WorldWideScience

Sample records for balancing radiation risks

  1. Balancing Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Lene; Rossen, Camilla Blach; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how eight pregnant women diagnosed with depression managed the decision whether or not to take antidepressants during pregnancy. In total, 11 interviews were conducted and analysed by means of constructivist grounded theory. The major category constructed was Balancing risk......, with two minor categories: Assessing depression and antidepressants and Evaluating the impact of significant others. The participants tried to make the safest decision, taking all aspects of their life into consideration. They described successful decision-making in the context of managing social norms...

  2. Balancing radiation risks and benefits of cardiac imaging: challenges for developed countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the US, EU, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, although coronary disease mortality has decreased due to improvements in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. In many developed countries, most cardiologists now perform procedures involving radiopharmaceuticals, CT, or fluoroscopy. Their increased utilization, while contributing to improved care for patients with known or suspected heart disease, has been accompanied by a sharp increase in collective doses from medical radiation. E.g., an estimated ∼ 10% (∼ 0.6 mSv/person/y) of the collective dose to the US population is now attributed to nuclear stress tests. Radiation risk from any modality is highly dependent on patient age and gender. Cardiologists, like most non-radiologists, have had limited training in the safe use of radiation and are generally unaware of such facts. While one encouraging sign has been the development of appropriateness criteria for various cardiac imaging modalities, much work remains to advance radiological protection for the tens of millions of patients each year who receive cardiac imaging studies. Here we address current efforts to balance benefits of cardiac imaging with radiation risks, dose-reduction strategies, and future desiderata. General themes are improvements in technology, education, clinical standards, and reimbursement policies for these examinations. The vast majority of nuclear cardiology studies are performed using SPECT, and the radiopharmaceuticals used most widely are 99mTc sestamibi and tetrofosmin, and 201Tl. Effective doses are considerably higher for standard injected activities of 201Tl than for 99mTc agents, and the highest doses, ∼ 24 mSv, are associated with dual isotope (rest 201Tl, stress 99mTc) protocols. E.g., in the US, 1/4 of nuclear stress tests are still performed using dual isotope protocols, a practice fostered by current structuring of reimbursement. Although most stress

  3. Balancing radiation benefits and risks: The needs of an informed public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American public's perceptions regarding ionizing radiation do not always conform to or correlate with scientific evidence. The ultimate purpose of this coordinated Federal effort and report is to increase the public's knowledge of the benefits and risks associated with ionizing radiation. This report is divided into five sections. The first section, Introduction, discusses the public's knowledge of radiation, their perceptions of benefits versus risks, and the Federal government's role in public education. The section also outlines the charge to the Subpanel. Radiation Issues and Public Reactions discusses several radiation issues important to Federal agencies for which public education programs need to be established or enhanced. Federal Programs describes Federal agencies with public education programs on radiation and the nature of the programs they support. Education Issues and Federal Strategies explores the elements identified by the Subpanel as critical to the development and implementation of an effective Federal program in the area of public education on radiation issues and nuclear technologies. An important issue repeatedly brought up during the public sector presentations to the Subpanel was the perceived lack of Federal credibility on radiation issues in the eyes of the public. To some degree, this concern was factored into all of the recommendations developed by the subpanel. The issues discussed in this section include the fragmented nature of Federal radiation programs and the need to improve credibility, promote agency responsiveness, and support the enhancement of scientific literacy. Finally, under Recommendations, the Subpanel discusses its overall findings and conclusions

  4. Balancing technical and socio-political issues in managing risks--the radiation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radioactive discharges from nuclear installations have been reduced to extremely low levels, pressures exist to drive down these levels even further. Because radiation exposure is such an emotive subject, it is particularly important that the decision-making process goes beyond science and economics. The key issue therefore is how the concerns and perceptions of various stakeholders who are less concerned with quantified levels of risk can be factored into the decision-making process in a way which means that if the course of action indicated by technical/economic analysis is not to be followed, then this is done clearly and transparently with an understanding about the implications for priorities in the use of resources to reduce risk. This paper looks at the scientific nature of the risks and how these might be better presented. It also shows the stark choices which exist for the best allocation of resources to reduce risk; and finally, it tries to address the difficult and complex issue of how less-quantifiable socio-political issues might fairly and transparently be included in the total decision-making process. (author)

  5. Radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an evaluation of data available about the deleterious effects of exposure of people to ionising radiation, assuming that the total exposure is low (low dose) or that exposure to dose takes place gradually (low dose rate). It is a revision of the 1985 Health Council report on 'The scientific foundations for radiation protection policy based on the UNSCEAR-77, -82, and BEIR reports'. The report is also meant to be a reply to a request for advice made by the Minister of Welfare, Public Health and Culture in 1989. Scientific opinion on induction of cancer by radiation has clearly changed since 1988. This is a consequence of new publications of epidemiological studies among survivors of the atomic explosions of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Committee that has produced the present report has paid much attention to this development. Besides, in the request for advice just mentioned it is asked whether the margins of uncertainty which complicated the quantitative assessment of the radiation risk can be reduced. Consequently the Committee has dealt extensively with the potential errors and uncertainties in available data. Especially these 2 elements - a careful consideration of a recent shift in scientific opinion and a constant attention for the magnitude of potential uncertainties - have had a predominant influence on the content and design of this report. The Committee has tried to answer as fully as possible the complex question how to transform results of scientific research into a well-organised data set on which the government can base its radiation protection policy. The Committee had also compared its evaluation to the recent recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the points of view of the Dutch policy directive 'Dealing with radiation risks'. (author). 111 refs.; 12 tabs

  6. Risk, Balanced Skills and Entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, C.; Parker, S.C.; Praag, van, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes that risk aversion encourages individuals to invest in balanced skill profiles, making them more likely to become entrepreneurs. By not having taken this possible linkage into account, previous research has underestimated the impacts both of risk aversion and balanced skills on the likelihood individuals choose entrepreneurship. Data on Dutch university graduates provides evidence which supports this contention. It thereby raises the possibility that even risk-averse peopl...

  7. Risks Associated with Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical use of ionizing radiations implies certain risks which are widely balanced by their diagnostic and therapeutic benefits. Nevertheless, knowledge about these risks and how to diagnose and prevent them minimizes their disadvantages and optimizes the quality and safety of the method. This article describes the aspects related to skin dose (nonstochastic effects), the importance of dose limit, the physiopathology of biological damage and, finally, the prevention measures.

  8. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  9. Comprehending radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the problem area covered by nine papers submitted through Riskkollegiet (a Swedish academy on risk) to the IAEA at their request. It introduces the basic concepts of radioactivity, radioactive substances, ionizing radiation and radiation dose, as well as the general concept of risk. The concept ''risk'' has no universally accepted definition and the word ''risk'' is used with several different meanings. The authors discuss attributes usually employed in quantitative presentations of risk: probability of harmful events, and the consequences, should such events occur, but also non-quantitative aspects involved in risk perception, risk comparisons and risk communication. (author)

  10. Radiation risk estimation models.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoel, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer risk models and their relationship to ionizing radiation are discussed. There are many model assumptions and risk factors that have a large quantitative impact on the cancer risk estimates. Other health end points such as mental retardation may be an even more serious risk than cancer for those with in utero exposures.

  11. Radiation balance of soybeans grown in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an experimental study of the radiation balance over a growing soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) crop at a tropical agricultural experimental station, Jaboticabal (22°15′S 48°18′W), São Paulo, Brazil. Incoming shortwave radiation, S, net radiation, R, and the shortwave reflection coefficient, α, were measured over this crop from November 1976 to April 1977, and net longwave radiation, L, was deduced from the radiation balance equation. Hourly variation of the radiation components, S, αS, R and L, are presented for 4 nearly clear sky-days during the different growing crop periods. The diurnal variation of α is also presented for these 4 days. The mean daily albedo values for this vegetative surface were between 0.12 and 0.26, and inversely related to the vegetation height. A regression analysis of the radiation balance equation has been made, and the heating coefficient, β, and the longwave exchange coefficient, λ, obtained. The results of the study indicate that both β and λ are found to be descriptively helpful parameters in agricultural meteorology. Predicted regression equations for net radiation from shortwave radiation are presented for the different periods

  12. Mammography and radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasia among women in Germany. The use of mammography as the most relevant diagnostic procedure has increased rapidly over the last decade. Radiation risks associated with mammography may be estimated from the results of numerous epidemiological studies providing risk coefficients for breast cancer in relation to age at exposure. Various calculations can be performed using the risk coefficients. For instance, a single mammography examination (bilateral, two views of each breast) of a women aged 45 may enhance the risk of developing breast cancer during her lifetime numerically from about 12% of 12.0036%. This increase in risk is lower by a factor of 3,300 as compared to the risk of developing breast cancer in the absence of radiation exposure. At the age of 40 or more, the benefit of mammography exceeds the radiation risk by a factor of about 100. At higher ages this factor increases further. Finally, the dualism of individual risk and collective risk is considered. It is shown that the individual risk of a patient, even after multiple mammography examinations, is vanishingly small. Nevertheless, the basic principle of minimising radiation exposure must be followed to keep the collective risk in the total population as low as reasonably achievable. (orig.)

  13. The Risk Management Balancing Act

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the report is to present the findings from IFC’s recent survey on risk and nonperforming loan management practices in financial institutions together with supporting benchmarks and global trends in risk management. Top tier financial institutions in their respective markets have participated in the survey, including 25 SME focused banks and 2 microfinance institutions in 18 countries (see Exhibit 1). The emphasis on credit risk in this report stems from credit...

  14. Perception of radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perception of risks by people depends on many factors, either characterizing the individuals, or specific to the risk sources. The risk concept, which confuses the issue, is precised first. Second, the perception phenomenon is presented as an interactive process involving the individual, the hazard, and the social context. Third, dimensions of perception are listed and used to describe the perception of radiation risks. Finally, the relation between perception and attitude is clarified. (author) 50 refs

  15. RISK BALANCING IN AN INTEGRATED FARM RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    OpenAIRE

    Escalante, Cesar L.; Barry, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Using optimization techniques in a simulation framework, this study demonstrates the synergy between risk balancing and alternative strategies in effectively reducing risk under changing farm conditions. Highly risk-averse farmers tend to prefer integrated risk-management plans, based on the diversification principle, that yield offsetting combinations of the risk-reducing benefits of most strategies and the profit-generating capacities of the others. The greater appeal of a more diversified ...

  16. Energy Balance and Breast Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, Alecia; Matthews, Charles E.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Hui; Dai, Qi; Jin, Fan; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that a pattern of behavioral exposures indicating positive energy balance [i.e., less exercise/sport activity, high body mass index (BMI), or high energy intake] would be associated with an increased breast cancer risk in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study, a population-based study of 1,459 incident breast cancer cases and 1,556 age frequency-matched controls. Participants completed in-person interviews that collected information on breast cancer risk factors, usual ...

  17. Radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the major publications between 1976 and 1981 that have contributed to the evolution of the way in which radiation risks (cancer and hereditary birth defects) are assessed. The publications include the latest findings of the UNSCEAR, BEIR and ICRP committees, epidemiological studies at low doses and new assessments of the doses received by the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report is not a detailed critique of those publications, but it highlights the impact of their findings on risk assessment

  18. Radiation force and balance of electromagnetic momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, I.; Jiménez, J. L.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Some force densities can be expressed as a divergence of a stress tensor, as is the case with the electromagnetic force density. We have shown elsewhere that from the Maxwell equations several balance equations of electromagnetic momentum can be derived, depending on the form these equations are expressed in terms of fields E, D, B, H, and polarisations P and M. These balance equations imply different force densities and different stress tensors, providing a great flexibility to solve particular problems. Among these force densities we have found some proposed in the past with plausibility arguments, like the Einstein–Laub force density, while other proposed force densities appear as particular or limit cases of these general force densities, like the Helmholtz force density. We calculate the radiation force of an electromagnetic wave incident on a semi-infinite negligibly absorbing material using these balance equations, corroborating in this way that the surface integration of the stress tensor gives the same result that the calculation made through a volume integration of the force density, as done by Bohren. As is usual in applications of Gauss’s theorem, the surface on which the surface integral is to be performed must be chosen judiciously, and due care of discontinuities on the boundary conditions must be taken. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students will find a different approach to new aspects of the interaction of radiation with matter.

  19. The structure of the radiation balance dependent on synoptic situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the studies was to mark daily variation of the radiation balance components in various weather conditions, in the south of Poland. The structure of the radiation balance components are formed differently in various weather types and the intensity of the individual components depend mainly on the cloudiness, fog and the air humidity. The value of total radiation, which is the sum of the solar radiation consisting of the direct radiation and the distracted one, was of the main importance to the radiation balance. At all observed weather types, short wave radiation fluxes were characterized by considerable daily variability in comparison to long wave fluxes. (author)

  20. Radiation effects and radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./MG) With 8 maps in appendix

  1. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  2. The risks of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettenen, Jorma K.

    1988-01-01

    The risks of radioactivity are a really complicated matter, yet they are much better known than are the risks relating to thousands of chemical poisons that occur in our environment. The greatest mistakes are probably made in the definition of safety margins. Except for the bombs dropped in Japan and one other case in the Marshall Islands, there has always—luckily—been a wide safety margin between fallout radiation and doses dangerous to health; the margin has actually been about 1000-fold. The Chernobyl dose of 0.5 mGy/year that we received is only 1/1000 of the acute dose of 0.5 Gy which would cause a slight and nonpermanent change in the blood picture. There is no such safety margin with respect to many air pollutants. The safety standards for sulfuric or nitric oxides, ozone and so on, have been set only just below the level that already causes a health hazard, and these standards are exceeded once in a while. Otherwise, traffic would have to be forbidden and many industrial plants, especially power stations using coal, would have to stop working whenever a low-temperature inversion occurred. Environmental radioactivity does not represent a likely health risk in Finland unless a nuclear war breaks out. Air pollutants, on the contrary, are a real and almost daily health risk that should be carefully considered when decisions about our energy production are being made. In spite of what happened at Chernobyl, global consumption of nuclear power will double by the year 2000, since there are about 140 nuclear power plants presently under construction. It is not likely that another catastrophe like Chernobyl will happen, yet nuclear plant accidents are of course possible, even if their likelihood is diminished by improving reactor safety and even if any eventual damage could be expected to be smaller. If a reactor is hooded by a containment structure, no significant release of radioactive materials should be possible even in case of an accident. However, we must

  3. Radiation exposures: risks and realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discovery of radioactivity in 1869 by Henry Becquerel and artificial radioactivity by Irene Curie in 1934 led to the development of nuclear field and nuclear materials in 20th century. They are widely used for man-kind across the globe in electricity production, carbon dating, treatment and diagnosis of diseases etc. While deriving benefits and utilizing nuclear resources for the benefit of man-kind, it is inevitable that exposure to radiation can not be avoided. Radiation exists all around us either natural or man-made which can not be totally eliminated or avoided. Radiation exposures from natural background contribute 2.4 to 3.6 mSv in a year. Radiation exposures incurred by a member of public due to nuclear industries constitute less than one hundredth of annual dose due to natural background. Hence it is important to understand the risk posed by radiation and comparison of radiation risk with various risks arising due to other sources. Studies have indicated that risks due to environmental pollution, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, heart diseases are far higher in magnitude compared to radiation risks from man made sources. This paper brings about the details and awareness regarding radiation exposures, radiation risk, various risks associated with other industries and benefits of radiation exposures. (author)

  4. Does radiation risk exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessment and risk management are parts of a dynamic process with the objective to decide on the tolerability of risk and on measures to keep risk within accepted limits. It enables all relevant parties to express their concerns and preferences regarding the different options for the human action involved and regarding the relative importance of criteria to decide on the tolerability of risk. Risk assessment has three phases; problem definition, risk analysis and risk characterization. Risk analysis is primarily a technical and scientific endeavour. With regard to problem definition and ride characterization consultation between risk assessors and risk managers (and other parties concerned) is a must. (author)

  5. Radiation risk and radiation protection concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revised dosimetry for the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki implies an increased risk from low LET radiation compared with that currently used. During its meeting in 1987 the ICRP stated that the new data at present do not require any change in the dose limits. However, two other factors can cause larger changes in the present risk estimates. Firstly, for some types of cancer the relative risk model seems to describe the observed data better than the absolute risk model currently used by the ICRP. Secondly, the shape of the dose-response relationship considerably influences the derived risks. In the present paper the factor causing a substantial increase in radiation risk are analyzed. Conclusions are drawn in how far a change in the currently recommended dose limits seems to be necessary. (author)

  6. Risk assessment perspectives in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk evaluation involves a) optimization, where collective dose is reduced by application of controls, b) justification, where benefits and costs are balanced, and c) application of dose limits. Justification may be determined in general by examining the difference between the new practice and a reference condition in the form of a diference equation. This equation is expanded to take into account other risks in addition to radiation risks. The relative potencies of some toxic chemicals are compared with those of some isotopes. Nuclear and waste disposal accidents are also considered. It is concluded that a probablistic analysis may be useful for resolving the high level radioactive waste question but not for nuclear accidents. However, in the latter case, relative risk models may provide insight into the causes of risk and where resources for reducing the risk may be best spent. (H.K.)

  7. Ionizing radiation and occupational risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brochure gives information about the risks of working with ionizing radiation. It tries to give answers to frequently posed questions, like; what is ionizing radiation; what are the biological consequences; which are the juridicial rules for inspection and control in the Netherlands. The auditory of the publication is thought to be: radiological workers, or employees working in the neighbourhood of ionizing radiation sources, radiation experts, safety experts and medical officers. (Auth.)

  8. Carcinogenic risks of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionising radiations are known since the end of the 19th century. Early, after being discovered, they were applied in Medicine and the association with an increased number of different malignant tumors was proved. This paper presents a literature review concerning epidemiological proof of radiation induced cancer, molecular mechanisms and factors that increase or decrease the carcinogenic action of ionizing radiations

  9. Radiation balance of an alfalfa crop in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-wave reflectivity or albedo is an important component of net radiation which represents the major determinant of radiation balance of crop surface. This study was conducted on an irrigated alfalfa crop field at Al-Kharj agricultural area in Saudi Arabia, grown according to normal agricultural practices. Data on radiation balance and crop cover were collected over a number of days from March to October 1986, crop albedo varying from 0–4 in early morning to 0–20 at noon, the overall mean value of the crop albedo being estimated at 0–26. The relation between the individual components of radiation balance was studied, and a significant correlation between incident radiation and net radiation was found. Possible causes responsible for changes in crop albedo were discussed. (author)

  10. Ionizing radiation: benefits vs. risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No one has been identifiably injured by radiation within the levels set by the NCRP and ICRP in 1934. This fact and the level of natural radiation (average dose 102 millirems/year) help provide standards against which the authors can view the relative increases in exposure from manmade sources of radiation. Because one person in five in the US will die of cancer from all causes, it is impossible to detect small increases in some types of cancer from radiation. A valid assumption is that any exposure to radiation carries some possibility of harm and should be kept below the level of the expected benefits. More is known about radiation toxicity than about any other potentially toxic substances. An obstacle to progress in the use of radioactive materials in biology and medicine is an exaggerated impression by the public of the risk of radiation. Several studies indicate that the public perceives the risk of radiation to be the greatest of all societal risks and at times does not distinguish peaceful from military uses of radiation. It behooves scientists and physicians to inform the public about the benefits as well as the risks of procedures involving radiation

  11. Macro risk premium and intermediary balance sheet quantities

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias ADRIAN; Moench, Emanuel; Shin, Hyun Song

    2010-01-01

    The macro risk premium measures the threshold return for real activity that receives funding from savers. We base our argument in this paper on the relationship between the macro risk premium and the growth of financial intermediaries' balance sheets. The spare capacity of their balance sheets determines the intermediaries' risk appetite, which in turn determines the real projects that receive funding and, hence, the supply of credit. Monetary policy affects risk appetite by changing the abil...

  12. Theoretical analysis of radiation-balanced double clad fiber laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ji-xin; SUI Zhan; CHEN Fu-shen; LI Ming-zhong; WANG Jian-jun

    2005-01-01

    In this letter,a theoretical model of radiation-balanced double clad fiber laser is presented.The characteristic of the laser with Yb doped double clad fiber is analyzed numerically.It is concluded that high output laser power can be obtained by selecting output coupling mirror with lower reflectivity,improving Yb doped concentration and choosing fiber length. This result can help us to design radiation balanced fiber laser.

  13. Competing risk theory and radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New statistical procedures are applied to estimate cumulative distribution functions (c.d.f.), force of mortality, and latent period for radiation-induced malignancies. It is demonstrated that correction for competing risks influences the shape of dose response curves, estimates of the latent period, and of the risk from ionizing radiations. The equivalence of the following concepts is demonstrated: force of mortality, hazard rate, and age or time specific incidence. This equivalence makes it possible to use procedures from reliability analysis and demography for radiation risk assessment. Two methods used by reliability analysts - hazard plotting and total time on test plots - are discussed in some detail and applied to characterize the hazard rate in radiation carcinogenesis. C.d.f.'s with increasing, decreasing, or constant hazard rate have different shapes and are shown to yield different dose-response curves for continuous irradiation. Absolute risk is shown to be a sound estimator only if the force of mortality is constant for the exposed and the control group. Dose-response relationships that use the absolute risk as a measure for the effect turn out to be special cases of dose-response relationships that measure the effect with cumulative incidence. (H.K.)

  14. Radiation balance in the sweet sorghum crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluxes of incident solar radiation, reflected and net radiation were measured during the growing cicle of two fields of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), cus. BR-501 and BR-503, maintained under convenient irrigation level. Resultant data allowed to estimate the crop albedo as well as the estimates of Rn. (M.A.C.)

  15. Perception of radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perception of risk depends on the context of a hazard, on the type of hazard, and on the type of persons who make the judgements. In addition, investigations of perceived risk are sensitive to the choice of methodology and study design. Perceptions of hazards, and risk ratings, must therefore be evaluated in relation to the specific objective or event at hand. Given these guidelines, public as well as individual reactions to hazards and risks can be understood and predicted fairly well. 46 refs, 3 figs

  16. Sarcoma risk after radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrington de Gonzalez Amy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sarcomas were one of the first solid cancers to be linked to ionizing radiation exposure. We reviewed the current evidence on this relationship, focusing particularly on the studies that had individual estimates of radiation doses. There is clear evidence of an increased risk of both bone and soft tissue sarcomas after high-dose fractionated radiation exposure (10 + Gy in childhood, and the risk increases approximately linearly in dose, at least up to 40 Gy. There are few studies available of sarcoma after radiotherapy in adulthood for cancer, but data from cancer registries and studies of treatment for benign conditions confirm that the risk of sarcoma is also increased in this age-group after fractionated high-dose exposure. New findings from the long-term follow-up of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors suggest, for the first time, that sarcomas can be induced by acute lower-doses of radiation (

  17. Radiation risk in space exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humans living and working in space are exposed to energetic charged particle radiation due to galactic cosmic rays and solar particle emissions. In order to keep the risk due to radiation exposure of astronauts below acceptable levels, the physical interaction of these particles with space structures and the biological consequences for crew members need to be understood. Such knowledge is, to a large extent, very sparse when it is available at all. Radiation limits established for space radiation protection purposes are based on extrapolation of risk from Japanese survivor data, and have been found to have large uncertainties. In space, attempting to account for large uncertainties by worst-case design results in excessive costs and accurate risk prediction is essential. It is best developed at ground-based laboratories, using particle accelerator beams to simulate individual components of space radiation. Development of mechanistic models of the action of space radiation is expected to lead to the required improvements in the accuracy of predictions, to optimization of space structures for radiation protection and, eventually, to the development of biological methods of prevention and intervention against radiation injury. (author)

  18. Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure to ionizing space radiation is challenging in part because of uncertainties of low-dose distribution amongst cells, of unknown potentially synergistic effects of microgravity upon cellular protein-expression, and of processing dose-related damage within cells to produce rare and late-appearing malignant transformation, degrade the confidence of cancer risk-estimates. The NASA- specific responsibility to estimate the risks of radiogenic cancer in a limited number of astronauts is not amenable to epidemiologic study, thereby increasing this challenge. Developing adequately sensitive cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report 1) the quantity of absorbed close after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing malignant transformation by the cells absorbing that dose could be useful for resolving these challenges. Use of a multiparametric cellular biodosimeter is suggested using analyses of gene-expression and protein-expression whereby large datasets of cellular response to radiation-induced damage are obtained and analyzed for expression-profiles correlated with established end points and molecular markers predictive for cancer-risk. Analytical techniques of genomics and proteomics may be used to establish dose-dependency of multiple gene- and protein- expressions resulting from radiation-induced cellular damage. Furthermore, gene- and protein-expression from cells in microgravity are known to be altered relative to cells grown on the ground at 1g. Therefore, hypotheses are proposed that 1) macromolecular expression caused by radiation-induced damage in cells in microgravity may be different than on the ground, and 2) different patterns of macromolecular expression in microgravity may alter human radiogenic cancer risk relative to radiation exposure on Earth. A new paradigm is accordingly suggested as a national database wherein genomic and

  19. Influence of soybean pubescence type on radiation balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing the density of pubescence on the leaves and stems of soybeans (Glycine max L.) should influence the radiation balance of the soybean canopy and affect the evapotranspiration and photosynthetic rates. This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of increased pubescence density on various components of the radiation balance. Near-isogenic lines of two soybean cultivars (Clark and Harosoy) were grown in four adjacent small plots (18 m · 18 m) during the 1980, 1981, and 1982 growing seasons near Mead, Nebr. The soil at this site is classified as a Typic Argiudoll. The isolines of each cultivar varied only in the amount of pubescence (dense vs. normal pubescence). Measurements of albedo, reflected photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), emitted longwave radiation, and net radiation were made over the crop surfaces with instruments mounted on a rotating boom located at the intersection of the four plots. Radiative canopy temperatures were measured with a handheld infrared thermometer (IRT). Results show that dense pubescence increased reflection of shortwave radiation and PAR by 3 to 5% and 8 to 11%, respectively. Emitted longwave radiation and radiative canopy temperature were not significantly affected by increased pubescence, although there was a slight tendency for the dense pubescent canopy to be cooler. Increased pubescence decreased net radiation over the canopy by 0.5 to 1.5%. These results suggest that soybeans with dense pubescence may be slightly better adapted to the high radiation, high temperature, and limited moisture conditions of the eastern Great Plains than are those with normal pubescence

  20. Including "evidentiary balance" in news media coverage of vaccine risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christopher E; Dixon, Graham N; Holton, Avery; McKeever, Brooke Weberling

    2015-01-01

    Journalists communicating risk-related uncertainty must accurately convey scientific evidence supporting particular conclusions. Scholars have explored how "balanced" coverage of opposing risk claims shapes uncertainty judgments. In situations where a preponderance of evidence points to a particular conclusion, balanced coverage reduces confidence in such a consensus and heightens uncertainty about whether a risk exists. Using the autism-vaccine controversy as a case study, we describe how journalists can cover multiple sides of an issue and provide insight into where the strength of evidence lies by focusing on "evidentiary balance." Our results suggest that evidentiary balance shapes perceived certainty that vaccines are safe, effective, and not linked to autism through the mediating role of a perception that scientists are divided about whether a link exists. Deference toward science, moreover, moderates these relationships under certain conditions. We discuss implications for journalism practice and risk communication. PMID:25010352

  1. Ionizing radiation, genetic risks and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With one method of risk estimation, designed as the doubling dose method, the estimates of total genetic risk (i.e., over all generation) for a population continuously exposed at a rate of 0.01 Gy/generation of low LET irradiation are about 120 cases of Mendelian and chromosomal diseases/106 live births and about the same number of cases for multifactorial diseases (i.e., a total of 240 cases/106). These estimates provide the basis for risk coefficients for genetic effects estimated by ICRP (1991) in its Publication 60. These are: 1.0%/Sv for the general population (which is 40% of 240/106/0.01 Gy), and 0.6%/Sv for radiation workers (which is 60% of that for the general population). The results of genetic studies carried out on the Japanese survivors of A-bombs have shown no significant adverse effects attributable to parental radiation exposures. The studies of Gardner and colleagues suggest that the risk of leukaemia in children born to male workers in the nuclear reprocessing facility in Sellafield, U.K., may be increased. However, this finding is at variance with the results from the Japanese studies and at present, does not lend itself to a simple interpretation based on radiobiological principles. In the light of recent advances in the molecular biology of naturally-occurring human Mendelian diseases and what we presently know about multifactorial diseases, arguments are advanced to support the thesis that (i) current risk estimates for Mendelian diseases may be conservative and (ii) an overall doubling dose for all adverse genetic effects may be higher than the 1 Gy currently used (i.e., the relative risks are probably lower). (author)

  2. Radiation risk of diagnostical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental radiation burden of man in Germany is about 1 mGy (Milligray) per year. This is, of course, also valid for children. Due to diagnostical procedures this burden is increased to about 1.3 mGy. The question arises wether this can be neglected, or important consequences have to be drawn. To give a clear answer, the action of ionizing radiation in living cells and in organisms is explained in detail. Many of the radiation actions at the DNA can soon be repaired by the cell, if the radiation dose was small. Some damage, however will remain irreparable for the cell and consequently leads to cell death, to mutations or to cell transformation. The number of these lesion increases or decreases linearily with radiation dose. Therefore, it must be expected that the risk of tumour induction is increased to above the normal background even by the smallest doses. This small but not negligible risk has to be compared with other risks of civilization or with other medical risks. But also the benefit and the efficacy of diagnostic procedures have to be considered. (orig./HSCH)

  3. Breast carcinogenesis: risk of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of radiation carcinogenesis in the opposite breast is a major concern for physicians and breast cancer patients who choose to preserve the involved breast through conservation treatment, i.e., conservation survey and radiation therapy. In analyzing the carcinogenic effect of irradiation on the breast, the radiobiologic risks assumed from the studies must be evaluated first in order to determine the accuracy of the epidemiologic data and radiation dosage. It is generally assumed from the carcinogenic studies that radiation is carcinogenic at any dose rate. However, it is well-known that low dose rates are less effective at producing cancer in animal species than high dose rates. However, in most epidemiologic studies no apparent account is taken of dose rate. Also, there are technical differences between the irradiation received by individuals involved in most epidemiologic studies and the therapeutic irradiation received by breast cancer patients. All of these factors make it difficult, if not impossible, to directly correlate the irradiation risk ascertained from the studies and modern radiotherapy. This paper examines what risk exists and how great it is

  4. Radiation risk and science education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost everywhere the topic of radioactivity is taught in the physics or chemistry classes of secondary schools. The question has been raised whether the common approach of teaching this topic would contribute to a better understanding of the risks of ionising radiation: and, if the answer is negative, how to explain and improve this situation? In a Dutch research programme which took almost ten years, answers to this question have been sought by means of analyses of newspaper reports, curriculum development, consultation with radiation experts, physics textbook analysis, interviews and questionnaires with teachers and pupils, class observations and curriculum development. Th main results of this study are presented and some recommendations given for science teaching and for communication with the public in general as regards radiation risk. (author)

  5. Farm household risk balancing: empirical evidence from Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mey, de Yann; Wauters, E.; Schmid, D.; Passel, van S.; Vancauteren, Mark; Lips, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first empirical evidence on household risk balancing behavior, i.e., strategic off-farm decisions in response to changes in expected business risk. Using Swiss FADN data, we estimate a fixed effects seemingly unrelated regression model to analyze how farm households jointly a

  6. Managing industrial price risk: a balancing act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenge of managing industrial price risk is assessed by a senior executive of Cargill, a diversified industrial conglomerate, involved in steel manufacturing and recycling, oilseeds, cocoa, beef, pork, and poultry processing, fertilizer and fruit juice production, in addition to trading and financial risk management. Energy is a key component in many of Cargill's businesses, hence the company has good reason to be concerned about price volatility. The effects of energy risk management on the company's shareholders are demonstrated by an analysis of month-to-month price fluctuations over the Nov 1999 to Oct 2000 period, showing the monthly value of risk at the 95 per cent confidence level as $4,832,195. The effects of alternatives for an end-user such as passing on cost to customers, improving energy efficiency. fuel switching and production curtailment, are explored and limitations and problems with each of the approaches are discussed. The best options for industrial end-users of natural gas are suggested to be a proactive risk management program in the short-term and asset diversification, fuel switching, and geographic relocation of production facilities in the long-term

  7. Concept of normalization of random radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility for the normal realization in parallel with collective radiation risk and individual risk was considered. Normalization of risk for the individual person, which is exposed to the maximum radiation dose effect, is suggested. It must be kept in mind not only probability of surpassing assigned dose but distribution of number of the specific contingent of the persons by radiation risk, and must define risk of the most irradiated person from this contingent. The impacts of bivariate normalization of risk are illustrated

  8. Radiation balance, transpiration and photosynthesis of an isolated tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation balance of an isolated walnut tree was measured using an experimental Whirligig device. The total amount of all-wave radiation absorbed by the tree canopy was used to estimate transpiration rates using a Penman-Monteith model. The results compared favourably with tree water use, measured by the heat-pulse technique. The total amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by the tree canopy was combined with a photosynthetic light response curve to estimate net photosynthesis rates. The results compare favourably with published data from other tree canopies. Daily energy balance calculations showed that on average, about two-thirds of the total radiant energy absorbed by the tree canopy was dissipated as latent heat in the form of transpiration. The dominant environmental variable influencing transpiration was the vapour pressure deficit of the air. Almost two-thirds of the net latent heat flux was attributable to the vapour pressure deficit component, with the remainder owing to the radiation component. Daily transpiration-assimilation ratios varied from day to day in response to changing environmental conditions, but generally decreased with increasing net photosynthesis and with increasing transpiration. This appears to be the first time that such a direct measurement of the energy balance and photosynthesis of a single tree has been made. (author)

  9. Balancing requirements for radioactive waste management and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors recall the principles of radiation protection and their application to radioactive waste management. The dose limitation system applies to every stage in management. The accepted risk limits should be compared with the level of risk from other sources, particularly from natural radiation. The uncertainties associated with long-term estimates should not lead to unrealistic requirements. The optimum rules are to be obtained by discussion among those responsible for radiation protection, nuclear safety and radioactive waste management. Satisfactory, applicable rules can be worked out in the present state of the art

  10. Balancing the risks: Choosing climate alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very aggressive reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are needed over the next ten years to avoid a 'planet on fire'. Current sub-national, national and international policy assumes that carbon sequestration, biofuels, nuclear power, ocean fertilization, atmospheric aerosols, and other such technologies, which heretofore have been considered too novel or too dangerous to use, will have to be deployed at large scale, globally. Moving forward with promising technologies that might preserve us from the consequences of global warming will be difficult because they also pose potential hazards, promise uncertain benefits, and in some cases are already burdened with restrictive legislation and poor public image. The lack of a rational process of risk assessment and public decision making is likely to lead to a poor long-term outcome. Moreover, the standard administrative and political processes used to assess such risks can take years, time that we do not have. Principled and practical policymaking demand citizens participate in the decision to develop and use these novel technologies. Environmental assessment, horizon scanning, and new research on human and organizational factors suggest techniques to improve technology development decisions.

  11. Risk assessment of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This commentary describes the radiation cancer risk assessed by international organizations other than ICRP, assessed for radon and for internal exposure, in the series from the aspect of radiation protection of explaining the assessments done until ICRP Pub. 103. Statistic significant increase of cancer formation is proved at higher doses than 100-200 mSv. At lower doses, with use of mathematical model, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) reported the death probability due to the excess lifetime risk (ELR) at 100 mSv of 0.36-0.77% for solid tumors and 0.03-0.05% for leukemia, and NRC in US, the risk of exposure-induced prevalence and death (REID) per 100 thousands persons of 800 (male)/1,310 (female) and 410/610, respectively. Both are essentially based on findings in A-bomb survivors. The assessment for Rn is described here not on dose. UK and US analyses of pooled raw data in case control studies revealed the significant increase of lung cancer formation at as low level as 100 Bq Rn/m3. Their analyses also showed the significance of smoking, which had been realized as a confounding factor in risk analysis of Rn for uranium miners. The death probability until the age of 85 y was found to be 1.2 x 10-4 in non-smokers and 24 x 10-4 in smokers/ Working Level Month (WLM). Increased thyroid cancer incidence has been known in Chernobyl Accident, which is realized as a result of internal exposure of radioiodine; however, the relationship between the internal dose to thyroid and its cancer prevalence resembles that in the case of external exposure. There is no certain evidence against the concept that risk of internal exposure is similar to and/or lower than, the external one although assessment of the internal exposure risk accompanies uncertainty depending on the used model and ingested dose. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations hitherto have been important and precious despite

  12. Analysis of the temporal variation of radiation balance components in arid rice (Oryza sativa L.) culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time variation of measured radiation balance components in a cultived rice area (Oryza sativa L.) under arid conditions in the Brazil central-west region was analysed. The relation between global solar radiation, radiation balance, reflected radiation and terrestrial effective radiation in three different stages of the culture development: vegetative stage; blooming and maturation, was determined. (M.C.K.)

  13. Radiation risks and radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure is an occupational hazard at CRNL. The predicted health effects of low levels of radiation are described and compared with other hazards of living. Data related to the health of radiation workers are also considered. Special attention is given to the expected effects of radiation on the unborn child. Measures taken to protect CRNL employees against undue occupational exposure to radiation are noted

  14. RISK BALANCING STRATEGIES IN THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY: AN APPLICATION OF CONDITIONAL VALUE AT RISK

    OpenAIRE

    Zylstra, Michael J.; Kilmer, Richard L.; Uryasev, Stanislav

    2003-01-01

    Legislation has prompted changes in milk price volatility. Milk price volatility impacts the producer's exposure to business risk which is compound by the firms financial risk. Financial risk is a function of the firms capital structure. In the short run it is difficult for the producer to significantly change the firms capital structure and therefore balance increased business risk with reduced financial risk. The producer can however reduce financial and business risk by using futures contr...

  15. Radiation risks for pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief survey makes evident that in all of the commonly used radiographic or radionuclide examinations the radiation dose received by the embryo/fetus remains far below the 50 mGy tolerance threshold set for the ovaries, beyond which the occurrence of intrauterine damage cannot be entirely ruled out. The range of radiography and radionuclide procedures involving exposure to an ovarian dose in excess of 1 mGy is restricted to such examinations as abdominal angiography, contrast-enhanced visualisation of the colon or scintiscanning of cardiac and skeletal structures. If sufficient caution is observed, the embryonic/fetal risk from carefully chosen radiologic or radionuclide techniques remains within reasonably acceptable limits. Considering the risks inherent in any gestational process, the probability of defective development or even death of the embryo/fetus is described as increased only for the radiotherapeutic dose range. (orig./MG)

  16. Ionization radiations - basis, risks and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to discuss the use of ionizing radiations in an impartial way. Ionizing radiation is potentially harmfull; excessive doses have a devastating effect on living cells. However, there is no direct, conclusive evidence of human disability, either in the form of cancer or genetic anomalies, arising as a consequence of low-level doses of x- or gamma-rays of about 0.01 Gray (1 rad) the entire dose range involved in medical radiography or in nuclear industry. Statements appearing in the press that a certain number of excess cancers will be produced are estimates, based maybe on plausible assumptions, but estimates nevertheless; they are not measured quantities or established facts. A balanced view of radiation must include appreciation of the substantial benefits which result from their use in both medicine and industry. The risks are small and hard to demonstrate, and it is instructive to make a comparison with the other hazards occuring continually in an industrialized society, such as driving a motorcar or smoking cigarettes. (Author)

  17. Postural balance and the risk of falling during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Bulent; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Inanir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological process and many changes occur in a woman's body during pregnancy. These changes occur in all systems to varying degrees, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems. The hormonal, anatomical, and physiological changes occurring during pregnancy result in weight gain, decreased abdominal muscle strength and neuromuscular control, increased ligamentous laxity, and spinal lordosis. These alterations shift the centre of gravity of the body, altering the postural balance and increasing the risk of falls. Falls during pregnancy can cause maternal and foetal complications, such as maternal bone fractures, head injuries, internal haemorrhage, abruption placenta, rupture of the uterus and membranes, and occasionally maternal death or intrauterine foetal demise. Preventative strategies, such as physical exercise and the use of maternity support belts, can increase postural stability and reduce the risk of falls during pregnancy. This article reviews studies that have investigated changes in postural balance and risk of falling during pregnancy. PMID:26212584

  18. Radiation teratogenesis: fetal risk and abortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of radiation on the developing mammalian embryo and especially the human embryo are reviewed. Counseling the women of reproductive age who will be exposed to radiation or have been exposed to radiation is frequently performed by physicians in a cavalies fashion, without the benefit of knowing the radiation exposure or the risks. The patient should be made aware of the radiation hazards to the embryos by individuals who are knowledgeable. Human radiation teratogenesis is described

  19. Рlace of off-balance sheet risks among banking risks

    OpenAIRE

    N.G. Vygovska; V.G. Vygovskyy

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the assessment of scientific approaches to the classification of banking risks, clarifying their classifications and types, the place of off-balance sheet risks in the proposed classification. It was determined that the complexity of identifying the risks is associated with fuzzy and multi-directional positions on the allocation of its classification. The article specifies the signs of risk classification and singles out the banking risks which contributes to the imp...

  20. Balancing Life with an Increased Risk of Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Nilbert, Mef; Bernstein, Inge;

    2014-01-01

    identified and formed the essence of the phenomenon "living with knowledge about risk." Family context influences how experiences and knowledge are interpreted and transformed into thoughts and feelings, which relates to how risk is approached and handled. The constitutions influence each other in a dynamic......Possibilities to undergo predictive genetic testing for cancer have expanded, which implies that an increasing number of healthy individuals will learn about cancer predisposition. Knowledge about how an increased risk of disease influences life in a long-term perspective is largely unknown, which...... led us to explore lived experiences in healthy mutation carriers with Lynch syndrome. Individual interviews were subjected to descriptive phenomenological analysis. Four constitutions, namely, family context, interpretation and transformation, approach to risk and balancing life at risk were...

  1. Cancer risk as a radiation detriment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential radiation detriment means a risk of cancer or other somatic disease, genetic damage of fetal injury. Quantative information about the relation between a radiation dose and cancer risk is needed to enable decision-making in radiation protection. However, assessment of cancer risk by means of the radiation dose is controversial, as epidemiological and biological information about factors affecting the origin of cancers show that risk assessment is imprecise when the radiation dose is used as the only factor. Focusing on radiation risk estimates for breast cancer, lung cancer and leukemia, the report is based on the models given in the Beir V report, on sources of radiation exposure and the uncertainty of risk estimates. Risk estimates are assessed using the relative risk model and the cancer mortality rates in Finland. Cancer incidence and mortality rates for men and women are shown in graphs as a function of age and time. Relative risks are shown as a function of time after exposure and lifetime risks as a function of age at exposure. Uncertainty factors affecting the radiation risk are examined from the point of view of epidemiology and molecular biology. (orig.)

  2. Radiation risk perception in Institute 'Vinca'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessity for research and development of risk analysis methods arise from practical needs for safety for men and environment. Relating to speed of technological development risk is implemented in modern technological achievements. Complexity of approach to the concept of risk presents the essence of risk management. Risk management means to apply risk analysis in order to risk decrease and control. Database for risk management is in technical social, economic and political area. Risk perception is a construction in the field of social psychology i.e. public opinion research. These results are of importance for the risk management. Research presented in this paper has been done on the sample of 240 examines with two basic sub samples: person working with ionizing radiation (140 of them) and persons not working with ionizing radiation (100 of them). Attitudes to risk definition risk acceptance and relation to risk consequences. (author)

  3. UK children go online: balancing the opportunities against the risks

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    As UK households gain access to the internet, many questions arise for social scientists and policy makers. This working paper overviews a project designed to understand the balance of opportunities and risks afforded to children and young people by the diffusion and appropriation of the internet in everyday life. The project, UK Children Go Online, sought to steer a course between utopian and dystopian views by conducting a substantial multi-method empirical project focusing on four key dime...

  4. Practical risk management in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology advances in radiation therapy is very remarkable. In the technological progress of radiation therapy, development of computer control technology has helped. However, there is no significant progress in the ability of human beings who is operating. In many hospitals, by the incorrect parameter setting and wrong operations at radiation treatment planning system, many incidents have been reported recently. In order to safely use invisible radiation beam for treatment, what we should be careful? In state-of-the-art radiation therapy and many technological progress, risk management should be correspond continue. I report practical risk management in radiation therapy about the technical skills, non-technical skills and the quality control. (author)

  5. Farm household risk balancing: implications for policy from an EU perspective

    OpenAIRE

    WAUTERS, E; de Mey, Yann; van Winsen, F.; Van Passel, Steven; Vancauteren, Mark; L. LAUWERS

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – Building on the risk balancing theory and on recent discussions the appropriateness of using farm income maximization as behavioural assumption, this paper extends the risk balancing framework by accounting for business-household interactions. The purpose of this paper is to theoretically introduce the concept of farm household risk balancing, a theoretical framework in which the farm household sets a constraint on the total household-level risk and balances farm-level and off-fa...

  6. Assessment of risk from radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of risk from exposure to ionizing radiations from man-made radiation sources and nuclear installations has to be viewed from three aspects, namely, dose-effect relationship (genetic and somatic) for humans, calculation of doses or dose-commitments to population groups, assessment of risk to radiation workers and the population at large from the current levels of exposure from nuclear industry and comparison of risk estimates with other industries in a modern society. These aspects are discussed in brief. On the basis of available data, it is shown that estimated incidence of genetic diseases and cancers due to exposure of population to radiation from nuclear industry is negligible in comparison with their natural incidence, and radiation risks to the workers in nuclear industry are much lower than the risks in other occupations. (M.G.B.)

  7. Risk and benefits in ionizing radiation uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting include: A tribute to Szeinfeld, presentation software for population dose, impact on radiation protection, radiation protection hospital and population exposed workers, regulation and licensing. radiological emergencies, risk, inspection, external radiotherapy and radiation protection with photons, brachytherapy, industrial, environmental monitoring, food irradiation, nuclear power, nuclear medicine.

  8. Radiation effects and radiation risks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig.) With 10 maps in appendix

  9. Relations between radiation risks and radiation protection measuring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relations between radiation risks and radiation protection measuring techniques are considered as components of the radiation risk. The influence of the exposure risk on type and extent of radiation protection measurements is discussed with regard to different measuring tasks. Based upon measuring results concerning the frequency of certain external and internal occupational exposures in the GDR, it has been shown that only a small fraction of the monitored persons are subjected to a high exposure risk. As a consequence the following recommendations are presented: occupationally exposed persons with small exposure risk should be monitored using only a long-term desimeter (for instance a thermoluminescence desimeter). In the case of internal exposure, the surface and air contamination levels should be controlled so strictly that routine measurements of internal contamination need not be performed

  10. Radiation risk in mammography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of X rays in mammography examinations requires not only constant control of physical and technical parameters of the equipment used, but also an evaluation of the radiation risk for patients, particularly in mammography screening programmes. There are a number of methods of dose evaluation in mammography. Some of them are included in the dosimetry protocols. The tolerances for measured values, limiting the dose to the patients have also been established. One of the methods, proposed by Dance, applies to establishing the doses to individual patients. It requires the knowledge of clinical and exposure parameters. Another method, recommended by the EC, requires establishing the phantom dose for reference exposure, as part of quality control tests. This approach is simpler but less precise, because at most mammography facilities, the conditions of reference exposure are different than those of routine clinical exposure, as was shown in an exercise of quality control tests in a group of 32 mammography facilities in Poland. The method proposed in this study is an intermediate solution recommending measurement of the phantom dose for routine clinical exposure. The report contains the data of 230 exposures performed at six mammography facilities in Poland. These data were used to establish an individual dose for every patient undergoing mammography examination according to the method proposed by Dance. For each mammography facility, the mean glandular dose (MGDF) was established for reference and routine exposures according to the EC Dosimetry Protocol. The limits for phantom dose were established, which, according to the EC protocol, depend on the optical density (over background) of the image of the PMMA phantom 4.5 cm thick. The phantom doses determined for each mammography facility were below the limits. The lowest value of the mean dose received by patients in six facilities was 1.05 mGy, and the highest 3.03 mGy. The differences between these values

  11. Farm Support Payments and Risk Balancing: Implications for Financial Riskiness of Canadian Farms

    OpenAIRE

    Uzeaa, Florentina Nicoleta; Poon, Kenneth; Sparling, David; Weersink, Alfons

    2013-01-01

    The risk balancing literature suggests that business risk management (BRM) programs may, through risk balancing (offsetting adjustments between business risk and financial risk), lead farmers to take on more financial risk than they would take otherwise, which, in turn, increases the risk of equity loss. Business risk management continues to be the central objective of Canadian agricultural policy, and this was re-enforced with the recent introduction of the Growing Forward II policy framewor...

  12. Space radiation and cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Marjan; Nelson, Gregory A; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-12-26

    Future long-distance space missions will be associated with significant exposures to ionizing radiation, and the health risks of these radiation exposures during manned missions need to be assessed. Recent Earth-based epidemiological studies in survivors of atomic bombs and after occupational and medical low dose radiation exposures have indicated that the cardiovascular system may be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than was previously thought. This has raised the concern of a cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to space radiation during long-distance space travel. Ground-based studies with animal and cell culture models play an important role in estimating health risks from space radiation exposure. Charged particle space radiation has dense ionization characteristics and may induce unique biological responses, appropriate simulation of the space radiation environment and careful consideration of the choice of the experimental model are critical. Recent studies have addressed cardiovascular effects of space radiation using such models and provided first results that aid in estimating cardiovascular disease risk, and several other studies are ongoing. Moreover, astronauts could potentially be administered pharmacological countermeasures against adverse effects of space radiation, and research is focused on the development of such compounds. Because the cardiovascular response to space radiation has not yet been clearly defined, the identification of potential pharmacological countermeasures against cardiovascular effects is still in its infancy. PMID:26730293

  13. Radiation risk and public education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two issues which deal with the public's perception of radiation hazards are discussed. The goal of public education about radiation, and the relative role of scientific and moral beliefs in public education are examined

  14. Characterising risk - aggregated metrics: radiation and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterisation of risk is an important phase in the risk assessment - risk management process. From the multitude of risk attributes a few have to be selected to obtain a risk characteristic or profile that is useful for risk management decisions and implementation of protective measures. One way to reduce the number of attributes is aggregation. In the field of radiation protection such an aggregated metric is firmly established: effective dose. For protection against environmental noise the Health Council of the Netherlands recently proposed a set of aggregated metrics for noise annoyance and sleep disturbance. The presentation will discuss similarities and differences between these two metrics and practical limitations. The effective dose has proven its usefulness in designing radiation protection measures, which are related to the level of risk associated with the radiation practice in question, given that implicit judgements on radiation induced health effects are accepted. However, as the metric does not take into account the nature of radiation practice, it is less useful in policy discussions on the benefits and harm of radiation practices. With respect to the noise exposure metric, only one effect is targeted (annoyance), and the differences between sources are explicitly taken into account. This should make the metric useful in policy discussions with respect to physical planning and siting problems. The metric proposed has only significance on a population level, and can not be used as a predictor for individual risk. (author)

  15. Delineating organs at risk in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Cèfaro, Giampiero Ausili; Perez, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    Defining organs at risk is a crucial task for radiation oncologists when aiming to optimize the benefit of radiation therapy, with delivery of the maximum dose to the tumor volume while sparing healthy tissues. This book will prove an invaluable guide to the delineation of organs at risk of toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy. The first and second sections address the anatomy of organs at risk, discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced damage, and present dose constraints and methods for target volume delineation. The third section is devoted to the radiological anatomy of orga

  16. New radiobiological, radiation risk and radiation protection paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-standing conventional paradigm for radiobiology has formed a logical basis for the standard paradigm for radiation risk of cancer and heritable effects and, from these paradigms, has developed the internationally applied system for radiation protection, but with many simplifications, assumptions and generalizations. A variety of additional radiobiological phenomena that do not conform to the standard paradigm for radiobiology may have potential implications for radiation risk and radiation protection. It is suggested, however, that the current state of knowledge is still insufficient for these phenomena, individually or collectively, to be formulated systematically into a new paradigm for radiobiology. Additionally, there is at present lack of direct evidence of their relevance to risk for human health, despite attractive hypotheses as to how they might be involved. Finally, it remains to be shown how incorporation of such phenomena into the paradigm for radiation protection would provide sufficient added value to offset disruption to the present widely applied system. Further research should aim for better mechanistic understanding of processes such as radiation-induced genomic instability (for all radiation types) and bystander effects (particularly for low-fluence high-LET particles) and also priority should be given to confirmation, or negation, of the relevance of the processes to human health risks from radiation.

  17. Radiation Protection for Manned Interplanetary Missions - Radiation Sources, Risks, Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.

    Health risks in interplanetary explorative missions differ in two major features significantly from those during the manned missions experienced so far. For one, presently available technologies lead to durations of such missions significantly longer than so far encountered - with the added complication that emergency returns are ruled out. Thus radiation exposures and hence risks for late radiation sequelae like cancer increase proportional to mission duration - similar like most other health and many technical risks too. Secondly, loss of the geomagnetic shielding available in low earth orbits (LEO) does increase the radiation dose rates from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since significant fractions of the GCR flux below about 10 GeV/n now can reach the space vehicle. In addition, radiation from solar particle events (SPE) which at most in polar orbit segments can contribute to the radiation exposure during LEO missions now can reach the spaceship unattenuated. Radiation doses from extreme SPEs can reach levels where even early acute radiation sickness might ensue - with the added risks from potentially associated crew performance decrements. In contrast to the by and large predictable GCR contribution, the doses and hence risks from large SPEs can only stochastically be assessed. Mission designers face the task to contain the overall health risk within acceptable limits. Towards this end they have to transport the particle fluxes of the radiation fields in free space through the walls of the spaceship and through the tissue of the astronaut to the radiation sensitive organs. To obtain a quantity which is useful for risk assessment, the radiobiological effectiveness as well as the specific sensitivity of a given organ has to be accounted for in such transport calculations which of course require a detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution and the atomic composition of the surrounding shielding material. In doing so the mission designer encounters two major

  18. Risk analysis of external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation therapy is carried out via a complex treatment process in which many different groups of staff work together. Much of the work is dependent on and in collaboration with advanced technical equipment. The purpose of the research task has been to identify a process for external radiation therapy and to identify, test and analyze a suitable method for performing risk analysis of external radiation therapy

  19. [Epidemiological data and radiation risk estimates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardis, E

    2002-01-01

    The results of several major epidemiology studies on populations with particular exposure to ionizing radiation should become available during the first years of the 21(st) century. These studies are expected to provide answers to a number of questions concerning public health and radiation protection. Most of the populations concerned were accidentally exposed to radiation in ex-USSR or elsewhere or in a nuclear industrial context. The results will complete and test information on risk coming from studies among survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, particularly studies on the effects of low dose exposure and prolonged low-dose exposure, of different types of radiation, and environmental and host-related factors which could modify the risk of radiation-induced effects. These studies are thus important to assess the currently accepted scientific evidence on radiation protection for workers and the general population. In addition, supplementary information on radiation protection could be provided by formal comparisons and analyses combining data from populations with different types of exposure. Finally, in order to provide pertinent information for public health and radiation protection, future epidemiology studies should be targeted and designed to answer specific questions, concerning, for example, the risk for specific populations (children, patients, people with genetic predisposition). An integrated approach, combining epidemiology and studies on the mechanisms of radiation induction should provide particularly pertinent information. PMID:11938114

  20. Epidemiological data and radiation risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of several major epidemiology studies on populations with particular exposure to ionizing radiation should become available during the first years of the 21. century. These studies are expected to provide answers to a number of questions concerning public health and radiation protection. Most of the populations concerned were accidentally exposed to radiation in ex-USSR or elsewhere or in a nuclear industrial context. The results will complete and test information on risk coming from studies among survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, particularly studies on the effects of low dose exposure and prolonged low-dose exposure, of different types of radiation, and environmental and host-related factors which could modify the risk of radiation-induced effects. These studies are thus important to assess the currently accepted scientific evidence on radiation protection for workers and the general population. In addition, supplementary information on radiation protection could be provided by formal comparisons and analyses combining data from populations with different types of exposure. Finally, in order to provide pertinent information for public health and radiation protection, future epidemiology studies should be targeted and designed to answer specific questions, concerning, for example, the risk for specific populations (children, patients, people with genetic predisposition). An integrated approach, combining epidemiology and studies on the mechanisms of radiation induction should provide particularly pertinent information. (author)

  1. Quantitative risk in radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bases for developing quantitative assessment of exposure risks in the human being, and the several problems that accompany the assessment and introduction of the risk of exposure to high and low LET radiation into radiation protection, will be evaluated. The extension of the pioneering radiation protection philosophies to the control of other hazardous agents that cannot be eliminated from the environment will be discussed, as will the serious misunderstandings and misuse of concepts and facts that have inevitably surrounded the application to one agent alone, of the protection philosophy that must in time be applied to a broad spectrum of potentially hazardous agents. (orig.)

  2. Radiation as a source of risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essence and nature of ionizing radiation as a source of risk are reviewed. Following to the appeal of necessity and importance of campaign for enlightening risk management, of individual and of society, background knowledge and information helpful to the promotion and discussion are summarized, also. (author)

  3. Risks associated with radiation: General information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employers have a general responsibility to explain occupational risks to their workers. This document has been prepared to assist employers in this task. Employers should inform their workers about radiation risks associated with their work by: identifying the source(s) of radiation exposure; identifying the risk of health effects due to exposure to these sources, including the risk to the embryo and foetus of pregnant female workers; explaining the relationship between regulatory dose limits and the risk of health effects; and, explaining a worker's personal dose in terms of risk. This publication provides basic information on these subjects in a form that is clear and easy to understand. For further information, a list of suggested additional reading is included at the end of the text. (author). 15 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  4. Radiation exposure and radiation risk of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major scientifically founded results concerning the assessment of the radiation exposure and the analysis and evaluation of the radiationhazards for the population, particularly in the range of low doses, are presented. As to the risk analysis special attention is paid to the rays with low ionization density (X-, γ-, β- and electronrays). Contents: 1) Detailed survey of the results and conclusions; 2) Data on the radiation load of the population; 3) Results to epidemiological questioning on the risk of cancer; 4) Genetical radiation hazards of the population. For quantification purposes of the risk of cancer by γ-radiation the observations with the a-bomb survivors in Japan are taken as a basis, as the available dosimetrical data have to be revised. Appendices: 1) German translation of the UNSCEAR-Report (1977); 2) BEIR-Report (1980); 3) Comments from the SSK on the comparability of the risks of natural-artificial radiation exposure; 4) Comments from the SSK on the importance of synergistical influences for the radiation protection (23.9.1977). (HP)

  5. Radiation risks in the workplace in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper puts occupational radiation risk into perspective with other risks encountered in the workplace and in society. The annual risk of fatal cancer associated with the average level of occupational exposure and the dose limit is compared with the annual risk of fatal occupational injury in other industrial sectors and with some annual risk of death from daily life. Finally, the lifetime risk associated with an exposure at the dose limit is set against the lifetime risk associated with exposure to dose limits of some chemical substances. The paper shows that the average level of radiation risk in the workplace is in the same order of magnitude as other risks for workers and follows the general trend in the reduction of risk at work observable in all sectors of the economy over the last three decades. The comparison also points out that at upper levels of individual doses, particularly when close to the dose limit, the level of risk deviates significantly from the main trends as far as risk estimates for other industrial activities are concerned. This calls for the need to pursue efforts in the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' principle in all domains. (author)

  6. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    A number of considerations must go into the process of determining the risk of deleterious effects of space radiation to travelers. Among them are (1) determination of the components of the radiation environment (particle species, fluxes and energy spectra) which will encounter, (2) determination of the effects of shielding provided by the spacecraft and the bodies of the travelers which modify the incident particle spectra and mix of particles, and (3) determination of relevant biological effects of the radiation in the organs of interest. The latter can then lead to an estimation of risk from a given space scenario. Clearly, the process spans many scientific disciplines from solar and cosmic ray physics to radiation transport theeory to the multistage problem of the induction by radiation of initial lesions in living material and their evolution via physical, chemical, and biological processes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels to produce the end point of importance.

  7. Ionizing radiations. Prevention and risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document proposes a global approach which can be applied to any occupational situation which may result in an exposure to ionizing radiations. It aims at the development of aspects related to prevention. After having recalled the effects of ionizing radiations, a first part describes the general prevention principles as they are defined in the French labour code, the radiation protection principles as they are defined by the CIPR, and addresses risk management. The second part describes how to identify the hazard and characterize hazardous situations, and how to assess the risk and implement prevention measures. Sheets describe the assessment of external exposure, the assessment of the contamination risk by ingestion or inhalation, and the assessment of a risk of contamination by contact

  8. Radiation risks for patient and personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum somatic risk to be expected for the patient - in dependency of the examination method - is of the 5th-6th order; however, for radioactive iodine patients the risk of spontaneous cancer of the thyroid is expected to be three times as high. The upper limit of the genetic risk is of the 4th order; on the average, a genetic risk of the 6th-7th order is to be expected. With regard to radiation risks to persons occupied in nuclear medicine, the following can be said: The somatic X-ray cancer risk (including leukaemia) to be expected, with about 2 * 10-2%, is small compared to the spontaneous cancer risk of about 20% at present. The genetic risk for the direct descendants of persons occupationally exposed to radiation, with a maximum of 1 mutation induced by radiation in 1,000 live births, is small compared to a spontaneous risk of 1 in 100. (orig./HP)

  9. Invited commentary: a fine balance--weighing risk factors against risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael G

    2009-01-15

    Fracture is a leading cause of disability in the aging population. Because the cost of fracture in terms of medical expenditures and quality of life lost can be substantial, it is essential to identify a complete profile of fracture risk for the development of timely interventions. Risk factors for fracture have most often been identified clinically. Thus, the contribution by Wagner et al. in this issue of the Journal is particularly important, since it demonstrates a robust association between balance impairment and fracture in a population-based setting. It is unclear, however, whether isolating balance as a risk factor can tell us enough about the clustering of risk factors for fracture that accompanies frailty. Indeed, this problem of risk clustering is one that epidemiologists often encounter as we try to locate the mediating processes between exposures and outcomes that lead downstream through complex interacting causal pathways. In this commentary, the author discusses the importance, particularly when studying frailty and fracture, of quantifying risk clustering rather than continuing to rely on solitary risk factors. Moreover, the author suggests the use of Bayesian networks in the expansion of our tool kit in this field of research. PMID:19064647

  10. Radiation protection and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its publications 22 and 26, ICRP recommends a method of optimization that requires that first the risks of the considered activity be quantitatively assessed. This paper deals with the transportation of radioactive material. Several aspects are examined: assessing risk quantitatively (as an expected number of health effects), determining the most cost-effective alternative options and applying the method to a practical example. Two of the possible applications of the results are presented in the case of transportation of UF6 in France: 1) the cost-effectiveness analysis of a set of alternative protection measures and 2) the comparison between such measures affecting risks in nuclear transportation and other measures dealing with different steps of the whole uranium fuel cycle. (HK)

  11. Net radiation balance for two forested slopes on opposite sides of a valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, T; Rost, J; Mayer, H

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of the net radiation balance of two forested sites on the opposite slopes of a valley in south-western Germany, made over 3 years, are presented in this study. Radiation sensors were mounted horizontally on two measurement towers above two beech stands. The direct part of the measured short-wave incoming radiation was adjusted according to the slope's angle to convert horizontally measured radiation data into surface-parallel radiation fluxes. During periods when contemporaneous measurements of slope-parallel and horizontal radiation fluxes were available, the calculation of surface-parallel radiation fluxes from the horizontally recorded net radiation components were compared with measured values. The net radiative fluxes parallel to the slopes were calculated for a period of 36 months and analysed. Results show that the different aspects of both sites cause significant differences of the net radiation balance. In June, when the elevation of the sun is highest, incoming solar radiation K downward arrow received on the NE-slope was 9% lower than K downward arrow received on the SW-slope. During the winter months, the differences were much greater and incoming solar radiation to the NE-slope was 50% of that to the SW-slope. Due to the differing solar irradiance, net radiation fluxes were significantly higher on the SW-slope than on the NE-slope. For long-wave radiation only small differences between both slopes could be found. Since radiative fluxes determine the energy balance and hence the microclimate and water balance of a forest stand, these differences in the net radiation balance between the slopes are important for the vegetation. PMID:15630573

  12. Radiation risks : the ethics of health protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the inception of commercial uses of nuclear technology, radiation protection standards established by regulatory agencies have reflected moral concerns based on two assumptions: (1) that the linear, zero-threshold hypothesis derives from scientific data in radiobiology which are virtually conclusive; (2) it is morally better for public health protection to assume that any radiation exposure, no matter how small, has some harmful effect which can and ought to be prevented. In the past few years these beliefs and related assumptions have received closer scrutiny, revealing hidden reasons for regulatory selection of radiation risks as objects of paramount ethical concern, with the result that greater risks to health have escaped comparison and mitigation. Based on this scrutiny this brief paper explores two questions: Are presupposed assumptions ethically justified on grounds of scientific evidence and ethical consistency? and should moral objections claiming to invalidate comparative risk assessments be accepted or rejected?

  13. Aircrew radiation exposure: sources-risks-measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short review is given on the actual aircrew exposure and its sources. The resulting risks for harmful effects to the health and discuss methods for in-flight measurements of exposure is evaluated. An idea for a fairly simple and economic approach to a practical, airborne active dosimeter for the assessment of individual crew exposure is presented. The exposure of civil aircrew to cosmic radiation, should not be considered a tremendous risk to the health, there is no reason for panic. However, being significantly higher than the average exposure to radiation workers, it can certainly not be neglected. As recommended by ICRP, aircrew exposure has to be considered occupational radiation exposure and aircrews are certainly entitled to the same degree of protection, as other ground-based radiation workers have obtained by law, since long time. (author)

  14. Radiation and risk in physics education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study reported in this thesis deals with physics education, particularly with the teaching and learning of radioactivity and ionizing radiation. It is a follow up of earlier research and development work in the Dutch Physics Curriculum Development Project (PLON) on a unit called Ionizing Radiation. The central theme of this unit was the acceptability of the risks of ionizing radiation. Preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of the PLON-unit showed that pupils appear to have lay-ideas which seem to be resistant to change. In this study the nature and persistence of these lay-ideas have been explored and a set of recommendations have been developed for writing curriculum materials and for teaching strategies, for physics lessons in secondary high school, in order to promote thoughtful risk analysis and assessment as regards applications of ionizing radiation. (H.W.). 225 refs.; 3 figs.; 41 tabs

  15. Ionizing Radiation Environments and Exposure Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Space radiation environments for historically large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are simulated to characterize exposures to radio-sensitive organs for missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), moon, near-Earth asteroid, and Mars. Primary and secondary particles for SPE and GCR are transported through the respective atmospheres of Earth or Mars, space vehicle, and astronaut's body tissues using NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code. Space radiation protection methods, which are derived largely from ground-based methods recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) or International Commission on Radiological Protections (ICRP), are built on the principles of risk justification, limitation, and ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). However, because of the large uncertainties in high charge and energy (HZE) particle radiobiology and the small population of space crews, NASA develops distinct methods to implement a space radiation protection program. For the fatal cancer risks, which have been considered the dominant risk for GCR, the NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model has been developed from recommendations by NCRP; and undergone external review by the National Research Council (NRC), NCRP, and through peer-review publications. The NSCR model uses GCR environmental models, particle transport codes describing the GCR modification by atomic and nuclear interactions in atmospheric shielding coupled with spacecraft and tissue shielding, and NASA-defined quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates for HZE particles. By implementing the NSCR model, the exposure risks from various heliospheric conditions are assessed for the radiation environments for various-class mission types to understand architectures and strategies of human exploration missions and ultimately to contribute to the optimization of radiation safety and well-being of space crewmembers participating in long-term space missions.

  16. Evidence Report: Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Janice; Carnell, Lisa; Blattnig, Steve; Chappell, Lori; Kerry, George; Lumpkins, Sarah; Simonsen, Lisa; Slaba, Tony; Werneth, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As noted by Durante and Cucinotta (2008), cancer risk caused by exposure to space radiation is now generally considered a main hindrance to interplanetary travel for the following reasons: large uncertainties are associated with the projected cancer risk estimates; no simple and effective countermeasures are available, and significant uncertainties prevent scientists from determining the effectiveness of countermeasures. Optimizing operational parameters such as the length of space missions, crew selection for age and sex, or applying mitigation measures such as radiation shielding or use of biological countermeasures can be used to reduce risk, but these procedures have inherent limitations and are clouded by uncertainties. Space radiation is comprised of high energy protons, neutrons and high charge (Z) and energy (E) nuclei (HZE). The ionization patterns and resulting biological insults of these particles in molecules, cells, and tissues are distinct from typical terrestrial radiation, which is largely X-rays and gamma-rays, and generally characterized as low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are comprised mostly of highly energetic protons with a small component of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei. Prominent HZE nuclei include He, C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe. GCR ions have median energies near 1 GeV/n, and energies as high as 10 GeV/n make important contributions to the total exposure. Ionizing radiation is a well known carcinogen on Earth (BEIR 2006). The risks of cancer from X-rays and gamma-rays have been established at doses above 50 mSv (5 rem), although there are important uncertainties and on-going scientific debate about cancer risk at lower doses and at low dose rates (risks during space exploration (Cucinotta and Durante 2006; Durante and Cucinotta 2008).

  17. Radiation risk due to occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionizing radiation occurs in many occupations. Workers can be exposed to both natural and artificial sources of radiation. Any exposure to ionizing radiation incurs some risk, either to the individual or to the individual's progeny. This dissertation investigated the radiation risk due to occupational exposure in industrial radiography. Analysis of the reported risk estimates to occupational exposure contained in the UNSCEAR report of 2008 in industrial radiography practice was done. The causes of accidents in industrial radiography include: Lack of or inadequate regulatory control, inadequate training, failure to follow operational procedures, human error, equipment malfunction or defect, inadequate maintenance and wilful violation have been identified as primary causes of accidents. To minimise radiation risks in industrial radiography exposure devices and facilities should be designed such that there is intrinsic safety and operational safety ensured by establishing a quality assurance programme, safety culture fostered and maintained among all workers, industrial radiography is performed in compliance with approved local rules, workers engaged have appropriate qualifications and training, available safe operational procedures are followed, a means is provided for detecting incidents and accidents and an analysis of the causes and lessons learned. (author)

  18. Radiation risks and benefits: politics and morality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioethical framework from which moral reasoning concerning nuclear technology has been derived is both seriously flawed and conceptually inadequate. The reasons are examined and are arranged in response to three questions. First, what is the status of alleged scientific evidence from which moral conclusions about the unacceptability of man-made radiation exposures are derived. Secondly, what criticisms of risk assessment reasoning are pertinent to ethical reflection. Finally, what revisions in an ethical framework are necessary if risk estimates of low-dose radiation exposure are to be conducted properly

  19. Radiation risk assessment of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprocessed uranium contains 232U, which is not found in nature, as well as 234U which is present in higher proportion than in natural uranium. Both isotopes modify the radiological properties of the material. The paper evaluates the increase of the internal and external radiation risk on the base of experimental data and theoretical calculations. It also suggests measures to be taken in the production of fuel elements with slightly enriched uranium.The radiation risk of reprocessed uranium is directly proportional to the content of 232U and 234U as well as to the aging time of the material

  20. Health risks associated with environmental radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much is known about health effects associated with exposure to ionising radiation. Numerous epidemiologic studies of populations exposed to radiation under a variety of circumstances have been conducted. These studies have clearly shown that radiation exposure can result in an increased risk of many types of cancer, and the findings are supported by a substantial body of literature from experimental studies. Despite the fact that radiation exposures from environmental sources comprise a relatively minor component of total population exposure, this type of exposure is often the most feared by the public. An accident like Chernobyl or a natural disaster like that at Fukushima provides a unique opportunity to learn more about the health risks from environmental radiation exposures. However, establishing the infrastructure and expertise required to design and conduct all aspects of a complex field study presents formidable challenges. This paper summarises the principal findings from the main studies of environmental radiation exposure that have been successfully undertaken. Although such studies are often exceedingly difficult to conduct, and may be limited by an ecologic design, they can be informative in assessing risk. Any new environmental study that is initiated should focus on special circumstances; additional ecological studies are not recommended. (note)

  1. Comparison of radiation and chemical risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injury to living cells is caused by mechanisms which in many cases are similar for radiation and chemicals. It is thus not surprising that radiation and many chemicals can cause similar biological effects, e.g. cancer, fetal injury and hereditary disease. Both radiation and chemicals are always found in our environment. One agent may strengthen or weaken the effect of another, be it radiation in combination with chemicals or one chemical with another. The implications of such synergistic or antagonistic effects are discussed. Intricate mechanisms help the body to defend itself against threats to health from radiation and chemicals, even against cancer risks. In a strategy for health, it might be worth to exploit actively these defense mechanisms, in parallel with decreasing the exposures. On particular interest are the large exposures from commonly known sources such as smoking, sun tanning and high fat contents of food. (author)

  2. Risk of cardiovascular disease following radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excess radiation-induced cardiac mortalities have been reported among radiotherapy patients. Many case reports describe the occurrence of atherosclerosis following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer. Some case reports describe the cerebral infarction following radiotherapy to neck region, and of peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities following radiotherapy to the pelvic region. The association of atomic bomb radiation and cardiovascular disease has been examined recently by incidence studies and prevalence studies of various endpoints of atherosclerosis; all endpoints indicated an increase of cardiovascular disease in the exposed group. It is almost certain that the cardiovascular disease is higher among atomic bomb survivors. However, since a heavy exposure of 10-40 Gy is delivered in radiotherapy and the bomb survivors were exposed to radiation at high dose and dose-rate, the question is whether the results can be extrapolated to individuals exposed to lower levels of radiation. Some recent epidemiological studies on occupationally exposed workers and population living near Chernobyl have provided the evidence for cardiovascular disease being a significant late effect at relatively low doses of radiation. However, the issue of non-cancer mortality from radiation is complicated by lack of adequate information on doses, and many other confounding factors (e.g., smoking habits or socio-economic status). This presentation will evaluate possible radiobiological mechanisms for radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, and will address its relevance to radiation protection management at low doses and what the impact might be on future radiation risk assessments. (authors)

  3. Risks from radiation - perception and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although we know a great deal about the risks to health from external ionizing radiation, there may be some points where we must be prepared to modify our understanding. We must take account of the concerns of the public in relation to risks that they dread. In the complex ecological and physiological systems which constitute our world, there are infinite number of peculiar circumstances affecting the distribution of specific radionuclides, the energy our tissues receive and the susceptibility of those tissues. (author)

  4. Balanced economic indicators as a tool for effective management of banking risks

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Andros

    2011-01-01

    Processed system of key performance indicators of banking activities. Characteristic of the key performance indicators of the bank as parameters in the dynamic model. Set algorithm of key performance indicators balancing to determine allowable limit values of each indicator. The necessity of a balanced system of economic indicators as an effective tool for management of banking risks. A direction of bank development strategy using balanced economic indicators in the context of banking risks.

  5. Radiation exposure and radiation protection dosimetry. Trial of a critical balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the state of radiation protection dosimetry of external irradiation is given. From the point of view of practical radiation protection a clear and unambiguous regulation system with unequivocal measurement and evaluation rules is more important than an apparently accurate determination of a risk equivalent radiation exposure. After a survey of the calculations of conversion coefficients between effective dose, operational quantities and primary quantities for photons and neutrons it is demanded that the results of a relevant ICRP/ICRU Task Group are published as soon as possible to create a binding and durable basis of radiation protection area and individual dosimetry. The special problem of evaluation of measured individual doses, if protective clothing in diagnostic radiology is worn, is discussed. Furthermore the following basic problems are dealt with: Required measuring ranges, state of the available measuring instruments, requirements for measurement accuracy and prototype testing. An analysis of surveillance results shows that on the one hand trivial exposures are monitored with great effort by means of personal dosemeters, on the other hand much higher exposures, on e.g. due to radon progeny, are controlled only by area monitoring. Despite the unsolved problems still to be worked on, all in all the state of radiation protection dosimetry is satisfactory. (orig.)

  6. Radiation induced cancer risk, detriment and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recommendations on radiation protection limits for workers and for the public depend mainly on the total health detriment estimated to be the result of low dose ionizing radiation exposure. This detriment includes the probability of a fatal cancer, an allowance for the morbidity due to non-fatal cancer and the probability of severe hereditary effects in succeeding generations. In a population of all ages, special effects on the fetus particularly the risk of mental retardation at defined gestational ages, should also be included. Among these components of detriment after low doses, the risk of fatal cancer is the largest and most important. The estimates of fatal cancer risk used by ICRP in the 1990 recommendations were derived almost exclusively from the study of the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombs of 1945. How good are these estimates? Uncertainties associated with them, apart from those due to limitations in epidemiological observation and dosimetry, are principally those due to projection forward in time and extrapolation from high dose and dose rate to low dose and dose rate, each of which could after the estimate by a factor of 2 or so. Recent estimates of risk of cancer derived directly from low dose studies are specific only within very broad ranges of risk. Nevertheless, such studies are important as confirmation or otherwise of the estimates derived from the atomic bomb survivors. Recent U.S. British and Russian studies are examined in this light. (author)

  7. Radiation and society: Comprehending radiation risk. V. 2. Poster papers. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This IAEA international conference on Radiation and Society was the first major international meeting devoted to the comprehension of radiation risk, public attitude towards radiation risk and hazards encountered by the general public in contaminated areas. Volume two of the proceedings mainly deals with assessment of radiation exposure levels, radiation health effects, impact of radiation on the environment, perception of and managing radiation risk. Refs, figs, tabs

  8. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD) cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  9. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-05-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  10. Environmental radiation standards and risk limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established environmental radiation standards for specific practices which correspond to limits on risk to the public that vary by several orders of magnitude and often are much less than radiation risks that are essentially unregulated, e.g., risks from radon in homes. This paper discusses a proposed framework for environmental radiation standards that would improve the correspondence with limitation of risk. This framework includes the use of limits on annual effective dose equivalent averaged over a lifetime, rather than limits on dose equivalent to whole body or any organ for each year of exposure, and consideration of exposures of younger age groups as well as adults; limits on annual effective dose equivalent averaged over a lifetime no lower than 0.25 mSv (25 mrem) per practice; maintenance of all exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA); and establishment of a generally applicable de minimis dose for public exposures. Implications of the proposed regulatory framework for the current system of standards for limiting public exposures are discussed. 20 refs

  11. Measuring the Effectiveness of Banking Risk Balanced Scorecard in Enhancing Bank Value

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed M. Elkhouly; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Mohamed M. El Frargy; Amal S. Kotb

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the body of knowledge in the area of risk balanced scorecard, particularly in the banking sector which faces variety complex types of risk. The authors develop a conceptual framework for measuring the effectiveness of Banking Risk Balanced Scorecard (BRBS) across and beyond Basel requirementsin addition to its essential role to maximize both of stakeholders’ value and competitive advantage. Stakeholders include shareholder value (investors) and in...

  12. Relationships between bank customers’ risk attitudes and their balance sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Hermansson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes relationships between Swedish bank customers’ risk appetite and their financial assets and debt, controlling for demographic, socio-economic, financial and educational variables including financial literacy. We use subjective risk measures, i.e. risk tolerance and risk preference, as well as an objective risk measure, i.e. relating customers’ saving deposits to more risky stocks and mutual funds as a share of total financial assets. Bank customers with high risk appetite h...

  13. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabarriti, Rafi; Guha, Chandan

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  14. Energy and radiation balance components for three grass surfaces near Kursk, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschen, Leo J.

    1992-01-01

    The energy and radiation balance components were determined over three grass surfaces, located on the Streletskaya steppe during July 1991. The Bowen ratio energy balance method was used to determine the sensible and latent heat flux densities using six computer controlled systems. A total of 126 variables were sampled, including global, diffuse, and reflected solar radiation, long wave radiation (up and down), net radiation, photosynthetically active radiation above and below the vegetation, infrared surface temperatues, soil temperature and heat flow, air temperature and vapor pressure at two levels, wind speed and direction, and precipitation. The ranking of the sites from greatest to smallest for net radiation and latent heat flux density were preserve, mowed in 1990, and mowed in 1991. The ranking of the sites from greatest to smallest for sensible heat flux density were mowed in 1990, mowed in 1991, and preserve.

  15. Balance 2003 of the risks control at the Cea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a research center on the energy, the information and health technologies and the defense, the Cea activities are indissociable from the risk control notion. To organize the risks management, the Cea decided to create in july 2003 a special pole of risks control and management. This presentation is based on some major topics of the risks control: the environmental impact control, the occupational risks control, the installations safety control and the hazardous matter transport control. (A.L.B.)

  16. Quantitative risk in radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the overall aim of radiobiology is to understand the biological effects of radiation, it also has the implied practical purpose of developing rational measures for the control of radiation exposure in man. The emphasis in this presentation is to show that the enormous effort expended over the years to develop quantitative dose-effect relationships in biochemical and cellular systems, animals, and human beings now seems to be paying off. The pieces appear to be falling into place, and a framework is evolving to utilize these data. Specifically, quantitative risk assessments will be discussed in terms of the cellular, animal, and human data on which they are based; their use in the development of radiation protection standards; and their present and potential impact and meaning in relation to the quantity dose equivalent and its special unit, the rem

  17. Radiation and energy balance of lettuce culture inside a polyethylene greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper was to describe the radiation and energy balance, during the lettuce (Lactuca sativa, L. cv. Verônica) crop cycle inside a polyethylene greenhouse. The radiation and energy balance was made inside a tunnel greenhouse with polyethylene cover (100 mm) and in an external area, both areas with 35 m2. Global, reflected and net radiation, soil heat flux and air temperature (dry and humid) were measured during the crop cycle. A Datalogger, which operated at 1 Hz frequency, storing 5 minutes averages was utilized. The global (K↓) and reflected (K) radiations showed that the average transmission of global radiation (K↓in / K↓ex) was almost constant, near to 79.59%, while the average ratio of reflected radiation (Kin / Kex) was 69.21% with 8.47% standard-deviation. The normalized curves of short-wave net radiation, in relation to the global radiation (K*/ K↓), found for both environments, were almost constant at the beginning of cycle; this relation decreased in the final stage of culture. The normalized relation (Rn/ K↓) was bigger in the external area, about 12%, when the green culture covered the soil surface. The long-wave radiation balance average (L*) was bigger outside, about 50%. The energy balance, estimated in terms of vertical fluxes, showed that, for the external area, in average, 83.07% of total net radiation was converted in latent heat evaporation (LE), and 18% in soil heat flux (G), and 9.96% in sensible heat (H), while inside of the greenhouse, 58.71% of total net radiation was converted in LE, 42.68% in H, and 28.79% in G. (author)

  18. Some problems of risk balancing for regulating environmental hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rational regulation of environmental hazards may be based on the implicit underlying principles that government actions should enhance the average quality of life for those governed and maintain some degree of equity in the distribution of benefits, costs, and risks. Issues arising from these principles have practical implications for risk management policy in general and for the development and application of radiological protection criteria in particular. One of the issues is the appropriate distribution of expenditures for regulating different risks. The total resources available for risk regulation are finite; hence, minimizing the total risk subject to this constraint is an appropriate strategy for optimum risk management. Using a simple model, it is shown that this strategy leads to a distribution of expenditures between different risks such that a greater fraction is allocated to a risk with a higher cost of mitigation or control but the allocation is limited in such a manner that the fractional contribution of that risk to the total risk is also higher. The effect of deviating from this strategy is examined. It is shown that reducing a single risk of concern below the optimum value by a factor 1/F can increase the total risk by about F times the risk of concern. Taking into account the large uncertainties in risk assessment for establishing radiological protection criteria, it is argued that an optimum strategy for remedial action should (1) set basic risk limits as high as reasonable; (2) use realistic, case-specific data and analyses in deriving allowable residual contamination levels from basic risk limits; and (3) implement a policy of reducing residual contamination to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) within the constraints imposed by optimum resource allocation. 10 references

  19. Are Balance Problems Connected to Reading Speed or the Familial Risk of Dyslexia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viholainen, Helena; Aro, Mikko; Ahonen, Timo; Crawford, Susan; Cantell, Marja; Kooistra, Libbe

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the connection between balance problems and reading speed in children with and without a familial risk of dyslexia by controlling for the effects of attention, hyperactivity, and cognitive and motor functioning. Method: The prevalence of balance problems was studied in 94 children (48 females, 46 males)…

  20. Radiation risk perception and public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We as Health Physicists face what, at many times, appears to be a hopeless task. The task simply stated is informing the public about the risks (or lack thereof) of radiation. Unfortunately, the public has perceived radiation risks to be much greater than they actually are. An example of this problem is shown in a paper by Arthur C. Upton. Three groups of people -- the League of Women Voters, students, and Business and Professional Club members -- were asked to rank 30 sources of risk according to their contribution to the number of deaths in the United States. Not surprisingly, they ranked nuclear power much higher and medical x-rays much lower than the actual values. In addition to the perception problem, we are faced with another hurdle: health physicists as communicators. Members of the Health Physics Society (HPS) found that the communication styles of most health physicists appear to be dissimilar to those of the general public. These authors administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to the HPS Baltimore-Washington Chapter. This test, a standardized test for psychological type developed by Isabel Myers, ask questions that provide a quantitative measure of our natural preferences in four areas. Assume that you as a health physicist have the necessary skills to communicate information about radiation to the public. Health physicists do nothing with these tools. Most people involved in radiation protection do not get involved with public information activies. What I will attempt to do is heighten your interest in such activities. I will share information about public information activities in which I have been involved and give you suggestions for sources of information and materials. 2 refs., 1 tab

  1. Radiation risk perception and public information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggs-Mayes, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    We as Health Physicists face what, at many times, appears to be a hopeless task. The task simply stated is informing the public about the risks (or lack thereof) of radiation. Unfortunately, the public has perceived radiation risks to be much greater than they actually are. An example of this problem is shown in a paper by Arthur C. Upton. Three groups of people -- the League of Women Voters, students, and Business and Professional Club members -- were asked to rank 30 sources of risk according to their contribution to the number of deaths in the United States. Not surprisingly, they ranked nuclear power much higher and medical x-rays much lower than the actual values. In addition to the perception problem, we are faced with another hurdle: health physicists as communicators. Members of the Health Physics Society (HPS) found that the communication styles of most health physicists appear to be dissimilar to those of the general public. These authors administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to the HPS Baltimore-Washington Chapter. This test, a standardized test for psychological type developed by Isabel Myers, ask questions that provide a quantitative measure of our natural preferences in four areas. Assume that you as a health physicist have the necessary skills to communicate information about radiation to the public. Health physicists do nothing with these tools. Most people involved in radiation protection do not get involved with public information activies. What I will attempt to do is heighten your interest in such activities. I will share information about public information activities in which I have been involved and give you suggestions for sources of information and materials. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Radiation exposure and radiation risk of the mammographic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depending on the technique applied the doses in the centre of the breast are significantly different. The dose reduction of a screen film grid combination is 50% compared with non-screen film. For the screen film combination alone it is significantly higher. The limited image quality of the gridless technique is not suited for primary examination. According to the present state of knowledge there are no reliable results about the radiation exposure of the breast in mammography and the induction of breast cancer. In a periodic mass screening the existing risk is significantly exceeded by the potential outcome. The care about the statistically calculated risk is irrelevant as to examinations within intervals of 1-2 years for women above 40. (author)

  3. Macroeconomic Risks in the Greater Mekong Sub-Region: Perspectives of External Balance and Monetary Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki Taguchi

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated the macroeconomic risks in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) from the perspectives of their external balances and monetary policies. The main findings are: 1) especially in Vietnam, the continuous deficit in current account accompanied with the decline in financial-account surplus and foreign reserves has increased economic risks in external balance, which seems to be a quite similar picture to the pre-crisis (1996-97) Thailand; 2) the rising real exchange rate, i.e....

  4. Radiation balance of a soil-straw surface modified by straw color

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straw color may alter the net radiative flux at the soil-straw surface and, consequently, the availability of energy for soil, biological, and atmospheric processes. This study ascertained the radiation balance of a soil-straw surface as modified by the color of the straw on the surface. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) stubble and loose straw on 36-m2 plots near Fairbanks, AK, was painted black, white, or remained unpainted (natural) in a randomized block experimental design. Reflected global radiation was measured in the spring of 1988–1990 and net radiation was monitored in the spring of 1990. Midday reflected global radiation and soil-straw surface temperatures were measured on clear days in 1989. The albedo of the black straw treatment was 0.05, of the natural straw treatment was 0.2, and of the white straw treatment was 0.3. The black straw treatment resulted in higher midday surface temperatures and consequently higher emission of longwave radiation compared with other straw color treatments. A soilstraw-atmosphere system model provided good estimates of the measured net radiative flux in 1990 (R2 = 0.91). The model predicted that a soil-black straw surface would absorb 10% more radiation than a soil-natural straw surface and 15% more radiation than a soil-white straw surface averaged over the three years. The results suggest that straw color management can be an option for altering the surface radiation balance in regions with extreme climates. (author)

  5. Medical radiation exposure and genetic risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everyone is exposed to background radiation throughout life (100 mrem/year to the gonads or 4 to 5 rem during the reproductive years). A lumbosacral series might deliver 2500 mrem to the male or 400 mrem to the female gonads. A radiologic procedure is a cost/benefit decision, and genetic risk is a part of the cost. Although cost is usually very low compared to benefit, if the procedure is unnecessary then the cost may be unacceptable. On the basis of current estimates, the doubling dose is assumed to be 40 rem (range 20 to 200) for an acute dose, and 100 rem for protracted exposure. Although there is no satisfactory way to predict the size of the risk for an individual exposed, any risk should be incentive to avoid unnecessary radiation to the gonads. Conception should be delayed for at least ten months for women and three or four months for men after irradiation of the gonads. The current incidence of genetically related diseases in the United States population is 60,000 per million live births. Based on the most conservative set of assumptions, an average gonadal dose of 1000 mrem to the whole population would increase the incidence of genetically related diseases by 0.2%

  6. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  7. Risk from deterministic effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication provides a review of information for assessing deterministic effects on human health likely to arise from serious overexposure to ionising radiation. It updates information in previous Board publications NRPB-R226 and NRPB-M246. It constitutes a parallel document to Documents of the NRPB, 4, No. 4 (1993), which deals with stochastic effects. These two documents, together with Documents of the NRPB, 6, No. 1 (1995), which deals specifically with stochastic risk at low dose rates, give the current Board view on all health consequences of exposure to ionising radiation. Little new primary information on deterministic effects has become available in recent years. However, advances in techniques for data analysis have been made and are incorporated in the present report. These are presented in a form suitable for use in modelling the consequences to populations of serious radiological incidents. (author)

  8. Investment, firm value, and risk for a system operator balancing energy grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the liberalization of energy markets integrated energy companies have separated into entities that specialize in production and/or transmission of energy. Transmission of energy requires balancing the grid to guarantee system security, which is performed by the (independent) system operator (SO). When the SO faces stochastic demand, grid balancing has sizeable consequences on current and future profits, and hence, on firm value and firm risk. We explore these value and risk consequences with and without an investment option to expand transmission capacity. We show that firm value consists of the value of the transmission capacity in place plus the value of a short put and a short call option that are the result of the SO's balancing actions. Firm risk without investment option is non-linear and determined by the short option positions. It is decreasing with increasing energy demand. The existence of an option to expand transmission capacity increases firm value and firm risk. - Highlights: ► Grid balancing under stochastic demand affect current and future revenues, and firm value and firm risk. ► Balancing firm value consists of the value of the transmission capacity plus the value of a short strangle. ► Firm risk without investment option is determined by the short strangle and decreasing with increasing energy demand. ► The existence of an expansion option implies that transmission capacity increases firm value and firm risk

  9. A radiation protection training program with a focus on communicating risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection training is generally provided to promote a radiologically safe work environment, and to help ensure that doses are kept as low as reasonably achievable. In many cases, this reason makes good sense. Radiological risk can often be a significant concern when working with radioactive materials or radiation-emitting devices. However, in conducting the work of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, it is often the case that the perception of radiological risk is of greater concern that the radiological risk itself. In this case, radiation protection training can serve another equally important purpose. It can be used to convey, in a balanced manner, the actual radiological risks associated with the work, and to put those risks in perspective. For individuals who are not familiar with radiation safety, effective radiation protection training that focuses on risk communication can reduce the level of concern surrounding work to be performed. This, in turn, can have an overall positive impact on the efficiency of the work, on goodwill within the community where the work is taking place, and even on the overall safety of those conducting the work. The radiation protection training program developed and implemented by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office is described in the context of other, more traditional radiation protection training programs. (author)

  10. Ultrasound power measurements of HITU transducer with a more stable radiation force balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new radiation force balance (RFB) system was established at Turkish National Metrology Institute (UME) Ultrasonics Laboratory for High intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) power measurements. The new system is highly stable at high power levels up to 500 Watts. The measurement system consists of a Plexiglas cylindrical balance arm, target mounting scale disks, conical reflecting and absorbing targets, adjustment nuts, and a hanging wire. Both of the two sides of balance were mounted similar size and weight targets. The equilibrium of the balance arm can be adjusted with nuts on screws located at both sides of the balance arm. Transducer was mounted to bottom of water tank. Absorbers in the bottom and the near walls of the tank were used for reflecting target case. Ultrasound power was applied to one scale of the balance where the reflecting/absorbing target was mounted and corresponding force was measured on the other scale of balance where was connected to a balance with a thin wire while the thin rest standing on a support. Ultrasound power of two HITU transducers at frequencies 0.93 MHz, 1.1 MHz and 3.3 MHz were measured with conventional and new system, the values were compared and uncertainty components were assessed in this paper.

  11. Radiation and health. Benefit and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on radiation and health covers the following topics: The world of radiation and waves; a sight into biology; if radiation hits the body; a sight into the internal radiation diagnostics; radiation hazards; the not always beloved sun; mobile phones, microwave ovens and power poles; healing with and due to radiation; radiation and food; radiation in the environment; generation and interactions of radiation in more detail; radiation effects in the cell - closer insight; radiation doses and measurement; epidemiology and its pitfalls; the system of radiation protection radiation accidents.

  12. Hypofractionation does not increase radiation pneumonitis risk with modern conformal radiation delivery techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Westerly, David C; Cannon, George M;

    2010-01-01

    To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models.......To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models....

  13. Assessing climate change. Temperatures, solar radiation, and heat balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Donald

    2008-07-01

    In ASSESSING CLIMATE CHANGE Donald Rapp has investigated a large body of scientific data relevant to climate change, approaching each element with necessary (but neutral) scientific skepticism. The chapters of the book attempt to answer a number of essential questions in relation to global warming and climate change. He begins by showing how the earth's climate has varied in the past, discussing ice ages, the Holocene period since the end of the last ice age, particularly during the past 1000 years. He investigates the reliability of ''proxies'' for historical temperatures and assesses the hockey stick version of global temperatures for the past millennium. To do this effectively he looks carefully at how well near surface temperatures of land and ocean on earth have been monitored during the past 100 years or more, and looks at the utility and significance of a single global average temperature. Topics such as the variability of the Sun and the Earth's heat balance are discussed in considerable detail. The author also investigates how the current global warming trend compares with past fluctuations in earth's climate and what is the likelihood that the warming trend we are experiencing now is primarily just another in a series of natural climate fluctuations as opposed to a direct result of human activities. A key factor in understanding what may happen in the future is to examine the credibility of the global climate models which claim that greenhouse gases produce most of the temperature rise of the 20th Century, and forecast much greater impacts in the century ahead. Finally, the book considers future global energy requirements, fossil fuel usage and carbon dioxide production, public policy relating to global warming, and agreements such as the Kyoto Protocol. (orig.)

  14. A Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program for American Indians with Metabolic Syndrome: The Balance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elisa T.; Jobe, Jared B.; Yeh, Jeunliang; Ali, Tauqeer; Rhoades, Everett R.; Knehans, Allen W.; Willis, Diane J.; Johnson, Melanie R.; Zhang, Ying; Poolaw, Bryce; Rogers, Billy

    2012-01-01

    The Balance Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in 200 American Indian (AI) participants with metabolic syndrome who reside in southwestern Oklahoma. Major risk factors targeted include weight, diet, and physical activity. Participants are assigned randomly to one of two groups, a guided or a…

  15. Nuclear submarine decommissioning. Radiation risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of the ships and vessels with nuclear power installations is a problem of primary and worldwide importance. It is essential for both the naval fleet and the military industrial complex as a whole. Nuclear submarines decommissioning is accompanied by a number of questions concerning the development and performance of the safe technologies for managing radioactive equipment and nuclear waste from the vessels with the nuclear power facilities. Decommissioning of nuclear submarines including unloading of the spent fuel should take place at the operating ship yards and repairing plants that are usually situated close to the densely populated areas and living blocks. Decommissioning includes a series of the potentially dangerous operations with radioactive materials, e.g. fuel unloading, disposal of coolant, dismantling of the contaminated equipment, cutting out the reactor compartment, etc. As a result a great amount of highly radioactive liquid and solid wastes are formed including the cut-out reactor compartment and spent fuel that produce additional radioactive load on the local environment and population. Estimation of the radiation risk for the environment and population due to decommissioning becomes an actual and necessary question. Apart from this the process of decommissioning may cause accidents followed by complicated radiation situation with high dose rates and contamination of the environment. Analysis of the most probable scenarios of the accident development and estimation of the expected radiation consequences should help to assess the risk rate for radiation impact on the environment and population as well as to develop an adequate environmental monitoring and to undertake measures for the accident localisation and liquidation of its consequences. A separate problem is management of the reactor compartment containing radioactive equipment of the steam producing installation and biological protection. Since there are no specialised

  16. Informing people about radiation risks: a review of obstacles to public understanding and effective risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the literature on informing people about radiation risks. The paper focuses on obstacles to public understanding and effective risk communication. The paper concludes with a set of guidelines for communicating information about radiation risks to the public. The paper also includes an appendix that reviews the literature on one of the most important tools for communicating information about radiation risks: risk comparisons

  17. Balancing Risks and Benefits of Therapy for Patients with Favorable-Risk Limited-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Role of ABVD Chemotherapy Alone

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, Annette E.; Meyer, Ralph M.

    2014-01-01

    More than 85% of patients with non-bulky stage IA-IIA Hodgkin lymphoma will obtain long-term disease control. However, as long-term survival is dependent on both disease control and avoidance of late toxic effects associated with the treatment received, the initial choice of treatment can be associated with trade-offs that balance optimum disease control with avoidance of these late-effect risks. Previous radiation therapy paradigms that used wide-field target volumes were the major treatment...

  18. Balancing Lymphedema Risk: Exercise Versus Deconditioning for Breast Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphedema, a common and feared negative effect of breast cancer treatment, is generally described by arm swelling and dysfunction. Risk averse clinical recommendations guided survivors to avoid use of the affected arm. This may lead to deconditioning and, ironically, the very outcome women seek to avoid. Recently published studies run counter to these guidelines.

  19. New Strategies for Managing Risks: A Balancing Act for Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The stately collegiate gothic buildings that define the iconic West Campus at Duke University evoke a strong sense of stability and the status quo. Like all institutions of higher learning, Duke faces many potential challenges to campus equilibrium--some of which could prove devastating to the university. Risk is inherent in academe, yet colleges…

  20. Balance Training Reduces Falls Risk in Older Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Steven; Colberg, Sheri R.; Mariano, Mira; Henri K. Parson; Vinik, Arthur I.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study assessed the effects of balance/strength training on falls risk and posture in older individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixteen individuals with type 2 diabetes and 21 age-matched control subjects (aged 50–75 years) participated. Postural stability and falls risk was assessed before and after a 6-week exercise program. RESULTS Diabetic individuals had significantly higher falls risk score compared with control subjects. The diabetic group also e...

  1. Solid tumor risks after high doses of ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Rainer K; Brenner, David J.

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing concern regarding radiation-related second-cancer risks in long-term radiotherapy survivors and a corresponding need to be able to predict cancer risks at high radiation doses. Although cancer risks at moderately low radiation doses are reasonably understood from atomic bomb survivor studies, there is much more uncertainty at the high doses used in radiotherapy. It has generally been assumed that cancer induction decreases rapidly at high doses due to cell killing. However...

  2. Understanding radiation and risk: the importance of primary and secondary education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan's primary and secondary schools, radiation and radioactivity are taught as part of the curriculum dealing with social science subjects. Students learn much about the hazardous features of radiation, but lack the scientific understanding necessary to build a more balanced picture. Although the same point applies to education covering the harmful effects of volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, electrical storms and so on, public understanding of these events is relatively high and students are generally able to make informed judgments about the risks involved. By contrast, their limited understanding of radiation often contributes to fears that it is evil or even supernatural. To correct this distortion, it is important that primary and secondary education includes a scientific explanation of radiation. Like heat and light, radiation is fundamental to the history of the universe; and scientific education programs should give appropriate emphasis to this important subject. Students would then be able to make more objective judgments about the useful and hazardous aspects of radiation. (author)

  3. Heat balance structure during nights with radiation and advection-radiation weather in autumn for standard surface of grass in Ursynów-WAU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mean duration of heat balance components during autumn nights with advection-radiation and radiation weather in years 1994-99 were stated on the basis of data observed in meteorological station Ursynów-WAU. Mean fluxes of heat balance components and values of components ratios are presented in tables

  4. Radiation balances of melting snow covers at an open site in the Central Sierra Nevada, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation balances of melting snow packs for three seasons at an open site at the Central Sierra Snow Laboratory near Soda Springs, California were examined. The snow covers were examples of below-normal, near-normal and much-above-normal water equivalents. Two of the snow covers melted under generally clear skies in late spring while the other melted under cloudier conditions and at a time when less extraterrestrial radiation was available. Moreover, the snow covers were of very different densities, thereby allowing examination of a possible relationship between that characteristic and albedo. No such relationship was observed. Despite the dissimilarities in the conditions under which melt occurred, the disposition of solar radiation was similar for the three melt seasons. Albedos and their rates of decline through the melt season were similar for the three seasons. Absorbed solar radiation and a cloudiness index were useful predictors for daily net radiation, accounting for 71% of the total variance. (author)

  5. Definition report on Radiation Indicators in the Environmental Balance and Environmental Outline reports of the Dutch government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For use in future versions of the integrative reports called 'Milieubalans' (Environmental Balance) and 'Milieuverkenning' (Environmental Outlook) RIVM has chosen to present an overview of environmental issues, especially those related to actual and future environmental policies in the Netherlands, in terms of so called target and related steering variables. This definition report describes the elaboration of the above-mentioned approach when it is applied to the complete area of interest: radiation. Together with other definition reports it is supposed to be the justification of choices which are made in defining the sequence of subjects and the minimum set of variables in the future versions of the 'Milieubalans' and the 'Milieuverkenning'. The elaboration is guided by the policy document 'Radiation protection and risk management' (Omgaan met risico's van straling). The policy can be characterized as risk management by focusing directly on the sources of radiation, i.e. steering at the beginning and setting limits at the end of the source-risk chain. Therefore, it is concluded that the complete source-risk chain has to be analyzed and modelled. The area of interest (radiation) is subdivided into areas corresponding to the source categories which are used in the policy document. For each area possible target and steering variables, together with related target and reference values, are collected. Present (diagnosis) and future (prognosis) values of the target variables are also investigated. In conclusion, an indication is given of the activities, which are advisable for the coming years in order to make the target variables operational. The next phases are roughly outlined. 6 tabs., 2 appendices, 19 refs

  6. Review of the current status of radiation risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the current status of radiation risk estimation for low linear energy transfer radiation. Recent statements by various national and international organisations regarding risk estimates are critically discussed. The recently published revised population risk estimates from the study of Japanese bomb survivors are also reviewed and used with some unpublished data from Japan to calculate risk figures for a general work force. (author)

  7. Comments on the theory of radiation risk I Systematic outline of the theory of radiation risk

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, J

    1974-01-01

    Presents a systematic outline of the current theory of radiation risk. The most basic ideas of the theory can be expressed by two quantities which represent the administrative approach to radiation risk. These quantities are 'specific dose', D/sub s/, which relates to individual organs or tissues and 'overall dose', D/sub 0/, which relates to the entire human body. By taking D/sub s/ and D/sub 0/ as a starting point and by using postulational methods, two auxiliary quantities have been derived which are 'dose equivalent', D/sub e/(r), and quality factor, Q. Dose equivalent, D/sub e/(r), is a macroscopic field quantity and is, therefore, different from the ICRP defined dose equivalent, H, which is microscopic.

  8. Instrumentation and control balancing the risks and benefits of modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the benefits and risks of modernization of instrumentation and control (I and C) systems for nuclear power plants. It will draw conclusions on how to proceed with such modernization across the spectrum from operating reactors to new plant designs. Lessons learned from Westinghouse's application of digital systems to the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant in the Czech Republic, and other nuclear plant upgrades will be used to support principles and conclusions drawn in the paper. A long term view of the modernization program is essential, even if piecemeal or individual upgrades are envisioned. A framework for considering these risks and goals into a long range strategic plan will be presented. The framework will be presented in the form of I and C architectures which permit long term growth, planning ahead for technological obsolescence, selectron of suppliers for term relationships, and effective integration of individual upgrades. Potential upgrade areas will be summarized for functional improvements, I and C hardware upgrades, and man-machine interface improvements. Examples from Westinghouse's I and C experience will be presented to clarify the principles and framework described in the paper. Lessons learned from the application of the Eagle product line to operating reactors and the emergence of distributed computer information systems as an integration vehicle for I and C upgrades will be discussed. Westinghouse is currently modernizing the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant I and C system in the Czech Republic. An overview of this program will be included as it relates to the modernization framework presented in the paper. (authors)

  9. Partitioning of radiation and energy balance components in an inhomogeneous desert valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation and energy balance components are required to validate global, regional, and local scale models representing surface heat flux relationships in the heterogeneous surfaces of the world's arid and desert regions. Research was conducted in north-eastern Nevada, U.S.A., in a Great Basin inhomogeneous semi-arid desert valley located at 40° 44′ N, 114° 26′ W, with an elevation of 1707 m above mean sea level, to study the daily, monthly, and annual mesoscale radiation and energy balance components. We established five radiation stations along with five Bowen ratio systems to measure the incoming (Rsi) and outgoing (Rso) solar (shortwave) radiation, net (Rn) radiation, air temperatures and moisture at 1 and 2 m above-ground, the aggregated (soil + vegetation) surface temperature, soil heat flux at 8 cm (three locations at each station), soil temperatures at 2 and 6 cm above each soil flux plate, wind speed and direction at 10 m, and precipitation (if any) every 5 s averaged into 20 min throughout the valley during the 93–94 water year (beginning 1 October). Our study during the 93–94 water year showed that albedo (Rso/Rsi) ranged from 85% (snow-covered surface) to 10% (cloudy skies with wet surface) among stations. The water year total incoming solar radiation (averaged among stations) amounted to 6·33 × 103MJ·m−2 and about 24% of that was reflected back to the atmosphere. The net longwave radiation (Rln = Rlo− Rli) was about 32% of Rsi, where Rlo and Rli are the terrestrial (outgoing) and atmospheric (incoming) longwave radiation, respectively. The 93–94 water year average net radiation (Rn) among stations amounted to 2·68 × 103MJ·m−2(about 44% of Rsi). Approximately 85·3% and 14·6% of Rn were used for the processes of sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat fluxes, respectively. The annual Rncontribution to surface soil heat flux (Gsurf) was almost 0·1%. Monthly and annual relationships among radiation and energy balance components are

  10. Evaluating shielding effectiveness for reducing space radiation cancer risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss calculations of probability distribution functions (PDF) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). The PDFs are used in significance tests for evaluating the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments are considered in models of cancer risk PDFs. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are included in the calculations. We show that the cancer risk uncertainty, defined as the ratio of the upper value of 95% confidence interval (CI) to the point estimate is about 4-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missions (180d) or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits that are based on acceptable levels of risk. For example, the upper 95% CI exceeding 10% fatal risk for males and females on a Mars mission. For reducing GCR cancer risks, shielding materials are marginally effective because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativistic particles. At the present time, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding cannot be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding based on a significance test that accounts for radiobiology uncertainties in GCR risk projection

  11. Evaluating Shielding Effectiveness for Reducing Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2007-01-01

    We discuss calculations of probability distribution functions (PDF) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). The PDF s are used in significance tests of the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments are considered in models of cancer risk PDF s. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. We show that the cancer risk uncertainty, defined as the ratio of the 95% confidence level (CL) to the point estimate is about 4-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missions (risk, however one that is mitigated effectively by shielding, especially for carbon composites structures with high hydrogen content. In contrast, for long duration lunar (>180 d) or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits, with 95% CL s exceeding 10% fatal risk for males and females on a Mars mission. For reducing GCR cancer risks, shielding materials are marginally effective because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativistic particles. At the present time, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding can not be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding based on a significance test that accounts for radiobiology uncertainties in GCR risk projection.

  12. Knowledge of medical imaging radiation dose and risk among doctors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) scans has revolutionised healthcare but also greatly increased population radiation doses. Overuse of diagnostic radiation is becoming a feature of medical practice, leading to possible unnecessary radiation exposures and lifetime-risks of developing cancer. Doctors across all medical specialties and experience levels were surveyed to determine their knowledge of radiation doses and potential risks associated with some diagnostic imaging. A survey relating to knowledge and understanding of medical imaging radiation was distributed to doctors at 14 major Queensland public hospitals, as well as fellows and trainees in radiology, emergency medicine and general practice. From 608 valid responses, only 17.3% correctly estimated the radiation dose from CT scans and almost 1 in 10 incorrectly believed that CT radiation is not associated with any increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. There is a strong inverse relationship between a clinician's experience and their knowledge of CT radiation dose and risks, even among radiologists. More than a third (35.7%) of doctors incorrectly believed that typical NM imaging either does not use ionising radiation or emits doses equal to or less than a standard chest radiograph. Knowledge of CT and NM radiation doses is poor across all specialties, and there is a significant inverse relationship between experience and awareness of CT dose and risk. Despite having a poor understanding of these concepts, most doctors claim to consider them prior to requesting scans and when discussing potential risks with patients.

  13. A modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    balanced antennas like loops or dipoles. In this paper, a modified Wheeler cap method is proposed for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas and a three-port network model of the Wheeler cap measurement is introduced. The advantage of the modified method is that it is...... wideband, thus does not require any balun, and both the antenna input impedance and radiation efficiency can be obtained. An electrically small loop antenna and a wideband dipole were simulated and measured according to the proposed method and the results of measurements and simulations are presented. The...... obtained results are also compared with the results from a spherical near-field measurements in an anechoic chamber and a good agreement is observed....

  14. Variability in the natural radiation dose as a point of comparison for judging acceptable radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection use, as a valid method for judging the acceptability of the level of risk due to occupational radiation exposure, a comparison of work-related radiation risks with risks in other occupations recognized as having high standards of safety. Recently the Food and Drug Administration evaluated various rationales on which to base Protective Action Guides (PAGs). PAGs are guides or numerical limits for actions, to be taken in the event of a radiological incident resulting in the contamination of human food or animal feeds. As with the ICRP's recommendations the PAGs have been formulated on the basis of a judgement of acceptable risk. One approach for making this judgement is to compare the risk of radiation exposure with the risk of other common hazards accepted by society. This approach is similar to that employed by the ICRP. Another method of comparison, described in this paper, uses the variability of natural radiation exposure for evaluating the acceptability of radiation risk. This comparison yields more conservative numerical limits than comparison to common societal hazards. This comparison is appropriate in that the geographic variability in natural radiation exposure is normally discounted as a risk in a highly mobile society. Further, in this analysis radiation risks are directly compared rather than comparing radiation with non-radiation risks, as is the case for analyses employing societal hazards as a baseline reference. (author)

  15. The commercialization of university-based research: Balancing risks and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield, Timothy; Ogbogu, Ubaka

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing push to commercialize university research has emerged as a significant science policy challenge. While the socio-economic benefits of increased and rapid research commercialization are often emphasized in policy statements and discussions, there is less mention or discussion of potential risks. In this paper, we highlight such potential risks and call for a more balanced assessment of the commercialization ethos and trends. Discussion There is growing evidence that t...

  16. Characteristics of KIPT staff by groups of radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology of individual radiation cancer risk assessment UNSCEAR-94 has been described. Characteristics of KIPT staff at the individual monitoring, in terms of the ''Dose-response matrix'' have been reviewed. The main results of the calculations of the relative, attributive and absolute radiation risks of KIPT personnel for different sites and different risk groups have been showed. The distributions of the main characteristics of the personnel: age, years on the individual monitoring and the cumulative dose for different radiation risk groups of staff have been investigated.

  17. Risk estimation for badge-monitored radiation workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, A.

    1997-01-01

    In estimating the cancer mortality risk for radiation workers it is conventional to use data obtained from the populations exposed to radiation as a result of the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This A-bomb experience resulted in relatively high doses of radiation and short periods of exposure. The availability of systematic analyses of the mortality of workers at the Hanford plant (Washington state) provides a more realistic basis for individual risk estimates. We present the da...

  18. Acceptable level of radiation risk and its perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceptable level of radiation risk for public members, that is 10-5/y, was proposed by ICRP and other international organizations. We studied to survey basic procedures of deriving this value and to derive an acceptable risk value in Japan by using similar procedures. The basic procedures to derive 10-5/y were found as follows; (1) 0.1 percent of annual mortality from all diseases, (2) 0.1 percent of life time risk, (3) one percent of mortality from all causes in each age cohort and (4) corresponding value to 1 mSv annual radiation exposure. From these bases we derived the value of 10-5/y as acceptable risk level in Japan. The perception to risk level of 10-5/y in conventional life was investigated by means of questionnaires for 1,095 college students living in Tokyo. The risks considered in this study were natural background radiation, coffee, skiing, X-ray diagnosis, spontaneous cancer, passive smoking and air pollution. The most acceptable risk was the risk related with natural background radiation. And the risk of natural background radiation was more easily accepted by the students who had knowledges on natural background radiation. On the other hand, the risk from air pollution or passive smoking was the most adverse one. (author)

  19. Radiation education to medical residents. Their understanding and risk perception of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement of radiation education to medical staffs is required in particular after the nuclear accident at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station; however, the comprehension level of radiation by medical doctors has not been elucidated. Here we analyzed the understanding and risk perception of radiation by the medical residents by the results of the review examination and the questionnaire in the radiation education course for them from 2011 to 2014. Although the health effect of radiation was relatively well understood compared to the basics, safe handling, and legal issues, some primary and simple questions in all areas resulted in exceptionally low scores. The risk perception of radiation was high in the nuclear power generation and low in the medical radiation, which appeared stable in every year and similar to the radiation risk perception by other respondents. These findings suggest that the repeated education course for medical staffs is absolutely necessary to make them better understand radiation and updated continuously. (author)

  20. 12 CFR 615.5211 - Risk categories-balance sheet assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk categories-balance sheet assets. 615.5211 Section 615.5211 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL... lending/borrowing transaction executed under standard industry documentation; (ii) Is collateralized...

  1. The expansion of central bank balance sheets in emerging Asia: what are the risks?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Filardo; James Yetman

    2012-01-01

    Central bank balance sheets in emerging Asia expanded rapidly over the past decade because of the unprecedented rise in foreign reserve assets. The corresponding expansion of the central banks' liabilities has created dangers - risks of inflation and financial instability and financial market distortions - that require attention.

  2. Education on radiation risk in primary and middle schools in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Junichiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8), Mikaduki, Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The (ionizing) radiation appears in the text of social studies in primary and middle school curriculums. The radiation is almost not involved in the text of science. Consequently, pupils know only the examples of disasters caused by the excessive radiation and have no chance to learn real natures and characters of the radiation after the compulsory education course. This situation means difficulties to give a lesson on the radiation risk. Erupting volcanoes, earthquakes and lightning are similar in danger of the excessive radiations. However, few pupils have a supernatural threat for these phenomena that ancient people do, because they have the adequate knowledge for theses after primary and middle school curriculums. This situation is a full of contrast to the case of the radiation on the major sensitivity that they have. The point is to let pupils learn that the radiation is one of the natural phenomena like heat and electricity, those exist before a birth of human being. Natural ionizing radiation sources are recommended for the first teaching material. Pupils know that the radiation is one of commonplace events, then. Radiation is one of the universe elements. Consequently, they will know that human being is evolving with the radiation exposures. The general perception on safety and danger is a kind of antinomy in Japan. A person who is following antinomy accepts only zero risk. Preschool educations will be needed to grow out of an antinomy concept on safety and danger, and to recognize the reality. A comprehensive knowledge should be provided with a full balance for the perception of risk. For an example, prejudices against HIV patients still remain in Japan, due to many belated campaigns on weak infection. People remember danger, and they do not remember the fact that is not dangerous. (Y. Tanaka)

  3. Education on radiation risk in primary and middle schools in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (ionizing) radiation appears in the text of social studies in primary and middle school curriculums. The radiation is almost not involved in the text of science. Consequently, pupils know only the examples of disasters caused by the excessive radiation and have no chance to learn real natures and characters of the radiation after the compulsory education course. This situation means difficulties to give a lesson on the radiation risk. Erupting volcanoes, earthquakes and lightning are similar in danger of the excessive radiations. However, few pupils have a supernatural threat for these phenomena that ancient people do, because they have the adequate knowledge for theses after primary and middle school curriculums. This situation is a full of contrast to the case of the radiation on the major sensitivity that they have. The point is to let pupils learn that the radiation is one of the natural phenomena like heat and electricity, those exist before a birth of human being. Natural ionizing radiation sources are recommended for the first teaching material. Pupils know that the radiation is one of commonplace events, then. Radiation is one of the universe elements. Consequently, they will know that human being is evolving with the radiation exposures. The general perception on safety and danger is a kind of antinomy in Japan. A person who is following antinomy accepts only zero risk. Preschool educations will be needed to grow out of an antinomy concept on safety and danger, and to recognize the reality. A comprehensive knowledge should be provided with a full balance for the perception of risk. For an example, prejudices against HIV patients still remain in Japan, due to many belated campaigns on weak infection. People remember danger, and they do not remember the fact that is not dangerous. (Y. Tanaka)

  4. Radiation risk for women undergoing mammography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: The application of X-rays in mammography examinations requires not only constant control of physical and technical parameters of the equipment used, but also an evaluation of the radiation risk for patients, particularly in mammography screening programs. There exist a number of methods of dose evaluation in mammography. Some of them are included in the dosimetry protocols. The tolerances for measured values, limiting the dose to the patients have also been established. One of the methods, proposed by Dance, applies to establishing the doses to individual patients. It requires the knowledge clinical and exposition parameters. Another method, recommended by the E.C., requires establishing the phantom dose for reference exposition, as part of quality control tests. This approach is simpler but less precise, because at most mammography facilities the conditions of reference exposition are different than those of routine clinical exposition as it was shown in an exercise of quality control tests in a group of 32 mammography facilities in Poland. The method proposed in this study is an intermediate solution recommending measurement of phantom dose for the routine clinical exposition. Material and Methods: The material contains the data of 230 expositions performed in 6 mammography facilities Poland. This data was used to establish individual dose for ever y patient undergoing mammography examination according to the method proposed by Dance. For each mammography facility the mean glandular dose (M.G.D. F.) was established for reference and routine expositions according to the E.C. Dosimetry Protocol. The limits for phantom dose were established, which, according to the E.C. protocol, depend on the optical density (over background) of the image of the PMMA phantom 4.5 cm thick. Results and Discussion: The phantom dose determined for each mammography facility were below the limits. The lowest value of the mean dose received

  5. Current and future impacts of ultraviolet radiation on the terrestrial carbon balance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Kolby SMITH; Wei GAO; Heidi STELTZER

    2009-01-01

    One of the most documented effects of human activity on our environment is the reduction of stratospheric ozone resulting in an increase of biologically harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In a less predictable manner, UV radiation incident at the surface of the earth is expected to be further modified in the future as a result of altered cloud condition, atmospheric aerosol concentration, and snow cover. Although UV radiation comprises only a small fraction of the total solar radiation that is incident at the earth's surface, it has the greatest energy per unit wavelength and, thus, the greatest potential to damage the biosphere. Recent investigations have highlighted numerous ways that UV radiation could potentially affect a variety of ecological processes, including nutrient cycling and the terrestrial carbon cycle. The objectives of the following literature review are to summarize and synthesize the available information relevant to the effects of UV radiation and other climate change factors on the terrestrial carbon balance in an effort to highlight current gaps in knowledge and future research directions for UV radiation research.

  6. EDITORIAL: The Earth radiation balance as driver of the global hydrological cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Liepert, Beate

    2010-06-01

    Variations in the intensity of the global hydrological cycle can have far-reaching effects on living conditions on our planet. While climate change discussions often revolve around possible consequences of future temperature changes, the adaptation to changes in the hydrological cycle may pose a bigger challenge to societies and ecosystems. Floods and droughts are already today amongst the most damaging natural hazards, with floods being globally the most significant disaster type in terms of loss of human life (Jonkman 2005). From an economic perspective, changes in the hydrological cycle can impose great pressures and damages on a variety of industrial sectors, such as water management, urban planning, agricultural production and tourism. Despite their obvious environmental and societal importance, our understanding of the causes and magnitude of the variations of the hydrological cycle is still unsatisfactory (e.g., Ramanathan et al 2001, Ohmura and Wild 2002, Allen and Ingram 2002, Allan 2007, Wild et al 2008, Liepert and Previdi 2009). The link between radiation balance and hydrological cycle Globally, precipitation can be approximated by surface evaporation, since the variability of the atmospheric moisture storage is negligible. This is the case because the fluxes are an order of magnitude larger than the atmospheric storage (423 x 1012 m3 year-1 versus 13 x 1012 m3 according to Baumgartner and Reichel (1975)), the latter being determined by temperature (Clausius-Clapeyron). Hence the residence time of evaporated water in the atmosphere is not more than a few days, before it condenses and falls back to Earth in the form of precipitation. Any change in the globally averaged surface evaporation therefore implies an equivalent change in precipitation, and thus in the intensity of the global hydrological cycle. The process of evaporation requires energy, which it obtains from the surface radiation balance (also known as surface net radiation), composed of the

  7. Minimizing Astronauts' Risk from Space Radiation during Future Lunar Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hayat, Mathew; Nounu, Hatem N.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the risk factors from space radiation for astronauts on future lunar missions. Two types of radiation are discussed, Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and Solar Particle events (SPE). Distributions of Dose from 1972 SPE at 4 DLOCs inside Spacecraft are shown. A chart with the organ dose quantities is also given. Designs of the exploration class spacecraft and the planned lunar rover are shown to exhibit radiation protections features of those vehicles.

  8. Medical interventional procedures--reducing the radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last 40 years, the number of percutaneous interventional procedures using radiation has increased significantly, with many secondary care clinicians using fluoroscopically guided techniques. Many procedures can deliver high radiation doses to patients and staff, with the potential to cause immediate and delayed radiation effects. The challenge for interventionists is to maximize benefit, whilst minimizing radiation risk to patients and staff. Non-radiologist clinicians are often inadequately trained in radiation safety and radiobiology. However, clinical governance and legislation now requires a more rigorous approach to protecting patients and staff. Protection can be ensured, and risks can be controlled, by appropriate design, procurement and commissioning of equipment; quality assurance; and optimal operational technique, backed by audit. Interventionists need knowledge and skills to reduce the risks. Appropriate training should include awareness of the potential for radiation injury, equipment operational parameters, doses measurement and recording methods and dose reduction techniques. Clinical governance requires informed consent, appropriate patient counselling and follow-up

  9. Space radiation risks to the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Alp, Murat; Sulzman, Frank M.; Wang, Minli

    2014-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) risks which include during space missions and lifetime risks due to space radiation exposure are of concern for long-term exploration missions to Mars or other destinations. Possible CNS risks during a mission are altered cognitive function, including detriments in short-term memory, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, which may affect performance and human health. The late CNS risks are possible neurological disorders such as premature aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other dementia. Radiation safety requirements are intended to prevent all clinically significant acute risks. However the definition of clinically significant CNS risks and their dependences on dose, dose-rate and radiation quality is poorly understood at this time. For late CNS effects such as increased risk of AD, the occurrence of the disease is fatal with mean time from diagnosis of early stage AD to death about 8 years. Therefore if AD risk or other late CNS risks from space radiation occur at mission relevant doses, they would naturally be included in the overall acceptable risk of exposure induced death (REID) probability for space missions. Important progress has been made in understanding CNS risks due to space radiation exposure, however in general the doses used in experimental studies have been much higher than the annual galactic cosmic ray (GCR) dose (∼0.1 Gy/y at solar maximum and ∼0.2 Gy/y at solar minimum with less than 50% from HZE particles). In this report we summarize recent space radiobiology studies of CNS effects from particle accelerators simulating space radiation using experimental models, and make a critical assessment of their relevance relative to doses and dose-rates to be incurred on a Mars mission. Prospects for understanding dose, dose-rate and radiation quality dependencies of CNS effects and extrapolation to human risk assessments are described.

  10. The Balance Between Initiation and Promotion in Radiation-Induced Murine Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shuryak, Igor; Ullrich, Robert L.; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of radiation carcinogenesis in animals allow detailed investigation of how the risk depends on age at exposure and time since exposure and of the mechanisms that determine this risk, e.g., induction of new pre-malignant cells (initiation) and enhanced proliferation of already existing pre-malignant cells (promotion). To assist the interpretation of these patterns, we apply a newly developed biologically based mathematical model to data on several types of solid tumors induced by acute...

  11. Acceptability of risk from radiation: Application to human space flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This one of NASA's sponsored activities of the NCRP. In 1983, NASA asked NCRP to examine radiation risks in space and to make recommendations about career radiation limits for astronauts (with cancer considered as the principal risk). In conjunction with that effort, NCRP was asked to convene this symposium; objective is to examine the technical, strategic, and philosophical issues pertaining to acceptable risk and radiation in space. Nine papers are included together with panel discussions and a summary. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  12. Acceptability of risk from radiation: Application to human space flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-30

    This one of NASA`s sponsored activities of the NCRP. In 1983, NASA asked NCRP to examine radiation risks in space and to make recommendations about career radiation limits for astronauts (with cancer considered as the principal risk). In conjunction with that effort, NCRP was asked to convene this symposium; objective is to examine the technical, strategic, and philosophical issues pertaining to acceptable risk and radiation in space. Nine papers are included together with panel discussions and a summary. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Interaction between radiation and other breast cancer risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A follow-up study was conducted of 1764 women institutionalized for pulmonary tuberculosis between 1930 and 1954. Among 1047 women exposed to fluoroscopic chest X-rays during air collapse therapy of the lung, an excess of breast cancer was observed and previously reported (41 cases observed versus 23.3 expected). Among 717 comparison patients who received other treatments, no excess breast cancer risk was apparent (15 cases observed versus 14.1 expected). To determine whether breast cancer risk factors modify the carcinogenic effect of radiation, analyses were performed evaluating the interaction of radiation with indicators of breast cancer risk. The greatest radiation risk was found when radiation exposure occurred just before and during menarche. Similarly, exposures during first pregnancy appeared substantially more hazardous than exposures occurring before or after first pregnancy, suggesting that the condition of the breast at the time of pregnancy modifies the effect of radiation in such a way as to enhance the risk. Age at menopause did not appear to influence the risk of radiation exposure. Other than radiation, benign breast disease was the most significant breast cancer risk indicator. Benign breast disease was not seen to modify the effect of radiation exposure; however, excessive radiation exposure might have increased the incidence of benign breast disease, complicating the interaction analysis. Because of the uncertainty due to small-number sampling variation, these study results will require confirmation by a larger series. They do, however, suggest that stages when breast tissue undergoes high mitotic activity, e.g. menarche and pregnancy, are times of special vulnerability to the harmful effects of ionizing radiation

  14. Radiation Risks and Mitigation in Electronic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, B

    2015-01-01

    Electrical and electronic systems can be disturbed by radiation-induced effects. In some cases, radiation-induced effects are of a low probability and can be ignored; however, radiation effects must be considered when designing systems that have a high mean time to failure requirement, an impact on protection, and/or higher exposure to radiat ion. High-energy physics power systems suffer from a combination of these effects: a high mean time to failure is required, failure can impact on protection, and the proximity of systems to accelerators increases the likelihood of radiation-induced events. This paper presents the principal radiation-induced effects, and radiation environments typical to high-energy physics. It outlines a procedure for designing and validating radiation-tolerant systems using commercial off-the-shelf components. The paper ends with a worked example of radiation-tolerant power converter controls that are being developed for the Large Hadron Collider and High Luminosity-Large Hadron Colli...

  15. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  16. Evaluations of Risks from the Lunar and Mars Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Protecting astronauts from the space radiation environments requires accurate projections of radiation in future space missions. Characterization of the ionizing radiation environment is challenging because the interplanetary plasma and radiation fields are modulated by solar disturbances and the radiation doses received by astronauts in interplanetary space are likewise influenced. The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) flux for the next solar cycle was estimated as a function of interplanetary deceleration potential, which has been derived from GCR flux and Climax neutron monitor rate measurements over the last 4 decades. For the chaotic nature of solar particle event (SPE) occurrence, the mean frequency of SPE at any given proton fluence threshold during a defined mission duration was obtained from a Poisson process model using proton fluence measurements of SPEs during the past 5 solar cycles (19-23). Analytic energy spectra of 34 historically large SPEs were constructed over broad energy ranges extending to GeV. Using an integrated space radiation model (which includes the transport codes HZETRN [1] and BRYNTRN [2], and the quantum nuclear interaction model QMSFRG[3]), the propagation and interaction properties of the energetic nucleons through various media were predicted. Risk assessment from GCR and SPE was evaluated at the specific organs inside a typical spacecraft using CAM [4] model. The representative risk level at each event size and their standard deviation were obtained from the analysis of 34 SPEs. Risks from different event sizes and their frequency of occurrences in a specified mission period were evaluated for the concern of acute health effects especially during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). The results will be useful for the development of an integrated strategy of optimizing radiation protection on the lunar and Mars missions. Keywords: Space Radiation Environments; Galactic Cosmic Radiation; Solar Particle Event; Radiation Risk; Risk

  17. Scientific approach to radiation-induced cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Sobue, Tomotaka

    2011-01-01

    When evaluating cancer risk of low-dose radiation, it is difficult to distinguish the actual effect from that of chance, bias, and confounding as they become relatively large. This is why the relation between radiation doses of less than 100 mSv and cancer risk is considered unknown. Based on data of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the cancer risk at 100 mSv is calculated at 1.05 times. On the other hand, the risk ratio for the relation between passive smoking and lung cancer...

  18. Social impacts induced by radiation risk in Fukushima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant induced by an earthquake of M9.0 and subsequent tsunami gave various kinds of impacts around the plant. After reviewing arguments of local governments for low dose radiation risk, this paper analyzed social impacts by the risk in terms of a gap of emergency response between national and local governments, corruption of communities in various levels induced by plural statements for risk levels in low level radiation, and economic impacts for agricultural crops made in Fukushima prefecture. Afterwards, clues for improving the situation were discussed, which include understanding of characteristics of public perception, attitudes of experts and interactive risk communication. (author)

  19. Radiation and society: Comprehending radiation risk. V. 3. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This IAEA international conference on Radiation and Society was the first major international meeting devoted to the comprehension of radiation risk, public attitude towards radiation risk and hazards encountered by the general public in contaminated areas. Volume three of the proceedings contains the speeches, ten introductory papers, summaries of the technical discussion sessions, the key note paper on uncertainties in the health impact of environmental pollutants. Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Seasonal changes in the radiation balance of subarctic forest and tundra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the seasonal behavior of the components of the radiation budget of subarctic tundra and open forest near Churchill, Manitoba. Data were collected between late February and August 1990. The presence of the winter snowpack is the most important factor which affects the difference in radiation balances of tundra and forest. Overall, net radiation was about four to five times larger over the forest when snow covered the ground. Albedo differences were primarily responsible for this difference in net radiation; however, somewhat smaller net longwave losses were experienced at the tundra site. The step decrease in albedo from winter to summer (i.e. snow-covered to snow-free conditions) was significant at both sites. The forest albedo decreased by about three-fold while the tundra experienced a seven-fold decrease. Net radiation at both sites increased in direct response to the albedo change. Transmissivity of the atmosphere near Churchill also appeared to change at about the same time as the loss of the snow cover and may be related to changing air masses which bring about the final snow melt

  1. Energy and carbon balances in cheatgrass, an essay in autecology. [Shortwave radiation, radiowave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, W.T.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment to determine the fates of energy and carbon in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) was carried out on steep (40/sup 0/) north- and south-facing slopes on a small earth mound, using many small lysimeters to emulate swards of cheatgrass. Meteorological conditions and energy fluxes that were measured included air and soil temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed, incoming shortwave radiation, net all-wave radiation, heat flux to the soil, and evaporation and transpiration separately. The fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon during spring growth was determined by analysis of the plant tissues into mineral nutrients, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, and nitrogen-free extract (NFE) for roots, shoots, and seeds separately. (auth)

  2. Risk of cancer subsequent to low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author puts low dose irradiation risks in perspective using average background radiation doses for standards. He assailed irresponsible media coverage during the height of public interest in the Three-Mile Island Reactor incident

  3. The variability of radiative balance elements and air temperature over the Asian region of Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Kharyutkina, E. V.; I. I. Ippolitov; S. V. Loginov

    2012-01-01

    The variability of spatial-temporal distribution of temperature and heat balance elements is investigated for the Asian territory of Russia (45–80° N, 60–180° E) using JRA-25, NCEP/DOE AMIP-II reanalysis data and observational data for the period of global warming 1979–2008. It is shown that temperature trend over the territory is 1.4 °C for the period under study according to reanalysis data. Since the beginning of 90s of 20th century the increase of back earth-atmosphere shortwave radiation...

  4. How dangerous is radioactive radiation? - Numerical risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article attempts to put radioactive radiation into perspective. The fact that humans are also exposed to natural radioactive radiation is noted and compared with the radiation resulting from nuclear accidents and military activities. Figures resulting from studies made on the effect of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima are discussed. The debate on the lower limit values for radiation exposition is commented on and the biological effects of ionising radiation are discussed. The distribution of radioactive elements in nature is discussed and comparisons made with the radiation caused by man's activities. Risks posed by incorporated radioactive substances and their quantification are compared with those posed, for instance, by tobacco. Public perception of the risks is briefly commented on

  5. Risks and management of radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Loren G

    2013-09-01

    High-energy ionizing radiation is harmful. Low-level exposure sources include background, occupational, and medical diagnostics. Radiation disaster incidents include radioactive substance accidents and nuclear power plant accidents. Terrorism and international conflict could trigger intentional radiation disasters that include radiation dispersion devices (RDD) (a radioactive dirty bomb), deliberate exposure to industrial radioactive substances, nuclear power plant sabotage, and nuclear weapon detonation. Nuclear fissioning events such as nuclear power plant incidents and nuclear weapon detonation release radioactive fallout that include radioactive iodine 131, cesium 137, strontium 90, uranium, plutonium, and many other radioactive isotopes. An RDD dirty bomb is likely to spread only one radioactive substance, with the most likely substance being cesium 137. Cobalt 60 and strontium 90 are other RDD dirty bomb possibilities. In a radiation disaster, stable patients should be decontaminated to minimize further radiation exposure. Potassium iodide (KI) is useful for iodine 131 exposure. Prussian blue (ferric hexacyanoferrate) enhances the fecal excretion of cesium via ion exchange. Ca-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) and Zn-DTPA form stable ionic complexes with plutonium, americium, and curium, which are excreted in the urine. Amifostine enhances chemical and enzymatic repair of damaged DNA. Acute radiation sickness ranges in severity from mild to lethal, which can be assessed by the nausea/vomiting onset/duration, complete blood cell count findings, and neurologic symptoms. PMID:24201986

  6. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Min H Huang, Tracy Shilling, Kara A Miller, Kristin Smith, Kayle LaVictoire Physical Therapy Department, School of Health Professions and Studies, University of Michigan–Flint, Flint, MI, USA Abstract: Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship...

  7. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Huang MH; Shilling T; Miller KA; Smith K.; LaVictoire K

    2015-01-01

    Min H Huang, Tracy Shilling, Kara A Miller, Kristin Smith, Kayle LaVictoire Physical Therapy Department, School of Health Professions and Studies, University of Michigan–Flint, Flint, MI, USA Abstract: Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of ...

  8. Influences of deforestation on radiation and heat balances in tropical peat swamp forest in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The difference of radiation and heat balances between a natural peat swamp forest and a deforested secondary forest has been investigated in Narathiwat Province, Thailand. Micrometeorological measurements were conducted continuously on observation towers 38 m and 4 m in heights in the primary forest and the secondary forest respectively. Results show that the deforestation of peat swamp forest leads to an increase in the sensible heat flux in the secondary forest. The yearly average ratio of the sensible heat flux to the net radiation was 20.9% in the peat swamp forest, and 33.2% in the secondary forest from Aug. 1995 to Jul. 1996. A ratio more than 40% was observed only in the dry season in the secondary forest. The change in sensible heat flux seemed to be influenced by the change in ground water levels. (author)

  9. Risk analysis in the country fuel energy balance - security and reliability of energy supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of risk have been discussed, that have been implemented in the existing fuel energy balance structure of Bulgaria. Some proposals for their decrease and alternatives have been done. Some possibilities for risk minimization have been proposed, in connection with the security and reliability of energy supplies for fuel and energy consumption needs in the country final energy consumption structure by fuel and energy types: solid fuels; liquid fuels; gaseous fuels; electricity; heat as well as by sectors: industry, transport, service sector, households, agriculture. (authors)

  10. Recent evolution of large-value payment systems : balancing liquidity and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Antoine Martin

    2005-01-01

    Large-value payment systems have evolved rapidly in the last 20 years, continually striking a balance between providing liquidity and keeping settlement risk under control. Changes to the design or to the risk management policies of such systems were needed, in part, due to the growth in the value of transactions on these systems. For example, in the United States the value of transactions on Fedwire, the Federal Reserve’s large-value payment system, increased from about 50 times GDP in 1989 ...

  11. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang MH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Min H Huang, Tracy Shilling, Kara A Miller, Kristin Smith, Kayle LaVictoire Physical Therapy Department, School of Health Professions and Studies, University of Michigan–Flint, Flint, MI, USA Abstract: Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A “faller” was a person with ≥1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher’s exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with P<0.15 were included in a forward logistic regression model to identify factors predictive of falls with age as covariate. Sensitivity and specificity of each predictor of falls in the model were calculated. Significance level for the regression analysis was P<0.05. During follow-up, 59% of participants had one or more falls. Baseline demographics, health information, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594–29.074 (P<0.05. Sensitivity and specificity for correctly

  12. Balancing the risks: the NRU reactor and the isotope crisis in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extended shutdown of the NRU reactor at Chalk River at the end of 2007 caused a critical shortage of medical radioisotopes in Canada and the world, led to a unique meeting of Canada's Parliament to pass emergency legislation, and cost the President of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission her job. This paper, based on the public record, reviews these events from the perspective of the balance of risk between the safety of the NRU reactor and the impact of a shortage of isotopes. This leads to important questions about the mandate, independence and flexibility of the nuclear regulator, relations between the regulator, the government, and the licensee, and the government's overall management of risks. We argue that the government approaches individual risks in isolation and needs a mechanism to deal with multiple risks. (author)

  13. Balancing the risks: the NRU reactor and the isotope crisis in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, B.; Meneley, D

    2008-09-15

    The extended shutdown of the NRU reactor at Chalk River at the end of 2007 caused a critical shortage of medical radioisotopes in Canada and the world, led to a unique meeting of Canada's Parliament to pass emergency legislation, and cost the President of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission her job. This paper, based on the public record, reviews these events from the perspective of the balance of risk between the safety of the NRU reactor and the impact of a shortage of isotopes. This leads to important questions about the mandate, independence and flexibility of the nuclear regulator, relations between the regulator, the government, and the licensee, and the government's overall management of risks. We argue that the government approaches individual risks in isolation and needs a mechanism to deal with multiple risks. (author)

  14. Radiation balance at the surface in the city of São Paulo, Brazil: diurnal and seasonal variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, M.J.; Oliveira, de A.P.; Soares, J.; Codato, G.; Wilde Barbaro, E.; Escobedo, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to describe the diurnal and seasonal variations of the radiation balance components at the surface in the city of São Paulo based on observations carried out during 2004. Monthly average hourly values indicate that the amplitudes of the diurnal cycles of net radiation (

  15. Use of MODIS Images to Quantify the Radiation and Energy Balances in the Brazilian Pantanal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio H. de C. Teixeira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available MODIS images during the year 2012 were used for modelling of the radiation and energy balance components with the application of the SAFER algorithm (Simple Algorithm for Evapotranspiration Retrieving in the Brazilian Pantanal area. Pixels from the main sub-regions of Barão de Melgaço (BR, Paiaguás (PA and Nhecolândia (NH were extracted in order to process microclimatic comparisons. In general, the net radiation (Rn relied much more on the global solar radiation (RG levels than on water conditions and ecosystem types, in accordance with the low Rn standard deviation values. The fraction of the available energy used as latent heat flux (λE were, on average, 65, 50 and 49% for the BR, PA and NH sub-regions, respectively. Horizontal heat advection, identified by the negative values of sensible heat flux (H, made several pixels with λE values higher than those for Rn in the middle of the year. Taking the evaporative fraction (Ef as a surface moisture indicator, the Tree-Lined Savanna (TLS was considered the moister ecosystem class, with 58% of the available energy being used as λE, while the driest one was the modified ecosystem Anthropogenic Changes (AC, presenting a λE/Rn fraction of 0.46. According to the spatial and temporal consistencies, and after comparisons with other previous point and large-scale studies, the SAFER algorithm proved to have sensibility to quantify and compare the large-scale radiation and energy balance components in the different ecosystems of the Brazilian Pantanal. The algorithm is useful for monitoring the energy exchange dynamics among the different terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem types throughout the seasons of the year.

  16. Biological consequences of radiation: risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is a syllabus of a course on Radiation Protection. The publication offers an overview of the biological radiation effects at cellular level. For that purpose, different forms of cancers and their incidence are first discussed; structure and functioning of normal cells are considered and an introduction in genetics is given. Finally, an overview is presented of the character of tissue damage after high-dose irradiation. (G.J.P.)

  17. A balanced hazard ratio for risk group evaluation from survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branders, Samuel; Dupont, Pierre

    2015-07-30

    Common clinical studies assess the quality of prognostic factors, such as gene expression signatures, clinical variables or environmental factors, and cluster patients into various risk groups. Typical examples include cancer clinical trials where patients are clustered into high or low risk groups. Whenever applied to survival data analysis, such groups are intended to represent patients with similar survival odds and to select the most appropriate therapy accordingly. The relevance of such risk groups, and of the related prognostic factors, is typically assessed through the computation of a hazard ratio. We first stress three limitations of assessing risk groups through the hazard ratio: (1) it may promote the definition of arbitrarily unbalanced risk groups; (2) an apparently optimal group hazard ratio can be largely inconsistent with the p-value commonly associated to it; and (3) some marginal changes between risk group proportions may lead to highly different hazard ratio values. Those issues could lead to inappropriate comparisons between various prognostic factors. Next, we propose the balanced hazard ratio to solve those issues. This new performance metric keeps an intuitive interpretation and is as simple to compute. We also show how the balanced hazard ratio leads to a natural cut-off choice to define risk groups from continuous risk scores. The proposed methodology is validated through controlled experiments for which a prescribed cut-off value is defined by design. Further results are also reported on several cancer prognosis studies, and the proposed methodology could be applied more generally to assess the quality of any prognostic markers. PMID:25894296

  18. An approach for balancing health and ecological risks at hazardous waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human health and ecological risks must be balanced at hazardous waste sites in order to ensure that remedial actions prevent unacceptable risks of either type. Actions that are designed to protect humans may fail to protect nonhuman populations and ecosystems or may damage ecosystems. However, there is no common scale of health and ecological risk that would allow comparisons to be performed. This paper presents an approach to addressing this problem based on classifying all risks (i.e., health and ecological risks due contaminants and remediation) as insignificant (de minimis), highly significant (de manifestis), or intermediate. For health risks the classification is based on standard criteria. However, in the absence of national guidance concerning the acceptability of ecological risks, new ecological criteria are proposed based on an analysis of regulatory precedents. Matrices and flow charts are presented to guide the use of these risk categories in remedial decision making. The assessment of mercury contamination of the East Fork Poplar Creek is presented as an example of the implementation of the approach. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  20. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.)

  1. Risk evaluation for protection of the public in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the risk that would be involved in the exposure of the public in the event of a radiation accident requires information on the biological consequences expected of such an exposure. This report defines a range of reference doses of radiation and their corresponding risks to the public in the event of a radiation accident. The reference doses and the considerations on which they were based will be used for assessing the hazards of nuclear installations and for policy decisions by the authorities responsible for measures taken to safeguards the public in the case of a nuclear accident.

  2. Radiation risk estimation based on measurement error models

    CERN Document Server

    Masiuk, Sergii; Shklyar, Sergiy; Chepurny, Mykola; Likhtarov, Illya

    2016-01-01

    This monograph discusses statistics and risk estimates applied to radiation damage under the presence of measurement errors. The first part covers nonlinear measurement error models, with a particular emphasis on efficiency of regression parameter estimators. In the second part, risk estimation in models with measurement errors is considered. Efficiency of the methods presented is verified using data from radio-epidemiological studies.

  3. Estimate of benefits versus radiation risks from mammographic screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany, a vivid debate is still going on concerning the implantation of preventive mammographic screening into the national health care system. Before launching such a programme, benefits and risks have to be carefully assessed. The risk of radiation induced breast cancer was calculated in terms of mortality per 100.000 women using the risk estimates of BEIR. The radiation dose was assumed to be 8 mSv per examination (2 mGy per view, 2 views; RBE=2, to be on the safe side). From the current literature regarding the benefits of screening, the number of deaths avoided per 100.000 women was estimated. Under the assumptions made in the model, screening from age 40 to 50 (six examinations at 2 years intervals, discontinuing at later age) might be associated with a benefit/risk ratio of about 6, whereas for women in the age group from 50 to 60 years the benefit/risk ratio was shown to be about 25. For a screening programme starting at the age of 50, the radiation risk involved does not appear to be a crucial issue. For performing mass screening with mammography beginning at the age of 40, radiation risks might have to be considered among a number of other risks associated with this age group. (orig.)

  4. Radiation balance of dryland grain sorghum as affected by planting geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of planting geometry on the radiation balance of dryland grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. cv. DK 46) were studied in a field experiment at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory at Bushland, TX, in 1984 on a Pullman clay loam (a fine, mixed, thermic Torrertic Paleustoll). The objective was to reduce the radiation load on a crop through manipulation of planting geometry and to determine whether that would affect crop productivity. Net radiation was 5% higher over wide compared to narrow rows (0.76 and 0.38 m, respectively) when averaged over three population levels from 33 to 110 days after sowing. East-west rows had 14% higher net radiation than north-south rows, averaged over two row spacings. The differences in net radiation were due to daytime responses, presumably shortwave albedo differences. Leaf photosynthesis and transpiration rates and stomatal resistance were measured twice during the grain-filling period. These measurements, taken S days after a period of moderate rains, showed no differences in the plant response due to row spacing or direction treatments. Slightly higher leaf temperatures in the high-population plots may have been related to greater depletion of plant available water than in medium and low population plots (72, 66, and 67% depletion, respectively). After 1 weeks of drying, narrow-row and high-population treatments showed greater stress as evidenced by lower transpiration and photosynthesis rates and higher stomatal resistance and leaf temperature. Soil water depletion was 20% less in narrow than wide rows during a 2-week period spanning the leaf transpiration measurement dates. Leaf photosynthesis, transpiration, temperature, and stomatal resistance were not affected by differences in net radiation due to row spacing or row direction

  5. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  6. Radiation and cancer risk in atomic-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K; Ozasa, K; Okubo, T

    2012-03-01

    With the aim of accurately assessing the effects of radiation exposure in the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has, over several decades, conducted studies of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, comprising 93 000 atomic-bomb survivors and 27 000 controls. Solid cancer: the recent report on solid cancer incidence found that at age 70 years following exposure at age 30 years, solid cancer rates increase by about 35%  Gy(-1) for men and 58% Gy(-1) for women. Age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. In the case of lung cancer, cigarette smoking has been found to be an important risk modifier. Radiation has similar effects on first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. Finally, radiation-associated increases in cancer rates appear to persist throughout life. Leukaemia: the recent report on leukaemia mortality suggests that radiation effects on leukaemia mortality persisted for more than 50 years. Moreover, significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in Nagasaki LSS members even 40-60 years after radiation exposure. Future perspective: given the continuing solid cancer increase in the survivor population, the LSS will likely continue to provide important new information on radiation exposure and solid cancer risks for another 15-20 years, especially for those exposed at a young age. PMID:22394591

  7. Radiation and cancer risk in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of accurately assessing the effects of radiation exposure in the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has, over several decades, conducted studies of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, comprising 93 000 atomic-bomb survivors and 27 000 controls. Solid cancer: the recent report on solid cancer incidence found that at age 70 years following exposure at age 30 years, solid cancer rates increase by about 35% Gy−1 for men and 58% Gy−1 for women. Age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. In the case of lung cancer, cigarette smoking has been found to be an important risk modifier. Radiation has similar effects on first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. Finally, radiation-associated increases in cancer rates appear to persist throughout life. Leukaemia: the recent report on leukaemia mortality suggests that radiation effects on leukaemia mortality persisted for more than 50 years. Moreover, significant dose–response for myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in Nagasaki LSS members even 40–60 years after radiation exposure. Future perspective: given the continuing solid cancer increase in the survivor population, the LSS will likely continue to provide important new information on radiation exposure and solid cancer risks for another 15–20 years, especially for those exposed at a young age. (note)

  8. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors)

  9. Cancer risk above 1 Gy and the impact for space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Walsh, Linda

    2009-07-01

    Analyses of the epidemiological data on the Japanese A-bomb survivors, who were exposed to γ-rays and neutrons, provide most current information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer. Since the dose span of main interest is usually between 0 and 1 Gy, for radiation protection purposes, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is often focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than 1 Gy are becoming more important for long-term manned space missions. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses larger than 1 Gy with respect to radiation-induced solid cancer and leukemia mortality. The present analysis of the A-bomb survivors data was extended by including two extra high-dose categories and applying organ-averaged dose instead of the colon-weighted dose. In addition, since there are some recent indications for a high neutron dose contribution, the data were fitted separately for three different values for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the neutrons (10, 35 and 100) and a variable RBE as a function of dose. The data were fitted using a linear and a linear-exponential dose-response relationship using a dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) of both one and two. The work presented here implies that the use of organ-averaged dose, a dose-dependent neutron RBE and the bending-over of the dose-response relationship for radiation-induced cancer could result in a reduction of radiation risk by around 50% above 1 Gy. This could impact radiation risk estimates for space crews on long-term mission above 500 days who might be exposed to doses above 1 Gy. The consequence of using a DDREF of one instead of two increases cancer risk by about 40% and would therefore balance the risk decrease described above.

  10. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  11. Regulatory assessment of risk to the environment: Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Health, Safety and Environment' is a familiar catchphrase in today's government departments, universities and industry. This catchphrase is most often associated with terms such as 'risk assessment', 'risk management' and 'hazard identification'. Such grouping demonstrates the underlying assumption that 'risk(s)' to the environment can be dealt with, and are being dealt with, using the same processes as those used for evaluating health and safety risks. This equally applies when the hazard is radiation. Management of risk to the environment is often carried out within a framework of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) incorporating Risk Assessment (RA) processes. Environmental Management Systems (EMS) and Risk Management Systems (RMS) also provide frameworks which incorporate RA processes. These systems are often integrated with existing quality and safety systems. The steps in these frameworks have been explained and comparisons have been drawn of how an EIA process and Environmental Management System compare with Environmental Risk Management processes. These comparisons demonstrate the common elements of each framework. The Australian Standard for Risk Management (AS/NZS 4360:1999) describes the risk management process in terms of establishing a risk context, identification, analysis, evaluation and treatment of risks. The application of risk management procedures as described in the Australian Standard for Risk Management have been discussed in relation to how they might apply to a simple case scenario of a historical landfill containing radioactive waste. (author)

  12. Attributable risk for radiation in the presence of other risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologne, John; Cullings, Harry; Furukawa, Kyoji; Ross, Phillip

    2010-11-01

    Two motivations for studying radiation risk are (1) to quantify the magnitude of risk as an aid to setting radiation protection standards and (2) to understand causality as an aid to assigning compensation for radiation exposed individuals whose disease or death may have been related to radiation exposure. Although it has long been known that radiation risk is modified by factors such as sex, age, and time, it is now apparent that radiation risk may also be modified by other risk factors, such as smoking, inflammation, genotype, and certain pathogens. Even apart from considerations of etiological interaction, the relative contribution of radiation to total burden of disease or death may depend on the level of background (spontaneous) risk of disease or death owing to those other factors if the joint effects do not multiply. Therefore, ignoring those other factors in assessing probability of causation for radiation (attributable fraction in epidemiological data) involves making a strong assumption about the joint effects. The concepts are discussed in detail and illustrated using results from studies on the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. PMID:20938230

  13. Ionizing radiation risk assessment, BEIR IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of the Subpanel discusses the potential impact on Federal agencies and indicates individual risk factors that could be used by them in risk assessment. The approach used in this CIRRPC report was to consider the risk factors presented in BEIR IV for each radionuclide (or group radioelements) and to make some judgments regarding their validity and/or the uncertainties involved. The coverage of Radon-222 and its progeny dominated the BEIR IV report and this Subpanel felt is was proper to devote more attention to this radionuclide family. This risk factor presented in BEIR IV for radon is 350 cancer deaths per million person-working level months (WLM) of exposure for a lifetime. There is a range of opinions on the conversion from WLM to absorbed dose. As discussed in the text, the use of the WLM concept makes it difficult or infeasible to compare the risk factor for radon with that of other radionuclides which are based on organ dose. This report also includes a discussion of certain fundamental scientific and operational issues that may have decisive effect upon risk factor selection. These adjunct items are dealt with under separate headings and include discussions of threshold dose considerations, extrapolation to low doses, and age at exposure

  14. Perception of risk for older people living with a mental illness: Balancing uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Leonie; Happell, Brenda; Moxham, Lorna

    2015-12-01

    Risk is commonly defined as a negative threat which needs to be controlled and mitigated; as a concept, it takes high priority in contemporary mental health services. Health-care organizations and clinicians are now required to use levels of risk as a benchmark for clinical decision-making. However, perceptions of risk change according to the lens through which it is viewed. A qualitative, exploratory research study was undertaken in an aged persons' mental health programme in Victoria, Australia, to explore the notion of risk from the multiple perspectives of service providers and consumers. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews, and analysis was based on the framework of Ritchie and Spencer. Balancing uncertainty emerged as a major theme, and comprised two subthemes: (i) complexity of risk from the perspective of providers of services; and (ii) complexity of safety from the perspectives of recipients of services. These differences emphasize a significant disjuncture between perceptions of risk and the potential for the individual needs and concerns of consumers to be subsumed under broader organizational issues. The uncertainty this tension highlights suggests the need to reconceptualize risk, incorporating the views and experiences of all stakeholders, particularly consumers and carers, to enhance recovery-oriented services and facilitate consumer participation within mental health services. PMID:26514097

  15. Radiation protection issues in galactic cosmic ray risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    1994-10-01

    Radiation protection involves the limitation of exposure to below threshold doses for direct (or deterministic) effects and a knowledge of the risk of stochastic effects after low doses. The principal stochastic risk associated with low dose rate galactic cosmic rays is the increased risk of cancer. Estimates of this risk depend on two factors (a) estimates of cancer risk for low-LET radiation and (b) values of the appropriate radiation weighting factors, wR, for the high-LET radiations of galactic cosmic rays. Both factors are subject to considerable uncertainty. The low-LET cancer risk derived from the late effects of the atomic bombs is vulnerable to a number of uncertainties including especially that from projection in time, and from extrapolation from high to low dose rate. Nevertheless, recent low dose studies of workers and others tend to confirm these estimates. wR, relies on biological effects studied mainly in non-human systems. Additional laboratory studies could reduce the uncertainties in wR and thus produce a more confident estimate of the overall risk of galactic cosmic rays.

  16. Radiation protection issues in galactic cosmic ray risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation protection involves the limitation of exposure to below threshold doses for direct (or deterministic) effects and a knowledge of the risk of stochastic effects after low doses. The principal stochastic risk associated with low dose rate galactic cosmic rays is the increased risk of cancer. Estimates of this risk depend on two factors (a) estimates of cancer risk for low-LET radiation and (b) values of the appropriate radiation weighting factors, WR, for the high-LET radiations of galactic cosmic rays. Both factors are subject to considerable uncertainty. The low-LET cancer risk derived from the late effects of the atomic bombs is vulnerable to a number of uncertainties including especially that from projection in time, and from extrapolation from high to low dose rate. Nevertheless, recent low dose studies of workers and others tend to confirm these estimates. WR, relies on biological effects studied mainly in non-human systems. Additional laboratory studies could reduce the uncertainties in WR and thus produce a more confident estimate of the overall risk of galactic cosmic rays.

  17. Lack of Effect for Decisional Balance as a Brief Motivational Intervention for At-Risk College Drinkers

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Susan E.; Carey, Kate B.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of written and in-person decisional balance exercises on measures of risky drinking. College students determined to be at-risk for alcohol-related problems (N = 131) were randomly assigned to an in-person decisional balance (IDB), a written decisional balance (WDB), or an assessment-only control (C) group. IDB participants met with an interventionist for individual 30-minute discussions of the pros and cons of maintaining versus changing their drinking behavior...

  18. Radiation and health risks: a bioethical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author suggests that radiation and radioactivity have acquired a set of attributes that tend almost inevitably to intensify public alarm as public concern over nuclear energy and nuclear weapons has escalated. She discusses the moral argument that widespread use of radioactive substances seems tantamount to an immoral violation of human rights no matter what the benefits might be

  19. Risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract in medical workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was determination of criteria for recognition of a pre senile cataract as a professional disease in health care personnel exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation. Method: The study included 3240 health workers in medical centers of Serbia in the period 1992-2002. A total of 1560 workers were employed in the zone (group A) and 1680 out of ionizing radiation zone (group B). Among group A, two groups had been selected: 1. Group A-1: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone who contracted lens cataract during their years of service while dosimetry could not reveal higher absorbed dose (A-1=115); 2. Group A-2: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone with higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations and without cataract (A-2=100). Results: More significant incidence of cataract was found in group A, χ2=65.92; p<0.01. Radiation risk was higher in health workers in radiation zone than in others, relative risk is 4, 6. Elevated blood sugar level was found in higher percentage with health workers working in radiation zone who developed cataract. Conclusion: Low doses of radiation are not the cause of occupational cataract as individual occupational disease. X-ray radiation may be a significant cofactor of cataract in radiological technicians. (author)

  20. Harmonization of risk management approaches: radiation and chemical exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation Safety Systems Div., Mumbai (India)

    2006-07-01

    Assessment of occupational and public risk from the environmental pollutants like chemicals, radiation, etc demands that the effects be considered not only from each individual pollutant, but from the combination of all the pollutants. An integrated risk assessment system needs to be in place to have an overall risk perspective for the benefit of policy makers and decision takers to try to achieve risk reduction in totality. The basis for risk-based radiation dose limits is derived from epidemiological studies, which provide a rich source of data largely unavailable to chemical risk assessors. In addition, use of the principle of optimization as expressed in the ALARA concept has resulted in a safety culture, which is much more than just complying with stipulated limits. The conservative hypothesis of no-threshold dose-effect relation (ICRP) is universally assumed. The end-points and the severity of different classes of pollutants and even different pollutants in a same class vary over a wide range. Hence, it is difficult to arrive at a quantitative value for the net detriment that weighs the various types of end-points and various classes of pollutants. Once the risk due to other pollutants is quantified by some acceptable methodology, it can be expressed in terms of the Risk Equivalent Radiation Dose (R.E.R.D.) for easy comparison with options involving radiation exposure. This paper is an effort to use to quantify and present the risk due to exposure to chemicals and radiation in a common scale for the purpose of easy comparison to facilitate decision taking. (authors)

  1. Harmonization of risk management approaches: radiation and chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of occupational and public risk from the environmental pollutants like chemicals, radiation, etc demands that the effects be considered not only from each individual pollutant, but from the combination of all the pollutants. An integrated risk assessment system needs to be in place to have an overall risk perspective for the benefit of policy makers and decision takers to try to achieve risk reduction in totality. The basis for risk-based radiation dose limits is derived from epidemiological studies, which provide a rich source of data largely unavailable to chemical risk assessors. In addition, use of the principle of optimization as expressed in the ALARA concept has resulted in a safety culture, which is much more than just complying with stipulated limits. The conservative hypothesis of no-threshold dose-effect relation (ICRP) is universally assumed. The end-points and the severity of different classes of pollutants and even different pollutants in a same class vary over a wide range. Hence, it is difficult to arrive at a quantitative value for the net detriment that weighs the various types of end-points and various classes of pollutants. Once the risk due to other pollutants is quantified by some acceptable methodology, it can be expressed in terms of the Risk Equivalent Radiation Dose (R.E.R.D.) for easy comparison with options involving radiation exposure. This paper is an effort to use to quantify and present the risk due to exposure to chemicals and radiation in a common scale for the purpose of easy comparison to facilitate decision taking. (authors)

  2. A mathematical foundation for controlling radiation health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection is to attain an adequate control of radiation health risk compared with other risks. Our society in the 21st century is predicted by some experts to seek the high priority of safety for expanding activity of human beings. The law of controlling risks will be a key subject to serve the safety of human beings and their environment. The main principles of the ICRP system of radiological system are strongly relating to the general law of various risk controls. The individual-based protection concept clearly gives us a mathematical model of controlling risks in general. This paper discusses the simplest formulation of controlling risks in the ICRP system, including other relating systems. First, the basic characteristics of occupational exposure as a risk control is presented by analyzing the data compiled over half a century. It shows the relation ship between dose control levels and individually controlled doses. The individual-based control also exerts some influence on the resultant collective dose. The study of occupational exposure concludes the simple mathematical expression of controlling doses under the ICRP system as shown by Kumazawa and Numakunai. Second, the typical characteristics of biological effects with repair or recovery of bio-systems are given by analyzing the data published. Those show the relationship between dose and biologically controlled or regulated response. The bio-system is undoubtedly relating to cybernetics that contains many functions of controlling risks. Consequently radiation effects might somewhat express the feature of biological risk controls. The shouldered survival of irradiated cells shows cybernetic characteristics that are assumed to be the mathematical foundation of controlling risks. The dose-response relationship shows another type of cybernetic characteristics, which could be reduced to the same basic form of controlling risks. The limited study of radiation effects definitely confirms the two

  3. Radiative energy balance of Venus based on improved models of the middle and lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Tellmann, S.; Arnold, G.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.; Häusler, B.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of sources and sinks of radiative energy forces the atmospheric dynamics. The radiative transfer simulation model described by Haus et al. (2015b) is applied to calculate fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km) covering the energetic significant spectral range 0.125-1000 μm. The calculations rely on improved models of atmospheric parameters (temperature profiles, cloud parameters, trace gas abundances) retrieved from Venus Express (VEX) data (mainly VIRTIS-M-IR, but also VeRa and SPICAV/SOIR with respect to temperature results). The earlier observed pronounced sensitivity of the radiative energy balance of Venus to atmospheric parameter variations is confirmed, but present detailed comparative analyses of possible influence quantities ensure unprecedented insights into radiative forcing on Venus by contrast with former studies. Thermal radiation induced atmospheric cooling rates strongly depend on temperature structure and cloud composition, while heating rates are mainly sensitive to insolation conditions and UV absorber distribution. Cooling and heating rate responses to trace gas variations and cloud mode 1 abundance changes are small, but observed variations of cloud mode 2 abundances and altitude profiles reduce cooling at altitudes 65-80 km poleward of 50°S by up to 30% compared to the neglect of cloud parameter changes. Cooling rate variations with local time below 80 km are in the same order of magnitude. Radiative effects of the unknown UV absorber are modeled considering a proxy that is based on a suitable parameterization of optical properties, not on a specific chemical composition, and that is independent of the used cloud model. The UV absorber doubles equatorial heating near 68 km. Global average radiative equilibrium at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is characterized by the net flux balance of 156 W/m2, the Bond albedo of 0.76, and the effective planetary emission temperature of 228

  4. Quantitative falls risk estimation through multi-sensor assessment of standing balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falls are the most common cause of injury and hospitalization and one of the principal causes of death and disability in older adults worldwide. Measures of postural stability have been associated with the incidence of falls in older adults. The aim of this study was to develop a model that accurately classifies fallers and non-fallers using novel multi-sensor quantitative balance metrics that can be easily deployed into a home or clinic setting. We compared the classification accuracy of our model with an established method for falls risk assessment, the Berg balance scale. Data were acquired using two sensor modalities—a pressure sensitive platform sensor and a body-worn inertial sensor, mounted on the lower back—from 120 community dwelling older adults (65 with a history of falls, 55 without, mean age 73.7 ± 5.8 years, 63 female) while performing a number of standing balance tasks in a geriatric research clinic. Results obtained using a support vector machine yielded a mean classification accuracy of 71.52% (95% CI: 68.82–74.28) in classifying falls history, obtained using one model classifying all data points. Considering male and female participant data separately yielded classification accuracies of 72.80% (95% CI: 68.85–77.17) and 73.33% (95% CI: 69.88–76.81) respectively, leading to a mean classification accuracy of 73.07% in identifying participants with a history of falls. Results compare favourably to those obtained using the Berg balance scale (mean classification accuracy: 59.42% (95% CI: 56.96–61.88)). Results from the present study could lead to a robust method for assessing falls risk in both supervised and unsupervised environments. (paper)

  5. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  6. Prenatal radiation risk to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Nervous System (CNS) exhibits a high sensitivity to ionizing radiation from conception until after birth. X-irradiation damage of the nervous system during development has been well documented and exposure to ionizing radiation above approximately 10 cGy during perinatal development is contraindicated. Shielding of the embryo or fetus usually prevents gross malformations but high energy irradiation of the pregnant female may result in embryonic growth retardation. This may be especially true when the irradiation is coupled with an ethanol-induced reduction in SOD activity. The synergistic interactions between other drugs and ionizing radiation also have been demonstrated. However, the concentration of endogenous compounds such as histamine and serotonin may be increased in the maternal circulation following irradiation and reach the fetal CNS through a blood-brain-barrier that is more permiable than normal. The introduction of histamine and/or serotonin into the fetal circulation may result in fetal hypotension, edema, cerebral ischemia, and damage to the developing CNS. 48 references

  7. Ionizing radiation risks to satellite power systems (SPS) workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyman, J.T.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Alpen, E.L.; Bond, V.; Curtis, S.B.; Fry, R.J.M.; Jackson, K.L.; Nachtwey, S.; Sondhaus, C.; Tobias, C.A.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-11-01

    The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment were examined. For ionizing radiation, the major concern will be late or delayed health effects, particularly the increased risk of radiation-induced cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for cancer is 0.8 to 5.0 excess deaths per 10,000 workers per rad of exposure. Thus, for example, in 10,000 workers who completed ten missions with an exposure of 40 rem per mission, 320 to 2000 additional deaths in excess of the 1640 deaths from normally occurring cancer, would be expected. These estimates would indicate a 20 to 120% increase in cancer deaths in the worker-population. The wide range in these estimates stems from the choice of the risk-projection model and the dose-response relationsip. The choice between a linear and a linear-quadratic dose-response model may alter the risk estimate by a factor of about two. The method of analysis (e.g., relative vs absolute risk model) can alter the risk estimate by an additional factor of three. Choosing different age and sex distributions can further change the estimate by another factor of up to three. The potential genetic consequences could be of significance, but at the present time, sufficient information on the age and sex distribution of the worker population is lacking for precise estimation of risk. The potential teratogenic consequences resulting from radiation are considered significant. Radiation exposure of a pregnant worker could result in developmental abnormalities.

  8. Ionizing radiation risks to satellite power systems (SPS) workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment were examined. For ionizing radiation, the major concern will be late or delayed health effects, particularly the increased risk of radiation-induced cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for cancer is 0.8 to 5.0 excess deaths per 10,000 workers per rad of exposure. Thus, for example, in 10,000 workers who completed ten missions with an exposure of 40 rem per mission, 320 to 2000 additional deaths in excess of the 1640 deaths from normally occurring cancer, would be expected. These estimates would indicate a 20 to 120% increase in cancer deaths in the worker-population. The wide range in these estimates stems from the choice of the risk-projection model and the dose-response relationsip. The choice between a linear and a linear-quadratic dose-response model may alter the risk estimate by a factor of about two. The method of analysis (e.g., relative vs absolute risk model) can alter the risk estimate by an additional factor of three. Choosing different age and sex distributions can further change the estimate by another factor of up to three. The potential genetic consequences could be of significance, but at the present time, sufficient information on the age and sex distribution of the worker population is lacking for precise estimation of risk. The potential teratogenic consequences resulting from radiation are considered significant. Radiation exposure of a pregnant worker could result in developmental abnormalities

  9. Radiation Risk and Possible Consequences for Ukrainian Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivovarov, Alexander [Ukrainian State Chemical-Technology Univ., Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine)

    2006-09-15

    The paper deals with the values of risk related to environmental pollution with radionuclides from the main sources located both on the territory of Ukraine and outside, which affect the Ukrainian population, in the context of long-range outlook. Ratios of risk for stochastic effects occurrence are given per unit of individual or collective dose, as well as for occurrence of fatal cancer, non-fatal cancer or serious hereditary effects. Besides, the paper mentions not only the impact of ionizing radiation, but severe population stress as well, which in certain regions turns into radiophobia. It is shown that for essential decrease of radiation risk in Ukraine, global problems should be solved, first of all, at the governmental level. Whereas a number of issues connected with the Chernobyl catastrophe are at least partially solved, the problems concerning the effects of radon and other radiation-dangerous factors are still to be tackled.

  10. Radiation Risk and Possible Consequences for Ukrainian Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the values of risk related to environmental pollution with radionuclides from the main sources located both on the territory of Ukraine and outside, which affect the Ukrainian population, in the context of long-range outlook. Ratios of risk for stochastic effects occurrence are given per unit of individual or collective dose, as well as for occurrence of fatal cancer, non-fatal cancer or serious hereditary effects. Besides, the paper mentions not only the impact of ionizing radiation, but severe population stress as well, which in certain regions turns into radiophobia. It is shown that for essential decrease of radiation risk in Ukraine, global problems should be solved, first of all, at the governmental level. Whereas a number of issues connected with the Chernobyl catastrophe are at least partially solved, the problems concerning the effects of radon and other radiation-dangerous factors are still to be tackled

  11. Probabilistic methodology for estimating radiation-induced cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RICRAC computer code was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide a versatile and convenient methodology for radiation risk assessment. The code allows as input essentially any dose pattern commonly encountered in risk assessments for either acute or chronic exposures, and it includes consideration of the age structure of the exposed population. Results produced by the analysis include the probability of one or more radiation-induced cancer deaths in a specified population, expected numbers of deaths, and expected years of life lost as a result of premature fatalities. These calculatons include consideration of competing risks of death from all other causes. The program also generates a probability frequency distribution of the expected number of cancers in any specified cohort resulting from a given radiation dose. The methods may be applied to any specified population and dose scenario

  12. A Mechanism of Solar Variability Effect on Radiative Balance of the Earth Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. A. Zherebtsov; V.A. Kovalenko; S.I. Molodykh

    2005-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of solar-climatic connections, which may be of importance as over short and long time intervals, are discussed. The variations of energetic balance of Earth's climatic system for the last fifty years are estimated. It is ascertained that the disbalance between the flux of solar energy that comes to the Earth and radiates to space is of 0.1% for the last ten years. The suggested mechanism makes it possible to explain not only the observed variation of the enthalpy of the Earth's climatic system for the period 1910-1980, but also the climate anomalies during last thousand years: the climate optimum in 12 century, and"small glacial period" in 16-17 centuries.

  13. Balancing risks and benefits fairly across generations: cost/benefit considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has been prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Workshop on the environmental and ethical aspects of long-lived radioactive waste disposal. The workshop is intended as a step toward preparation of a collective opinion on deep geological storage of nuclear waste. As requested, this paper answers to the following specific questions : 1) Discounting of costs with time is a widely applied technique in the evaluation of the impact of economic and industrial decisions. Could or should discounting of long-term health risks due to radioactive waste disposal be envisaged? 2) Is it possible to assess what is passed on to future generations in terms of health risks, other detriments and possible benefits of all sorts, directly or indirectly? Should such an assessment be applied generically to human activities in a broad sense or should it concern only waste disposal issues? 3) How can the immediate needs of the current generations for example for energy generation or public health protection be balanced with inter generational equity requirements in the very long term? 4) Are resources devoted to assuring safety of radioactive waste disposal appropriately balanced with risks given that these resources could be applied to other societal goals? 5) Is it preferable to take all physical actions today to minimize any bequest of liabilities for waste management actions to future generations. If not how should financial assets be set aside to meet the liabilities? 6) What guidelines and principles should we follow to balance these risks? Does the proposition that we should not expose future generations to a risk that is not acceptable today appropriately address this issue? 7) Should measures of risk acceptability be considered in the context of individual rights or local rights or the collective rights of the population? 8) What measures are necessary in the siting of repositories to assure that disadvantaged populations do not bear disproportionate burdens? 9) Is

  14. Role of net radiation on energy balance closure in heterogeneous grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Low energy balance closure (EBC at a particular eddy-covariance flux site increased the uncertainties of carbon, water and energy measurements and thus hampered the urgent research of scaling up and modeling analysis through site combinations. A series of manipulative experiments were conducted in this study to explore the role of net radiation (Rn in the EBC in relation to spatial variability of vegetation characteristics, source area, sensor type, and dome condition in the Inner Mongolian grassland of Northern China. At all three sites, the daytime peak residual fluxes of EBC were consistently about 100 W m−2 regardless of radiometers (i.e., REBS Q7.1 or CNR1. The spatial variability in net radiation was 19 W m−2 (5% of Rn during the day and 7 W m−2 (16% at night, with an average of 13 W m−2 (11% from eight plot measurements across the three sites. Net radiation results were affected more by measurement source area in unclipped heterogeneous system than in clipped homogeneous vegetation. Large area measurement significantly (P<0.0001 increased by 9 W m−2 during the day and decreased by 4 W m−2 at night in unclipped treatments. With an increase in clipping intensity, net radiation decreased by 25 W m−2 (6% of Rn at midday and 81 MJ m−2 (6% during a growing season with heavier regular clipping than that in unclipped treatments. Additional effort in EBC between 9:00 and 15:00 LT is needed for future research because of high variation. Using this method, the EBC difference derived from the two types of net radiometers was only 6 W m−2. Results from Q7.1 with new domes were higher during the day but lower at night than those with used domes. Overall, the inclusion of the uncertainty in available energy accounted for 60% of the 100 W m−2 shortfalls in the lack

  15. Radiation protection standards: A practical exercise in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within 12 months of the discovery of x-rays in 1895, it was reported that large doses of radiation were harmful to living human tissues. The first radiation protection standards were set to avoid the early effects of acute irradiation. By the 1950s, evidence was mounting for late somatic effects - mainly a small excess of cancers - in irradiated populations. In the late 1980's, sufficient human epidemiological data had been accumulated to allow a comprehensive assessment of carcinogenic radiation risks following the delivery of moderately high doses. Workers and the public are exposed to lower doses and dose-rates than the groups from whom good data are available so that risks have had to be estimated for protection purposes. However, in the 1990s, some confirmation of these risk factors has been derived occupationally exposed populations. If an estimate is made of the risk per unit dose, then in order to set dose limits, an unacceptable level of risk must be established for both workers and the public. There has been and continues to be a debate about the definitions of 'acceptable' and 'tolerable' and the attributing of numerical values to these definitions. This paper discusses the issues involved in the quantification of these terms and their application to setting dose limits on risk grounds. Conclusions are drawn about the present protection standards and the application of the methods to other fields of risk assessment. (author)

  16. Radiation effects and risks: overview and a new risk perception index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainty provides opportunities for differences in perception, and radiation risks at low level of exposures involved in few computed tomography scans fall in this category. While there is good agreement among national and international organisations on risk probability of cancer, risk perception has barely been dealt with by these organisations. Risk perception is commonly defined as the subjective judgment that people make about the characteristics and severity of a risk. Severity and latency are important factors in perception. There is a need to connect all these. Leaving risk perception purely as a subjective judgement provides opportunities for people to amplifying risk. The author postulates a risk perception index as severity divided by latency that becomes determining factor for risk perception. It is hoped that this index will bring rationality in risk perception. (authors)

  17. Long-term energy flux and radiation balance observations over Lake Ngoring, Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoguo; Lyu, Shihua; Ao, Yinhuan; Wen, Lijuan; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shaoying

    2015-03-01

    It remains unclear what are the characteristics of the surface energy budget and the radiation balance over the lake at high altitudes. Here we report a nearly two-year ice-free time measurement (2011-2012) of energy flux and radiation balance using the eddy covariance method over Lake Ngoring, Tibetan Plateau. A persistent unstable atmospheric boundary layer was maintained over the lake, caused by a higher water surface temperature compared with the overlying atmosphere. As a result, the positive sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE) fluxes almost lasted throughout the entire observation period. The heat storage period of the lake could last until September, and the strongest heating occurred in October from the lake to the atmosphere. Compared with the subtropical lake, Bowen ratios were larger in Lake Ngoring, caused by a large temperature difference and a small specific humidity difference between the water surface and the overlying air. The patterns of H versus the atmospheric stability differed from those of LE. H was large under unstable stratification conditions and significantly decreased in the nearly neutral and stable atmospheric stratification. By contrast, the large LE concentrated in the weak unstable to the nearly neutral atmospheric stratification, and clearly declined with increased atmospheric instability. Overall, the vertical specific humidity difference contributed more to LE than the wind speed. As regards H, the major contributors varied with the atmospheric stability. The intrusion of dry, cold air with strong wind could result in significant increases in H and LE (approximately 2.0-4.5 times as much as those of normal days); during this period, the stored energy in water dramatically decreased and even could provide 70% of the energy for H and LE.

  18. The functional assessment Berg Balance Scale is better capable of estimating fall risk in the elderly than the posturographic Balance Stability System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Vieira Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to verify which instrument better identifies recurrent falls in the elderly. Ninety-eight old people, with an average age of 80±4 years, were submitted to an assessment of balance and fall risk by means of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS and the posturographic Balance Stability System (BSS. The BBS was correlated with the BSS (r=-0.27; p=0.008, age (r=-0.38; p<0.001 and number of falls (r=-0.25; p=0.013 and the analysis of logistical regression showed that the elderly classified with fall risk on the BBS presented 2.5 (95%CI 1.08-5.78 more chance of identifying who had two falls or more over the last year. The BBS identified that the greater the age the worse the functional balance and demonstrated a greater capacity to identify falls risk suffered over the last year when compared with the BSS.

  19. Adequacy of relative and absolute risk models for lifetime risk estimate of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the applicability of the relative (multiplicative) and absolute (additive) models in predicting lifetime risk of radiation-induced cancer. A review of the epidemiologic literature, and a discussion of the mathematical models of carcinogenesis and their relationship to these models of lifetime risk, are included. Based on the available data, the relative risk model for the estimation of lifetime risk is preferred for non-sex-specific epithelial tumours. However, because of lack of knowledge concerning other determinants of radiation risk and of background incidence rates, considerable uncertainty in modelling lifetime risk still exists. Therefore, it is essential that follow-up of exposed cohorts be continued so that population-based estimates of lifetime risk are available

  20. A review of radiation risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three authoritative reports (UNSCEAR-1988, BEIR-V-1990, and ICRP-1990 Recommendations) on risk estimates have been reviewed and compared to previous risk estimates published by the same organizations. The ICRP now uses the term 'probability' in place of the term 'risk'. For fatal cancers, the new ICRP probability estimates are 5.0 x 10-2 Sv-1 for a population of all ages and 4.0 x 10-2 Sv-1 for a population of working age. For serious hereditary effects summarized over all generations, the ICRP probability coefficients are 1.0 x 10-2 Sv-1 for a population of all ages and 0.6 x 10-2 Sv-1 for a population of working age. For prenatal irradiation, at 8 - 15 weeks after conception, there may be a decrease of 30 I.Q. points per Sv and a risk of cancer which may lie in the range of 2 to 10 x 10-2 Sv-1. Based mainly on the new probability estimates the ICRP recommends a limit on effective dose of 20 mSv per year, averaged over 5 years (100 mSv in 5 years) with the further provision that the effective dose should not exceed 50 mSv in any single year. For public exposure the ICRP recommends an annual limit on effective dose of 1 mSv. However, in special circumstances, a higher value of effective dose could be allowed in a single year provided that the average over 5 five years does not exceed 1 mSv per year. Once pregnancy has been declared, the conceptus should be protected by applying a supplementary equivalent dose limit to the surface of the woman's abdomen of 2 mSv for the remainder of the pregnancy and by limiting intakes of radionuclides to about 1/20 of the annual limit on intake. A brief survey of epidemiological studies of workers and the risks from radon and thoron progeny is also included. (110 refs, 29 tabs., 10 figs.)

  1. Study on technology for minimizing radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apoptosis, also called programmed cell death to discriminate it from necrosis, is characterized by : chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, fragmentation of DNA into oligonucleosome sized pieces, swelling and progressive cell degradation. We examined morphological and biochemical changes of T-lymphocytes following gamma irradiation exposure. The results are followings. 1) Murine lymphocytes have several characteristics : The irradiated cells undergo morphological and biochemical changes characteristic of apoptosis, causing growth delay. (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 Gy) 2) The onset of DNA fragmentation in cells occurs after one more cell divisions. 3) DNA fragmentation in cells occurs in all irradiated group (0.1, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 Gy, 24 hours following gamma radiation exposure) 4) Apoptotic bodies were detected by confocal microscope with ease when compared with electron microscope. For the developing technology for minimizing radiation damage, the following experimental works have been done. 1) Establishment of experimental system for pre-screening of radioprotectants - Screening of protective substances using TSH bioindicator - Efficacy test of some radioprotective materials 2) TSH bioindicator system can make a scientific role in screening unknown materials for their possible radioprotective effect. (author). 42 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs

  2. Study on technology for minimizing radiation risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Chun, Ki Chung

    1997-01-01

    Apoptosis, also called programmed cell death to discriminate it from necrosis, is characterized by : chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, fragmentation of DNA into oligonucleosome sized pieces, swelling and progressive cell degradation. We examined morphological and biochemical changes of T-lymphocytes following gamma irradiation exposure. The results are followings. (1) Murine lymphocytes have several characteristics : The irradiated cells undergo morphological and biochemical changes characteristic of apoptosis, causing growth delay. (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 Gy) (2) The onset of DNA fragmentation in cells occurs after one more cell divisions. (3) DNA fragmentation in cells occurs in all irradiated group (0.1, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 Gy, 24 hours following gamma radiation exposure) (4) Apoptotic bodies were detected by confocal microscope with ease when compared with electron microscope. For the developing technology for minimizing radiation damage, the following experimental works have been done. (1) Establishment of experimental system for pre-screening of radioprotectants - Screening of protective substances using TSH bioindicator - Efficacy test of some radioprotective materials (2) TSH bioindicator system can make a scientific role in screening unknown materials for their possible radioprotective effect. (author). 42 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  3. Perception of radiation risk from a cross cultural perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding radiation risk individual coping strategies range from apathy, no worry, avoidance, information seeking, changes in life style, inter alia. How they occur and when, is a necessary information for the development of better risk communication programmes. To address these points four particular situations involving radiation were chosen, namely indoor radon exposure, X-ray diagnostic, consumption of irradiated food, and radioactive waste management. Situations correspond to very different contexts, natural exposure (with indoor radon), daily life (with medical diagnostic and food consumption) and the industrial and energy context (with waste). From a cross-cultural perspective it was deemed fruitful to compare these situations in various countries. (author)

  4. Balancing public health and resource limitations: A role for ethical low-level risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognition of the pervasiveness of risk in everyday life in modern industrial society has elicited calls for greater efforts to protect individual and public health. Yet, it is increasingly clear that decisions to do so must often be made in the context of significant limits in the amounts of financial resources available for achieving that protection. Achieving risk-free work, residential, and community environments may be so expensive as to render a private business unit uncompetitive or as to divert resources from or prelude commencing with other governmental projects with equal or greater health benefit potential. Ethical low-level risk communication (LLRC) is something risk-generating entities are morally obligated to do. However, such communication also offers important opportunities for such entities to move toward achieving better balances between health and the costs of protecting it. In this paper, the authors elaborate on several features of an ethically ideal LLRC process, focusing on those with aspects they hope are not obvious or common knowledge. In discussing these features, they provide examples of conflicts between health risks and resource limits at the level of the individual private firm, the local community, or the national government, such that LLRC with the feature in question provides an opportunity for mitigating or at least clarifying the conflict in question

  5. Test models for estimating radiation balance in different scales for Jaboticabal, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria de Alencar Beserra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The net radiation (Rn in agroecosystems is the amount of energy that is available in the environment to heating processes of living organisms, air and soil; perspiration of animals and plants; photosynthesis and water evaporation. The Rn defines the type of climate and weather conditions prevailing in a region affecting the availability and thermal water, the fundamental understanding of genotype-environment, which ultimately determine the productivity of the agricultural system. Rn usually is used in models of weather and climate studies. The sustainability and economic viability of zootechnical activity is dependent on the positive interaction between animal and environment. Environmental factors such as water, shading, thermal exchanges sensible heat (conduction, convection and radiation skin and latent heat losses (evaporation and transpiration, conditioned by Rn, must be managed to provide the best results. The present study was conducted to develop and test models for accurate and precise radiation balance on the scales daily, monthly and seasonal ten-day for Jaboticabal - SP, due to the importance of estimates of net radiation for agricultural activities. We used daily meteorological data from weather station located in Jaboticabal, SP (coordinates: 21 ° 14'05 "South, 48 ° 17'09" West, 615m altitude at Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio Mesquita Filho" - FCAV/UNESP in a situation of default grass "Bahiagrass" during the period 20/08/2005 to 20/01/2012. The data used were the maximum temperature (Tmax, minimum (Tmin and mean (TMED; maximum relative humidity (URMáx, minimum (URMín and average (URMéd precipitation (mm, average velocity (m/s, Qo, solar radiation (MJ m-2, sunshine (hour meter (MJ m², soil temperature at two depths (Tsoil2CM, Tsoil5CM and class A pan evaporation (TCA (mm. The measures taken by the balance radiometer were taken as a reference to test other models. The models tested were those reported by NORMAN et al

  6. Risk assessment and management of natural radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the range of natural radiation exposures received both by the general population and by occupationally exposed groups. Particular emphasis is placed in this paper on the cosmic radiation exposures of air crew and on exposures to radon in the workplace. In both these cases exposure and risk assessment procedures are described. Present approaches to the management of these exposures from natural radiation are outlined in particular in the context of the revised European Union Basic Safety Standards Directive which must be implemented in European Union Member States by May 2000. (author)

  7. Systematic review on physician's knowledge about radiation doses and radiation risks of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The frequent use of computed tomography is a major cause of the increasing medical radiation exposure of the general population. Consequently, dose reduction and radiation protection is a topic of scientific and public concern. Aim: We evaluated the available literature on physicians' knowledge regarding radiation dosages and risks due to computed tomography. Methods: A systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane and PRISMA statements was performed using eight databases. 3091 references were found. Only primary studies assessing physicians' knowledge about computed tomography were included. Results: 14 relevant articles were identified, all focussing on dose estimations for CT. Overall, the surveys showed moderate to low knowledge among physicians concerning radiation doses and the involved health risks. However, the surveys varied considerably in conduct and quality. For some countries, more than one survey was available. There was no general trend in knowledge in any country except a slight improvement of knowledge on health risks and radiation doses in two consecutive local German surveys. Conclusions: Knowledge gaps concerning radiation doses and associated health risks among physicians are evident from published research. However, knowledge on radiation doses cannot be interpreted as reliable indicator for good medical practice.

  8. Radiation Dose Risk and Diagnostic Benefit in Imaging Investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrescu, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents many facets of medical imaging investigations radiological risks. The total volume of prescribed medical investigations proves a serious lack in monitoring and tracking of the cumulative radiation doses in many health services. Modern radiological investigations equipment is continuously reducing the total dose of radiation due to improved technologies, so a decrease in per caput dose can be noticed, but the increasing number of investigations has determined a net increase of the annual collective dose. High doses of radiation are cumulated from Computed Tomography investigations. An integrated system for radiation safety of the patients investigated by radiological imaging methods, based on smart cards and Public Key Infrastructure allow radiation absorbed dose data storage.

  9. Is cancer risk of radiation workers larger than expected?

    OpenAIRE

    P. JACOB; Rühm, W; Walsh, L.; Blettner, M; Hammer, G; Zeeb, H.

    2009-01-01

    Occupational exposures to ionising radiation mainly occur at low-dose rates and may accumulate effective doses of up to several hundred milligray. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the evidence of cancer risks from such low-dose-rate, moderate-dose (LDRMD) exposures. Our literature search for primary epidemiological studies on cancer incidence and mortality risks from LDRMD exposures included publications from 2002 to 2007, and an update of the UK National Registry for Radiati...

  10. Radiation Risk Associated with Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Irrational Fear or Real Danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The established worldwide practice of protecting people from radiation based on the assessments of radiation risk received in the researches carried out earlier costs hundreds of billions of dollars a year to implement. In the opinion of the well-known experts, the maintenance of the existing radiation protection regulations or moreover acceptance of more tough regulations can influence the development of nuclear power engineering. The accepted practice of assessment of human health risk from radiation may also significantly affect our perception of threats of radiation terrorism. In this work, the critical analysis of publications on the assessment of the effects of small doses of radiation on human health is carried out. In our analysis, we especially emphasize the data on cancer mortality among survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who received instantaneous radiation doses of less than 200 mSv including the data on leukemia and solid cancer, as well as epidemiological studies in the regions of India and China with high level of natural radiation. Since the investigations of radiation risk is a base for formulating modern radiation protection regulations, their reliability and validity are of great importance. As follows from the analysis, the subsequent, during three decades, toughening of radiation protection regulations has already led to exceedingly prohibitive standards and impractical recommendations the science-based validity of which can cause serious doubts. Now, a number of world-wide known scientists and authoritative international organizations call for revision of these standards and of the radiation safety concept itself. (author)

  11. Understanding radiation and risk: the importance of primary and secondary education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Junichiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8), Mikaduki, Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    In Japan's primary and secondary schools, radiation and radioactivity are taught as part of the curriculum dealing with social science subjects. Students learn much about the hazardous features of radiation, but lack the scientific understanding necessary to build a more balanced picture. Although the same point applies to education covering the harmful effects of volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, electrical storms and so on, public understanding of these events is relatively high and students are generally able to make informed judgments about the risks involved. By contrast, their limited understanding of radiation often contributes to fears that it is evil or even supernatural. To correct this distortion, it is important that primary and secondary education includes a scientific explanation of radiation. Like heat and light, radiation is fundamental to the history of the universe; and scientific education programs should give appropriate emphasis to this important subject. Students would then be able to make more objective judgments about the useful and hazardous aspects of radiation. (author)

  12. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Clayton B; Thompson, Holly M; Benedict, Stanley H; Seibert, J Anthony; Wong, Kenneth; Vaughan, Andrew T; Chen, Allen M

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning--a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of "gentle IGRT

  13. Space Radiation Cancer Risks and Uncertainties for Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Peterson, L. E.; Badhwar, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.; Dicello, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    Projecting cancer risks from exposure to space radiation is highly uncertain because of the absence of data for humans and because of the limited radiobiology data available for estimating late effects from the high-energy and charge (HZE) ions present in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Cancer risk projections involve many biological and physical factors, each of which has a differential range of uncertainty due to the lack of data and knowledge. We discuss an uncertainty assessment within the linear-additivity model using the approach of Monte Carlo sampling from subjective error distributions that represent the lack of knowledge in each factor to quantify the overall uncertainty in risk projections. Calculations are performed using the space radiation environment and transport codes for several Mars mission scenarios. This approach leads to estimates of the uncertainties in cancer risk projections of 400-600% for a Mars mission. The uncertainties in the quality factors are dominant. Using safety standards developed for low-Earth orbit, long-term space missions (>90 days) outside the Earth's magnetic field are currently unacceptable if the confidence levels in risk projections are considered. Because GCR exposures involve multiple particle or delta-ray tracks per cellular array, our results suggest that the shape of the dose response at low dose rates may be an additional uncertainty for estimating space radiation risks.

  14. Risk management and radiation protection policies in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A risk management policy concerning human mortality was introduced and approved in the Netherlands in 1985. For single technological activities or noxious substances, maximum acceptable levels and negligible levels, respectively, have been defined in terms of the individual risk and the group risk. Individual risks above 10-6/a are considered to be unacceptable, risks between 10-6/a and 10-8/a are considered to be justifiable, whereas risks below 10-8/a are deemed trivial and thus negligible. The limitation of the group risk, being the probability of a disruptive event resulting in more than N simultaneous deaths, is of particular importance for activities which may lead to catastrophic accidents. For man-made hazards with a large societal impact, risk criteria are expressed in terms of complementary cumulative frequency distributions, forming straight lines on a log-log scale of the F-N plot. To deal with risk aversion a slope of -2 for these complementary cumulative frequency distributions is chosen. For example, hazardous incidents in which ten or more persons are killed which have a calculated frequency of 10-5/a are considered unacceptable; a calculated frequency of 100 times lower is considered as negligible. Major accidents may have impact not only on human life but also on environmental quality. Standards limiting the generalized environmental risks are at present in the process of development. The Dutch risk management policy is in several aspects similar, and in others complementary, to the radiation protection principles formulated and elaborated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. 'Group risk' is a novel concept which has not yet been extensively discussed at the international level. The radiation protection and general environmental protection principles are compared and prospects for harmonization are discussed. (author). 13 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. Risk of stillbirths and paternal occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the effects on the progeny of the pre conceptional father irradiation, Louise Parker and her team have begun a large cohort study turning on the whole of children born in the Cumbria area where is situated the Sellafield facility. The article published in the lancet, studies the risk of a stillbirth in function of paternal occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. For the cohort study, the crude and adjusted analysis show a statistically significant association between the risk of stillbirth and the ASD total (Annual Summary Dose, ASD, ASD total is ASD cumulated on the entire life, and ASD 90 is external radiation dose received during the 90 days preceding the conception) and between the risk of stillbirth and ASD 90. The analysis of witness-cases study confirms the existence of an association between the cumulative pre conceptional dose (FB total, FB acronym for film badge) and the risk of a stillbirth. On the other hand, the risk of stillbirth is not clearly associated to an increasing of the FB 90 (that is the external radiation dose received during the 90 days preceding the conception. The differences between the two studies about the effect of irradiation in the 90 days preceding the conception could be explained by the estimation of the measure of ASD 90 proportionately to the annual cumulative dose. It could be the case, if during one year, the workers are irregularly exposed to ionizing radiation. If it is untimely to interpret the relationship observed between the paternal occupational irradiation and the risk of stillbirth in term of causality, the study of Parker and coll. incite to the development of complementary researches on the trans-generational effects of a pre conceptional exposure to ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  16. Surface energy balance, clouds and radiation over Antarctic sea ice during Austral spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancoppenolle, M.; Ackley, S. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Tison, J.-L.

    2009-04-01

    In Sept-Oct 2007, a sea ice drift station, Ice Station Belgica, was established in the Bellingshausen Sea. Over twenty-seven days, measurements of meteorological variables, radiation and surface albedo were performed by combining ship-based and in situ data, in order to assess the surface energy balance. Visual observations of the state of the sky (clear or overcast) were also done. The sampled floe was characterized by thin (0.6m) and medium thick (1.1m) first-year ice and older, second-year ice of greater than 2m mean thickness. Snow cover depth varied from zero cm over the new ice to > 0.8m on the second year ice. The weather at Ice Station Belgica was characterized by typical spring conditions. Synoptic variability was mostly driven by the wind direction, which determines the origin - continental or oceanic - of the air masses. Under northerly winds, warm (from -5 to 0 °C) and wet (relative humidity from 90 to 100%) oceanic air was advected on the floe. Under southerlies, cold (from -20 to -10°C) and dry (70-85 %) continental air was brought on site. In turn, this also determined the state of the sky, with clear (overcast) skies mostly associated to continental (oceanic) weather. The incoming solar radiation was on average 124 W/m², with a trend of 3.5 W/m² over the ice station, while the incoming longwave radiation was on average 227 W/m², with no trend. As expected, the incoming solar radiation shows a marked diurnal cycle, while LW does not. The day-to-day variability in radiation is largely determined by changes in the state of the sky. Broadband surface albedo was measured in situ, using a bidirectional pyranometer, on two sites respectively covered by thin (10-15 cm) and deep (30-40 cm) snow. Both sites were visited every 5 days and albedo was measured on 6 points, spaced by 5 m on an 25-m long "albedo" line. Snow depth was also monitored every meter along the albedo line. The mean albedo is 0.83 ± 0.05. Variations around this mean value are

  17. Radiation risk in Republics Belarus after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiation pollution of the territory of the Republic of Belarus has been considered for a long time as a basic ecological danger source. Since the disaster at Chernobyl, a considerable number of the inhabited areas turned out to be situated on the territory contaminated with the radioactive substances. A risk value of the radiation-inducible affections is used in order to appraise the damage to the health of the population, residing in such regions, in other words - of the long term (stochastic) effects probability, among which malignant neoplasm represents the most serious danger. In many countries the systems of radiological protection and safety criteria are based on ecocentric approaches. Nevertheless the post-Chernobyl situation in the Republic of Belarus is continually producing a wide spectrum of hard questions of human health and social activity on contaminated territories. That is why present work is completely produced in the frameworks of anthropocentric approach. The radiation risk has been evaluated for a number of regions of Gomel areas and Mogilev region in accordance with the linear non-threshold model 'Dose-Effect'. A lifelong risk coefficient of the radiation-inducible cancers of 5% / Zv, offered by the ICRP, is used in the evaluations. The doses, used for the risk assessment, are taken from the Doses Catalogue-1992 of the Ministry of Health, Republic of Belarus, which contains the doses, referring to the years 1991-1992. Correspondingly, our evaluations determine potential cancers, conditioned by the radiation exposure during this period of time. Obtained evaluations do not take into account either the radiation-inducible cancers of the thyroid gland, or the leukemia cases, observed in the liquidators as a result of the radiation exposure in the year 1986. The work also contains an evaluation of the component, specific for the Chernobyl radiation risk, conditioned by the radiation dose, accumulated in the population of the regions

  18. To prove the genetic radiation risk for man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results make obvious that when aneuploidy had been observed in the descendents of irradiated parents the proportion did not depend of the energy dosis. If these results are applied to man the conclusion can be drawn that genetic-caused diseases, which originate from aneuploidy, are no suitable indicators to show the genetic risk of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  19. Medicine and ionizing radiation: help cards for risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following an inquiry in Ile de France on radiation protection, a scientific committee associating several institutions and different experts has elaborated cards for help to risk analysis. A first series of this cards is published in this issue documents for the labour physician and will be next on Internet. the other fields of medical use will be covered in the future. (N.C.)

  20. Mechanisms of Enhanced Cell Killing at Low Doses: Implications for Radiation Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have shown that cell lethality actually measured after exposure to low-doses of low-LET radiation, is markedly enhanced relative to the cell lethality previously expected by extrapolation of the high-dose cell-killing response. Net cancer risk is a balance between cell transformation and cell kill and such enhanced lethality may more than compensate for transformation at low radiation doses over a least the first 10 cGy of low-LET exposure. This would lead to a non-linear, threshold, dose-risk relationship. Therefore our data imply the possibility that the adverse effects of small radiation doses (<10 cGy) could be overestimated in specific cases. It is now important to research the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of low-dose hypersensitivity to cell killing, in order to determine whether this can be generalized to safely allow an increase in radiation exposure limits. This would have major cost-reduction implications for the whole EM program

  1. Balancing the risks of habitat alteration and environmental contamination in a contaminated forested wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The North Lawrence Oil Dump Site (NLODS) is an inactive hazardous waste site located adjacent to an extensive palustrine forested wetland in upstate New York. Waste oil and oil sludge were disposed of in a lagoon adjacent to the wetland during the 1960s. During periods of high water, oils escaped from the lagoon and were transported into the wetlands. High concentrations of lead and PCBs were detected in NLODS wetland sediments, and contaminants from the site were present in wetland's plant and animal tissues. However, contaminated portions of the wetlands appear to be physically undisturbed and provide high quality wildlife habitat. The results of an ecological risk assessment indicated that lead and PCB contamination in NLODS sediment may be impacting some components of the wetlands community. The risk management process considered both the toxicological risks associated with lead and PCB contamination, as well as the significant habitat destruction risks associated with remediation. Six potential PCB target cleanup levels were evaluated. Following removal of sediments with PCB contamination greater than 0.5 mg/kg, 3.5 acres of sediment with lead contamination in excess of 250 mg/kg (the New York State ''Severe Effect Level'') would remain. More than 1.5 of these acres would contain lead concentrations in excess of 1,000 mg/kg. Reducing lead levels to background concentrations would require more than 50 acres of wetlands alteration. The Record of Decision at the NLODS recognized the high quality habitat provided by the site's wetlands, and attempted to balance the risks from habitat alteration with the risks of environmental contamination

  2. A new perspective on radiation risk communication in Fukushima, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The March 11, 2011 cascading disasters of the historic earthquake, unprecedented tsunami, and subsequent radioactive substances release from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have shocked the world. But the specter of radiation exposure has complicated the earthquake and tsunami disaster aid activities. Herein is a personal commentary on the current status of the risk communication activities within the disaster populations in Fukushima prefecture. A literature review of the current scientific literature was performed focusing on risk communication within the Fukushima region during the disaster recovery phase. I have limited my commentary to only the 5 most relevant of the publications which focus exclusively on the issue of risk communication and the problems which have generated the urgency to improve risk communication. There were several themes which were consistently identified across the articles and echo some of the personal observations of the many types of responses which victims are now demonstrating: fear, anger, distrust, denial, confusion, uncertainty, ambivalence, and hyperbole stood out regarding their varied responses to the current radiological situation and, regarding the government role in risk communication, corruption and lack of transparency. Two recommendations for helping to address these issues in risk communication are the inclusion of a community intermediary and great use of community engagement in the disaster recovery process. Improved risk communication, perhaps using established guidelines and including both community intermediaries and improved community engagement, may prove useful within the radiation affected populations of Japan. (author)

  3. Risk of breast cancer following low-dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk of breast cancer following radiation exposure was studied, based on surveys of tuberculosis patients who had multiple fluoroscopic examinations of the chest, mastitis patients given radiotherapy, and atomic bomb survivors. Analysis suggests that the risk is greatest for persons exposed as adolescents, although exposure at all ages carries some risk. The dose-response relationship was consistent with linearity in all studies. Direct evidence of radiation risk at doses under 0.5 Gy (50 rad) is apparent among A-bomb survivors. Fractionation does not appear to diminish risk, nor does time since exposure (even after 45 years of observation). The interval between exposure and the clinical appearance of radiogenic breast cancer may be mediated by hormonal or other age-related factors but is unrelated to dose. Age-specific absolute risk estimtes for all studies are remarkably similar. The best estimate of risk among American women exposed after age 20 is 6.6 excess cancers/104 WY-Gy

  4. Social and psychological factors under realization of radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the experiments with mice of Af line, irradiated by gamma-radiation with doses of up to 1.0 Gy and subjected to psycho-emotional effect (the model of 'the provoked aggression') have been investigated the processes of tumour formation. The index of cariogenic efficiency of effects is the number of the induced adenomas in lungs. It has been shown that under separate effect of these factors the frequency of adenomas increases. Under the combined effect the additional number of adenomas per mouse is registered, which exceeds theoretically the expected value assuming additivity of effects, the synergism coefficient was 1.57 (for females). It has been marked that the character of tumour reaction on separate and the combined effect of radiation, as well as the stress-factor has sex distinctions. It has been shown that that real assessment of the radiation risk and the development of the measures system on minimization of medical and biological consequences of the accident should take into account not only the radiation factor, but also a psychological one, especially in those cases when realization of the risk of combined effect of radiation and non-radiation factors can manifest synergism

  5. Occurrence, spatiotemporal distribution, mass balance and ecological risks of antibiotics in subtropical shallow Lake Taihu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Jun; Wu, Qinglong L; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Bi-Ying

    2016-04-20

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence, spatiotemporal distribution, mass balance and ecological risks of 43 commonly used human and veterinary antibiotics in both aqueous and sedimentary phases in a large subtropical shallow lake, Lake Taihu. In the aqueous phase, sulfonamides (2.64-344 ng L(-1)), lincomycin (ND to 53.8 ng L(-1)) and florfenicol (0.15-963 ng L(-1)) were the main compounds with high concentrations and detection frequencies. In the sedimentary phase, fluoroquinolones (ND to 174 ng g(-1), dry weight) and tetracyclines (ND to 39.6 ng g(-1), dry weight) were the predominant compounds. Antibiotic concentrations in Lake Taihu were generally lower relative to data documented in previous studies on China and other countries. The composition of antibiotics showed that livestock wastewater might be the main source of antibiotics in Lake Taihu, followed by domestic wastewater. Antibiotics in the lake water showed slight spatial variation in summer and significant spatial variation in winter; whereas, antibiotic concentrations in the sediments varied obviously, with high concentrations found in the sites close to potential pollution sources. Mass balance showed that sediments are an important sink and potential source for fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines. In addition to antibiotics' physicochemical properties, the spatiotemporal distribution of antibiotics in the lake was influenced by both pollution sources and lake hydrodynamics. The environmental risk assessment results showed that sulfamethoxazole could pose high risks on the algae in the aquatic ecosystem, followed by tetracyclines (algae) and fluoroquinolones (bacteria). Overall, our study reveals complex compositions and clear spatiotemporal dynamics in Lake Taihu, which were the consequence of pollution sources and lake hydrodynamics. PMID:27048777

  6. Heel spur radiotherapy and radiation carcinogenesis risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a nonsurgical alternative therapy of painful heel spur patients. Nonetheless, cancer induction is the most important somatic effect of ionizing radiation. This study was designed to evaluate the carcinogenesis risk factor in benign painful heel spur patients treated by radiotherapy. Between 1974 and 1999, a total of 20 patients received mean 8.16 Gy total irradiation dose in two fractions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD100) were placed on multiple phantom sites in vivo within the irradiated volume to verify irradiation accuracy and carcinogenesis risk factor calculation. The 20 still-alive patients, who had a minimum 5-year and maximum 29-year follow-up (mean 11.9 years), have been evaluated by carcinogenic radiation risk factor on the basis of tissue weighting factors as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60. Reasonable pain relief has been obtained in all 20 patients. The calculated mean carcinogenesis risk factor is 1.3% for radiation portals in the whole group, and no secondary cancer has been clinically observed. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment modality for relieving pain in calcaneal spur patients. The estimated secondary cancer risk factor for irradiation of this benign lesion is not as high as was feared. (author)

  7. Public perception of radiation-related risks of imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, diagnostic procedures using ionizing radiation have achieved a great boom, although patients are often unaware of the risks they involve. Objectives: To know how is ionizing radiation perceived by the population attending Clinica Davila, Department of Radiology (DRCD). Methods: A voluntary and anonymous survey was conducted on patients and / or companions. Results: A total of 330 adults were surveyed. An 57% had completed higher education, whereas 7.9% had only finished elementary schooling; 78.8% had undergone three or more imaging tests. CT examination was considered to pose the highest levels of risk (42.4%), followed by Ultrasonography (30.6%). Discussion: The survey group was made up of young adults, mostly college graduates, and predominantly female. Surprinsingly enough, considering that obstetric sonography is commonly used during pregnancy, US was ranked second in terms of associated health risks. There is an evident interest in the subject, since 90% of responders would like to receive further information

  8. Optimization of radiation risk: regulatory application to waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, risk optimization for radiation protection has been based on relating the economic costs to the effective dose equivalent or, if appropriate, to the collective effective dose equivalent, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This approach is, however, the first step in a more generalized optimization method. In the United States, a 'bubble' policy has been instituted for air pollution abatement. A plant with several sources of emission may optimize its operations provided the total emissions do not exceed a certain agreed limit. No consideration is given to the individual emission sources as long as the entire 'bubble' is in compliance with the emission limits. It can be demonstrated that the total risk cannot be optimized if the radiation risk is considered without other activities. The integrated optimization is valid for industrial operations as well as for regulatory decisions. (author)

  9. Assessment of genetic risk for human exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The methodology of assessing the genetic risk of radiation exposure is based on the concept of 'hitting the target' in development of which N.V. Timofeeff-Ressovsky has played and important role. To predict genetic risk posed by irradiation, the U N Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has worked out direct and indirect methods of assessment, extrapolation, integral and palpitation criteria of risk analysis that together permit calculating the risk from human exposure on the basis of data obtained for mice. Based on the reports of UNSCEAR for the period from 1958 to 2001 the paper presents a retrospective analysis of the use of direct methods and the doubling dose method for quantitative determination of the genetic risk of human exposure expressed as different hereditary diseases. As early as 1962 UNSCEAR estimated the doubling dose (a dose causing as many mutations as those occurring spontaneously during one generation) at 1 Gy for cases of exposure to ionizing radiations with low LET at a low dose rate and this value was confirmed in the next UNSCEAR reports up to now. For cases of acute irradiation the doubling dose was estimated at 0,3-0,4 Gy for the period under review. The paper considers the evolution of the concepts of human natural hereditary variability which is a basis for assessing the risk of exposure by the doubling dose method. The level of human natural genetic variability per 1 000 000 newborns is estimated at 738 000 hereditary diseases including mendelian, chromosomal and multifactorial ones. The greatest difficulties in assessing the doubling dose value were found to occur in the case of multifactorial diseases the pheno typical expression of which depends on mutational events in polygenic systems and on numerous environmental factors. The introduction in calculations of the potential recoverability correction factor (RPCF) made it possible to assess the genetic risk taking into account this class of

  10. The relevance of radiation induced bystander effects for low dose radiation carcinogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Where epidemiology studies lack the ability to prescribe radiation doses, customise sample sizes and replicate findings, radiobiology experiments provide greater flexibility to control experimental conditions. This control simplifies the process of answering questions concerning carcinogenic risk after low dose radiation exposures. However, the flexibility requires critical evaluation of radiobiology findings to ensure that the right questions are being asked, the experimental conditions are relevant to human exposure scenarios and that the data are cautiously interpreted in the context of the experimental model. In particular, low dose radiobiology phenomena such as adaptive responses, genomic instability and bystander effects need to be investigated thoroughly, with continual reference to the way these phenomena might occur in the real world. Low dose radiation induced bystander effects are of interest since their occurrence in vivo could complicate the shape of the radiation dose-response curve in the low dose range for a number of biological endpoints with subsequent effects on radiation-induced cancer risk. Conversely, radiation-induced abscopal effects implicate biological consequences of radiation exposure outside irradiated volumes, and complicate the notion of effective dose calculations. Achieving a consensus on the boundaries that distinguish the radiobiology phenomena of bystander and abscopal effects will aid progress towards understanding their relevance to in vivo radiation exposures. A proposed framework for discussing bystander effects and abscopal effects in their appropriate context will be outlined, with a discussion on the future investigation of radiation-induced bystander effects. Such frameworks can assist the integration of results from experimental radiobiology to risk evaluation and management practice. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, BioI. and Environ. Research, US Dept. of Energy, Grant DE

  11. Radiation and society: a no regret approach to low level radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear dose-effect relationship lies at the core of the recommendations of the two major radiation protection organisations. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation accept the relationship and the associated non-threshold hypothesis which implies that it is not possible to be at zero risk when exposed to radiation. There is no verifiable scientific evidence for this hypothesis and many argue either that it ignores biological defence mechanisms built up over multiple generations or the possible beneficial effects of low level radiation exposure. This paper briefly addresses the contentious non-threshold hypothesis, considers epidemiological research on the beneficial effects of natural background radiation, and examines the problems of the current regulatory approach to low level radiation risk which foster an exaggerated fear of radiation and can result in severe negative impacts on society. A ''no-regret'' approach is suggested. This could take the form of specifying a reasonable threshold exposure, related perhaps to the natural background radiation exposure, which is considered normal and below which there are no health effects. (UK)

  12. Balance Sheet Network Analysis of Too-Connected-to-Fail Risk in Global and Domestic Banking Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge A. Chan-Lau

    2010-01-01

    The 2008/9 financial crisis highlighted the importance of evaluating vulnerabilities owing to interconnectedness, or Too-Connected-to-Fail risk, among financial institutions for country monitoring, financial surveillance, investment analysis and risk management purposes. This paper illustrates the use of balance sheet-based network analysis to evaluate interconnectedness risk, under extreme adverse scenarios, in banking systems in mature and emerging market countries, and between individual b...

  13. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  14. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  15. Radiation hygiene in medical X-ray imaging. Pt. 3. Radiation exposure of patients and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of X-ray examinations in Germany and the resulting radiation exposure is amongst the highest in comparison with other European countries. To reduce medical radiation exposure and to safeguard radiation protection regulations, the X-ray ordinance stipulates a justification of each individual X-ray application. The justification principle means that the X-ray application should produce sufficient health benefit to offset the radiation risk. Such a benefit-risk assessment needs an adequate estimation of radiation risk. The aim of this paper is to explain the principles of benefit-risk assessment for different situations (e.g. healthcare and screening). The basics and concepts of radiation effects and radiation epidemiology as well as examples of risk estimation and benefit-risk assessments are given. (orig.)

  16. Ionizing radiation and cancer risk: evidence from epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, E

    1998-11-01

    Epidemiological studies provide the primary data on the carcinogenic effects of radiation in humans. Much of what is known has come from studies of the atomic bomb survivors, and to a lesser extent from patients receiving radiotherapy. These studies demonstrate that exposure to moderate to high doses of radiation increases the risk of cancer in most organs. For all solid cancers combined, cancers of the thyroid, breast and lung, and leukemia, risk estimates are fairly precise, and associations have been found at relatively low doses (bomb survivors, a linear-quadratic dose response seems to fit the data better than a pure linear model. Radiation does not act entirely in isolation. It can interact with other carcinogens, e.g. tobacco or chemotherapeutic agents, and with host factors such as age at exposure, gender or reproductive history. Interactions with medical interventions or with certain heritable mutations have also been suggested. While the studies of high-dose exposures are essential for understanding the overall biological consequences of radiation exposure, the public is more concerned about the long-term health effects from protracted exposures at low doses. Unfortunately, the inherent limitations of epidemiology make it extremely difficult to directly quantify health risks from these exposures. While most epidemiological data are compatible with linear extrapolations from exposures at high doses or high dose rates, they cannot entirely exclude other possibilities. As the field of epidemiology advances, understanding more about the health effects of prolonged and low-dose exposures will be the next challenge. PMID:9806607

  17. Responding to the Marketplace: Workforce Balance and Financial Risk at Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retchin, Sheldon M

    2016-07-01

    Elsewhere in this issue, Welch and Bindman present research demonstrating that academic health centers (AHCs) continue to disproportionately comprise specialists and subspecialist faculty physicians compared with community-based physician groups. This workforce composition has served AHCs well through the years-specialists fuel the clinical engine of the major tertiary and quaternary missions of AHCs, and they also dominate much of the clinical and translational research enterprise. AHCs are not alone-less than one-third of U.S. physicians practice primary care. However, health reform has prompted many health systems to reconsider this configuration. Payers, employers, and policy makers are shifting away from fee-for-service toward value-based care. Large community-based physician groups and their parent health systems appear to be far ahead of AHCs with a more balanced physician workforce. Many are leveraging their emphasis on primary care to participate in population health initiatives, such as accountable care organizations, and some own their own health plans. These approaches largely assume some element of financial risk and require both a more balanced workforce and an infrastructure to accommodate the management of covered lives. It remains to be seen whether AHCs will reconsider their own physician specialty composition to emphasize primary care-and, if they do, whether the traditional academic model, or a more community-based approach, will prevail. PMID:27224298

  18. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  19. Chromospheric and Coronal Structure of Polar Plumes. 1; Magnetic Structure and Radiative Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Maxwell J.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Walker, Arthur B. C.; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA), a rocket-borne solar observatory, was successfully launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on May 13, 1991 at 19:05 UT. The telescope systems onboard the MSSTA obtained several full disk solar images in narrow bandpasses centered around strong soft X-ray, EUV, and FUV emission lines. Each telescope was designed to be sensitive to the coronal plasmas at a particular temperature, for seven temperatures ranging from 20,000 K to 4,000,000 K. We report here on the images obtained during the initial flight of the MSSTA, and on the chromospheric and coronal structure of polar plumes observed over both poles of the Sun. We have also co-aligned the MSSTA images with Kitt Peak magnetograms taken on the same day. We are able to positively identify the magnetic structures underlying the polar plumes we analyze as unipolar. We discuss the plume observations and present a radiative energy balance model derived from them.

  20. Urban pollution by electromagnetic radiation. What risk for human health?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power lines, domestic appliances, radios, TV sets, cell-phones, radar, etc., they are all instruments which, entering our everyday life, cause electromagnetic pollution. The risks for human health as a consequence of being exposed to this kind of radiation haven't been clearly ascertained yet, even if there is proof of the connection between the onset of some tumoral forms and exposure to electromagnetic fields. Many countries, among which Italy, are tackling the problem of safety distances, necessary to reduce exposure to non-ionising radiation, by issuing bills suitable for human health protection

  1. Total Risk Management for Low Dose Radiation Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our civilization is witnessing about century of nuclear age mixed with enormous promises and cataclysmic threats. Nuclear energy seems to encapsulate both potential for pure good and evil or at least we humans are able to perceive that. These images are continuously with us and they are both helping and distracting from making best of nuclear potentials for civilization. Today with nuclear use significantly present and with huge potential to further improve our life with energy and medical use it is of enormous importance to try to have calmed, rational, and objective view on potential risks and certain benefits. Because all use of nuclear energy proved that their immediate risks are negligible (i.e., Three Mile Island and Fukushima) or much smaller than from the other alternatives (i.e., Chernobyl) it seems that the most important issue is the amount of risk from the long term effects to people from exposure to small doses of radiation. A similar issue is present in the increased use of modern computational tomography and other radiation sources use in medicine for examination and therapy. Finally, extreme natural exposures are third such potential risk sources. Definition of low doses varies depending on the way of delivery (i.e., single, multiple or continuous exposures), and for this paper usual dose of 100 mSv is selected as yearly upper amount. There are three very different scientifically supported views on the potential risks from the low doses exposure. The most conservative theory is that all radiation is harmful, and even small increments from background levels (i.e., 2-3 mSv) present additional risk. This view is called linear no threshold theory (LNT) and it is accepted as a regulatory conservative simple approach which guarantees safety. Risk is derived from the extrapolation of the measured effects of high levels of radiation. Opposite theory to LNT is hormesis which assumes that in fact small doses of radiation are helpful and they are improving our

  2. The cancer risk attributable to radiation exposure: some practical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appears that quantitative risk estimation for carcinogenesis will be used more and more in connection with case investigations or litigation involving individuals with a malignancy and a previous history of exposure to a carcinogen. There is some confusion as to how to handle the relevant probabilities. The problems involved are discussed. It is suggested that since the ICRP and the NCRP have now entered into quantitative risk estimation as applied to radiation protection, it would seem to be appropriate for these organizations to provide advice and guidance on appropriate methods for determining probabilities under different circumstances. (author)

  3. Radiation risk evaluation and reference doses in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In interventional radiology, there are two potential hazards to the patient. These are somatic risks and, for certain procedures, deterministic injuries. The task of radiation protection in interventional radiology is to minimise somatic risks and avoid deterministic injuries. Radiation protection tools and protocols must be developed to achieve these two objectives. Reference doses have been proposed as a method of identifying high dose centres and equipment. The role of reference doses in interventional radiology will be discussed. There are two approaches to reference doses in interventional radiology. These are the measurement of patient entrance skin dose or skin dose rate, or image intensifier input dose rate. Alternatively, dose area product or effective dose to the patient may be monitored. These two main approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. (author)

  4. The role of radiation factors in ecological risks for the population of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents the analysis of the 50-year investigation into the effect of nuclear energetic and industrial installations on the population health and environmental conditions. The radiological risks in routine operations and emergency cases are assessed. The results of the comparative analysis of risks concerned with a man-caused radiation exposure and a chemical pollution of the environment are presented. Our results show that there is a severe discrepancy between protection of the population and environment from radiation and a harmful effect of chemicals. In Russia, the level of additional exposure due to industrial sources of radiation is legislatively limited by a value of 1 mSv. In practice, the population in residential areas near a routinely operating nuclear installation is exposed below 0.1 mSv/year, which is several orders lower than the threshold of health effects. An absolutely different situation exists with a chemical pollution of the environment. An excess of concentrations of chemically hazardous substances is a regular practice and a methodology of their regulation is far from being perfect. We discuss the approaches to balancing the normative-legislative basis. (author)

  5. Relevance of Fukushima Nuclear Accident to India: Nuclear Radiation Risk and Interventions to Mitigate Adverse Fallout

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav Kapil, Varshney Neha, Aslesh OP, Karmakar MG, Pandav Chandrakant S

    2012-01-01

    The environmental radiation release from Fukushima nuclear power following tsunami in Japan has once again highlighted the omnipotent risk of radiation injury in the today’s world. India is at a real risk from radiation fallout both due to nuclear power plant accidents and nuclear warfare threat. The risk from nuclear radiation accident in India is further increased by the region being endemic for iodine deficiency as adverse effects following nuclear radiation fallout l...

  6. Solid cancer risks from radiation exposure for the Australian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates are made of the risks to the Australian population as a function of age and gender for mortality or morbidity for all solid cancers after exposure to radiation. Excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) models are used. The model coefficients are re-evaluated for radiation doses expressed as effective dose using data from the Japanese Life Span Study. Life-table methods are used throughout and the risk measures studied are: the risk of exposure related death, RERD and the risk of exposure related cancer, RERC. Australian life-table data and the age-specific cancer incidence and mortality rates of Australian males and females are taken from recent published tables. No dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor is applied. Sources of uncertainty used to calculate the confidence regions for the estimated risks include the statistical uncertainties of the model parameters and of the extrapolation of the risks beyond the period supported by the epidemiological data. Summary values of the risks are reported as averages of those calculated from the ERR and the EAR models. For males, the mortality risks per sievert range from 14% for 0-9 year age group, 7% at 30-39 years and 4% at 50-59 years. Corresponding values for females are 20%, 10% and 6%. Incidence risks are higher: for males the estimates are 32% for the 0-9 year group, 12% at 30-39 and 5% at 50-59. Corresponding values for females are 56%, 20% and 8%. The 90% confidence regions are about ± 50% of these values. Estimates are given for the risks from CT whole-body scanning or virtual colonoscopy which could be used for cancer screening. If used at 3 year intervals and the effective dose per procedure is 10 mSv, then the RERD for males beginning screening at 40, 50 and 60 years is 0.4%, 0.3% and 0.1%, respectively and for females, 0.6%, 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. RERD estimates for a 5 year interval between screens are about one-third smaller. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of

  7. Risk analysis guideline for working with radiation; Leidraad risicoanalyse stralingstoepassingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, S.

    2010-11-15

    The RIVM has developed a guideline for carrying out ionizing radiation risk analyses. Dutch law requires that radiation risk analyses be carried out, but the Dutch Labour Inspectorate has signalled that compliance is low, primarily because many health physicists lack the necessary knowledge. Noncompliance is a reason for concern, as the risk analysis provides the basis for a proper understanding of the risks of working with radiation. Worker safety is enhanced when the guideline is followed. Dutch law dictates that a risk analysis must be carried out before any individual starts working with radiation. Examples of activities falling under the auspices of this law are the detection of welding defects in gas pipes and the taking of X-rays by veterinarians. The guideline, which was commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment, is a roadmap in which the most important steps for performing a risk analysis are described. Those responsible for radiation worker safety are expected to modify and apply these guidelines to the specific working conditions of their respective professional groups. [Dutch] Het RIVM heeft een leidraad ontwikkeld waarmee een risicoanalyse kan worden uitgevoerd voor het werken met ioniserende straling. Aanleiding is een signaal van de Arbeidsinspectie dat deze risicoanalyses die bij wet verplicht zijn, te weinig worden opgesteld. Dat komt doordat stralingsdeskundigen vaak niet weten hoe ze zoiets aan moeten pakken. Dit is zorgelijk, omdat de risicoanalyse ten grondslag ligt aan een goed begrip van de risico's van het werken met straling. Gebruik van de leidraad draagt bij aan een betere veiligheid van werknemers. De Nederlandse wet verplicht ondernemers om voorafgaand aan een handeling met ioniserende straling een risicoanalyse uit te laten voeren. Enkele voorbeelden van dat soort handelingen zijn de controle van lasnaden in gasleidingen met gammabronnen en het maken van een rontgenfoto door een dierenarts. De leidraad

  8. Commentary on Using LNT for Radiation Protection and Risk Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Cuttler, Jerry M.

    2010-01-01

    An article by Jerome Puskin attempts to justify the continued use of the linear no-threshold (LNT) assumption in radiation protection and risk assessment. In view of the substantial and increasing amount of data that contradicts this assumption; it is difficult to understand the reason for endorsing this unscientific behavior, which severely constrains nuclear energy projects and the use of CT scans in medicine. Many Japanese studies over the past 25 years have shown that low doses and low do...

  9. National Chernobyl registry of Russia: Radiation risks analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years have elapsed after the Chernobyl accident. The problem concerning the estimation of the total integral damage to life and health of people exposed to radiation remains very complicated. A negative influence of the Chernobyl included a spectrum of factors which may reinforce each other. In particular, to date there are no theoretical models or practical recommendations on integral estimating the contribution of social and psycho-emotional factors to the risks of diseases due to radiological accidents. On the other hand, for maximum effective rehabilitation of suffered people the ranging and impartial determination of contribution both of proper radiation and non-radiation components of influence are needed. Therefore, continuation of long-standing investigations is of great practical importance to diminish health consequences of the accident. 5 refs, 7 figs, 4 tabs

  10. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Yu-Jen; Chong Ngot-Swan; Chang Hou-Tai; Lin Shih-Chiang; Shueng Pei-Wei; Wang Li-Ying; Hsieh Yen-Ping; Hsieh Chen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical or...

  11. Decommissioning and material recycling. Radiation risk management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once nuclear fuel cycle facilities have permanently stopped operations they have to be decommissioned. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the surveillance and dismantling of the facility systems and buildings, the management of the materials resulting from the dismantling activities and the release of the site for further use. The management of radiation risks associated with these activities plays an important role in the decommissioning process. Existing legislation covers many aspects of the decommissioning process. However, in most countries with nuclear power programmes legislation with respect to decommissioning is incomplete. In particular this is true in the Netherlands, where government policy with respect to decommissioning is still in development. Therefore a study was performed to obtain an overview of the radiation risk management issues associated with decommissioning and the status of the relevant legislation. This report describes the results of that study. It is concluded that future work at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation on decommissioning and radiation risk management issues should concentrate on surveillance and dismantling activities and on criteria for site release. (orig.)

  12. Decommissioning and material recycling. Radiation risk management issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, D.H.

    1996-09-01

    Once nuclear fuel cycle facilities have permanently stopped operations they have to be decommissioned. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the surveillance and dismantling of the facility systems and buildings, the management of the materials resulting from the dismantling activities and the release of the site for further use. The management of radiation risks associated with these activities plays an important role in the decommissioning process. Existing legislation covers many aspects of the decommissioning process. However, in most countries with nuclear power programmes legislation with respect to decommissioning is incomplete. In particular this is true in the Netherlands, where government policy with respect to decommissioning is still in development. Therefore a study was performed to obtain an overview of the radiation risk management issues associated with decommissioning and the status of the relevant legislation. This report describes the results of that study. It is concluded that future work at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation on decommissioning and radiation risk management issues should concentrate on surveillance and dismantling activities and on criteria for site release. (orig.).

  13. Risk from ionizing radiations in the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioisotopes in industry, and particularly in medicine, means there is intense traffic in this dangerous material by air, sea, rail and land. Special conditions have to be used to reduce the risk from ionizing radiation to workers and the population in general. Special attention is paid to distinguishing normal and occasional transport conditions with respect to the risks involved for the workers engaged on the job. On the basis of international regulations (IAEA 1967 and 1973), the radiation risk conditions to which workers are exposed are examined by sampling several packages. The parcels which can cause radiation doses in workers are confined to those of class ''yellow II'' and ''yellow III'' as per the definitions of the 1967 Regulations. The problem is raised of whether a choice should be made between the possibility of distributing a small dose to a large number of people who are not controlled from the medical point of view (i.e. who belong to special population groups), or whether to concentrate a higher dose on a more limited number of people (belonging to the occupationally exposed) but who are controlled. (N.E.A.)

  14. Understanding the risk coming from the radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1972, the National Academy has published a series of reports on the biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR) in relation to the health effects of the low level radiation. The Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy and the Academy of Sciences of US, began in 1996 the first phase of the BEIR VII report about the health risks associated to the exposure to low level ionizing radiation. The purpose of the first phase of the study is to revise the literature and to decide if enough novel information existed to guarantee the complete study. The National Academies concluded that enough information existed with an appropriate time to carry out the reanalysis. Among the conclusions of BEIR VII are that the current scientific evidence is concordant with the hypothesis of the existence of a linear model without threshold (LSU) in the dose-response relationship among the exposure to ionizing radiation and the cancer development in humans. This implies that very low dose even has the potential of causing deleterious effects in the health, although the risk to low dose is very small. (Author)

  15. Myelodysplastic syndrome. A blood disease of high risk to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is reviewed on its classification, diagnosis, therapy, prognosis, patho-physiology, causes and relation to radiation, mainly from radiation biology aspect. MDL is a cryptogenic, progressive and refractory blood disease with abnormal morphology and dysfunction of cells of bone marrow and peripheral blood and often results in leukemia. Epidemiology shows that radiation is a potent cause of MDL as well as chemotherapy to malignant diseases and that in Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, leukemia risk is linearly correlated with their exposed dose. In Hiroshima survivors, the excessive relative risk of MDL per Sv (ERR1Sv) is preliminarily reported to be as high as 13 and MDL patients is reportedly increasing in Chernobyl. T-lymphocytes from MDL patients are found more sensitive to X-ray in the micronucleus assay. However, direct causal gene(s) are obscure now. Cause and pathology of MDL are expected solved by future elucidation of gene expression concerned with radiation response and DNA repair, and of subsequent change of functional protein products. (K.H.)

  16. Doses of low level ionizing radiation; a misunderstood risk, however unavoidable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment given by international organizations and associations to the problems of radiation exposures, and the recommendations and norms for calculating risks of low level radiation are analysed. It is shown that there are not zero risks for nuclear energy, and emphasis is given to the risks of natural radiation from environment. (M.C.K.)

  17. Space Radiation: The Number One Risk to Astronaut Health beyond Low Earth Orbit

    OpenAIRE

    Chancellor, Jeffery C.; Scott, Graham B. I.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Projecting a vision for space radiobiological research necessitates understanding the nature of the space radiation environment and how radiation risks influence mission planning, timelines and operational decisions. Exposure to space radiation increases the risks of astronauts developing cancer, experiencing central nervous system (CNS) decrements, exhibiting degenerative tissue effects or developing acute radiation syndrome. One or more of these deleterious health effects could develop duri...

  18. Management of cancer risk from radiation: A model and a standard for handling chemical risks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparsely ionizing radiation is the environmental cancer initiator which is at present best characterized with respect to the magnitude of cancer risks associated with exposure. Possibilities of estimating cancer risks from chemicals by expressing chemical doses as radiation-dose equivalents was therefore studied. This approach eliminates most of the difficulties encountered in efforts to estimate risks from experimental data. Particularly, it permits an implicit estimation, which cannot be obtained from animal studies, of the influences of promotive and cocarcinogenic factors in human populations. Chemical doses are monitored by adducts of reactive chemicals or metabolites to proteins and DNA in humans and animals. This method overcomes the low sensitivity and low specificity of disease- epidemiological studies and may be used to detect and identify cancer initiators (mutagens) of exogenous or endogenous origin. The expression of doses in a common unit, that is directly related to risk, facilitates addition of and comparisons of risks. The fact that this unit refers to radiation, a factor that is well-known to the public and to administrators, facilitates realization of the magnitude of risks and the application of the ICRP principles for regulation, particularly with regard to stochastic effects. (author)

  19. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Simon, Steven L [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wojcik, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardis, Elisabeth [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar) and CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica - CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot [Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological and Human Health Division, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hayata, Isamu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: jhendry2002uk@yahoo.com

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of {sup 222}Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  20. Heart irradiation as a risk factor for radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To investigate the potential role of incidental heart irradiation on the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) for patients receiving definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods. Two hundred and nine patient datasets were available for this study. Heart and lung dose-volume parameters were extracted for modeling, based on Monte Carlo-based heterogeneity corrected dose distributions. Clinical variables tested included age, gender, chemotherapy, pre-treatment weight-loss, performance status, and smoking history. The risk of RP was modeled using logistic regression. Results. The most significant univariate variables were heart related, such as heart heart V65 (percent volume receiving at least 65 Gy) (Spearman Rs = 0.245, p < 0.001). The best-performing logistic regression model included heart D10 (minimum dose to the hottest 10% of the heart), lung D35, and maximum lung dose (Spearman Rs 0.268, p < 0.0001). When classified by predicted risk, the RP incidence ratio between the most and least risky 1/3 of treatments was 4.8. The improvement in risk modeling using lung and heart variables was better than using lung variables alone. Conclusions. These results suggest a previously unsuspected role of heart irradiation in many cases of RP

  1. Comparative analysis of different approaches to the computation of long-wave radiation balance of water air systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, the net long-wave radiation balance of the water-air environmental systems is analysed on the base of several semi-empirical approaches. Various theoretical models of infrared atmospheric radiation are reviewed. Factors, affecting their behavior are considered. Special attention is paid to physical conditions under which those models are applicable. Atmospheric and net infrared radiation fluxes are computed and compared under clear and cloudy sky. Results are presented in graphical form. Conclusions are made on the applicability of models considered for evaluating infrared radiation fluxes in environmental conditions of Central Italy. On the base of present analysis Anderson's model is chosen for future calculations of heat budget of lakes in Central Italy

  2. A GIS water balance approach to support surface water flood risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Nieto, J.

    Concern has arisen as to whether the lack of appropriate consideration to surface water in urban spatial planning is reducing our capacity to manage surface water flood risk. Appropriate tools are required that allow spatial planners to explore opportunities and solutions for surface after flooding at large spatial scales. An urban surface water balance model has been developed that screens large urban areas to identify flooded areas and which allows solutions to be explored. The model hypothesis is that key hydrological characteristics; storage volume and location, flow paths and surface water generation capture the key processes responsible for surface water flooding> The model uses a LiDAR DEM (Light Detection and Ranging Digital Elevation Model) as the basis for determining surface water accumulation in a catchment and has been developed so that it requires minimal inputs and computational resources. The urban surface water balance approach is applied to Keighley in West Yorkshire where several instances of surface water flooding have been reported. This research used a postal questionnaire, followed up with site visits to collect data on surface water flooding locations in Keighley. A qualitative analysis based on field visits revealed that the degree of interaction with the sewer network varies spatially, and as the importance of the interaction of the sewer system increase, the accuracy of the model results are lowered. It also highlighted that local detail not present in the DEM, the presence of urban drainage assets and the performance of the sewer system which are not be represented in the model, can determine the accuracy of model results. Model results were used as a basis to develop solutions to surface water flooding. A least cost path methodology was developed to identify managed flood routes as a solution. These were translated into model inputs in the form a modified DEM.

  3. Logistic regression analysis on the risk factors of radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To identify the risk factors of radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 101 patients with radiation pneumonitis using SPSS 8.0 software. Factors evaluated included: gender, age, pathology, clinical stage, irradiation dose, irradiation field size, history of smoking, cardiovascular disease, bronchitis, surgery, chemotherapy, lung infection, atelectasis, obstructive infection and pleural effusion. Univariate analysis was performed using Chi-Square test and multivariate analysis was performed using Logistic regression model. Results: Univariate analysis revealed a significant relationship between 10 factors: pulmonary infection, atelectasis, obstructive infection, cardiovascular disease, bronchitis, chemotherapy, irradiation dose, number of days of radiation and irradiation field size were factors leading to radiation pneumonitis. Multivariate analysis showed that 9 factors: pulmonary infection, obs tractive infection, atelectasis, pleural effusion, bronchitis, cardiovascular disease, chemotherapy, irradiation dose, and irradiation field size were independent factors. Conclusion: Comprehensive consideration of the accompanying disease, chemotherapy, dose, field size, etc during the planning of radiotherapy is able to minimize the possibility of developing radiation pneumonitis

  4. International study on the risks of occupational exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the current lack of statistical power of individual worker studies to estimate cancer risks precisely, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) held a meeting in 1988 to discuss the possibility of international collaborative analyses based on pooling data from different countries. It was decided to carry out a feasibility study of an international collaborative study of groups of workers who had not been investigated at that time. Following that meeting a 'Study Group' comprising epidemiologists and dosimetry experts from each of the interested countries was set up under IARC coordination. The feasibility study established that, within each of the 12 countries represented, information was available to allow identification of a cohort of radiation workers whose mortality could be studied in relation to occupational dose, both retrospectively and prospectively. The retrospective study would be likely to have sufficient statistical power to rule out risks more than a few times current risk estimates. (Author)

  5. Risk estimates for the health effects of alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides risk estimates for various health effects of alpha radiation. Human and animal data have been used to characterize the shapes of dose-response relations and the effects of various modifying factors, but quantitative risk estimates are based solely on human data: for lung cancer, on miners in the Colorado plateau, Czechoslovakia, Sweden, Ontario and Newfoundland; for bone and head cancers, on radium dial painters and radium-injected patients. Slopes of dose-response relations for lung cancer show a tendency to decrease with increasing dose. Linear extrapolation is unlikely to underestimate the excess risk at low doses by more than a factor of l.5. Under the linear cell-killing model, our best estimate

  6. Radiation Balance of Urban Materials and Their Thermal Impact in Semi-Desert Region: Mexicali, México Study Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Santillán-Soto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Net radiation is an essential forcing of climate in the lower layers of Earth’s atmosphere. In this paper, radiation balance is measured in clay soil and green grass, and is compared with three urban materials. These materials: asphalt, concrete and white painted elastomeric polystyrene roofing sheet are widely used in Mexicali, Baja California, México. This study was carried out during August of 2011, the hottest time of the year. The 24-hour average values of net radiation found were: 137.2 W·m−2 for asphalt, 119.1 for concrete, 104.6 for clay soil, 152 for green grass and 29.2 for the polystyrene insulation. The latter two types of materials are likely to be the most effective in reducing urban heat island effects. This variation in the radiation balance has widespread implications for human living conditions, as land cover change tends to be towards surfaces that have higher levels of net radiation.

  7. Cancer risk estimation caused by radiation exposure during endovascular procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y. H.; Cho, J. H.; Yun, W. S.; Park, K. H.; Kim, H. G.; Kwon, S. M.

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the radiation exposure dose of patients, as well as staff caused by fluoroscopy for C-arm-assisted vascular surgical operation and to estimate carcinogenic risk due to such exposure dose. The study was conducted in 71 patients (53 men and 18 women) who had undergone vascular surgical intervention at the division of vascular surgery in the University Hospital from November of 2011 to April of 2012. It had used a mobile C-arm device and calculated the radiation exposure dose of patient (dose-area product, DAP). Effective dose was measured by attaching optically stimulated luminescence on the radiation protectors of staff who participates in the surgery to measure the radiation exposure dose of staff during the vascular surgical operation. From the study results, DAP value of patients was 308.7 Gy cm2 in average, and the maximum value was 3085 Gy cm2. When converted to the effective dose, the resulted mean was 6.2 m Gy and the maximum effective dose was 61.7 milliSievert (mSv). The effective dose of staff was 3.85 mSv; while the radiation technician was 1.04 mSv, the nurse was 1.31 mSv. All cancer incidences of operator are corresponding to 2355 persons per 100,000 persons, which deemed 1 of 42 persons is likely to have all cancer incidences. In conclusion, the vascular surgeons should keep the radiation protection for patient, staff, and all participants in the intervention in mind as supervisor of fluoroscopy while trying to understand the effects by radiation by themselves to prevent invisible danger during the intervention and to minimize the harm.

  8. Radiation risks of medical imaging: separating fact from fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William R; O'Connor, Michael K

    2012-08-01

    During the past few years, several articles have appeared in the scientific literature that predict thousands of cancers and cancer deaths per year in the U.S. population caused by medical imaging procedures that use ionizing radiation. These predictions are computed by multiplying small and highly speculative risk factors by large populations of patients to yield impressive numbers of "cancer victims." The risk factors are acquired from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII report without attention to the caveats about their use presented in the BEIR VII report. The principal data source for the risk factors is the ongoing study of survivors of the Japanese atomic explosions, a population of individuals that is greatly different from patients undergoing imaging procedures. For the purpose of risk estimation, doses to patients are converted to effective doses, even though the International Commission on Radiological Protection warns against the use of effective dose for epidemiologic studies or for estimation of individual risks. To extrapolate cancer incidence to doses of a few millisieverts from data greater than 100 mSv, a linear no-threshold model is used, even though substantial radiobiological and human exposure data imply that it is not an appropriate model. The predictions of cancers and cancer deaths are sensationalized in electronic and print public media, resulting in anxiety and fear about medical imaging among patients and parents. Not infrequently, patients are anxious about a scheduled imaging procedure because of articles they have read in the public media. In some cases, medical imaging examinations may be delayed or deferred as a consequence, resulting in a much greater risk to patients than that associated with imaging examinations. © RSNA, 2012. PMID:22821690

  9. The Role of Cognitive Factors in Predicting Balance and Fall Risk in a Neuro-Rehabilitation Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saverino, A.; Waller, D.; Rantell, K.; Parry, R.; Moriarty, A.; Playford, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a consistent body of evidence supporting the role of cognitive functions, particularly executive function, in the elderly and in neurological conditions which become more frequent with ageing. The aim of our study was to assess the role of different domains of cognitive functions to predict balance and fall risk in a sample of adults with various neurological conditions in a rehabilitation setting. Methods This was a prospective, cohort study conducted in a single centre in the UK. 114 participants consecutively admitted to a Neuro-Rehabilitation Unit were prospectively assessed for fall accidents. Baseline assessment included a measure of balance (Berg Balance Scale) and a battery of standard cognitive tests measuring executive function, speed of information processing, verbal and visual memory, visual perception and intellectual function. The outcomes of interest were the risk of becoming a faller, balance and fall rate. Results Two tests of executive function were significantly associated with fall risk, the Stroop Colour Word Test (IRR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.03) and the number of errors on part B of the Trail Making Test (IRR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03–1.49). Composite scores of executive function, speed of information processing and visual memory domains resulted in 2 to 3 times increased likelihood of having better balance (OR 2.74 95% CI 1.08 to 6.94, OR 2.72 95% CI 1.16 to 6.36 and OR 2.44 95% CI 1.11 to 5.35 respectively). Conclusions Our results show that specific subcomponents of executive functions are able to predict fall risk, while a more global cognitive dysfunction is associated with poorer balance. PMID:27115880

  10. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy inWestern Utility Resource Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Markets for renewable electricity have grown significantly in recent years, motivated in part by federal tax incentives and in part by state renewables portfolio standards and renewable energy funds. State renewables portfolio standards, for example, motivated approximately 45% of the 4,300 MW of wind power installed in the U.S. from 2001 through 2004, while renewable energy funds supported an additional 15% of these installations. Despite the importance of these state policies, a less widely recognized driver for renewable energy market growth is poised to also play an important role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Formal resource planning processes have re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions where retail competition has failed to take root. In the western United States, recent resource plans contemplate a significant amount of renewable energy additions. These planned additions - primarily coming from wind power - are motivated by the improved economics of wind power, a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities, and an increasing recognition of the inherent risks (e.g., natural gas price risk, environmental compliance risk) in fossil-based generation portfolios. The treatment of renewable energy in utility resource plans is not uniform, however. Assumptions about the direct and indirect costs of renewable resources, as well as resource availability, differ, as do approaches to incorporating such resources into the candidate portfolios that are analyzed in utility IRPs. The treatment of natural gas price risk, as well as the risk of future environmental regulations, also varies substantially. How utilities balance expected portfolio cost versus risk in selecting a preferred portfolio also differs. Each of these variables may have a substantial effect on the degree to which renewable energy contributes to the preferred portfolio of each utility IRP. This article

  11. A dietary oxidative balance score of vitamin C, beta-carotene and iron intakes and mortality risk in male smoking Belgians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoydonck, van P.G.A.; Temme, E.H.M.; Schouten, E.G.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, in smokers, whether the oxidative balance of their dietary pattern affected mortality risk. To evaluate the oxidative balance of the dietary pattern, an oxidative balance score was constructed that summarized the combined intake of dietary antioxidants (

  12. Getting the balance right

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 8 page leaflet is published by the Nuclear Electricity Information Group (NEIG) which is made up of eight different bodies working within the nuclear industry. It aims to present a balanced outline of the facts needed to form an opinion about energy policy in the UK. It looks at the price of electricity, other sources of electricity, (oil and coal, solar power, wind power, water power), safety in the nuclear industry, nuclear waste disposal and risks from radiation. The NEIG is in favour of a balanced energy programme with nuclear energy being only a part of the overall scheme. (U.K.)

  13. Are passive smoking, air pollution and obesity a greater mortality risk than major radiation incidents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jim T

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a nuclear incident, the communication and perception of radiation risk becomes a (perhaps the major public health issue. In response to such incidents it is therefore crucial to communicate radiation health risks in the context of other more common environmental and lifestyle risk factors. This study compares the risk of mortality from past radiation exposures (to people who survived the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs and those exposed after the Chernobyl accident with risks arising from air pollution, obesity and passive and active smoking. Methods A comparative assessment of mortality risks from ionising radiation was carried out by estimating radiation risks for realistic exposure scenarios and assessing those risks in comparison with risks from air pollution, obesity and passive and active smoking. Results The mortality risk to populations exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident may be no higher than that for other more common risk factors such as air pollution or passive smoking. Radiation exposures experienced by the most exposed group of survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to an average loss of life expectancy significantly lower than that caused by severe obesity or active smoking. Conclusion Population-averaged risks from exposures following major radiation incidents are clearly significant, but may be no greater than those from other much more common environmental and lifestyle factors. This comparative analysis, whilst highlighting inevitable uncertainties in risk quantification and comparison, helps place the potential consequences of radiation exposures in the context of other public health risks.

  14. Risk management strategies for the radon paradox in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon is recognised as being the most important radiation burden for the general public. In Belgium, as in many other countries, exposure levels giving rise to yearly risks of more than 10-2 have been found. This latter value is normally considered unacceptable for the public. Moreover, an important fraction of the population lives in houses with radon levels of more than 400 Bq.m-3, representing a risk level of 10-3 per year or more. A level of this order is the limit for authorised and regulated activities at work. Prevention and intervention opportunities exist for these situations. The dose reduction opportunities are limited, but higher than the total collective dose in all nuclear activities. The analysis of radiation protection approaches, communication and decision-making for radon, compared to nuclear industrial activities shows incoherence at different levels. As a first attempt to develop a rational and coherent approach, cost-benefit analysis was applied to radon. Four optimisation scenarios were developed: three remediation and one about prevention. Referring to the α values applied by radiation protection authorities in France, Sweden and the Netherlands, the different scenarios are found to be highly justified. (author)

  15. Scientific uncertainties associated with risk assessment of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proper use and interpretation of data pertaining to biological effects of ionizing radiations is based on a continuous effort to discuss the various assumptions and uncertainties in the process of risk assessment. In this perspective, it has been considered useful by the Committee to review critically the general scientific foundations that constitute the basic framework of data for the evaluation of health effects of radiation. This review is an attempt to identify the main sources of uncertainties, to give, when possible, an order of magnitude for their relative importance, and to clarify the principal interactions between the different steps of the process of risk quantification. The discussion has been restricted to stochastic effects and especially to cancer induction in man: observations at the cellular levels and animal and in vitro experiments have not been considered. The consequences which might result from abandoning the hypothesis of linearity have not been directly examined in this draft, especially in respect to the concept of collective dose. Since another document dealing with 'Dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer' is in preparation, an effort has been made to avoid any overlap by making reference to that document whenever necessary

  16. Radiation dose and radiation risk to foetuses and newborns during X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to determine the way in which the demands set by degree 423/2000 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health are fulfilled with respect to the most radiosensitive groups, the foetus and the child, by estimating the radiation dose and radiation risk to the foetus from x-ray examinations of an expectant mother's pelvic region, finding out the practice involved in preventing doses to embryos and foetuses and assessing dose practices in cases where an embryo or foetus is or shall be exposed, and by estimating radiation dose and risk due to the radiation received by a new-born being treated in a paediatric intensive care unit. No statistics are available in Finland to indicate how many x-ray examinations of the pelvic region and lower abdomen are made to pregnant patients or to show the dose and risk to the foetus due these examinations. In order to find out the practices in radiological departments concerning the pelvic x-ray examination of fertile woman and the number of foetuses exposed, a questionnaire was sent to all radiation safety officers responsible for the safe use of radiation (n = 290). A total of 173 questionnaires were returned. This study recorded the technique and Dose-Area Product of 118 chest examinations of newborns in paediatric intensive care units. Entrance surface doses and effective doses were calculated separately to each newborn. Based on the patient records, the number of all x-ray examinations during the study was calculated and the effective doses were estimated retrospectively to each child. The radiation risk was estimated both for the foetuses and for the newborns. According to this study, it is rare in Finland to expose a pregnant woman to radiation. On the other hand, with the exception of pelvimetry examinations, there are no compiled statistics concerning the number of pelvic x-ray examinations of a pregnant woman. There was no common practice on how to exclude the possibility of pregnancy. The dose to a

  17. Aedes aegypti Global Suitability Maps Using a Water Container Energy Balance Model for Dengue Risk Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, D.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue infections are estimated to total nearly 400 million per year worldwide, with both the geographic range and the magnitude of infections having increased in the past 50 years. The primary dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti is closely associated with humans. It lives exclusively in urban and semi-urban areas, preferentially bites humans, and spends its developmental stages in artificial water containers. Climate regulates the development of Ae. aegypti immature mosquitoes in artificial containers. Potential containers for Ae. aegypti immature development include, but are not limited to, small sundry items (e.g., bottles, cans, plastic containers), buckets, tires, barrels, tanks, and cisterns. Successful development of immature mosquitoes from eggs to larvae, pupae, and eventually adults is largely dependent on the availability of water and the thermal properties of the water in the containers. Recent work has shown that physics-based approaches toward modeling container water properties are promising for resolving the complexities of container water dynamics and the effects on immature mosquito development. An energy balance container model developed by the author, termed the Water Height And Temperature in Container Habitats Energy Model (WHATCH'EM), solves for water temperature and height for user-specified containers with readily available weather data. Here we use WHATCH'EM with NASA Earth Science products used as input to construct global suitability maps based on established water temperature ranges for immature Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. A proxy for dengue risk is provided from habitat suitability, but also population estimates, as Ae. aegypti is closely associated with human activity. NASA gridded Global Population of the World data is used to mask out rural areas with low dengue risk. Suitability maps are illustrated for a variety of containers (size, material, color) and shading scenarios.

  18. Public perception on radiation-related risks of imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In recent years, diagnostic procedures using ionizing radiation have achieved a great boom, although patients are often unaware of the risks they involve. Objectives: To know how is ionizing radiation perceived by the population attending Clinica Davila, Department of Radiology (DRCD).Methods: A voluntary and anonymous survey was conducted on patients and / or companions. Results: A total of 330 adults were surveyed. An 57% had completed higher education, whereas 7.9% had only finished elementary schooling; 78.8% had undergone three or more imaging tests. CT examination was considered to pose the highest levels of risk (42.4%), followed by Ultrasonography (30.6%). Discussion: The survey group was made up of young adults, mostly college graduates, and predominantly female. Surprisingly enough, considering that obstetric sonography is commonly used during pregnancy, US was ranked second in terms of associated health risks. There is an evident interest in the subject, since 90% of responders would like to receive further information

  19. Radioecological education and perception of radiation risk in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perceptions of a considerable part of the population of Belarus concerning the possibility of construction of a NPP have formed through the prism of this catastrophe and are often based on incorrect representation of the degree of radiation risk from the Chernobyl accident as well as from operation of a future NPP. In this connection, a specific necessity is radioecological education of the population and management bodies of Belarus. Radioecological literacy of all sectors of society is a guarantee of adequate perception of real radiation risk, which will permit effective solution of the problems of rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated areas and provide answers to the questions related to development of nuclear power engineering. Thus, correct understanding by the public of radioecological risk is not just a guarantee of support for the idea of development of nuclear power engineering, but first is a basis for adequate understanding of the consequences of catastrophe and formation of corresponding models for behavior in conditions of radioactive contamination of the environment

  20. Biodosimetry as a New Paradigm for Determination of Radiation Risks and Risk-Mitigation in Astronauts Exposed to Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Predicting risk of cancer in astronauts exposed to space radiation is challenging partly because uncertainties of absorption of dose and the processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level degrade the confidence of predicting the expression of cancer. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the macromolecular profiles related to malignant transformation in cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported, This is the demonstration of two dose-responsive field-effects of enhanced protein-expression. In one case, expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) irradiated with cesium-137 gamma-rays is enhanced following exposure of log phase cells to relatively low doses of 30 to 90 cGy. K18 has been reported by a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis. In the second case, expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) is increased in irradiated stationary phase cultures of HMEC, indicating enhanced formation of gap junctions. Gap junctions have been reported to be involved in bystander effects following irradiation. It is a biodosimeter for assessing radiogenic damage. It is suggested further that such biomolecular dosimetry may introduce a new paradigm for assessing cancer risk and risk-mitigation in individuals, a requirement for managing radiation health in astronauts during extended missions in space. This new paradigm is built upon the statistical power provided by the use of functional genomics and proteomics represented in combined gene- and protein-expression assays.

  1. REDUCING THE IMPACT OF RADIATION FACTORS IN AREAS WITH HIGH LEVEL OF RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zaredinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the modern problems of radioecology. The study reveals the problems of radioecological situation in some regions of the Republic of Uzbekistan. The main attention of the authors is paid to the ecologically hazardous objects in the uranium mining industry. The characteristics of wastes from uranium mining and stages of development of the mining industry are described. The historical background of the accumulation of the wastes in dumps, the ore-bearing rocks, and other off-balance ores is given. The practical experience and directions radio-ecological safety are generalized, achieving improvements of the environmental quality in areas with high risk. In conclusion, the authors recommend carrying out some measures to reduce an impact of the radiation factor on human health and to stabilize the radioecological situation at the studied regions.

  2. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  3. What are the risks of medical radiation exposure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A recent Four Corners programme has focussed the public's attention on to the possible risks from diagnostic medical radiation exposure, particularly from CT and fluoroscopic procedures. This paper reviews the recently published epidemiological studies on the consequences of radiation exposure of either patients or medical staff. Studies of Swedish thyroid cancer patients and an equal number of age and sex matched controls revealed no evidence that diagnostic x-ray exposure contributed to the induction of the thyroid cancer (Inskip PD et al, J Nat Cancer Inst 87: 1613 - 1621, 1995). In a similar US study, there was no evidence of leukaemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma as a result of diagnostic radiology studies (Boice JD et al, JAMA, 265:1290-1294, 1991). There has also been a detailed study in Sweden of the use of radioiodine in both diagnostic and therapeutic studies. In those patients given radioiodine for thyroid cancer, an increased risk of subsequent cancer at other sites has been demonstrated (RR=1.4), which is related to the total administered activity (Hall P. et al, Br J Cancer 64: 159-163, 1991). In a related study, over 10,000 patients who had been treated for hyperthyroidism were followed up for an average of 15 years. A smaller, but significant, risk of cancer was found in this group (RR=1.14) (Hall P. Int J Cancer, 50:886-890, 1992). There was an increased leukaemia risk in patients given radioiodine for thyroid cancer, but not when it had been given for diagnosis or for the treatment of hyperthyroidism (Hall P et al, Lancet, 340: 1 -4, 1992). Radiographers and nuclear medicine technologists are exposed to low-level radiation in performing the patient studies - does this radiation exposure effect their health? Studies of breast cancer among over 100,000 radiographers in the US demonstrated that the incidence of breast cancer was similar to that in the general population and that there was no association between cancer incidence and

  4. Literature search on risks related to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors propose a selection of information sources regarding risks related to ionizing radiations. They present knowledge bases which can be found on different Internet sites belonging to different bodies and agencies (IRSN, CEA, INRS, SFRP, CNRS, Radioprotection Cirkus, EDF) and in different books. They present information sources dealing with radionuclides which can be found in French and international Internet sites and in books, information sources concerning different professional activities and sectors (ASN, IRSN, INRS, medical-professional sheets proposed by the CISME, sheets proposed by the Labour Ministry and other bodies). It presents information sources dealing with radiological incidents, accidents and emergencies, dealing with radioactive wastes, with the legal European and French framework. Some additional tools of general or more detailed information are indicated (CIPR, IAEA, UNSCAR, IRPA, IRSN, SFRP, CEA, CEPN, Radiation Cirkus, books). Ways to get an updated search are indicated for different databases, as well as some practical services

  5. Alpha-risk: a European project on the quantification of risks associated with multiple radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alpha-Risk research project is being conducted within the Sixth European Framework Programme (EC-FP6, 2005 -2008). It aims to improve the quantification of risks associated with multiple exposures, taking into account the contribution of different radionuclides and external exposure using specific organ dose calculations. The Alpha-Risk Consortium involves 18 partners from 9 countries, and is coordinated by the IRSN. Its composition allows a multidisciplinary collaboration between researchers in epidemiology, dosimetry, statistics, modelling and risk assessment. Alpha-Risk brings together major epidemiological studies in Europe, which are able to evaluate long-term health effects of internal exposure from radionuclides. It includes large size cohort and case-control studies, with accurate registration of individual annual exposures: uranium miner studies, studies on lung cancer and indoor radon exposure, and studies of lung cancer and leukaemia among nuclear workers exposed to transuranic nuclides (mainly uranium and plutonium), for whom organ doses will be reconstructed individually. The contribution of experts in dosimetry will allow the calculation of organ doses in presence of multiple exposures (radon decay products, uranium dust and external gamma exposure). Expression of the risk per unit organ dose will make it possible to compare results with those from other populations exposed to external radiation. The multidisciplinary approach of Alpha-Risk promotes the development of coherent and improved methodological approaches regarding risk modelling. A specific work - package is dedicated to the integration of results and their use for risk assessment, especially for radon. Alpha-Risk will contribute to a better understanding of long-term health risks following chronic low doses from internal exposures. The project also has the great potential to help resolve major public health concerns about the effects of low and/or protracted exposures, especially

  6. Assessment of Radiation Risk by Circulating microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jufang

    2016-07-01

    Highly energized particles delivered by galactic cosmic rays as well as solar particle events are one of the most severe detrimental factors to the health of crews during long-term space missions. Researches related to the assessment of radiation risk have been carried out with ground-based accelerator facilities all around the world. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in blood have the advantages of specificity and stability, which could be used as disease biomarkers and potential bio-dosimeters to monitor the radiation risk. Based on this backgroud, circulating miRNAs were isolated from blood after Kunming mice were whole-body exposed to 300MeV/u carbon ion beam which were generated by the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), and the levels of miRNA expression were detected by miRNA PCR array. It was found that more than one hundred of circulating miRNAs were responded to carbon ion irradiation. Among these radiosensitive miRNAs, most of them were closely associated with immune system and hematopoietic system. The miRNA levels changed more than 2-fold were further verified by qRT-PCR analysis following exposure to X rays and iron ion beam. Some miRNAs such as let-7a, miR-34a, miR-223 and miR-150 showed obvious radio-sensitivity and dose-dependent effect, demonstrating that they were potential biomarkers of radiation and could be used as ideal bio-dosimeters. Those findings indicate that with the properties of high radio-sensitivity and time-saving quantification method by standard PCR assay, circulating miRNAs may become potential biomarkers for radiation detection in space exploration.

  7. Risk of potential radiation accidental situations at TESLA accelerator installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this paper is to recognize some of the numerous risks of potential exposure and to quantify requirements and probability of failure of radiation protection system due to design event tree. Nature of design and construction of Tesla Accelerator Installation (T.A.I.) make possibility of potential exposure as a result of proven design and modification, trade off, human error as well as defense in depth. In the case of potential exposure human risk is the result of two random events: first, the occurrence of the event that causes the exposure, and the second, the appearance of a harmful effect. The highest doses during potential exposure at T.A.I. can be received at the entrance to primary beam space (V.I.N.C.Y. cyclotron vault) as well as in space with target for fluorine production, high energy experimental channels, proton therapy channel and channel for neutron researches. Expected values of prompt radiation equivalent dose rate in the cyclotron vault is considerably high, in order of 10 Sv/h. Serious problem deals with such large research installation is a number of workers, as visiting research workers of different educational levels and people in Institute who are not professionally connected with ionizing radiation. They could cause willing or unwilling opening of the cyclotron vault doors. Considering some possible scenarios we assumed that during 7000 working hours per year it is reasonably to expect 300 unsafe entries per year. It can be concluded that safety system should be designed so that probability of failure of radiation protection system has to be less than 1.9 10-6. (authors)

  8. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical organs under treatment. However, there are a lot of non-target organs at risk (OARs) occupied by low dose with underestimate in this modern rotational IMRT treatment. Herein, we report a case of a pathologic compression fracture of the T9 vertebra in a 55-year-old patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The patient underwent HT at a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions delivered to T8-T10 for symptom relief. Two weeks after the radiotherapy had been completed, the first course of chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, fluorouracil, and leucovorin was administered. After two weeks of chemotherapy, however, the patient developed progressive dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern with traction bronchiectasis, diffuse ground-glass opacities, and cystic change with fibrosis. Acute radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of radiation toxicities caused by low dose off-targets and abscopal effects even with highly conformal radiotherapy

  9. Comparative risk assessment: an element for a more rational and ethical approach to radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peaceful nuclear technologies are still perceived by a large fraction of the general public, the media as well as by some decision makers, as more risky than many other 'conventional' technologies. One of the approaches that can help bringing more rationality and ethics into the picture is to present the risk associated with radiation and nuclear technologies in the frame of correctly conducted comparative risk assessments. However, comparing different risks is not so straightforward because quantifying different risks on a comparable scale requires overcoming both conceptual and practical difficulties. Risk (R) can be expressed as the product of the probability (P) that a given undesired event, the risk, will occur, times the consequences of this event (C), i.e. R = P x C. Although in principle risks could be compared by simply ranking them according to the different values of R, this simplistic approach is not always possible because to correctly compare risks all factors, circumstances and assumptions should be mutually equivalent and quantified and the (often large) uncertainties taken into proper account. In the case of radiation risk, ICRP has assumed as valid the LNT model, (probability coefficient of 5 % per Sievert for attributable death from cancer) and selected the present equivalent dose limit of 1 mSv per year for public exposure. This dose corresponds to 50 lethal cancers by 1 million people exposed and is approximately equivalent (in terms of probability of death) to the risk of bicycling for 600 km, driving for 3200 km, crossing a busy road twice a day for 1 year, smoking 2.5 packets of cigarettes or being X-rayed once for kidney metabolism. However, according to many scientists on the basis of both epidemiological and biological results and considerations, the actual risk is far lower than that predicted by the LNT model. Nevertheless, the policies and myths that were created about half a century ago are still persisting and have lead the general

  10. Are passive smoking, air pollution and obesity a greater mortality risk than major radiation incidents?

    OpenAIRE

    Smith Jim T

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Following a nuclear incident, the communication and perception of radiation risk becomes a (perhaps the) major public health issue. In response to such incidents it is therefore crucial to communicate radiation health risks in the context of other more common environmental and lifestyle risk factors. This study compares the risk of mortality from past radiation exposures (to people who survived the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs and those exposed after the Chernobyl a...

  11. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabala, Dana; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia

    2013-11-01

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  12. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabala, Dana [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  13. Radiation and the perception of risk in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that the radiation protection standards setting process should ideally consider not only scientific data but also perceived risks and benefits of the technology under consideration. In addition the demographic character of the affected group needs to be considered. It is pointed out that public opinion data can provide useful and otherwise unobtainable information to the standards setting body. This point is illustrated by reference to polls taken before and after the Three Mile Island incident, and also to differences in response by male and female. (U.K.)

  14. Radiation dose and risk in gastrointestinal roentgendiagnostic of the child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In gastrointestinal roentgendiagnostic of the child the exposure of the skin and the testis depends on body height and body weight. The dose grows with the age. The squaredose product (Rcm2) and the energy absorbed by the body(integraldose, rdkg)increases comparably. On the other hand the quotient integraldosis/body weight is similar for the different age-groups. The radiation risk (the probability to die as consequence of a roentgenray induced disease) is approximately 1:100,000 to 1:10,000,000. (orig.)

  15. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management

  16. Risky Business: The Science and Art of Radiation Risk Communication in the High Risk Context of Space Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, Shona Robin; Shavers, Mark; Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Semones, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Successfully communicating the complex risks associated with radiation exposure is a difficult undertaking; communicating those risks within the high-risk context of space travel is uniquely challenging. Since the potential risks of space radiation exposure are not expected to be realized until much later in life, it is hard to draw comparisons between other spaceflight risks such as hypoxia and microgravity-induced bone loss. Additionally, unlike other spaceflight risks, there is currently no established mechanism to mitigate the risks of incurred radiation exposure such as carcinogenesis. Despite these challenges, it is the duty of the Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at NASA's Johnson Space Center to provide astronauts with the appropriate information to effectively convey the risks associated with exposure to the space radiation environment. To this end, astronauts and their flight surgeons are provided with an annual radiation risk report documenting the astronaut's individual radiation exposures from space travel, medical, and internal radiological procedures throughout the astronaut's career. In an effort to improve this communication and education tool, this paper critically reviews the current report style and explores alternative report styles to define best methods to appropriately communicate risk to astronauts, flight surgeons, and management.

  17. Upon the estimation of somatic radiation risks during thyroid diagnostics with radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation risk of the thyroid is estimated by use of data from the literature and own investigations. Comparing these results with the statistical incidence of radiation evoked diseases the risk of a patient to develop thyroid carcinoma receiving 50 μCi 131J for thyroid diagnostics is about tenfold compared to the spontaneous risk with a twofold risk to develop hypothyroidsm. Using sup(99m)Tc or 123J these risks are minimized to a small percentage. For technicians in the RIA lab or during labelling of proteins the thyroid's radiation risk can be diminished by ingestion of inactive iodine, however, this procedure includes new risks of iodine side effects. Comparing the pharmacological risks of iodine intake and the radiation risk it seems to be useful to suggest iodine prophylaxis when the expected radiation dose exceeds 10 rad in the thyroid. (orig.)

  18. Dose dependence on stochastic radiobiological effect in radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the results in dose -- effect relationship observation has been carried out on the cell and organism levels, with the aim to obtain more precise data on the risk coefficients at low doses. The results are represented by two contrasting groups of dose dependence on effect: a downwards concave and a J-shaped curve. Both types of dependence are described by the equation solutions of an assumed unified protective mechanism, which comprises two components: constitutive and adaptive or inducible ones. The latest data analysis of the downwards concave dependence curves shows a considerable underestimation of radiation risk in all types of cancer, except leukemia, for a number of critical groups in a population, at low doses comparing to the ICRP recommendations. With the dose increase, the decrease of the effect value per dose unit is observed. It may be possibly related to the switching of the activity of the adaptive protective mechanism, with some threshold dose values being exceeded

  19. Risks posed by ionizing radiation and chemo-toxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern over the risks from exposure to radiation or chemical toxins now appears to be forming an integral part of everyday life for a large percentage of the population. In this volume, attempts have therefore been made to compile well documented information relating to those topics as well as to give insights into relevant interconnections and to elucidate certain terms that are not closely enough defined or even have contradictory uses. In the two introductory reports, the multifarious perceptions of what may constitute a risk are outlined and discussed on a large scale stretching from mathematical to purely intuitive factors. The subsequent contributions focus on individual aspects pertinent to dangers from ionizing rays and chemical toxins and examine their wider implications in terms of social, ethical and psychological influences. Of the ten contributions to this volume two were prepared for individual retrieval. (orig./MG)

  20. Radiation risk to patients from percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is commonly used to control coronary atherosclerosis, and in many patients repeated applications occur. We investigated the current level of radiation dose and the corresponding risk for PTCA patients. The frequency of PTCA and patient demographics were also examined. Data for 1,503 Ottawa Heart Institute patients undergoing PTCA between January 1, 1987, and December 31, 1989, were analyzed retrospectively. Entrance exposures were estimated from records of the fluoroscopy time per case, the number of cine frames used, and exposure rate measurements. These were converted to average organ doses by using the Monte Carlo results of the Rosenstein group. Risks of including fatal cancers were estimated according to ICRP Report 60 (draft)

  1. Evaluation of radiation risk and work practices during cerebral interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Raghuram, L; Korah, Ipeson P; Raj, D Victor [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632004 (India)

    2003-09-01

    This study was intended to evaluate radiation risk to patients during cerebral interventions and the contribution to this risk from work practices. Thirty nine patients undergoing cerebral interventions in a digital subtraction angiography suite were included in this study. Patients who underwent cerebral interventions were categorised into two groups according to the number of cerebral interventions performed on them, and their effective doses were calculated. The effective dose for patients undergoing a single cerebral intervention (group A) varied from 1.55 to 15.9 mSv and for multiple cerebral interventions (group B) varied from 16.52 to 43.52 mSv. Two patients who underwent multiple cerebral interventions (group B) had alopecia of the irradiated scalp.

  2. Evaluation of radiation risk and work practices during cerebral interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was intended to evaluate radiation risk to patients during cerebral interventions and the contribution to this risk from work practices. Thirty nine patients undergoing cerebral interventions in a digital subtraction angiography suite were included in this study. Patients who underwent cerebral interventions were categorised into two groups according to the number of cerebral interventions performed on them, and their effective doses were calculated. The effective dose for patients undergoing a single cerebral intervention (group A) varied from 1.55 to 15.9 mSv and for multiple cerebral interventions (group B) varied from 16.52 to 43.52 mSv. Two patients who underwent multiple cerebral interventions (group B) had alopecia of the irradiated scalp

  3. Radiation risk, medical surveillance programme and radiation protection in mining and milling of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mining and milling of uranium ores comprise multiple operations such as developement, drilling, blasting, handling, crushing, grinding, leaching of the ore and concentration, drying, packaging and storing of the concentrate product. Apart from the hazards of any metal mining and milling operations due to dust, noise, chemicals, accidents etc there are radiation risks also resulting from exposure to airborne radioactivity and external radiation. The inhalation risk is of more concern in underground mines than in open pit mines. The objective of a Medical Surveillance Programme (an occupational Health Programme) is to ensure a healthy work force. It should ultimately lead to health maintenance and improvement, less absenteeism increased productivity and the achievement of worker and corporate goals. The programme includes prevention, acute care, counselling and rehabilitation. Radiological workers require special monitoring for their work-related radiation exposure effect by film monitoring service, whole body counting and bioassay. Radiation protection in the mining and milling of Uranium ores include the use of personal protective equipment, work station protection, personal hygiene and house keeping. (author). 15 refs

  4. Radiation and Health Effects and Inferring Radiation Risks from the Fukushima Daiichi Accident. Annex X of Technical Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anxieties about the risk of harm from radiation are often out of proportion to the actual likelihood of harm. Therefore, in order to deal sensibly with situations involving exposure to radiation, it is important to clarify what is known and what is not known about radiation and health effects. This annex provides a general qualitative overview of what is known about radiation-induced health effects, followed by a more detailed exploration of the quantitative inferences that may be drawn from past analyses of the relationships between radiation exposure and risk

  5. Multicomponent risk inherent to nuclear or radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear or radiation emergency response planning is based on expected avertable doses for a short (4 hours, 2 days, 1 week) and a long (50 or 70 years) periods of time. On calculating the doses one should take into account not only the sources of ionizing radiation with their foreseen characteristics, e.g. a half-life, but also the possibility of their probabilistic transformations. It can be illustrated by the chronicle of Chernobyl accident, where for nine days it was impossible to envisage with reliability the quantities of released radionuclides due to many uncontrolled factors related to the scope and character of the zone wreckage. Any other developments of the accident, such as destruction of the under reactor support plate, sinking of the melted zone into a highly radioactive water down at the reactor cavity or changing of the wind could have resulted in a substantial contamination of 3 mln. Kiev and other densely populated area of Ukraine. Another factor to be taken into account in the emergency response is a way of an actual risk perception by the population. The article suggests an approach to take into account the time-dependent secondary sources of exposure and the disparity in accepting the hazard of real risk of an accident by the trained workers and population. (author)

  6. The risk/reward balance in subsalt exploration: How teamwork and technology are improving the odds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffelt, R.M.; Fox, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    The recent discoveries in the subsalt trend offshore Louisiana are examples of how teamwork and technology can open up a new frontier in a maturely explored basin. Several key relationships had to succeed before the subsalt plan could become reality: (1) Partnerships between companies with different experience, expertise and viewpoint; (2) Regional understanding of the basin`s geology coupled with a detailed understanding of salt tectonics; (3) Integrated teams of engineers, geoscientists, and other specialists to handle new drilling problems; (4) Proper application of new seismic imaging technology; and (5) Support for key research, both internal and external. Effectively managing these relationships has helped the risk/reward balance, allowing the subsalt to be an economic venture. The high entry cost of subsalt wells, basin-wide 2D and 3D seismic databases, and the technologies employed (such as 3D depth migration), would be prohibitive without the possibility of significant discoveries and large reserves. Also, the challenge of managing such diverse talents and personalities involved with the key relationships is demanding. By properly utilizing the innovative ideas of these specialists, and applying leading edge technologies, true value is being generated for the shareholders of the companies involved in the play. The discoveries of Mahogany and Teak have generated not only excitement in the Gulf Coast oil industry, but on Wall Street and in Washington as well. The possibility of another major frontier in the United States could revitalize the domestic oil industry. But this new play brings additional competition, which brings added challenges. Continued wise utilization of creative people`s talents and new technologies will he necessary to reap the true rewards of this play.

  7. Epistemological problems in assessing cancer risks at low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, biology has not been subjected to any epistemological analysis as has been the case with mathematics and physics. Our knowledge of the effects in biological systems of various stimuli proves to be dualistic in a complementary (although not mutually exclusive) way, which bears resemblance to the knowledge of phenomena in quantum physics. The dualistic limbs of biological knowledge are the action of stimuli and the response of the exposed, biological system. With regard to radiogenic cancer, this corresponds to the action of the ionizations and the response of the exposed mammal to that action, respectively. The following conclusions can be drawn from the present analysis: Predictions as to radiogenic cancer seem often if not always to have neglected the response variability (variations in radiosensitivity) in individuals or among individuals in populations, i.e. the predictions have been based exclusively on radiation doses and exposure conditions. The exposed individual or population, however, must be considered an open statistical system, i.e. a system in which predictions as to the effect of an agent are only conditionally possible. The knowledge is inverse to the size of the dose or concentration of the active agent. On epistemological grounds, we can not gain knowledge about the carcinogenic capacity of very low (non-dominant) radiation doses. Based on the same principle, we can not predict cancer risks at very low (non-dominant) radiation doses merely on the basis of models, or otherwise interpolated or extrapolated high-dose effects, observed under special exposure conditions

  8. Health risk assessment of jobs involving ionizing radiation sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević-Tišma Vera D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included 75 subjects exposed to low doses of external ionizing radiation and 25 subjects from the control group, all male. The first group (A consisted of 25 subjects employed in the production of technetium, with an average job experience of 15 years. The second group (B consisted of 25 subjects exposed to ionizing radiation from enclosed sources, working in jobs involving the control of X-ray devices and americium smoke detectors, their average work experience being 18.5 years. The third group (C consisted of 25 subjects involved in the decontamination of the terrain at Borovac from radioactive rounds with depleted uranium left over after the NATO bombing of Serbia in 1999, their average job experience being 18.5 years. The control group (K consisted of 25 subjects who have not been in contact with sources of ionizing radiation and who hold administrative positions. Frequencies of chromosome aberrations were determined in lymphocytes of peripheral blood and compared to the control group. The average annual absorbed dose determined by thermoluminescent dosimeters for all three groups did not exceed 2 mSv. In the present study, the largest number of observed changes are acentric fragments and chromosome breaks. The highest occupational risk appears to involve subjects working in manufacturing of the radio-isotope technetium.

  9. GERMcode: A Stochastic Model for Space Radiation Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    A new computer model, the GCR Event-based Risk Model code (GERMcode), was developed to describe biophysical events from high-energy protons and high charge and energy (HZE) particles that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the GERMcode, the biophysical description of the passage of HZE particles in tissue and shielding materials is made with a stochastic approach that includes both particle track structure and nuclear interactions. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections. For NSRL applications, the GERMcode evaluates a set of biophysical properties, such as the Poisson distribution of particles or delta-ray hits for a given cellular area and particle dose, the radial dose on tissue, and the frequency distribution of energy deposition in a DNA volume. By utilizing the ProE/Fishbowl ray-tracing analysis, the GERMcode will be used as a bi-directional radiation transport model for future spacecraft shielding analysis in support of Mars mission risk assessments. Recent radiobiological experiments suggest the need for new approaches to risk assessment that include time-dependent biological events due to the signaling times for activation and relaxation of biological processes in cells and tissue. Thus, the tracking of the temporal and spatial distribution of events in tissue is a major goal of the GERMcode in support of the simulation of biological processes important in GCR risk assessments. In order to validate our approach, basic radiobiological responses such as cell survival curves, mutation, chromosomal

  10. Balancing Potency of Platelet Inhibition with Bleeding Risk in the Early Treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slattery, David E

    2009-08-01

    challenge in choosing appropriate therapy in the emergency department lies in balancing the need for potent platelet inhibition with the potential for increased risk of bleeding and future interventions the patient is likely to receive during the index hospitalization.[WestJEM. 2009;10:163-175.

  11. Assessment of balance and risk for falls in a sample of community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colonvega Makasha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are a major health concern for older adults and their impact is a significant public health problem. The chief modifiable risk factors for falls in community-dwellers are psychotropic drugs, polypharmacy, environmental hazards, poor vision, lower extremity impairments, and balance impairments. This study focused on balance impairments. Its purpose was to assess the feasibility of recruiting older adults with possible balance problems for research conducted at a chiropractic research center, and to explore the utility of several widely used balance instruments for future studies of the effect of chiropractic care on balance in older adults. Methods This descriptive study was conducted from September through December 2004. Participants were recruited through a variety of outreach methods, and all were provided with an educational intervention. Data were collected at each of two visits through questionnaires, interviews, and physical examinations. Balance was assessed on both visits using the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABCS, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS, and the One Leg Standing Test (OLST. Results A total of 101 participants enrolled in the study. Advertising in the local senior newspaper was the most effective method of recruitment (46%. The majority of our participants were white (86% females (67%. About one third (32% of participants had a baseline BBS score below 46, the cut-off point for predicting risk of falling. A mean improvement in BBS scores of 1.7 points was observed on the second visit. For the subgroup with baseline scores below 46, the mean change was 4.5 points, but the group mean remained below 46 (42.5. Conclusion Recruitment of community-dwelling seniors for fall-related research conducted at a chiropractic research center appears feasible, and the most successful recruitment strategies for this center appeared to be a combination of targeted newspaper ads and personal contact through

  12. The assessment of risks from exposure to low-levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with risk assessments for human populations receiving low level radiation doses; workers routinely exposed to radiation, Japanese victims of nuclear bombs, and the general public are all considered. Topics covered include risk estimates for cancer, mortality rates, risk estimates for nuclear site workers, and dosimetry

  13. The assessment of risks from exposure to low-levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report is concerned with risk assessments for human populations receiving low level radiation doses; workers routinely exposed to radiation, Japanese victims of nuclear bombs, and the general public are all considered. Topics covered include risk estimates for cancer, mortality rates, risk estimates for nuclear site workers, and dosimetry.

  14. Use of mass and toxicity balances in risk-based corrective action decisions at contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contaminated groundwater at a sour gas plant facility was studied to identify the chemicals of environmental concern. Simple mass balance principles were used to determine the proportion of organic carbon, organic nitrogen and MicrotoxR toxicity that can be attributed to two process chemicals that have contaminated several sour gas plants in western Canada. The two process chemicals are sulfolane and diisopropanolamine (DIPA). The organic carbon balance was calculated by determining the molar contribution of sulfolane and DIPA relative to the mass of carboxylic acid-corrected dissolved organic carbon. Organic carbon balances ranged from 44 to 96 per cent. The organic nitrogen balance was calculated by determining the molar contribution of DIPA relative to the mass of ammonium ion-corrected dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen. The nitrogen balances were highly variable between 8 to 48 per cent for samples with organic nitrogen concentrations between 10 and 32 mg/L. The MicrotoxR toxicity balance was calculated by determining the proportions of toxicity that could be accounted for by pure phase sulfolane and DIPA. The MicrotoxR toxicity balance for samples that showed significant toxicity ranged from 71 to 122 per cent

  15. Risk-informed profitability-based analysis support of nuclear power station balance-of-plant change management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a three-phased method is proposed for the STP Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) Risk and Reliability Analysis Section (RRA) to perform analyses and decision-making support for the STPNOC Balance-of-Plant (BOP)Task Force in managing change to simultaneously optimize plant safety and maximize long-term return-on-asset (or profitability) for the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS). (authors)

  16. Postoperative radiation for cervical cancer with pathologic risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy of postoperative radiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer with pathologic risk factors. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of 83 patients who received postoperative radiation therapy at our facility from March 1980 to November 1993 for early stage cervix cancer with positive surgical margins, positive pelvic or periaortic lymph nodes, lymphovascular space invasion, deep invasion, or for disease discovered incidentally at simple hysterectomy. Twenty-eight patients received low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary radiation with or without external beam pelvic irradiation and 55 patients received external beam pelvic irradiation with high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary implants. Of these 83 patients, 66 were evaluable--20 LDR and 46 HDR patients. All patients received 45-50 Gy external beam irradiation and 20 Gy LDR equivalent intracavitary irradiation prescribed to 0.5 cm below the mucosa. Ninety percent of the LDR group and 92% of the HDR group completed treatment within < 56 days. Treatment-related toxicities were scored according to the GOG toxicity scale. Mean and median follow-up times were 101 months and 111 months (3-172 months) for the LDR group and 42 and 40 months (3-98 months) for the HDR group. Results: The 5-year disease-free survival was 89% for the LDR group and 72% for the HDR group. Local control was observed in 90% (18 out of 20) of the LDR patients and 89% (41 out of 46) of the HDR patients for an overall local control rate of 89.5%. Two of 20 LDR patients (10%) experienced recurrence (two pelvic with distant metastasis). Nine of 46 HDR patients (22%) had recurrence of disease (three pelvic, four distant metastasis, and two pelvic with distant metastasis). In the HDR group, 6 out of 16 (38%) with positive lymph nodes died of disease whereas, 27 out of 30 (90%) of the patients with negative lymph nodes remain free of disease. Three of 20 (15%) LDR patients and 4 out of 46 (9%) HDR patients experienced

  17. Risk concepts in various fields including radiation protection. A historical review and some recent topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a review by the expert group concerning risks in radiation protection and in chemical management, recent state of protection and of health-risk assessment of low dose radiation, and risk concepts in other fields. Risk concepts in radiation protection are described mainly on ICRP: Its history leading to its Publication 1 (1958), Pub. 9 (1965), Pub. 26 (1977) and Pub. 60 (1990). In that recent publication, the term, risk, is used only for the established one like estimated risk or excess relative risk. Risk management of chemicals involves that against pollution from environmental and ecological aspects, and assessment of dioxin and chemicals from toxicology and carcinogenicity aspects. Recently, risks of low dose radiation have been actively discussed conceivably because of possible reduction of the exposure limit in ICRP Recommendation 1990, Chernobyl accident, advances of radiation biology and radiation protection problem in the radioactive waste disposition. Globally, many academic societies such as American Health-Physics Society published Position Statements and Reports and there are activities like the Research program plan for the risk and an international conference of bridging radiation policy and science. Risk concepts involve technological and ecological ones, insurance ones and health ones. Risk assessment or analysis is done through recognition, measurement and prediction, thus through the scientific process based on objective facts. (K.H.)

  18. Phase I trials involving radiation therapy, quantifying the risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over one third of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) at some point. Our purpose was to quantify the risks to patients associated with enrolment onto RT-based phase I trials. All phase I and phase I/II clinical trials involving RT published in English between 2001 and 2010 were identified via a PubMed search. For pragmatic reasons, we focused on trials from 2001, 2005 and 2009. For each trial we calculated a 'toxicity ratio' equal to the number of grade 3/4/5 toxic events divided by the number of patients in the trial. Linear regression was used to determine which variables were associated with higher toxicity ratios. There were a total of 33 treatment-related deaths, and 1812 acute grade 3/4 toxicities among the 2994 subjects in 98 trials. The median toxicity ratio over 98 trials was 0.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34 to 0.58). Multivariate regression analysis showed that toxicity ratios were significantly higher in trials with chemotherapy (P=0.002) and in trials for cancers of the head-and-neck (P<0.001). The median toxicity ratio in chemotherapy trials was 0.60 (95% CI: 0.48 to 0.72) compared with trials without chemotherapy 0.08 (95% CI: 0.03 to 0.13). Although the risk of grade 5 toxicity is low, the risk of major toxicity is significant in phase I RT trials. These values are comparable to published risk estimates for phase I non-RT trials.

  19. The Australasian radiation protection society's position statement on risks fro low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Controversy continues in the radiation protection literature on whether or not ionizing radiation is harmful at low doses, with unresolved scientific uncertainty about effects below a few tens of millisieverts. To settle what regulatory controls (if any) should apply in this dose region, an assumption has to be made relating dose to the possibility of harm or benefit. The assumption made and the way it is applied can have far-reaching effects, not only on the scale of regulatory compliance required but also on public perception of risk, and therefore on the technological choices made by society. It is important therefore that decisions reached concerning the regulation of low doses of ionizing radiation derive from rational arguments and are perceived to have an ethical basis. It is also important that such decisions are neither portrayed nor perceived as resolving the scientific uncertainties: rather, they serve merely to facilitate the implementation of appropriate measures to ensure safety. At its Annual General Meeting in 2004, the Australasian Radiation Protection Society (ARPS) set up a working group to draft a statement of the Society's position on this matter. The resulting position statement was adopted by the Society at its Annual General Meeting on 14 November 2005. Its salient features are as follows: There is insufficient evidence to establish a dose-effect relationship for doses that are less than a few tens of millisieverts in a year. A linear extrapolation from higher dose levels should be assumed only for the purpose of applying regulatory controls; Estimates of collective dose arising from individual doses that are less than some tens of millisieverts in a year should not be used to predict numbers of fatal cancers; The risk to an individual of doses significantly less than 100 microsieverts in a year is so small, if it exists at all, that regulatory requirements to control exposure at this level are not warranted. The paper will

  20. Health risks (early, delayed and genetic) from the present radiation level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey is given of the risks of early, delayed and genetic injuries from present radiation environment. Brief data is presented on some industrial and medical accidents. It is stated that in Norway there are 5-10 incidents per year in industrial radiography, none of which have led to radiation syndrome. Delayed radiation effects are discussed and figures quoted for risk due to mining, industrial and medical radiography and natural sources. Genetic effects are similarly discussed and genetically significant doses from similar sources are quoted. It is concluded that the health risk from the radiation environment is very small compared with other risks. (JIW)

  1. A theoretical concept of low level/low LET radiation carcinogenic risk (LLCR) projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filyushkin, I.V. [Laboratory of Theoretical Radiobiology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1992-06-01

    Carcinogenic risk to humans resulting from low level/low LET radiation exposure (LLLCR) has not been observed directly because epidemiological observations have not yet provided statistically significant data on risk values. However, these values are of great interest for radiation health science and radiation protection practice under both normal conditions and emergency situations. This report presents a theoretical contribution to the validation of dose and dose rate efficiency factors (DDREF) transforming cocinogenic risk coefficients from those revealed in A-bomb survivors to factors appropriate for the projection of the risk resulting from very low levels of low LET radiation.

  2. A theoretical concept of low level/low LET radiation carcinogenic risk (LLCR) projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogenic risk to humans resulting from low level/low LET radiation exposure (LLLCR) has not been observed directly because epidemiological observations have not yet provided statistically significant data on risk values. However, these values are of great interest for radiation health science and radiation protection practice under both normal conditions and emergency situations. This report presents a theoretical contribution to the validation of dose and dose rate efficiency factors (DDREF) transforming cocinogenic risk coefficients from those revealed in A-bomb survivors to factors appropriate for the projection of the risk resulting from very low levels of low LET radiation

  3. Radiation risks and monitoring of transboundary rivers of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The condition of the water resources of the Republic of Kazakhstan is characterized with their whole deficiency as well as their high pollution and desiccation. The situation is also aggravated with much relaxation of work coordination on regulation of trans-boundary river flows and control of their water quality as a result of the USSR collapse and isolation of separate republics. The absence of objective information on water condition of rivers and their contamination sources creates a danger of high ecological risk and psychological stress for inhabitants, localities of that related to the basins of these rivers, and serves as reasoning for claims (occasionally unreasonable) to neighboring countries. Following rivers are the largest trans-boundary ones in Kazakhstan: Ile, Syrdarya, Ural and Irtysh. All these rivers are of great importance for people's life-support of the republic. At the same time presence of a number of large industrial centers, agricultural enterprises and radiation-dangerous objects in the basins of these rivers creates a potential danger of chemical and radiation contamination for their water flows. Objective information on its influence rate is required. The most acceptable form of the control of radiation and hydro-chemical situation in the basins of transboundary rivers is their monitoring based on modern nuclear-and-physical methods of analysis. Very important factor in organization of such monitoring system is participation of all the countries concerned with the basin of the river under the control. There is a work experience of many years in Central Asia on monitoring of large Syrdarya and Amudarya rivers. These works have been carried out since 2000 with the framework of the International project NAVRUZ. Participants of this project are organizations of nuclear profile from Uzbekistan, Kirghizia, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan. The collaborator of this project is the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), USA. Experience of these

  4. Esophageal toxicity of radiation therapy: Clinical risk factors and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute radiation-induced esophagitis includes all clinical symptoms (odynophagia, dysphagia) occurring within 90 days after thoracic irradiation start. Its severity can be graded using RTOG and CTCAE scales. The clinical risk factors are: age, female gender, initial performance status, pre-therapeutic body mass index, pre-therapeutic dysphagia, tumoral and nodal stage, delivered dose, accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy, concomitant association of chemotherapy to radiotherapy and response to the treatment. The dosimetric parameters predictive of esophagitis are: mean dose, V20 Gy, V30 Gy, V40 Gy, V45 Gy and V50 Gy. Amifostine is the only drug to have a proven radioprotective efficacy (evidence level C, ESMO recommendation grade III). The medical management of esophagitis associates a diet excluding irritant food, medication against gastroesophageal reflux, analgesic treatment according to the WHO scale and management of dehydration and de-nutrition by enteral feeding. (authors)

  5. Radiation exposure and risk of pediatric thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large amount of radioactive substances were released in air following the Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident (Mar. 2011), of which subsequent medical and pediatric events are reported herein. Many residents who had lived close to the Plant had to dwell in the evacuation area. The risk of their pediatric thyroid cancer has become a subject of anxiety since the incidence of the cancer alone is known to have increased post Chernobyl nuclear accident. The cancer is quite rare in the pediatric field, the tissue type is mostly of differentiated papillocarcinoma, and the long prognosis is reportedly as good as that of the cancer not due to radiation exposure if surgically treated appropriately. After the Accident, Radiation Medical Science Center for Fukushima Health Management Survey was founded in Fukushima Medical University, where the whole lifetime health management of Fukushima prefectural residents is to be continued. Among them, the ultrasonic examination of the thyroid started in Oct. 2011 to 360 thousands children of the age 20 mm cyst or >5 mm solid node. It is important to carefully watch the health of children involving their mental side as they suffer from the experience of ''exposed'', rather than the actual physical effect. (T.T.)

  6. Risk from exposure to natural and artificial ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association between exposure to ultraviolet (UV) and damage to the skin and eyes is today generally accepted. Exposure to UV radiation may occur in several ways. Apart from the sun, there is a wide range of artificial sources used in different fields of industry, research and medicine, the exposure to which adds to the total exposure of an individual during his life-span. The potential effects of ozone layer depletion on the increase of the solar UV radiation at earth's surface, and therefor on human health, have recently been emphasized. Moreover, great attention has been devoted to the often uncontrolled use of UV lamps for tanning. This report shows the basis on which short and long term UV risk is assessed, and indicates some parameters necessary to its evaluation. The UV effects, both at molecular and cellular levels and on humans, are described together with their respective action spectra. The most common UV sources are then analyzed and their use in different fields is shown. Finally, some methods in dosimetry, which are useful for the correct measurement of exposure values, are described

  7. Radiation and energy balance dynamics over young chir pine ( Pinus roxburghii) system in Doon of western Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nilendu; Bhattacharya, Bimal K.; Nanda, M. K.; Soni, Prafulla; Parihar, Jai Singh

    2014-10-01

    The regional impacts of future climate changes are principally driven by changes in energy fluxes. In this study, measurements on micrometeorological and biophysical variables along with surface energy exchange were made over a coniferous subtropical chir pine ( Pinus roxburghii) plantation ecosystem at Forest Research Institute, Doon valley, India. The energy balance components were analyzed for two years to understand the variability of surface energy fluxes, their drivers, and closure pattern. The period covered two growth cycles of pine in the years 2010 and 2011 without and with understory growth. Net short wave and long wave radiative fluxes substantially varied with cloud dynamics, season, rainfall induced surface wetness, and green growth. The study clearly brought out the intimate link of albedo dynamics in chir pine system with dynamics of leaf area index (LAI), soil moisture, and changes in understory background. Rainfall was found to have tight linear coupling with latent heat fluxes. Latent heat flux during monsoon period was found to be higher in higher rainfall year (2010) than in lower rainfall year (2011). Higher or lower pre-monsoon sensible heat fluxes were succeeded by noticeably higher or lower monsoon rainfall respectively. Proportion of latent heat flux to net radiation typically followed the growth curve of green vegetation fraction, but with time lag. The analysis of energy balance closure (EBC) showed that the residual energy varied largely within ±30% of net available energy and the non-closure periods were marked by higher rainspells or forced clearance of understory growths.

  8. Radiation and energy balance dynamics over young chir pine (Pinus roxburghii) system in Doon of western Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nilendu Singh; Bimal K Bhattacharya; M K Nanda; Prafulla Soni; Jai Singh Parihar

    2014-10-01

    The regional impacts of future climate changes are principally driven by changes in energy fluxes. In this study, measurements on micrometeorological and biophysical variables along with surface energy exchange were made over a coniferous subtropical chir pine (Pinus roxburghii) plantation ecosystem at Forest Research Institute, Doon valley, India. The energy balance components were analyzed for two years to understand the variability of surface energy fluxes, their drivers, and closure pattern. The period covered two growth cycles of pine in the years 2010 and 2011 without and with understory growth. Net short wave and long wave radiative fluxes substantially varied with cloud dynamics, season, rainfall induced surface wetness, and green growth. The study clearly brought out the intimate link of albedo dynamics in chir pine system with dynamics of leaf area index (LAI), soil moisture, and changes in understory background. Rainfall was found to have tight linear coupling with latent heat fluxes. Latent heat flux during monsoon period was found to be higher in higher rainfall year (2010) than in lower rainfall year (2011). Higher or lower pre-monsoon sensible heat fluxes were succeeded by noticeably higher or lower monsoon rainfall respectively. Proportion of latent heat flux to net radiation typically followed the growth curve of green vegetation fraction, but with time lag. The analysis of energy balance closure (EBC) showed that the residual energy varied largely within ±30% of net available energy and the non-closure periods were marked by higher rainspells or forced clearance of understory growths.

  9. Radiation chemistry of water at low dose rates with emphasis on the energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been considerable interest in absorbed dose water calorimetry. In order to accurately relate the temperature change to the absorbed dose, the energy balance of the overall chemistry of the system must be known. The radiolytic products and their yields are affected by dose rate, dose and added solutes. The yields of the radiolytic products have been calculated using a computer program developed at Atomic Energy of Canada. The chemical energy balance was determined as a function of dose for various dose rates and initial concentrations of hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In solutions containing H2O2 or O2 and H2 the chemical reactions were exothermic; in other cases they were endothermic. Approach to equilibrium and equilbrium conditions are discussed

  10. The impact of deforestation in the Amazonian atmospheric radiative balance: a remote sensing assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Sena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the Amazonian radiative budget after considering three aspects of deforestation: (i the emission of aerosols from biomass burning due to forest fires; (ii changes in surface albedo after deforestation and (iii modifications in the column water vapour amount over deforested areas. Simultaneous Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES shortwave fluxes and aerosol optical depth (AOD retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS were analysed during the peak of the biomass burning seasons (August and September from 2000 to 2009. A discrete-ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT code was used to extend instantaneous remote sensing radiative forcing assessments into 24-h averages. The mean direct radiative forcing of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA during the biomass burning season for the 10-yr studied period was −5.6 ± 1.7 W m−2. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the direct radiative forcing of aerosols over Amazon was obtained for the biomass burning season of each year. It was observed that for high AOD (larger than 1 at 550 nm the imbalance in the radiative forcing at the TOA may be as high as −20 W m−2 locally. The surface reflectance plays a major role in the aerosol direct radiative effect. The study of the effects of biomass burning aerosols over different surface types shows that the direct radiative forcing is systematically more negative over forest than over savannah-like covered areas. Values of −15.7 ± 2.4 W m−2550 nm and −9.3 ± 1.7 W m−2550 nm were calculated for the mean daily aerosol forcing efficiencies over forest and savannah-like vegetation respectively. The overall mean annual albedo-change radiative forcing due to deforestation over the state of Rondônia, Brazil, was determined as −7.3 ± 0.9 W m−2. Biomass burning aerosols impact the radiative

  11. The Australasian radiation protection society's position statement on risks from low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At its Annual General Meeting in 2004, the Australasian Radiation Protection Society (A.R.P.S.) set up a working group to draft a statement of the Society's position on risks from low levels of exposure to ionizing radiation. The resulting position statement was adopted by the Society at its Annual General Meeting in 2005. Its salient features are as follows: First, there is insufficient evidence to establish a dose-effect relationship for doses that are less than a few tens of milli sieverts in a year. A linear extrapolation from higher dose levels should be assumed only for the purpose of applying regulatory controls. Secondly, estimates of collective dose arising from individual doses that are less than some tens of milli sieverts in a year should not be used to predict numbers of fatal cancers. Thirdly, the risk to an individual of doses significantly less than 100 micro sieverts in a year is so small, if it exists at all, that regulatory requirements to control exposure at this level are not warranted. (authors)

  12. Library 2.0: Balancing the Risks and Benefits to Maximise the Dividends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian; Bevan, Paul; Akerman, Richard; Alcock, Jo; Fraser, Josie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a number of examples of how Web 2.0 technologies and approaches (Library 2.0) are being used within the library sector. The paper acknowledges that there are a variety of risks associated with such approaches. The paper describes the different types of risks and outlines a risk assessment and risk…

  13. The variability of radiative balance elements and air temperature over the Asian region of Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Kharyutkina, E. V.; I. I. Ippolitov; S. V. Loginov

    2012-01-01

    The variability of spatial-temporal distribution of temperature and heat balance elements is investigated for the Asian territory of Russia (45–80° N, 60–180° E) using JRA-25, NCEP/DOE AMIP-II reanalysis data and observational data for the period of global warming 1979–2008. It is shown that temperature trend over the territory is 1.4 °C for the period under study according to reanalysis data. Since the beginning of 90s of 20th century the increase of back earth-atmosphere shor...

  14. Balancing Caution and Greed: Neurometric Responses to Decision-Making under Escalating Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meder, David; Haagensen, Brian Numelin; Morville, Tobias;

    probability possibly reflects the increasing response conflict (5). The prediction error signal in primary visual areas might indicate a top-down influence on V1, whereas the prediction error signal in dPCC activation fits to theories of its role in balancing between internal and external attentional...

  15. Combined effect of ionizing radiation and other risk factors on the incidence of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on combined effect of ionizing radiation (the number of roentgenoscopies and integral absorbed dose) and other risk factors (age, observation period etc) on the incidence of breast cancer (BC). It is shown that the relative BC risk, related with radiation, is affected by woman age during exposure

  16. Combined Measures of Dynamic Bone Quality and Postural Balance-A Fracture Risk Assessment Approach in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amit; Watts, Nelson B; Dwivedi, Alok; Shukla, Rakesh; Mani, Ashutosh; Diab, Dima

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated functional measures of neuromuscular integrity and bone's resistance to fracture as a combined tool in discriminating osteoporosis patients with and without fractures. Functional aspects of neuromuscular integrity were quantified with a noninvasive measure of static and dynamic functional postural stability (FPS), and fracture resistance was obtained with bone shock absorption in patients with osteoporosis aged 65-85 and compared our measures with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX [World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases, Sheffield, UK]) in women with osteoporosis, some with and some without vertebral fractures. Patients with vertebral fracture showed larger static FPS (postural sway excursion) in the mediolateral and anterior-posterior directions, suggesting poorer balance. Most of the variables of dynamic FPS showed significant differences between fracture and no-fracture groups (e.g., the fracture group took significantly longer during turning, implying poorer dynamic balance control). Also, compared with healthy control subjects, all 4 dynamic FPS responses for osteoporosis patients with and without fracture were significantly poorer, suggesting potential risk for falls. In summary, patients with osteoporosis who have vertebral fractures (compared with patients with similarly low bone mineral density and other nonfracture risk fractures) have not only lower bone shock absorption damping (ζ) but also increased postural imbalance. PMID:25936482

  17. Risks related to fluoroscopy radiation associated with electrophysiology procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano; Emanuela Piccaluga; Renato Padovani; Claudio Antonio Traino; Maria Grazia Andreassi; Giulio Guagliumi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of cardiac imaging are immense, and modern cardiac electrophysiology (EP requires the extensive and versatile use of a variety of cardiac imaging and radiology-based techniques. In the cardiac electrophysiology lab, doses can range around a reference effective dose (ED of 15 milliSievert corresponding to 750 chest x-rays for a cardiac radiofrequency ablation, ranging from less than 2 to > 60 mSv. The reference dose for a regular pacemaker or ICD implant is 4 mSv (range 1.4-17 and for a CRT implant is 22 mSv (range 2.2-95. Doses on the order of magnitude of 10-100 milliSievert (mSv correspond to a low (albeit definite, not negligible additional lifetime risk of fatal and non-fatal cancer from between 1 in 1000 (10 mSv to 1 in 100 (100 mSv. The increasing use and complexity of cardiac electrophysiology techniques have not been matched by increasing awareness and knowledge by prescribers and practitioners. The protection of doctors is just as important as protection of patients. Most experienced (and most exposed interventional cardiologists and electrophysiologists have an exposure per annum of around 5 mSv, two to three times higher than diagnostic radiologists, with a typical cumulative lifetime attributable risk on the order of magnitude of 1 cancer (fatal and non-fatal per 100 exposed subjects. Operator dose per procedure correlates somewhat with the patient dose, but may be typically 1000 times lower depending upon the shielding employed (one unit of incidence scatter dose for the operator when 1000 units of incident dose are given to the patient. However, adequate radiation protection training and diligent protection can reduce this radiation exposure by 90%. The priority given to radioprotection in every cardiology department is an effective strategy for primary prevention of cancer, a strong indicator of the quality of the cardiology division, and the most effective shielding for enhancing the safety of patients, doctors, and

  18. Risk estimation of benzene-induced leukemia by radiation equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki epidemiological study, risk assessment system for radiation has been well developed and is practically applied to the international protection standards. Hence, defining the radiation equivalent dose for chemical agents could place in the order of their risk. As well as the radiation, benzene causes leukemia to humans. Therefore, we evaluated the radiation-equivalent dose for benzene based on chromosome aberration rates induced by its metabolites and low-dose rate radiation because chromosome aberration is thought to be closely related to the leukemogenesis. Using radiation risk coefficient, the leukemia risk caused by 1 mg/m3 benzene inhalation was estimated 5.5 - 7.3 x 10-8, which is underestimated compared to other studies based on human epidemiological researches. (author)

  19. Mechanistic and genetic studies of radiation tumorigenesis in the mouse - implications for low dose risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation cancer risk estimates remain firmly based upon epidemiological data. Experimental validation of the fundamental aspects of these risk estimates relies on animal studies. In particular, animal model systems for radiation carcinogenesis can provide data for mechanistic modelling approaches to risk estimation. The accuracy and validity of risk estimation models developed will depend upon the extent of our understanding of the process of radiation carcinogenesis. The study of 'spontaneous' tumours in humans continues to provide a sound context in which to consider the mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Several mouse radiation carcinogenesis systems are considered here with particular reference to the nature of the initiating event and the influence of genetic susceptibility on radiation-induced cancer. (author)

  20. Radiation risk assessments, protection policies, and procedures of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the radiation risk assessments, protection policies, and procedures of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The activities of ICRP are reviewed. Thus, ICRP is an independent international network of specialists in various fields of radiological protection. The biological effects of ionising radiation, the risks of late harm, the protection against radiation risks, and the plans for the future are described. A future project aims to review existing recommendations on radiological protection for disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste, such as spend nuclear fuel. In addition, a number of new projects are being started in 1998. These include Cancer risk at low doses, Radiation risks to the embryo / foetus, probably Quality factors and RBE, further Doses from radiopharmaceuticals, Dose coefficients for external radiation, Pregnancy in medical practice, Patient safety in radiotherapy, and Interventional procedures. Other areas are constantly being monitored for possible later inclusion into the ICRP work programme. (Cho, G. S.). 5 refs

  1. Elements of risk while using ionizing radiation in teaching of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems related to ionizing radiations are taught extensively in the course of physics. Some risks of biological effects for both teachers and students have to be considered. Types of ionizing radiations, concepts and units are described, permissible dose rates and safety regulations for open and sealed radiation sources, X-ray equipment etc. are given in form of recommendation for school labs. (EG)

  2. Radiation risk statement in the participant information for a research protocol that involves exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) is required to scrutinise the protocols of clinical drug trials that recruit patients as participants. If the study involves exposing the participants to ionizing radiation the information provided to the participant should contain a radiation risk statement that is understandable by the Committee and the participant. The information that should be included in the risk statement is available from a variety of published sources and is discussed. The ARPANSA Code of Practice Exposure of Humans to Ionizing Radiation for Research Purposes (2005) states explicitly what the responsibilities of the researcher and the HREC are. Some research protocols do not provide the information required by good radiation protection practice and explicitly called for by the Code. Nine points (including: state that ionizing radiation is involved; that the radiation is additional to standard care; the effective dose to be received; the dose compared to natural background; the dose to the most exposed organs; a statement of risk; the benefits accruing from the exposure; ask the participant about previous exposures; name a contact person from whom information may be sought) that should be considered for inclusion in the participant information are presented and discussed. An example of a radiation risk statement is provided

  3. The Basel Capital Adequacy and Regulatory Framework: Balancing Risk Sensitivity, Simplicity and Comparability

    OpenAIRE

    Ojo, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    As well as highlighting the importance of cost benefit analyses in decision- making processes where (expected) outcomes are very difficult to predict – given the degree of prevailing and potential risks and uncertainties, as well as the unquantifiable nature of such risks and uncertainties, this paper also illustrates the importance of complementary measures in the current Basel risk based capital adequacy framework. As technological advances and societal changes contribute towards the ge...

  4. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, R D; Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubM...

  5. Assessment of radiation risk as a part of ecological risk in the Republic of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The purpose of the work: foundation for principles of planning protection measures, that provide safety for population activity on the territories, contaminated with radio-nuclides, by analysing radio-chemical situation, using risk assessment methods. Problems set in the work: -) Analyses of radiation risk in the structure of ecological risk in the territory of the Republic of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident; -) Investigation of chemical risk level, connected with air pollution from stationary objects exhausts, for the territories, contaminated with Chernobyl radio-nuclides; -) Modelling of the combined impact of ionising radiation and chemical carcinogen for the possible ecological risk assessment; -) Involving modern geo informational systems in the radio-ecological risk assessment process; -) Foundation for the assessment methodology of the complex influence of negative factors in the territories, contaminated with Chernobyl radio-nuclides. The problems are solved by carrying out specific experiments and by analysing published and own data on radioactive and chemical contamination of some regions of Belarus. Major findings: Radiation input to the really registered carcinogens is estimated to app. 10 %. In case of multiple factors influence of different contaminators of industrial and natural origin (i.e. radiation is not the only negative factor), ignorance of non-radiation origin factors may seriously distort estimation of radiation risk, when it is related to the registered effects. Radiation should be in no way treated as the major factor of real ecological risk in Belarus. Method for comparative analysis of territories' ecological risk level is developed and implemented. A GIS segment, that includes subsystem of the real and forecasted radio-ecological mapping, is created. The authors grounded the experimental model for study the complex influence of radioactive and non-radioactive (chemical carcinogen) factors. Revealed dependencies 'dose

  6. Test models for estimating radiation balance in different scales for Jaboticabal, SP

    OpenAIRE

    Valquíria de Alencar Beserra; Glauco de Souza Rolim

    2012-01-01

    The net radiation (Rn) in agroecosystems is the amount of energy that is available in the environment to heating processes of living organisms, air and soil; perspiration of animals and plants; photosynthesis and water evaporation. The Rn defines the type of climate and weather conditions prevailing in a region affecting the availability and thermal water, the fundamental understanding of genotype-environment, which ultimately determine the productivity of the agricultural system. Rn usually ...

  7. What is risk perception in general and in radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the universal roll Risk Perception plays in our daily life, the author makes an effort to understand this notion better. For such a subtle task, it will be good to know something about the person, who undertakes such a challenge. Thus, he first makes a short description of himself in a number of relevant personal feature, emphasising rather what he is not: cadre of insurance company.... etc. He starts with a literal understanding of the idiom Risk Perception in English and in other languages (in Chinese). This formulation, still abstract, is framed with concrete objects, and materialised into touchable structures. He then puts life into these structures, and makes them accessible to emotion and experience. Now that this notion is animated, he follows it's way into life in the field of Radiation Protection, and find among others that the term Cost and Benefit correspond to the Chinese idiom, and that the system of Justification and Optimisation is as difficult to achieve objectively as an Upright Walk on the Confucian Path to-ward the Middle. One of the difficulties lies in the difference in the scale in estimating values. For instance, though the idea of Asian and Western Values are rather diffuse, their difference is never-the-less high enough to render it to be insurmountable, at least at present. These observation belong actually to common experience of Health physicists, and nothing new or spectacular is presented. The author emphasises only, again not a new idea of his own, only putting weight to, that perception depends on point of view, or rather on stand of viewing points, and rarely represent the whole story, the true situation. This leads, according to the author, to the well known and accepted term of Risk Residuum, in German, Rest Risiko. Despite of partialness of all perceptions, solid decisions are based on perception. We all know mournful consequences of unsound decision in our daily life. It is tragic, when this happens in history. The

  8. Space Radiation Heart Disease Risk Estimates for Lunar and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Program performs research on the risks of late effects from space radiation for cancer, neurological disorders, cataracts, and heart disease. For mortality risks, an aggregate over all risks should be considered as well as projection of the life loss per radiation induced death. We report on a triple detriment life-table approach to combine cancer and heart disease risks. Epidemiology results show extensive heterogeneity between populations for distinct components of the overall heart disease risks including hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and cerebrovascular diseases. We report on an update to our previous heart disease estimates for Heart disease (ICD9 390-429) and Stroke (ICD9 430-438), and other sub-groups using recent meta-analysis results for various exposed radiation cohorts to low LET radiation. Results for multiplicative and additive risk transfer models are considered using baseline rates for US males and female. Uncertainty analysis indicated heart mortality risks as low as zero, assuming a threshold dose for deterministic effects, and projections approaching one-third of the overall cancer risk. Medan life-loss per death estimates were significantly less than that of solid cancer and leukemias. Critical research questions to improve risks estimates for heart disease are distinctions in mechanisms at high doses (>2 Gy) and low to moderate doses (<2 Gy), and data and basic understanding of radiation doserate and quality effects, and individual sensitivity.

  9. Sensitivity of a distributed temperature-radiation index melt model based on AWS observations and surface energy balance fluxes, Hurd Peninsula glaciers, Livingston Island, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Y. Jonsell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We use an automatic weather station and surface mass balance dataset spanning four melt seasons collected on Hurd Peninsula Glaciers, South Shetland Islands, to investigate the point surface energy balance, to determine the absolute and relative contribution of the various energy fluxes acting on the glacier surface and to estimate the sensitivity of melt to ambient temperature changes. Long-wave incoming radiation is the main energy source for melt, while short-wave radiation is the most important flux controlling the variation of both seasonal and daily mean surface energy balance. Short-wave and long-wave radiation fluxes do, in general, balance each other, resulting in a high correspondence between daily mean net radiation flux and available melt energy flux. We calibrate a distributed melt model driven by air temperature and an expression for the incoming short-wave radiation. The model is calibrated with the data from one of the melt seasons and validated with the data of the three remaining seasons. The model results deviate at most 140 mm w.e. from the corresponding observations using the glaciological method. The model is very sensitive to changes in ambient temperature: a 0.5 °C increase results in 56 % higher melt rates.

  10. Balancing risk and reward: a rat model of risky decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nicholas W; Gilbert, Ryan J; Mayse, Jeffrey D; Bizon, Jennifer L; Setlow, Barry

    2009-09-01

    We developed a behavioral task in rats to assess the influence of risk of punishment on decision making. Male Long-Evans rats were given choices between pressing a lever to obtain a small, 'safe' food reward and a large food reward associated with risk of punishment (footshock). Each test session consisted of 5 blocks of 10 choice trials, with punishment risk increasing with each consecutive block (0, 25, 50, 75, 100%). Preference for the large, 'risky' reward declined with both increased probability and increased magnitude of punishment, and reward choice was not affected by the level of satiation or the order of risk presentation. Performance in this risky decision-making task was correlated with the degree to which the rats discounted the value of probabilistic rewards, but not delayed rewards. Finally, the acute effects of different doses of amphetamine and cocaine on risky decision making were assessed. Systemic amphetamine administration caused a dose-dependent decrease in choice of the large risky reward (ie, it made rats more risk averse). Cocaine did not cause a shift in reward choice, but instead impaired the rats' sensitivity to changes in punishment risk. These results should prove useful for investigating neuropsychiatric disorders in which risk taking is a prominent feature, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and addiction. PMID:19440192

  11. Balancing Risk and Reward: A Rat Model of Risky Decision-Making

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Nicholas W.; Gilbert, Ryan J.; Mayse, Jeffrey D.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Setlow, Barry

    2009-01-01

    We developed a behavioral task in rats to assess the influence of risk of punishment on decision-making. Male Long-Evans rats were given choices between pressing a lever to obtain a small, “safe” food reward and a large food reward associated with risk of punishment (footshock). Each test session consisted of 5 blocks of 10 choice trials, with punishment risk increasing with each consecutive block (0, 25, 50, 75, 100%). Preference for the large, “risky” reward declined with both increased pro...

  12. Radiation and other risk issues in Norwegian newspapers ten years after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Content analysis of risk articles has been performed in 1996 for five Norwegian newspapers four weeks before and four weeks after the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The main focus has been on radiation and/or nuclear risks. The report is part of an international project on risk perception and communication. 94 refs

  13. Radiation and other risk issues in Norwegian newspapers ten years after Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Aa.; Reitan, J.B.; Toennesen, A.; Waldahl, R.

    1997-09-01

    Content analysis of risk articles has been performed in 1996 for five Norwegian newspapers four weeks before and four weeks after the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The main focus has been on radiation and/or nuclear risks. The report is part of an international project on risk perception and communication. 94 refs.

  14. Radiative Energy Balance in the Tropical Tropopause Layer: An Investigation with ARM Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Qiang

    2013-10-22

    The overall objective of this project is to use the ARM observational data to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation effects in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which is crucial for improving the simulation and prediction of climate and climate change. In last four and half years, we have been concentrating on (i) performing the comparison of the ice cloud properties from the ground-based lidar observations with those from the satellite CALIPSO lidar observations at the ARM TWP sites; (ii) analyzing TTL cirrus and its relation to the tropical planetary waves; (iii) calculating the radiative heating rates using retrieved cloud microphysical properties by combining the ground-based lidar and radar observations at the ARM TWP sites and comparing the results with those using cloud properties retrieved from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations; (iv) comparing macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds from the CALIPSO satellite and from ground-based micropulse and Raman lidar observations; (v) improving the parameterization of optical properties of cirrus clouds with small effective ice particle sizes; and (vi) evaluating the enhanced maximum warming in the tropical upper troposphere simulated by the GCMs. The main results of our research efforts are reported in the 12 referred journal publications that acknowledge the DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER64769.

  15. 2013 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel Status Review for: The Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure, The Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (SPEs), The Risk Of Degenerative Tissue Or Other Health Effects From Radiation Exposure, and The Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) was impressed with the strong research program presented by the scientists and staff associated with NASA's Space Radiation Program Element and National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The presentations given on-site and the reports of ongoing research that were provided in advance indicated the potential Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure (CNS) and were extensively discussed by the SRP. This new data leads the SRP to recommend that a higher priority should be placed on research designed to identify and understand these risks at the mechanistic level. To support this effort the SRP feels that a shift of emphasis from Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) and carcinogenesis to CNS-related endpoints is justified at this point. However, these research efforts need to focus on mechanisms, should follow pace with advances in the field of CNS in general and should consider the specific comments and suggestions made by the SRP as outlined below. The SRP further recommends that the Space Radiation Program Element continue with its efforts to fill the vacant positions (Element Scientist, CNS Risk Discipline Lead) as soon as possible. The SRP also strongly recommends that NASA should continue the NASA Space Radiation Summer School. In addition to these broad recommendations, there are specific comments/recommendations noted for each risk, described in detail below.

  16. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 1. The radiation risk from CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of radiation carcinogenesis has been debated for decades. Most estimates of the radiation risks from CT have been based on extrapolations from the lifespan follow-up study of atomic bomb survivors and on follow-up studies after therapeutic radiation, using the linear no-threshold theory. Based on this, many population-based projections of induction of future cancers by CT have been published that should not be used to estimate the risk to an individual because of their large margin of error. This has changed recently with the publication of three large international cohort follow-up studies, which link observed cancers to CT scans received in childhood. A fourth ongoing multi-country study in Europe is expected to have enough statistical power to address the limitations of the prior studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) report released in 2013 specifically addresses variability in response of the pediatric population exposed to ionizing radiation. Most authorities now conclude that there is enough evidence to link future cancers to the radiation exposure from a single CT scan in childhood but that cancer risk estimates for individuals must be based on the specifics of exposure, age at exposure and absorbed dose to certain tissues. Generalizations are not appropriate, and the communication of the CT risk to individuals should be conducted within the framework of personalized medicine. (orig.)

  17. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 1. The radiation risk from CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The theory of radiation carcinogenesis has been debated for decades. Most estimates of the radiation risks from CT have been based on extrapolations from the lifespan follow-up study of atomic bomb survivors and on follow-up studies after therapeutic radiation, using the linear no-threshold theory. Based on this, many population-based projections of induction of future cancers by CT have been published that should not be used to estimate the risk to an individual because of their large margin of error. This has changed recently with the publication of three large international cohort follow-up studies, which link observed cancers to CT scans received in childhood. A fourth ongoing multi-country study in Europe is expected to have enough statistical power to address the limitations of the prior studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) report released in 2013 specifically addresses variability in response of the pediatric population exposed to ionizing radiation. Most authorities now conclude that there is enough evidence to link future cancers to the radiation exposure from a single CT scan in childhood but that cancer risk estimates for individuals must be based on the specifics of exposure, age at exposure and absorbed dose to certain tissues. Generalizations are not appropriate, and the communication of the CT risk to individuals should be conducted within the framework of personalized medicine. (orig.)

  18. Risk-Informed Balancing Of Safety, Nonproliferation, And Economics For The SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A substantial barrier to the implementation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology in the short term is the perception that they would not be economically competitive with advanced light water reactors. With increased acceptance of risk-informed regulation, the opportunity exists to reduce the costs of a nuclear power plant at the design stage without applying excessive conservatism that is not needed in treating low risk events. In the report, NUREG-1860, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes developmental activities associated with a risk-informed, scenario-based technology neutral framework (TNF) for regulation. It provides quantitative yardsticks against which the adequacy of safety risks can be judged. We extend these concepts to treatment of proliferation risks. The objective of our project is to develop a risk-informed design process for minimizing the cost of electricity generation within constraints of adequate safety and proliferation risks. This report describes the design and use of this design optimization process within the context of reducing the capital cost and levelized cost of electricity production for a small (possibly modular) SFR. Our project provides not only an evaluation of the feasibility of a risk-informed design process but also a practical test of the applicability of the TNF to an actual advanced, non-LWR design. The report provides results of five safety related and one proliferation related case studies of innovative design alternatives. Applied to previously proposed SFR nuclear energy system concepts We find that the TNF provides a feasible initial basis for licensing new reactors. However, it is incomplete. We recommend improvements in terms of requiring acceptance standards for total safety risks, and we propose a framework for regulation of proliferation risks. We also demonstrate methods for evaluation of proliferation risks. We also suggest revisions to scenario-specific safety risk acceptance standards

  19. RISK-INFORMED BALANCING OF SAFETY, NONPROLIFERATION, AND ECONOMICS FOR THE SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolakis, George; Driscoll, Michael; Golay, Michael; Kadak, Andrew; Todreas, Neil; Aldmir, Tunc; Denning, Richard; Lineberry, Michael

    2011-10-20

    A substantial barrier to the implementation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology in the short term is the perception that they would not be economically competitive with advanced light water reactors. With increased acceptance of risk-informed regulation, the opportunity exists to reduce the costs of a nuclear power plant at the design stage without applying excessive conservatism that is not needed in treating low risk events. In the report, NUREG-1860, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes developmental activities associated with a risk-informed, scenario-based technology neutral framework (TNF) for regulation. It provides quantitative yardsticks against which the adequacy of safety risks can be judged. We extend these concepts to treatment of proliferation risks. The objective of our project is to develop a risk-informed design process for minimizing the cost of electricity generation within constraints of adequate safety and proliferation risks. This report describes the design and use of this design optimization process within the context of reducing the capital cost and levelized cost of electricity production for a small (possibly modular) SFR. Our project provides not only an evaluation of the feasibility of a risk-informed design process but also a practical test of the applicability of the TNF to an actual advanced, non-LWR design. The report provides results of five safety related and one proliferation related case studies of innovative design alternatives. Applied to previously proposed SFR nuclear energy system concepts We find that the TNF provides a feasible initial basis for licensing new reactors. However, it is incomplete. We recommend improvements in terms of requiring acceptance standards for total safety risks, and we propose a framework for regulation of proliferation risks. We also demonstrate methods for evaluation of proliferation risks. We also suggest revisions to scenario-specific safety risk acceptance standards

  20. Risk factors for development of radiation pneumonitis following radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors contributing to development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with lung cancer who undergo radiation therapy to the thorax. Methods and Materials: Development and severity of RP were retrospectively analyzed for 89 patients with lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy at the National Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital between 1991 and 1995. The severity of RP was determined using a modified grading scale based on that of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer. Results: Fifty-two (58%) patients developed RP: 34 patients with Grade 1, 5 with Grade 2, 8 with Grade 3, and 5 with Grade 5 RP. Severe RP tended to develop earlier than less severe RP, but not to a significant extent (p = 0.151). On logistic regression analysis including both patient condition and treatment factors, development of Grade 1 or more severe RP was most frequently observed for Stage I-II disease (p = 0.011). The use of chemotherapy, large daily radiation dose, and once-daily fractionation (vs. twice-daily fractionation) were possibly related to the development of RP (p = 0.057, p = 0.069, and p = 0.092, respectively). For the group of 48 patients who underwent chemo radiation therapy, the use of large daily radiation dose was a significant risk factor for RP (p = 0.014). In addition, the use of once-daily fractionation was a marginally significant risk factor (p = 0.052). Among chemotherapy drugs administered, cisplatin was a favorable factor (p = 0.011), while adriamycin was a risk factor (p = 0.061). Conclusions: In radiation therapy for lung cancer, administration of a large daily dose should be avoided in order to prevent RP, particularly when radiation therapy is combined with chemotherapy

  1. Relevance of Fukushima Nuclear Accident to India: Nuclear Radiation Risk and Interventions to Mitigate Adverse Fallout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Kapil, Varshney Neha, Aslesh OP, Karmakar MG, Pandav Chandrakant S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental radiation release from Fukushima nuclear power following tsunami in Japan has once again highlighted the omnipotent risk of radiation injury in the today’s world. India is at a real risk from radiation fallout both due to nuclear power plant accidents and nuclear warfare threat. The risk from nuclear radiation accident in India is further increased by the region being endemic for iodine deficiency as adverse effects following nuclear radiation fallout like thyroid cancer is significantly higher in iodine deficient populations .There is need to institute disaster preparedness measures to mitigate the damage in case of a nuclear accident. Interventions to control adverse fallout of nuclear radiation include evacuation, sheltering and food controls as well as iodine prophylaxis

  2. A balanced hazard ratio for risk group evaluation from survival data

    OpenAIRE

    Branders, Samuel; Dupont, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Common clinical studies assess the quality of prognostic factors, such as gene expression signatures, clinical variables or environmental factors, and cluster patients into various risk groups. Typical examples include cancer clinical trials where patients are clustered into high or low risk groups. Whenever applied to survival data analysis, such groups are intended to represent patients with similar survival odds and to select the most appropriate therapy accordingly. The relevance of such ...

  3. The Risks of Off-Balance Sheet Derivatives in U.S. Commercial Banks

    OpenAIRE

    M Kabir Hassan; Ahmad Khasawneh

    2009-01-01

    This study employs both contingent and non-contingent claim models to test for the existence of market discipline hypothesis for derivative contracts in U.S. banking industry. In addition to the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) measure of systematic risk and standard deviation of a bank’s equity return, we apply Ronn-Verma option pricing model to assess whether market participants incorporate derivatives positions when they price banks’ market risk. The benefit of using the contingent claim...

  4. The challenge resulting from positive and negative effects of sunlight: how much solar UV exposure is appropriate to balance between risks of vitamin D deficiency and skin cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Reichrath, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Animals;cancer epidemiology;deficiency;Dose-Response Relationship,Radiation;epidemiology;Environmental Exposure;Evaluation;Germany;Humans;Incidence;Internationality;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;nursing;Neoplasms,Radiation-Induced;prevention & control;Risk Assessment;Risk Factors;statistics & numerical data;Skin Neoplasms;Sunlight;therapy;Ultraviolet Therapy;Vitamin D;Vitamin D Deficiency;analysis.

  5. Communication of radiation risk in nuclear medicine: Are we saying the right thing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation risk arising from nuclear medicine investigations represents a small but manageable risk to patients and it needs to be effectively communicated to them. Frequently in the culture of “doctor knows best,” patients trust their doctors to do whatever is right and appropriate and leave it to them to worry about any attendant risks associated with any tests involving the use of radiation. The benefit to the patient of having a speedier diagnosis and a further guide to management may not be effectively communicated in a comprehensive, timely and professional manner. In this article, we address the issue of communication of radiation risk and benefits to patients and the basis for such information. While there are different ways of communicating radiation risk, we recognize that certain basic parameters are absolutely essential for patients to enable them to make an informed choice about undergoing a nuclear medicine investigation under the direction of a well-trained and qualified individual

  6. Mitigating the risk of radiation-induced cancers: limitations and paradigms in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States radiation medical countermeasures (MCM) programme for radiological and nuclear incidents has been focusing on developing mitigators for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure (DEARE), and biodosimetry technologies to provide radiation dose assessments for guiding treatment. Because a nuclear accident or terrorist incident could potentially expose a large number of people to low to moderate doses of ionising radiation, and thus increase their excess lifetime cancer risk, there is an interest in developing mitigators for this purpose. This article discusses the current status, issues, and challenges regarding development of mitigators against radiation-induced cancers. The challenges of developing mitigators for ARS include: the long latency between exposure and cancer manifestation, limitations of animal models, potential side effects of the mitigator itself, potential need for long-term use, the complexity of human trials to demonstrate effectiveness, and statistical power constraints for measuring health risks (and reduction of health risks after mitigation) following relatively low radiation doses (<0.75 Gy). Nevertheless, progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms resulting in radiation injury, along with parallel progress in dose assessment technologies, make this an opportune, if not critical, time to invest in research strategies that result in the development of agents to lower the risk of radiation-induced cancers for populations that survive a significant radiation exposure incident. (review)

  7. Radiation health risk management of Fukushima nuclear disaster. Role of medical personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It consists of eight chapters such as 1) introduction, 2) medical personnel concerned to radiation emergency medicine, 3) understanding of radiological protection standard, 4) experience of Chernobyl, and radiation health risk management, 5) comment of the president of Science Council of Japan, 6) Fukushima Health Management Survey, 7) report of International Expert Symposium in Fukushima, 2011 and 8) conclusion. The cancer causes, effects of radiation on human body, comparison of thyroid cancer of children born before and after the disaster, relation between inner exposure and soil contamination of Cs-137, relative risks of some cancer causes to radiation cause, radiological protection standard dose, and Fukushima health management etc. are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  8. Operationalisation of the model 'risk-sovereignty' in the field of radiation protection. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central aim of the BfS research project titled ''operationalization of the 'risk sovereignty model' with special consideration to lifestyle and value approaches as a basis for risk communication in the field of radiation protection'' was the identification of suitable measures to enhance the degree of risk sovereignty of the German population with regard to radiation risks (mobile telephony, nuclear power, ultraviolet radiation and X-rays). This requires the development of a measuring instrument for capturing the prevailing degree of risk sovereignty in the whole population or in certain subgroups with regard to radiation risks empirically. In the first two phases of the project suitable instruments for the construct ''risk sovereignty'' have been developed. Furthermore a value-typology for the identification of different groups of persons as well as independent variables likely to have an influence on 'risk sovereignty' (information behavior, communication or participation intention) were included in the study. The empirical research is divided into a quantitative and a qualitative inquiry. Based on the empirical studies, a guidance document to improve the cognitive capability of people to build up risk sovereignty, in particular in relation to radiation was developed. For the three types of respondents, different strategies were recommended taking into account their needs and information seeking behavior

  9. Risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we present the risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation compared to those of non-radiation workers. Cataract is the most common degenerative opacity of the crystalline lens developing with aging. Other risk factors for cataract are: infrared and ultraviolet radiation, systemic diseases (diabetes, hypertonic disease), eye diseases (glaucoma, high myopia), drugs (steroids), etc. High risk of developing cataract we find among staff occupationally exposed to radiation during operations - interventional cardiologists and neurosurgeons. This study includes 30 people between 33 and 60 years of age working in neurosurgical department and control group (the same amount and age of people not exposed to radiation in their work). After visual acuity measurement, the lens was examined by retroillumination method (red reflex) and using a bio microscope. The patients were asked for presence of ocular and systemic diseases, eye trauma, drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse and for how many years they work in this department. There was one case with cataract among neurosurgeons. The doctor doesn't have eye or systemic diseases, doesn't take any drugs and is not alcohol or tobacco abuser. In the control group there were two persons with subcapsular cataract but they have diabetes. Radiation is one of the risk factors for cataract. Continuing of this epidemiological survey will provide further knowledge on the potential risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract among neurosurgical staff and will contribute for optimization of radiation protection. (authors)

  10. An overview of black carbon deposition in High Asia glaciers and its impacts on radiation balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jing; Xiao, Cunde; Du, Zhencai; Yang, Xingguo

    2013-05-01

    Since 2000, 18 High Asia glaciers have been surveyed for black carbon (BC) deposition 22 times, and numerous snow samples and ice cores have been collected by researchers. However, most of the results were interpreted individually in papers. Here, we assemble the data and discuss the distribution of BC deposition and its impacts on the melting of the glaciers through radiative forcing. We find that BC distribution on the surfaces of High Asia glaciers primarily depends upon their elevations (i.e., higher sites have lower concentrations) and then upon regional BC emissions and surface melting conditions. BC concentrations in High Asia glaciers are similar to the Arctic and western American mountains but are significantly less than heavy industrialized areas such as northern China. Although Himalayan glaciers, which are important due to their water resources, are directly facing the strong emissions from South Asia, their mean BC is the lowest due to high elevations. A new finding indicated by ice core records suggested that great valleys in the eastern Himalayan section are effective pathways for BC entering the Tibetan Plateau and make increasing BC trends in the local glaciers. On average, BC deposition causes a mean forcing of ˜6 W m-2 (roughly estimated 5% of the total forcing) in High Asia glaciers and therefore may not be a major factor impacting the melting of most glaciers.

  11. An Overview of NASA's Risk of Cardiovascular Disease from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Huff, Janice L.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The association between high doses of radiation exposure and cardiovascular damage is well established. Patients that have undergone radiotherapy for primary cancers of the head and neck and mediastinal regions have shown increased risk of heart and vascular damage and long-term development of radiation-induced heart disease [1]. In addition, recent meta-analyses of epidemiological data from atomic bomb survivors and nuclear industry workers has also shown that acute and chronic radiation exposures is strongly correlated with an increased risk of circulatory disease at doses above 0.5 Sv [2]. However, these analyses are confounded for lower doses by lifestyle factors, such as drinking, smoking, and obesity. The types of radiation found in the space environment are significantly more damaging than those found on Earth and include galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events (SPEs), and trapped protons and electrons. In addition to the low-LET data, only a few studies have examined the effects of heavy ion radiation on atherosclerosis, and at lower, space-relevant doses, the association between exposure and cardiovascular pathology is more varied and unclear. Understanding the qualitative differences in biological responses produced by GCR compared to Earth-based radiation is a major focus of space radiation research and is imperative for accurate risk assessment for long duration space missions. Other knowledge gaps for the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease include the existence of a dose threshold, low dose rate effects, and potential synergies with other spaceflight stressors. The Space Radiation Program Element within NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is managing the research and risk mitigation strategies for these knowledge gaps. In this presentation, we will review the evidence and present an overview of the HRP Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure.

  12. Radiation-induced cancer from low doses of ionizing radiation: risk analysis using the cell dose concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High doses of ionizing radiations are known to bear the risk of cancer to the exposed individual. In order to appreciate potential carcinogenesis from low doses also, the action of ionizing radiation in the human body has to be considered in holistic approach: energy depositions to individual cells trigger effects within a hierachical structure of interacting levels of biological systems, consisting consecutively of atoms, molecules, cells and organ tissue. The present paper describes the cell dose concept which is an essential factor in assessing the risk due to the ionizing radiation to the cells and tissues. Low dose of ionizing radiation induces adaptive response in individual cells which could be linked to the action of molecular radicals. Enzyme activities in bone marrow cells and bilayer lipid membranes and radicals are directly related to radiation effects. Temporary improvements of the detoxification of molecular radicals also improve the cellular defence. The risk analysis calls for more attention as it is important for radiation protection and other beneficial effects due to low doses of irradiation. (author). 18 refs

  13. Stagnating crop yields: An overlooked risk for the carbon balance of agricultural soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmeier, Martin; Hübner, Rico; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    The carbon (C) balance of agricultural soils may be largely affected by climate change. Increasing temperatures are discussed to cause a loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) due to enhanced decomposition of soil organic matter, which has a high intrinsic temperature sensitivity. On the other hand, several modeling studies assumed that potential SOC losses would be compensated or even outperformed by an increased C input by crop residues into agricultural soils. This assumption was based on a predicted general increase of net primary productivity (NPP) as a result of the CO2 fertilization effect and prolonged growing seasons. However, it is questionable if the crop C input into agricultural soils can be derived from NPP predictions of vegetation models. The C input in European croplands is largely controlled by the agricultural management and was strongly related to the development of crop yields in the last decades. Thus, a glance at past yield development will probably be more instructive for future estimations of the C input than previous modeling approaches based on NPP predictions. An analysis of European yield statistics indicated that yields of wheat, barley and maize are stagnating in Central and Northern Europe since the 1990s. The stagnation of crop yields can probably be related to a fundamental change of the agricultural management and to climate change effects. It is assumed that the soil C input is concurrently stagnating which would necessarily lead to a decrease of agricultural SOC stocks in the long-term given a constant temperature increase. Remarkably, for almost all European countries that are faced with yield stagnation indications for agricultural SOC decreases were already found. Potentially adverse effects of yield stagnation on the C balance of croplands call for an interdisciplinary investigation of its causes and a comprehensive monitoring of SOC stocks in agricultural soils of Europe. PMID:26235605

  14. Uncertainties due to soil data in Flood Risk Forecasts with the Water Balance Model LARSIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterer, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Reliable flood forecasts with quantitative statements about contained uncertainties are essential for far reaching decisions in disaster management. In this paper uncertainties resulting from soil data are analysed for the in the German-speaking world widely used water balance model LARSIM and quantified as far as possible. At the beginning a structural and statistical analysis about the wittingly simple designed soil module is performed. It consists of a storage volume with four separate runoff components only defined by the storage size. Additionally, the model structure is examined with regard to effects of uncertain soil data using a soil map from the Bavarian State Institute for Forestry which already contains estimated minimum and maximum values for important soil parameters. For further analysis, two German catchments in Upper Franconia located at the White Main with a size of 250 km² each, covering a huge variety of soil types are used as case examples. Skeleton is identified as an important source of uncertainty in soil data comparing the quantifiable information of available soil maps and using field and laboratory analysis. Furthermore, surface runoff and fast interflow fluxes show up to be sensitive for peaks of flood events, whereas slow interflow and base flow fluxes have smaller and more long term effects on discharges and the water balance. A reduction of the soil storage basically leads to a more intensified reaction of discharges than an enlargement. The calculation of two extreme scenarios within the statistical analysis result in simulated gage measurements varying from -42 % till +218 % compared to the scenario with the main value of the map. A percental variation of the soil storage shows a doubling of the flood discharges, if the storage size is halved and a reduction up to 20% using a doubled one. Finally, a Monte Carlo Simulation is performed using the statistical data of the soil map combined with a normal distribution, whereby the

  15. Balancing Type I Risk and Loss of Power in Ordered Bonferroni Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cani, John S.

    1984-01-01

    While Bonferroni procedures control the risk of Type I errors, their cost is loss of power. Ordered Bonferroni procedures conserve power for more important tests while sacrificing power for less important tests. Both costs and benefits should be considered when choosing weights for individual tests and the overall level of Type I error protection.…

  16. Health risks associated with low dose diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health risks to humans associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation have been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses, dose rates, and mixed radiation qualities using a linear no threshold model. Based on this approach, it has been argued that human exposure to low doses of diagnostics X-rays and gamma-rays increase an individual's risk of developing cancer throughout their life-time. Also, repeated medical diagnostic procedures involving low dose exposures will have an additive effect and consequently further increase health risk. The specific aim of this seminar will be to address the relative risk associated with diagnostic X-rays from CT scans and gamma-rays from positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Objectives of the talk will include: 1) Defining low dose exposures at a cellular level and relate that to diagnostic or therapeutic exposures, 2) Describing modern tools in molecular cytogenetics to estimate radiation exposure and assess radiation risk, 3) Identifying the different cellular mechanisms that influence radiation risk at high and low dose exposures and relate that to individual radiation risk. (author)

  17. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca F.; Johnson, Darren J.; Neubauer, Scott C.; Raynie, Richard C.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 yr-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 yr-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 yr-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 yr-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  18. Radiation risk perception: a discrepancy between the experts and the general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determining the differences in the perception of risks between experts who are regularly exposed to radiation, and lay people provides important insights into how potential hazards may be effectively communicated to the public. In the present study we examined lay people's (N = 1020) and experts' (N = 332) perception of five different radiological risks: nuclear waste, medical x-rays, natural radiation, an accident at a nuclear installation in general, and the Fukushima accident in particular. In order to link risk perception with risk communication, media reporting about radiation risks is analysed using quantitative and qualitative content analyses. The results showed that experts perceive radiological risks differently from the general public. Experts' perception of medical X-rays and natural radiation is significantly higher than in general population, while for nuclear waste and an accident at a nuclear installation, experts have lower risk perception than the general population. In-depth research is conducted for a group of workers that received an effective dose higher than 0.5 mSv in the year before the study; for this group we identify predictors of risk perception. The results clearly show that mass media don't use the same language as technical experts in addressing radiological risks. The study demonstrates that the discrepancy in risk perception and the communication gap between the experts and the general population presents a big challenge in understanding each other

  19. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-08-10

    Markets for renewable energy have historically been motivated primarily by policy efforts, but a less widely recognized driver is poised to also play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Resource planning has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions where retail competition has failed to take root. In the western United States, the most recent resource plans contemplate a significant amount of renewable energy additions. These planned additions--primarily coming from wind power--are motivated by the improved economics of wind power, a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities, and an increasing recognition of the inherent risks (e.g., natural gas price risk, environmental compliance risk) in fossil-based generation portfolios. This report examines how twelve western utilities treat renewable energy in their recent resource plans. In aggregate, these utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. Our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable energy, and (2) to identify methodological/modeling issues, and suggest possible improvements to methods used to evaluate renewable energy as a resource option. Here we summarize the key findings of the report, beginning with a discussion of the planned renewable energy additions called for by the twelve utilities, an overview of how these plans incorporated renewables into candidate portfolios, and a review of the specific technology cost and performance assumptions they made, primarily for wind power. We then turn to the utilities' analysis of natural gas price and environmental compliance risks, and examine how the utilities traded off portfolio cost and risk in selecting a preferred portfolio.

  20. [Radiation risk, health and quality of life: the medico-psychological and social-ecological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, B I; Ponomarenko, V A; Baluev, O T; Ushakov, I B

    1993-01-01

    Complexity and contradictoriness of the triplet life quality-health-risk gain particular acuity owing to the extensive and intensive nature of radiation and non-radiation risks in the modern technological society. Improvement of life standards issue new risks. Unavoidability of existing risks, emergence of new ones, and necessity of qualitative, first of all energetic, life maintenance come into conflict with the principles of ecological stability. The concept of life quality is in many respects irrational and in the future will largely hinge on traditions, ideological and religious maxims. PMID:8012301

  1. A balance between radiative forcing and climate feedback in the modeled 20th century temperature response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Julia A.; Forster, Piers M.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we breakdown the temperature response of coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models into components due to radiative forcing, climate feedback, and heat storage and transport to understand how well climate models reproduce the observed 20th century temperature record. Despite large differences between models' feedback strength, they generally reproduce the temperature response well but for different reasons in each model. We show that the differences in forcing and heat storage and transport give rise to a considerable part of the intermodel variability in global, Arctic, and tropical mean temperature responses over the 20th century. Projected future warming trends are much more dependent on a model's feedback strength, suggesting that constraining future climate change by weighting these models on the basis of their 20th century reproductive skill is not possible. We find that tropical 20th century warming is too large and Arctic amplification is unrealistically low in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CM2.1, Meteorological Research Institute CGCM232a, and MIROC3.2(hires) models because of unrealistic forcing distributions. The Arctic amplification in both National Center for Atmospheric Research models is unrealistically high because of high feedback contributions in the Arctic compared to the tropics. Few models reproduce the strong observed warming trend from 1918 to 1940. The simulated trend is too low, particularly in the tropics, even allowing for internal variability, suggesting there is too little positive forcing or too much negative forcing in the models at this time. Over the whole of the 20th century, the feedback strength is likely to be underestimated by the multimodel mean.

  2. Concepts and challenges in cancer risk prediction for the space radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Blakely, Eleanor A; Burma, Sandeep; Fornace, Albert J; Gerson, Stanton; Hlatky, Lynn; Kirsch, David G; Luderer, Ulrike; Shay, Jerry; Wang, Ya; Weil, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is an important long-term risk for astronauts exposed to protons and high-energy charged particles during travel and residence on asteroids, the moon, and other planets. NASA's Biomedical Critical Path Roadmap defines the carcinogenic risks of radiation exposure as one of four type I risks. A type I risk represents a demonstrated, serious problem with no countermeasure concepts, and may be a potential "show-stopper" for long duration spaceflight. Estimating the carcinogenic risks for humans who will be exposed to heavy ions during deep space exploration has very large uncertainties at present. There are no human data that address risk from extended exposure to complex radiation fields. The overarching goal in this area to improve risk modeling is to provide biological insight and mechanistic analysis of radiation quality effects on carcinogenesis. Understanding mechanisms will provide routes to modeling and predicting risk and designing countermeasures. This white paper reviews broad issues related to experimental models and concepts in space radiation carcinogenesis as well as the current state of the field to place into context recent findings and concepts derived from the NASA Space Radiation Program. PMID:26256633

  3. Review of the controversy on risks from low levels of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for regulation of low levels of radiation exposure, and the estimation of risks from such exposures, are based on the assumption that risk is proportional to dose without a threshold, the 'linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis'. This assumption is not supported by scientific data. There is no clear evidence of harm from low levels of exposure, up to at least 20 mSv (acute dose) or total dose rates of at least 50 mSv per year. Even allowing for reasonable extrapolation from radiation levels at which harmful effects have been observed, the LNT assumption should not be used to estimate risks from doses less than 100 mSv. Laboratory and epidemiological evidence, and evolutionary expectations of biological effects from low level radiation, suggest that beneficial health effects (sometimes called 'radiation hormesis') are at least as likely as harmful effects from such exposures. Controversy on this matter strikes at the basis of radiation protection practice

  4. Radiation risks related to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effects of the atomic bombs dropped down on Hiroshima and Nagasaki are studied in detail. There is no significant genetic effect on the children of survivors. The genetic damage on survivors is a linear or quadratic function of the dose. The connection between cancerous tumours and the dose is studied in detail for small doses. Significant difference was found between the effects of the two bombs. Its main reason is that the radiation of the bomb on Nagasaki was primarily gamma radiation, while that of Hiroshima radiated fast neutrons and γ rays. It is shown that the mortality rate in people who received small dose of radiation is lower compared to those who did not receive radiation at all. (K.A.) 6 figs

  5. Biologically motivated tumor-models used for risk estimates at low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biologically motivated tumour models are necessary for estimating the radiation risk at low doses, as epidemiological studies cannot give significant results for sufficiently small risks as a matter of principle. The tumour models combine knowledge about the mechanisms of tumour development with epidemiological data and results of animal experiments. The are usefuls for testing hypothesis on radiation carcinogenesis. In the framework of EU-projects European partners work on the difficult task of quantifying the relevant biological parameters, and the radiation risk at low doses. Various data sets are described well by assuming an initiating and a promoting action of radiation. As an example a new analysis of radon-induced lung tumours in the Colorado plateau miners is discussed. The estimated lifetime relative risk extrapolated to exposures as they hold in indoor situations is substantially lower than estimated in the BEIR VI report. (orig.)

  6. Was the Risk from Nursing-Home Evacuation after the Fukushima Accident Higher than the Radiation Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Michio Murakami; Kyoko Ono; Masaharu Tsubokura; Shuhei Nomura; Tomoyoshi Oikawa; Tosihiro Oka; Masahiro Kami; Taikan Oki

    2015-01-01

    After the 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, nursing-home residents and staff were evacuated voluntarily from damaged areas to avoid radiation exposure. Unfortunately, the evacuation resulted in increased mortalities among nursing home residents. We assessed the risk trade-off between evacuation and radiation for 191 residents and 184 staff at three nursing homes by using the same detriment indicator, namely loss of life expectancy (LLE), under four scenarios, i.e. "r...

  7. Methodology for conceptual remote sensing spacecraft technology: insertion analysis balancing performance, cost, and risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, David A.; Duclos, Donald P.; Barrera, Mark J.; Mosher, Todd J.; Lao, Norman Y.

    1997-12-01

    Emerging technologies and micro-instrumentation are changing the way remote sensing spacecraft missions are developed and implemented. Government agencies responsible for procuring space systems are increasingly requesting analyses to estimate cost, performance and design impacts of advanced technology insertion for both state-of-the-art systems as well as systems to be built 5 to 10 years in the future. Numerous spacecraft technology development programs are being sponsored by Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agencies with the goal of enhancing spacecraft performance, reducing mass, and reducing cost. However, it is often the case that technology studies, in the interest of maximizing subsystem-level performance and/or mass reduction, do not anticipate synergistic system-level effects. Furthermore, even though technical risks are often identified as one of the largest cost drivers for space systems, many cost/design processes and models ignore effects of cost risk in the interest of quick estimates. To address these issues, the Aerospace Corporation developed a concept analysis methodology and associated software tools. These tools, collectively referred to as the concept analysis and design evaluation toolkit (CADET), facilitate system architecture studies and space system conceptual designs focusing on design heritage, technology selection, and associated effects on cost, risk and performance at the system and subsystem level. CADET allows: (1) quick response to technical design and cost questions; (2) assessment of the cost and performance impacts of existing and new designs/technologies; and (3) estimation of cost uncertainties and risks. These capabilities aid mission designers in determining the configuration of remote sensing missions that meet essential requirements in a cost- effective manner. This paper discuses the development of CADET modules and their application to several remote sensing satellite

  8. Practical guidance for using rivaroxaban in patients with atrial fibrillation: balancing benefit and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Haas S.; Bode C; Norrving B; Turpie AGG

    2014-01-01

    Sylvia Haas,1 Christoph Bode,2 Bo Norrving,3 Alexander GG Turpie4 1Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany; 3Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; 4Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Abstract: Rivaroxaban is a direct factor Xa inhibitor that is widely available to reduce the risk of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with non...

  9. Possible application of fuzzy set theory to radiation protection and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation protection and risk assessment human factors play an important role. Human reliability and performance would be affected by many factors: medical, physiological and psychological, etc.. The uncertainty involved in human factors may not necessarily be probabilistic, but fuzzy. Possible application of fuzzy set theory to radiation protection and risk assessment is discussed in this paper with the introduction of the concept of possibility. 5 refs. (Author)

  10. The relevance of animal experimental results for the assessment of radiation genetic risks in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No suitable data are available from man for the quantitative assessment of genetic radiation risk. Therefore, the results from experiments on animals must be utilized. Two hypotheses are presented here in drawing analogical conclusions from one species to another. Although the extrapolation of results from animal experiments remains an open question, the use of experimental results from mice seems to be justified for an assessment of the genetic radiation risk in man. (orig.)

  11. Associations of natural radiation and radon with the risk of dying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural background radiation and recent estimates of radon gas concentrations are found to have statistically significant associations with the risk of dying for white males, age 35-74, 1977-1983. These associations are found for natural causes and several major disease categories, the higher the radiation, the lower the risk. This association is very limited for radon, but suggests clearly that, at the levels to which areas or entire communities are exposed, these exposures may not be harmful

  12. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nievelstein, R. A. J.; Quarles van Ufford, H.M.E.; Kwee, T. C.; Bierings, M.B.; Ludwig, I.; Beek, F. J. A.; de Klerk, J. M. H.; Mali, W P Th M; de Bruin, P.W.; Geleijns, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin’s disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma [NHL]). Methods First, organ doses were assessed for a typical diagnostic work-up in children with HD and adults with NHL. Subsequently, life tables were constructed for assessment of radiation risks, also taking into account the diseas...

  13. Response to Out of Balance: The risk of irreversible climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standing Committee on Environment of the Canadian House of Commons tabled a report entitled Out of Balance, which was an investigation of issues related to the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and possible responses to impending climatic change. The government's response to the recommendations made in that report are presented. The framework to the government's response is first introduced, which includes the National Action Strategy on Global Warming (NASGW) that provides a strategy for Canadian initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The strategy is based on the fundamental principles of comprehensiveness, the importance of international agreements, and flexibility. The Standing Committee's recommendations focused on policies to limit Canadian emissions of carbon dioxide, one of the major greenhouse gases. Canadian policies to achieve this goal are being implemented in the Green Plan and the NASGW. Other recommendations and responses involve environmental education, greenhouse gas data collection, phasing out of chlorofluorocarbons, natural gas leakage, energy conservation and demand management, regulatory systems, fuel efficiency standards, forest management, greenhouse gas emissions from federal departments and agencies, and encouragement of environmentally acceptable technologies

  14. Thermoregulation of water foraging honeybees--balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and functional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton; Schmaranzer, Sigurd

    2010-12-01

    Foraging honeybees are subjected to considerable variations of microclimatic conditions challenging their thermoregulatory ability. Solar heat is a gain in the cold but may be a burden in the heat. We investigated the balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and physiological functions of water foraging Apis mellifera carnica honeybees in the whole range of ambient temperatures (T(a)) and solar radiation they are likely to be exposed in their natural environment in Middle Europe. The mean thorax temperature (T(th)) during foraging stays was regulated at a constantly high level (37.0-38.5 °C) in a broad range of T(a) (3-30 °C). At warmer conditions (T(a)=30-39 °C) T(th) increased to a maximal level of 45.3 °C. The endothermic temperature excess (difference of T(body)-T(a) of living and dead bees) was used to assess the endogenously generated temperature elevation as a correlate of energy turnover. Up to a T(a) of ∼30 °C bees used solar heat gain for a double purpose: to reduce energetic expenditure and to increase T(th) by about 1-3 °C to improve force production of flight muscles. At higher T(a) they exhibited cooling efforts to get rid of excess heat. A high T(th) also allowed regulation of the head temperature high enough to guarantee proper function of the bees' suction pump even at low T(a). This shortened the foraging stays and this way reduced energetic costs. With decreasing T(a) bees also reduced arrival body weight and crop loading to do both minimize costs and optimize flight performance. PMID:20705071

  15. Fluid and electrolyte balance during the first week of life and risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in the preterm neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Rocha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early fluid and electrolyte imbalances may be associated with an increased risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. OBJECTIVE: We sought to establish an association between fluid and electrolyte balance in the first week of life and the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. METHODS: Clinical charts of 205 neonates <32 weeks gestational age and/or <1,250 g birth weight (admitted to our NICU between 1997 and 2008 were analyzed. Clinical features, fluid and electrolyte balance were analyzed for the first 7 days of life using multivariate models of generalized estimation equations. A p value <0.05 was considered significant in all of the hypothesis tests. RESULTS: The prevalence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia was 22%. Lower gestational age and birth weight, male gender, less frequent use of antenatal steroids, respiratory distress syndrome, use of surfactant, patent ductus arteriosus, duration of invasive ventilation and NICU stay were significantly associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The variation in serum values of potassium, phosphorus and creatinine during the first week of life also revealed an association with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Higher mean plasma calcium values were associated with spontaneous closure of the patent ductus arteriosus. The use of indomethacin to induce patent ductus arteriosus closure was significantly higher in bronchopulmonary dysplasia patients. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in renal function and tubular handling of potassium and phosphorus are present during the first week of life among preterm neonates who will develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The higher rate of patent ductus arteriosus and indomethacin use may influence these differences. Serum levels of calcium also appear to play a role in spontaneous ductus arteriosus closure.

  16. Radiation exposure and circulatory disease risk: Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor data, 1950-2003

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Yukiko; Kodama, Kazunori; Nishi, Nobuo; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Suyama, Akihiko; Soda, Midori; Grant, Eric J; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Sakata, Ritsu; Moriwaki, Hiroko; Hayashi, Mikiko; Konda, Manami; Shore, Roy E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the degree to which ionising radiation confers risk of mortality from heart disease and stroke. Design Prospective cohort study with more than 50 years of follow-up. Setting Atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Participants 86 611 Life Span Study cohort members with individually estimated radiation doses from 0 to >3 Gy (86% received

  17. Radiation burden and risks associated with non-invasive coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation load of patients undergoing coronary CT angiography by applying the retrospective ECG gating approach was estimated. The radiation burden is rather high and was found to be higher in men than in women, whereas the risk of secondary induced tumours appears to be higher in women than in men. (orig.)

  18. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M;

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A sign...

  19. Brachytherapy Improves Biochemical Failure–Free Survival in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Compared With Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Graham D. [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kelowna General Hospital, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, L' Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Morris, Jim [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Catton, Charles [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lukka, Himu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Warner, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Center, London, Ontario (Canada); Yang, Ying [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Rodrigues, George, E-mail: George.Rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Center, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and overall survival (OS) in low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients who received brachytherapy (BT) (either low-dose-rate brachytherapy [LDR-BT] or high-dose-rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy [HDR-BT+EBRT]) versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) alone. Methods and Materials: Patient data were obtained from the ProCaRS database, which contains 7974 prostate cancer patients treated with primary radiation therapy at four Canadian cancer institutions from 1994 to 2010. Propensity score matching was used to obtain the following 3 matched cohorts with balanced baseline prognostic factors: (1) low-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; (2) intermediate-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; and (3) intermediate-risk HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare differences in bFFS (primary endpoint) and OS in the 3 matched groups. Results: Propensity score matching created acceptable balance in the baseline prognostic factors in all matches. Final matches included 2 1:1 matches in the intermediate-risk cohorts, LDR-BT versus EBRT (total n=254) and HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT (total n=388), and one 4:1 match in the low-risk cohort (LDR-BT:EBRT, total n=400). Median follow-up ranged from 2.7 to 7.3 years for the 3 matched cohorts. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that all BT treatment options were associated with statistically significant improvements in bFFS when compared with EBRT in all cohorts (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT hazard ratio [HR] 4.58, P=.001; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 2.08, P=.007; low-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 2.90, P=.004). No significant difference in OS was found in all comparisons (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 1.27, P=.687; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 1.55, P=.470; low-risk LDR-BT vs EBRT HR 1.41, P=.500). Conclusions: Propensity score matched analysis showed that BT options led

  20. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part IV: Long term risks - Carcinogenic, hereditary, and teratogenetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term risks induced by radiation are of much concern to patients and clinicians alike. As an example, perceived radiation risks are frequently cited in a woman's decision to choose a radical mastectomy over lumpectomy + radiation. In consequence, the actual radiation risks are often considerably overstated, or unreasonably downplayed. In this lecture we will discuss just what is known about the long term risks following radiotherapy, both from the human experience and from the laboratory. We will discuss risks both to the patient and to radiotherapy personnel. A good deal is known about the carcinogenic effects of high and low doses of radiation, in large part thanks to the careful study of the survivors of the atomic bombing in Japan, as well as studies of individuals exposed to medical x rays. It is possible to make an estimate, which is probably good to within a factor of, perhaps, three to five, of the cancer risks faced by a patient of a particular age and sex who is going to undergo a particular radiotherapeutic regimen. It is also possible to make an estimate of the risks faced by radiotherapy and nursing staff exposed to low doses. Brachytherapy related risk estimates are likely to be somewhat more uncertain, due to the poorly known sparing effects of the low dose rates used; for the radiotherapy personnel in brachytherapy, because of the doses which can be received, the risks can be quite significant. A recent complication in external-beam radiotherapy is the advent of high-energy linacs, which can produce a significant fast neutron dose which, dose for dose, may be ten to fifty times more carcinogenic than gamma rays. Data relating to the risks of hereditary effects of radiation come almost entirely from laboratory experiments in animals. Studies involving several million mice form the basis of most of our current understanding of hereditary effects. The results of these studies indicate that radiation is a relatively inefficient mutagen. The

  1. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy: Long term risks - Carcinogenic, hereditary, and teratogenetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term risks induced by radiation are of much concern to patients and clinicians alike. As an example, perceived radiation risks are frequently cited in a woman's decision to choose a radical mastectomy over lumpectomy + radiation. In consequence, the actual radiation risks are often considerably overstated, or unreasonably downplayed. In this lecture we will discuss just what is known about the long term risks following radiotherapy, both from the human experience and from the laboratory. We will discuss risks both to the patient and to radiotherapy personnel. A good deal is known about the carcinogenic effects of high and low doses of radiation, in large part thanks to the careful study of the survivors of the atomic bombing in Japan, as well as studies of individuals exposed to medical x rays. It is possible to make an estimate, which is probably good to within a factor of, perhaps, three to five, of the cancer risks faced by a patient of a particular age and sex who is going to undergo a particular radiotherapeutic regimen. It is also possible to make an estimate of the risks faced by radiotherapy and nursing staff exposed to low doses. Brachytherapy related risk estimates are likely to be somewhat more uncertain, due to the poorly known sparing effects of the low dose rates used; for the radiotherapy personnel in brachytherapy, because of the doses which can be received, the risks can be quite significant. A recent complication in external-beam radiotherapy is the advent of high-energy linacs, which can produce a significant fast neutron dose which, dose for dose, may be ten to fifty times more carcinogenic than gamma rays. Data relating to the risks of hereditary effects of radiation come almost entirely from laboratory experiments in animals. Studies involving several million mice form the basis of most of our current understanding of hereditary effects. The results of these studies indicate that radiation is a relatively inefficient mutagen. The

  2. Ischemic heart disease in workers at Mayak PA: latency of incidence risk after radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoforo Simonetto

    Full Text Available We present an updated analysis of incidence and mortality from atherosclerotic induced ischemic heart diseases in the cohort of workers at the Mayak Production Association (PA. This cohort constitutes one of the most important sources for the assessment of radiation risk. It is exceptional because it comprises information on several other risk factors. While most of the workers have been exposed to external gamma radiation, a large proportion has additionally been exposed to internal radiation from inhaled plutonium. Compared to a previous study by Azizova et al. 2012, the updated dosimetry system MWDS-2008 has been applied and methods of analysis have been revised. We extend the analysis of the significant incidence risk and observe that main detrimental effects of external radiation exposure occur after more than about 30 years. For mortality, significant risk was found in males with an excess relative risk per dose of 0.09 (95% CI: 0.02; 0.16 [Formula: see text] while risk was insignificant for females. With respect to internal radiation exposure no association to risk could be established.

  3. Risk Assessment of Radiation Exposure using Molecular Biodosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Todd F.; George, K.; Hammond, D. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Current cytogenetic biodosimetry methods would be difficult to adapt to spaceflight operations, because they require toxic chemicals and a substantial amount of time to perform. In addition, current biodosimetry techniques are limited to whole body doses over about 10cGy. Development of new techniques that assess radiation exposure response at the molecular level could overcome these limitations and have important implications in the advancement of biodosimetry. Recent technical advances include expression profiling at the transcript and protein level to assess multiple biomarkers of exposure, which may lead to the development of a radiation biomarker panel revealing possible fingerprints of individual radiation sensitivity. So far, many biomarkers of interest have been examined in their response to ionizing radiation, such as cytokines and members of the DNA repair pathway. New technology, such as the Luminex system can analyze many biomarkers simultaneously in one sample.

  4. Proceedings of the fourth JAEA-US EPA workshop on radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the proceedings of the fourth workshop jointly organized by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) under the terms of agreement for cooperation in the field of radiation protection. The workshop was sponsored by the Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate and was held at the Nuclear Science Research Institute, the Tokai Research and Development Center, JAEA, on November 7-8, 2006. The objective of the workshop was to exchange and discuss recent information on radiation effects, radiation risk assessment, radiation dosimetry, emergency response, radiation protection standards, and waste management. Twenty-two papers were presented by experts from JAEA, US EPA, the National Academies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Washington State University and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Three keynotes addressed research on radiation effects and radiation protection at JAEA, the latest report on health risks from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation published by the National Research Council (BEIR VII Phase 2), and recent developments in Committee 2 for the forthcoming recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The workshop provided a good opportunity for identifying future research needed for radiation risk assessment. The 22 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Perception of Radiation Risk by Japanese Radiation Specialists Evaluated as a Safe Dose Before the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Miwa; Ono, Koji; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Matsuda, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    From October to December 2010, just before the radiological accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, 71 radiation professionals from radiation facilities in Japan were asked what they considered as a "safe dose" of radiation for themselves, their partners, parents, children, siblings, and friends. Although the 'safe dose' they noted varied widely, from less than 1 mSv y to more than 100 mSv y, the average dose was 35.6 mSv y, which is around the middle point between the legal exposure dose limits for the annual average and for any single year. Similar results were obtained from other surveys of members of the Japan Radioisotope Association (36.9 mSv y) and of the Oita Prefectural Hospital (36.8 mSv y). Among family members and friends, the minimum average "safe" dose was 8.5 mSv y for children, for whom 50% of the responders claimed a "safe dose" of less than 1 mSv. Gender, age and specialty of the radiation professional also affected their notion of a "safe dose." These findings suggest that the perception of radiation risk varies widely even for radiation professionals and that the legal exposure dose limits derived from regulatory science may act as an anchor of safety. The different levels of risk perception for different target groups among radiation professionals appear similar to those in the general population. The gap between these characteristics of radiation professionals and the generally accepted picture of radiation professionals might have played a role in the state of confusion after the radiological accident. PMID:27115222

  6. Radiation risks in the 20. Century: reality, illusions and ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Average global natural ionizing radiation dose for man is 2.4 mSv/year ranging in various geographical regions from about 1 to 220 mSv/year. At the dawn of life this dose was by a factor of three to five higher than now. The entire man-made contribution to radiation dose is only about 0.2% of natural radiation. From medical radiodiagnostics the average global dose is about 0.5 mSv/year, from nuclear explosions was in 1963 <0.2 mSv/year, from Chernobyl accident was in 1986-1987 0.05 mSv/year, and from nuclear power in 1995 about 0.007 mSv/year. Radiation is rather a weak noxious agent as compared with other natural and man-made hazards. Radiophobia has its source not in real peace-time radiation hazard to population, but in politics and group interests. Current excessive radiation protection standards, e.g. 1mSv/year, are based on an arbitrary assumption on linearity and a lack of threshold in dose/effect relationship, and on ignoring the beneficial effects of low doses of radiation. A whole body dose rate of 1mSv/year causes about 2 DNA damages in each cell. This can be compared with 70 million natural DNA damaging events occurring in each cell per year. Regulations based on this assumption lead to the wasting of resources desperately needed to deal with real health problems, and to strangulation of development of environmentally and human friendly nuclear technologies. Radiation standards should be based on 'practical threshold', one below which induction of detectable radiogenic cancers or genetic effects is not expected. (author)

  7. Risk of wine-distillery waste compost application in vulnerable zones: nitrogen balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requejo, M. I.; Villena, R.; Ventas, L.; Ribas, F.; Castellanos, M. T.; Cabello, M. J.; Arce, A.; Cartagena, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the nutrient with the greatest impact on yield of horticultural crops. It is extremely dynamic in soil and undergoes changes that include processes of gains, losses and transformations. The melon crop area at Ciudad Real adds the 29% of the national production in Spain. The common agronomic management is representative of semiarid cropped zones of Spain where environmental degradation of water supplies with high N loads is observed. The site of this work is located near of Mancha Occidental aquifer (U.H.04.04, 6.953 km2) and Campo de Montiel aquifer (U.H. 04.06, 3.192 km2) with high contamination problems. The efficient use of fertilizers and irrigation is especially important in these areas designated vulnerables to nitrate pollution from agricultural sources. The aim of this study was to assess N losses when applying exhausted grape marc compost to a melon crop as source of nutrients in a vulnerable area. The doses are often excessive because are normally based on the input of organic matter rather than on the potentially mineralizable nitrogen. This N is not only released during the growing season but also in the intercropping period. In this experiment a nitrogen balance was carried out with three different doses of compost: 0 (D0), 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 T compost ha-1 (D3). The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Alfisol Xeralf Petrocalcic Palexeralfs), with a depth of 0.6 m and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.6 and 0.7 m. Nitrogen plant absorption and nitrate losses were measured weekly, controlling at the same time N mineralized in soil. Simultaneously, a mineralization experiment was carried out without crop (either in laboratory and field conditions) to compare it with the results obtained with melon crop. Acknowledgements This project has been supported by INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01.

  8. Fluoride concentrations in the water of Maringá, Brazil, considering the benefit/risk balance of caries and fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmara Tatiely Pedroso BERGAMO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current Brazilian law regarding water fluoridation classification is dichotomous with respect to the risks of and benefits for oral diseases, and fluoride (F concentrations less than 0.6 or above 0.8 mg F/L are considered outside the normal limits. Thus, the law does not consider that both caries and fluorosis are dependent on the dosage and duration of fluoride exposure because they are both chronic diseases. Therefore, this study evaluated the quality of water fluoridation in Maringá, PR, Brazil, considering a new classification for the concentration of F in water the supply, based on the anticaries benefit and risk of fluorosis (CECOL/USP, 2011. Water samples (n = 325 were collected monthly over one year from 28 distribution water networks: 20 from treatment plants and 8 from artesian wells. F concentrations were determined using a specific ion electrode. The average F concentration was 0.77 mg F/L (ppm F, ranging from 0.44 to 1.22 mg F/L. Considering all of the water samples analyzed, 83.7% of them presented from 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L, and according to the new classification used, they would provide maximum anticaries benefit with a low risk of fluorosis. This percentage was lower (75.4% in the water samples supplied from artesian wells than from those distributed by the treatment plant (86%. In conclusion, based on the new classification of water F concentrations, the quality of water fluoridation in Maringá is adequate and is within the range of the best balance between risk and benefit.

  9. Risk calculations for hereditary effects of ionizing radiation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F

    1992-05-01

    A prediction of the extent to which an additional dose of ionizing radiation increases the natural germ cell mutation rate, and how much such an increase will affect the health status of future human populations is part of the service that human geneticists are expected to offer to human society. However, more detailed scrutiny of the difficulties involved reveals an extremely complex set of problems. A large number of questions arises before such a prediction can be given with confidence; many such questions cannot be answered at our present state of knowledge. However, such predictions have recently been attempted. The 1988 report of the United Nations Scientific Committee for the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the fifth report of the Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation of the US National Research Council have presented a discussion of the human genetics problems involved. Empirical data from studies on children of highly radiation-exposed parents, e.g. parents exposed to the atomic bombs of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or parents belonging to populations living on soil with high background radiation, have been mentioned in this context. Whereas precise predictions are impossible as yet because of deficiencies in our knowledge of medical genetics at various levels, the bulk of the existing evidence points to only small effects of low or moderate radiation doses, effects that will probably be buried in the "background noise" of changing patterns of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:1587523

  10. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew E; Keisler, Jeffrey M; Zussblatt, Niels P; Plourde, Kenton J; Wender, Ben A; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis-methods commonly applied in financial and operations management-to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios-combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results. PMID:26551015

  11. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew E.; Keisler, Jeffrey M.; Zussblatt, Niels P.; Plourde, Kenton J.; Wender, Ben A.; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis—methods commonly applied in financial and operations management—to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios—combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results.

  12. Practical guidance for using rivaroxaban in patients with atrial fibrillation: balancing benefit and risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sylvia Haas,1 Christoph Bode,2 Bo Norrving,3 Alexander GG Turpie4 1Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany; 3Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; 4Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Abstract: Rivaroxaban is a direct factor Xa inhibitor that is widely available to reduce the risk of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and one or more risk factors for stroke. Rivaroxaban provides practical advantages compared with warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists, including a rapid onset of action, few drug interactions, no dietary interactions, a predictable anticoagulant effect, and no requirement for routine coagulation monitoring. However, questions have emerged relating to the responsible use of rivaroxaban in day-to-day clinical practice, including patient selection, dosing, treatment of patients with renal impairment, conversion from use of vitamin K antagonists to rivaroxaban and vice versa, coagulation tests, and management of patients requiring invasive procedures or experiencing bleeding or an ischemic event. This article provides practical recommendations relating to the use of rivaroxaban in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, based on clinical trial evidence, relevant guidelines, prescribing information, and the authors' clinical experience. Keywords: novel oral anticoagulants, direct factor Xa inhibitor, peri-interventional management, practical guidance, rivaroxaban, stroke prevention

  13. Cancer incidence after retinoblastoma - Radiation dose and sarcoma risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, FL; Boice, JD; Abramson, DH; Tarone, RE; Kleinerman, RA; Stovall, M; Goldman, MB; Seddon, JM; Tarbell, N; Fraumeni, JF; Li, FP

    1997-01-01

    Context.-There is a substantial risk of a second cancer for persons with hereditary retinoblastoma, which is enhanced by radiotherapy. Objective.-To examine long-term risk of new primary cancers in survivors of childhood retinoblastoma and quantify the role of radiotherapy in sarcoma development. De

  14. Risk and value of conventional myelography with regard to radiation exposure of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate the effective equivalent dose with reference to the area under examination and the foils employed, fifty patients underwent conventional diagnostic myelography, after which, by means of thermoluminescence surface dosimetry, the mean organ dose was ascertained from the radiation field size, using the computer program ORDOS. Effective equivalent dose can be used to determine the inherent risk of radiation injury involved. The risk-benefit ratios obtained would suggest that conventional myelography, prospectively in the form of digital myelography, and spinal computer tomography are not opposing but complementary approaches to spinal diagnosis. Spinal NMR imaging must not be discussed under the aspect of radiation exposure but under the aspect of availability. (author)

  15. How safe is safe enough? Radiation risk for a human mission to Mars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis A Cucinotta

    Full Text Available Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed for up to 3 years to galactic cosmic rays (GCR--made up of high-energy protons and high charge (Z and energy (E (HZE nuclei. GCR exposure rate increases about three times as spacecraft venture out of Earth orbit into deep space where protection of the Earth's magnetosphere and solid body are lost. NASA's radiation standard limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID at the upper 95% confidence interval (CI of the risk estimate. Fatal cancer risk has been considered the dominant risk for GCR, however recent epidemiological analysis of radiation risks for circulatory diseases allow for predictions of REID for circulatory diseases to be included with cancer risk predictions for space missions. Using NASA's models of risks and uncertainties, we predicted that central estimates for radiation induced mortality and morbidity could exceed 5% and 10% with upper 95% CI near 10% and 20%, respectively for a Mars mission. Additional risks to the central nervous system (CNS and qualitative differences in the biological effects of GCR compared to terrestrial radiation may significantly increase these estimates, and will require new knowledge to evaluate.

  16. Chemical and radiation environmental risk management at the crossroads: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many of the major environmental risk management decisions we face today require the simultaneous evaluation and control of both radiological and chemical risks, the separation of radiation and chemical risk management persists along legal, regulatory, programmatic, training and professional practice levels. In June 1998, a panel of 40 chemical and radiation risk experts met at an interactive workshop entitled 'Addressing the Similarities and Differences in Chemical and Radiation Environmental Risk Management,' in Annapolis, Maryland to discuss several perspectives on harmonizing chemical and radiation risk management approaches. At the conclusion of the meeting, workshop participants recommended that case studies of clean-up sites at which radioactive materials and hazardous chemical risks were addressed, be developed to help educate participants in the harmonization dialogue about their counterpart's issues, stimulate discussion and sharpen issues in a way that they can be resolved. Several key risk management issues that were highlighted from the discussion at the Annapolis meeting are being evaluated in the case studies. They include: decision criteria, costs and public/stakeholder input. This paper presents these key issues and the approach taken in the case studies. (author)

  17. Radiation risk associated with radiologocal procedures for age estimation for forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Age estimation for forensic purposes is, in general, based on a radiogram of the left hand or an orthopantomogram of the teeth. Two examples are given exemplifying the principal procedure that may be applied for estimating the radiation risks associated with the radiological examinations considered. Method: Mortality risks were calculated using the risk coefficients of ICRP and the mass ratio of radiation-exposed portion to total organ. For a radiogram of the hand, a radiation dose of 0.15 mGy was adopted. For an orthopantomogram the following doses were used: Bone surface and red bone marrow 0.25 mGy, skin on the neck 0.56 mGy, thyroid gland 0.053 mGy. Results: Mortality risks obtained were 5.1 x 10-8 for a radiogram of the hand and 1.8 x 10-7 for an orthopantomogram. For comparison, it was estimated that the calculated risks might be equivalent to the mortality risks associated with public road traffic during less than one hour or about 2.5 hours, respectively. Conclusions: The calculated radiation risks are of a similar order of magnitude as are the risks the respective person is exposed to on the way to the medical examination or to the court. However, the applicability and the limits of the radiological procedures applied for age estimation require extensive and critical discussion. (orig.)

  18. From 'Image Gently' to image intelligently: a personalized perspective on diagnostic radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of ionizing radiation from diagnostic imaging has been a popular topic in the radiology literature and lay press. Communicating the magnitude of risk to patients and caregivers is problematic because of the uncertainty in estimates derived principally from epidemiological studies of large populations, and alternative approaches are needed to provide a scientific basis for personalized risk estimates. The underlying patient disease and life expectancy greatly influence risk projections. Research into the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair challenges the linear no-threshold dose-response assumption and reveals that individuals vary in sensitivity to radiation. Studies of decision-making psychology show that individuals are highly susceptible to irrational biases when judging risks. Truly informed medical decision-making that respects patient autonomy requires appropriate framing of radiation risks in perspective with other risks and with the benefits of imaging. To follow the principles of personalized medicine and treat patients according to their specific phenotypic and personality profiles, diagnostic imaging should optimally be tailored not only to patient size, body region and clinical indication, but also to underlying disease conditions, radio-sensitivity and risk perception and preferences that vary among individuals. (orig.)

  19. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.;

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk...... for a patient without pulmonary co-morbidities, caudally located tumor, no history of smoking,...

  20. Risk evaluation of medical and industrial radiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991, the NRC, Division of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety, began a program to evaluate the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in regulating medical devices. This program represents an initial step in an overall plant to evaluate the use of PRA in regulating the use of nuclear by-product materials. The NRC envisioned that the use of risk analysis techniques could assist staff in ensuring that the regulatory approach was standardized, understandable, and effective. Traditional methods of assessing risk in nuclear power plants may be inappropriate to use in assessing the use of by-product devices. The approaches used in assessing nuclear reactor risks are equipment-oriented. Secondary attention is paid to the human component, for the most part after critical system failure events have been identified. This paper describes the risk methodology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), initially intended to assess risks associated with the use of the Gamma Knife, a gamma stereotactic radiosurgical device. For relatively new medical devices such as the Gamma Knife, the challenge is to perform a risk analysis with very little quantitative data but with an important human factor component. The method described below provides a basic approach for identifying the most likely risk contributors and evaluating their relative importance. The risk analysis approach developed for the Gamma Knife and described in this paper should be applicable to a broader class of devices in which the human interaction with the device is a prominent factor. In this sense, the method could be a prototypical model of nuclear medical or industrial device risk analysis

  1. The Swift Project Contamination Control Program: A Case Study of Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Day, Diane T.; Secunda, Mark S.; Rosecrans, Glenn P.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Observatory will be launched in early 2004 to examine the dynamic process of gamma ray burst (GRB) events. The multi-wavelength Observatory will study the GRB afterglow characteristics, which will help to answer fundamental questions about both the structure and the evolution of the universe. The Swift Observatory Contamination Control Program has been developed to aid in ensuring the success of the on-orbit performance of two of the primary instruments: the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT). During the design phase of the Observatory, the contamination control program evolved and trade studies were performed to assess the risk of contaminating the sensitive UVOT and XRT optics during both pre-launch testing and on-orbit operations, within the constraints of the overall program cost and schedule.

  2. Balancing the Trade-off Between Learning Prospects and Spillover Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perri, Alessandra; Andersson, Ulf; Nell, Phillip Christopher;

    2013-01-01

    competition and subsidiary capabilities. Our theoretical development and the results from the analysis document a far more complex and dynamic relationship between levels of competition and MNCs’ local participation in knowledge intensive activities, i.e. learning and spillovers, than previous studies do. We...... find a curvilinear relationship between the extent of competitive pressure and the quality of local linkages confirming our argument of a trade-off between learning prospects and spillover risks. Furthermore, the level of subsidiary capabilities moderates this relationship.......This paper investigates local vertical linkages of foreign subsidiaries and the dual role of such linkages as conduits for learning as well as potential channels for spillovers to competitors. On the basis of data from 97 subsidiaries, we analyze the quality of such linkages under varying levels of...

  3. Mitigating the risk of opioid abuse through a balanced undergraduate pain medicine curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley-Forster PK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patricia K Morley-Forster,1,2 Joseph V Pergolizzi,3–5 Robert Taylor Jr,5 Robert A Axford-Gatley,6 Edward M Sellers71Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 2Outpatient Pain Clinic, St Joseph’s Hospital, London, ON, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5NEMA Research Inc, Naples, FL, USA; 6Clinical Content and Editorial Services, Complete Healthcare Communications, Inc, Chadds Ford, PA, USA; 7DL Global Partners Inc, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Chronic pain is highly prevalent in the United States and Canada, occurring in an estimated 30% of the adult population. Despite its high prevalence, US and Canadian medical schools provide very little training in pain management, including training in the safe and effective use of potent analgesics, most notably opioids. In 2005, the International Association for the Study of Pain published recommendations for a core undergraduate pain management curriculum, and several universities have implemented pilot programs based on this curriculum. However, when outcomes have been formally assessed, these initiatives have resulted in only modest improvements in physician knowledge about chronic pain and its treatment. This article discusses strategies to improve undergraduate pain management curricula and proposes areas in which those efforts can be augmented. Emphasis is placed on opioids, which have great potency as analgesics but also substantial risks in terms of adverse events and the risk of abuse and addiction. The authors conclude that the most important element of an undergraduate pain curriculum is clinical experience under mentors who are capable of reinforcing didactic learning by modeling best practices.Keywords: chronic pain, curricular content, medical education, opioids, pain

  4. Nutrients and Chemical Pollutants in Fish and Shellfish. Balancing Health Benefits and Risks of Regular Fish Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns and lifestyle factors are clearly associated with at least five of the ten leading causes of death, including coronary heart disease, certain types of cancer, stroke, non-insulin insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis. Concerning specifically fish and seafood consumption, its beneficial health effects in humans are clearly supported by an important number of studies performed in the last 30 years. These studies have repeatedly linked fish consumption, especially those species whose contents in omega-3 fatty acids are high, with healthier hearts in the aging population. The nutritional benefits of fish and seafood are also due to the content of high-quality protein, vitamins, as well as other essential nutrients. However, a number of studies, particularly investigations performed in recent years, have shown that the unavoidable presence of environmental contaminants in fish and shellfish can also mean a certain risk for the health of some consumers. While prestigious international associations as the American Heart Association have recommended eating fish at least two times (two servings a week), based on our own experimental results, as well as in results from other laboratories, we cannot be in total agreement with that recommendation. Although a regular consumption of most fish and shellfish species should not mean adverse health effects for the consumers, the specific fish and shellfish species consumed, the frequency of consumption, as well as the meal size, are essential issues for adequately balancing the health benefits and risks of regular fish consumption. PMID:25486051

  5. Radiation dose and risk of patients through nuclear medical procedures in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the years 1978 and 1981 we compared the radiation dose for the patients examined by in vivo methods after administration of radiopharmaceuticals (27 procedures). The somatic effective dose equivalent, the effective collective dose, the somatic radiation risk, and the number of induced malignancies were calculated according to ICRP publication No. 26. All the procedures give rise to a radiation-induced somatic risk from the 4th up the 7th order. In recent years we have seen an increase of the application of sup(99m)Tc compounds and a decrease in the use of 131I-sodium iodide. A comparison of the results for the two years shows the expected reduction of radiation dose and risk. (orig.)

  6. Communication of radiation benefits and risks in decision making: some lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Paul A

    2011-11-01

    This paper is focused on summarizing the "lessons learned" from discussions at the 2010 NCRP Annual Meeting on effective communications on the subject of radiation benefits and risks in public exposures. Five main lessons learned are discussed in regard to effective methods of public communication: the use of new social media communication tools such as Facebook and Twitter, emergency situations that require rapid societal and personal messaging, medical radiological procedures where benefits must be described in comparison to long-term health risks of radiation exposures, and information that should be provided to stakeholders in situations such as environmental radionuclide contamination to which members of the public may be exposed. It is concluded that effective communications in which radiation benefits are contrasted with health risks of exposure are an important aspect of making and implementing decisions on employing radiation health protection procedures. PMID:21979551

  7. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently. PMID:22494369

  8. Risks associated with low level ionizing radiation (with special reference to nuclear power workers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes a project to use epidemiological studies of workers in the nuclear industry to estimate the cancer risk associated with low-dose chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. The project aims both to improve the basis for radiation risk assessment and to test the validity of currently used models for the extrapolation of radiation risk. This report focusses on the former aim, and summarizes discussions at two meetings held in June 1988. One of these was a small working group consisting mainly of epidemiologists who had carried out studies of nuclear workers; the other included nominees of the nuclear industries of eleven countries as well as epidemiologists and radiation physicists and biologists. As a result of the meetings, efforts are underway to pool existing data and a feasibility study is addressing the possibility of an international collaborative study of unstudied groups of nuclear workers

  9. IAEA experience in communicating radiation risks through the RPOP web site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report here their successful experience of communicating information to health professionals, patients and the public on benefits and risks of ionising radiation in medical applications. The approaches used have been based on giving importance to clinical benefits against risks, as well as safety in use against risk of use. Communicating brief messages against catchy questions with positive and pragmatic approach resulted in making web site on radiation protection of patients (RPOP) as the top web site of the world in this area. Credibility of information has been maintained. The results show immense outreach in 213 countries/territories. (authors)

  10. Do changes in biomarkers from space radiation reflect dose or risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A.

    The space environment is made up of many different kinds of radiation so that the proper use of biomarkers is essential to estimate radiation risk. This presentation will evaluate differences between biomarkers of dose and risk and demonstrate why they should not be confused following radiation exposures in deep space. Dose is a physical quantity, while risk is a biological quantity. Many examples exist w ereh dose or changes in biomarkers of dose are inappropriately used as predictors of risk. Without information on the biology of the system, the biomarkers of dose provide little help in predicting risk in tissues or radiation exposure types where no excess risk can be demonstrated. Many of these biomarkers of dose only reflect changes in radiation dose or exposure. However, these markers are often incorrectly used to predict risk. For example, exposure of the trachea or of the deep lung to high-LET alpha particles results in similar changes in the biomarker chromosome damage in these two tissues. Such an observation would predict that the risk for cancer induction would be similar in these two tissues. It has been noted , however, that there has never been a tracheal tumor observed in rats that inhaled radon, but with the same exposure, large numbers of tumors were produced in the deep lung. The biology of the different tissues is the major determinant of the risk rather than the radiation dose. Recognition of this fact has resulted in the generation of tissue weighting factors for use in radiation protection. When tissue weighting factors are used the values derived are still called "dose". It is important to recognize that tissue specific observations have been corrected to reflect risk, and therefore should no longer be viewed as dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is also used to estimate radiation risk. The use of biomarkers to derive RBE is a difficult since it involves the use of a biological response to a standard low-LET reference radiation

  11. Risk factors for musculoskeletal symptoms among Korean radiation workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Moo-Seong; Ahn, Jae-Ouk

    2015-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms. The second aim was to study the association between musculoskeletal symptoms and factors in radiation workers from the active lists of clinics and hospitals and then to provide basic data for a systematic and effective resource management of radiation workers' musculoskeletal problems in the future. A questionnaire survey was conducted on radiation workers in clinics, general hospitals, and Dong-A university hospitals around the Korean city Buscan from July 10 to 31, 2011. The results showed that the rate of musculoskeletal symptoms was higher in the shoulder, waist, neck, leg/foot, hand/wrist/finger than arm/elbow. The probability of neck pain was 2 times higher in patients with a disease. PMID:24219636

  12. Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled

  13. Radiation risk to low fluences of alpha particles may be greater than we thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H; Suzuki, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Vannais, D; Chen, G; Trosko, J E; Waldren, C A; Hei, T K

    2001-12-01

    Based principally on the cancer incidence found in survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the United States National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low dose exposure be extrapolated from higher doses by using a linear, no-threshold model. This recommendation is based on the dogma that the DNA of the nucleus is the main target for radiation-induced genotoxicity and, as fewer cells are directly damaged, the deleterious effects of radiation proportionally decline. In this paper, we used a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction (either 100% or making risk estimates for low dose, high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation exposure. PMID:11734643

  14. Radiation dose and cancer risk among pediatric patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During interventional neuroradiology procedures, patients can be exposed to moderate to high levels of radiation. Special considerations are required to protect children, who are generally more sensitive to the short- and long-term detrimental effects of radiation exposure. Estimates of dose to the skin of children from certain interventional procedures have been published elsewhere, but we are not aware of data on dose to the brain or on the long-term risk of cancer from brain radiation. Our goals were to estimate radiation doses to the brain in 50 pediatric patients who had undergone cerebral embolization and to assess their lifetime risks of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Entrance-peak skin dose and various assumptions on conditions of exposure were used as input for dosimetric calculations to estimate the spatial pattern of dose within the brain and the average dose to the whole brain for each child. The average dose and the age of the child at time of exposure were used to estimate the lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Among the 50 patients, average radiation doses to the brain were estimated to vary from 100 mGy to 1,300 mGy if exposed to non-collimated fields and from 20 mGy to 160 mGy for collimated, moving fields. The lifetime risk of developing brain cancer was estimated to be increased by 2% to 80% as a result of the exposure. Given the very small lifetime background risk of brain tumor, the excess number of cases will be small even though the relative increase might be as high as 80%. ALARA principles of collimation and dose optimization are the most effective means to minimize the risk of future radiation-related cancer. (orig.)

  15. Study warns of radiation risk in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-10-01

    A study of a million US patients suggests that some who undergo medical imaging could be exposed to more ionizing radiation than those who work with radioactive materials in nuclear power plants. The study, reported in The New England Journal of Medicine (361 849), implies that current exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray equipment as well as computed tomography (CT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners could lead to tens of thousands of extra cases of cancer in the US alone.

  16. Safety and radiation risks in the labelling of blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk in the management of radioactive material and biological exposition to infectious agents. Protocols and normative to observe GOOD RADIOPHARMACY Practices. Main infectious agents that may be transmitted during preparation of a blood cell radiopharmaceutical. Problems of contamination

  17. Trivial risks and the new radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection proposes that doses below a certain level should be excluded from the system of protection, without regard to the number of people exposed. As the Commission assumes that there is a risk of harm even from very low doses, the proposal also disregards these very low risks. The arguments for this proposal are examined here. It is argued that the fact that risks are small compared to natural sources cannot be used as justification for accepting them. The principle 'if the risk of harm to the health of the most exposed individual is trivial, then the total risk is trivial-irrespective of how many people are exposed' is analysed. It is found to equivocate on the meaning of the word trivial and to ignore the total risk. It is also argued that the new proposal is not justified by a change from a utilitarian ethic to an ethic based on individual rights. Finally, it is suggested that small doses should only be disregarded if the expected value of harm is small, and the exclusion level should thus depend on the number of people exposed

  18. Interactive Learning Module Improves Resident Knowledge of Risks of Ionizing Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Alexander Y; Breaud, Alan H; Schneider, Jeffrey I; Kadom, Nadja; Mitchell, Patricia M; Linden, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    Physician awareness of the risks of ionizing radiation exposure related to medical imaging is poor. Effective educational interventions informing physicians of such risk, especially in emergency medicine (EM), are lacking. The SIEVERT (Suboptimal Ionizing Radiation Exposure Education - A Void in Emergency Medicine Residency Training) learning module was designed to improve provider knowledge of the risks of radiation exposure from medical imaging and comfort in communicating these risks to patients. The 1-hour module consists of introductory lecture, interactive discussion, and role-playing scenarios. In this pilot study, we assessed the educational effect using unmatched, anonymous preintervention and postintervention questionnaires that assessed fund of knowledge, participant self-reported imaging ordering practices in several clinical scenarios, and trainee comfort level in discussing radiation risks with patients. All 25 EM resident participants completed the preintervention questionnaire, and 22 completed the postintervention questionnaire within 4 hours after participation. Correct responses on the 14-question learning assessment increased from 6.32 (standard deviation = 2.36) preintervention to 12.23 (standard deviation = 1.85) post-intervention. Overall, 24% of residents were comfortable with discussing the risks of ionizing radiation exposure with patients preintervention, whereas 41% felt comfortable postintervention. Participants ordered fewer computed tomography scans in 2 of the 4 clinical scenarios after attending the educational intervention. There was improvement in EM residents' knowledge regarding the risks of ionizing radiation exposure from medical imaging, and increased participant self-reported comfort levels in the discussion of these risks with patients after the 1-hour SIEVERT learning module. PMID:26657346

  19. Radiation risks and work-up strategies of detected lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groups of women who received extremely high doses of radiation (100 to over 1000 rads) to the breast have shown as excess number breast cancers when compared with comparable groups on nonexposed women. These high-dose groups include Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, women treated with radiation therapy in 1920s for benign breast conditions such as post partum mastitis or received multiple chest fluoroscopies after tuberculosis treated with artificial pneumothorax therapy. Not known is whether very low doses of radiation can also be carcinogenic. The low doses used in mammography techniques are all far below one rad. Mean breast dose for a two-view exposure is 0.1 rad and even using a grid, it is still less than 0.2 rad. It is slightly higher for Xeromammography, which is in fact in decreasing use in the USA. Only a minority of examinations, perhaps 20%, are still conducted on Xeromammography. The dose is about 0.5 rad for the Xeron negative mode technique and 0.25 rad for the new Xerox liquid toner system. In any event, all these doses are extremely low and several orders of magnitude lower than the doses at which radiation carcinogenesis has been demonstrated. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  20. Risks of increased UV-B radiation for humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If not compensated in any way, depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer leads to an increase of UV-B radiation at the earth's surface, especially towards the short-wave range, which is biologically the more active. The most concerning effect here is that of UV-B induced skin reactions, in particular malignant skintumors (malignant melanoma, spinocellular carcinoma, basalioma), whose incidence is expected to increase in future. As some photoreactions can be inhibited or enhanced also by radiation outside their action spectrum, it is possible for changes in solar spectral radiation flux density to influence photo-induced reactions that are driven at wavelengths outside the UV-B range. The authors have performed studies for developing methods of quantifying individual UV sensitivity. In vitro studies have shown that UV-A dependent photoreactions can be partly inhibited by UV-B. A number of drugs, as well as sulphites, which are used as preservatives amongst other things, have been shown to have phototoxic properties that may be relevant to photocarcinogenesis. Irradiation tests on cell cultures for different UV-B ranges have shown that irradiation at shorter wavelengths leads to a stronger release of proinflammatory cytokines that ar longer wavelengths with the same dose. Altogether it can be said that despite compelling theoretical evidence it is not easily possible to predict the actual consequences of an increase in particular of short-wave UV-B radiation at the earth's surface. The assumed effects must be examined individually by appropriate methods. (orig.)

  1. Radiation balance of coffee hedgerows Balanço de radiação de renques de cafeeiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz R. Angelocci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The radiation balance of hedgerows is an important variable in studies of mass and energy exchanges between parcial ground cover crops and the atmosphere. This paper describes a device with eight net radiometers encompassing the plants of a hedgerow. The radiometers were moved along a length of hedgerow, in a continuous and reversible movement. The canopy net radiation in this length (Rnc was found by integration of the measurements over the notional cylinder formed. The device showed good performance and provided reliable measurements of Rnc of coffee hedgerows, showing itselfto be an useful technique of measurement in field conditions. Good correlations between Rnc and global solar radiation, turfgrass and coffee crop net radiation were found in 15-min, daytime and 24-hr periods, allowing the possibility of estimating Rnc from these simple measurements. Beer’s law was also used to have an independent estimation of Rnc. A good agreement was found between values of Rnc estimated by this law of attenuation and those integrated by the device in periods of 15 min, with overestimation of 10%, whereas for values integrated over daytime periods the agreement was not satisfactory.A radiação, tanto de ondas curtas como de ondas longas, absorvida por um renque de plantas de uma cultura que cobre de forma descontínua o solo, é uma variável importante para os estudos das trocas de massa e de energia com a atmosfera. Este trabalho apresenta um dispositivo que movimenta oito saldo-radiômetros dispostos em torno de um renque. O movimento de ida e volta ao longo de um trecho de um renque, permite a integração do saldo de radiação na superfície de um cilindro nocional de medidas, representando o balanço de radiação (Rnc do trecho amostrado. O equipamento apresentou um bom desempenho quando empregado em dois cafezais, mostrando potencial para a realização de medidas de campo, com valores medidos confiáveis. Foram obtidas boas correla

  2. Attitudes of Kuwaiti public towards the radiation risks of nuclear medicine diagnositic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public perception of radiation risks of diagnostic imaging procedures differs from that of professionals working in the field. The perception probably varies among societies and may vary within the same society. The objective of this study is to determine the public perception in Kuwait represented by patients referred for nuclear medicine diagnostic studies. With the assistance of Arabic speaking investigators, 239 patients (139 males and 100 females) with a mean age of 37 years (Range of 15 to 90 years) completed a questionnaire about their opinion of radiation fear from the nuclear medicine procedures as well as their education, income, ability to speak English and foreign travel experience. Radiation phobia was measured by asking the patient to to the statement 'Radiation from nuclear medicine examination is likely to harm my body' by one of 5 choices, 1 strongly agree, 2 somewhat agree, 3 uncertain, 4 somewhat disagree, 5 strongly disagree. Responses 1 and 2 were classified as radiation phobia. Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression analysis were used for data analysis. Forty four percent of patients had radiation phobia. Only education significantly correlated with radiation phobia. Income, ability to speak English, age, gender or travel experience did not show significant correlation. Our study indicates that radiation phobia is common and is probably widespread throughout the society. Patient education should emphasize radiation benefits and actual risks and include the entire community. (authors)

  3. Perception and acceptance of risk from radiation exposure in space flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a number of factors that influence how a person views a particular risk. These include whether the risk is judged to be voluntary and/or controllable, whether the effects are immediate or delayed, and the magnitude of the benefits that are to be gained as a result of being exposed to the risk. An important aspect of the last factor is whether those who suffer the risks are also those who stand to reap the benefits. The manner in which risk is viewed is also significantly influenced by the manner in which it is framed and presented. In short, risk does not exist in the world independent of our minds and cultures, waiting to be measured. Assessments of risk are based on models whose structure is subjective and associated evaluations are laden with assumptions whose inputs are dependent on judgments. In fact, subjectivity permeates every aspect of risk assessment. The assessment of radiation risks in space is no exception. The structuring of the problem includes judgments related to the probability, magnitude, and effects of the various types of radiation likely to be encountered and assumptions related to the quantitative relationship between dose and a range of specific effects, all of which have associated uncertainties. For these reasons, there is no magic formula that will lead us to a precise level of acceptable risk from exposure to radiation in space. Acceptable risk levels must evolve through a process of negotiation that integrates a large number of social, technical, and economic factors. In the end, a risk that is deemed to be acceptable will be the outgrowth of the weighing of risks and benefits and the selection of the option that appears to be best

  4. Perception and acceptance of risk from radiation exposure in space flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovic, P.

    1997-04-30

    There are a number of factors that influence how a person views a particular risk. These include whether the risk is judged to be voluntary and/or controllable, whether the effects are immediate or delayed, and the magnitude of the benefits that are to be gained as a result of being exposed to the risk. An important aspect of the last factor is whether those who suffer the risks are also those who stand to reap the benefits. The manner in which risk is viewed is also significantly influenced by the manner in which it is framed and presented. In short, risk does not exist in the world independent of our minds and cultures, waiting to be measured. Assessments of risk are based on models whose structure is subjective and associated evaluations are laden with assumptions whose inputs are dependent on judgments. In fact, subjectivity permeates every aspect of risk assessment. The assessment of radiation risks in space is no exception. The structuring of the problem includes judgments related to the probability, magnitude, and effects of the various types of radiation likely to be encountered and assumptions related to the quantitative relationship between dose and a range of specific effects, all of which have associated uncertainties. For these reasons, there is no magic formula that will lead us to a precise level of acceptable risk from exposure to radiation in space. Acceptable risk levels must evolve through a process of negotiation that integrates a large number of social, technical, and economic factors. In the end, a risk that is deemed to be acceptable will be the outgrowth of the weighing of risks and benefits and the selection of the option that appears to be best.

  5. The functional assessment Berg Balance Scale is better capable of estimating fall risk in the elderly than the posturographic Balance Stability System A avaliação funcional Berg Balance Scale é capaz de estimar melhor o risco de quedas em idosos do que a posturografia Balance Stability System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Vieira Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to verify which instrument better identifies recurrent falls in the elderly. Ninety-eight old people, with an average age of 80±4 years, were submitted to an assessment of balance and fall risk by means of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS and the posturographic Balance Stability System (BSS. The BBS was correlated with the BSS (r=-0.27; p=0.008, age (r=-0.38; pA proposta do estudo foi verificar o instrumento que melhor identifica o risco de quedas recorrentes em idosos. O estudo incluiu 98 idosos, com média de idade de 80±4 anos, submetidos à avaliação do equilíbrio e risco de quedas por meio da Berg Balance Scale (BBS e da posturografia Balance Stability System (BSS. A BBS foi correlacionada com a BSS (r=-0,27; p=0,008, com a idade (r=-0,38; p<0,001 e com o número de quedas (r=-0,25; p=0,013. A análise de regressão logística mostrou que idosos classificados com risco de quedas na BBS apresentaram 2,5 (95%IC 1,08-5,78 mais chances de identificar quem teve duas quedas ou mais no último ano. A BBS identificou que quanto maior a idade pior é o equilíbrio funcional e demonstrou maior capacidade de identificar o risco de quedas sofridas no último ano quando comparada a BSS.

  6. Evidence Report: Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana; Huff, Janice; Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Blattnig, Steve; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposure from the space environment may result in non-cancer or non-CNS degenerative tissue diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cataracts, and respiratory or digestive diseases. However, the magnitude of influence and mechanisms of action of radiation leading to these diseases are not well characterized. Radiation and synergistic effects of radiation cause DNA damage, persistent oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and accelerated tissue aging and degeneration, which may lead to acute or chronic disease of susceptible organ tissues. In particular, cardiovascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis are of major concern following gamma-ray exposure. This provides evidence for possible degenerative tissue effects following exposures to ionizing radiation in the form of the GCR or SPEs expected during long-duration spaceflight. However, the existence of low dose thresholds and dose-rate and radiation quality effects, as well as mechanisms and major risk pathways, are not well-characterized. Degenerative disease risks are difficult to assess because multiple factors, including radiation, are believed to play a role in the etiology of the diseases. As additional evidence is pointing to lower, space-relevant thresholds for these degenerative effects, particularly for cardiovascular disease, additional research with cell and animal studies is required to quantify the magnitude of this risk, understand mechanisms, and determine if additional protection strategies are required.The NASA PEL (Permissive Exposure Limit)s for cataract and cardiovascular risks are based on existing human epidemiology data. Although animal and clinical astronaut data show a significant increase in cataracts following exposure and a reassessment of atomic bomb (A-bomb) data suggests an increase in cardiovascular disease from radiation exposure, additional research is required to fully understand and quantify these adverse outcomes at lower doses (less than 0.5 gray

  7. [Risk analysis in radiation therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, R; Aguini, N; Deutsch, É

    2013-01-01

    Five radiotherapy accidents, from which two serial, occurred in France from 2003 to 2007, led the authorities to establish a roadmap for securing radiotherapy. By analogy with industrial processes, a technical decision form the French Nuclear Safety Authority in 2008 requires radiotherapy professionals to conduct analyzes of risks to patients. The process of risk analysis had been tested in three pilot centers, before the occurrence of accidents, with the creation of cells feedback. The regulation now requires all radiotherapy services to have similar structures to collect precursor events, incidents and accidents, to perform analyzes following rigorous methods and to initiate corrective actions. At the same time, it is also required to conduct analyzes a priori, less intuitive, and usually require the help of a quality engineer, with the aim of reducing risk. The progressive implementation of these devices is part of an overall policy to improve the quality of radiotherapy. Since 2007, no radiotherapy accident was reported. PMID:23787020

  8. A novel tool for user-friendly estimation of natural, diagnostic and professional radiation risk: Radio-Risk software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Paterni, Marco [CNR, Institute of Clinical Physiology (Italy); Caramella, Davide [Radiology Department, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Vano, Eliseo [San Carlos Hospital, Radiology Department, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Picano, Eugenio, E-mail: picano@ifc.cnr.it [CNR, Institute of Clinical Physiology (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Background: Awareness of radiological risk is low among doctors and patients. An educational/decision tool that considers each patient' s cumulative lifetime radiation exposure would facilitate provider-patient communication. Aim: The purpose of this work was to develop user-friendly software for simple estimation and communication of radiological risk to patients and doctors as a part of the SUIT-Heart (Stop Useless Imaging Testing in Heart disease) Project of the Tuscany Region. Methods: We developed a novel software program (PC-platform, Windows OS fully downloadable at (http://suit-heart.ifc.cnr.it)) considering reference dose estimates from American Heart Association Radiological Imaging 2009 guidelines and UK Royal College of Radiology 2007 guidelines. Cancer age and gender-weighted risk were derived from Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation VII Committee, 2006. Results: With simple input functions (demographics, age, gender) the user selects from a predetermined menu variables relating to natural (e.g., airplane flights and geo-tracked background exposure), professional (e.g., cath lab workers) and medical (e.g., CT, cardiac scintigraphy, coronary stenting) sources. The program provides a simple numeric (cumulative effective dose in milliSievert, mSv, and equivalent number of chest X-rays) and graphic (cumulative temporal trends of exposure, cancer cases out of 100 exposed persons) display. Conclusions: A simple software program allows straightforward estimation of cumulative dose (in multiples of chest X-rays) and risk (in extra % lifetime cancer risk), with simple numbers quantifying lifetime extra cancer risk. Pictorial display of radiation risk may be valuable for increasing radiological awareness in cardiologists.

  9. A novel tool for user-friendly estimation of natural, diagnostic and professional radiation risk: Radio-Risk software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Awareness of radiological risk is low among doctors and patients. An educational/decision tool that considers each patient’ s cumulative lifetime radiation exposure would facilitate provider–patient communication. Aim: The purpose of this work was to develop user-friendly software for simple estimation and communication of radiological risk to patients and doctors as a part of the SUIT-Heart (Stop Useless Imaging Testing in Heart disease) Project of the Tuscany Region. Methods: We developed a novel software program (PC-platform, Windows OS fully downloadable at (http://suit-heart.ifc.cnr.it)) considering reference dose estimates from American Heart Association Radiological Imaging 2009 guidelines and UK Royal College of Radiology 2007 guidelines. Cancer age and gender-weighted risk were derived from Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation VII Committee, 2006. Results: With simple input functions (demographics, age, gender) the user selects from a predetermined menu variables relating to natural (e.g., airplane flights and geo-tracked background exposure), professional (e.g., cath lab workers) and medical (e.g., CT, cardiac scintigraphy, coronary stenting) sources. The program provides a simple numeric (cumulative effective dose in milliSievert, mSv, and equivalent number of chest X-rays) and graphic (cumulative temporal trends of exposure, cancer cases out of 100 exposed persons) display. Conclusions: A simple software program allows straightforward estimation of cumulative dose (in multiples of chest X-rays) and risk (in extra % lifetime cancer risk), with simple numbers quantifying lifetime extra cancer risk. Pictorial display of radiation risk may be valuable for increasing radiological awareness in cardiologists.

  10. Biological effects of radiation and health risks from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very fact that ionizing radiation produces biological effects is known from many years. The first case of injury reported by Sir Roentgen was reported just after a few months after discovery of X-rays in 1895. As early as 1902, the first case of X-ray induced cancer was reported in the literature. Early human evidence of harmful effects as a result of exposure to radiation in large amounts existed in the 1920s and 1930s, based upon the experience of early radiologists, miners exposed to airborne radioactivity underground, persons working in the radium industry, and other special occupational groups. The long-term biological significance of smaller, repeated doses of radiation, however, was not widely appreciated until relatively recently, and most of our knowledge of the biological effects of radiation has been accumulated since World War II. The mechanisms that lead to adverse health effects after exposure to ionizing radiation are still not fully understood. Ionizing radiation has sufficient energy to change the structure of molecules, including DNA, within the cells of the body. Some of these molecular changes are so complex that it may be difficult for the body's repair mechanisms to mend them correctly. However, the evidence is that only a small fraction of such changes would be expected to result in cancer or other health effects. The most thoroughly studied individuals for the evaluation of health effects of ionizing radiation are the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings, a large population that includes all ages and both sexes.The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Japan has conducted followup studies on these survivors for more than 50 years. An important finding from these studies is that the occurrence of solid cancers increases in proportion to radiation dose. More than 60% of exposed survivors received a dose of radiation of less than 100 mSv (the definition of low dose used by the BEIR VII report). (author)

  11. Radiation-related risks of non-cancer outcomes in the atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, K; Takahashi, I; Grant, E J

    2016-06-01

    Risks of non-cancer outcomes after exposure to atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation have been evaluated among the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort and its subcohort, the Adult Health Study (AHS). Information regarding non-cancer outcomes in the LSS is obtained from death certificates. In the AHS, members undergo clinical examinations biennially to determine their health status. Many AHS studies have been limited to participants attending the clinic over a limited period, and therefore have varying degrees of inferential utility; as such, care is required for comparison with the LSS results. Disease structure of non-cancer diseases in Japan has changed over the long follow-up period since the end of World War II. The health status of the A-bomb survivors may be associated with the hardships of living in a devastated city and impoverished country following the prolonged war effort, in addition to the direct effects of radiation exposure. Radiation-related risk of cardiovascular disease may have increased due to radiation-related increased risk of hypertension and other secondary associations, and the risk of atherosclerotic disorders has also been reported recently. These results should be interpreted with caution because of changes in disease definitions over the follow-up period. The radiation-related risk of non-cancer respiratory diseases also appears to have increased over the follow-up period, but the shapes of the dose-response curves have shown little consistency. PMID:26956675

  12. Case report: a balance training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit to reduce fall risk in an older adult with bilateral peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Renée Marie; Salvo, Charles J; Balent, Anthony; Keyasko, Michael; McGlynn, Deidre

    2015-02-01

    A recent systematic review supported the use of strength and balance training for older adults at risk for falls, and provided preliminary evidence for those with peripheral neuropathy (PN). However, the role of gaming systems in fall risk reduction was not explored. The purpose of this case report was to describe the use of the Nintendo® Wii™ Fit gaming system to train standing balance in a community-dwelling older adult with PN and a history of recurrent near falls. A 76-year-old patient with bilateral PN participated in 1 h of Nintendo® Wii™ Fit balance training, two times a week for 6 weeks. Examination was conducted using a Computerized Dynamic Posturography system (i.e. Sensory Organization Test (SOT), Limits of Stability (LOS), Adaptation Test (ADT) and Motor Control Test (MCT) and clinical testing with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and 30-s Chair Stand. Following training, sensory integration scores on the SOT were unchanged. Maximum excursion abilities improved by a range of 37-86% on the LOS test. MCT scores improved for amplitude with forward translations and ADT scores improved for downward platform rotations. Clinical scores improved on the BBS (28/56-34/56), ABC (57.5-70.6%) and TUG (14.9-10.9 s) which indicated reduced fall risk. Balance training with a gaming system showed promise as a feasible, objective and enjoyable method to improve physical performance and reduce fall risk in an individual with PN. PMID:25515202

  13. What Influences Public Opinion About Risks of Ionising Radiation in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ionising radiation is used in many different ways and for different purposes in medicine. First of all, it is used both in diagnosing (radiology and in nuclear medicine) and therapy. When diagnosing diseases at an early stage, the amount of ionising radiation must be adequate to its specific purpose. In therapeutic medical exposures the usage of ionising radiation is acceptable for treating malignant diseases. Benign diseases (e.g. hyperthyreosis), on the other hand, do not always have to be treated with ionising radiation. Considering public perception of the risks of ionising radiation and their concern for the possible consequences, there are few aspects of how patients accept its use in diagnostic and therapeutic medical exposures. Some people are demanding such examinations and treatments even when there's the least significant symptom of disease. Others are very sceptic and refuse to risk their health (they are afraid of cancer) or to cause genetic effects. Our efforts are concentrated on creating realistic understanding of radiation risk among people. Only specialists in this field are competent and trusting persons who should introduce the patient with the gist of the problem. Their approach should be individual, since and above all, they should use understandable phrases. The intention of this paper is to discuss the main sources of influence on public perception of the (in)sufficiency of radiation protection in diagnosis and treating diseases in medicine. (author)

  14. A legacy of Hiroshima and Nagasaki : risk estimates for radiation induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki fifty years ago ended the war in the Pacific and set the world agog at the prospect of new and frightening weapons for the future. Many residents of these cities, exposed to lesser than lethal amounts of radiation, survived to constitute the most remarkable radioepidemiological study of late radiation effects any of us could have imagined. These survivors and those relatively few among them who died of cancers attributable to radiation, provide us with our primary source of risk estimates for radiation induced cancer. As cancer is the principal low dose radiation effect these estimates are today at the core of our radiation protection system for workers and the public. In 1977 it was the risk estimates mainly from the LSS (Lifespan Study of the A-bomb survivors) estimated at about 1%/Sv that enabled ICRP to confirm the existing worker limit of 50mSv/y. In 1987, NCRP introduced a new and more restrictive occupational guideline because risk estimates from the LSS were known to be 'going up'. Continued surveillance of radioepidemiological studies and especially the LSS is a vital part of the scientific background of radiation protection. (author)

  15. Radiation effects on cancer risks in the life span study cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine late health effects of radiation in atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has been conducting studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) population, which consists of 93 000 atomic bomb survivors and 27.000 controls. A recent report on the incidence of solid cancers estimates that at the age of 70 y, after exposure at the age of 30 y, solid-cancer rates increase by about 35 % per Gy for men and 58 % per Gy for women. The age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. Furthermore, it seems that radiation-associated increases in cancer rates persist throughout life. In addition, radiation has similar effects upon first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. A recent report on leukemia mortality suggested that the effect of radiation on leukemia mortality persisted for more than five decades. In addition, a significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome is found in Nagasaki LSS members 40-60 y after radiation exposure. In view of the nature of the continuing increase in solid cancers, the LSS should continue to provide important new information on cancer risks, as most survivors still alive today were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation under the age of 20 y and are now entering their cancer-prone years. (authors)

  16. Technologically enhanced natural radiation and the significance of related risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologically enhanced natural radiation (TENR) is the result of a wide range of industrial activities, such as: non-nuclear energy production, manufacturing, and ore extraction and refining. In addition, recycling of industrial wastes (e.g. phosphogypsum, fly-ash) as construction material, special architectural characteristics (e.g. energy-efficient solar homes) and specific used (e.g. mineral storage by collectors) can cause an increased radiation exposure to workers and members of the public. The total collective effective dose equivalent commitment (CDEC) from the TENR on a global scale in about 400,000 man Sv per year of practice, predominantly due to the impact of the phosphate fertilizer industry. This is equivalent to about 140-times the CDEC resulting from the present complete nuclear fuel cycle worldwide. (author). 43 refs, 5 figs, 5 tabs

  17. Computer-aided methods for evaluating cancer risk in miners due to radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents some aspects of radiation hazard which occurs in a non-nuclear sector of industry, namely radiation hazard in non-uranium underground mines. The radiation hazard is caused in each type of underground mine by the naturally occurring noble radioactive gas-radon (222Rn) and radioactive products of its decay 218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi/214Po the so-called 'radon daughters' occurring in the mines' air. The paper presents the concept of how to provide a reliable system of assessment of miners' exposure by application of representative individual dosimetry, and also presents principles of computer-aided methods for interpretation of the results of miner's dosimetry useful for conversion of dosimetry data to the term of expected risk of cancer caused by exposure at miner's workplaces. The representative Individual Dosimetry system strengthened by computer-aided methods of analysis of results provided essential information on radiation cancer risk for miners employed in coal mines, metal-ore mines, chemical raw material mines in Poland. The coefficient of annual cancer risk induction is 1.5 x 10-4 year-1 for coal mines, 1.40 x 10-4 year-1 for metal ore mines and 1.5 x 10-4 year-1 for chemical raw material mines. The radiation risk appears to be of the same magnitude as the conventional risk of life loss at work-related accidents. The average Lost Life Expectancy coefficient for both the radiation risk and conventional risk are 0.5 and 0.3 year per each miner, respectively. (author)

  18. Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range

  19. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary

  20. The Dutch risk management policy and its impact for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1985 the environmental policy in the Netherlands is based on a quantitative risk management policy. This policy was developed for reasons of external safety and for the management of chemical substances in the environment. The experiences with this quantitative risk management policy are positive. An extension of the risk policy is currently in preparation: the risks of other aspects than the death of human beings will be included. For example, the risk of damage to the environmental production function of soils and water will be taken into account. Meanwhile, a policy whitebook on radiation protection standards is in preparation. In this whitebook the occupational and environmental aspects of radiation protection will be dealt with. The whitebook will be sent to Parliament in 1989. in the radiation protection policy to be developed there will be a strong relation between the quantitative risk management of the environmental policy and the system of radiation protection standards to be developed. In the paper some basic presumptions as well as the international context of changes in standard setting will be discussed. (author)