accomplished through an integrated package that combines albendazole, ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine, and azithromycin, in a program of national control. Australia's Aboriginal population may benefit from appropriately integrated MDA into primary health care systems. Several emerging viral NTDs remain important threats to the region.

  8. Neglected tropical diseases of Oceania: review of their prevalence, distribution, and opportunities for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Kevin; McCarthy, James S; Pearson, Mark; Loukas, Alex; Hotez, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Among Oceania's population of 35 million people, the greatest number living in poverty currently live in Papua New Guinea (PNG), Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands. These impoverished populations are at high risk for selected NTDs, including Necator americanus hookworm infection, strongyloidiasis, lymphatic filariasis (LF), balantidiasis, yaws, trachoma, leprosy, and scabies, in addition to outbreaks of dengue and other arboviral infections including Japanese encephalitis virus infection. PNG stands out for having the largest number of cases and highest prevalence for most of these NTDs. However, Australia's Aboriginal population also suffers from a range of significant NTDs. Through the Pacific Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis, enormous strides have been made in eliminating LF in Oceania through programs of mass drug administration (MDA), although LF remains widespread in PNG. There are opportunities to scale up MDA for PNG's major NTDs, which could be accomplished through an integrated package that combines albendazole, ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine, and azithromycin, in a program of national control. Australia's Aboriginal population may benefit from appropriately integrated MDA into primary health care systems. Several emerging viral NTDs remain important threats to the region. PMID:23383349

  9. Parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild ruminants and wild boar belong to the order Artiodactyla, the suborders Ruminantia and Nonruminantia and are classified as wild animals for big game hunting, whose breeding presents a very important branch of the hunting economy. Diseases caused by protozoa are rarely found in wild ruminants in nature. Causes of coccidiosis, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, sarcocystiosis, giardiasis, babesiosis, and theileriosis have been diagnosed in deer. The most significant helminthoses in wild ruminants are fasciosis, dicrocoeliasis, paramphistomosis, fascioloidosis, cysticercosis, anoplocephalidosis, coenurosis, echinococcosis, pulmonary strongyloidiasis, parasitic gastroenteritis, strongyloidiasis and trichuriasis, with certain differences in the extent of prevalence of infection with certain species. The most frequent ectoparasitoses in wild deer and doe are diseases caused by ticks, mites, scabies mites, and hypoderma. The most represented endoparasitoses in wild boar throughout the world are coccidiosis, balantidiasis, metastrongyloidiasis, verminous gastritis, ascariasis, macracanthorhynchosis, trichinelosis, trichuriasis, cystecercosis, echinococcosis, and less frequently, there are also fasciolosis and dicrocoeliasis. The predominant ectoparasitoses in wild boar are ticks and scabies mites. Knowledge of the etiology and epizootiology of parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar is of extreme importance for the process of promoting the health protection system for animals and humans, in particular when taking into account the biological and ecological hazard posed by zoonotic infections.

  10. Concurrent infection and seasonal distribution of gastrointestinal parasites in cross-bred cattle of Sirajganj district in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aktaruzzaman,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the extent of concurrent infection and seasonal distribution of gastrointestinal parasites in cross-bred cattle of Shahzadpur upazila of Sirajganj district, Bangladesh.Materials and Methods: Faecal samples from 4248 cross-bred cattle presented to the diagnostic centre of Milk Vita, Baghabari, Sirajganj with complains of digestive disturbances over the period from November, 2008 to October, 2009 were examined grossly with naked eye followed by microscopic examination with direct smear method, Will's floatation and sedimentation techniques.Results: Out of 4248 faecal samples examined, 3268 (76.93% samples harboured one or more parasitic ova or cyst and the rest 980 (23.07% samples found free of parasitic ova or cyst. Among the positive cases, single infection of fascioliasis (29.0.5%, paramphistomiasis (8.3%, toxocariasis (11.32%, haemonchosis (2.47%, monieziasis (0.7%, balantidiasis (4.19%, trichuriasis (1.1%, trichostrongylosis (1.4% and strongyloidosis (1.6% were diagnosed. Mixed infection with at least two (dual infection and/ or any three of above mentioned parasitic species (triple infection were also recorded. Cattle harbouring eggs of one parasite were more common [60.03% (95% Confidence interval (CI: 58.53, 61.51] than those harbouring eggs of two [15.44% (95% CI, 14.36, 16.56] or three [1.46% (95% CI, 1.12, 1.87] parasites concurrently. Significantly (p0.05. A non-significant (p>0.005 decreasing trend of occurrence from winter through summer and rainy season was also observed in case of trichostrongylosis.Conclusion: The result of current study clearly indicate that helminth infections are highly prevalent in cross-bred cattle of the study area. The findings on abundance and distribution of gastrointestinal parasitism in different age groups of cattle, the poly-parasitism nature of the disease and the seasonal variation of occurrence obtained from present study will therefore assist the clinicians for forecasting of