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Sample records for bakers yeast

  1. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized,...

  2. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  4. Accumulation of gold using Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have reported preconcentration of 152Eu, a long-lived fission product, by yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gold being a precious metal is used in electroplating, hydrogenation catalyst, etc. Heterogeneous composition of samples and low concentration offers renewed interest in its selective extraction of gold using various extractants. Gold can be recovered from different solutions using various chemical reagents like amines, organophosphorus compounds, and extractants containing sulphur as donor atom, etc. In the present work, two different strains of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been used to study the preconcentration of gold at various experimental conditions

  5. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast...

  6. Removal of heavy metal from industrial effluents using Baker's yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Anika; Maisha, Nuzhat; Sultana, Nayer; Ahmed, Shoeb

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation of wastewater containing heavy metals is one of the major challenges in environmental biotechnology. Heavy metals are not degraded and as a result they remain in the ecosystem, and pose serious health hazards as it comes in contact with human due to anthropogenic activities. Biological treatment with various microorganisms has been practiced widely in recent past, however, accessing and maintaining the microorganisms have always been a challenge. Microorganisms like Baker's yeast can be very promising biosorbents as they offer high surface to volume ratio, large availability, rapid kinetics of adsorption and desorption and low cost. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the biosorption process using baker's yeast. Here we present an experimental investigation of biosorption of Chromium (Cr) from water using commercial Baker's Yeast. It was envisaged that yeast, dead or alive, would adsorb heavy metals, however, operating parameters could play vital roles in determining the removal efficiency. Parameters, such as incubation time, pH, amount of biosorbent and heavy metal concentration were varied to investigate the impacts of those parameters on removal efficiency. Rate of removal was found to be inversely proportional to the initial Cr (+6) concentrations but the removal rate per unit biomass was a weakly dependent on initial Cr(+6) concentrations. Biosorption process was found to be more efficient at lower pH and it exhibited lower removal with the increase in solution pH. The optimum incubation time was found to be between 6-8 hours and optimum pH for the metal ion solution was 2. The effluents produced in leather industries are the major source of chromium pollution in Bangladesh and this study has presented a very cost effective yet efficient heavy metal removal approach that can be adopted for such kind of wastewater.

  7. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast by reducing sucrase activity in sweet dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Er; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Jia; Pi, Li; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Leavening ability in sweet dough is required for the commercial applications of baker's yeast. This property depends on many factors, such as glycolytic activity, sucrase activity, and osmotolerance. This study explored the importance of sucrase level on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Furthermore, the baker's yeast strains with varying sucrase activities were constructed by deleting SUC2, which encodes sucrase or replacing the SUC2 promoter with the VPS8/TEF1 promoter. The results verify that the sucrase activity negatively affects the leavening ability of baker's yeast strains under high-sucrose conditions. Based on a certain level of osmotolerance, sucrase level plays a significant role in the fermentation performance of baker's yeast, and appropriate sucrase activity is an important determinant for the leavening property of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Therefore, modification on sucrase activity is an effective method for improving the leavening properties of baker's yeast in sweet dough. This finding provides guidance for the breeding of industrial baker's yeast strains for sweet dough leavening. The transformants BS1 with deleted SUC2 genetic background provided decreased sucrase activity (a decrease of 39.3 %) and exhibited enhanced leavening property (an increase of 12.4 %). Such a strain could be useful for industrial applications. PMID:27041690

  8. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Matos, Cláudia; Møller, Birger L.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has...... recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results: Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis...... thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets...

  9. Baker's yeast as a potential substitute for live algae in aquaculture diets: Artemia as a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Coutteau, P.; Lavens, P.; Sorgeloos, P.

    1990-01-01

    In this study baker's yeast was evaluated as a substitute for live Dunaliella tertiolecta algae in the culture of the brine shrimp Artemia . Consumption of fresh baker's yeast resulted in poor growth and survival of brine shrimp. However, the nutritional value of the yeast significantly improved after complete removal of the yeast cell wall by enzymatic treatment. Baker's yeast was also made digestible for Artemia by simple chemical treatment which did not reduce rigidity of the yeast cell. T...

  10. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Jørgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1 were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Conclusion Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories.

  11. Biosorption of Copper Ions by Caustic Treated Waste Baker's Yeast Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Göksungur, Yekta; ÜREN, Sibel; Güvenç, Ulgar

    2003-01-01

    Waste baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used as a biosorbent for Cu+2 biosorption. The yeast cells were treated with caustic soda, ethanol and heat to increase their biosorption capacity. Among the treatment methods used, the highest copper uptake (21.1 mg g-1) was obtained with the caustic treatment of baker's yeast. The effect of initial copper concentration and pH on biosorption for caustic treated yeast was studied. The highest Cu+2 uptake (120.7 mg g-1) was obtained ...

  12. Treatment of the baker's yeast wastewater by electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the laboratory-scale experiments, treatment of baker's yeast production wastewater has been investigated by electrocoagulation (EC) using a batch reactor. Effects of the process variables such as pH, electrode material (Fe and Al), current density, and operating time are investigated in terms of removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), turbidity, and operating cost, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, TOC and turbidity under optimal operating conditions, i.e., pH 6.5 for Al electrode and pH 7 for Fe electrode, current density of 70 A/m2 and operating time of 50 min were 71, 53 and 90% for Al electrode and 69, 52 and 56% for Fe electrode, respectively. Al electrode gave 4.4 times higher removal efficiency of turbidity than Fe electrode due to interference from color of dissolved iron. The operating costs for Al and Fe electrodes in terms of $/m3 or $/kg COD were 1.54 and 0.82, 0.51 and 0.27, respectively

  13. Effect of yeast storage temperature and flour composition on fermentative activities of baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Dušanka J.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast is a set of living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It contains around 70-72% of water, 42-45% of proteins, around 40% of carbohydrates, around 7.5% of lipids (based on dry matter, and vitamin B-complex. On the basis of yeast cell analysis it can be concluded that yeast is a complex biological system which changes in time. The intensity of the changes depends on temperature. Yeast sample was stored at 4°C i 24°C for 12 days. During storage at 4°C, the content of total carbohydrates decreased from 48.81% to 37.50% (dry matter, whereas carbohydrate loss ranged from 40.81% to 29.28% at 24°C. The content of trehalose was 12.33% in the yeast sample stored at 4°C and 0.24% at 24°C. Loss of fermentative activity was 81.76% in the sample stored at 24°C for 12 days. The composition of five samples of 1st category flour was investigated. It was found that flours containing more reducing sugars and maltose enable higher fermentation activities. The flours with higher ash content (in the range 0.5-0.94% had higher contents of phytic acid. Higher ash and phytic contents in flour increased the yeast fermentative efficiency. In bakery industry, a range of ingredients has been applied to improve the product's quality such as surface active substances (emulsifiers, enzymes, sugars and fats. In the paper, the effect of some ingredients added to dough (margarine, saccharose, sodium chloride and malted barley on the yeast fermentative activity was studied. The mentioned ingredients were added to dough at different doses: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0%, flour basis. It was found that the investigated ingredients affected the fermentative activity of yeast and improved the bread quality.

  14. Catalytic activity of baker's yeast in a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Enas Taha; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi

    2012-08-01

    The catalytic activity of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a biocatalyst was investigated in a mediatorless microbial fuel cell. The yeast cells that adhered on the anode surface were the active biocatalyst for glucose oxidation in a mediatorless biofuel cell, suggesting that the electron transfer took place through the surface confined species. The species in the anolyte solution including the dispersed yeast cells did not take a part in the electron transfer and thus in the power generation. PMID:22357359

  15. Baker's Yeast: improving the D-stereoselectivity in reduction of 3-oxo esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The stereoselectivity of baker's yeast in the reduction of ethyl 3-oxopentanoate was shifted towards the corresponding (R)-hydroxy ester by sugar, heat treatment and allyl alcohol. The highest enantiomeric excesses obtained with baker's yeast with a good reduction capacity, 92-97%, were achieved by...... combining allyl alcohol and sugar; heat treatment did not increase the stereoselectivity further. With the use of this technique, ethyl (R)-3-hydroxyhexanoate, >99% ee, and ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate, 82-90% ee, were produced from the corresponding esters, and for the first time an excess of the...

  16. Uranium uptake by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) - development of a biological ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of micro-organisms for decontamination of, and heavy metal recovery from industrial waste water is a modern, low-cost, and environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional chemical and physical methods. The uptake of uranium by baker's yeast is investigated under the aspect of application in biotechnology. A novel, regenerable biological ion exchanger was produced by immobilisation of the yeast in agar gel. (orig.)

  17. Baker's yeast catalyzed asymmetric reduction of methyl acetoacetate in glycerol containing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Adi Wolfson; Nisim Haddad; Chrstina Dlugy; Dorith Tavor; Yoram Shotland

    2008-01-01

    The asymmetric hydrogenation of methyl acetoacetate was successfully performed with baker's yeast in pure glycerol and mixtures of glycerol and water. Though yeast viability was very low after exposure to glycerol, the enzymatic activity in pure glycerol was preserved for some days. In addition, a mixture of glycerol and water combined the advantageous of each individual solvent and resulted in high catalytic performance and efficient product extraction yield

  18. Baker's yeast catalyzed asymmetric reduction of methyl acetoacetate in glycerol containing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Wolfson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric hydrogenation of methyl acetoacetate was successfully performed with baker's yeast in pure glycerol and mixtures of glycerol and water. Though yeast viability was very low after exposure to glycerol, the enzymatic activity in pure glycerol was preserved for some days. In addition, a mixture of glycerol and water combined the advantageous of each individual solvent and resulted in high catalytic performance and efficient product extraction yield

  19. Effects of mill stream flours technological quality on fermentative activity of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirić Katarina V.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work in concerned with the interdependence between technological quality of mill stream flours and fermentative activity of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each mill stream flour has its own specific properties, determined by the particle size, technological phase of its formation and part of the wheat kernel it consists of. Biochemical complexity of dough during examination of fermentative activity of baker's yeast confirmed the influence of a number of physical and biochemical flour properties, such as ash content, wet gluten content, rheological flour properties, phytic acid content and amylograph peak viscosity. Abudance of significant flour characteristic, their interaction and different behavior in the presence of the yeast, showed diversity and variation of result within the same category of the mill stream flour.

  20. Model-based identification and control on baker's yeast fed-batch fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, E. C.; Soares, Filomena; Pimenta, Pedro C. C.; Azevedo, S. Feyo de

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study is reported concerning the control of baker's yeast fed-batch fermentation. The overall approach follows the methodology proposed by Bastin & Dochain (1990) which exploits the structure of a general nonlinear deterministic model for bioreactors. Software-sensors have been developed and employed for the on-line estimation of 'non-measured' state variables (Feyo de Azevedo et al., 1992). An adaptive linearizing control cheme, based as well on the g...

  1. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen Jørgen; Møller Birger L; Matos Claudia; Brochado Ana; Mortensen Uffe H; Patil Kiran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing ...

  2. The Treasure of the Humble: Lessons from Baker's Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaraman, Ramakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    The study of model organisms is a powerful and proven experimental strategy for understanding biological processes. This paper describes an attempt to utilize advances in yeast molecular biology to enhance student understanding by presenting a more comprehensive view of several interconnected molecular processes in the overall functioning of an…

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Baker's Yeast, suppresses the growth of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Badr El-Din, Nariman K; Noaman, Eman; Tolentino, Lucilene

    2008-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of anti-tumor activity of Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in immunocompetent mice. Swiss albino mice were inoculated intramuscularly in the right thigh with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) cells. At day 8, mice bearing Solid Ehrlich Carcinoma tumor (SEC) were intratumorally (IT) injected with killed S. cerevisiae (10 x 10(6) and 20 x 10(6) cells) for 35 days. Histopathology of yeast-treated mice showed extensive tumor degeneration, apoptosis, and ischemic (coagulative) and liquefactive necrosis. These changes are associated with a tumor growth curve that demonstrates a significant antitumor response that peaked at 35 days. Yeast treatment (20 x 10(6) cells) three times a week resulted in a significant decrease in tumor volume (TV) (67.1%, P Yeast administered three and two times per week induced significant decrease in TV as early as 9 and 25 days post-treatment, respectively. Administration of yeast significantly enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, including macrophages, into the tumors and triggered apoptosis in SEC cells as determined by flow cytometry (78.6%, P yeast treatment elevated TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma plasma levels and lowered the elevated IL-10 levels. No adverse side effects from the yeast treatment were observed, including feeding/drinking cycle and life activity patterns. Indeed, yeast-treated mice showed significant final body weight gain (+21.5%, P yeast, which is known to be safe for human consumption. PMID:17891396

  4. Bioareactor-on-a chip: application to Baker's yeast fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Filomena; Correia, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a miniaturized bioreactor (bioreactor-on-a-chip) applied to baker’s yeast fermentation. The bioreactor-on-a-chip is fabricated using a silicon and glass wafers applying micromachining technology (wet-etching techniques) in order to create microchannels, mixerchannels, microvalves. The miniaturization and integration allows smaller volumes to be used, which can be often rather challenging from the analytical point of view. Also, optical detection by absorption, ele...

  5. Kinetics of biosorption of cadmium on Baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Padma; Padmavathy, V; Dhingra, S C

    2003-09-01

    In the present study the kinetics of biosorption of cadmium(II) ions by deactivated protonated yeast converted to sodium form was investigated for different initial concentrations of the metal ion (10-100 ppm) and different sorbent dosages (0.1-2.0 g) at a pH of 6.5. The adsorption process occurred in four distinct steps and the rates for these steps decreased sequentially. The rate of cadmium uptake in each case was pseudo-second-order with respect to metal ion concentration. The amount sorbed at equilibrium was found to be directly proportional to the initial metal ion concentration divided by the sorbent mass. PMID:12798119

  6. Effect of Sodium Chloride on Bakers' Yeast Growing in Gelatin

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chia-Jenn; Robert D. Tanner; Malaney, George W.

    1982-01-01

    In recent years, industrial fermentation researchers have shifted their attention from liquid to solid and semisolid culture conditions. We converted liquid cultures to the semisolid mode by adding high levels of gelatin. Previous studies on liquid cultures have revealed the inhibitory activity of mineral salts, such as NaCl, on the fermentation of sugars by yeasts. We made a kinetic study of the effects of 1 to 5% (wt/vol) NaCl on the alcoholic fermentations of glucose by Saccharomyces cerev...

  7. Biosorption of monovalent and divalent ions on baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Padma; Padmavathy, V; Dhingra, S C

    2002-05-01

    Biosorption of monovalent ions Na+ and K+, by deactivated protonated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) at controlled pH, was compared with biosorption of divalent ions Ca2+ and Mg2+ to help to understand the underlying bindingmechanisms. The adsorption for monovalent ions was accompanied by H+ release. Divalent ions were sorbed by proton displacement, and also an additional mode not accompanied by release of H+. The sorption uptake of both monovalent and divalent metal ions increased with pH in the range 3-7 peaking at 6.75. Equilibrium sorption isotherms at pH = 6.75 showed that the totalmaximum biosorptive capacity for metal ions decreased in the following order: Ca > Mg > Na > or = K. PMID:11991078

  8. Production of Aromatic Plant Terpenoids in Recombinant Baker's Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerstorfer-Augustin, Anita; Pichler, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Plant terpenoids are high-value compounds broadly applied as food additives or fragrances in perfumes and cosmetics. Their biotechnological production in yeast offers an attractive alternative to extraction from plants. Here, we provide two optimized protocols for the production of the plant terpenoid trans-nootkatol with recombinant S. cerevisiae by either (I) converting externally added (+)-valencene with resting cells or (II) cultivating engineered self-sufficient production strains. By synthesis of the hydrophobic compounds in self-sufficient production cells, phase transfer issues can be avoided and the highly volatile products can be enriched in and easily purified from n-dodecane, which is added to the cell broth as second phase. PMID:26843167

  9. Radiation stimulation of yeast crops for increasing output of alcohol and baker yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to stimulate by gamma radiation the existing commercial types of yeast so as to obtain yeasts that would better reflect the substrate and have improved reproductive capacity. The experiments were conducted under ordinary conditions using commercial yeasts received from one factory producing alcohol and bakery yeasts and isolated as pure cultures. Irradiating yeast cultures with small doses (up to 10 krad) was found to stimulate the reproduction and fermenting activity of yeast cells as manifested in increased accumulation of yeast biomass and greater yield of ethyl alcohol. (E.T.)

  10. Biosorption behavior of strontium ions and mechanism analysis on baker's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The baker's yeast was utilized as biosorption material to remove Sr2+ from simulant aqueous solution. The effect factors on biosorption were analyzed, which included pH values, initial concentration (co) , adsorbent concentration (ρm), and temperature (t). Meanwhile, the correlation biosorption thermodynamics was analyzed and the mechanism of biosorption was researched. The results show that the optimum condition for biosorption is as follows: pH=4.5, t=30℃, c0 =1.0 mmol/L, ρm =4.0 g/L. The isotherm adsorption curve of Sr2+ under different temperatures accords well with the Langmuir and Freunlich absorption models, and both R2 are above 0.988. The biosorption of Sr2+ by yeast can proceed spontaneously under different temperatures. And the higher temperature is in favour of the spontaneous process of Sr2+ biosorption at the range of 10-30℃. The analysis indicates that there is chemisorption in the course of Sr2+ biosorption by yeast. The components of yeast cell, including polysaccharide and amide protein, are involved in the Sr2+ biosorption. And the principal absorption sites are the active sites on the cell wall surface. (authors)

  11. The Isolation of Invertase from Baker's Yeast: A Four-Part Exercise in Protein Purification and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerman, Anthony P.; Fenrick, Angela M.; Zamis, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    A sequence of exercises for the isolation and characterization of invertase (E.C. 3.1.2.26) from baker's yeast obtained from a local grocery store is outlined. Because the enzyme is colorless, the use of colored markers and the sequence of purification steps are designed to "visualize" the process by which a colorless protein is selectively…

  12. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Sasano Yu; Haitani Yutaka; Hashida Keisuke; Ohtsu Iwao; Shima Jun; Takagi Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Rece...

  13. Integrated biological (anaerobic-aerobic) and physico-chemical treatment of baker's yeast wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Starostina, E; Shcherbakov, S; Versprille, B

    2005-01-01

    The UASB reactor (35 degrees C) was quite efficient for removal of bulk COD (52-74%) from simulated (on the basis of cultivation medium from the first separation process) general effluent of baker's yeast production (the average organic loading rates varied from 8.1 to 16 g COD/l/d). The aerobic-anoxic biofilter (19-23 degrees C) can be used for removal of remaining BOD and ammonia from anaerobic effluents; however, it suffered from COD-deficiency to fulfil denitrification requirements. To balance COD/N ratio, some bypass (approximately 10%) of anaerobically untreated general effluent should be added to the biofilter feed. The application of iron (III)-, aluminium- or calcium-induced coagulation for post-treatment of aerobic-anoxic effluents can fulfil the limits for discharge to sewerage (even for colour mainly exerted by hardly biodegradable melanoidins), however, the required amounts of coagulants were relatively high. PMID:16459801

  14. Combined biological and physico-chemical treatment of baker's yeast wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Starostina, E; Shcherbakov, S; Versprille, A

    2005-01-01

    The UASB reactor (35 degrees C) was quite efficient for removal of bulk COD (52-74%) from the raw and diluted cultivation medium from the first separation process of baker's yeasts (the average organic loading rates varied in the range 3.7-16 g COD/I/d). The aerobic-anoxic biofilter (19-23 degrees C) can be used for removal of remaining BOD and ammonia from anaerobic effluents; however, it had insufficient COD to fulfil the denitrification requirements. To balance COD/N ratio, some bypass of raw wastewater (approximately 10%) should be added to the biofilter feed. The application of iron (III)-, aluminium- or calcium-induced coagulation for post-treatment of aerobic effluents can fulfil the limits for discharge to sewerage (even for colour mainly exerted by hardly biodegradable melanoidins), however, the required amounts of coagulants were relatively high. PMID:16180425

  15. Utilization of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for the production of yeast extract: effects of different enzymatic treatments on solid, protein and carbohydrate recovery

    OpenAIRE

    TATJANA VUKASINOVIC MILIC; MARICA RAKIN; SLAVICA SILER-MARINKOVIC

    2007-01-01

    Yeast extract (YE) was produced from commercial pressed baker's yeast (active and inactivated) using two enzymes: papain and lyticase. The effects of enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the recovery of solid, protein and carbohydrate were investigated. Autolysis, as a basic method for cell lysis was also used and the results compared. The optimal extraction conditions were investigated. The optimal concentrations of papain and lyticase were found to be 2.5 % and 0.025 %, respectively.

  16. Utilization of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of yeast extract: effects of different enzymatic treatments on solid, protein and carbohydrate recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA VUKASINOVIC MILIC

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeast extract (YE was produced from commercial pressed baker's yeast (active and inactivated using two enzymes: papain and lyticase. The effects of enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the recovery of solid, protein and carbohydrate were investigated. Autolysis, as a basic method for cell lysis was also used and the results compared. The optimal extraction conditions were investigated. The optimal concentrations of papain and lyticase were found to be 2.5 % and 0.025 %, respectively.

  17. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper. PMID:26965428

  18. Biosorption of nickel(II) ions by baker's yeast: kinetic, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, V

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the biosorption of nickel(II) ion on deactivated protonated yeast was investigated as a function of temperature at different initial metal ion concentrations. The effect of temperature on the sorption was more significant at lower nickel(II) ion concentrations compared to higher concentrations. The protonated yeast biomass exhibited the highest nickel(II) ion uptake capacity at 27 degrees C at an initial nickel(II) ion concentration of 400mg/l and an initial pH of 6.75. The biosorption capacity decreased from 9.8 to 9.3mg/g at an initial nickel(II) ion concentration of 400mg/l, while at a lower initial concentration of 100mg/l, it decreased from 8.2 to 4.9 mg/g, as the temperature was increased from 27 degrees C to 60 degrees C. The equilibrium data fit better to the Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherm models compared to the Langmuir model in the concentration range studied (10-400mg/l). Kinetic models applied to the sorption data at different temperatures showed that nickel(II) ion uptake process followed the pseudo-second order rate model and the adsorption rate constants decreased with increasing temperature. The activation energy of biosorption (Ea) was determined to be -13.3 kJ/mol using the pseudo-second order rate constants. The results indicated that the biosorption of nickel(II) ion on to baker's yeast was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Desorption studies revealed that the protonated yeast biomass can be regenerated using 0.1N HCl and reused. PMID:17683930

  19. Evaluation of baker's yeast strains exhibiting significant growth on Japanese beet molasses and compound analysis of the molasses types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hiroaki; Tamura, Masahiko; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2014-06-01

    Cane molasses, most of which is imported, is used as a raw material for production of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in Japan. On the other hand, beet molasses is scarcely used for this purpose, but it can be of great advantage to cane molasses because it is domestically produced in relatively high amounts as a by-product of beet sugar processing. However, the yield of baker's yeast is sometimes low with Japanese beet molasses compared to imported cane molasses. For the production of baker's yeast with Japanese beet molasses, we evaluated S. cerevisiae strains, including industrial and laboratory strains, to group them according to the growth profile on beet and cane molasses. To discuss the factors affecting growth, we further analyzed the major compounds in both types of molasses. Beet molasses seems to contain compounds that promote the growth of beet molasses-favoring strains rather than inhibit the growth of cane molasses-favoring strains. It was assumed that α-amino acid was one of the growth promotion factors for beet molasses-favoring strains. PMID:24333188

  20. Matrix factorization-based data fusion for gene function prediction in baker's yeast and slime mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective methods for the characterization of gene functions that are able to combine diverse data sources in a sound and easily-extendible way is an important goal in computational biology. We have previously developed a general matrix factorization-based data fusion approach for gene function prediction. In this manuscript, we show that this data fusion approach can be applied to gene function prediction and that it can fuse various heterogeneous data sources, such as gene expression profiles, known protein annotations, interaction and literature data. The fusion is achieved by simultaneous matrix tri-factorization that shares matrix factors between sources. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by evaluating its performance on predicting ontological annotations in slime mold D. discoideum and on recognizing proteins of baker's yeast S. cerevisiae that participate in the ribosome or are located in the cell membrane. Our approach achieves predictive performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art kernel-based data fusion, but requires fewer data preprocessing steps. PMID:24297565

  1. Treatment of the baker's yeast wastewater by electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobya, M. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, 41400 Gebze (Turkey)], E-mail: kobya@gyte.edu.tr; Delipinar, S. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, 41400 Gebze (Turkey)

    2008-06-15

    In the laboratory-scale experiments, treatment of baker's yeast production wastewater has been investigated by electrocoagulation (EC) using a batch reactor. Effects of the process variables such as pH, electrode material (Fe and Al), current density, and operating time are investigated in terms of removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), turbidity, and operating cost, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, TOC and turbidity under optimal operating conditions, i.e., pH 6.5 for Al electrode and pH 7 for Fe electrode, current density of 70 A/m{sup 2} and operating time of 50 min were 71, 53 and 90% for Al electrode and 69, 52 and 56% for Fe electrode, respectively. Al electrode gave 4.4 times higher removal efficiency of turbidity than Fe electrode due to interference from color of dissolved iron. The operating costs for Al and Fe electrodes in terms of $/m{sup 3} or $/kg COD were 1.54 and 0.82, 0.51 and 0.27, respectively.

  2. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasano Yu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS

  3. Construction from a single parent of baker's yeast strains with high freeze tolerance and fermentative activity in both lean and sweet doughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S; Ouchi, K

    1994-10-01

    From a freeze-tolerant baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), 2,333 spore clones were obtained. To improve the leavening ability in lean dough of the parent strain, we selected 555 of the high-maltose-fermentative spore clones by using a method in which a soft agar solution containing maltose and bromocresol purple was overlaid on yeast colonies. By measuring the gassing power in the dough, we selected 66 spore clones with a good leavening ability in lean dough and a total of 694 hybrids were constructed by crossing them. Among these hybrids, we obtained 50 novel freeze-tolerant strains with good leavening ability in all lean, regular, and sweet doughs comparable to that of commercial baker's yeast. Hybrids with improved leavening ability or freeze tolerance compared with the parent yeast and commercial baker's yeasts were also obtained. These results suggest that hybridization between spore clones derived from a single parent strain is effective for improving the properties of baker's yeasts. PMID:7986027

  4. Maximizing biomass concentration in baker's yeast process by using a decoupled geometric controller for substrate and dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopda, Viki R; Rathore, Anurag S; Gomes, James

    2015-11-01

    Biomass production by baker's yeast in a fed-batch reactor depends on the metabolic regime determined by the concentration of glucose and dissolved oxygen in the reactor. Achieving high biomass concentration in turn is dependent on the dynamic interaction between the glucose and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taking this into account, we present in this paper the implementation of a decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) for maximizing biomass in a fed-batch yeast process. The decoupling is based on the inversion of 2×2 input-output matrix resulting from global linearization. The DIOLC was implemented online using a platform created in LabVIEW employing a TCP/IP protocol via the reactor's built-in electronic system. An improvement in biomass yield by 23% was obtained compared to that using a PID controller. The results demonstrate superior capability of the DIOLC and that the cumulative effect of smoother control action contributes to biomass maximization. PMID:26233328

  5. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Katsuya; Nakamura, Hitomi; Nakanishi, Kazuma

    2014-02-01

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol-gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  6. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol–gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  7. A Comparison of the Beneficial Effects of Live and Heat-Inactivated Baker's Yeast on Nile Tilapia: Suggestions on the Role and Function of the Secretory Metabolites Released from the Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ran

    Full Text Available Yeast is frequently used as a probiotic in aquaculture with the potential to substitute for antibiotics. In this study, the involvement and extent to which the viability of yeast cells and thus the secretory metabolites released from the yeast contribute to effects of baker's yeast was investigated in Nile tilapia. No yeast, live yeast or heat-inactivated baker's yeast were added to basal diets high in fishmeal and low in soybean (diet A or low in fishmeal and high in soybean (diet B, which were fed to fish for 8 weeks. Growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine and head kidney were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Gut alkaline phosphatase (AKP activity was measured after challenging the fish with Aeromonas hydrophila. Results showed that live yeast significantly improved FBW and WG (P < 0.05, and tended to improve FCR (P = 0.06 of fish compared to the control (no yeast. No significant differences were observed between inactivated yeast and control. Live yeast improved gut microvilli length (P < 0.001 and density (P < 0.05 while inactivated yeast did not. The hsp70 expression level in both the intestine and head kidney of fish was significantly reduced by live yeast (P < 0.05 but not inactivated yeast. Live yeast but not inactivated yeast reduced intestinal expression of tnfα (P < 0.05, tgfβ (P < 0.05 under diet A and il1β (P = 0.08. Intestinal Lactococcus spp. numbers were enriched by both live and inactivated yeast. Lastly, both live and inactivated yeast reduced the gut AKP activity compared to the control (P < 0.001, indicating protection of the host against infection by A. hydrophila. In conclusion, secretory metabolites did not play major roles in the growth promotion and disease protection effects of yeast. Nevertheless, secretory metabolites were the major contributing factor towards improved gut

  8. Improved synchronous light scattering method for measuring baker's yeast biomass using thickened suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Guo, Xiangfeng; Jia, Lihua; Ding, Ying

    2013-08-01

    Measuring yeast biomass is important in the processes of microbial fermentations. It has been demonstrated that synchronous light scattering (SLS) signals could be applied for the quantification of model bioparticles such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, an improved synchronous light scattering method was developed for yeast biomass estimation. The settlement of yeast cells during SLS signals measuring process was studied, and hydrolysis anionic polyacrylamide was added into yeast suspensions to increase the stability of the cells in liquid environment. By simultaneously scanning both the excitation and emission monochromators of a common spectrofluorometer with same starting excitation and emission wavelength (namely, ∆λ = 0), the SLS intensity was found to be proportional to the yeast concentration in the range from 0 to 4.9 × 10(6) cell/mL (R (2) = 0.9907), the detection limit is 8.1 × 10(3) cell/mL. The developed method exhibited good stability and sensitivity in the recovery test and growth curve drawing process, demonstrating the potential of the method in practical application of biomass estimation. PMID:23529355

  9. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26471666

  10. A comprehensive web resource on RNA helicases from the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, P; Gasteiger, E; Bairoch, A

    2000-04-01

    Members of the RNA helicase protein family are defined by several motifs that have been widely conserved during evolution. They are found in all organisms-from bacteria to humans-and many viruses. The minimum number of RNA helicases present within a eukaryotic cell can be predicted from the complete sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Recent progress in the functional analysis of various family members has confirmed the significance of RNA helicases for most cellular RNA metabolic processes. We have assembled a web resource that focuses on RNA helicases from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It includes descriptions of RNA helicases and their functions, links to sequence- and yeast-specific databases, an extensive list of references, and links to non-yeast helicase web resources. PMID:10790687

  11. Baker's yeast beta glucan supplementation increases salivary IgA and decreases cold/flu symptomatic days after intense exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Brian K; Carpenter, Katie C; Davidson, Tiffany; McFarlin, Meredith A

    2013-09-01

    Strenuous exercise, such as running a marathon, is known to suppress mucosal immunity for up to 24 hr, which can increase the risk of developing an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and reduced performance capacity (Allgrove JE, Geneen L, Latif S, Gleeson M. Influence of a fed or fasted state on the s-IgA response to prolonged cycling in active men and women. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2009;19(3):209-221; Barrett B, Locken K, Maberry R, Schwamman J, Brown R, Bobula J, Stauffacher EA. The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS): a new research instrument for assessing the common cold. J Fam Pract. 2002;51(3):265; Carpenter KC, Breslin WL, Davidson T, Adams A, McFarlin BK. Baker's yeast beta glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk? Br J Nutr. 2012;1-9). While many dietary interventions have been used to combat postexercise immune suppression, most have been ineffective. The key purpose of this study was to determine if baker's yeast β-glucan (BG) could positively affect the immune system of individuals undergoing intense exercise stress using two experiments. In the first (E1; N = 182 men and women), BG was compared to placebo supplementation for the incidence of URTI symptoms for 28 days postmarathon. In the second (E2; N = 60 men and women) changes in salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) were evaluated after 50-min of strenuous cycling when participants had been supplemented for 10 days with either BG (250 mg/day) or placebo (rice flour). For E1, subjects reported URTI symptoms using a daily health log. For E2, saliva was collected prior to, immediately, and 2-hr postexercise using a salivette. Data for E1 and E2 were analyzed using separate analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with repeated measures (p < .05). In E1, BG was associated with a 37% reduction in the number of cold/flu symptom days postmarathon compared to placebo (p = .026). In E2, BG was associated with a 32% increase in

  12. Some Practical Aspects of Sugar Fermentation by Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes simple quantitative determinations for ethanol and carbon dioxide, together with techniques for examining the effects of a number of environmental factors on their production. The experimental work centers around the growth of a cell population of yeast, and is suitable for senior high school students. (JR)

  13. Thermal and spectroscopic studies on sorption of nickel(II) ion on protonated baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, V; Vasudevan, Padma; Dhingra, S C

    2003-09-01

    Protonated form (Hy) of yeast was subjected to thermal analysis (TGA and DTG) in the temperature range 60-800 degrees C. Chemically bound water volatilizes around 200 degrees C and the matrix undergoes extensive oxidative decomposition at 450 degrees C, the weight loss reaching 75% at 800 degrees C. The sorption capacity of the matrix for nickel(II) ion increases on heat treatment from 60 to 200 degrees C (from 16.9 to 25.0 mg/g), but was reduced on heating to higher temperatures at an initial nickel(II) ion concentration of 1200 mg/g. The FTIR spectra of Hy and nickel(II) ion saturated yeast, indicated that biosorption occurs on the sugar and nucleic acid regions, possibly involving --COOH and --NH groups. PMID:12871747

  14. Bio sorption of Uranium by baker's yeast in the presence of Lead and Cadmium and modeling of equilibrium data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio sorption technology is one of the novel technologies used for removal and recovery of radioactive metals from aqueous solutions. Scheduled researches are required for this technique. In this research, bio sorption of uranium, lead and cadmium by immobilized baker's yeast on calcium alginate was investigated. Equilibrium parameters in single systems and binary systems (uranium-lead and uranium-cadmium) were studied. The obtained results in single systems showed that the uranium uptake capacity is higher than that of lead and cadmium. Also, according to the observations in binary systems, the uranium uptake capacity was decreased by interferences of lead or cadmium ions. Nevertheless, uranium uptake capacity in these binary systems is high (more than 130 mg g-1 in uranium-lead and 200 mg g-1 in uranium-cadmium binary systems). The equilibrium isotherms were modeled by Langmuir, Freundlich and combination Langmuir-Freundlich models in single systems and the competitive Langmuir, modified extended Langmuir, extended Freundlich and combination Langmuir-Freundlich models in binary systems. According to the results, the Freundlich model in single systems and the extended Freundlich model in binary systems were found to be better than the others.

  15. Baker's yeast catalyzed asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones in different reaction mediums

    OpenAIRE

    Adi Wolfson; Christina Dlugy; Dorith Tavor

    2013-01-01

    Baker’s yeast catalyzes the asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones in water and in various organic solvents. The reaction in water, which is the first solvent of choice for bio-reactions, led to a high product yield and enantiomeric excess, but the low miscibility of organic molecules in water resulted in lower conversions when more hydrophobic ketones were used. Petroleum-based solvents such as hexane and petroleum ether were also successfully employed as reaction mediums, but the viabili...

  16. Teaching microbial physiology using glucose repression phenomenon in baker's yeast as an examplele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayendran, Raghavendran; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used by human beings since ancient times for its ability to convert sugar to alcohol. Continual exposure to glucose in the natural environment for innumerable generations has probably enabled S. cerevisiae to grow in fermentative mode on sugars by...... experiments of the wild type and a mutant that lacks a trait partially responsible for the fermentative behavior. Various undergraduate student exercises have been (and can be) formulated to illustrate the concept of glucose repression....

  17. Molecular Cloning and Yeast Expression of Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase from Ornithogalum saundersiae Baker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Qiang Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OSW-1, isolated from the bulbs of Ornithogalum saundersiae Baker, is a steroidal saponin endowed with considerable antitumor properties. Biosynthesis of the 4-methoxybenzoyl group on the disaccharide moiety of OSW-1 is known to take place biochemically via the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, but molecular biological characterization of the related genes has been insufficient. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11, catalyzing the hydroxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to p-coumaric acid, plays a key role in the ability of phenylpropanoid metabolism to channel carbon to produce the 4-methoxybenzoyl group on the disaccharide moiety of OSW-1. Molecular isolation and functional characterization of the C4H genes, therefore, is an important step for pathway characterization of 4-methoxybenzoyl group biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for C4H, designated as OsaC4H, was isolated according to the transcriptome sequencing results of Ornithogalum saundersiae. The full-length OsaC4H cDNA is 1,608-bp long, with a 1,518-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 505 amino acids, a 55-bp 5′ non-coding region and a 35-bp 3'-untranslated region. OsaC4H was functionally characterized by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and shown to catalyze the oxidation of trans-cinnamic acid to p-coumaric acid, which was identified by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD, HPLC-MS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The identification of the OsaC4H gene was expected to open the way to clarification of the biosynthetic pathway of OSW-1.

  18. Molecular cloning and yeast expression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from Ornithogalum saundersiae baker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian-Qiang; Lu, Di; Wang, Zhi-Biao

    2014-01-01

    OSW-1, isolated from the bulbs of Ornithogalum saundersiae Baker, is a steroidal saponin endowed with considerable antitumor properties. Biosynthesis of the 4-methoxybenzoyl group on the disaccharide moiety of OSW-1 is known to take place biochemically via the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, but molecular biological characterization of the related genes has been insufficient. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11), catalyzing the hydroxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to p-coumaric acid, plays a key role in the ability of phenylpropanoid metabolism to channel carbon to produce the 4-methoxybenzoyl group on the disaccharide moiety of OSW-1. Molecular isolation and functional characterization of the C4H genes, therefore, is an important step for pathway characterization of 4-methoxybenzoyl group biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for C4H, designated as OsaC4H, was isolated according to the transcriptome sequencing results of Ornithogalum saundersiae. The full-length OsaC4H cDNA is 1,608-bp long, with a 1,518-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 505 amino acids, a 55-bp 5' non-coding region and a 35-bp 3'-untranslated region. OsaC4H was functionally characterized by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and shown to catalyze the oxidation of trans-cinnamic acid to p-coumaric acid, which was identified by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), HPLC-MS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The identification of the OsaC4H gene was expected to open the way to clarification of the biosynthetic pathway of OSW-1. PMID:24476601

  19. Scientific Opinion on the safety of vitamin D-enriched UV-treated bakers yeast

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA)

    2014-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of “UV-treated baker’s yeast” (Lallemand SAS) as a novel food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97, taking into account the comments and objections of a scientific nature raised by Member States. The novel food ingredient (NFI) is baker’s yeast treated with UV irradiation to induce the conversion of ergos...

  20. Baker's yeast catalyzed asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones in different reaction mediums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Wolfson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Baker’s yeast catalyzes the asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones in water and in various organic solvents. The reaction in water, which is the first solvent of choice for bio-reactions, led to a high product yield and enantiomeric excess, but the low miscibility of organic molecules in water resulted in lower conversions when more hydrophobic ketones were used. Petroleum-based solvents such as hexane and petroleum ether were also successfully employed as reaction mediums, but the viability of the yeast in these solvents was negligible, and they have severe environmental impacts due to their high toxicity levels. Performing the reaction in green solvents, like ionic liquids, fluorous media, and glycerol-based solvents, which have low volatilities and can be recycled, enabled dissolution of the substrates and of the energy source and also promoted isolation of the product. Among all tested green solvents, glycerol-based solvents are preferable due to their biodegradable natures and their origins from renewable sources.

  1. Influence of addition of amylase preparation to dough on fermentative activity of baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodić Jelena M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dough samples with different content of amylases were investigated immediately after mixing and after 7, 14 and 30 days of frozen storage. The obtained results show that the fermentation time is shorter, both in fresh and frozen samples, when amylase sample 1 was added, compared to dough without enzymes. The addition of amylase 2 to dough resulted in minimal decrease of "rising" time, both is frozen and fresh dough samples. The rising time of fresh samples was shorter when amylase 3 was added to dough. The specific fermentative activity of fresh dough samples is increasing by about 10% compared to the control sample, for all amounts of amylase 1 and 2 added to the do- ugh. The fermentative activity of yeast in frozen samples increased by 5-10%, after keeping of dough with the addition of amylase 1 for 14 days. The specific fermentative activity of fresh dough samples increased compared to the control, for all amounts of added amylase 3 to the dough. In frozen dough samples the fermentative activity of yeast decreased by 10% for all added amounts of amylase 3. Baked goods made of fresh and frozen dough, prepared with the addition of amylase 1, are better than the ones made of control dough sample, considering all evaluated parameters.

  2. Direct conversion of starch into ethanol in a gas-solid fluidized bed fermenter with technical amylases and baker's yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moebus, O.; Teuber, M.

    1985-02-01

    Our experiments have shown that solid substrate fermentations in a gas-solid fluidized bed reactor can be used with starch for producing ethanol. Ground modified rice (0,3 mm mesh) was fluidized with pressed baker's yeast particles and powdered enzyme preparations of ..cap alpha..-amylase and amyloglucosidase in the reactor, gassed with carbon dioxide, which was added before fermentation or produced by the fermentation, and humidified by spraying deionized water with a two phase nozzle into the bed. The modified starch absorbed water, which allowed the amylases to attack the starch. The glucose set free was transformed by the yeast into ethanol and carbon dioxide. This system offers an alternative to the recently developed methods of coimmobilisation.

  3. Dowex anion exchanger-loaded-baker's yeast as bi-functionalized biosorbents for selective extraction of anionic and cationic mercury(II) species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowex anion exchanger-immobilized-baker's yeast [Dae-yeast] were synthesized and potentially applied as environmental friendly biosorbents to evaluate the up-take process of anionic and cationic mercury(II) species as well as other metal ions. Optimization of mass ratio of Dowex anion exchanger versus yeast (1:1-1:10) in presence of various interacting buffer solutions (pH 4.0-9.0) was performed and evaluated. Surface modification of [Dae-yeast] was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy. The maximum metal biosorption capacity values of [Dae-yeast] towards mercury(II) were found in the range of 0.800-0.960, 0.840-0.950 and 0.730-0.900 mmol g-1 in presence of buffer solutions pH 2.0, 4.0 and 7.0, respectively. Three possible and different mechanisms are proposed to account for the biosorption of mercury and mercuric species under these three buffering conditions based on ion exchange, ion pair and chelation interaction processes. Factors affecting biosorption of mercury from aqueous medium including the pH effect of aqueous solutions (1.0-7.0), shaking time (1-30 min) and interfering ions were searched. The potential applications of modified biosorbents for selective biosorption and extraction of mercury from different real matrices including dental filling waste materials, industrial waste water samples and mercury lamp waste materials were also explored. The results denote to excellent percentage extraction values, from nitric acid as the dissolution solvent with a pH 2.0, as determined in the range of 90.77-97.91 ± 3.00-5.00%, 90.00-93.40 ± 4.00-5.00% and 92.31-100.00 ± 3.00-4.00% for the three tested samples, respectively.

  4. Isolation and Screening of Haploid of Baker's Yeast with High Sugar Tolerance%耐高糖面包酵母单倍体的分离筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封冰; 张翠英; 肖冬光

    2014-01-01

    Spore-producing culture of baker's yeast BY-6 with high sugar tolerance was carried out to obtain its haploids. 6 strains of type alpha haploid and 5 strains of type a haploid were separated and identified by matching and PCR authentication. Compared with the parental strain, a-70 strain andα-24 strain were obtained based on their excellent performance in biomass, growth curve, fermentation ability in high-sugar dough, and gas production in the simulation of high-sugar dough. This study laid a good foundation for genetic breeding of baker's yeast with high sugar toler-ance in the future.%以耐高糖面包酵母BY-6为出发菌株进行生孢培养制备单倍体,通过单倍体的分离、配型验证和PCR验证,获得6株α型单倍体,5株a型单倍体。通过比较单倍体菌株的生长和发酵性能,筛选出生长性能较好,在高糖模拟面团中产气量较大,并且在高糖面团中发酵力较高的优良单倍体菌株70a和24α,这为后续通过基因工程改造提高面包酵母的高糖耐性奠定了良好的基础。

  5. Measurement of the gassing power of bakers' yeast: correlation between the dough volume and the incubation time

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Borzani

    2004-01-01

    An empirical equation is proposed to correlate the dough volume and the incubation time during cylinder tests using thin flour dough carried out to evaluate the gassing power of compressed yeast. The above equation permitted to correlate the gassing power of the yeast and the proof time, as well as to calculate the specific rate of the dough volume variation at any time. It provided more information regarding the fermentation power of the yeast than the sole value of its gas-producing power. ...

  6. Chemoselective biohydrogenation of chalcone (2Ε)-3-(1,3-benzodioxole-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one mediated by baker yeasts immobilized in polymeric supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, baker's yeast (BY) was immobilized in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), sodium caseinate (SC), gelatin (G) films and in agar (A) and gelatin (G) gels, and used as a biocatalyst in the biohydrogenation reaction of (2Ε)-3-(1,3-benzodioxyl-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one (1). The transformation of (1) into the corresponding dehydro chalcone (2) through biohydrogenation reactions was carried out in n-hexane at 25 or 35 deg C, for 4-48 h reaction. The product conversion, under different experimental conditions, was evaluated by hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, 1H NMR.The highest conversion degrees were achieved using BY immobilized in agar gel, (29-47%), depending also on the temperature. Using BY immobilized in PEO, PVA, SC and G films, the conversion into (2) was lower (0-21%). The results show the feasibility of the use of BY immobilized in polymeric materials to reduce a,b-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. (author)

  7. The linear structure of β-glucan from baker's yeast and its activation of macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xing; Zou, Siwei; Xu, Hui; Liu, Qingye; Song, Jianhui; Xu, Min; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lina

    2016-09-01

    Yeast β-glucan has many formulations with different chemical structures, water solubility and purity. In particular, the purity of β-glucan in these formulations is variable and relatively low, contributing to different data on its biological activity. In this study, the major polysaccharide component in the crude Baker's yeast polysaccharides coded as BBG with high purity of 99% was obtained, and its chemical structure was determined to be a linear β-(1,3)-glucan. It was found that BBG interacted with complement receptor 3 (CR3) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on the surface of macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells, and initiated activation of RAW264.7 cells characterized by significant production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1). Additionally, activation of the nuclear factor kappaB p65 (NF-κB p65), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) induced by BBG, were also observed, further confirming the stimulation of RAW264.7 cells by BBG. All these findings provided important scientific evidences for better understanding the molecular mechanism of action for the linear β-(1,3)-glucan in cells. PMID:27185116

  8. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Katsuya, E-mail: katsuya-kato@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, 463-8560 (Japan); Nakamura, Hitomi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, 463-8560 (Japan); Nakanishi, Kazuma [Department of Chemistry for Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurimamachiya-cho, Tsu, Mie, 514-8570 (Japan)

    2014-02-28

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol–gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  9. Combined biological and physico-chemical treatment of baker's yeast wastewater including removal of coloured and recalcitrant to biodegradation pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladchenko, M; Starostina, E; Shcherbakov, S; Versprille, B; Kalyuzhnyi, S

    2004-01-01

    The UASB reactor (35 degrees C) was quite efficient for removal of bulk COD (62-67%) even for such high strength and recalcitrant wastewater as the cultivation medium from the first separation process of baker'syeasts (the average organic loading rates varied from 3.7 to 10.3 g COD/l/d). The aerobic-anoxic biofilter (20 degrees C) can be used for removal of remaining BOD and ammonia from strong nitrogenous anaerobic effluents; however, it suffered from COD-deficiency to fulfil denitrification requirements. To balance the COD/N ratio, some bypass of raw wastewater should be added to the biofilter feed. The application of iron chloride coagulation for post-treatment of aerobic effluents may fulfil the discharge limits (even for colour mainly exerted by hardly biodegradable melanoidins) under iron concentrations around 200 mg/l. PMID:15497831

  10. Scientific Opinion on the safety of vitamin D-enriched UV-treated baker’s yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of “UV-treated baker’s yeast” (Lallemand SAS as a novel food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC No 258/97, taking into account the comments and objections of a scientific nature raised by Member States. The novel food ingredient (NFI is baker’s yeast treated with UV irradiation to induce the conversion of ergosterol to vitamin D2. The applicant intends to use the NFI during the production of yeast-leavened bread, rolls, fine pastry and food supplements. The Panel considers that the provided compositional data, the specification, the data from batch testing, data on the stability on the production process are sufficient and do not give rise to safety concerns. The Panel concludes that the data provided are sufficient and do not give rise to safety concerns.The applicant intends to use the NFI as an alternative source of vitamin D for food supplements and for fortification of yeast-leavened bread, rolls and fine pastry at maximum concentrations of 5 μg vitamin D2 per 100 g of these foods. The applicant provided combined intake estimates for these two food categories for “all subjects” and “consumers only”. The source for the production of the NFI is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an organism with a long history of safe food use. Even if the NFI is used at the maximum intended use levels, which deliver 5 µg vitamin D/100 g bread, rolls and fine pastry, it is highly unlikely that Tolerable Upper Intake Levels as established by EFSA (EFSA NDA Panel, 2012 are exceeded. The Panel considers that UV-treated baker’s yeast exhibiting an enhanced content of vitamin D2 is safe under the intended conditions of use.

  11. Entropy of Baker's Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾长福

    2003-01-01

    Four theorems about four different kinds of entropies for Baker's transformation are presented. The Kolmogorov entropy of Baker's transformation is sensitive to the initial flips by the time. The topological entropy of Baker's transformation is found to be log k. The conditions for the state of Baker's transformation to be forbidden are also derived. The relations among the Shanonn, Kolmogorov, topological and Boltzmann entropies are discussed in details.

  12. Structural, thermal, functional, antioxidant & antimicrobial properties of β-d-glucan extracted from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cereviseae)-Effect of γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asma Ashraf; Gani, Adil; Masoodi, F A; Amin, Furheen; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad; Gani, Asir

    2016-04-20

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of γ-irradiation (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 & 50kGy) on the structural, functional, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of yeast β-d-glucan. The samples were characterized by ATR-FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the thermal properties were studied using DSC. There was a decrease in the average molecular weight of β-d-glucan as the irradiation dose increased. The functional properties of irradiated yeast β-d-glucan were largely influenced by the action of gamma radiation like swelling power and viscosity decreases with increase in the irradiation dose while as fat binding capacity, emulsifying properties, foaming properties and bile acid binding capacity shows an increasing trend. All the antioxidant properties carried out using six different assays increased significantly (p≤0.05) in a dose dependent manner. The antibacterial activity of yeast β-d-glucan also showed an increasing trend with increase in the irradiation dose from 5 to 50kDa. PMID:26876872

  13. Overexpression of O‐methyltransferase leads to improved vanillin production in baker's yeast only when complemented with model‐guided network engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Patil, Kiran R.

    2013-01-01

    limited in eukaryotic systems. In this study, we compared the effects of overexpressing a key gene in de novo vanillin biosynthesis (coding for O‐methyltransferase, hsOMT) in two yeast strains, with and without model‐guided global network modifications. Overexpression of hsOMT resulted in increased...... vanillin production only in the strain with model‐guided modifications, exemplifying advantage of using a global strategy prior to local pathway manipulation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 656–659. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  14. On-line determination of Sb(III) and total Sb using baker's yeast immobilized on polyurethane foam and hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was immobilized in cubes of polyurethane foam and the ability of this immobilized material to separate Sb(III) and Sb(V) was investigated. A method based on sequential determination of total Sb (after on-line reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) with thiourea) and Sb(III) (after on-line solid-liquid phase extraction) by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry is proposed. A flow system assembled with solenoid valves was used to manage all stages of the process. The effects of pH, sample loading and elution flow rates on solid-liquid phase extraction of Sb(III) were evaluated. Also, the parameters related to on-line pre-reduction (reaction coil and flow rates) were optimized. Detection limits of 0.8 and 0.15 μg L-1 were obtained for total Sb and Sb(III), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of river water and effluent samples. The results obtained for the determination of total Sb were in agreement with expected values, including the river water Standard Reference Material 1640 certified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Recoveries of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in spiked samples were between 81 ± 19 and 111 ±15% when 120 s of sample loading were used

  15. Baker Omitted Value

    OpenAIRE

    Chakra, Tarun Kumar; Chakraborty, Gorachand; Nayak, Tarakanta

    2015-01-01

    We define Baker omitted value, in short bov, of an entire or meromorphic function f in the complex plane as an omitted value for which there exists r0 > 0 such that for each ball Dr(a) centered at a and with radius r satisfying 0 < r < r0, every component of the boundary of f only asymptotic value. An entire function has bov if and only if the image of every unbounded curve is unbounded. It follows that an entire function has bov whenever it has a Baker wandering domain. Functions with bov ha...

  16. Baker: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 2412

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The graduate of the Baker apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) prepare and bake all types of high quality yeast raised products in commercial quantities; (2) produce and decorate various types of cakes, cookies and pastries commonly available in commercial bakeries; (3) use efficiently and safely all hand…

  17. The Baker's cyst - a diagnostic problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise definition of Baker's cyst has been prevented by variety of synonyms. Following anatomical description, Baker's determination, and investigations of myself one should differentiate between the rupture of capsule, bursa semimembranos-gastrocnemia, and Baker's cyst because thea are clearly independent from the pathologic-anatomical point of view. Clinical importance of Baker's cyst in connection with further diseases of the knee joint and therapeutical possibilities are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Consumption of agro-industrial supplies by the baker subsector of Palmira, Valle, Colombia. Consumo de insumos agroindustriales por el subsector panificador de Palmira, Valle del Cauca.

    OpenAIRE

    Adarme J Wilson; Álvarez P. Camilo

    2007-01-01

    The indicators of agroindustrial consumption in the bakers subsector Pymes play a primary role for designing sustainable strategies for the small craftsman of bread. The administrative, operative and human talent subsystems were evaluated, in 30 of 178 organizations that conformed the bakers subsystems of Palmira on 2005. The estimated annual consumption of wheat flour on 2004 was 2016 t; 348 t of sugar; 240 t of cheese; 54 t of salt; 492 t of margarine; 99 t of yeast; 151200 panels of eggs. ...

  19. Respiratory cancer in Danish bakers: a 10 year cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Tüchsen, F; Nordholm, L.

    1986-01-01

    A national cohort based on the census at 9 November 1970 and the death registration files from 1970 to 1980 was analysed to see if skilled Danish bakers had an excess of respiratory cancer. The group of skilled bakers was divided into occupational subgroups to try to narrow down the possible causes of cancer. Significant excess mortality was found among skilled bakers in retail bakeries, skilled bakers in hotels and restaurants, and independent bakers. To adjust for confounding factors, the S...

  20. Pühendusega isadele - Baker Street

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Üritusest 7. novembril Kuressaares Arensburg lounge-restoranis Muusa toimuvast isadepäevahõngulisest üritusest, esinevad Virgo Veldi & Band kavaga "Baker Street", erikülalisena Villu Veski. Saksofonistist Virgo Veldist

  1. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Baker Island 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 8 sites at Baker Island in the US...

  2. Some Aspects of Catalase Induction in Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Described are experiments for demonstrating essential features of substrate-induced enzyme synthesis based on the Jacob-Monod model, and for showing that the activity of certain genes can be modified by environmental temperature. (RH)

  3. Periodic operation of a continuous culture of Baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulesz, E M; Lyberatos, G

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of enhancing the biomass productivity of a continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on a glucose-limited medium is addressed. An unstructured Monod-type model is first identified using steady-state data. The culture is subjected to step changes in dilution rate, and it is seen that the Monod model is unable to predict even qualitatively the dynamic response of the culture. Incorporation of a time delay allows significant improvement in the transient fit. It is found that the culture has a time lag of about 3 h in adapting its growth rate. Cycling the dilution rate with a period of 3 h leads to substantial improvement in the average biomass productivity. PMID:18588160

  4. Laboratory evolution of copper tolerant yeast strains

    OpenAIRE

    Adamo Giusy; Brocca Stefania; Passolunghi Simone; Salvato Benedetto; Lotti Marina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Yeast strains endowed with robustness towards copper and/or enriched in intracellular Cu might find application in biotechnology processes, among others in the production of functional foods. Moreover, they can contribute to the study of human diseases related to impairments of copper metabolism. In this study, we investigated the molecular and physiological factors that confer copper tolerance to strains of baker's yeasts. Results We characterized the effects elicited in ...

  5. Josephine Baker: psychoanalysis and the colonial fetish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Anne Anlin

    2006-01-01

    This paper traces an intricate path connecting racial fantasy, aesthetic judgment, and the larger cultural problem of inter-subjective recognition. In particular, the author examines the theme of fetishism, both sexual and racial, in a Western historical, colonial context, in order to unravel a set of disturbances that cohere around the racial fetish then and now. Taking the figure of an entertainment icon of the 1920s, Josephine Baker, as a case study, the author shows how the imagination of the colonizing white male was both articulated and disrupted by Baker as a ready-made representation of the cultural, racial, and sexual other. PMID:16482962

  6. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  7. Adaptive color quantization using the baker's transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Montagne, Christophe; Lelandais, Sylvie; Smolarz, André; Cornu, Philippe; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2006-01-01

    International audience In this article we propose an original technique to reduce the number of colors contained in an image. This method uses the "Bakers Transformation", which obtains a statistically suitable mixture of the pixels of the image. mm this mixture, we can extract several samples, which present the same characteristics as the initial image. The concept we imagined is to consider these samples as potential pallets of colors. These pallets make it possible to do an adaptive qua...

  8. Shuffling cards, factoring numbers, and the quantum baker's map

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshminarayan, Arul

    2005-01-01

    It is pointed out that an exactly solvable permutation operator, viewed as the quantization of cyclic shifts, is useful in constructing a basis in which to study the quantum baker's map, a paradigm system of quantum chaos. In the basis of this operator the eigenfunctions of the quantum baker's map are compressed by factors of around five or more. We show explicitly its connection to an operator that is closely related to the usual quantum baker's map. This permutation operator has interesting...

  9. Wheat flour sensitisation and airways disease in urban bakers.

    OpenAIRE

    Prichard, M G; Ryan, G.; Musk, A W

    1984-01-01

    A total of 176 bakers and 24 subjects employed as bread slicers and wrappers were studied to examine the effect of occupational category on respiratory symptoms, ventilatory capacity, non-specific bronchial reactivity, and prick skin test responses to wheat and common allergens. Bakers had a greater prevalence of attacks of wheeze and dyspnoea and more frequently considered that work affected their chests than did slicers and wrappers. Bakers with a history of asthma with onset since starting...

  10. Transforming women's lives:Bobby Baker's performances of Daily Life

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    In an earlier issue of New Theatre Quarterly, NTQ55 (August 1998), Marcia Blumberg examined the setting of the kitchen in performances by Bobby Baker and Jeanne Goosen, arguing for the 'transitional and transgressive' possibilities of this domesticum-performance space. Here, Elaine Aston returns to the 'kitchen' in Bobby Baker's performances of 'daily life.' The article examines Baker's 'language' of food which 'speaks' of domesticity, and her conjunction of comic playing and the hysterical m...

  11. Yeast as a platform to explore polyglutamine toxicity and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duennwald, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases caused by polyglutamine expansion proteins, such as Huntington's disease. The model organism baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has provided important general insights into the basic cellular mechanisms underlying protein misfolding. Furthermore, experiments in yeast have identified cellular factors that modulate the toxicity and the aggregation associated with polyglutamine expansion proteins. Notably, many features discovered in yeast have been proven to be highly relevant in other model organisms and in human pathology. The experimental protocols depicted here serve to reliably determine polyglutamine toxicity and polyglutamine aggregation in yeast. PMID:23719914

  12. Josephine Baker: A Chanteuse and a Fighter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konomi Ara

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available

    This excerpt is from her newly-published biography of Josephine Baker, “A Fighting Diva.” It tells the intriguing story of Baker’s travels to Japan, her close friendship with the Japanese humanitarian Miki Sawada, and her adoption of a pair of Japanese orphans. Even after she achieved celebrity in France, Baker’s experience as a Black American led her to develop an antiracist philosophy at a worldwide level, and she combined political militancy in the public sphere with a personal commitment through the formation of an international multiracial household of children, the “Rainbow Tribe.”

  13. Josephine Baker: A Chanteuse and a Fighter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konomi Ara

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This excerpt is from her newly-published biography of Josephine Baker, “A Fighting Diva.” It tells the intriguing story of Baker’s travels to Japan, her close friendship with the Japanese humanitarian Miki Sawada, and her adoption of a pair of Japanese orphans. Even after she achieved celebrity in France, Baker’s experience as a Black American led her to develop an antiracist philosophy at a worldwide level, and she combined political militancy in the public sphere with a personal commitment through the formation of an international multiracial household of children, the “Rainbow Tribe.”

  14. Pre-employment screening among trainee bakers.

    OpenAIRE

    De Zotti, R; Molinari, S.; Larese, F; Bovenzi, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the prevalence of atopy in a vocational school so as to evaluate the feasibility of pre-employment screening. METHODS--The prevalence of atopy by family diathesis, prick tests, immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentrations, and personal history of allergic respiratory diseases was investigated in 144 trainee bakers and 81 students on a graphic artists course (mean age 15.4 years). Skin sensitisation to wheat, rye, and barley flours, to alpha amylase, and to storage mites was als...

  15. Obituary: James Gilbert Baker, 1914-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Neal Kenton

    2005-12-01

    Dr. James Gilbert Baker, renowned astronomer and optical physicist, died 29 June 2005 at his home in Bedford, New Hampshire at the age of 90. Although his scientific interest was astronomy, his extraordinary ability in optical design led to the creation of hundreds of optical systems that supported astronomy, aerial reconnaissance, instant photography (Polaroid SX70 camera), and the US space programs. He was the recipient of numerous awards for his creative work. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on 11 November 1914, the fourth child of Jesse B. Baker and Hattie M. Stallard. After graduating from Louisville DuPont Manual High, he went on to attend the University of Louisville majoring in Mathematics. He became very close to an Astronomy Professor, Dr. Moore, and many times used his telescopes to do nightly observations. While at the university, he built mirrors for his own telescopes and helped form the Louisville Astronomical Society in 1933. At the University of Louisville, he also met his future wife, Elizabeth Katherine Breitenstein of Jefferson County, Kentucky. He received his BA in 1935 at the height of the Depression. He began his graduate work in astronomy at the Harvard College Observatory. After his MA (1936), he was appointed a Junior Fellow (1937-1943) in the Prestigious Harvard Society of Fellows. He received his PhD in 1942 from Harvard in rather an unusual fashion, which is worth retelling. During an Astronomy Department dinner, Dr. Harlow Shapley (the director) asked him to give a talk. According to the "Courier-Journal Magazine", "Dr. Shapley stood up and proclaimed an on-the-spot departmental meeting and asked for a vote on recommending Baker for a Ph.D. on the basis of the 'oral exam' he had just finished. The vote was unanimous." It was at Harvard College Observatory during this first stage of his career that he collaborated with Donald H. Menzel, Lawrence H. Aller, and George H. Shortley on a landmark set of papers on the physical processes

  16. Study on Biological Characters of Asparagus macowanii Baker.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Asparagus macowanfi Baker, is a climbing herbaceous foliage species in genus Asparagus of Liliaceae, This paper summarized its multiple uses, morphologi- cal characteristics, biological habit, reproduction methods, management after cultiva- tion, prevention and control of pests and disease, as well as harvest and grading, with the objective to provide references for the exploitation and utilization of As- paragus macowanii Baker.

  17. Optimization of feeding strategy for the ergosterol production by yeasts saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Mojmir Rychtera; Josef Cermak; Jaroslav Votruba; Jan Nahlik; Karel Melzoch; Christopher A. Kent; Estela Escalante, Waldir D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective of this study was to optimize ergosterol production by yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the use of computer controlled feeding of cultivation medium. Baker´s yeasts strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally modified and selected as mutant D7 was further applied in an industrial scale and also in this investigation. Composition of cultivation medium was optimized with the use of a modified Rosenbrock´s method with regard to following components: glucose, yeast extract, ...

  18. Celebrating the Fiftieth Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery: The Legacy of Thomas J. Baker, M.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuzin, James M

    2016-02-01

    The Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery celebrates its fiftieth year. A review of its history mirrors the evolution of aesthetic surgery in terms of advancements in techniques, and the acceptance of cosmetic surgery as a credible subspecialty of plastic surgery. Beginning in 1967, the Baker Gordon Symposium was the first live surgery symposium that focused on aesthetic surgery, and set a precedent for aesthetic surgery education over the ensuing decades. Historically, the pioneers in aesthetic techniques first presented their innovations at the Baker Gordon Symposium, helping to educate and train their peers to perform cosmetic procedures. The legacy of Thomas Baker is intertwined with the history of the Baker Gordon Symposium, both in terms of his contributions to plastic surgery education, and to the acceptance of the subspecialty of aesthetic surgery. PMID:26818283

  19. Yeast Genomics for Bread, Beer, Biology, Bucks and Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharkar, Kishore R.; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    The rapid advances and scale up of projects in DNA sequencing dur ing the past two decades have produced complete genome sequences of several eukaryotic species. The versatile genetic malleability of the yeast, and the high degree of conservation between its cellular processes and those of human cells have made it a model of choice for pioneering research in molecular and cell biology. The complete sequence of yeast genome has proven to be extremely useful as a reference towards the sequences of human and for providing systems to explore key gene functions. Yeast has been a ‘legendary model’ for new technologies and gaining new biological insights into basic biological sciences and biotechnology. This chapter describes the awesome power of yeast genetics, genomics and proteomics in understanding of biological function. The applications of yeast as a screening tool to the field of drug discovery and development are highlighted and the traditional importance of yeast for bakers and brewers is discussed.

  20. Baker Island National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Baker Island NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  1. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Baker Island 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at Baker Island in the US...

  2. Intramuscular dissection of Baker's cysts: report on three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker's cysts are fluid distensions of the gastrocnemius-semimembranosus bursa and are the most common cystic lesion around the knee. Typically cysts enlarge along intermuscular planes around the knee. We report three cases in which the expanding cyst did not respect these planes and dissected along an intramuscular route as confirmed by MR imaging. Such behaviour by Baker's cysts is hitherto unreported in the literature. Possible mechanisms to account for this phenomenon are discussed. (orig.)

  3. The genome of wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis provides a tool to explore its food-related properties

    OpenAIRE

    Piskur, Jure

    2012-01-01

    The yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis can cause enormous economic losses in wine industry due to production of phenolic off-flavor compounds. D. bruxellensis is a distant relative of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nevertheless, these two yeasts are often found in the same habitats and share several food-related traits, such as production of high ethanol levels and ability to grow without oxygen. In some food products, like lambic beer, D. bruxellensis can importantly contribut...

  4. Yeast: a microbe with macro-implications to antimicrobial drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balibar, Carl J; Roemer, Terry

    2016-03-01

    Paramount to any rational discovery of new antibiotics displaying novel mechanisms of action is a deep knowledge of the genetic basis of microbial growth, division and virulence. The bakers' yeast,Saccharomyces cerevisiae, illustrates the highest understanding of the genetic underpinnings of microbial life, and from this framework, a systems biology paradigm has evolved, begging to be emulated in antibacterial discovery. Here, we review landmark events in the history of yeast genomics that provide this new foundation for antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:26443612

  5. Purification and Characterization of Enzymes from Yeast: An Extended Undergraduate Laboratory Sequence for Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.; McIntyre, Neil R.; Thompson, Marleesa

    2013-01-01

    Providing a project-based experience in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory class can be complex with large class sizes and limited resources. We have designed a 6-week curriculum during which students purify and characterize the enzymes invertase and phosphatase from bakers yeast. Purification is performed in two stages via ethanol…

  6. Pulmonary hypersensitivity to Alternaria and Aspergillus in baker's asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaustermeyer, W B; Bardana, E J; Hale, F C

    1977-05-01

    In two cases of baker's asthma pulmonary hypersensitivity was found to the fungi Alternaria and Aspergillus. Provocative bronchial challenge revealed a dual response; an immediate and an Arthus type hypersensitivity to Aspergillus in the first case. A primary binding assay revealed high titres of anti-Aspergillus antibody in the serum. In the second case intradermal and bronchial challenge suggested an immediate type I hypersensitivity response to Alternaria. The suspected organisms were present in the room air of the bakeries. It is suggested that an immunological response to these airborne fungi may have contributed to the pathogenesis of baker's asthma. PMID:561668

  7. Hypersensitivity to Perturbations in the Quantum baker's Map

    CERN Document Server

    Schack, R

    1999-01-01

    We analyze a randomly perturbed quantum version of the baker's transformation, a prototype of an area-conserving chaotic map. By numerically simulating the perturbed evolution, we estimate the information needed to follow a perturbed Hilbert-space vector in time. We find that the Landauer erasure cost associated with this information grows very rapidly and becomes much larger than the maximum statistical entropy given by the logarithm of the dimension of Hilbert space. The quantum baker's map thus displays a hypersensitivity to perturbations that is analogous to behavior found earlier in the classical case. This hypersensitivity characterizes ``quantum chaos'' in a way that is directly relevant to statistical physics.

  8. Disturbance and Celebration of Josephine Baker in Copenhagen 1928

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanger, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    discourses. Drawing upon Sarah Ahmed’s (2004, 2006) approach to affect, the article analyses the way in which Baker’s performance produced harm and fear, but also desire and celebration involving gender and sexuality in the Danish society. The body of Josephine Baker was both celebrated by the Danish culture...

  9. Yeast fuel cell: Application for desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardiana, Ummy; Innocent, Christophe; Cretin, Marc; Buchari, Buchari; Gandasasmita, Suryo

    2016-02-01

    Yeasts have been implicated in microbial fuel cells as biocatalysts because they are non-pathogenic organisms, easily handled and robust with a good tolerance in different environmental conditions. Here we investigated baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the oxidation of glucose. Yeast was used in the anolyte, to transfer electrons to the anode in the presence of methylene blue as mediator whereas K3Fe(CN)6 was used as an electron acceptor for the reduction reaction in the catholyte. Power production with biofuel cell was coupled with a desalination process. The maximum current density produced by the cell was 88 mA.m-2. In those conditions, it was found that concentration of salt was removed 64% from initial 0.6 M after 1-month operation. This result proves that yeast fuel cells can be used to remove salt through electrically driven membrane processes and demonstrated that could be applied for energy production and desalination. Further developments are in progress to improve power output to make yeast fuel cells applicable for water treatment.

  10. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg2+, and [γ-32P]ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH α subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg2+, and Ca2+. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the α subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg

  11. Identification and Population Dynamics of Yeasts in Sourdough Fermentation Processes by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Meroth, Christiane B.; Hammes, Walter P.; Hertel, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Four sourdoughs (A to D) were produced under practical conditions, using a starter obtained from a mixture of three commercially available sourdough starters and baker's yeast. The doughs were continuously propagated until the composition of the microbiota remained stable. A fungi-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) system was established to monitor the development of the yeast biota. The analysis of the starter mixture revealed the presence of Candida humilis, Debaryo...

  12. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Baker Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Baker Quadrangle, Oregon, and Idaho, was evaluated to identify areas containing geologic environments favorable for uranium deposits. The criteria used was developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Stream-sediment reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by subsurface-data interpretion and an aerial radiometric survey. Results indicate that lower Pliocene sedimentary rocks in the Lower Powder River Valley-Virtue Flat basin are favorable characteristics, they remain unevaluated because of lack of subsurface data. Tertiary sandstones, possibly present at depth in the Long and Cascade Valleys, also remain unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data. All remaining environments in the Baker Quadrangle are unfavorable for all classes of uranium deposits

  13. A novel pattern classification scheme using the Baker's map

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Alan; Keating, John; Shorten, Robert

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel application of nonlinear systems in the design of pattern classification systems. We show that pattern classification systems can be designed based upon training algorithms designed to control the qualitative behaviour of a nonlinear system. Our paradigm is illustrated by means of a simple chaotic system-the Baker's map. Algorithms for training the system are presented and examples are given to illustrate the operation and learning of the system for pattern classificati...

  14. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the 32P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation

  15. Exposure-response relations for self reported asthma and rhinitis in bakers

    OpenAIRE

    Brisman, J.; Jarvholm, B; Lillienberg, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To explore relations between two estimates of exposure to inhalable flour dust, and the incidence rates (IRs) of asthma and rhinitis in bakers.
METHODS—This was a retrospective cohort study among 2923 bakers. A posted questionnaire registered the disease and work history. For every year, each baker was assigned an estimate of the exposure concentration to inhalable flour dust derived from reported job-tasks and dust measurements. Exposure at onset of disease was expressed as curren...

  16. [Isolation and catalytic properties of the soluble monomeric form of inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasho, V N; Bakuleva, N P; Baĭkov, A A; Avaeva, S M

    1982-06-01

    Data from sedimentation analysis suggest that modification of about 40% of free amino groups of inorganic pyrophosphatase by maleic anhydride, pH 10.5, results in a loss of the enzyme ability to form dimers at neutral values of pH. The specific activity of monomeric pyrophosphatase is 50-80% of that of the dimeric form. The monomer has a pH optimum of about 7, requires metal ions for activation of both enzyme and substrate and is capable of exergonic synthesis of PPi in the active center. The enzyme binding to PPi is strongly stabilized by fluoride. The experimental data indicate that the individual subunit of inorganic pyrophosphatase possesses all the main catalytic properties of native dimeric molecule. PMID:6126223

  17. Teaching microbial physiology using glucose repression phenomenon in baker's yeast as an examplele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayendran, Raghavendran; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    switching off the genes responsible for respiration even under aerobic conditions. This phenomenon is referred to as the Crabtree effect. The present review focuses on glucose repression in S. cerevisiae from a physiological perspective. Physiological studies presented involve batch and chemostat...... experiments of the wild type and a mutant that lacks a trait partially responsible for the fermentative behavior. Various undergraduate student exercises have been (and can be) formulated to illustrate the concept of glucose repression....

  18. Baker's yeast drying in conical spouted bed: multiscale experiments and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Spreutels, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Le séchage est une opération unitaire pratiquée depuis des millénaires pour laquelle les connaissances scientifiques sont encore très incomplètes. Il est cependant de plus en plus nécessaire de « bien » sécher afin d’atteindre une combinaison optimale du temps de séchage, de l’énergie consommée et surtout de la qualité du produit final. Ceci est d’autant plus vrai dans le cadre du séchage alimentaire où de nombreux produits sont très sensibles à la température et à la déshydratation. C’est le...

  19. Yeast redoxyendonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme similar to Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A DNA repair endonuclease (redoxyendonuclease) was isolated from bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The enzyme has been purified by a series of column chromatography steps and cleaves OsO4-damaged, double-stranded DNA at sites of thymine glycol and heavily UV-irradiated DNA at sites of cytosine, thymine, and guanine photoproducts. The base specificity and mechanism of phosphodiester bond cleavage for the yeast redoxyendonuclease appear to be identical with those of Escherichia coli endonuclease III when thymine glycol containing, end-labeled DNA fragments of defined sequence are employed as substrates. Yeast redoxyendonuclease has an apparent molecular size of 38,000-42,000 daltons and is active in the absence of divalent metal cations. The identification of such an enzyme in yeast may be of value in the elucidation of the biochemical basis for radiation sensitivity in certain yeast mutants

  20. Respiratory symptoms and sensitization in bread and cake bakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T A; Smith, P W

    1998-07-01

    This purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between exposure to wheat flour, soya flour and fungal amylase and the development of work-related symptoms and sensitization in bread and cake bakery employees who have regular exposure to these substances. The study populations consisted of 394 bread bakery workers and 77 cake bakery workers whose normal jobs involved the sieving, weighing and mixing of ingredients. The groups were interviewed with the aim of identifying the prevalence, nature and pattern of any work-related respiratory symptoms. They were also skin-prick tested against the common bakery sensitizing agents, i.e., wheat flour, soya flour, rice flour and fungal amylase. The results of personal sampling for sieving, weighing and mixing operations at the bakeries from which the study groups were taken were collated in order to determine typical exposures to total inhalable dust from the ingredients, expressed as 8 hour time-weighted average exposures. Data from the health surveillance and collated dust measurements were compared with the aim of establishing an exposure-response relationship for sensitization. The prevalence of work-related symptoms in bread bakery and cake bakery ingredient handlers was 20.4% and 10.4% respectively. However, in a large proportion of those reporting symptoms in connection with work, the symptoms were intermittent and of short duration. It is considered that the aetiology of such symptoms is likely to be due to a non-specific irritant effect of high total dust levels, rather than allergy. None of the cake bakers and only 3.1% of the bread bakers had symptoms which were thought to be due to allergy to baking ingredients. Using skin-prick testing as a marker of sensitization, the prevalence of positive tests to wheat flour was 6% for the bread bakers and 3% for the cake bakers. Comparable prevalences for soya flour were 7% and 1% respectively. However, the prevalence of positive skin-prick tests to fungal amylase

  1. Foundations of invasion genetics: the Baker and Stebbins legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Spencer C H

    2015-05-01

    Invasion genetics is a relatively new discipline that investigates patterns of genetic variation in populations of invasive species and their ecological and evolutionary consequences. Evolutionary biologists have a long-standing interest in colonizing species, owing to their short life cycles and widespread distributions, but not until publication of The Genetics of Colonizing Species (1965), edited by H.G. Baker and G.L. Stebbins, was a synthesis on the genetics and evolution of colonizers available. Here, I make the case that the Baker and Stebbins volume is the foundational document for invasion genetics, and in conjunction with the increased use of genetic markers and development of invasion biology, resulted in the birth of this new field over the past two decades. I consider the historical origins and legacy of the Baker and Stebbins volume and review some of the key issues that were addressed. I provide biographical sketches of the two editors, emphasizing their contrasting backgrounds and personalities. I review examples from my own work on plant invasions that are relevant to issues discussed by contributors to the volume. These include the following: determinants of invasion success, life history trade-offs, generalist vs. specialist strategies, general-purpose genotypes, adaptive phenotypic plasticity, mating systems and the influence of bottlenecks on genetic variation. I conclude by posing several key questions in invasion genetics and argue that one of the main challenges that the area faces is to integrate experimental field studies of the ecology and demography of populations with the largely descriptive approaches that have tended to dominate most research to date. PMID:25442107

  2. Breaking an encryption scheme based on chaotic baker map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, a growing number of cryptosystems based on chaos have been proposed, many of them fundamentally flawed by a lack of robustness and security. This Letter describes the security weaknesses of a recently proposed cryptographic algorithm with chaos at the physical level based on the baker map. It is shown that the security is trivially compromised for practical implementations of the cryptosystem with finite computing precision and for the use of the iteration number n as the secret key. Some possible countermeasures to enhance the security of the chaos-based cryptographic algorithm are also discussed

  3. Antiproliferative effects of isopentenylated coumarins isolated from Phellolophium madagascariense Baker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, C; Goossens, L; Pommery, N; Fourneau, C; Delelis, A; Henichart, J P

    2006-08-01

    From the leaves of Phellolophium madagascariense Baker (Apiaceae), an endemic herb to Madagascar, three known coumarins (osthol, murraol and meranzin hydrate) have been isolated and identified. This is the first report of these compounds in this species. The structural elucidations were based on the analysis of physical and spectroscopic data. The anticancer activity of the three isolated compounds and of a synthetic sample of osthol was evaluated on L1210 mouse leukemia and on human prostatic cancer hormonosensitive LNCaP and hormonoindependent PC3 and DU145 cell lines. PMID:16854718

  4. Selfish Bakers, Caring Nurses? A Model of Work Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Nyborg, Karine; Brekke, Kjell Arne

    2009-01-01

    Work contributes to people’s self-image in important ways. We propose a model in which individuals have a preference for being important to others. This leads to the following predictions: 1) In fully competitive markets with performance pay, behavior coincides with the standard model (bakers). 2) In jobs where e¤ort is not rewarded according to its social marginal value, behavior is more socially bene…cial than predicted by the standard model (nurses). 3) Even if unemployment bene…ts provide...

  5. The Archives of the History of American Psychology: An Interview with David B. Baker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Loreto R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with David B. Baker, Director of the Archives of the History of American Psychology. Covers topics such as: Baker's interest in the history of psychology, his work at the Archives of the History of American Psychology, and recommendations for teachers when addressing history in non-history courses. (CMK)

  6. Hydrothermal decomposition of yeast cells for production of proteins and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines hydrothermal decomposition of Baker's yeast cells, used as a model for spent Brewer's yeast waste, into protein and amino acids. The reaction was carried out in a closed batch reactor at various temperatures between 100 and 250 deg. C. The reaction products were separated into water-soluble and solid residue. The results demonstrated that the amount of yeast residue decreased with increasing hydrolysis temperature. After 20 min reaction in water at 250 deg. C, 78% of yeast was decomposed. The highest amount of protein produced was also obtained at this condition and was found to be 0.16 mg/mg dry yeast. The highest amount of amino acids (0.063 mg/mg dry yeast) was found at the lowest temperature tested after 15 min. The hydrolysis product obtained at 200 deg. C was tested as a nutrient source for yeast growth. The growth of yeast cells in the culture medium containing 2 w/v% of this product was comparable to that of the cells grown in the medium containing commercial yeast extract at the same concentration. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using subcritical water to potentially decompose proteinaceous waste such as spent Brewer's yeast while recovering more useful products

  7. Leavening ability and freeze tolerance of yeasts isolated from traditional corn and rye bread doughs

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, M. J.; Pais, Célia

    1996-01-01

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii isolated from traditional bread doughs displayed dough-raising capacities similar to the ones found in baker's yeasts. During storage of frozen doughs, strains of T. delbrueckii (IGC 5321, IGC 5323, and IGC 4478) presented approximately the same leavening ability for 30 days. Cell viability was not significantly affected by freezing, but when the dough was submitted to a bulk fermentation before being stored at -20 degrees C, the...

  8. Baker- Lin-Huang type Bivariate distributions based on order statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Bairamov, I

    2011-01-01

    Baker (2008) introduced a new class of bivariate distributions based on distributions of order statistics from two independent samples of size n. Lin-Huang (2010) discovered an important property of Baker's distribution and showed that the Pearson's correlation coefficient for this distribution converges to maximum attainable value, i.e. the correlation coefficient of the Frech\\'et upper bound, as n increases to infinity. Bairamov and Bayramoglu (2011) investigated a new class of bivariate distributions constructed by using Baker's model and distributions of order statistics from dependent random variables, allowing high correlation than that of Baker's distribution. In this paper a new class of Baker's type bivariate distributions with high correlation are constructed on the base of distributions of order statistics by using an arbitrary continuous copula instead of the product copula. Keywords: Bivariate distribution function, FGM distributions, copula, positive quadrant dependent, negative quadrant depende...

  9. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment and follow-up of Baker's cyst in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Purpose of this study is to assess sonographic changes and clinical response in different subgroups of Baker's cyst patients with knee osteoarthritis after a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration and corticosteroid injection. Materials and methods: Thirty-two knee osteoarthritis patients (46–85 years, mean 58.97 ± 9.88) with symptomatic Baker's cyst diagnosed at ultrasonography were included in the study. To determine the grade of the symptoms, Visual Analogue Scale was applied. The patients were grouped in two, as simple (n = 24) and complex (n = 8) Baker's cyst. Thirty-two ultrasound-guided cyst aspirations concomitant 1 ml betamethasone injection (24 simple, 8 complex subgroups) were performed. Patients were followed clinically as well as via ultrasonography for 6 months after procedures. Results: A significant decrease in volume of the Baker's cysts after percutaneous treatment was accompanied by a significant clinical improvement. Moreover, the volume reduction of Baker's cyst after the treatment was significantly correlated with the clinical improvement (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.542, p = 0.001). All 6 Baker's cysts relapsed at ultrasonography were complex type. Furthermore, a comparison of patients with simple Baker's cysts and those with complex Baker's cysts demonstrated no significant change in Visual Analogue Scale scores between two groups (p = 0.061, Mann–Whitney U). No complications (minor or major) occurred secondary to percutaneous treatment. Conclusion: Baker's cysts can be grouped as simple and complex groups via ultrasonography prior to the treatment. Cyst aspiration with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection yields clinical improvement and cyst volume reduction in all subgroups of patients with Baker's cyst secondary to knee osteoarthritis.

  10. Hypersensitivity and chaos signatures in the quantum baker's maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical chaotic systems are distinguished by their sensitive dependence on initial conditions. The absence of this property in quantum systems has led to a number of proposals for perturbation-based characterizations of quantum chaos, including linear growth of entropy, exponential decay of fidelity, and hypersensitivity to perturbation. All of these accurately predict chaos in the classical limit, but it is not clear that they behave the same far from the classical realm. We investigate the dynamics of a family of quantizations of the baker's map, which range from a highly entangling unitary transformation to an essentially trivial shift map. Linear entropy growth and fidelity decay are exhibited by this entire family of maps, but hypersensitivity distinguishes between the simple dynamics of the trivial shift map and the more complicated dynamics of the other quantizations. This conclusion is supported by an analytical argument for short times and numerical evidence at later times

  11. Hypersensitivity and chaos signatures in the quantum baker's maps

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, A J; Caves, C M; Schack, R; Brun, Todd A.; Caves, Carlton M.; Schack, Ruediger

    2006-01-01

    Classical chaotic systems are distinguished by their sensitive dependence on initial conditions. The absence of this property in quantum systems has lead to a number of different criteria being proposed for quantum chaos, including linear growth of entropy, exponential decay of fidelity, and hypersensitivity to perturbation. All of these accurately predict chaos in the classical limit, but it is not clear that they behave the same far from the classical realm. We investigate the dynamics of a family of quantizations of the baker's map, which range from a highly entangling unitary transformation to an essentially trivial shift map. Linear entropy growth and fidelity decay are exhibited by this entire family of maps, but hypersensitivity distinguishes between the simple dynamics of the trivial shift map and the more complicated dynamics of the other quantizations. This is supported by an analytical argument for short times and numerical evidence at later times.

  12. Biocavity laser spectroscopy of genetically altered yeast cells and isolated yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Copeland, R. Guild; Naviaux, Robert K.; Yaffe, Michael P.

    2006-02-01

    We report an analysis of 2 yeast cell mutants using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The two yeast strains differed only by the presence or absence of mitochondrial DNA. Strain 104 is a wild-type (ρ +) strain of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strain 110 was derived from strain 104 by removal of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Removal of mtDNA causes strain 110 to grow as a "petite" (ρ -), named because it forms small colonies (of fewer cells because it grows more slowly) on agar plates supplemented with a variety of different carbon sources. The absence of mitochondrial DNA results in the complete loss of all the mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes a and b. These cells have mitochondria, but the mitochondria lack the normal respiratory chain complexes I, III, IV, and V. Complex II is preserved because its subunits are encoded by genes located in nuclear DNA. The frequency distributions of the peak shifts produced by wild-type and petite cells and mitochondria show striking differences in the symmetry and patterns of the distributions. Wild-type ρ + cells (104) and mitochondria produced nearly symmetric, Gaussian distributions. The ρ - cells (110) and mitochondria showed striking asymmetry and skew that appeared to follow a Poisson distribution.

  13. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Baker in the Pacific...

  14. High Resolution Imagery of Baker Island Coral Reef Systems Prior to and During Suspected Bleaching Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of imagery of Baker Island coral reef systems. They are pairs of imagery where one image was acquired during a suspected bleaching...

  15. Baker- Lin-Huang type Bivariate distributions based on order statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Bairamov, I.; Bayramoglu, K.

    2011-01-01

    Baker (2008) introduced a new class of bivariate distributions based on distributions of order statistics from two independent samples of size n. Lin-Huang (2010) discovered an important property of Baker's distribution and showed that the Pearson's correlation coefficient for this distribution converges to maximum attainable value, i.e. the correlation coefficient of the Frech\\'et upper bound, as n increases to infinity. Bairamov and Bayramoglu (2011) investigated a new class of bivariate di...

  16. Laboratory evolution of copper tolerant yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamo Giusy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast strains endowed with robustness towards copper and/or enriched in intracellular Cu might find application in biotechnology processes, among others in the production of functional foods. Moreover, they can contribute to the study of human diseases related to impairments of copper metabolism. In this study, we investigated the molecular and physiological factors that confer copper tolerance to strains of baker's yeasts. Results We characterized the effects elicited in natural strains of Candida humilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the exposure to copper in the culture broth. We observed that, whereas the growth of Saccharomyces cells was inhibited already at low Cu concentration, C. humilis was naturally robust and tolerated up to 1 g · L-1 CuSO4 in the medium. This resistant strain accumulated over 7 mg of Cu per gram of biomass and escaped severe oxidative stress thanks to high constitutive levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Both yeasts were then "evolved" to obtain hyper-resistant cells able to proliferate in high copper medium. While in S. cerevisiae the evolution of robustness towards Cu was paralleled by the increase of antioxidative enzymes, these same activities decreased in evolved hyper-resistant Candida cells. We also characterized in some detail changes in the profile of copper binding proteins, that appeared to be modified by evolution but, again, in a different way in the two yeasts. Conclusions Following evolution, both Candida and Saccharomyces cells were able to proliferate up to 2.5 g · L-1 CuSO4 and to accumulate high amounts of intracellular copper. The comparison of yeasts differing in their robustness, allowed highlighting physiological and molecular determinants of natural and acquired copper tolerance. We observed that different mechanisms contribute to confer metal tolerance: the control of copper uptake, changes in the levels of enzymes involved in oxidative stress response and

  17. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  18. Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae): A Promising Source of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jucélia Barbosa; Temponi, Vanessa dos Santos; Gasparetto, Carolina Miranda; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Aragão, Danielle Maria de Oliveira; Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Ribeiro, Antônia; Scio, Elita; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae). Dried and powdered leaves were exhaustively extracted with ethanol by static maceration followed by partition to obtain the hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions. Total phenols and flavonoids contents were determined through spectrophotometry and flavonoids were identified by HPLC-DAD system. The antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, TLC-bioautography, reducing power of Fe+3, phosphomolybdenum, and TBA assays. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids ranged from 0.19 to 23.11 g/100 g and from 0.13 to 4.10 g/100 g, respectively. The flavonoids apigenin and luteolin were identified in the ethyl acetate fraction. The IC50 of DPPH assay varied from 4.28 to 75.10 µg/mL and TLC-bioautography detected the antioxidant compounds. The reducing power of Fe+3 was 19.98 to 336.48 μg/mL, while the reaction with phosphomolybdenum ranged from 13.54% to 32.63% and 56.02% to 135.00% considering ascorbic acid and rutin as reference, respectively. At 30 mg/mL, the ethanolic extract and fractions revealed significant effect against lipid peroxidation. All these data sustain that V. condensata is an important and promising source of bioactive substances with antioxidant activity. PMID:24489987

  19. Genetic manipulation of amylotic yeast for degradation of starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of a variety of techniques in Genetic Engineering has greatly facilitated the manipulation of hereditary material. These methodologies provide effective tools to utilize the existing microorganisms for creating novel combinations of hybrid strains for the degradation of substrates that can be converted into alcohol. Yeasts have several distinct advantages including the long standing industrial experience of scaling up the growth. The present report deals with the account of some experimental approaches used to obtained amylolytic yeast strains with ability to degrade starch. From among the naturally occurring yeasts schwanniomyces was found to be very efficient for this purpose. Both gene cloning and protoplast fusion were used to transfer DNA from Saccharomyces diastaticus to the bakers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The glucoamylase gene of S. diastaticus has been successfully cloned into S. cerevisiae. The observations are discussed as there relate to the current efforts to degrade substrates for energy placing special emphasis on the tremendous potential that naturally occurring microbes may have. This emphasizes the need to examine this aspect critically before initiating attempts to genetically engineer microbes for heterologous gene transfer, which appears to have serious limitations as far as the production of the end products adequate for industrial purposes are concerned. (author)

  20. 'Yeast mail': a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) to encrypt messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemeyer, Helmut; Paululat, Achim; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2014-09-01

    The universal genetic code is used by all life forms to encode biological information. It can also be used to encrypt semantic messages and convey them within organisms without anyone but the sender and recipient knowing, i.e., as a means of steganography. Several theoretical, but comparatively few experimental, approaches have been dedicated to this subject, so far. Here, we describe an experimental system to stably integrate encrypted messages within the yeast genome using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based, one-step homologous recombination system. Thus, DNA sequences encoding alphabetical and/or numerical information will be inherited by yeast propagation and can be sent in the form of dried yeast. Moreover, due to the availability of triple shuttle vectors, Saccharomyces cerevisiae can also be used as an intermediate construction device for transfer of information to either Drosophila or mammalian cells as steganographic containers. Besides its classical use in alcoholic fermentation and its modern use for heterologous gene expression, we here show that baker's yeast can thus be employed in a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) as a simple steganographic container to hide and convey messages. PMID:25238077

  1. Yeast Infection (Candidiasis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Yeast Infection (Candidiasis) Information for adults A A A This is a candida (yeast) infection of the skin folds of the abdomen. Overview ...

  2. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  3. Effect of the gamma radiation on the chemical, rheological, baker and microbiological properties in wheat flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma radiation has been used in several places of the World as a sterilization method, preservation and pasteurization of foodstuffs, effect which is achieved due to diminishing or elimination of the microorganisms, reaching every time more acceptance, moreover eliminates the uses of toxic and carcinogenic substances, of general use, but at the present, being in the process of being totally prohibited, due to the higher risk in the human health. In this work the related results with the effects of the gamma radiation are presented, coming from a 60 Co source, in commercial wheat flour exposed to a dose of 1.0 KGy. The used dose is that allowed according to the NOM-033-SSA1-1993 standard. It was determined that the chemical characteristics of humidity, protein and ashes were not affected by radiation. The rheological properties neither suffer severe effects as consequence of radiation; the pharynographic and alveographic parameters were lightly affected by the treatment. Significant changes were detected in the percentage of water absorption and in the tolerance index to mixing. However a diminish of 10% in the development time and an increase of 13% in the stability was observed, for the irradiated samples respect to the those samples not irradiated. In relation to the alveograph parameters it was only detected a diminish of 7% in the force parameter (w) without changes in the tenacity/blowing up index ratio (P/L). The fall number diminish 11% indicating a small diminution in viscosity. The bakering properties do not turn out modified by the irradiation treatment finding a specific weight of 4.6 and 4.5 (cm3/g) for the control and irradiated samples, respectively. In the mesophyll analysis it was found a diminish of 96% from the original charge in control samples, observing a diminution of 74 and 25% in yeasts and mushrooms respectively. Microbiologically it was determined absence of total coliforms bacteria and faecal coliforms in the control samples and of

  4. Prions in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Liebman, Susan W; Chernoff, Yury O.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a prion as an infectious self-propagating protein isoform was initially proposed to explain certain mammalian diseases. It is now clear that yeast also has heritable elements transmitted via protein. Indeed, the “protein only” model of prion transmission was first proven using a yeast prion. Typically, known prions are ordered cross-β aggregates (amyloids). Recently, there has been an explosion in the number of recognized prions in yeast. Yeast continues to lead the way in unde...

  5. The fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates with xylose isomerases and yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, T.

    1992-01-01

    Untreated spent sulphite liquor (SSL) was fermented with Canida tropicalis, Pichia stipitis, Pachysolen tannophilus, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a co-culture of P. Tannophilus and A. cerevisiae, in the presence of xylose isomerases and 4.6 mM azide. The highest yield of ethanol, 0.41 g/g total sugar was obtained with S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis, and P. tannophilus produced considerble amounts of polyoles, mainly xylitol. With P. stipitis sugar uptake was rapidly inhibited in untreated SSL. The presence of azide contributed to the yield by about 0.04. The fermentation of hydrogen fluoride-pretreated and acid-hydrolysed wheat straw with S. cerevisiae, xylose isomerase, and azide gave a yield of 0.40 g ethanol/g total sugar. In this substrate the xylose utilisation was 84% compared with 51% in SSL. In the concentration range appropriate for enzymatic xylose isomerization, xylulose was measured in a lignocellulose hydrolysate using HPLC with two hydrogen loaded ion exchange columns in series. SSL was used as a model for lignocellulose hydrolysates. The enzymatic isomerization of xylose to xylulose was followed directly in SSL, providing a method for the direct determination of xylose isomerase activity in lignocellulose hydrolysates. Three different xylose isomerase preparations of L. brevis whole cells were compared with a commercial enzyme preparation Maxazyme GI-immob., with respect to activity and stability. From a continuous SSL fermentation plant, two species of yeasts were isolated, S. cerevisiae and Pichia membranaefaciens. One of the isolates of S. cerevisiae, no. 3 was heavily flocculating. Without acetic acid present, both bakers' yeast and isolate no. 3 showed catabolite repression and fermented glucose and galactose sequentially. Galactose fermentation with bakers' yeast was strongly inhibited by acetic acid at pH values below 6. Isolate no. 3 fermented galactose, glucose and mannose, in the presence of acetic acid

  6. Non-Genetic Engineering Approaches for Isolating and Generating Novel Yeasts for Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, P. J.; Bellon, J. R.; Schmidt, S. A.; Varela, C.; Pretorius, I. S.

    Generating novel yeast strains for industrial applications should be quite straightforward; after all, research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of Baker's Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has paved the way for many advances in the modern biological sciences. We probably know more about this humble eukaryote than any other, and it is the most tractable of organisms for manipulation using modern genetic engineering approaches. In many countries, however, there are restrictions on the use of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs), particularly in foods and beverages, and the level of consumer acceptance of GMOs is, at best, variable. Thus, many researchers working with industrial yeasts use genetic engineering techniques primarily as research tools, and strain development continues to rely on non-GM technologies. This chapter explores the non-GM tools and strategies available to such researchers.

  7. Yeast That Smell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Y Xu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental mechanism of olfactory receptor activation has been conserved from yeast to humans. Engineered yeast cells can smell some of the same odorants as humans can, which makes yeast an ideal model system for studying human olfaction. Furthermore, if engineered yeast cells are incorporated into sensory arrays, they can be used as biosensors or artificial noses.Keywords: Yeast, olfactory receptor, G protein-coupled receptor, biosensor, smellReceived: 31 July 2008 / Received in revised form: 6 August 2008, Accepted: 13 August 2008, Published online: 17 August 2008

  8. Ethanolic rhizome extract from Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjerdpongchai, Ratana; Suwannachot, Kittiphan; Rattanapanone, Viboon; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2008-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker is a Thai herb containing many flavonoids that have anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and antioxidant activities. The objective of this study was to demonstrate apoptotic effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract on HL-60 cells in vitro. The extract suppressed HL-60 cell growth and decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death was demonstrated by changes in cell morphology, externalization of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, loss in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and activation of caspase 3. Apoptosis induced by K. parviflora Wall. ex. Baker rhizome ethanolic extract was enhanced by treatment with paclitaxel or doxorubicin, and inhibitors of Akt, PI3-K and MEK. PMID:19256745

  9. Reconstructing streamflow variation of the Baker River from tree-rings in Northern Patagonia since 1765

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Antonio; Bahamondez, Alejandra; González-Reyes, Alvaro; Muñoz, Ariel A.; Cuq, Emilio; Ruiz-Gómez, Carolina

    2015-10-01

    The understanding of the long-term variation of large rivers streamflow with a high economic and social relevance is necessary in order to improve the planning and management of water resources in different regions of the world. The Baker River has the highest mean discharge of those draining both slopes of the Andes South of 20°S and it is among the six rivers with the highest mean streamflow in the Pacific domain of South America (1100 m3 s-1 at its outlet). It drains an international basin of 29,000 km2 shared by Chile and Argentina and has a high ecologic and economic value including conservation, tourism, recreational fishing, and projected hydropower. This study reconstructs the austral summer - early fall (January-April) streamflow for the Baker River from Nothofagus pumilio tree-rings for the period 1765-2004. Summer streamflow represents 45.2% of the annual discharge. The regression model for the period (1961-2004) explains 54% of the variance of the Baker River streamflow (R2adj = 0.54). The most significant temporal pattern in the record is the sustained decline since the 1980s (τ = -0.633, p = 1.0144 ∗ 10-5 for the 1985-2004 period), which is unprecedented since 1765. The Correlation of the Baker streamflow with the November-April observed Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is significant (1961-2004, r = -0.55, p network and quality of instrumental weather, streamflow and other monitoring stations as well as the study and modeling of the complex hydrological processes in the Baker basin are necessary. This should be the basis for planning, policy design and decision making regarding water resources in the Baker basin.

  10. Die infragenerische Gliederung der Gattung Bomarea Mirb. und die Revision der Untergattungen Sphaerine (Herb.) Baker und Wichuraea (M. Roemer) Baker (Alstroemeriaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofreiter, Anton

    2003-01-01

    Die Gattung Bomarea wurde seit BAKER 1888 nicht mehr revidiert. Seither hat die Zahl gültig veröffentlichter Namen von 105 auf 280 zugenommen. Eine neue Revision ist dringend erforderlich. Ausgedehnte Feldstudien in Peru bilden die Grundlage für die Inangriffnahme dieses Projekts. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die taxonomische Geschichte der Gattung rekonstruiert. Bomarea wird gegen die nahe verwandte Alstroemeria abgegrenzt. HUNZIKER (1973) hatte Bomarea sogar eingezogen. Die meisten Autor...

  11. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment and follow-up of Baker's cyst in knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeroglu, Mert, E-mail: mertkoroglu@hotmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Call Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I oglu, Mehmet, E-mail: mehmetcallioglu@hotmail.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Eris, Hueseyin Naim, E-mail: drhneris@hotmail.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Kayan, Mustafa, E-mail: drkayan32@hotmail.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Cetin, Meltem, E-mail: meltemcetin2011@yahoo.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isparta (Turkey); Yener, Mahmut, E-mail: bahtiyaryener@yahoo.com [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Isparta (Turkey); Guerses, Cemil, E-mail: cemilgurses@gmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Erol, Bekir, E-mail: mertkoroglu@hotmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Tuerkbey, Bar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I s, E-mail: bturkbey@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Parlak, Ayse Eda, E-mail: drteda@yahoo.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey); Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: Purpose of this study is to assess sonographic changes and clinical response in different subgroups of Baker's cyst patients with knee osteoarthritis after a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration and corticosteroid injection. Materials and methods: Thirty-two knee osteoarthritis patients (46-85 years, mean 58.97 {+-} 9.88) with symptomatic Baker's cyst diagnosed at ultrasonography were included in the study. To determine the grade of the symptoms, Visual Analogue Scale was applied. The patients were grouped in two, as simple (n = 24) and complex (n = 8) Baker's cyst. Thirty-two ultrasound-guided cyst aspirations concomitant 1 ml betamethasone injection (24 simple, 8 complex subgroups) were performed. Patients were followed clinically as well as via ultrasonography for 6 months after procedures. Results: A significant decrease in volume of the Baker's cysts after percutaneous treatment was accompanied by a significant clinical improvement. Moreover, the volume reduction of Baker's cyst after the treatment was significantly correlated with the clinical improvement (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.542, p = 0.001). All 6 Baker's cysts relapsed at ultrasonography were complex type. Furthermore, a comparison of patients with simple Baker's cysts and those with complex Baker's cysts demonstrated no significant change in Visual Analogue Scale scores between two groups (p = 0.061, Mann-Whitney U). No complications (minor or major) occurred secondary to percutaneous treatment. Conclusion: Baker's cysts can be grouped as simple and complex groups via ultrasonography prior to the treatment. Cyst aspiration with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection yields clinical improvement and cyst volume reduction in all subgroups of patients with Baker's cyst secondary to knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer promoted evolution of the ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions in yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gojkovic, Zoran; Knecht, Wolfgang; Warneboldt, J.; Coutelis, J.B.; Pynyaha, J.; Neuveglise, C.; Møller, Kasper; Loffler, M.; Piskur, Jure

    2004-01-01

    The ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions is an essential and unique trait of brewer's or baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cervisiae). To understand the evolution of facultative anaerobiosis we studied the dependence of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, more precisely the fourth enzymic...... the phylogenetic point of view, this enzyme is closely related to a bacterial DHODase from Lactococcus lactis. Here we show that S. kluyveri, which separated from the S. cerevisiae lineage more than 100 million years ago, represents an evolutionary intermediate, having both cytoplasmic and...... acquired a bacterial gene for DHODase, which subsequently allowed cell growth gradually to become independent of oxygen....

  13. Pexophagy in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Pexophagy, selective degradation of peroxisomes via autophagy, is the main system for reducing organelle abundance. Elucidation of the molecular machinery of pexophagy has been pioneered in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the methylotrophic yeasts Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha. Recent analyses using these yeasts have elucidated the molecular machineries of pexophagy, especially in terms of the interactions and modifications of the so-called adaptor proteins required for guiding autophagic membrane biogenesis on the organelle surface. Based on the recent findings, functional relevance of pexophagy and another autophagic pathway, mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), is discussed. We also discuss the physiological importance of pexophagy in these yeast systems. PMID:26409485

  14. Erisipelóide de Baker-Rosenbach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureo Guimarães de Macedo

    1970-10-01

    Full Text Available O erisipelóide de Baker-Rosenbach, embora assinalado no Brasil há 23, anos, por Sebastião Sampaio, seguido de nove casos estudados em 1951 por Lacaz e Ancona Lopes, não tem sido motivo de publicações posteriores. O A. teve ocasião de estudar seis casos, senão que três foram motivo de trabalho anterior e foram observados em 1953. Os três restantes, um de 1965 e dois de 1967, são aqui relatados. Assinala o A. a ubiquidade do germe, o Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae e a variedade de condições em que o homem pode infectar-se, especialmente no exercício de determinadas profissões, o que dá à doença, caráter típico de doença profissional. São os operários de fábricas de botões ou em geral os que lidam com ossos, especialmente de porco ou carneiro, os açougueiros, magarefes, salsicheiros etc. São particularmente vulneráveis os que tratam com produtos do mar, pescadores, mercadores de siris, camarões, crustáceos, peixes em geral, pela facilidade com que se podem ferir e adquirir a infecção por picada ocasional. A doença atinge numerosos animais domésticos ou não, com formas clínicas bem definidas no porco (erisipela dos porcos, no carneiro (poliartrite dos carneiros, em animais de corte e de tração, em aves domésticas ou de rapina, ratos e camundongos, além de outros numerosos roedores. Moscas hematófagas e outros insetos têm sido encontrados infectados. Nunca é demais frisar que os produtos do mar são grande fonte de infecção humana. No homem, tem a dcença em geral, caráter benigno e localizado (erisipelóide, podendo em certas circunstâncias assumir característica septicêmica como no porco, produzir endocardite, como no carneiro além de outras formas clínicas e complicações. São resumidos no texto os três casos anteriormente apresentados e bem descritos os três inéditos, que têm história clínica e evolução típicas de erisipelóide. Tratando-se de doença com características tipicamente

  15. Baker Island Site 5P 1/24/2004 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 5P 00 11.781N, 176 29.176W, between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Baker Island Site 16P 1/23/2004 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 16P 00 11 698N, 176 27.753W, between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. A new pomegranate pest for Turkey; Pomegranate false spidermite, Tenuipalpus punicae Pirtchard and Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae)

    OpenAIRE

    DÖKER, İsmail; KAZAK, Cengiz; KARUT, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the pomegranate false spider mite Tenuipalpus punicae Pirtchard and Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) collected from pomegranate growing areas of Adana province is determined for the first record for Turkish mite fauna. Some information related to world distribution, damage, biology and control of this pest are presented in the paper.

  18. 75 FR 21985 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Interpretation of Unblockable Drain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 54301) announcing that it would be conducting a public... Drain AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Final interpretive rule. SUMMARY: The Consumer... ``unblockable drain'' as used in the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act (``VGB Act''). DATES:...

  19. Probabilistic (Quasi)metric Versions for a Stability Result of Baker

    OpenAIRE

    Dorel Miheţ; Claudia Zaharia

    2012-01-01

    By using the fixed point method, we obtain a version of a stability result of Baker in probabilistic metric and quasimetric spaces under triangular norms of Hadžić type. As an application, we prove a theorem regarding the stability of the additive Cauchy functional equation in random normed spaces.

  20. Baker Island Site 11P 2/10/2001 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 11P (00 11.941N, 176 29.078W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Baker Island Site 11P 1/30/2002 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 11P 00 11.941N, 176 29.078W, between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Baker Island Site 5P 3/19/2000 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 5P (00 11.781N, 176 29.176W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Baker Island Site 5P 1/24/2004 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 5P (00 11.781N, 176 29.176W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Baker Island Site 5P 3/19/2000 55-56M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 5P (00 11.781N, 176 29.176W), between 55 and 56 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Baker Island Site 5P 3/19/2000 60-61M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 5P 00 11.781N, 176 29.176W, between 60 and 61 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Baker Island Site 5P 2/9/2001 60-61M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 5P 0 11.781N, 176 29.176W, between 60 and 61 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Baker Island Site 5P 1/24/2004 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 5P (00 11.781N, 176 29.176W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Electronically Transmitted Threats and Higher Education: Oppression, Free Speech, and Jake Baker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jared C.

    2013-01-01

    When Jake Baker wrote a violent, sexually themed story about one of his classmates and emailed it to a friend, the case that ensued highlighted how new technologies have created fresh ways for students to harass, oppress, or be oppressed by others. This article examines concepts of violence and cultural imperialism oppression, primarily as defined…

  9. Realizing the quantum baker's map on a 3-qubit NMR quantum computer

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T A; Brun, Todd A.; Schack, Ruediger

    1999-01-01

    By numerically simulating an implementation of the quantum baker's map on a 3-qubit NMR quantum computer based on the molecule trichloroethylene, we demonstrate the feasibility of quantum chaos experiments on present-day quantum computers. We give detailed descriptions of proposed experiments that investigate (a) the rate of entropy increase due to decoherence and (b) the phenomenon of hypersensitivity to perturbation.

  10. Baker Island Site 16P 1/30/2002 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Baker Island, site 16P (00 11 698N, 176 27.753W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Exact Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula for the contact Heisenberg algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Bravetti, Alessandro; Tapias, Diego

    2016-01-01

    In this work we introduce the contact Heisenberg algebra as the Lie algebra of linear functions over a contact manifold and we give the exact expression of its corresponding Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. We argue that this result is relevant to the quantization of contact systems.

  12. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Greg Baker named Miami game Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Capt. Greg Baker, U.S. Army, who earned a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences and a minor in leadership studies from the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Rice Center for Leader Development in 2004 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus University of Miami game.

  13. Reconstructing streamflow variation of the Baker River from tree-rings in Northern Patagonia since 1765

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Antonio; Bahamondez, Alejandra; González-Reyes, Alvaro; Muñoz, Ariel A.; Cuq, Emilio; Ruiz-Gómez, Carolina

    2015-10-01

    The understanding of the long-term variation of large rivers streamflow with a high economic and social relevance is necessary in order to improve the planning and management of water resources in different regions of the world. The Baker River has the highest mean discharge of those draining both slopes of the Andes South of 20°S and it is among the six rivers with the highest mean streamflow in the Pacific domain of South America (1100 m3 s-1 at its outlet). It drains an international basin of 29,000 km2 shared by Chile and Argentina and has a high ecologic and economic value including conservation, tourism, recreational fishing, and projected hydropower. This study reconstructs the austral summer - early fall (January-April) streamflow for the Baker River from Nothofagus pumilio tree-rings for the period 1765-2004. Summer streamflow represents 45.2% of the annual discharge. The regression model for the period (1961-2004) explains 54% of the variance of the Baker River streamflow (R2adj = 0.54). The most significant temporal pattern in the record is the sustained decline since the 1980s (τ = -0.633, p = 1.0144 ∗ 10-5 for the 1985-2004 period), which is unprecedented since 1765. The Correlation of the Baker streamflow with the November-April observed Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is significant (1961-2004, r = -0.55, p River documented here for the 1980-2004 period is consistent with precipitation decrease associated with the SAM. Conversely, other studies have reported an increase of summer streamflow for a portion of the Baker River for the 1994-2008 period, explained by ice melt associated with temperature increase and glacier retreat and thinning. Future research should consider the development of new tree-ring reconstructions to increase the geographic range and to cover the last 1000 or more years using long-lived species (e.g. Fitzroya cupressoides and Pilgerodendron uviferum). Expanding the network and quality of instrumental weather, streamflow and

  14. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  15. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  16. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Isand Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom coverage...

  17. Howland, Baker and Jarvis Islands 25 Years after Cat Eradication: the Recovery of Seabirds in a Biogeographical Context

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Feral cats Felis catus were eradicated from Howland, Baker and Jarvis Islands, all U.S. National Wildlife Refuges in the equatorial Central Pacifi c Ocean, by the...

  18. The indentation of pressurized elastic shells: from polymeric capsules to yeast cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, D.

    2011-08-10

    Pressurized elastic capsules arise at scales ranging from the 10 m diameter pressure vessels used to store propane at oil refineries to the microscopic polymeric capsules that may be used in drug delivery. Nature also makes extensive use of pressurized elastic capsules: plant cells, bacteria and fungi have stiff walls, which are subject to an internal turgor pressure. Here, we present theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations of the indentation of a linearly elastic shell subject to a constant internal pressure. We show that, unlike unpressurized shells, the relationship between force and displacement demonstrates two linear regimes. We determine analytical expressions for the effective stiffness in each of these regimes in terms of the material properties of the shell and the pressure difference. As a consequence, a single indentation experiment over a range of displacements may be used as a simple assay to determine both the internal pressure and elastic properties of capsules. Our results are relevant for determining the internal pressure in bacterial, fungal or plant cells. As an illustration of this, we apply our results to recent measurements of the stiffness of baker\\'s yeast and infer from these experiments that the internal osmotic pressure of yeast cells may be regulated in response to changes in the osmotic pressure of the external medium.

  19. Topics in noncommutative algebra the theorem of Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff and Dynkin

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglioli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the importance of the Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff, Dynkin Theorem in many different branches of Mathematics and Physics (Lie group-Lie algebra theory, linear PDEs, Quantum and Statistical Mechanics, Numerical Analysis, Theoretical Physics, Control Theory, sub-Riemannian Geometry), this monograph is intended to: 1) fully enable readers (graduates or specialists, mathematicians, physicists or applied scientists, acquainted with Algebra or not) to understand and apply the statements and numerous corollaries of the main result; 2) provide a wide spectrum of proofs from the modern literature, comparing different techniques and furnishing a unifying point of view and notation; 3) provide a thorough historical background of the results, together with unknown facts about the effective early contributions by Schur, Poincaré, Pascal, Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff and Dynkin; 4) give an outlook on the applications, especially in Differential Geometry (Lie group theory) and Analysis (PDEs of subelliptic type); ...

  20. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention. Micrograph showing Candida albicans from a patient with vaginal candidiasis, also known ... caused by an overgrowth of a fungus called Candida albicans in the vagina. Candida is yeast, which is ...

  1. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  2. Bakers' cyst and tibiofemoral abnormalities are more distinctive MRI features of symptomatic osteoarthritis than patellofemoral abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, A W; Mertens, B; Reijnierse, M; Bloem, J L; de Mutsert, R; le Cessie, S; Rosendaal, F R; Kloppenburg, M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate which structural MR abnormalities discriminate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), taking co-occurrence of abnormalities in all compartments into account. Methods The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study is a population-based cohort aged 45–65 years. In 1285 participants (median age 56 years, 55% women, median body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2), MRI of the right knee were obtained. Structural abnormalities (osteophytes, cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), subchondral cysts, meniscal abnormalities, effusion, Baker's cyst) at 9 patellofemoral and tibiofemoral locations were scored following the knee OA scoring system. Symptomatic OA in the imaged knee was defined following the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Logistic ridge regression analyses were used to investigate which structural abnormalities discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic OA, crude and adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Results Symptomatic knee OA was present in 177 individuals. Structural MR abnormalities were highly frequent both in individuals with OA and in those without. Baker's cysts showed the highest adjusted regression coefficient (0.293) for presence of symptomatic OA, followed by osteophytes and BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment (0.185–0.279), osteophytes in the medial trochlear facet (0.262) and effusion (0.197). Conclusions Baker's cysts discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic knee OA. Structural MR abnormalities, especially in the medial side of the tibiofemoral joint and effusion, add further in discriminating symptomatic OA. Baker's cysts may present as a target for treatment. PMID:27252896

  3. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

  4. Dimension and measure of baker-like skew-products of $\\beta$-transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Färm, David

    2010-01-01

    We consider a generalisation of the baker's transformation, consisting of a skew-product of contractions and a $\\beta$-transformation. The Hausdorff dimension and Lebesgue measure of the attractor is calculated for a set of parameters with positive measure. The proofs use a new transverality lemma similar to Solomyak's [Solomyak, 1995]. This transversality, which is applicable to the considered class of maps holds for a larger set of parameters than Solomyak's transversality.

  5. Variability in Punitive Damages: Empirically Assessing Exxon Shipping Co. v. Baker

    OpenAIRE

    Theodore Eisenberg; Michael Heise; Wells, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    Exxon Shipping Co. v. Baker acknowledged that empirical studies undercut criticism of punitive damages. Paradoxically, the Court simultaneously expressed concern about jury predictability based on a high and variable punitive-compensatory ratio published in an article by the present authors. The Court reduced the $2.5 billion Exxon Valdez punitive award to $500 million and stated: ithe constitutional outer limit may well be 1:1. Our empirical findings do not support the unpredictability conce...

  6. Entropy of semiclassical measures of the Walsh-quantized baker's map

    OpenAIRE

    Anantharaman, Nalini; Nonnenmacher, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    We study the baker's map and its Walsh quantization, as a toy model of a quantized chaotic system. We focus on localization properties of eigenstates, in the semiclassical regime. Simple counterexamples show that quantum unique ergodicity fails for this model. We obtain, however, lower bounds on the entropies associated with semiclassical measures, as well as on the Wehrl entropies of eigenstates. The central tool of the proofs is an "entropic uncertainty principle".

  7. Baker - Campbell - Hausdorff relation for special unitary groups SU(N)

    OpenAIRE

    Weigert, S.

    1997-01-01

    Multiplication of two elements of the special unitary group SU(N) determines uniquely a third group element. A BAker-Campbell-Hausdorff relation is derived which expresses the group parameters of the product (written as an exponential) in terms of the parameters of the exponential factors. This requires the eigen- values of three (N-by-N) matrices. Consequently, the relation can be stated analytically up to N=4, in principle. Similarity transformations encoding the time evolution of quantum m...

  8. Meiosis in haploid yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wagstaff, Joseph E.; Klapholz, Sue; Esposito, Rochelle Easton

    1982-01-01

    Haploid yeast cells normally contain either the MATa or MATα mating-type allele and cannot undergo meiosis and spore formation. If both mating-type alleles are present as a consequence of chromosome III disomy (MATa/MATα), haploids initiate meiosis but do not successfully form spores, probably because the haploid chromosome complement is irregularly partitioned during meiotic nuclear division. We have demonstrated that the ochre-suppressible mutation spo13-1 enables haploid yeast cells disomi...

  9. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  10. The genome of wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis provides a tool to explore its food-related properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, Jure; Ling, Zhihao; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Ishchuk, Olena P.; Aerts, Andrea; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Compagno, Concetta; Bisson, Linda; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Gabaldon, Toni; Phister, Trevor

    2012-03-14

    The yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis can cause enormous economic losses in wine industry due to production of phenolic off-flavor compounds. D. bruxellensis is a distant relative of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nevertheless, these two yeasts are often found in the same habitats and share several food-related traits, such as production of high ethanol levels and ability to grow without oxygen. In some food products, like lambic beer, D. bruxellensis can importantly contribute to flavor development. We determined the 13.4 Mb genome sequence of the D. bruxellensis strain Y879 (CBS2499) and deduced the genetic background of several ?food-relevant? properties and evolutionary history of this yeast. Surprisingly, we find that this yeast is phylogenetically distant to other food-related yeasts and most related to Pichia (Komagataella) pastoris, which is an aerobic poor ethanol producer. We further show that the D. bruxellensis genome does not contain an excess of lineage specific duplicated genes nor a horizontally transferred URA1 gene, two crucial events that promoted the evolution of the food relevant traits in the S. cerevisiae lineage. However, D. bruxellensis has several independently duplicated ADH and ADH-like genes, which are likely responsible for metabolism of alcohols, including ethanol, and also a range of aromatic compounds.

  11. The genome of wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis provides a tool to explore its food-related properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškur, Jure; Ling, Zhihao; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Ishchuk, Olena P; Aerts, Andrea; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Compagno, Concetta; Bisson, Linda; Grigoriev, Igor V; Gabaldón, Toni; Phister, Trevor

    2012-07-01

    The yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis can cause enormous economic losses in wine industry due to production of phenolic off-flavor compounds. D. bruxellensis is a distant relative of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nevertheless, these two yeasts are often found in the same habitats and share several food-related traits, such as production of high ethanol levels and ability to grow without oxygen. In some food products, like lambic beer, D. bruxellensis can importantly contribute to flavor development. We determined the 13.4 Mb genome sequence of the D. bruxellensis strain Y879 (CBS2499) and deduced the genetic background of several "food-relevant" properties and evolutionary history of this yeast. Surprisingly, we find that this yeast is phylogenetically distant to other food-related yeasts and most related to Pichia (Komagataella) pastoris, which is an aerobic poor ethanol producer. We further show that the D. bruxellensis genome does not contain an excess of lineage specific duplicated genes nor a horizontally transferred URA1 gene, two crucial events that promoted the evolution of the food relevant traits in the S. cerevisiae lineage. However, D. bruxellensis has several independently duplicated ADH and ADH-like genes, which are likely responsible for metabolism of alcohols, including ethanol, and also a range of aromatic compounds. PMID:22663979

  12. Yeast cytochrome c peroxidase: mutagenesis and expression in Escherichia coli show tryptophan-51 is not the radical site in compound I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis, they have constructed a system for the mutation and expression of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP, EC 1.11.1.5) in Escherichia coli and applied it to test the hypothesis that Trp-51 is the locus of the free radical observed in compound I of CCP. The system was created by substituting a CCP gene modified by site-directed mutagenesis, CCP(MI), for the fol gene in a vector previously used for mutagenesis and overexpression of dihydrofolate reductase. E. coli transformed with the resulting plasmid produced the CCP(MI) enzyme in large quantities, more than 15 mg/L of cell culture, of which 10% is holo- and 90% is apo-CCP(MI). The apoenzyme was easily converted to holoenzyme by the addition of bovine hemin. Purified CCP(MI) has the same catalytic activity and spectra as bakers' yeast CCP. A mutation has been made in CCP(MI), Trp-51 to Phe. The Phe-51 mutant protein CCP(MI,F51) is fully active, and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum, at 89 K, of its oxidized intermediate, compound I, displays a strong sharp resonance at g = 2.004, which is very similar to the signal observed for compound I of both bakers' yeast CCP and CCP(MI). However, UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy revealed that the half-life of CCP(MI,F51) compound I at 23 0C is only 1.4% of that observed for the compound I forms of CCP(MI) or bakers' yeast CCP. Thus, Trp-51 is not necessary for the formation of the free radical observed in compound I but appears to exert a significant influence on its stability

  13. Characterization of yeast strains for wine production: effect of fermentation variables on quality of wine produced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndip, R N; Akoachere, J F; Dopgima, L L; Ndip, L M

    2001-09-01

    Sixteen yeast strains isolated from grapefruit (Citrus paradis), orange (Citrus sinensis) and pineapple (Ananas comosus) were characterized using standard microbiological procedures. The species were identified as Saccharomyces uvarum, S. cerevisiae, S. carlbergensis, and S. ellipsoideus. Their abilities for wine production were tested by using sugar and ethanol tolerance tests. The best biochemically active strain, S. ellipsoideus, was used along with commercially available baker's yeast (S. cerevisiae) to produce wine from grapefruit, orange, and pineapple juices. After fermentation for 14 d with S. cerevisiae and 21 d with S. ellipsoideus, wines produced were compared with Baron de Valls (standard). The highest (10.47% [v/v]) and lowest (7.68% [v/v]) alcohol concentrations with corresponding residual sugar concentrations of 1.88% (w/v) and 7.7% (w/v) were produced from orange after fermentation with S. cerevisiae and S. ellipsoideus, respectively. S. ellipsoideus was found to be the best yeast strain producing wine with the highest acceptable score of 7.41 from orange. The study revealed the possibility of producing wine from our locally available fruits using simple, cheap, and adaptable technology with biochemically characterized yeast strains. PMID:11732717

  14. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells. PMID:25033548

  15. Genetics of Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  16. Effect of aqueous extract of Bulbine natalensis (Baker) stem on the sexual behaviour of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, M T; Afolayan, A J

    2009-12-01

    The phytochemical constituents of aqueous extract of Bulbine natalensis (Baker) stem and its effect on male rat sexual behaviour were evaluated for 7 days. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, cardiac glycoside, tannins, alkaloids and anthraquinones. Administration of the extract at the doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight resulted in the significant increase (p ejaculation frequency, serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone concentrations, computed indices of sexual behaviour, erection, quick flips, long flips and total penile reflexes whereas the mount latency, intromission latency and post-ejaculatory interval were significantly decreased (p management of disorders of desire/libido, premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction in males. PMID:18710410

  17. Vpliv kondicioniranja na vezavo baker-etanolaminskih zaščitnih sredstev

    OpenAIRE

    Žlahtič, Mojca

    2014-01-01

    Les na prostem je izpostavljen različnim dejavnikom razgradnje, ki so v naravi dobrodošli, v gospodarske namene pa navadno nezaželeni. Baker-etanolaminski pripravki so trenutno najpomembnejša skupina zaščitnih sredstev za zaščito lesa v III. in IV. razredu izpostavitve. Ti pripravki se praviloma dobro vežejo v les, v posameznih primerih pa je opaziti poslabšano vezavo. Le-to pripisujemo neustreznemu kondicioniranju impregniranega lesa. Smrekove vzorce dimenzij (1,5 x 2,5 x 5,0) cm3 (SIST EN 1...

  18. Vpliv vrednosti pH baker-etanolaminskih zaščitnih pripravkov na izpiranje

    OpenAIRE

    Pučko, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Bakrove spojine so učinkoviti in zelo razširjeni fungicidi. Nezadostna fiksacija omejuje uporabo zaščitenega lesa v okoljih, kjer lahko pride do izpiranja aktivnih komponent. Vezavo bakrovih soli v les so v preteklosti reševali z dodajanjem kromovih spojin, danes pa se uveljavlja etanolamin. Z željo izboljšati vezavo baker-etanolaminskih pripravkov smo raziskali vpliv različnih pH vrednosti pripravkov na vezavo zaščitnih sredstev v les. Smrekove vzorce smo po postopku polnih celic impregniral...

  19. Multi-Baker Map as a Model of Digital PD Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernák, Gábor; Gyebrószki, Gergely; Stépán, Gábor

    Digital stabilization of unstable equilibria of linear systems may lead to small amplitude stochastic-like oscillations. We show that these vibrations can be related to a deterministic chaotic dynamics induced by sampling and quantization. A detailed analytical proof of chaos is presented for the case of a PD controlled oscillator: it is shown that there exists a finite attracting domain in the phase-space, the largest Lyapunov exponent is positive and the existence of a Smale horseshoe is also pointed out. The corresponding two-dimensional micro-chaos map is a multi-baker map, i.e. it consists of a finite series of baker’s maps.

  20. Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff relation for special unitary groups SU(N)

    CERN Document Server

    Weigert, S

    1997-01-01

    Multiplication of two elements of the special unitary group SU(N) determines uniquely a third group element. A BAker-Campbell-Hausdorff relation is derived which expresses the group parameters of the product (written as an exponential) in terms of the parameters of the exponential factors. This requires the eigen- values of three (N-by-N) matrices. Consequently, the relation can be stated analytically up to N=4, in principle. Similarity transformations encoding the time evolution of quantum mechanical observables, for example, can be worked out by the same means.

  1. Plant regeneration from excised bulb scale segments of Zephyranthes robusta Baker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Furmanowa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Zephyranthes robusta Baker excised bulb scale segments with the basal plate were grown on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium in four modifications. The cultures were kept at 25°C in darkness. The best results (bulbing, leaf development and rooting were obtained on MS medium with 1 mg/l IBA, 2-6 bulblets being developed from one explant. After 6 weeks the plantlets (4-6 cm high were transferred to pots filled with sterilized soil mixes. After two months the leaves of the plants reached a length of 20 cm.

  2. Yeast fluorescence microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jiří

    New Jersey : Humana Press, 2005, s. 85-96. ISBN 1-59259-958-3 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020102; GA ČR GA204/02/1424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yeast * fluorescence microscopy * immunofluorescence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  3. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181. ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  4. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  5. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  6. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  7. A vibrating membrane bioreactor operated at supra- and sub-critical flux: Influence of extracellular polymeric substances from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren Prip; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2007-01-01

    A vibrating membrane bioreactor, in which the fouling problems are reduced by vibrating a hollow fiber membrane module, has been tested in constant flux microfiltration above (supra-critical) and below (sub-critical) an experimentally determined critical flux. Suspensions of bakers yeast cells were....... Filtration just below the critical flux (sub-critical) seems to be a good compromise between acceptable flux level and acceptable increase of fouling resistance and trans-membrane pressure (TMP) in a given time period. EPS from the yeast cells causes the membrane module to foul and part of the fouling is...... continually washed out during supra-critical flux operation whereas the washing out at sub-critical flux operation is not observed. This might be due to locally different hydrodynamic conditions at the membrane surface and pore entrances at supra- and sub-critical flux respectively....

  8. Development of industrial yeast for second generation bioethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X.

    2012-01-15

    The cost of lignocellulose-based bioethanol needs to be reduced, in order to commercialize this clean and sustainable fuel substitute for fossil fuels. A microorganism that can completely and efficiently convert all the sugars in lignocellulose into ethanol is one of the prerequisites of a cost-effective production process. In addition, the microorganisms should also have a high tolerance towards the inhibitory compounds present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate, which are formed during the pretreatment of lignocellulose. Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is generally regarded as a robust microorganism and can efficiently ferment glucose. But it lacks the ability to ferment xylose which comprises 20-35% of lignocellulose. Naturally xylose-fermenting yeast such as Pichia stipitis is much more sensitive to inhibitors than S. cerevisiae and it requires accurately controlled microaerophilic conditions during the xylose fermentation, rendering the process technically difficult and expensive. In this study, a novel xylose fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum displayed fast cell growth and efficient xylose fermentation under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, P. stipitis was almost unable to utilize xylose under the same conditions. It is further demonstrated that S. passalidarum converts xylose by means of NADH-preferred xylose reductase (XR) and NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). Thus, the capacity of S. passalidarum to utilize xylose under anaerobic conditions is possibly due to a balance between supply and demand of cofactor through this XR-XDH pathway. Only one other XR with NADH preference has been reported so far. Unfortunately, S. passalidarum also has a low tolerance towards inhibitors generated during pretreatment, which prevents immediate use of this yeast in industrial application. S. passalidarum is able to convert the inhibitor furfural to furfuryl alcohol in a synthetic medium when the addition of furfural is low. The enzymes

  9. Simplifying the Reinsch algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series

    CERN Document Server

    Van-Brunt, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series computes the quantity \\begin{equation*} Z(X,Y)=\\ln\\left( e^X e^Y \\right) = \\sum_{n=1}^\\infty z_n(X,Y), \\end{equation*} where $X$ and $Y$ are not necessarily commuting, in terms of homogeneous multinomials $z_n(X,Y)$ of degree $n$. (This is essentially equivalent to computing the so-called Goldberg coefficients.) The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series is a general purpose tool of wide applicability in mathematical physics, quantum physics, and many other fields. The Reinsch algorithm for the truncated series permits one to calculate up to some fixed order $N$ by using $(N+1)\\times(N+1)$ matrices. We show how to further simplify the Reinsch algorithm, making implementation (in principle) utterly straightforward. This helps provide a deeper understanding of the Goldberg coefficients and their properties. For instance we establish strict bounds (and some equalities) on the number of non-zero Goldberg coefficients. Unfortunately, we shall see that the number of terms in the multino...

  10. ‘We Have Become Niggers!’: Josephine Baker as a Threat to Viennese Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Horak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Early 1928 Josephine Baker, by that time a famous dancer and singer, came to Vienna to be part of a vaudeville show. Even before her arrival the waves went high – her possible presence in Vienna caused a major uproar there. Various com-mentators constructed an image of Baker that was based on the assumption that she was seriously attacked on the values of traditional European culture and, furthermore, true Viennese culture. In my essay, where I address the Viennese Negerskandal more directly, I explore the various discourses that produced this ‘event’ along the interface of mass culture/avant-garde and high/low culture. It is evident that these events centre on a construction of ‘blackness’ and of ‘black cultural expression’; it goes without saying that racism and sexism play a central role. I will, however, try to contextualize the ‘nigger scandal’ in a broader setting: against the background of Vienna in the late 1920s the perceived threat of ‘Americanisation’ will be discussed.

  11. Remedial action for the Baker and Williams Warehouses Site New York, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Baker and Williams Warehouses site in the Borough of Manhattan on the west side of New York City was remediated as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a Department of Energy (DOE) effort to identify and clean up or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive contamination exceeding current guidelines remains from the early years of the Nation's atomic energy program. The site, formerly owned by Baker and Williams Company, was used during the 1940s by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), predecessor to DOE, for short-term storage of uranium concentrates. A 1989 radiological survey conducted for DOE by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) indicated the presence of residual contamination in the east bay basement and the west bay of the first floor of one of the three buildings at the site. This paper describes the rationale for implementation of the selected alternatives to remediate contaminated surfaces in these areas. The selected remedial alternatives included mechanical decontamination by scarification and chemical decontamination using Nutech-755, a nonhazardous, nontoxic product that breaks down the concrete and releases entrapped contaminants by a process similar to etching. A verification survey of the remediated areas in April 1991 confirmed that all areas designated as exceeding guidelines had been successfully remediated to meet criteria

  12. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  13. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  14. Ultrastructure of methanotrophic yeasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, H. J.; Christiansen, M.; Hanson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The cellular structure of two yeast strains capable of growth on methane was investigated by electron microscopy. Microbodies were observed in cells of Sporobolomyces roseus strain Y and Rhodotorula glutinis strain CY when grown on methane but rarely when grown on glucose. The size of the microbodies and the number observed per cell in a thin section did not increase with culture age. No crystalline organization was observed within these organelles. Similar microbodies were also observed in c...

  15. 77 FR 12002 - Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Site-Specific Invasive Plant Treatment Project and Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ..., Final Environmental Impact Statement (USFS 2005a, R6 2005 FEIS), ] and Record of Decision (USFS 2005b, R6 2005 ROD). The Proposed Action would allow for use of these tools, including additional herbicides... Record of Decision (R6 2005 ROD). The R6 2005 ROD amended the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie (MBS) Forest Plan...

  16. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D;

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  17. Yeast biomass production: a new approach in glucose-limited feeding strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Durão Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to implement experimentally a simple glucose-limited feeding strategy for yeast biomass production in a bubble column reactor based on a spreadsheet simulator suitable for industrial application. In biomass production process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, one of the constraints is the strong tendency of these species to metabolize sugars anaerobically due to catabolite repression, leading to low values of biomass yield on substrate. The usual strategy to control this metabolic tendency is the use of a fed-batch process in which where the sugar source is fed incrementally and total sugar concentration in broth is maintained below a determined value. The simulator presented in this work was developed to control molasses feeding on the basis of a simple theoretical model in which has taken into account the nutritional growth needs of yeast cell and two input data: the theoretical specific growth rate and initial cell biomass. In experimental assay, a commercial baker's yeast strain and molasses as sugar source were used. Experimental results showed an overall biomass yield on substrate of 0.33, a biomass increase of 6.4 fold and a specific growth rate of 0.165 h-1 in contrast to the predicted value of 0.180 h-1 in the second stage simulation.

  18. Effects of yeasts and bacteria on the levels of folates in rye sourdoughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariluoto, Susanna; Aittamaa, Marja; Korhola, Matti; Salovaara, Hannu; Vahteristo, Liisa; Piironen, Vieno

    2006-02-01

    Fermentation of rye dough is often accompanied with an increase in folate content. In this study, three sourdough yeasts, Candida milleri CBS 8195, Saccharomyces cerevisiae TS 146, and Torulaspora delbrueckii TS 207; a control, baker's yeast S. cerevisiae ALKO 743; and four Lactobacillus spp., L. acidophilus TSB 262, L. brevis TSB 307, L. plantarum TSB 304, and L. sanfranciscensis TSB 299 originally isolated from rye sourdough were examined for their abilities to produce or consume folates. The microorganisms were grown in yeast extract-peptone-d-glucose medium as well as in small-scale fermentations that modelled the sourdough fermentation step used in rye baking. Total folate contents were determined using Lactobacillus rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) as the growth indicator organism. The microorganisms studied did not excrete folates into the media in significant amounts. Yeasts increased the folate contents of sterilised rye flour-water mixtures from 6.5 microg/100 g to between 15 and 23 microg/100 g after 19-h fermentation, whereas lactic acid bacteria decreased it to between 2.9 and 4.2 microg/100 g. Strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. casei, L. curvatus, L. fermentum, L. helveticus, Pediococcus spp., and Streptococcus thermophilus that were also tested gave folate contents after fermentation that varied between 2 and 10.4 microg/100 g. Although the four Lactobacillus spp. from sourdough consumed folates their effect on folate contents in co-cultivations was minimal. It was concluded that the increase of folate content during fermentation was mainly due to folate synthesis by yeasts. Fermentation of non-sterilised flour-water mixtures as such resulted in three-fold increases in the folate contents. Two folate producing bacteria were isolated from the non-sterilised flour and identified as Enterobacter cowanii and Pantoea agglomerans. PMID:16213050

  19. Flavour-active wine yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Christopher D.; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2012-01-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can infl...

  20. The flip-flop mechanism of the phosphorylation of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakuleva, N P; Baykov, A A; Kasho, V N; Nazarova, T I; Avaeva, S M

    1983-01-01

    1. An active monomeric form of inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was prepared by maleylation of the protein at pH 10.5. 2. The dimeric and monomeric pyrophosphatase bound at non-catalytic sites 0.5 and 1.0 mol of slowly dissociating Pi per mol subunit, respectively. This stoichiometry was not affected on active site blockage with PPi. 3. Added Pi accelerated the dissociation of Pi from the dimeric but not monomeric enzyme. 4. Our results indicate a strong interaction to occur between the non-catalytic sites of two subunits of native pyrophosphatase which results in diminished stability of Pi binding to one of them. PMID:6134648

  1. Application of synthetic biology for production of chemicals in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Li, Mingji

    2015-01-01

    biology has the potential to bring down this cost by improving our ability to predictably engineer biological systems. This review highlights synthetic biology applications for design, assembly, and optimization of non-native biochemical pathways in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe...... computational tools for the prediction of biochemical pathways, molecular biology methods for assembly of DNA parts into pathways, and for introducing the pathways into the host, and finally approaches for optimizing performance of the introduced pathways.......Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering enable generation of novel cell factories that efficiently convert renewable feedstocks into biofuels, bulk, and fine chemicals, thus creating the basis for biosustainable economy independent on fossil resources. While over a hundred proof...

  2. Meltwater palaeohydrology of the Baker River basin (Chile/Argentina) during Late Pleistocene deglaciation of the Northern Patagonia Icefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndycraft, Varyl; Bendle, Jacob; Benito, Gerardo; Sancho, Carlos; Palmer, Adrian; Rodríguez, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The Late Pleistocene deglaciation of the Northern Patagonia Icefield (NPI) was characterised by rapid ice sheet thinning and retreat, and the development of large proglacial lake systems characterised by continental scale drainage reversals. In this region, research has focused primarily on the identification of former ice-limits (e.g. moraine ridges) for geochronological analyses, with little attention given to the meltwater palaeohydrology of major river valleys. The Baker River catchment drains the majority of the eastern ice shed of the NPI, with a basin area of 29,000 km2 that includes the large transboundary lakes of General Carrera/Buenos Aires and Cochrane/Puerreydón. The Baker River valley is aligned north to south, crossing the east-west valleys of the main NPI outflow glaciers, and thus represents an important aspect of regional Late Pleistocene palaeogeography. The Baker River valley therefore has the potential to refine regional models of deglaciation through better understanding of relationships between glacier dynamics, ice dammed lakes and meltwater pathways. Here we present geomorphological mapping from the Atlantic-Pacific drainage divide (over 150 km east of the Cordillera) to the lower Baker valley, in order to reconstruct Late Pleistocene palaeohydrology. We provide new mapping of palaeolake shoreline elevations and evidence for glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) pathways that require a re-evaluation of the currently accepted palaeogeographic models. For example, the palaeohydrological evidence does not support existing models of a unified Buenos Aires/Puerreydón mega-lake at ca. 400m elevation. We propose a relative chronology of palaeohydrological events that help refine the published moraine chronology derived from cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Controls on Late Pleistocene meltwater palaeohydrology of the Baker catchment are discussed, including the interplay of glacial processes and regional tectonics, in particular, dynamic

  3. Special-case closed form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van-Brunt, Alexander; Visser, Matt

    2015-06-01

    The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula is a general result for the quantity Z(X,Y)=ln ({{e}X}{{e}Y}), where X and Y are not necessarily commuting. For completely general commutation relations between X and Y, (the free Lie algebra), the general result is somewhat unwieldy. However in specific physics applications the commutator [X,Y], while non-zero, might often be relatively simple, which sometimes leads to explicit closed form results. We consider the special case [X,Y]=uX+vY+cI, and show that in this case the general result reduces to Furthermore we explicitly evaluate the symmetric function f(u,v)=f(v,u), demonstrating that and relate this to previously known results. For instance this result includes, but is considerably more general than, results obtained from either the Heisenberg commutator [P,Q]=-i\\hbar I or the creation-destruction commutator [a,{{a}\\dagger }]=I.

  4. Mitigation of cimetidine induced testicular toxicity in mice by Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex Baker rhizome extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampa Luangpirom

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex Baker is a herb belonging to the family Zingiberaceae, its rhizomes were used as tea or wine and well known as Thai ginseng. This present study is to evaluate the mitigative effect of aqueous rhizome extract of K. parviflora (KPE against testicular toxicity induced by subcutaneous injection of cimetidine 2 mg / 100 gBW for 14 days in male mice. The extracts at oral doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg / 100 gBW were pretreated for 7 days and co-treated with cimetidine for 14 days exhibited the significant results of mitigation by elevating seminal quality, higher than the cimetidine treated group (P K. parviflora rhizome extract as mitigative agent against testicular toxicity induced by cimetidine.

  5. Characterization of Baker Fjord region through its heavy metal content on sediments (Central Chilean Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Ahumada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of heavy metals content (Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sr and Zn in sediments of the Baker Fjord and surrounding channels in the central region of the Chilean fjords (47°45'S, 48°15'S is analyzed. The aim of the study was characterized the patterns of abundance and distribution of these metals in surface sediments. The area corresponds to a poorly studied zone with low human activity. Distribution patterns would be influenced by rainfall conditions (local erosion, fluvial (continental sediments carried by rivers, glacier (glacier flour and estuarine circulation. Cluster analysis allows differentiation among the sampled sites and group with similar characteristics. Finally, the concentrations found were contrasted with average values of metamorphic rocks and show with some certainty that the values found for calendar for this area and the greatest concentrations are the result of natural enrichment.

  6. I Teoremi di Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff e Dynkin. Storia, Prove, Problemi Aperti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bonfiglioli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this lecture is to provide an overview of facts and references about past and recent results on the Theorem of Campbell, Baker, Hausdorff and Dynkin (shortcut as the CBHD Theorem, following the recent preprint monograph [13]. In particular, we shall give sketches of the following facts: A historical précis of the early proofs (see also [1]; the statement of the CBHD Theorem as usually given in Algebra and that employed in the Analysis of linear PDE's; a review of proofs of the CBHD Theorem (as given by: Bourbaki; Hausdorff; Dynkin; Varadarajan together with a unifying demonstrational approach; an application to the Third Theorem of Lie (in local form. Some new results will be also commented: The intertwinement of the CBHD Theorem with the Theorem of Poincaré-Birkhoff-Witt and with the free Lie algebras (see [12]; recent results on optimal domains of convergence.

  7. Water dynamics in fresh and frozen yeasted dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Simon M; Huang, Victor T; Reid, David S; Winger, Ray J

    2012-01-01

    Water is an integral part of wheat flour dough-the amount, physical state, and location of water are crucial to the formation of a dough that will hold gas and produce an open, aerated crumb structure in the final product. This has been understood for centuries by craft bakers, who were highly attuned to the "feel" of dough in their hands. In the 20th century, empirical instruments were invented that simulated part of the breadmaking process, and their limited predictive capacity made them valuable quality control tools. During the latter decades of the 20th century the cost and availability of advanced instrumental methods for characterizing foods improved dramatically, and facilitated a "fundamental science" approach to food research. The physicochemical mechanisms by which water exerts such a strong influence on the character of dough are now better understood. This review contrasts the empirical and fundamental view points, and summarizes recent knowledge about the roles of water in the manufacture of fresh and frozen yeasted dough. PMID:22369259

  8. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  9. Uranium geology of the eastern Baker Lake basin, District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proterozoic sequences associated with major unconformities are potential uranium metallogenic provinces. Late Aphebian to Paleohelikian Dubawnt Group contintental clastic sedimentary and subaerial alkaline volcanic rocks and underlying Archean gneisses, District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories, represent one such uraniferous metallogenic province. Three types of uranium mineralization are present in the eastern Baker Lake basin, which extends from Christopher Island at the eastern end of Baker Lake southwestwards to the western limit of Thirty Mile Lake. The three uranium associations are: 1) fracture controlled mineralization in the Dubawnt Group and basement gneisses (U-Cu-Ag-Au-Se or U-Cu-Pb-Mo-Zn), 2)diatreme breccia mineralization in basement gneisses (U-Cu-Zn), and 3) impregnation and microfracture mineralization in altered arkose peripheral to lamprophyre dykes(U-Cu-Ag). Hydrothermal fracture related mineralization is controlled by northwest- and east-northeast-trending fault-fracture zones. Diatreme breccia mineralization results from the channelling of groundwaters through highly permeable brecciated gneiss. Mineralization within the altered Kazan arkose peripheral to alkaline dyke complexes formed by a two stage process. Iron and copper sulphides and silver were deposited within the outer portions of the thermal aureole in response to a temperature and Eh gradient across a convective cell created by the thermal anomaly of the dyke complex. The epigenetic sulphide mineralization subsequently provided the reducing environment for precipitation of uranium from groundwater. All three uranium associations show a close spatial distribution to the basal Dubawnt unconformity. The lithological and structural relationships of the Dubawnt Group rocks, types of mineralization and associated alteration assemblages are strikingly similar to the Beaverlodge district, Saskatchewan. (author)

  10. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  11. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  12. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Smid, E.J.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts duri

  13. Eighteen new oleaginous yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Chandra, Idelia; Shi, Sandy; Lin, Ting; German, J Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2016-07-01

    Of 1600 known species of yeasts, about 70 are known to be oleaginous, defined as being able to accumulate over 20 % intracellular lipids. These yeasts have value for fundamental and applied research. A survey of yeasts from the Phaff Yeast Culture Collection, University of California Davis was performed to identify additional oleaginous species within the Basidiomycota phylum. Fifty-nine strains belonging to 34 species were grown in lipid inducing media, and total cell mass, lipid yield and triacylglycerol profiles were determined. Thirty-two species accumulated at least 20 % lipid and 25 species accumulated over 40 % lipid by dry weight. Eighteen of these species were not previously reported to be oleaginous. Triacylglycerol profiles were suitable for biodiesel production. These results greatly expand the number of known oleaginous yeast species, and reveal the wealth of natural diversity of triacylglycerol profiles within wild-type oleaginous Basidiomycetes. PMID:27072563

  14. Application of biogenic carbon dioxide produced by yeast with different carbon sources for attraction of mosquitoes towards adult mosquito traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, D; Ponmariappan, S; Sharma, Atul K; Jha, Hemendra K; Wasu, Yogesh H; Sharma, Ajay K

    2016-04-01

    Surveillance is a prime requisite for controlling arthropod vectors like mosquitoes that transmit diseases such as malaria, dengue and chikungunya. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the main cues from vertebrate breath that attracts mosquitoes towards the host. Hence, CO2 is used as an attractant during surveillance of mosquitoes either from commercial cylinders or dry ice for mosquito traps. In the present study, the biogenic carbon dioxide production was optimized with different carbon sources such as glucose, simple sugar and jaggery with and without yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) media using commercial baker's yeast. The results showed that yeast produced more biogenic CO2 with simple sugar as compared to other carbon sources. Further substrate concentration was optimized for the continuous production of biogenic CO2 for a minimum of 12 h by using 10 g of baker's yeast with 50 g of simple sugar added to 1.5 l distilled water (without YPD media) in a 2-l plastic bottle. This setup was applied in field condition along with two different mosquito traps namely Mosquito Killing System (MKS) and Biogents Sentinel (BGS) trap. Biogenic CO2 from this setup has increased the trapping efficiency of MKS by 6.48-fold for Culex quinquefasciatus, 2.62-fold for Aedes albopictus and 1.5-fold for Anopheles stephensi. In the case of BGS, the efficiency was found to be increased by 3.54-fold for Ae. albopictus, 4.33-fold for An. stephensi and 1.3-fold for Armigeres subalbatus mosquitoes. On the whole, plastic bottle setup releasing biogenic CO2 from sugar and yeast has increased the efficiency of MKS traps by 6.38-fold and 2.74-fold for BGS traps as compared to traps without biogenic CO2. The present study reveals that, among different carbon sources used, simple sugar as a substance (which is economical and readily available across the world) yielded maximum biogenic CO2 with yeast. This setup can be used as an alternative to CO2 cylinder and dry ice in any adult mosquito traps to

  15. Inventory and Monitoring Plan for Howland Island, Baker Island, Jarvis Island National Wildlife Refuges; Units of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monuments

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan documents and prioritizes inventory and monitoring surveys and research currently conducted, and proposed to be conducted, at the Howland Island, Baker...

  16. CRED Simrad em300 multibeam backscatter data of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  17. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  18. Yeasts: from genetics to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, S; Berkovitz Siman-Tov, R; Poli, G

    1995-01-01

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the "biotechnological revolution" by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. PMID:9003692

  19. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, S.; Poli, G. [Univ. of Milan (Italy); Siman-Tov, R.B. [Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Genetic study on yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research during the past year has moved ahead on several fronts. A major compilation of all the genetic mapping data for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completed. The map describes the location of over 300 genes on 17 chromosomes. A report on this work will appear in Microbiological Reviews in December 1980. Recombinant DNA procedures have been introduced into the experiments and RAD52 (one of the genes involved in recombination and repair damage), has been successfully cloned. This clone will be used to determine the gene product. Diploid cells homozygous for RAD52 have exceptionally high frequencies of mitotic loss of chromosomes. This loss is stimulated by ionizing radiation. This effect is a very significant finding. The effect has also been seen with certain other RAD mutants

  1. Postglacial volcanic deposits at Mount Baker, Washington, and potential hazards from future eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jack H.; Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1978-01-01

    Eruptions and other geologic events at Mount Baker during the last 10,000 years have repeatedly affected adjacent areas, especially the valleys that head on the south and east sides of the volcano. Small volumes of tephra were erupted at least four times during the past 10,000 years. Future eruptions like these could cause as much as 35 centimeters of tephra to be deposited at sites 17 kilometers from the volcano, 15 centimeters of tephra to be deposited 29 kilometers from the volcano, and 5 centimeters, 44 kilometers from the volcano. Lava flows were erupted at least twice during the last 10,000 years and moved down two valleys. Future lava flows will not directly endanger people because lava typically moves so slowly that escape is possible. Hot pyroclastic flows evidently occurred during only one period and were confined to the Boulder Creek valley. Such flows can move at speeds of as much as 150 kilometers per hour and can bury valley floors under tens of meters of hot rock debris for at least 15 kilometers from the volcano. large mudflows, most of which contain hydrothermally altered rock debris, originated at Mount Baker at least eight times during the last 10,000 years. The largest mudflow reached 29 kilometers or more down the valley of the Middle Fork Nooksack River, west of the volcano, about 6,000 years ago. Extensive masses of hydrothermally altered rock that are potentially unstable exist today near the summit of the volcano, especially in the Sherman Crater - Sherman Peak area. Avalanches of this material could be triggered by steam explosions, earthquakes, or eruptions, or may occur because of slow-acting forces of processes that gradually decrease stability. large avalanches could move downslope at high speed and could grade downvalley into mudflows. Floods caused by rapid melting of snow and ice by lava or by hot rock debris could affect valley floors many tens of kilometers from the volcano and could have especially severe effects if they were to

  2. Simplifying the Reinsch algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van-Brunt, Alexander; Visser, Matt

    2016-02-01

    The Goldberg version of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series computes the quantity Z ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X e Y ) = ∑ w g ( w ) w ( X , Y ) , where X and Y are not necessarily commuting in terms of "words" constructed from the {X, Y} "alphabet." The so-called Goldberg coefficients g(w) are the central topic of this article. This Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series is a general purpose tool of very wide applicability in mathematical physics, quantum physics, and many other fields. The Reinsch algorithm for the truncated series permits one to calculate the Goldberg coefficients up to some fixed word length |w| by using nilpotent (|w| + 1) × (|w| + 1) matrices. We shall show how to further simplify the Reinsch algorithm, making its implementation (in principle) utterly straightforward using "off the shelf" symbolic manipulation software. Specific computations provide examples which help to provide a deeper understanding of the Goldberg coefficients and their properties. For instance, we shall establish some strict bounds (and some equalities) on the number of non-zero Goldberg coefficients. Unfortunately, we shall see that the number of nonzero Goldberg coefficients often grows very rapidly (in fact exponentially) with the word length |w|. Furthermore, the simplified Reinsch algorithm readily generalizes to many closely related but still quite distinct problems—we shall also present closely related results for the symmetric product S ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X / 2 e Y e X / 2 ) = ∑ w g S ( w ) w ( X , Y ) . Variations on such themes are straightforward. For instance, one can just as easily consider the "loop" product L ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X e Y e - X e - Y ) = ∑ w g L ( w ) w ( X , Y ) . This "loop" type of series is of interest, for instance, when considering either differential geometric parallel transport around a closed curve, non-Abelian versions of Stokes' theorem, or even Wigner rotation/Thomas precession in special

  3. Reseña de Baker, P. (2010). Sociolinguistics and corpus linguistics. Edimburgo, Escocia: Edinburgh University Press.

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Romero, Camilo E.

    2013-01-01

    En este documento, el profesor Paul Baker (Universidad de Manchester) nos informa acerca del papel que están jugando los estudios sobre lingüística del corpus en la caracterización de la variación y el cambio de las formas y los significados de todo tipo de ítems lingüísticos dentro de un contexto social.

  4. Image encryption schemes for JPEG and GIF formats based on 3D baker with compound chaotic sequence generator

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Shiyu; Tong, Xiaojun; Zhang, Miao

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposed several methods to transplant the compound chaotic image encryption scheme with permutation based on 3D baker into image formats as Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) and Graphics Interchange Format (GIF). The new method averts the lossy Discrete Cosine Transform and quantization and can encrypt and decrypt JPEG images lossless. Our proposed method for GIF keeps the property of animation successfully. The security test results indicate the proposed methods have high s...

  5. Diversity and Genetic Structure of the Mexican Endemic Epiphyte Tillandsia achyrostachys E. Morr. ex Baker var. achyrostachys (Bromeliaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    GONZÁLEZ-ASTORGA, JORGE; CRUZ-ANGÓN, ANDREA; Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Andrew P. Vovides

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims The monoecious, bird-pollinated epiphytic Tillandsia achyrostachys E. Morr. ex Baker var. achyrostachys is an endemic bromeliad of the tropical dry forests of Mexico with clonal growth. In the Sierra de Huautla Natural Reserve this species shows a host preference for Bursera copallifera (Sessé & Moc ex. DC) Bullock. As a result of deforestation in the study area, B. copallifera has become a rare tree species in the remaining forest patches. This human-induced disturbance...

  6. Consumption of agro-industrial supplies by the baker subsector of Palmira, Valle, Colombia. Consumo de insumos agroindustriales por el subsector panificador de Palmira, Valle del Cauca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarme J Wilson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The indicators of agroindustrial consumption in the bakers subsector Pymes play a primary role for designing sustainable strategies for the small craftsman of bread. The administrative, operative and human talent subsystems were evaluated, in 30 of 178 organizations that conformed the bakers subsystems of Palmira on 2005. The estimated annual consumption of wheat flour on 2004 was 2016 t; 348 t of sugar; 240 t of cheese; 54 t of salt; 492 t of margarine; 99 t of yeast; 151200 panels of eggs. With regarding to raw materials it consumes 384000 m3 of natural gas; 1.2 million kw of electric power and 156000 m3 of water. The sector generates 681 direct employments. Map is presented with the location of 86% of the bakeries registered in the Trade Chamber. There is not a unique bakery that had implemented a program of Good Manufacture Practices BPM in an integral way, that meets the National Institute of Medications and Foods Surveillance INVIMA Standars, that has of a system of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP or have been is to be certified with Quality Assuring Standars (ISO 9000, and/or Environmental Administration (ISO 14000, with occupational health programs (OHSAS 18000 and permanent improvement programs relative to administrative and commercial aspects.Los indicadores de consumo agroindustrial en las Pymes del subsector panificador resultan apremiantes para el diseño de estrategias de sostenibilidad para los pequeños artesanos del pan. Se evaluaron los subsistemas administrativos, talento humano y operativo en 30 de las 178 organizaciones que conformaron el subsistema panificador de Palmira en el 2005. El consumo estimado anual para el 2004 de harina de trigo fue 2.016 t; 348 t de azúcar; 240 t de queso; 54 t de sal; 492 t de margarina; 99 t de levadura; 151.200 paneles de huevos. En materias primas auxiliares consume 384.000 m3 de gas natural; 1.2 millones de kw de energía eléctrica y 156.000 m3 de agua. El sector genera

  7. ONYCHOMYCOSIS DUE TO YEAST AND YEAST-LIKE FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zaini

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Onychomycosis due to the yeast and yeast-like fungi was investigated among the 147 patient who refered to the mycology laboratory of school of public Health during the period of 11 months. The isolated yeasts and yeast-like fungi were examined by API Auxanogram methed. The distribution of isolated microorganisms were C. tropicalis 10(7.4%, C.guillioimondii & (5.9% cases and one case of each of the C.krusei, C.pseudotropicalis, C.rugosa, trichosporon cutaneum, trolopsis maris, Cryptococcus albidus and finaly 3(2.2% cases of candida famata. High incidence of infection was in the patients with 0-15 years of age and most of them were in the groups of 0-4 years. Nail infection among the females were much more frequently than the males and predominant occupation of the women was house duties. The results which obtained from this investigation with the API Auxanogram system is quite satistactory and use of this rapid method for identification of yeasts and yeast-like fungi from the clinical materials of the patients is recommended.

  8. Biotechnical Microbiology, yeast and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid Stampe

    1999-01-01

    This section contains the following single lecture notes: Eukaryotic Cell Biology. Kingdom Fungi. Cell Division. Meiosis and Recombination. Genetics of Yeast. Organisation of the Chromosome. Organization and genetics of the mitochondrial Geneme. Regulatio of Gene Expression. Intracellular Compart...

  9. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infection caused by a type of fungus called candida albicans . Yeast infections usually happen in warm, moist parts of the ... fungus can grow. Doctors call this candida overgrowth candidiasis (pronounced: can-dih-DYE-uh-sis) Candida can ...

  10. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products varies depending on the yeast strains and culture conditions used to manufacture them. The strains and ... supplements should not be used while pregnant or breastfeeding. Lovastatin can interact with a variety of drugs ...

  11. On Prigogine's approaches to irreversibility: a case study by the baker map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tasaki

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The baker map is investigated by two different theories of irreversibility by Prigogine and his colleagues, namely, the Λ-transformation and complex spectral theories, and their structures are compared. In both theories, the evolution operator U† of observables (the Koopman operator is found to acquire dissipativity by restricting observables to an appropriate subspace Φ of the Hilbert space L2 of square integrable functions. Consequently, its spectral set contains an annulus in the unit disc. However, the two theories are not equivalent. In the Λ-transformation theory, a bijective map Λ†−1:Φ→L2 is looked for and the evolution operator U of densities (the Frobenius-Perron operator is transformed to a dissipative operator W=ΛUΛ−1. In the complex spectral theory, the class of densities is restricted further so that most values in the interior of the annulus are removed from the spectrum, and the relaxation of expectation values is described in terms of a few point spectra in the annulus (Pollicott-Ruelle resonances and faster decaying terms.

  12. Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec: a new robotic wide-field Baker-Nunn facility

    CERN Document Server

    Fors, O; Muiños, J L; Montojo, F J; Baena-Gallé, R; Boloix, J; Morcillo, R; Merino, M T; Downey, E C; Mazur, M J

    2012-01-01

    A Baker-Nunn Camera (BNC), originally installed at the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in 1958, was refurbished and robotized. The new facility, called Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec (TFRM), was installed at the Observatori Astron\\`omic del Montsec (OAdM). The process of refurbishment is described in detail. Most of the steps of the refurbishment project were accomplished by purchasing commercial components, which involve little posterior engineering assembling work. The TFRM is a 0.5m aperture f/0.96 optically modified BNC, which offers a unique combination of instrumental specifications: fully robotic and remote operation, wide-field of view (4.4 deg x 4.4 deg), moderate limiting magnitude (V~19.5mag), ability of tracking at arbitrary right ascension and declination rates, as well as opening and closing CCD shutter at will during an exposure. Nearly all kind of image survey programs can benefit from those specifications. Apart from other less time consuming programs, since the beginning of sci...

  13. The effects of mixture commercial live bakers’ yeast and probiotic bacillus on growth and feeding performance and survival rate of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix larvae via bioencapsulated Artemia urmiana nauplii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Adineh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (Valenciennes, 1844 larvae is an important species forfreshwater aquaculture. This study evaluated the effects of feeding a blend of probiotic bacilli bacteria(B. polymixa, B. licheniformis, B. circulans and baker´s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth and feeding parameters and survival rate of Silver carp larvae. Artemia urmiana (Gǘnther, 1899 nauplii is an important live food that was used as a vector to carry probiotic bacillus to digestive tract of silver carp larvae. The fish larvae were fed at a level of 10 percent body weight at 4 times a day for 30 days. Fish larvae in experimental treatments were fed A. urmiana nauplii that were enriched by blend of 50 percent of Bacillus spp. with concentrations of 1×105, 2×105, 3×105 and 4×105 CFU mL-1 and 50 percent of baker´s yeast with concentrations of 1×105, 2×105, 3×105 and 4×105 cellsmL-1 (T1, T2, T3, T4, respectively and were compared to fish larvae fed control diets of unbioencapsulated A. urmiananauplii. The experiment indicated that feeding and growth parameters in fish fed experimental treatments were significantly higher than fish fed control diets (P<0.05 but survival rate did not significantly differ. Overall, the best group was fed the highest level of yeast and probiotic.

  14. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Bilke, Sven

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent ...

  15. Mucositis Grades and Yeast Species

    OpenAIRE

    Ognjenović, Marina; Milatić, Katja; Parat, Katica; Kovačić, Ivan; Ježina Bušelić, Marina A.; Božić, Joško

    2013-01-01

    Surgically treated patients with oral, head and neck cancer commonly develop mucositis during additional irradiation therapy. Oral mucosa inflammation other than irradiation is mostly caused by Candida albicans, yeast of Candida genus. This study evaluated possible connection between grades of oral mucositis and oral yeast profile in irradiated patients before, during and after irradiation. In 25 examined patients mucosits grades »0« to »2« before irradiation with 20% positive smears and o...

  16. Sociobiology of the budding yeast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dominika M Wloch-Salamon

    2014-04-01

    Social theory has provided a useful framework for research with microorganisms. Here I describe the advantages and possible risks of using a well-known model organism, the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for sociobiological research. I discuss the problems connected with clear classification of yeast behaviour based on the fitness-based Hamilton paradigm. Relevant traits include different types of communities, production of flocculins, invertase and toxins, and the presence of apoptosis.

  17. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  18. Synthetic Yeast Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Wenying; Burton, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Cooperation is wide-spread and has been postulated to drive major transitions in evolution. However, Darwinian selection favors ``cheaters'' that consume benefits without paying a fair cost. How did cooperation evolve against the threat of cheaters? To investigate the evolutionary trajectories of cooperation, we created a genetically tractable system that can be observed as it evolves from inception. The system consists of two engineered yeast strains -- a red-fluorescent strain that requires adenine and releases lysine and a yellow-fluorescent strain that requires lysine and releases adenine. Cells that consume but not supply metabolites would be cheaters. From the properties of two cooperating strains, we calculated and experimentally verified the minimal initial cell densities required for the viability of the cooperative system in the absence of exogenously added adenine and lysine. Strikingly, evolved cooperative systems were viable at 100-fold lower initial cell densities than their ancestors. We are investigating the nature and diversity of pro-cooperation changes, the dynamics of cooperator-cheater cocultures, and the effects of spatial environment on cooperation and cheating.

  19. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  20. Selective Affinity Separation of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase by Reverse Micelles with Unbound Triazine Dye*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张天喜; 刘会洲; 陈家镛

    2001-01-01

    The reversed micelles were formed with cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant and n-hexanol as cosolvent in the CTAB (50 mmol·L- 1)/hexanol (15% by volume)/hexane system. Cibacron Blue 3GA (CB) as an affinity ligand in the aqueous phase was directly introduced to the reversed micelles with electrostatic interaction between anionic CB and cationic surfactant. High molecular weight (Mr) protein, yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, Mr = 141000) from baker's yeast, has been purified using the affinity reversed micelles by the phase transfer method. Various parameters, such as CB concentration, pH and ionic strength, on YADH forward and backward transfer were studied. YADH can be transferred into and out from the reversed micelles under mild conditions (only by regulation of solution pH and salt concentration) with the successful recoveryof most YADH activity. Both forward and backward extractions occurred when the aqueous phase pH>pI with electrostatic attraction between YADH and CTAB. The recovery of YADH activity and purification factor have been improved with addition of a small amount of affinity CB. The recovery of YADH activity obtained was 99% and the purification factor was about 4.0-fold after one cycle of full forward and backward extraction. The low ionic strength in the initial aqueous phase might be responsible for the YADH transfer into the reversed micellar phase.

  1. Selective Affinity Separation of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase by Reverse Micelles with Unbound Triazine Dye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reversed micelles were formed with cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfac tant and n-hexanol as cosolvent in the CTAB (50mmol.L-1)/hexanol (15% by volume)/hexane system. Cibacron Blue 3GA (CB) as an affinity ligand in the aqueous phase was directly introduced to the reversed micelles with electrostatic interaction between anionic CB and cationic surfactant. High molecular weight (Mr) protein, yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, Mr = 141000) from baker's yeast, has been purified using the affinity reversed micelles by the phase transfer method. Various parameters, such as CB concentration, pH and ionic strength, on YADH forward and backward transfer were studied. YADH can be transferred into and out from the reversed mi celles under mild conditions (only by regulation of solution pH and salt concentration) with the successful recovery of most YADH activity. Both forward and backward extractions occurred when the aqueous phase pH>pI with electrostatic attraction between YADH and CTAB. The recovery of YADH activity and purification factor have been improved with addition of a small amount of affinity CB. The recovery of YADH activity obtained was ~99% and the purification factor was about 4.0-fold after one cycle of full forward and backward extraction. The low ionic strength in the initial aqueous phase might be responsible for the YADH transfer into the reversed micellar phase.

  2. L’Hyperréalisme de Nicholson Baker, ou comment se refamiliariser avec le quotidien

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Schmitt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cet article se propose d’étudier la dynamique inhérente à deux romans de Nicholson Baker – The Mezzanine et A Box of Matches – et la façon dont celle-ci repose sur une dialectique populaire/savant, et plus exactement thématique populaire/récit savant. Après avoir défini la culture savante avant tout comme une culture de communauté, comme cela a été fait par le philosophe Hilary Putnam à travers son concept de « division linguistique du travail » (« linguistic division of labor », nous tentons de démontrer qu’être savant en littérature n’est pas lié à ce que l’on dit, mais à la façon dont on le dit. En d’autres termes, il peut exister des récits savants dont la thématique est essentiellement populaire. La littérature proposée par Nicholson Baker obéit justement à cette logique : à travers des chronotopes réduits, mais denses, ses romans nous refamiliarisent avec l’infra-ordinaire, l’ultra-populaire, les gestes répétitifs et souvent mécaniques du quotidien, par le biais de récits pourtant sophistiqués –« savants » puisque nécessitant une très bonne culture littéraire – se caractérisant par des écarts formels typiquement post-modernes (notes pléthoriques, logique itérative poussée à l’extrême.This article aims at studying the dynamics of Nicholson Baker’s The Mezzanine and A Box of Matches, which is based on a lowbrow/highbrow dialectics, and more precisely on a dialectical tension between a lowbrow subject matter and a highbrow narrative. After addressing the nature of “highbrow culture” through Hilary Putnam’s concept of “linguistic division of labor”, we try to show that the very idea of “highbrow literature” does not stem from what the author writes about but from how he writes about it. In other words, a highbrow novel can tackle lowbrow themes. Nicholson Baker’s novels corroborate this claim: dealing with extremely limited chronotopes (a few

  3. Effect of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex. Baker on sexual activity of male rats and its toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudwan, Paiwan; Saenphet, Kanokporn; Saenphet, Supap; Suwansirikul, Songkiet

    2006-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker (Krachaidum) has long been used among Thai men for sexual enhancement. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of K. parviflora ethanolic extract on the sexual behavior of male rats and its toxicity. The experiment was divided into three groups of rats given K. parviflora extract at doses of 60, 120, and 240 mg/kg BW for 60 days, whilst a control group received distilled water at 1 ml/day per oral. The results showed that all groups of male rats had significantly higher courtship behavior during the first 10-minute period of observation than in the 2nd and 3rd 10-minute periods, except those receiving the highest dose of K. parviflora. They revealed the same amount of courtship behavior throughout a whole 30-minute period, which was significantly lower than the control group. There was no significant difference between treated and control groups in other sexual behaviors; mount frequency (MF), intromission frequency (IF), mount latency (ML), or intromission latency (IL). Toxicological study revealed no significant difference of hemoglobin, WBC or differential cell count. All dosages had no effect on kidney and liver function, according to the normal values of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Crea), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Nevertheless, the histopathological study showed a morphological change in the liver. It was concluded that K. parviflora extract at 240 mg/kg BW reduced the time in the first 10 mintues of rat courtship behavior and the use of high and chronic doses of K. parviflora in humans should be considered inadvisable. PMID:17547083

  4. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

  5. Diet, occupational exposure and early asthma incidence among bakers, pastry makers and hairdressers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémen Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of occupational asthma (OA is influenced by many determinants. This study aims to assess the combined roles of personal characteristics, including occupational exposure and nutritional habits, on the incidence of OA during the first years at work. Methods A nested case–control study was conducted within a retrospective cohort of young workers in the bakery, pastry-making and hairdressing sectors. Cases were subjects diagnosed as ‘confirmed’ or ‘probable’ OA consecutively to a medical visit (N = 31. Controls were subjects without OA (N = 196. Atopy was defined after blood specific IgE analysis, based on the PhadiatopTM test. Occupational exposure was characterized by standardized questionnaires and diet patterns by a food frequency questionnaire. Results Among bakers and pastry-makers, only atopy is an independent risk factor of OA (OR = 10.07 95%CI [2.76 – 36.65]. Among hairdressers, several variables are associated with OA. Body mass index (unit OR = 1.24 [1.03 – 1.48] and the score of exposure intensity (unit OR = 1.79 [1.05 – 3.05] are independent predictors of OA, but the role of atopy is weak (OR = 4.94 [0.66 – 36.75]. Intake of vitamin A is higher among hairdressers cases (crude p = 0.002, adjusted p = 0.01 after control for body mass index and atopy; the same observation is made for vitamin D (crude p = 0.004, adjusted p = 0.01. Conclusion This study suggests that the influence of several factors on the incidence of OA, including dietary vitamins, might vary across exposure settings.

  6. Ancient evolutionary trade-offs between yeast ploidy states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikö Zörgö

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of chromosome sets contained within the nucleus of eukaryotic organisms is a fundamental yet evolutionarily poorly characterized genetic variable of life. Here, we mapped the impact of ploidy on the mitotic fitness of baker's yeast and its never domesticated relative Saccharomyces paradoxus across wide swaths of their natural genotypic and phenotypic space. Surprisingly, environment-specific influences of ploidy on reproduction were found to be the rule rather than the exception. These ploidy-environment interactions were well conserved across the 2 billion generations separating the two species, suggesting that they are the products of strong selection. Previous hypotheses of generalizable advantages of haploidy or diploidy in ecological contexts imposing nutrient restriction, toxin exposure, and elevated mutational loads were rejected in favor of more fine-grained models of the interplay between ecology and ploidy. On a molecular level, cell size and mating type locus composition had equal, but limited, explanatory power, each explaining 12.5%-17% of ploidy-environment interactions. The mechanism of the cell size-based superior reproductive efficiency of haploids during Li(+ exposure was traced to the Li(+ exporter ENA. Removal of the Ena transporters, forcing dependence on the Nha1 extrusion system, completely altered the effects of ploidy on Li(+ tolerance and evoked a strong diploid superiority, demonstrating how genetic variation at a single locus can completely reverse the relative merits of haploidy and diploidy. Taken together, our findings unmasked a dynamic interplay between ploidy and ecology that was of unpredicted evolutionary importance and had multiple molecular roots.

  7. Ancient evolutionary trade-offs between yeast ploidy states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zörgö, Enikö; Chwialkowska, Karolina; Gjuvsland, Arne B; Garré, Elena; Sunnerhagen, Per; Liti, Gianni; Blomberg, Anders; Omholt, Stig W; Warringer, Jonas

    2013-03-01

    The number of chromosome sets contained within the nucleus of eukaryotic organisms is a fundamental yet evolutionarily poorly characterized genetic variable of life. Here, we mapped the impact of ploidy on the mitotic fitness of baker's yeast and its never domesticated relative Saccharomyces paradoxus across wide swaths of their natural genotypic and phenotypic space. Surprisingly, environment-specific influences of ploidy on reproduction were found to be the rule rather than the exception. These ploidy-environment interactions were well conserved across the 2 billion generations separating the two species, suggesting that they are the products of strong selection. Previous hypotheses of generalizable advantages of haploidy or diploidy in ecological contexts imposing nutrient restriction, toxin exposure, and elevated mutational loads were rejected in favor of more fine-grained models of the interplay between ecology and ploidy. On a molecular level, cell size and mating type locus composition had equal, but limited, explanatory power, each explaining 12.5%-17% of ploidy-environment interactions. The mechanism of the cell size-based superior reproductive efficiency of haploids during Li(+) exposure was traced to the Li(+) exporter ENA. Removal of the Ena transporters, forcing dependence on the Nha1 extrusion system, completely altered the effects of ploidy on Li(+) tolerance and evoked a strong diploid superiority, demonstrating how genetic variation at a single locus can completely reverse the relative merits of haploidy and diploidy. Taken together, our findings unmasked a dynamic interplay between ploidy and ecology that was of unpredicted evolutionary importance and had multiple molecular roots. PMID:23555297

  8. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 μm plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  9. Variações na morfoanatomia foliar de Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren) Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae) sob distintas condições ambientais Leaf morphoanatomy variation in Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren) Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae) under distinct environmental conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Heinig Voltolini; Marisa Santos

    2011-01-01

    Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren) Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae-Bromelioideae) ocorre em restingas e Floresta Pluvial de Encosta Atlântica em Santa Catarina e Nordeste do Rio Grande do Sul, BR. Pode ser encontrada total ou parcialmente exposta à irradiação solar e em distintas formas de vida - terrícola, rupícola e epifítica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar morfoanatomicamente às características de folhas de A. lindenii var. lindenii em distintas condições ambientais. Foram coletadas, n...

  10. Biosynthesis of acid phosphatase of baker's yeast . Characterization of a protoplast-bound fraction containing precursors of the exo-enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Pieter; Rijn, Herman J.M. van; Reinking, A.; Steyn-Parvé, Elizabeth P.

    1975-01-01

    1. 1.|Yest protoplasts, secreting acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (acid optimum) EC 3.1.3.2) contain a small amount of firmly bound enzyme, even after lysis (Van Rijn, H.J.M.; Boer, P. and Steyn-Parvé, E.P. (1972) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 268, 431–441). The major part (70%

  11. Determinação de metais em água e folha de AECHMEA BLANCHETIANA (BAKER) L.B

    OpenAIRE

    Jaline R. Ribeiro; Sergio Siqueira; Cleber G. Novaes; João H. Santos Neto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the concentrations of calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium and sodium in the water and leaves of Aechmea blanchetiana (Baker) L.B species collected between the cities of Ilhéus and Itacaré, Bahia, Brazil and verify if the metals found in the water can be absorbed by the leaves. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) and flame photometry were used for the determination of metals. pH measurements, dissolved oxygen and water temperature were a...

  12. Mitigation of cimetidine induced testicular toxicity in mice by Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex Baker rhizome extract

    OpenAIRE

    Ampa Luangpirom; Narumon Komnon

    2011-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex Baker is a herb belonging to the family Zingiberaceae, its rhizomes were used as tea or wine and well known as Thai ginseng. This present study is to evaluate the mitigative effect of aqueous rhizome extract of K. parviflora (KPE) against testicular toxicity induced by subcutaneous injection of cimetidine 2 mg / 100 gBW for 14 days in male mice. The extracts at oral doses of 5, 10 and 20 mg / 100 gBW were pretreated for 7 days and co-treated with cimetidine for...

  13. Utilization of the Baker soil test in synthetic soil preparation for reclamation of coal ash disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of procedures developed for preparation of synthetic soils for reclamation of two coal ash disposal sites in Pennsylvania is presented. These procedures include determination of water holding properties, lime requirement, and the Baker Soil Test (BST) for chemical element analysis. Results from soil and plant analyses following establishment of vegetation on the sites have shown that the BST predicts plant incorporation of chemical elements from the synthetic soils. The results confirm the utility of the BST in planning and executing successful reclamation on disturbed lands in a manner which protects the soil-plant-animal food chain

  14. Patrones de búsqueda y respuesta funcional del acaro phytoseiidae neoseiulus anonymus (chant & baker), depredando a tetranychus urticae (koch)

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Mauricio; Páramo, Gabriel; Corredor, Darío

    2011-01-01

    Las respuestas de hembras adultas de Tetrenychus urtieae (Koch) a condiciones variables de luz y topografía (reportadasen publicación anterior por los mismos autores). fueron comparadas con los patrones de búsqueda desarrollados por Neoseiulus anonymus (Chant & Baker) bajo las mismas condiciones experimentales. Mediante la medida de tales patrones se determinó la velocidad de búsqueda y se multiplicó por el campo de percepción con el fin de  determinar el área total de búsqueda del depred...

  15. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bilke, S

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent cell clock is identified. The capability of the algorithm to extract information about signal flow in the regulatory network underlying the expression patterns is demonstrated.

  16. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  17. Black yeasts in cold habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Selbmann; G.S. de Hoog; L. Zucconi; D. Isola; S. Onofri

    2014-01-01

    Black yeasts have already been known since the end of the nineteenth century, but for a number of reasons, only few workers were familiar with them. That was since recently, until the wealth of biodiversity, stunning ecologies and potential applications have become apparent. Some remote and extreme

  18. Retention of polyacrylamide by berea sandstone, baker dolomite, and sodium kaolinite during polymer flooding. Paper SPE 8981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, J.J.; Pledger, H. Jr.; Hogen-Esch, T.E.; Butler, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    Surface charge and accessible surface area control the retention of polyacrylamide by berea sandstone, baker dolomite, and sodium kaolinite. Hydrolysis of polyacrylamide increases retention by materials with a positively charged surface, such as dolomite, and decreases retention, when surface area remains constant, on materials with negatively charged surfaces, such as sandstone. Additives which form a more theta or less effective solvent promote retention. Water becomes a less effective solvent for polyacrylamide when its salt content is increased or when nonsolvents, such as alcohols, are added to it. Berea sandstone cores retained over 50 percent of polyacrylamide injected under all salinities, polyacrylamide concentrations, and degrees of hydrolysis tested and sodium kaolinite retained over 90 percent of all injected polyacrylamide under the same conditions. In contrast, baker dolomite, a high purity dolomite, retains only 17.9 percent of the unhydrolyzed polyacrylamide injected. Since bera sandstone contains 7.5 percent kaolinite, these data suggest that clay content has a significant effect on total polymer retention. Flocculating sodium kaolinite, which reduces its accessible surface area by over 80 percent, reduces retention by 70 percent, from 1217 ..mu..g/g to 360 ..mu..g/g. With other variables held constant, reduction in accessible surface area will reduce retention of polyacrylamide by a porous medium as long as adsorption dominates the retention process. 24 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Whey - raw material for the production of baker starter-cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Mrvčić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of production Lactic acid bacteria (LAB, which are suitable for breadmaking on whey was researched and compared to the results achieved in modified MRS medium. The growth and fermentation activities of Leuconostoc meseteroides L-3, Lactobacillus brevis L-62 and Lactobacillus plantarum L-73 were examined by monitoring lactic and acetic acid production in fermentation broth and in sourdough. Presented results show that deproteinized whey is suitable for LAB production. The best biomass yield (1,7 g/L and lactic acid production (9,15 mg/mL was achieved with L. plantarum L-73. Better flavour, elasticity and shelf life of bread made with whey-based starters compared to the classical yeast-monoculture based bread were determined by sensory analysis (DLG method.

  20. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here. PMID:25682759

  1. Combinatorial pathway assembly in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Essani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of synthetic biology and the vast knowledge about individual biocatalytic reactions, the challenge nowadays is to implement whole natural or synthetic pathways into microorganisms. For this purpose balanced enzyme activities throughout the pathway need to be achieved in addition to simple functional gene expression to avoid bottlenecks and to obtain high titers of the desired product. As the optimization of pathways in a specific biological context is often hard to achieve by rational design, combinatorial approaches have been developed to address this issue. Here, current strategies and proof of concepts for combinatorial pathway assembly in yeasts are reviewed. By exploiting its ability to join multiple DNA fragments in a very efficient and easy manner, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not only constitute an attractive host for heterologous pathway expression, but also for assembling pathways by recombination in vivo.

  2. Changing the Behaviour of Traditional Bakers in a Chinese Multi-Family Owned Food Company through Workplace Action Learning in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Barry; Tse, Rex Chi-Hang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale for designing and implementing an action learning and research process to significantly transform the work behaviour of tradition-bound bakers to embrace leading ideas of a new workplace culture in order to diversify the product range of the moon cake and generally improve the…

  3. Agave x güemensis Guillot & Meer (Agave polyacantha Haw. x Agave warelliana Baker), un nuevo híbrido dentro del grupo Polycephalae Gentry

    OpenAIRE

    Guillot Ortiz, Daniel; Van der Meer, Piet

    2005-01-01

    Se describe un nuevo híbrido dentro del género Agave L., a partir de ejemplares cultivados en el Jardín Botánico de Valencia, Agave x güemensis Guillot & Meer (Agave polyacantha Haw. x Agave warelliana Baker).

  4. Nuclear Import of Yeast Proteasomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Burcoglu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are highly conserved protease complexes responsible for the degradation of aberrant and short-lived proteins. In highly proliferating yeast and mammalian cells, proteasomes are predominantly nuclear. During quiescence and cell cycle arrest, proteasomes accumulate in granules in close proximity to the nuclear envelope/ER. With prolonged quiescence in yeast, these proteasome granules pinch off as membraneless organelles, and migrate as stable entities through the cytoplasm. Upon exit from quiescence, the proteasome granules clear and the proteasomes are rapidly transported into the nucleus, a process reflecting the dynamic nature of these multisubunit complexes. Due to the scarcity of studies on the nuclear transport of mammalian proteasomes, we summarised the current knowledge on the nuclear import of yeast proteasomes. This pathway uses canonical nuclear localisation signals within proteasomal subunits and Srp1/Kap95, and the canonical import receptor, named importin/karyopherin αβ. Blm10, a conserved 240 kDa protein, which is structurally related to Kap95, provides an alternative import pathway. Two models exist upon which either inactive precursor complexes or active holo-enzymes serve as the import cargo. Here, we reconcile both models and suggest that the import of inactive precursor complexes predominates in dividing cells, while the import of mature enzymes mainly occurs upon exit from quiescence.

  5. Yeast: A new oil producer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beopoulos Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand of plant oils or animal fat for biodiesel and specific lipid derivatives for the oleochemical field (such as lubricants, adhesives or plastics have created price imbalance in both the alimentary and energy field. Moreover, the lack of non-edible oil feedstock has given rise to concerns on land-use practices and on oil production strategies. Recently, much attention has been paid to the exploitation of microbial oils. Most of them present lipid profiles similar in type and composition to plants and could therefore have many advantages as are no competitive with food, have short process cycles and their cultivation is independent of climate factors. Among microorganisms, yeasts seem to be very promising as they can be easily genetically enhanced, are suitable for large-scale fermentation and are devoid of endotoxins. This review will focus on the recent understanding of yeasts lipid metabolism, the succeeding genetic engineering of the lipid pathways and the recent developments on fermentation techniques that pointed out yeasts as promising alternative producers for oil or plastic.

  6. Study on Total DNA Extraction of Alsophila costularis Baker and Its ISSR-PCR Analysis%中华桫椤DNA提取及ISSR分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应站明; 黎桂芳; 王海舟

    2009-01-01

    [目的]研究中华桫椤总DNA的提取方法.[方法]采用SDS法和改良CTAB法提取中华桫椤总DNA,通过电泳检测方法进行比较.[结果]用改良CTAB法得到的DNA浓度和纯度都较高,基本上无蛋白质、多糖等杂质.用改良CTAB法得到的总DNA进行ISSR-PCR扩增,谱带清晰,获得较好的效果.[结论]为提取高质量的DNA样品奠定了基础,并为探讨中华桫椤自然居群的遗传多样性和种群遗传结构及进一步保护和利用中华桫椤提供了分子遗传学依据.%[Objective] The research aimed to study the total DNA extraction methods of A. costularis Baker.[Method] To investigate the optimum DNA extraction method, SDS and modified CTAB methods for isolating genomic DNA from A. costularis Baker leaf were studied. The isolated DNA was examined by ultraviolet absorption test and agarose gelelectrophoresis. [Result] The results showed that the modified CTAB method was suitable for DNA isolation from A. costularis Baker plants. The quality of DNA could meet ISSR requirement even extracted once by the modified CTAB method. [Conclusion] The study can provide the basis for extracting high quality DNA sample, and can offer the molecular genetics reference for exploring the genetic diversity and the population genetic structure of A. costularis Baker and deeply protecting and utilizing A. costularis Baker.

  7. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YEL005C, YGL079W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available endosome; identified as a transcriptional activator in a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid assay Rows with th...protein localizes to the endosome; identified as a transcriptional activator in a high-throughput yeast one-

  8. Determinação de metais em água e folha de AECHMEA BLANCHETIANA (BAKER L.B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaline R. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the concentrations of calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium and sodium in the water and leaves of Aechmea blanchetiana (Baker L.B species collected between the cities of Ilhéus and Itacaré, Bahia, Brazil and verify if the metals found in the water can be absorbed by the leaves. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS and flame photometry were used for the determination of metals. pH measurements, dissolved oxygen and water temperature were also made. The results obtained were used in an exploratory analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA showed clearly the distinct formation of two clusters and the correlation analysis indicated that the leaves of A. blanchetiana seem to absorb iron, calcium, manganese and zinc from the water tank.

  9. “Show Us Your God”: Marilla Baker Ingalls and the Power of Religious Objects in Nineteenth-Century Burma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kaloyanides

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the unusual evangelical work of Marilla Baker Ingalls, an American Baptist missionary to Burma from 1851–1902. By the time of her death in Burma at the age of 75, Ingalls was known as one of the most successful Baptist evangelists among Burmese Buddhists. To understand the extraordinary dynamic of Ingalls’ expanding Christian community, this essay focuses on two prominent objects at the Baptist mission: A life-sized dog statue that Ingalls kept chained at the edge of her property and a massive banyan tree covered with biblical illustrations and revered by locals as an abode of divine beings. This essay argues that these objects transformed Ingalls’ American Baptist Christianity into a kind of Burmese religion that revolved around revered objects. Through an examination of the particular shrine practices that pulled people into the Baptist mission, this essay reflects on the larger context of religious encounter, conflict, and representation in modernizing Burma.

  10. Revaluation of Waste Yeast from Beer Production

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta Suruceanu; Sonia Socaci; Teodora Coldea; Elena Mudura

    2013-01-01

    Brewing yeast is an important waste product from beer production. The valorification of slurry yeast mainly consists of separation of vitamins and important nitrogen compounds. The hops compounds, one of the most important raw materials in beer technology are removed beforehand valorification. The prenylflavonoids compounds from hops are important bioactive compounds that can be revaluation with proper technology. Revaluation of prenylflavonoids from waste yeast into dietary supplement, ident...

  11. The Application of Enzyme and Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Qing

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor’s thesis concerns the application of enzymes and yeasts for bio-industry. The purpose of this work is to understand the basic knowledge about enzyme and yeast, and meanwhile, to find out their different applications. Through comprehensive study, the knowledge was accumulated which brought a clear understanding for the enzyme structure and yeast microorganism, together with their working principles for the bioprocess. For wood-based industry, the different enzymes used in bi...

  12. Drosophila Regulate Yeast Density and Increase Yeast Community Similarity in a Natural Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Stamps, Judy A.; Yang, Louie H; Morales, Vanessa M.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster adults and larvae, but especially larvae, had profound effects on the densities and community structure of yeasts that developed in banana fruits. Pieces of fruit exposed to adult female flies previously fed fly-conditioned bananas developed higher yeast densities than pieces of the same fruits that were not exposed to flies, supporting previous suggestions that adult Drosophila vector yeasts to new substrates. However, larvae alone had dramatic effects on yeast densit...

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF YEAST FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghizadeh Ghassem

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of pure ethanol apparently begins in the 12-14th century. Improvements in the distillation process with the condensation of vapors of lower boiling liquids. Ethanol is produced commercially by chemical synthesis or biosynthesis. High ethanol producing yeast exhibits rapid metabolic activity and a high fermentation rate with high product output in less time.Yeasts were isolated from Corn, Curd, Grapes, Water 1, Water 2, and Paneer. Isolation was done on MGYP (Malt Extract Glucose Yeast extract Peptone media. Contamination was less in selected media. Grape sample yeast was observed as high in producing ethanol after optimization in jaggery broth. Curd yeast gives 4.6% alcohol by volume alcohol (a.b.v after fermentation .Paneer yeast gives 2.88% alcohol by volume alcohol (a.b.v after fermentation. Corn yeast gives 5.25% (a.b.v alcohol after fermentation Water-1 yeast gives 5.51% (a.b.v alcohol after fermentation.Water-2 yeast gives 4.98% (a.b.v alcohol after fermentation.

  14. Construction of Killer Wine Yeast Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Seki, Tetsuji; Choi, Eon-Ho; Ryu, Dewey

    1985-01-01

    A double-stranded RNA plasmid which confers the superkiller phenotype was transferred into a wine yeast (Montrachet strain 522) and its leucine-requiring derivative (strain 694) by cytoduction, using the protoplast fusion technique. The killer wine yeast constructed completely suppressed the growth of killer-sensitive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in yeast extract-peptone-glucose medium at pH 4.5, whereas the killer effect was somewhat decreased at pH 3.5. The wine yeast harboring the k...

  15. A fermentation process for producing both ethanol and lysine-enriched yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, R D; Souki, N T; Russell, R M

    1977-01-01

    In 18 batch-fermentation experiments, baker's yeast was grown in an enriched mineral medium, containing 10% by weight glucose, at various pH and temperature levels. The pH and temperature are just two representative engineering variables which can be easily varied at negligible cost. The commercial yeast inoculum, 20% by weight or about .16% viable cells, was selected to represent industrial (nonsterile) conditions. Free L-lysine, ethanol, and cell growth were followed in time for each batch run held at a fixed pH and temperature. The maximum free lysine level reached at either 10 1/2 or 24 hr occurred at a pH of 5 and 32 degrees C. At 24 hr, the peak free lysine level, 120 mg/liter, is three times as great as the uncontrolled pH counterpart. In terms of total L-lysine (free plus protein-bound) the peak represents a 25% improvement over the uncontrolled case, based on an average 3.5% lysine level per cell weight. The greatest measured cell level, .9% by weight in the fermentation broth, or a 5 1/2-fold increase over th inoculum, was reached during the 36 degrees C and pH 3 run, while the largest measured ethanol value (3%, or 30% conversion by weight from glucose) was achieved during the 28 degrees C and pH 6 experiment. The optimal lysine run product, however, no less than 15% of the maximum cell and 30% of the maximum ethanol levels. PMID:14745

  16. YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated 'metabolomic' database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide Metabolism in Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Verduyn, C; Giuseppin, M L; Scheffers, W A; van Dijken, J P

    1988-01-01

    A catalase-negative mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha consumed methanol in the presence of glucose when the organism was grown in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The organism was apparently able to decompose the H2O2 generated in the oxidation of methanol by alcohol oxidase. Not only H2O2 generated intracellularly but also H2O2 added extracellularly was effectively destroyed by the catalase-negative mutant. From the rate of H2O2 consumption during growth in chemostat cultures on mix...

  18. NetPhosYeast: prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, C.R.; Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, O.N.; Blom, Nikolaj

    2007-01-01

    We here present a neural network-based method for the prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast-an important model organism for basic research. Existing protein phosphorylation site predictors are primarily based on mammalian data and show reduced sensitivity on yeast phosphorylation...... sites compared to those in humans, suggesting the need for an yeast-specific phosphorylation site predictor. NetPhosYeast achieves a correlation coefficient close to 0.75 with a sensitivity of 0.84 and specificity of 0.90 and outperforms existing predictors in the identification of phosphorylation sites...... in yeast....

  19. Biological repair of Pichia Pinus yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of liquid-holding recovery of Pichia pinus yeast after γ- and α-irradiation was determined. Haploid cells are not capable of recovery involved. Nonreparable component of diploid yeast recovery is 0.7 after γ-irradiation and 0.8 after α-irradiation

  20. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  1. Perbedaan Stres Kerja Berdasarkan Shift Kerja Pada Pekerja Bagian Electrical Field Service Di Pt Baker Hughes Indonesia Duri-Riau Tahun 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Hasibuan, Mayan Sari

    2016-01-01

    Job stress disorder is the negative reaction that arising caused by work performed. A variety of factors can contribute to a person feeling stressed at work including the work shift, where workers will experience a different work situations between the day shift and night shift. This research is aimed to look the differences work related stress that occurred due to the work shift on electrical field service workers at PT. Baker Hughes Indonesia Duri-Riau, 2013. This research is an analytic...

  2. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  3. Overview of fission yeast septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Pilar; Cortés, Juan C G; Martín-García, Rebeca; Ribas, Juan C

    2016-09-01

    Cytokinesis is the final process of the vegetative cycle, which divides a cell into two independent daughter cells once mitosis is completed. In fungi, as in animal cells, cytokinesis requires the formation of a cleavage furrow originated by constriction of an actomyosin ring which is connected to the plasma membrane and causes its invagination. Additionally, because fungal cells have a polysaccharide cell wall outside the plasma membrane, cytokinesis requires the formation of a septum coincident with the membrane ingression. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a unicellular, rod-shaped fungus that has become a popular model organism for the study of actomyosin ring formation and constriction during cell division. Here we review the current knowledge of the septation and separation processes in this fungus, as well as recent advances in understanding the functional interaction between the transmembrane enzymes that build the septum and the actomyosin ring proteins. PMID:27155541

  4. Modeling competition between yeast strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the strains. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.

  5. Purification of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase by using immobilized metal affinity cryogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akduman, Begüm [Chemistry Department, Adnan Menderes University, Aydın (Turkey); Uygun, Murat [Koçarlı Vocational and Training School, Adnan Menderes University, Aydın (Turkey); Uygun, Deniz Aktaş, E-mail: daktas@adu.edu.tr [Chemistry Department, Adnan Menderes University, Aydın (Turkey); Akgöl, Sinan [Biochemistry Department, Ege University, İzmir (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Chemistry Department, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-12-01

    (HEMA–GMA)-IDA cryogels were used for the adsorption of alcohol dehydrogenase. • The effects of pH, alcohol dehydrogenase concentration, temperature, and flow rate on adsorption were investigated. • These cryogels were used for the purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from Baker's yeast with a single step.

  6. Purification of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase by using immobilized metal affinity cryogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (HEMA–GMA)-IDA cryogels were used for the adsorption of alcohol dehydrogenase. • The effects of pH, alcohol dehydrogenase concentration, temperature, and flow rate on adsorption were investigated. • These cryogels were used for the purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from Baker's yeast with a single step

  7. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam;

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used...... adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol...

  8. Yeast Exocytic v-SNAREs Confer Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Chapman-Shimshoni, Daphne; Trajkovic, Selena; Gerst, Jeffrey E.

    2000-01-01

    In yeast, homologues of the synaptobrevin/VAMP family of v-SNAREs (Snc1 and Snc2) confer the docking and fusion of secretory vesicles at the cell surface. As no v-SNARE has been shown to confer endocytosis, we examined whether yeast lacking the SNC genes, or possessing a temperature-sensitive allele of SNC1 (SNC1ala43), are deficient in the endocytic uptake of components from the cell surface. We found that both SNC and temperature-shifted SNC1ala43 yeast are d...

  9. Yeast cell factories on the horizon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    For thousands of years, yeast has been used for making beer, bread, and wine. In modern times, it has become a commercial workhorse for producing fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals such as insulin, human serum albumin, and vaccines against hepatitis virus and human papillomavirus. Yeast has also...... been engineered to make chemicals at industrial scale (e.g., succinic acid, lactic acid, resveratrol) and advanced biofuels (e.g., isobutanol) (1). On page 1095 of this issue, Galanie et al. (2) demonstrate that yeast can now be engineered to produce opioids (2), a major class of compounds used for...

  10. “YONDER LIES YOUR HINTERLAND”: RHODES, BAKER AND THE TWISTED STRANDS OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN ARCHITECTURAL TRADITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Claassen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the various strands that make up the classical architectural tradition in South Africa. In the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth, under British rule the tradition of the Palladian style for civic buildings and of Graeco-Roman building styles for institutions of higher learning reflected the imperial ideals of South Africa’s political overlords. This was the tradition in which Sir Herbert Baker had been trained and which he encountered when he reached South Africa late in the nineteenth century. South African architecture would have been less rich without the strong influence of Cecil John Rhodes’ admiration for indigenous Cape Dutch architecture on Baker’s architectural taste. This architecture was strongly rooted in another aspect of the classical tradition. During Dutch economic and imperial rule, the northern European style of classicistic or baroque gabling on perpendicular buildings had at the Cape been translated into the gables of sprawling low buildings. Illustrations show earlier examples of classical styles at the Cape, including examples of the second classical strain (via Holland and Germany in South African architecture, so much admired by Rhodes. The article continues with an examination of some of Baker’s best known buildings that show a blending of these two strands. It ends with some thoughts on the durability of the Classical tradition and neo-classical vestiges in post-colonial (and postapartheid South Africa.

  11. SPECT using bremsstrahlung to quantify 90Y uptake in Baker's cysts: Its application in radiation synovectomy of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of SPECT with bremsstrahlung radiation has been investigated in studies on patients undergoing 90Y therapy for persistent synovitis of the knee. In particular, its value in the estimation of 90Y uptake into Baker's cysts was assessed and, to this end, realistic 'knee phantoms' were employed in order to calibrate for cysts of different size. Problems associated with the measurement of the extensive bremsstrahlung spectrum and the estimation of cyst volume have been discussed. It is shown that, although the apparent volume of a cyst is markedly dependent on the chosen count rate threshold, volumes greater than about 30 ml can be estimated with reasonable accuracy using a threshold of 50%. The uptake of 90Y in cysts, measured on 3 occasions within the first 2 days in 10 patients, showed wide variation (0%-40%) between patients and was poorly related to the size of cysts on arthrograms and to the clinical response to therapy. In these studies, the ability to analyse SPECT slices provided a distinct advantage over planar imaging for discriminating between 90Y uptake in cysts and adjacent sites. Retention of 90Y in the total knee was also widely variable, with losses of 2%-38% observed 2 days after injection which, in general, were not fully accounted for by uptake in liver or lymph nodes. The changing distribution of 90Y colloid in the knee during the first two days, as observed in some patients, might explain part of the discrepancy. (orig.)

  12. 扇蕨孢子的组织培养%Tissue Culture of Spores of Neocheiropteris palmatopedata(Baker)Christ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张光飞; 翟书华; 苏文华

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 植物名称扇蕨[Neocheiropteris palmatopedata (Baker)Christ]. 2 材料类别成熟孢子. 3 培养条件孢子萌发培养基:(1)B5+20 g·L-1蔗糖.原叶体增殖培养基:(1)B5+20 g·L-1蔗糖;(2)1/2B5+20 g·L-1蔗糖;(3)1/485+20 g·L-1蔗糖;(4)1/885+20g·L-1蔗糖;(5)B5,(6)B5+10 g·L-1蔗糖;(7)B5+30 g·L-1蔗糖;(8)B5+40 g·L-1蔗糖;(9)B5+50 g·L-1蔗糖;(10)B5+60 g·L-1蔗糖.

  13. Immobilization of yeast cells by radiation-induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced polymerization method was applied to the immobilization of yeast cells. The effects of irradiation, cooling and monomer, which are neccessary for polymerization, were recovered completely by subsequent aerobical incubation of yeast cells. The ethanol productive in immobilized yeast cells increased with the increase of aerobical incubation period. The growth of yeast cells in immobilized yeast cells was indicated. The maximum ethanol productivity in immobilized yeast cell system was around three times as much as that in free yeast cell system. (orig.)

  14. YeastWeb: a workset-centric web resource for gene family analysis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Haihua

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, a number of yeast genomes with different physiological features have been sequenced and annotated, which provides invaluable information to investigate yeast genetics, evolutionary mechanism, structure and function of gene families. Description YeastWeb is a novel database created to provide access to gene families derived from the available yeast genomes by assigning the genes into putative families. It has many useful features that complement existing databases, such as SGD, CYGD and Génolevures: 1 Detailed computational annotation was conducted with each entry with InterProScan, EMBOSS and functional/pathway databases, such as GO, COG and KEGG; 2 A well established user-friendly environment was created to allow users to retrieve the annotated genes and gene families using functional classification browser, keyword search or similarity-based search; 3 Workset offers users many powerful functions to manage the retrieved data efficiently, associate the individual items easily and save the intermediate results conveniently; 4 A series of comparative genomics and molecular evolution analysis tools are neatly implemented to allow users to view multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree of gene families. At present, YeastWeb holds the gene families clustered from various MCL inflation values from a total of 13 available yeast genomes. Conclusions Given the great interest in yeast research, YeastWeb has the potential to become a useful resource for the scientific community of yeast biologists and related researchers investigating the evolutionary relationship of yeast gene families. YeastWeb is available at http://centre.bioinformatics.zj.cn/Yeast/.

  15. Enzyme contribution of non-Saccharomyces yeasts to wine production

    OpenAIRE

    Maicas i Prieto, Sergi; Mateo Tolosa, José Juan

    2015-01-01

    The fermentation of grape must to produce wine is a biologically complex process, carried on by yeasts and malolactic bacteria. The yeasts present in spontaneous fermentation may be divided into two groups, the Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. cerevisiae, and the non-Saccharomyces yeasts which include members of the genera Rhodotorula, Pichia, Candida, Debaryomyces, Metschtnikowia, Hansenula and Hanseniaspora. S. cerevisiae yeasts are able to convert sugar into ethanol and CO2 via fermen...

  16. Production Of Extracellular Enzymes By Some Soil Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Falih, A. M. [عبد الله مساعد خلف الفالح

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of soil yeasts, Geotrichum candidum, Geotrichum capitatum and Williopsis californica to produce extracellular enzymes (amylase, cellulase and protease) in vitro compared with that of a laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It appears that the soil yeasts studied here were less amylolytic yeasts except the yeast G. candidum, which was highly effective at extracellular amylase production. The soil yeast W. californica was an average producer of cellu...

  17. DETERMINATION OF KILLER CHARACTER OF WINE YEAST ISOLATED FROM ISTRA

    OpenAIRE

    Sandi ORLIC; POGAČIĆ, Martina; Ana JEROMEL; Marko KAROGLAN; Kozina, Bernard; IACUMIN, Lucilla; Redžepović, Sulejman

    2008-01-01

    Wild wine yeasts with killer phenotype are widespread in many wine regions of the world. The presence of killer yeasts may become particularly important in wine fermentations conducted by inoculation with selected strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Wild killer yeasts may suppress selected sensitive yeasts inoculated into the must during the fermentation. The goal of this investigation was to identify killer yeast in Istra region using physiological and molecular methods. In total 50 S.cerev...

  18. Regulatory aspects of methanol metabolism in yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formaldehyde is the first and key intermediate in the metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts since it stands at a branch point of pathways for methanol oxidation and assimilation. Methanol and, formaldehyde are toxic compounds which severely affect the growth rate, yield coefficient, etc., of yeasts. Two questions arise when considering regulation of methanol metabolism in yeasts how a nontoxic level of formaldehyde is maintained in the cell and how the formaldehyde flow is distributed into oxidation and assimilation. To answer these questions we studied the role of GSH, which spontaneously binds formaldehyde, yielding S-hydroxymethylglutathione; in vivo rates of formaldehyde dissimilation and assimilation by using [14C]methanol; profiles of enzymes responsible for production and utilization of formaldehyde; and levels of metabolites affecting dissimilation and assimilation of formaldehyde. All of the experiments were carried out with the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii KD1. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. ENGINEERING THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF STYRENE IN YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    The strategy pursued was to insert genes for phenylalanine ammonia lysase (pal) and phenolic acid decarboxylase (pad) into the yeast that would convert phenylalanine to styrene through a cinnamic acid intermediate. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall...... causing significant DNA damage was 20 μM for H2O2 and 200 mg/l for acrylamide. Tertiary-treated wastewater from the outlets of three municipal wastewater-treatment plants was tested, but did not cause DNA damage. Even though it is possible to produce comets with tetraploid yeast cells, the amount of DNA...

  1. Adenosine triphosphate inhibition of yeast trehalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, A D

    1969-09-01

    Yeast trehalase has been found to be inhibited non-competitively by adenosine triphosphate. Such a biological control could explain the accumulation of trehalose during the stationary phase of the growth curve. PMID:5370287

  2. Genomic Evolution of the Ascomycete Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Salamov, Asaf; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Goker, Markus; Hittinger, Chris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lopes, Mariana; Meir-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos; Scheuner, Carmen; Soares, Marco; Stielow, Benjamin; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Wolfe, Ken; Blackwell, Meredith; Kurtzman, Cletus; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. Phylogenetic analysis of these and previously published yeast genomes helped resolve the placement of species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora, Hyphopichia burtonii, and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Moreover, we find that alternative nuclear codon usage, where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine, are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes, and a tendency towards more introns in early-diverging species. Analysis of enzyme phylogeny gives insights into the evolution of metabolic capabilities such as methanol utilization and assimilation of alternative carbon sources.

  3. Physiological and environmental control of yeast prions

    OpenAIRE

    Chernova, Tatiana A.; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Chernoff, Yury O.

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-perpetuating protein isoforms that cause fatal and incurable neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Recent evidence indicates that a majority of human proteins involved in amyloid and neural inclusion disorders possess at least some prion properties. In lower eukaryotes, such as yeast, prions act as epigenetic elements, which increase phenotypic diversity by altering a range of cellular processes. While some yeast prions are clearly pathogenic, it is also postulated that prion ...

  4. Production of biopharmaceutical proteins by yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals, so-called biopharmaceuticals, is a multi-billion dollar industry. Many different cell factories are used for the production of biopharmaceuticals, but the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important cell factory as it is used for production of several large volume products. Insulin and insulin analogs are by far the dominating biopharmaceuticals produced by yeast, and this will increase as the global insulin market is expected ...

  5. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome

    OpenAIRE

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R.; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D.; Luis, Bryan-Joseph San

    2013-01-01

    ABC transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid (MYTH) technology to map the protein interactome of all non-mitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomy cescerevisiae, and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID databa...

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF YEAST FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Taghizadeh Ghassem; Delbari Azam Sadat; Kulkarni D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The production of pure ethanol apparently begins in the 12-14th century. Improvements in the distillation process with the condensation of vapors of lower boiling liquids. Ethanol is produced commercially by chemical synthesis or biosynthesis. High ethanol producing yeast exhibits rapid metabolic activity and a high fermentation rate with high product output in less time.Yeasts were isolated from Corn, Curd, Grapes, Water 1, Water 2, and Paneer. Isolation was done on MGYP (Malt Extract Glucos...

  7. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E.; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant c...

  8. Principles of chromosomal organization: lessons from yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Christophe; Fabre, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    The spatial organization of genes and chromosomes plays an important role in the regulation of several DNA processes. However, the principles and forces underlying this nonrandom organization are mostly unknown. Despite its small dimension, and thanks to new imaging and biochemical techniques, studies of the budding yeast nucleus have led to significant insights into chromosome arrangement and dynamics. The dynamic organization of the yeast genome during interphase argues for both the physica...

  9. Multidrug resistant yeasts in synanthropic wild birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somanath Sushela

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of multidrug resistant yeasts in the faeces of synanthropic wild birds from the Bangsar suburb of Kuala Lumpur. Methods Species characterisations of yeast isolates and determinations of antimycotic susceptibility profiles were undertaken using the commercial characterization kit, Integral System Yeasts Plus (Liofilchem, Italy. Results Fourteen species of yeasts were detected in the bird faecal samples.Candida albicans was present in 28.89% of bird faecal samples, Candida krusei (13.33%, Candida tropicalis (4.44%, Candida glabrata (4.44%, Candida parapsilosis (2.22%, Candida lambica (2.22%, Candida stellatoidea (2.22%, Candida rugosa (2.22% and Candida lusitaniae (2.22%. Amongst the non-candidal yeast isolates, Cryptococcus laurentii was present in 6.67% of bird faecal samples, Cryptococcus uniguttulatus (4.44%, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4.44%, Trichosporon pullulans (2.22%, Trichosporon pullulans/Cryptococcus albidus (8.89% and Rhodotorula rubra/Rhodotorula glutinis (4.44%. Of the isolated yeasts, 18.1% (or 26/144 were found to be resistant to all 11 antimycotic agents they were tested against i.e. Nystatin, Amphotericin B, Flucytosine, Econazole, Ketoconazole, Clotrimazole, Miconazole, Itraconazole, Voriconazole, Fluconazole 16 and Fluconazole 64. 45.8% (or 66/144 of the bird faecal yeast isolates were resistant to four or more of the 11 antimycotic agents they were tested against. Conclusions This finding is of public health significance as these synanthropic wild birds may be reservoirs for transmission of drug resistant yeast infections to humans.

  10. Uniform yeast cell assembly via microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Marquez, Samantha M.; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the use of microfluidic approaches for the fabrication of yeastosomes (yeast-celloidosomes) based on self-assembly of yeast cells onto liquid-solid or liquid-gas interfaces. Precise control over fluidic flows in droplet- and bubble-forming microfluidic devices allows production of monodispersed, size-selected templates. The general strategy to organize and assemble living cells is to tune electrostatic attractions between the template (gel or gas core) and the cells via sur...

  11. EXPLORING BIODIVERSITY POTENTIAL OF WINE ASSOCIATED YEASTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dashko, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Human exploitation of yeast fermentation dates back to the Neolithic. S. cerevisiae has been the most important yeast used for numerous fermentations of biotechnological interest, including grape fermentation for wine production. Despite its abundant use, the molecular mechanisms controlling alcoholic fermentation are rather unclear and the choice of S. cerevisiae as an inoculum is often the consequence of a mere habit, rather than the result of rational analyses. In this work we focused o...

  12. Featured Organism: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, The Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Jo Wixon

    2002-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the fission yeast, has long been a crucial model for the study of the eukaryote cell cycle. We take a look at this important yeast, whose genome has recently been completed, featuring comments from Valerie Wood, Jürg Bähler, Ramsay McFarlane, Susan Forsburg, Iain Hagan and Paul Nurse on the implications of having the complete sequence and future prospects for pombe genomics.

  13. Determination of tritium in wine yeast samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical procedures were developed to determine tritium in wine and wine yeast samples. The content of organic compounds affecting the LSC measurement is reduced by fractioning distillation for wine samples and azeotropic distillation/fractional distillation for wine yeast samples. Finally, the water samples were normally distilled with K MO4. The established procedures were successfully applied for wine and wine samples from Murfatlar harvests of the years 1995 and 1996. (authors)

  14. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis

    OpenAIRE

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P.; Piškur, Jure

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beer...

  15. Produção de frutanos em calos e plântulas clonadas in vitro de Viguiera discolor Baker (Asteraceae Fructan production in callus and in vitro cloned seedlings of Viguiera discolor Baker (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Massumi Itaya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Viguiera discolor Baker é uma espécie nativa do cerrado, cuja sobrevivência está ameaçada pela invasão de espécies exóticas. Considerando sua elevada produção e a vasta aplicação de frutanos, o presente trabalho foi conduzido visando à obtenção in vitro dessa espécie e à prospecção desses carboidratos nessas condições. Sementes foram germinadas in vitro, em meio MS modificado, e após cinco semanas de incubação, nós caulinares foram isolados e incubados no mesmo meio adicionado de 0,5 mg L-1 de ANA, regenerando plantas uniformes, raízesnão espessadas, raízes tuberosas e estruturas semelhantes a calo (calo tipo1, formadas na região caulinar basal. Análise desse material evidenciou a presença de frutanos do tipo inulina nas raízes tuberosas e nos calos tipo 1. Na presença de 2,4-D obteve-se a formação de calos friáveis (calo tipo 2, nos quais também foram detectados frutanos e suas enzimas de síntese sacarose: sacarose 1-frutosiltransferase (SST e frutano: frutano 1-frutosiltransferase (FFT. Embora em concentrações menores às observadas nas plantas cultivadas sob condições naturais, o material produzido in vitro apresentou frutanos do mesmo tipo e razão SST/FFT menor do que um. Em meio de cultura sem hormônios, foi verificada a regeneração de 50% de plantas a partir dos nós caulinares. A propagação de V. discolor in vitro pode viabilizar a multiplicação e a preservação da espécie, bem como a produção de frutanos nessas condições.Viguiera discolor Baker is a herbaceous species, native to cerrado and its survival has been threatened by the invasion of exotic species. Considering its high production and the wide application of fructans, the present work has aimed to establish in vitro culture of this species and to investigate the presence of fructans under these conditions. Seeds were germinated in vitro on modified MS medium and after plant growth, stem nodes were isolated and incubated on

  16. Variações na morfoanatomia foliar de Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae sob distintas condições ambientais Leaf morphoanatomy variation in Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae under distinct environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Heinig Voltolini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae-Bromelioideae ocorre em restingas e Floresta Pluvial de Encosta Atlântica em Santa Catarina e Nordeste do Rio Grande do Sul, BR. Pode ser encontrada total ou parcialmente exposta à irradiação solar e em distintas formas de vida - terrícola, rupícola e epifítica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar morfoanatomicamente às características de folhas de A. lindenii var. lindenii em distintas condições ambientais. Foram coletadas, na Ilha de Santa Catarina (Florianópolis, SC, folhas de plantas terrícolas em restinga herbácea (alta irradiação solar, rupícolas de costões rochosos (alta irradiação solar, terrícolas e epifíticas de sub-bosques (baixa irradiação solar de restinga arbórea e rupícolas de sub-bosque (baixa irradiação solar de Floresta Pluvial de Encosta Atlântica. Foram mensurados comprimento, largura, área da lâmina e bainha foliar, densidade estomática, comprimento e largura das células-guarda, espessura total e das estruturas constituintes na lâmina foliar. As características anatômicas qualitativas são semelhantes nas distintas condições analisadas. A baixa irradiação solar determina maior expansão da área foliar, decorrente do alongamento da lâmina. Lâmina e bainha foliares têm maior largura sob alta irradiação. A densidade estomática foi maior em folhas de plantas sob alta irradiação solar. A espessura total da lâmina foliar foi menor em plantas terrícolas sob alta irradiação, porém não mostrou diferenças estatísticas significativas entre as outras condições.Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae-Bromelioideae occurs in restingas and hillside Atlantic rain forest in Santa Catarina and northeastern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It is found totally or partially exposed to solar radiation and in different life forms - terricolous, rupicolous and epiphytes. The aim of this work was to compare

  17. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air-liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  18. Revaluation of Waste Yeast from Beer Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Suruceanu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brewing yeast is an important waste product from beer production. The valorification of slurry yeast mainly consists of separation of vitamins and important nitrogen compounds. The hops compounds, one of the most important raw materials in beer technology are removed beforehand valorification. The prenylflavonoids compounds from hops are important bioactive compounds that can be revaluation with proper technology. Revaluation of prenylflavonoids from waste yeast into dietary supplement, identification and quantification of xanthohumol by HPLC method. Waste yeast from brewery pilot plant of USAMV Cluj Napoca it was dried by atomization and the powder was analyzed on xanthohumol content by HPLC method. For quantification a calibration curve it was used. The process of drying by atomisation lead to a powder product. It was used malt dextrin powder for stabilisation. The final product it was encapsulated. The xanthohumol content of powdered yeast it was 1.94 µg/ml. In conclusion the slurry yeast from beer production it is an important source of prenylflavonoids compounds.

  19. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  20. Spermidine cures yeast of prions

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    Shaun H. Speldewinde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prions are self-perpetuating amyloid protein aggregates which underlie various neurodegenerative diseases in mammals. The molecular basis underlying their conversion from a normally soluble protein into the prion form remains largely unknown. Studies aimed at uncovering these mechanism(s are therefore essential if we are to develop effective therapeutic strategies to counteract these disease-causing entities. Autophagy is a cellular degradation system which has predominantly been considered as a non-selective bulk degradation process which recycles macromolecules in response to starvation conditions. We now know that autophagy also serves as a protein quality control mechanism which selectively degrades protein aggregates and damaged organelles. These are commonly accumulated in various neurodegenerative disorders including prion diseases. In our recent study [Speldewinde et al. Mol. Biol. Cell. (2015] we used the well-established yeast [PSI+]/Sup35 and [PIN­+]/Rnq1 prion models to show that autophagy prevents sporadic prion formation. Importantly, we found that spermidine, a polyamine that has been used to increase autophagic flux, acts as a protective agent which prevents spontaneous prion formation.

  1. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given. PMID:27491712

  2. A validated UV-HPLC method for determination of chlorogenic acid in Lepidogrammitis drymoglossoides (Baker Ching, Polypodiaceae

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    Jiagen Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lepidogrammitis drymoglossoides (Baker Ching (L. drymoglossoides, a member of the Polypodiaceae family, was used in the treatment of numerous diseases. However, none of the potential ingredients and the quality control methods concerning this plant medicine was pronounced. Objective: To identify chlorogenic acid (CGA from L. drymoglossoides and develop a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC assay of CGA. Materials and Methods: UV, TLC, and HPLC were utilized to identify the phytochemicals of L. drymoglossoides and determine the CGA content, respectively. The HPLC conditions were as following: a Phenomenex Luna C18 (2 (250 × 4.6 mm i.d.; 5 μm particle size; 100 Å pore size column; the mobile phase of the mixture of acetonitrile and 0.5% aqueous phosphoric acid (11.5:88.5 v/v; the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and determination wavelength of 327 nm. Results: The proposed HPLC method has been developed and validated. The calibration curve was y = 28328x + 16610 (R2 = 0.9997. The intra-day and inter-day precision and intermediate precision were validated with the RSD less than 5%. The mean recovery rate of the method ranged from 95% to 104%, with the RSD less than 5%. The LOD and LQD values were 0.049 and 0.132 mg/L, respectively. The content of CGA in L. drymoglossoides approximately reached 0.24% (v/v by the proposed extraction and determination methods. Conclusion: The assay method was simple, convenient, and accurate to the quantification of CGA and can be used for the quality control of the herb.

  3. Volcanic Risk Perception and Preparedness in Communities within the Mount Baker and Glacier Peak Lahar Hazard Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    A community's ability to effectively respond to and recover from natural hazards depends on both the physical characteristics of the hazard and the community's inherent resilience. Resilience is shaped by a number of factors including the residents' perception of and preparedness for a natural hazard as well as the level of institutional preparedness. This study examines perception of and preparedness for lahar hazards from Mount Baker and Glacier Peak in Washington's Skagit Valley. Through an online survey, this study isolates the influence of specific variables (e.g., knowledge, past experience, scientific background, trust in various information sources, occupation, self-efficacy, sense of community) on risk perception and explores reasons behind the frequent disconnect between perception and preparedness. We anticipate that individuals with more extensive education in the sciences, especially geology or earth science, foster greater trust in scientists and a more accurate knowledge, understanding, and perception of the volcanic hazards in their community. Additionally, little research exists examining the extent to which first responders and leaders in response-related institutions prepare on a personal level. Since these individuals work toward community preparedness professionally, we hypothesize that they will be more prepared at home than members of the general public. Finally, the Skagit Valley has a significant history of flooding. We expect that the need to respond to and recover from frequent flooding creates a community with an inherently higher level of preparedness for other hazards such as lahars. The results of this study will contribute to the understanding of what controls risk perception and the interplay between perception and preparedness. At a broader level, this study provides local and state-level emergency managers information to evaluate and improve response capabilities and communication with the public and key institutions in order to

  4. Preparing for Volcanic Hazards: An Examination of Lahar Knowledge, Risk Perception, and Preparedness around Mount Baker and Glacier Peak, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    As the number of people living at risk from volcanic hazards in the U.S. Pacific Northwest continues to rise, so does the need for improved hazard science, mitigation, and response planning. The effectiveness of these efforts relies not only on scientists and policymakers, but on individuals and their risk perception and preparedness levels. This study examines the individual knowledge, perception, and preparedness of over 500 survey respondents living or working within the lahar zones of Mount Baker and Glacier Peak volcanoes. We (1) explore the common disconnect between accurate risk perception and adequate preparedness; (2) determine how participation in hazard response planning influences knowledge, risk perception, and preparedness; and (3) assess the effectiveness of current lahar hazard maps for public risk communication. Results indicate that a disconnect exists between perception and preparedness for the majority of respondents. While 82% of respondents accurately anticipate that future volcanic hazards will impact the Skagit Valley, this knowledge fails to motivate increased preparedness. A majority of respondents also feel "very responsible" for their own protection and provision of resources during a hazardous event (83%) and believe they have the knowledge and skills necessary to respond effectively to such an event (56%); however, many of these individuals still do not adequately prepare. When asked what barriers prevent them from preparing, respondents primarily cite a lack of knowledge about relevant local hazards. Results show that participation in response-related activities—a commonly recommended solution to this disconnect—minimally influences preparedness. Additionally, although local hazard maps successfully communicate the primary hazard—97% of respondents recognize the lahar hazard—many individuals incorrectly interpret other important facets of the maps. Those who participate in response-related activities fail to understand these

  5. Phytochemical and bio-efficacy studies on methanolic flower extracts of Peltophorum pterocarpum (DC.) Baker ex Heyne.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinod Kumar Nathan; Johnson Marimuthu Antonisamy; Wesely Edward Gnanaraj

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed to investigate the preliminary phytochemical analysis and HPTLC profiling and the antibacterial activity of P. pterocarpum methanolic flower extracts against the bacteria isolated from human infections. Methods: The preliminary phytochemical screening was performed according to the Harborne method. HPTLC studies were carried out using Harborne and Wagner et al method. The methanolic flower extracts of P. pterocarpum were tested against Salmonella typhi (MTCC 733), Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 96), Proteus mirabilis (MTCC 742), Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 441) and Escherichia coli (MTCC 443). The antimicrobial activity was tested through well diffusion method. Results: The phytochemical studies on methanolic flower extract of Peltophorum pterocarpum (DC.) Baker ex Heyne. revealed the presence of glycosides, flavonoids, phenolics, saponins, catechin and alkaloids. The HPTLC separation was achieved using ethyl acetate-methanol-ethanol-water (8.1: 1.1: 0.4: 0.8) as the mobile phase. The methanolic extract of P. pterocarpum showed four different Rf values 0.16, 0.31, 0.77 and 0.82 which indicated various glycosides present in the flower extract. The methanolic extract of P. pterocarpum showed the maximum zone of inhibition against Proteus mirabilis followed by Salmonella typhi. Conclusion: Bio-assay revealed the presence of specific and selective antimicrobial compounds in the fractions. Broad range activity of plant extracts as per observations in this study was due to presence of multiple antimicrobial compounds or synergic effects of these compounds. Therefore, standardization of active fractions and study for in vivo efficacy may result in development of better antimicrobial drugs.

  6. The yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms in the denitrification unit biocenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Sláviková

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic studies of the yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms in the denitrification unit biocenosis were carried out. A set of 13 strains of these microorganisms were examined for their morphological and physiological characters. Considering their special features and some relation to the known species, the isolated microorganisms were classified to the 3 genera: Candida, Geotrichium and Hansenula.

  7. Taxonomical study of yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms isolated from the denitrification unit biocenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sláviková

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A set of 8 strains of yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms was isolated from the denitrification unit biocenosis fed with a synthetic medium containing methanol as a carbon source. These strains were identified as Candida boidinii, C. maltosa, Rhodotorula rubra and Trichosporon cutaneum.

  8. Taxonomical study of yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms isolated from the denitrification unit biocenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Sláviková; Anna Grabińska-Łoniewska

    2014-01-01

    A set of 8 strains of yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms was isolated from the denitrification unit biocenosis fed with a synthetic medium containing methanol as a carbon source. These strains were identified as Candida boidinii, C. maltosa, Rhodotorula rubra and Trichosporon cutaneum.

  9. Boolean model of Yeast Apoptosis as a tool to study yeast and human apoptotic regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarijaCvijovic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is an essential cellular mechanism that is evolutionary conserved, mediated through various pathways and acts by integrating different stimuli. Many diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancers are found to be caused by, or associated with, regulations in the cell death pathways. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a unicellular eukaryotic organism that shares with human cells components and pathways of the PCD and is therefore used as a model organism. Boolean modelling is becoming promising approach to capture qualitative behaviour and describe essential properties of such complex networks. Here we present large literature-based and to our knowledge first Boolean model that combines pathways leading to apoptosis (a type of PCD in yeast. Analysis of the yeast model confirmed experimental findings of anti-apoptotic role of Bir1p and pro-apoptotic role of Stm1p and revealed activation of the stress protein kinase Hog proposing the maximal level of activation upon heat stress. In addition we extended the yeast model and created an in silico humanized yeast in which human pro- and anti-apoptotic regulators Bcl-2 family and Valosin-contain protein (VCP are included in the model. We showed that accumulation of Bax in in silico humanized yeast shows apoptotic markers and that VCP is essential target of Akt Signaling. The presented Boolean model provides comprehensive description of yeast apoptosis network behaviour. Extended model of humanized yeast gives new insights of how complex human disease like neurodegenration can initially be tested.

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YFR015C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...ression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary ...tion, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary phase Rows with this bait as bait..., the more highly expressed yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGR013W, YKL012W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YGR013W SNU71 Component of U1 snRNP required for mRNA splicing via spliceosome; yeast ... specific, ... snRNP required for mRNA splicing via spliceosome; yeast ... specific, no metazoan counterpart Rows with this b ...

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YMR294W, YPL174C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMR294W JNM1 Component of the yeast ... dynactin complex, consisting of Nip100p, Jnm1p, and Arp1p; r ... t gene name JNM1 Bait description Component of the yeast ... dynactin complex, consisting of Nip100p, Jnm1p, an ...

  13. Optimization of feeding strategy for the ergosterol production by yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Mojmir Rychtera

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this study was to optimize ergosterol production by yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the use of computer controlled feeding of cultivation medium. Baker´s yeasts strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally modified and selected as mutant D7 was further applied in an industrial scale and also in this investigation. Composition of cultivation medium was optimized with the use of a modified Rosenbrock´s method with regard to following components: glucose, yeast extract, ammonium sulphate, potassium dihydrogen phosphate, magnesium sulphate and calcium chloride. Cultivation of yeast culture was performed in 7 L laboratory bioreactor with a working volume of 5 L equipped with a control unit and linked to a computer, with dissolved oxygen tension measurement, oxygen and carbon dioxide analyzers. BIOGENES prototype software was created from the commercial control system Genesis for Windows 3.0 (GFW, from Iconics and CLIPS 6.04 for the PC-Windows platform. From various factors affecting sterol biosynthesis a specific growth rate was chosen. Feed rate was controlled according to mathematical model. In this case it dealt with a design of optimal profile of specific growth rate with consequent calculation of carbon dioxide profile. Sterol concentration in the dry biomass increased from 1.0 % up to 3 %. Key words: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, ergosterol, fed-batch cultivation control, effect of the specific growth rate. Resumen: El objetivo de este estudio fue optimizar la producción de ergosterol por una cepa de levadura Saccharomyces cerevisiae, controlando la alimentación de medio de cultivo por computadora. La cepa de levadura panadera Saccharomyces cerevisiae originalmente modificada y seleccionada como mutante D7 fue posteriormente utilizada a escala industrial y también para esta investigación. La composición del medio de cultivo fue optimizada usando el método modificado de Rosenbrock respecto a los siguientes

  14. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts in the chemo selective bioreduction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-pentadien-3-one in biphasic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Cesar A.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Nascimento, Maria da G., E-mail: maria.nascimento@ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Stambuk, Boris U. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    This work describes the chemoselective bioreduction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)- 1,4-pentadien-3-one (1) mediated by baker's yeast (BY, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells) in an aqueous/organic solvent biphasic system. The biotransformation of this compound was chemoselective and formed only the corresponding saturated ketone 1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)- 3-pentanone (2). The influence of various factors which may alter the bioreduction of 1, such as the type and percentage of co-solvents, use of six different S. cerevisiae yeast samples (four commercial and two industrial), variations in the substrate and yeast concentrations, temperature, pH and volume of aqueous and organic phases, was investigated. The best reaction conditions were 66.7 g L{sup -1} of Fleischmann BY, 8.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} of substrate, pH 6.5 at 35 deg C in the presence of 2.5% (v/v) of N,N-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as an additive and a V{sub aq}/V{sub org} ratio of 70/30. Under these conditions, the product 2 was recovered in conversions of 82% in 5 h reaction. (author)

  15. Terroir of yeasts? – Application of FTIR spectroscopy and molecular methods for strain typing of yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhards Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The site specific influence on wine (Terroir is an often by wine producers, consumers and scientists discussed topic in the world of wine. A study on grapes and (spontaneous fermentations from six different vineyards was done to investigate the biodiversity of yeasts and to answer the question if there is a terroir of yeast and how it could be influenced. Randomly isolated yeasts were identified by FTIR-spectroscopy and molecular methods on species and strain level. Vineyard specific yeast floras would be observed but they are not such important as expected. Only a few overlapping strain patterns would be identified during both vintages. The yeast flora of the winery had a huge impact on the spontaneous fermentations, but is not really constant and influenced by different factors from outside.

  16. Production of alpha-amylase by yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomse, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme alpha-amylase confers to an organism the enzymatic activity for the degradation of polyglucosides with alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds such as starch and glycogen which are among the major storage compounds in plants and animals. Most alpha-amylases are single polypeptides of molecular weights around 50,000 dalton. They are generally found in the digestive tract of animals and in germinating seeds. Among the products released upon enzymatic degradation of polyglucosides maltose, a sugar that can be utilized as carbon source by yeast, is a major constituent. A cDNA segment complementary to mouse salivary amylase messenger RNA has been inserted into the yeast expression vector pMA56 behind the promoter of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase I of yeast. Yeast transformants harboring plasmids with the normal orientation of the promoter and the mouse amylase cDNA gene produce amylase and release the enzyme in free form into the culture medium. Approximately 90% of the amylase activity is found in the medium. Yeast strains carrying MAL allele and transformed with a plasmid which directed the synthesis of mouse alpha-amylase were tested on plates containing starch and in batch fermentations using different high molecular weight sugars and oligosaccharides as carbon source. The results of these experiments will be discussed. (Refs. 21).

  17. Protein patterns of yeast during sporulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to study protein synthesis during synchronous meiosis and ascospore formation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stained protein patterns of samples harvested at any stage between meiotic prophase and the four-spore stage in two sporulating strains showed the same approximately 250 polypeptides. Of these only a few seemed to increase or decrease in concentration during sporulation. The characteristic pattern of sporulating yeast was identical to the pattern of glucose-grown staitonary yeast cells adapted to respiration. The latter type of cells readily initiates meiosis when transferred to sporulation medium. This pattern differed from the protein patterns of exponentially growing cells in glucose or acetate presporulation medium. Five major proteins in stationary and sporulating yeast cells were not detected in either type of exponential culture. Two-dimensional autoradiograms of [35S]methionine-labelled yeast proteins revealed that some proteins were preferentially labelled during sporulation, while other proteins were labelled at later stages. These patterns differed from the auroradiograms of exponentially growing yeast cells in glucose presporulation medium in a number of spots. No differences were observed when stained gels or autoradiograms of sporulating cultures and non-sporulating strains in sporulation medium were compared. (author)

  18. Resistance of tomato genotypes with high level of acylsugars to Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard Resistência de genótipos de tomateiro com alto teor de acilaçúcares a Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Tadeu Vilela de Resende

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Lycopersicon pennellii accession LA716 has been used as a source of arthropod pest resistance in tomato breeding programs due the high contents of acylsugars presents in its leaflets. We investigated the relationship between high foliar acylsugar contents and repellence to spider mite Tetranychus evansi in plants with contrasting acylsugar levels, selected from F2 and BC1F2 (= F2 of the first backcross towards L. esculentum generations derived from the interespecific cross L. esculentum 'TOM-584' ´ L. pennellii LA716. Mite resistance was assessed by a repellence test. Plants selected for high levels of acylsugars in leaflets had mite repellence levels similar to that of LA716. The high correlation confirmed the association between high acylsugar levels and mite repellence.O acesso de Lycopersicon pennellii LA716 tem sido utilizado em programas de melhoramento do tomateiro devido à sua resistência a artrópodos-pragas, mediada pela presença de acilaçúcares nos folíolos. Foi verificada a correlação entre o teor de acilaçúcares em folíolos de tomateiros e a repelência ao ácaro Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard. Foram selecionadas plantas contrastantes quanto aos níveis de acilaçúcares nos folíolos de populações F2 e F2RC1 (= F2 do primeiro retrocruzamento para Lycopersicon esculentum do cruzamento interespecífico de L. esculentum TOM 584 (baixo teor de acilaçúcares e L. pennellii LA 716 (alto teor. Foi realizado um teste de repelência ao ácaro T. evansi, tomando por base a distância percorrida pelos ácaros nos folíolos. Os genótipos selecionados para alto teor de acilaçúcares, em média, foram responsáveis por reduções significativas nas distâncias percorridas pelos ácaros sobre a superfície do folíolo. A repelência ao ácaro T. evansi exercida pelas plantas selecionadas para alto teor de acilaçúcares deu-se de forma semelhante àquela conferida pelo genitor LA-716. As magnitudes das correla

  19. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process. PMID:27148235

  20. Degradation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural during yeast fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıllıoglu, Halise Gül; Mogol, Burçe Ataç; Gökmen, Vural

    2011-12-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) may occur in malt in high quantities depending on roasting conditions. However, the HMF content of different types of beers is relatively low, indicating its potential for degradation during fermentation. This study investigates the degradation kinetics of HMF in wort during fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results indicated that HMF decreased exponentially as fermentation progressed. The first-order degradation rate of HMF was 0.693 × 10(-2) and 1.397 × 10(-2)min(-1) for wort and sweet wort, respectively, indicating that sugar enhances the activity of yeasts. In wort, HMF was converted into hydroxymethyl furfuryl alcohol by yeasts with a high yield (79-84% conversion). Glucose and fructose were utilised more rapidly by the yeasts in dark roasted malt than in pale malt (pyeast cells, and presence of sugars in the fermentation medium increases this activity. PMID:22010851

  1. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process. PMID:27148235

  2. Yeast interactions in inoculated wine fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio eCiani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process.

  3. Drug for Yeast Infections May Raise Miscarriage Risk, FDA Warns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158503.html Drug for Yeast Infections May Raise Miscarriage Risk, FDA Warns Agency ... brand name Diflucan) is used to treat vaginal yeast infections. "Patients who are pregnant or actively trying ...

  4. Modeling diauxic glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2010-01-01

    investigations of central metabolism dynamics of yeast cells. We have previously proposed a model for the open system comprised of the primary fermentative reactions in yeast that quantitatively describes the oscillatory dynamics. However, this model fails to describe the transient behavior of metabolic....... Experimental and computational results strongly suggest that regulation of acetaldehyde explains the observed behavior. We have extended the original model with regulation of pyruvate decarboxylase, a reversible alcohol dehydrogenase, and drainage of pyruvate. Using the method of time rescaling in the extended...

  5. Multiple Functions of Sterols in Yeast Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Heese-Peck, Antje; Pichler, Harald; Zanolari, Bettina; Watanabe, Reika; Daum, Günther; Riezman, Howard

    2002-01-01

    Sterols are essential factors for endocytosis in animals and yeast. To investigate the sterol structural requirements for yeast endocytosis, we created a variety of ergΔ mutants, each accumulating a distinct set of sterols different from ergosterol. Mutant erg2Δerg6Δ and erg3Δerg6Δ cells exhibit a strong internalization defect of the α-factor receptor (Ste2p). Specific sterol structures are necessary for pheromone-dependent receptor hyperphosphorylation, a prerequisite for internalization. Th...

  6. Overwintering of vineyard yeasts: survival of interacting yeast communities in grapes mummified on vines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eSipiczki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of grape must into wine involves the development and succession of yeast populations differing in species composition. The initial population is formed by vineyard strains which are washed into the must from the crushed grapes and then completed with yeasts coming from the cellar environment. As the origin and natural habitat of the vineyard yeasts are not fully understood, this study addresses the possibility that grape yeasts can be preserved in berries left behind on vines at harvest until the spring of the next year. These berries become mummified during the winter on the vines. To investigate whether yeasts can survive in these overwintering grapes, mummified berries were collected in 16 localities in the Tokaj wine region (Hungary-Slovakia in early March. The collected berries were rehydrated to recover viable yeasts by plating samples onto agar plates. For the detection of minority species which would not be detected by direct plating, an enrichment step repressing the propagation of alcohol-sensitive yeasts was also included in the process. The morphological, physiological and molecular analysis identified 13 basidiomycetous and 23 ascomycetous species including fermentative yeasts of wine-making relevance among the 3879 isolates. The presence of viable strains of these species demonstrates that the grapes mummified on the vine can serve as a safe reservoir of yeasts, and may contribute to the maintenance of grape-colonizing yeast populations in the vineyard over years, parallel with other vectors and habitats. All basidiomycetous species were known phylloplane yeasts. Three Hanseniaspora species and pigmented Metschnikowia strains were the most frequent ascomycetes. Other fermentative yeasts of wine-making relevance were detected only in the enrichment cultures. Saccharomyces (S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum were recovered from 13 % of the samples. No Candida zemplinina was found. The isolates with Aureobasidium

  7. Newly identified prions in budding yeast, and their possible functions

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, Emily T.; Li, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prions are atypical genetic elements that are transmitted as heritable protein conformations. [PSI+], [URE3], and [PIN+] are three well-studied prions in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the last three years, several additional prions have been reported in yeast, including [SWI+], [OCT+], [MCA], [GAR+], [MOT3+], [ISP+], and [NSI+]. The growing number of yeast prions suggests that protein-based inheritance might be a widespread biological phenomenon. In this review, we sum...

  8. Rapid isolation of yeast genomic DNA: Bust n' Grab

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson Kenneth R; Fedosyuk Halyna; Harju Susanna

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Mutagenesis of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) often requires analysis of large numbers of yeast clones to obtain correctly targeted mutants. Conventional ways to isolate yeast genomic DNA utilize either glass beads or enzymatic digestion to disrupt yeast cell wall. Using small glass beads is messy, whereas enzymatic digestion of the cells is expensive when many samples need to be analyzed. We sought to develop an easier and faster protocol than the existing methods fo...

  9. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Nicolino, Martina Picca; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food ferment...

  10. Assessing the potential of wild yeasts for bioethanol production

    OpenAIRE

    Ruyters, Stefan; Mukherjee, Vaskar; Verstrepen, Kevin; Thevelein, Johan; Willems, Kris; Lievens, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bioethanol fermentations expose yeasts to a new, complex and challenging fermentation medium with specific inhibitors and sugar mixtures depending on the type of carbon source. It is, therefore, suggested that the natural diversity of yeasts should be further exploited in order to find yeasts with good ethanol yield in stressed fermentation media. In this study, we screened more than 50 yeast isolates of which we selected five isolates with promising features. The species Candida bombi, Wicke...

  11. A new methodology to obtain wine yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Quirós Asensio, Manuel; González Ramos, Daniel; Tabera Moreno, Laura; González García, Ramón

    2010-01-01

    Yeast mannoproteins are highly glycosylated proteins that are covalently bound to the β-1,3-glucan present in the yeast cell wall. Among their outstanding enological properties, yeast mannoproteins contribute to several aspects of wine quality by protecting against protein haze, reducing astringency, retaining aroma compounds and stimulating growth of lactic-acid bacteria. The development of a non-recombinant method to obtain enological yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins would therefor...

  12. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Saccharomyces cereviseae, Saccharomyces fragilis, or Candida utilis) using the sprout portion of malt barley as... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt...

  13. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Tibet Kefir

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Li; Tongjie Liu; Guoqing He

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of yeasts in Tibet kefir were investigated in this study. Five samples of Tibetan kefir from Tibet and surrounding areas were collected for yeast isolation. Based on physiological, biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results, eight species of yeast were isolated and identified from Tibet kefir, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia fermentans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida zeylanoide, Candida parapsilosis, Kl...

  14. Adhesive interactions between medically important yeasts and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millsap, KW; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Yeasts are being increasingly identified as important organisms in human infections. Adhesive interactions between yeasts and bacteria may contribute to yeast retention al body sites. Methods for studying adhesive interactions between bacterial strains are well known, and range from simple macroscop

  15. In vivo Antihypertensive and Antihyperlipidemic Effects of the Crude Extracts and Fractions of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. Leaves in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geleta, Bekesho; Makonnen, Eyasu; Debella, Asfaw; Tadele, Ashenif

    2016-01-01

    Background: Moringa stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. is a medicinal plant that has been used in Ethiopian traditional medicine as a remedy for treatment of hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect in fructose induced hypertensive rats. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into control and treatment groups (n = 6). Treatment groups were given daily extracts (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) orally with fructose. Whereas, positive, negative and normal control groups were received captopril (20 mg/kg/day with fructose), only fructose (66% w/v ad libitum) and distilled water ad libitum for 15 days, respectively. The blood pressure was measured every 5th day using tail cuff blood pressure analyzer, and on the 16th day the blood was sampled to evaluate antihyperlipidemic effect using clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: The study showed that aqueous and 70% ethanol extracts significantly prevented blood pressure increment in a dose dependent manner comparable to that of the standard drug. Similarly, the extracts suppressed increment in lipid profile (cholesterol, glucose, and triglycerides) compared with negative control. The biochemical test revealed that extracts produced a rise in liver but no effect on kidney function indicators compared with normal control. Conclusion: These findings revealed that both crude extracts of M. stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. possess antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect.

  16. Long-term changes in quiescent degassing at Mount Baker Volcano, Washington, USA; Evidence for a stalled intrusion in 1975 and connection to a deep magma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C.; Evans, William C.; Poland, M.; Tucker, D.S.; Doukas, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term changes have occurred in the chemistry, isotopic ratios, and emission rates of gas at Mount Baker volcano following a major thermal perturbation in 1975. In mid-1975 a large pulse in sulfur and carbon dioxide output was observed both in emission rates and in fumarole samples. Emission rates of CO2 and H2S were ??? 950 and 112??t/d, respectively, in 1975; these decreased to ??? 150 and 7??Rc/RA), but has declined slightly since the mid-1970s, and ??13C-CO2 has decreased by ??? 1??? over time. Both trends are expected from a gradually crystallizing magma. While other scenarios are investigated, we conclude that magma intruded the mid- to shallow-crust beneath Mount Baker during the thermal awakening of 1975. Since that time, evidence for fresh magma has waned, but the continued emission of CO2 and the presence of a long-term hydrothermal system leads us to suspect some continuing connection between the surface and deep convecting magma.

  17. In vivo antihypertensive and antidyslipidemic effects of the crude extracts and fractions of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f. Cufod. leaves in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekesho eGeleta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Moringa stenopetala (Baker f. Cufod. is a medicinal plant that has been used in Ethiopian traditional medicine as a remedy for treatment of hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect in fructose induced hypertensive rats.Rats were randomly divided into control and treatment groups (n=6. Treatment groups were given daily extracts (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg orally with fructose. Whereas, positive, negative and normal control groups were received captopril (20 mg/kg/day with fructose, only fructose (66% w/v ad libitum and distilled water ad libitum for 15 days, respectively. The blood pressure was measured every 5th day using tail cuff blood pressure analyzer, and on the 16th day the blood was sampled to evaluate antihyperlipidemic effect using clinical chemistry analyzer. The study showed that aqueous and 70% ethanol extracts significantly prevented blood pressure increment in a dose dependent manner comparable to that of the standard drug. Similarly, the extracts suppressed increment in lipid profile (cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides compared with negative control. The biochemical test revealed that extracts produced a rise in liver but no effect on kidney function indicators compared with normal control.These findings revealed that both crude extracts of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f. Cufod. possess antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect.

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR357C, YGL079W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available izes to the endosome; identified as a transcriptional activator in a high-throughput...ome; identified as a transcriptional activator in a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid assay Rows with this pr

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YLR258W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into statio

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YJL137C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...pression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary

  1. Matemaatiline juhtimine / Stephen Baker

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Baker, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Autori raamat "Numeraadid" tutvustab matemaatikavõlureid, kes tuhnivad meie andmetes. Numeraatide üks paljutõotavamaid laboreid on töökohad, kus saab uurida iga klahvivajutust, hiireklõpsu ja meilisõnumit. Peatükis "Töötajad" vaatleb autor IBMi, kus matemaatikud loovad omaenda kolleegide käitumist prognoosivaid mudeleid. Lisa: Juhtimise teadus. Stopperist matemaatiliste mudeliteni; Viited

  2. Inhibition of Alcoholic Fermentation of Grape Must by Fatty Acids Produced by Yeasts and Their Elimination by Yeast Ghosts

    OpenAIRE

    Lafon-Lafourcade, S.; Geneix, C.; Ribéreau-Gayon, P.

    1984-01-01

    In a complete nutritive medium rich in sugar, such as grape must, the inhibition of alcoholic fermentation is caused by substances produced by the yeast which, acting synergistically with ethanol, are toxic to the yeasts themselves. Among these are decanoic and octanoic acids and their corresponding ethyl esters. Their adsorption by yeast ghosts permits the prevention and treatment of fermentation stoppages.

  3. Yeasts associated with Vienna sausage packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, B C; Dykes, G A; Callis, M; von Holy, A

    1993-03-01

    A total of 123 representative yeast isolates from a previous study of a Vienna sausage processing plant were identified according to conventional methods and long-chain fatty acid analyses. The most prevalent isolates belonged to the genera Candida and Debaryomyces. Other genera encountered were Rhodotorula, Yarrowia, Pichia, Galactomyces, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and Torulaspora. PMID:8466813

  4. Arachidonic acid metabolites in pathogenic yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ells Ruan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although most of what is known about the biology and function of arachidonic acid metabolites comes from the study of mammalian biology, these compounds can also be produced by lower eukaryotes, including yeasts and other fungi. It is also in this group of organisms that the least is known about the metabolic pathways leading to the production of these compounds as well as the functions of these compounds in the biology of fungi and yeasts. This review will deal with the discovery of oxylipins from polyunsaturated fatty acids, and more specifically the arachidonic acid derived eicosanoids, such as 3-hydroxy eicosatetraenoic acid, prostaglandin F2α and prostaglandin E2, in yeasts starting in the early 1990s. This review will also focus on what is known about the metabolic pathways and/or proteins involved in the production of these compounds in pathogenic yeasts. The possible roles of these compounds in the biology, including the pathology, of these organisms will be discussed.

  5. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  6. Stress-induced radiation resistance in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells have evolved biological defense mechanisms that can protect them against a variety of harmful environmental stress including ionizing radiation exposure. The authors have demonstrated that many stresses will induce radiation resistance in yeast. Recently it has become apparent that radiation resistance may be associated with the highly conserved 'stress response' mechanism that confers cellular resistance to a multitude of agents. A universal response to stress is the synthesis of a distinctive set of new proteins, although the function of many of these specific stress proteins is still unknown. One stress protein known to affect thermal tolerance in yeast is HSP104. This report has assessed involvement of HSP104 in the mechanism of radiation resistance by utilizing a yeast strain lacking HSP104 protein (a deletion mutant). It is previously demonstrated that radiation itself will induce yeast cells to develop radiation resistance and that the signal for the response is DNA damage. The nature of the DNA damage signal is important and it is reported that, per unit dose, low linear energy transfer (LET) 60Co gamma-rays induce a greater resistance response compared to high LET neutrons. Here is tested whether the dose rate also influences the signalling efficiency of a radiation inducing dose. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs

  7. Yeast improves resistance to environmental challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphamune™, a yeast extract antibiotic alternative, was added at either 1 lb/ton or 2 lb/ton to a turkey starter diet. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of Alphamune™ on gut maturation of 7 and 21 day old poults. Sections from the mid-point of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of each ...

  8. DNA sequence of the yeast transketolase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, T S; Kwee, I L; Nakada, T; Largman, C; Martin, B M

    1992-02-18

    Transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) is the enzyme that, together with aldolase, forms a reversible link between the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways. We have cloned and sequenced the transketolase gene from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). This is the first transketolase gene of the pentose phosphate shunt to be sequenced from any source. The molecular mass of the proposed translated protein is 73,976 daltons, in good agreement with the observed molecular mass of about 75,000 daltons. The 5'-nontranslated region of the gene is similar to other yeast genes. There is no evidence of 5'-splice junctions or branch points in the sequence. The 3'-nontranslated region contains the polyadenylation signal (AATAAA), 80 base pairs downstream from the termination codon. A high degree of homology is found between yeast transketolase and dihydroxyacetone synthase (formaldehyde transketolase) from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. The overall sequence identity between these two proteins is 37%, with four regions of much greater similarity. The regions from amino acid residues 98-131, 157-182, 410-433, and 474-489 have sequence identities of 74%, 66%, 83%, and 82%, respectively. One of these regions (157-182) includes a possible thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) binding domain, and another (410-433) may contain the catalytic domain. PMID:1737042

  9. Radiation-sensitive mutants of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomenclature for various radiosensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is briefly discussed. Tables are presented to show results of allelism tests of most of the radiosensitive mutants isolated by various investigators together with a standardized rad locus designation and map positions of a number of rad loci in yeast

  10. Engineering yeast tolerance to inhibitory lignocellulosic biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Joana Filipa Torres Pinheiro; Aguiar, Tatiana Quinta; D. Mendes; Pereira, Francisco B.; Domingues, Lucília

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the necessity for biotechnological manufacturing based on lignocellulosic feedstocks has become evident. However, the pre-treatment step in the production of lignocellulosic bioethanol leads to the accumulation of inhibitory byproducts. Robust second generation bioethanol processes require microorganisms able to ferment these inhibitory lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of the determinants of yeast tolerance to lignocellulose...

  11. Raman microspectroscopy of the yeast vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Palacký, J.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva; Mojzeš, P.

    Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2013 - (Marques, M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.; Haris, P.), s. 73-77. (Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules. 7). ISBN 978-1-61499-183-0 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida albicans * chemical composition * living cell * polyphosphate * Raman microspectroscopy * vacuole * yeast Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Willemoës, Martin; Grubmeyer, Charles; Winther, Jakob R.

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  13. Regulations of sugar transporters: insights from yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 59, 1-2 (2013), s. 1-31. ISSN 0172-8083 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/0307 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : sugar transporter * yeast * glucose signaling * sensing Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.712, year: 2013

  14. Killer yeasts as biocontrol agents of spoilage yeasts and bacteria isolated from wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández de Ullivarri Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the winemaking process Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main yeast species but other yeasts called non-Saccharomyces as well as different species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB are also present. Then, one strategy to prevent or reduce microbial contamination during the winemaking process is the use of killer yeasts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the killer activity (KA of autochthonous yeasts from Northwest region of Argentine (S. cerevisiae Cf8 and Wickerhamomyces anomalus Cf20 on spoilage yeasts and in LAB of the wine. The KA was evaluated using cell-free supernatants obtained from pure and mixed cultures of strains Cf8-Cf20. S. cerevisiae Cf8 showed a growth reduction between 7 and 48% on D. anomala BDa15, P. membranifaciens BPm481 and Z. bailii Bzb317 while W. anomalus Cf20 exhibited KA of 20, 61, 91 and 92% against B. bruxellensis Ld1, D. anomala BDa15, P. membranifaciens BPm481 and P. guilliermondii Cd6, respectively. Killer mixed supernatants showed growth inhibition similar to strain Cf20. Screening against LAB showed that both killer toxins were able to inhibit the growth of L. hilgardii 5w as well as to reduce a 16–31% histamine production by this LAB strain. These results confirm the potential of autochthonous killer yeasts as biocontrol agents in winemaking process. The mixed culture S. cerevisiae Cf8-W. anomalus Cf20 presented a wide range of KA on spoilage yeasts as well as on L. hilgardii. Therefore, the use of killer yeasts as starter cultures would allow producing wines with controlled quality.

  15. Rescue of end fragments of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanson, G G; Hoekstra, M F; McElligott, D. L.; Evans, G A

    1991-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) provide a powerful tool for the isolation and mapping of large regions of mammalian chromosomes. We developed a rapid and efficient method for the isolation of DNA fragments representing the extreme ends of YAC clones by the insertion of a rescue plasmid into the YAC vector by homologous recombination. Two rescue vectors were constructed containing a yeast LYS2 selectable gene, a bacterial origin of replication, an antibiotic resistance gene, a polylinker c...

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBR288C, YGR261C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YBR288C APM3 Mu3-like subunit of the clathrin associated protein complex (AP-3); functions in tr ... as prey (0) YGR261C APL6 Beta3-like subunit of the yeast ... AP-3 complex; functions in transport of alkaline p ... me APL6 Prey description Beta3-like subunit of the yeast ... AP-3 complex; functions in transport of alkaline p ...

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOL069W, YMR294W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YOL069W NUF2 Component of the evolutionarily conserved kinetochore-associated Ndc80 complex (Ndc ... his bait as prey (0) YMR294W JNM1 Component of the yeast ... dynactin complex, consisting of Nip100p, Jnm1p, an ... y gene name JNM1 Prey description Component of the yeast ... dynactin complex, consisting of Nip100p, Jnm1p, an ...

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR311W, YMR294W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDR311W TFB1 Subunit of TFIIH and nucleotide excision repair factor 3 complexes, required for nu ... his bait as prey (0) YMR294W JNM1 Component of the yeast ... dynactin complex, consisting of Nip100p, Jnm1p, an ... y gene name JNM1 Prey description Component of the yeast ... dynactin complex, consisting of Nip100p, Jnm1p, an ...

  19. Occurrence of Killer Yeast Strains in Fruit and Berry Wine Yeast Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbiniene, Gintare; Kondratiene, Laima; Jokantaite, Tautvile; Serviene, Elena; Melvydas, Vytautas; Petkuniene, Giedre

    2004-01-01

    Apple, cranberry, chokeberry and Lithuanian red grape wine yeast populations were used for the determination of killer yeast occurrence. According to the tests of the killer characteristics and immunity the isolated strains were divided into seven groups. In this work the activity of killer toxins purified from some typical strains was evaluated. The analysed strains produced different amounts of active killer toxin and some of them possessed new industrially significant killer properties. To...

  20. Alternative branch points are selected during splicing of a yeast pre-mRNA in mammalian and yeast extracts.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruskin, B; Pikielny, C W; Rosbash, M; Green, M R

    1986-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing in yeast and higher eukaryotes proceeds by similar pathways, in which a probable splicing intermediate and the excised intron are in a lariat configuration. To compare the pre-mRNA splicing mechanisms in yeast and higher eukaryotes, we have analyzed the RNA products resulting from in vitro processing of a yeast intron-containing pre-mRNA in HeLa cell and yeast extracts. In yeast, the RNA branch (2'-5' phosphodiester bond) of the RNA lariat forms at the third adenosine of the...

  1. Using mineral geochemistry to decipher slab, mantle, and crustal inputs to the generation of high-Mg andesites from Mount Baker and Glacier Peak, northern Cascade arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, M.; DeBari, S. M.; Clynne, M. A.; Rusk, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental question in geology is whether subducting plates get hot enough to generate melt that contributes to magmatic output in volcanic arcs. Because the subducting plate beneath the Cascade arc is relatively young and hot, slab melt generation is considered possible. To better understand the role of slab melt in north Cascades magmas, this study focused on petrogenesis of high-Mg andesites (HMA) and basaltic andesites (HMBA) from Mt. Baker and Glacier Peak, Washington. HMA have unusually high Mg# relative to their SiO2 contents, as well as elevated La/Yb and Dy/Yb ratios that are interpreted to result from separation of melt from a garnet-bearing residuum. Debate centers on the garnet's origin as it could be present in mineral assemblages from the subducting slab, deep mantle, thick lower crust, or basalt fractionated at high pressure. Whole rock analyses were combined with major, minor, and trace element analyses to understand the origin of these HMA. In the Tarn Plateau (Mt. Baker) flow unit (51.8-54.0 wt.% SiO2, Mg# 68-70) Mg#s correlate positively with high La/Yb in clinopyroxene equilibrium liquids, suggesting an origin similar to that of Aleutian adakites, where slab-derived melts interact with the overlying mantle to become Mg-rich and subsequently mix with mantle-derived basalts. The source for high La/Yb in the Glacier Creek (Mt. Baker) flow unit (58.3-58.7 wt.% SiO2, Mg# 63-64) is more ambiguous. High whole rock Sr/P imply origin from a mantle that was hydrated by an enriched slab component (fluid ± melt). In the Lightning Creek (Glacier Peak) flow unit (54.8-57.9 SiO2, Mg# 69-72) Cr and Mg contents in Cr-spinel and olivine pairs suggest a depleted mantle source, and high whole rock Sr/P indicate hydration-induced mantle melting. Hence Lightning Creek is interpreted have originated from a refractory mantle source that interacted with a hydrous slab component (fluid ± melt). Our results indicate that in addition to slab-derived fluids, slab

  2. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  3. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  4. Presencia de Circulifer tenellus Baker y Beet mild curly top virus en maleza durante el invierno en el centro norte de México Circulifer tenellus Baker and Beet mild curly top virus presence in weeds during the winter in north-central Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo Velásquez-Valle; Luis Roberto Reveles-Torres; Mario Domingo Amador-Ramírez; María Mercedes Medina-Aguilar; Guillermo Medina-García

    2012-01-01

    Una de las enfermedades más importantes del chile para secado en el norte centro de México es la denominada amarillamientos del chile. Existe poca información acerca de la interacción entre el vector (Circulifer tenellus Baker), el Beet mild curly top virus y la maleza durante el invierno en esta región, consecuentemente el objetivo del trabajo fue identificar maleza de invierno que sirve como refugio para el vector y hospedero del virus en esta región. Entre enero y marzo de 2011 se muestrea...

  5. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Shevelev, Igor; Sturley, Stephen L; Boone, Charles; Greenblatt, Jack F; Zhang, Zhaolei; Paumi, Christian M; Babu, Mohan; Park, Hay-Oak; Michaelis, Susan; Stagljar, Igor

    2013-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used membrane yeast two-hybrid technology to map the protein interactome of all of the nonmitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID database to generate a comprehensive, integrated 'interactome'. We show that ABC transporters physically associate with proteins involved in an unexpectedly diverse range of functions. We specifically examine the importance of the physical interactions of ABC transporters in both the regulation of one another and in the modulation of proteins involved in zinc homeostasis. The interaction network presented here will be a powerful resource for increasing our fundamental understanding of the cellular role and regulation of ABC transporters. PMID:23831759

  6. Structural Studies of the Yeast Mitochondrial Degradosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    The yeast mitochondrial degradosome/exosome (mtExo) is responsible for most RNA turnover in mitochondria and has been proposed to form a central part of a mitochondrial RNA surveillance system responsible for degradation of aberrant and unprocessed RNA ([1], [2]). In contrast to the cytoplasmic...... and nuclear exosome complexes, which consist of 10-12 different nuclease subunits, the mitochondrial degradosome is composed of only two large subunits - an RNase (Dss1p) and a helicase (Suv3p), belonging the Ski2 class of DExH box RNA helicases. Both subunits are encoded on the yeast nuclear genome...... and imported to the mitochondrial matrix posttranslationally. In an effort to understand the complex mechanisms underlying control of RNA turnover and surveillance in eukaryotic organisms, we are studying the structure of the mitochondrial degradosome as a model system for the more complex exosomes. Dss1p...

  7. Uniform yeast cell assembly via microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Marquez, Samantha M; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the use of microfluidic approaches for the fabrication of yeastosomes (yeast-celloidosomes) based on self-assembly of yeast cells onto liquid-solid or liquid-gas interfaces. Precise control over fluidic flows in droplet- and bubble-forming microfluidic devices allows production of monodispersed, size-selected templates. The general strategy to organize and assemble living cells is to tune electrostatic attractions between the template (gel or gas core) and the cells via surface charging. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) polyelectrolyte deposition was employed to invert or enhance charges of solid surfaces. We demonstrated the ability to produce high-quality, monolayer-shelled yeastosome structures under proper conditions when sufficient electrostatic driving forces are present. The combination of microfluidic fabrication with cell self-assembly enables a versatile platform for designing synthetic hierarchy bio-structures. PMID:22655026

  8. Homocysteine thiolactone affects protein ubiquitination in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretes, Ewa; Zimny, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    The formation of homocysteine thiolactone (HcyTl) from homocysteine occurs in all examined so far organisms including bacteria, yeast, and humans. Protein N-homocysteinylation at the ε-amino group of lysine is an adverse result of HcyTl accumulation. Since tagging of proteins by ubiquitination before their proteasomal degradation takes place at the same residue, we wondered how N-homocysteinylation may affect the ubiquitination of proteins. We used different yeast strains carrying mutations in genes involved in the homocysteine metabolism. We found positive correlation between the concentration of endogenous HcyTl and the concentration of ubiquitinated proteins. This suggests that N-homocysteinylation of proteins apparently does not preclude but rather promotes their decomposition. PMID:24051443

  9. Stochasticity in the yeast mating pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report stochastic simulations of the yeast mating signal transduction pathway. The effects of intrinsic and external noise, the influence of cell-to-cell difference in the pathway capacity, and noise propagation in the pathway have been examined. The stochastic temporal behaviour of the pathway is found to be robust to the influence of inherent fluctuations, and intrinsic noise propagates in the pathway in a uniform pattern when the yeasts are treated with pheromones of different stimulus strengths and of varied fluctuations. In agreement with recent experimental findings, extrinsic noise is found to play a more prominent role than intrinsic noise in the variability of proteins. The occurrence frequency for the reactions in the pathway are also examined and a more compact network is obtained by dropping most of the reactions of least occurrence

  10. Effect of Yeast : Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Marine Yeast as probiotic supplement on performance of poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Kompiang

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment had been conducted to evaluate the effect of marine yeast and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc as probiotic supplement on poultry performance. Marine yeast isolated from rotten sea-weed and commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used. Evaluation was conducted by comparing performance of broiler chicken supplemented with marine yeast or Sc, which were given through drinking water (5 ml/l to negative control (feed without antibiotic growth promotor/GPA, positive control (feed with GPA, and reference commercial probiotic. Forty DOC broiler birds were used for each treatment, divided into 4 replicates (10 birds/replicate and raised in wire cages for 5 weeks. Body weight and feed consumption were measured weekly and mortality was recorded during the trial. The results showed that there were no significant difference on the birds performance among marine yeast, Sc, positive control and probiotic reference control treatments. However their effects on bird performance were better (P<0.05 than treatment of negative control. It is concluded that marine yeast or Saccharomyces cerevisiae could replace the function of antibiotic as a growth promotant.

  11. Induction of apoptosis in the human Leukemic U937 cell line by Kaempferia parviflora Wall.ex.Baker extract and effects of paclitaxel and camptothecin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjerdpongchai, Ratana; Chanwikruy, Yupa; Rattanapanone, Viboon; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2009-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall.ex.Baker is a Thai medicinal herb that has high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Apoptotic effects of the herbal extract alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were here studied in the human promonocytic leukemic U937 cell line. K. parviflora extract suppressed cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner as assessed using the trypan blue exclusion assay. Staining of extract-treated cells with propidium iodide and examination under a fluorescence microscope showed condensed nuclei and apoptotic bodies. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) decreased after treatment and the number of cells with decreased MTP also increased. Furthermore, activation of caspase-3 was found in herbal extract-treated cells. When the extract was combined with paclitaxel, an additive effect on U937 cell apoptosis was obtained, whereas camptothecin exerted an antagonistic effect. PMID:20192599

  12. Dissection and design of yeast prions.

    OpenAIRE

    Osherovich, Lev Z; Cox, Brian S; Mick F Tuite; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2004-01-01

    Many proteins can misfold into beta-sheet-rich, self-seeding polymers (amyloids). Prions are exceptional among such aggregates in that they are also infectious. In fungi, prions are not pathogenic but rather act as epigenetic regulators of cell physiology, providing a powerful model for studying the mechanism of prion replication. We used prion-forming domains from two budding yeast proteins (Sup35p and New1p) to examine the requirements for prion formation and inheritance. In both proteins, ...

  13. Telomere behavior in a hybrid yeast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ona C Martin; Christopher G De Sevo; Benjamin Z Guo; Douglas E Koshland; Maiterya J Dunham; Yixian Zheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Telomeres and the protein/RNA complexes involved in maintaining them are rapidly evolving systems across eukaryotes.Using two Saccharomyces species, among S.cerevisiae and S.bayanus, we provide evidence that the telomere systems of these two closely related yeasts have evolved significantly apart and that the gene in one spe-cies cannot maintain the set-point of telomere length of the other soecies in the hybrid.

  14. Yeast mutants auxotrophic for choline or ethanolamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, K D; Jensen, B.; Kolat, A I; Storm, E M; Henry, S. A.; Fogel, S

    1980-01-01

    Three mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which require exogenous ethanolamine or choline were isolated. The mutants map to a single locus (cho1) on chromosome V. The lipid composition suggests that cho1 mutants do not synthesize phosphatidylserine under any growth conditions. If phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine, which are usually derived from phosphatidylserine, were synthesized from exogenous ethanolamine or choline, the mutants grew and divided relatively normally....

  15. Environmental influences on organotin-yeast interactions

    OpenAIRE

    White, Jane S.

    2002-01-01

    As a consequence of the widespread industrial and agricultural applications of organotin compounds, contamination of various ecosystems has occurred in recent decades. Understanding how these compounds interact with cellular membranes is essential in assessing the risks of organotin pollution. The organotins, tributyltin (TBT) and trimethyltin (TMT) and inorganic tin, Sn(IV), were investigated for their physical interactions with non-metabolising cells and protoplasts of the yeast, Candida ma...

  16. Multipurpose Transposon-Insertion Libraries in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Libraries of transposon-insertion alleles constitute powerful and versatile tools for large-scale analysis of yeast gene function. Transposon-insertion libraries are constructed most simply through mutagenesis of a plasmid-based genomic DNA library; modification of the mutagenizing transposon by incorporation of yeast selectable markers, recombination sites, and an epitope tag enables the application of insertion alleles for phenotypic screening and protein localization. In particular, yeast genomic DNA libraries have been mutagenized with modified bacterial transposons carrying the URA3 marker, lox recombination sites, and sequence encoding multiple copies of the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope. Mutagenesis with these transposons has yielded a large resource of insertion alleles affecting nearly 4000 yeast genes in total. Through well-established protocols, these insertion libraries can be introduced into the desired strain backgrounds and the resulting insertional mutants can be screened or systematically analyzed. Relative to alternative methods of UV irradiation or chemical mutagenesis, transposon-insertion alleles can be easily identified by PCR-based approaches or high-throughput sequencing. Transposon-insertion libraries also provide a cost-effective alternative to targeted deletion approaches, although, in contrast to start-codon to stop-codon deletions, insertion alleles might not represent true null-mutants. For protein-localization studies, transposon-insertion alleles can provide encoded epitope tags in-frame with internal codons; in many cases, these transposon-encoded epitope tags can provide a more accurate localization for proteins in which terminal sequences are crucial for intracellular targeting. Thus, overall, transposon-insertion libraries can be used quickly and economically and have a particular utility in screening for desired phenotypes and localization patterns in nonstandard genetic backgrounds. PMID:27250950

  17. Pentose utilization in yeasts: Physiology and biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, H.

    1996-04-01

    The fermentive performance of bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi was investigated in a pentose (xylose)-rich lignocellulosic hydrolyzate. The filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum and the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis were found to be very sensitive to the inhibiting hydrolyzate. Recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed very poor ethanol formation from xylose; xylitol being the major product formed. The highest ethanol yields were obtained with recombinant Escherichia coli KO11, however, for maximal ethanol yield detoxification of the hydrolyzate was required. The influence of oxygen on the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in the xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis CBS 6054 was investigated. A low and well-controlled level of oxygenation has been found to be required for efficient ethanol formation from xylose by the xylose-fermenting yeasts. The requirement of oxygen is frequently ascribed to the apparent redox imbalance which develops under anaerobic conditions due to the difference in co-factor utilization of the two first enzymes in the xylose metabolism, further reflected in xylitol excretion. However, a low and well controlled level of oxygenation for maximal ethanol production from glucose was also demonstrated, suggesting that the oxygen requirement is not only due to the dual co-factor utilization, but also serves other purposes. Cyanide-insensitive and salicyl hydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration (CIR) was found in P. stipitis. CIR is suggested to act as a redox sink preventing xylitol formation in P. stipitis under oxygen-limited xylose fermentations. Xylitol metabolism by P. stipitis CBS 6054 was strictly respiratory and ethanol was not formed under any conditions. The absence of ethanol formation was not due to a lack of fermentative enzymes, since the addition of glucose to xylitol-pregrown cells resulted in ethanol formation. 277 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Kinetics of hairpin ribozyme cleavage in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, C P; Fedor, M J

    1997-01-01

    Hairpin ribozymes catalyze a self-cleavage reaction that provides a simple model for quantitative analyses of intracellular mechanisms of RNA catalysis. Decay rates of chimeric mRNAs containing self-cleaving ribozymes give a direct measure of intracellular cleavage kinetics in yeast. Intracellular ribozyme-mediated cleavage occurs at similar rates and shows similar inhibition by ribozyme mutations as ribozyme-mediated reactions in vitro, but only when ribozymes are located in a favorable mRNA...

  19. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a complex process that involves regulation by both genetic and biochemical mechanisms. The activity levels of phospholipid synthesis enzymes are controlled by gene expression (e.g., transcription) and by factors (lipids, water-soluble phospholipid precursors and products, and covalent modification of phosphorylation) that modulate catalysis. Phosphatidic acid, whose levels are controlled by the biochemical regulation of key phosp...

  20. Population genomics of domestic and wild yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Liti, Gianni; Carter, David M.; Moses, Alan M.; Warringer, Jonas; Parts, Leopold; James, Stephen A.; Davey, Robert P.; Roberts, Ian N.; Burt, Austin; Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Tsai, Isheng J.; Bergman, Casey M.; Bensasson, Douda; O'Kelly, Michael J.T.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Since the completion of the genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in 19961,2, there has been an exponential increase in complete genome sequences accompanied by great advances in our understanding of genome evolution. Although little is known about the natural and life histories of yeasts in the wild, there are an increasing number of studies looking at ecological and geographic distributions3,4, population structure5-8, and sexual versus asexual reproduction9,10. Less well understood a...

  1. Conflict between noise and plasticity in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehner, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression responds to changes in conditions but also stochastically among individuals. In budding yeast, both expression responsiveness across conditions (“plasticity”) and cell-to-cell variation (“noise”) have been quantified for thousands of genes and found to correlate across genes. It has been argued therefore that noise and plasticity may be strongly coupled and mechanistically linked. This is consistent with some theoretical ideas, but a strong coupling between noise and plasticit...

  2. Raman Microspectroscopy of the Yeast Vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Palacký, J.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva; Mojzeš, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, 5-6 (2012), s. 503-507. ISSN 0712-4813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0376; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * living cell * yeast * vacuole * chemical composition * polyphospate * Candida albicans Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2012

  3. Vacuole Partitioning during Meiotic Division in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Roeder, A D; Shaw, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the partitioning of the yeast vacuole during meiotic division. In pulse-chase experiments, vacuoles labeled with the lumenal ade2 fluorophore or the membrane-specific dye FM 4-64 were not inherited by haploid spores. Instead, these fluorescent markers were excluded from spores and trapped between the spore cell walls and the ascus. Serial optical sections using a confocal microscope confirmed that spores did not inherit detectable amounts of fluorescently labeled vacuoles. Mo...

  4. Raman microspectroscopy of the yeast vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Gregorová, Š.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Palacký, J.; Mojzeš, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2014), s. 15. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /12./. 13.03.2014-15.03.2014, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0376 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * yeast vacuoles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE)

    OpenAIRE

    DiCarlo, JE; Conley, AJ; Penttilä, M; Jäntti, J; Wang, HH; Church, GM

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host S. cerevisiae, which we call Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we ach...

  6. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the diffe...

  7. Zinc accumulation and utilization by wine yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Raffaele De Nicola1,3, Nichola Hall2,3, Tatiana Bollag3, Georgios Thermogiannis3, Graeme M Walker31DSM Nutritional Products, Dept. NRD/CX, Basel, Switzerland; 2Vinquiry, Inc. Windsor, CA, USA; 3School of Contemporary Sciences, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee, UK Abstract: The present study has focused on the accumulation of zinc by wine yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation of both grape juice and chemically defined medium with different carbohydrates and...

  8. Sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis using yeast cellulolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Angelica Cristina de; Carvalho, Fernanda Paula; Silva e Batista, Cristina Ferreira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Dias, Disney Ribeiro

    2013-10-28

    Ethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass is emerging as one of the most important technologies for sustainable development. To use this biomass, it is necessary to circumvent the physical and chemical barriers presented by the cohesive combination of the main biomass components, which hinders the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars. This study evaluated the hydrolytic capacity of enzymes produced by yeasts, isolated from the soils of the Brazilian Cerrado biome (savannah) and the Amazon region, on sugarcane bagasse pre-treated with H2SO4. Among the 103 and 214 yeast isolates from the Minas Gerais Cerrado and the Amazon regions, 18 (17.47%) and 11 (5.14%) isolates, respectively, were cellulase-producing. Cryptococcus laurentii was prevalent and produced significant β- glucosidase levels, which were higher than the endo- and exoglucanase activities. In natura sugarcane bagasse was pre-treated with 2% H2SO4 for 30 min at 150oC. Subsequently, the obtained fibrous residue was subjected to hydrolysis using the Cryptococcus laurentii yeast enzyme extract for 72 h. This enzyme extract promoted the conversion of approximately 32% of the cellulose, of which 2.4% was glucose, after the enzymatic hydrolysis reaction, suggesting that C. laurentii is a good β-glucosidase producer. The results presented in this study highlight the importance of isolating microbial strains that produce enzymes of biotechnological interest, given their extensive application in biofuel production. PMID:23851270

  9. Comparative genomics of biotechnologically important yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Lopes, Mariana R; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Göker, Markus; Salamov, Asaf A; Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Long, Tanya M; Calvey, Christopher H; Aerts, Andrea L; Barry, Kerrie W; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; Coughlan, Aisling Y; Deshpande, Shweta; Douglass, Alexander P; Hanson, Sara J; Klenk, Hans-Peter; LaButti, Kurt M; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika A; Lipzen, Anna M; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Ohm, Robin A; Otillar, Robert P; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L; Peng, Yi; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos A; Scheuner, Carmen; Sibirny, Andriy A; Slot, Jason C; Stielow, J Benjamin; Sun, Hui; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor V; Jeffries, Thomas W

    2016-08-30

    Ascomycete yeasts are metabolically diverse, with great potential for biotechnology. Here, we report the comparative genome analysis of 29 taxonomically and biotechnologically important yeasts, including 16 newly sequenced. We identify a genetic code change, CUG-Ala, in Pachysolen tannophilus in the clade sister to the known CUG-Ser clade. Our well-resolved yeast phylogeny shows that some traits, such as methylotrophy, are restricted to single clades, whereas others, such as l-rhamnose utilization, have patchy phylogenetic distributions. Gene clusters, with variable organization and distribution, encode many pathways of interest. Genomics can predict some biochemical traits precisely, but the genomic basis of others, such as xylose utilization, remains unresolved. Our data also provide insight into early evolution of ascomycetes. We document the loss of H3K9me2/3 heterochromatin, the origin of ascomycete mating-type switching, and panascomycete synteny at the MAT locus. These data and analyses will facilitate the engineering of efficient biosynthetic and degradative pathways and gateways for genomic manipulation. PMID:27535936

  10. [Determination of riboflavin kinase activity in yeast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavlovsky, G M; Kashchenko, V E

    1975-01-01

    It is established that the main reason of the riboflavin kinase (RFK, EC 2.7.1.26) low specific activity in the cell-free extracts of the yeast Pichia guillermondii Wickerham ATCC 9058 is the presence of alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), effectively destructing flaven mononucleotide. By chromatography of the cell-free extracts of P. guillermondii on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, CM-Sphadex C-50, CM-cellulose, Sephadexes G-75 and G-100 RFK and alkaline phosphatase may be separated completely. Any of these procedures results in a several times increase of the RFK activity as compared with the initial preparation. One failed to obtain a similar effect by fractionation of the extracts with amminium sulphate and by hydroxylapatite chromatography. A simple method is developed for determining the activity of RFK in the cell-free extracts of yeast on the basis of negative adsorption of this enzyme on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. A selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase by ions Be2+ and F- yields a less satisfactory result. The data are presented on the PFK activity of certain species of flavinogenic (Pichia guillermondii, Torulopsis camdida) and non-flavinogenic (Pichia ohmeri, Candida utilis, Saccharomyces cervisiae) yeast. PMID:174262

  11. YeastMed: an XML-Based System for Biological Data Integration of Yeast

    CERN Document Server

    Briache, Abdelaali; Kerzazi, Amine; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Montes, Jose F Aldana; Hassani, Badr D Rossi; Lairini, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of bioinformatics is to create database systems and software platforms capable of storing and analysing large sets of biological data. Hundreds of biological databases are now available and provide access to huge amount of biological data. SGD, Yeastract, CYGD-MIPS, BioGrid and PhosphoGrid are five of the most visited databases by the yeast community. These sources provide complementary data on biological entities. Biologists are brought systematically to query these data sources in order to analyse the results of their experiments. Because of the heterogeneity of these sources, querying them separately and then manually combining the returned result is a complex and laborious task. To provide transparent and simultaneous access to these sources, we have developed a mediator-based system called YeastMed. In this paper, we present YeastMed focusing on its architecture.

  12. Black yeast-like fungi in skin and nail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunte, D M; Tarazooie, B; Arendrup, M C;

    2011-01-01

    Black yeast-like fungi are rarely reported from superficial infections. We noticed a consistent prevalence of these organisms as single isolations from mycological routine specimens. To investigate the prevalence of black yeast-like fungi in skin, hair and nail specimens and to discuss...... the probability of these species to be involved in disease. Slow-growing black yeast-like fungi in routine specimens were prospectively collected and identified. A questionnaire regarding patient information was sent to physicians regarding black yeast-like fungus positive patients. A total of 20 746...... dermatological specimens were examined by culture. Black yeast-like fungi accounted for 2.2% (n = 108) of the positive cultures. Only 31.0% of the samples, culture positive for black yeast-like fungi were direct microscopy positive when compared with overall 68.8% of the culture positive specimens. The most...

  13. Biosorption of nickel by yeasts in an osmotically unsuitable environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breierova, Emilia; Kovarova, Annamaria [SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia). Inst. of Chemistry; Certik, Milan [SUT, Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Gregor, Tomas [Mendel Univ. of Agriculture and Forestry, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2008-11-15

    The tolerance, sorption of nickel(II) ions, and changes in the production and composition of exopolymers of eight yeast strains grown under nickel presence with/without NaCl were studied. Strains of Pichia anomala and Candida maltosa known as the most resistant yeasts against nickel tolerated up to 3 mm Ni{sup 2+}. NaCl addition decreased both the resistance ofthe yeast strains toward nickel ions and the sorption of metal ions into cells. All yeasts absorbed nickel predominantly into exopolymers (glycoproteins) and on the surface of cells. However, while the amount of polysaccharide moieties of exoglycoproteins of most of the resistant yeasts was induced by stress conditions, the ratio polysaccharide/protein in the exopolymers remained unchanged in the sensitive species Cystofilobasidium. The exopolymer composition might play a key role in yeast adaptation to stress conditions caused by heavy metal ions. (orig.)

  14. Why, when, and how did yeast evolve alcoholic fermentation?

    OpenAIRE

    Dashko, Sofia; Zhou, Nerve; Compagno, Concetta; Piškur, Jure

    2014-01-01

    The origin of modern fruits brought to microbial communities an abundant source of rich food based on simple sugars. Yeasts, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, usually become the predominant group in these niches. One of the most prominent and unique features and likely a winning trait of these yeasts is their ability to rapidly convert sugars to ethanol at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Why, when, and how did yeasts remodel their carbon metabolism to be able to accumulate ethanol u...

  15. Measuring Replicative Life Span in the Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Kristan K.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Aging is a degenerative process characterized by a progressive deterioration of cellular components and organelles resulting in mortality. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively to study the biology of aging, and several determinants of yeast longevity have been shown to be conserved in multicellular eukaryotes, including worms, flies, and mice 1. Due to the lack of easily quantified age-associated phenotypes, aging in yeast has been assayed almost exclusively by...

  16. Gas bubble formation in the cytoplasm of a fermenting yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Swart, Chantel W.; Dithebe, Khumisho; Pohl, Carolina H.; Swart, Hendrik C.; Coetsee, Elizabeth; van Wyk, Pieter WJ; Swarts, Jannie C.; Lodolo, Elizabeth J; Kock, Johan LF

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Current paradigms assume that gas bubbles cannot be formed within yeasts although these workhorses of the baking and brewing industries vigorously produce and release CO2 gas. We show that yeasts produce gas bubbles that fill a significant part of the cell. The missing link between intracellular CO2 production by glycolysis and eventual CO2 release from cells has therefore been resolved. Yeasts may serve as model to study CO2 behavior under pressurized conditions that may impact on f...

  17. Biodiversity of Yeasts During Plum Wegierka Zwykla Spontaneous Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Satora, Pawel; Tuszynski, Tadeusz

    2005-01-01

    The study comprises an analysis of the yeast microbiota that participated in the spontaneous fermentation of crushed Wegierka Zwykla plum fruit, which is the raw material for slivovitz production in the mountain region in the south of Poland. Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains were differentiated by means of the killer sensitivity analysis related to a killer reference panel of 9 well-known killer yeast strains. The first phase of the fermentation was dominated by the representatives of K...

  18. Probiotic properties of yeasts occurring in fermented food and beverages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lene

    Besides being able to improve the quality and safety of many fermented food and beverages some yeasts offer a number of probiotic traits. Especially a group of yeast referred to as "Saccharomyces boulardii", though taxonomically belonging to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been claimed to have...... probiotic properties. Besides, yeasts naturally occurring globally in food and beverages will have traits that might have a positive impact on human health....

  19. Responses of Yeast Biocontrol Agents to Environmental Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Yuan; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir; Liu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing wild species and strains of antagonistic yeast species, is a research topic that has received considerable attention in the literature over the past 30 years. In principle, it represents a promising alternative to chemical fungicides for the management of postharvest decay of fruits, vegetables, and grains. A yeast-based biocontrol system is composed of a tritrophic interaction between a host (commodity), a pathogen, and a yeast species, a...

  20. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastien eLebreton; Peter eWitzgall; Marie eOlsson; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies ...

  1. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  2. Whole Genome Analysis of a Wine Yeast Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Kurt Fellenberg; Rosario Gil; Sonja Bastuck; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains frequently exhibit rather specific phenotypic features needed for adaptation to a special environment. Wine yeast strains are able to ferment musts, for example, while other industrial or laboratory strains fail to do so. The genetic differences that characterize wine yeast strains are poorly understood, however. As a first search of genetic differences between wine and laboratory strains, we performed DNA-array analyses on the typical wine yeast strain T73 an...

  3. Aboveground Deadwood Deposition Supports Development of Soil Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Wehde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular saprobic fungi (yeasts inhabit soils worldwide. Although yeast species typically occupy defined areas on the biome scale, their distribution patterns within a single type of vegetation, such as forests, are more complex. In order to understand factors that shape soil yeast communities, soils collected underneath decaying wood logs and under forest litter were analyzed. We isolated and identified molecularly a total of 25 yeast species, including three new species. Occurrence and distribution of yeasts isolated from these soils provide new insights into ecology and niche specialization of several soil-borne species. Although abundance of typical soil yeast species varied among experimental plots, the analysis of species abundance and community composition revealed a strong influence of wood log deposition and leakage of organic carbon. Unlike soils underneath logs, yeast communities in adjacent areas harbored a considerable number of transient (phylloplane-related yeasts reaching 30% of the total yeast quantity. We showed that distinguishing autochthonous community members and species transient in soils is essential to estimate appropriate effects of environmental factors on soil fungi. Furthermore, a better understanding of species niches is crucial for analyses of culture-independent data, and may hint to the discovery of unifying patterns of microbial species distribution.

  4. In situ selective determination of methylmercury in river water by diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) using baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafurt-Cardona, Makenly [Programa de Pós-graduação em Geociências e Meio Ambiente, Instituto de Geociências e Ciências Exatas, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24-A, 1515, CEP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Centro de Estudos Ambientais, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24-A, 1515, CEP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Eismann, Carlos Eduardo; Suárez, Carlos Alfredo [Centro de Estudos Ambientais, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24-A, 1515, CEP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Menegário, Amauri Antonio, E-mail: amenega@rc.unesp.br [Programa de Pós-graduação em Geociências e Meio Ambiente, Instituto de Geociências e Ciências Exatas, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24-A, 1515, CEP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Centro de Estudos Ambientais, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24-A, 1515, CEP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Silva Luko, Karen [Programa de Pós-graduação em Geociências e Meio Ambiente, Instituto de Geociências e Ciências Exatas, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24-A, 1515, CEP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Centro de Estudos Ambientais, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24-A, 1515, CEP: 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); and others

    2015-08-05

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase and polyacrylamide as diffusive layer in the diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) was used for selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg). Deployment tests showed good linearity in mass uptake up to 48 h (3276 ng). When coupling the DGT technique with Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, the method has a limit of detection of 0.44 ng L{sup −1} (pre concentration factor of 11 for 48 h deployment). Diffusion coefficient of 7.03 ± 0.77 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} at 23 °C in polyacrylamide gel (pH = 5.5 and ionic strength = 0.05 mol L{sup −1} NaCl) was obtained. Influence of ionic strength (from 0.0005 mol L{sup −1} to 0.1 mol L{sup −1} NaCl) and pH (from 3.5 to 8.5) on MeHg uptake were evaluated. For these range, recoveries of 84–105% and 84–98% were obtained for ionic strength and pH respectively. Potential interference due to presence of Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn was also assessed showing good recoveries (70–87%). The selectivity of the proposed approach was tested by deployments in solutions containing MeHg and Hg(II). Results obtained showed recoveries of 102–115 % for MeHg, while the uptake of Hg(II) was insignificant. The proposed approach was successfully employed for in situ measurements in the Negro River (Manaus-AM, Brazil). - Highlights: • A method for in situ selective determination of MeHg by DGT technique is proposed. • Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel was used as binding agent. • Effects of pH, ionic strength and concomitant ions on uptake of MeHg were evaluated. • DGT device containing polyacrylamide gel as diffusive layer showed better selectivity. • The proposed approach was successfully applied for analysis of river water.

  5. In situ selective determination of methylmercury in river water by diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) using baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase and polyacrylamide as diffusive layer in the diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) was used for selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg). Deployment tests showed good linearity in mass uptake up to 48 h (3276 ng). When coupling the DGT technique with Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, the method has a limit of detection of 0.44 ng L−1 (pre concentration factor of 11 for 48 h deployment). Diffusion coefficient of 7.03 ± 0.77 × 10−6 cm2 s−1 at 23 °C in polyacrylamide gel (pH = 5.5 and ionic strength = 0.05 mol L−1 NaCl) was obtained. Influence of ionic strength (from 0.0005 mol L−1 to 0.1 mol L−1 NaCl) and pH (from 3.5 to 8.5) on MeHg uptake were evaluated. For these range, recoveries of 84–105% and 84–98% were obtained for ionic strength and pH respectively. Potential interference due to presence of Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn was also assessed showing good recoveries (70–87%). The selectivity of the proposed approach was tested by deployments in solutions containing MeHg and Hg(II). Results obtained showed recoveries of 102–115 % for MeHg, while the uptake of Hg(II) was insignificant. The proposed approach was successfully employed for in situ measurements in the Negro River (Manaus-AM, Brazil). - Highlights: • A method for in situ selective determination of MeHg by DGT technique is proposed. • Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel was used as binding agent. • Effects of pH, ionic strength and concomitant ions on uptake of MeHg were evaluated. • DGT device containing polyacrylamide gel as diffusive layer showed better selectivity. • The proposed approach was successfully applied for analysis of river water

  6. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Petruzzi; Antonietta Baiano; Antonio De Gianni; Milena Sinigaglia; Maria Rosaria Corbo; Antonio Bevilacqua

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA) by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45), previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments w...

  7. Biodiversity of Saccharomyces yeast strains from grape berries of wine-producing areas using starters commercial yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Valero, Eva; Cambon, Brigitte; Schuller, Dorit Elisabeth; Casal, Margarida; Dequin, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The use of commercial wine yeast strains as starters has been extensively generalised over the past two decades. In this study, a large scale sampling plan was devised over a period of three years in three different vineyards in the south of France, to evaluate autochthonous wine yeast biodiversity in vineyards around wineries where active dry yeasts have been used as fermentation starters during more than 5 years. 72 spontaneous fermentations were performed from a total of 106 grape samples,...

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YMR294W, YLL049W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMR294W JNM1 Component of the yeast dynactin complex, consisting of Nip100p, Jnm1p, and Arp1p; r ... equired for proper nuclear migration ... and spindle partitioning during mitotic anaphase B ... Protein of unknown function; required for nuclear migration ; null mutant shows a reduced affinity for the alci ...

  9. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2013-05-14

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  10. Genetically modified yeast species and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet (Kingsport, TN); Koivuranta, Kari (Helsinki, FI); Penttila, Merja (Helsinki, FI); Ilmen, Marja (Helsinki, FI); Suominen, Pirkko (Maple Grove, MN); Aristidou, Aristos (Maple Grove, MN); Miller, Christopher Kenneth (Cottage Grove, MN); Olson, Stacey (St. Bonifacius, MN); Ruohonen, Laura (Helsinki, FI)

    2011-05-17

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications', include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  11. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet [Kingsport, TN; Koivuranta, Kari [Helsinki, FI; Penttila, Merja [Helsinki, FI; Ilmen, Marja [Helsinki, FI; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Maple Grove, MN; Miller, Christopher Kenneth [Cottage Grove, MN; Olson, Stacey [St. Bonifacius, MN; Ruohonen, Laura [Helsinki, FI

    2014-01-07

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  12. Studies on the yeast nucleus : III. Properties of a deoxyribonucleoprotein complex derived from yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, P.C. van der; Tonino, G.J.M.; Rozijn, Th.H.

    1969-01-01

    1. A deoxyribonucleoprotein complex was isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is composed of 36% DNA, 4% RNA and 60% protein. About 70% of the protein is acid-extractable. The complex sediments as a single band with a s°20,w of 27 S. 2. The yeast deoxyribonucleoprotein shows a biphasic melting

  13. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2016-08-09

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  14. How does yeast respond to pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes P.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The brewing and baking yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for stress response studies of eukaryotic cells. In this review we focus on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP on S. cerevisiae. HHP exerts a broad effect on yeast cells characteristic of common stresses, mainly associated with protein alteration and lipid bilayer phase transition. Like most stresses, pressure induces cell cycle arrest. Below 50 MPa (500 atm yeast cell morphology is unaffected whereas above 220 MPa wild-type cells are killed. S. cerevisiae cells can acquire barotolerance if they are pretreated with a sublethal stress due to temperature, ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, or pressure. Nevertheless, pressure only leads to protection against severe stress if, after pressure pretreatment, the cells are also re-incubated at room pressure. We attribute this effect to the inhibition of the protein synthesis apparatus under HHP. The global genome expression analysis of S. cerevisiae cells submitted to HHP revealed a stress response profile. The majority of the up-regulated genes are involved in stress defense and carbohydrate metabolism while most repressed genes belong to the cell cycle progression and protein synthesis categories. However, the signaling pathway involved in the pressure response is still to be elucidated. Nitric oxide, a signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions, confers baroprotection. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae cells in the early exponential phase submitted to 50-MPa pressure show induction of the expression level of the nitric oxide synthase inducible isoform. As pressure becomes an important biotechnological tool, studies concerning this kind of stress in microorganisms are imperative.

  15. Biological Effects of Yeast β-Glucans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Petravić-tominac

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available β-Glucans are glucose polymers that naturally occur in yeasts, molds, algae, mushrooms, bacteria, oats and barley. Immunostimulation is one of the most important properties of β-glucans. They are classified as biological response modifiers and because of their biological activities they can be used in human and veterinary medicine and pharmacy. Additionally, β-glucans show interesting physicochemical properties and therefore could be applied in food and feed production as well as in cosmetic and chemical industries. Immunomodulation by β-glucan, both in vitro and in vivo, inhibits cancer cell growth and metastasis and prevents or reduces bacterial infection. In humans, dietary β-glucan lowers blood cholesterol, improves glucose utilization by body cells and also helps wound healing. β-Glucans work, in part, by stimulating the innate immune mechanism to fight a range of foreign challenges and could be used as an adjuvant, in combination with anti infective or antineoplastic agents, radiotherapy, and a range of topical agents and nutrients. The structure of β-glucans depends on the source they are isolated from. Native β-glucan molecules can be linked and branched in several ways. Biological properties of different β-glucan molecules are dependent on their molecular structure. Some authors claim that the β-(1→3, (1→6-glucan derived from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce the highest biological effects. Thus, in this review the β-glucans and their metabolic activity are discussed, with the special accent on those isolated from yeast. Other possible β-glucan applications, directed to cosmetic production, non-medical application in pharmaceutical and chemical industry, are also discussed.

  16. Detection and identification of wild yeasts in lager breweries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa Kühle, A; Jespersen, L

    1998-09-01

    Wild yeasts were detected in 41 out of 101 brewery yeast samples investigated using six different selective principles. Malt extract, yeast extract, glucose, peptone (MYGP) agar supplemented with 195 ppm CuSO4 was found to be the most effective selective principle, detecting wild yeasts in 80% of the contaminated samples. Both Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wild yeasts were detected on this medium. Lysine medium, crystal violet medium and incubation of non-selective media at 37 degrees C detected wild yeasts in 46-56% of the contaminated samples. On using actidione medium, only 20% of the wild yeasts were detected. The combined use of MYGP supplemented with 195 ppm CuSO4 and one of the other selective principles did not improve the recovery of the wild yeasts. The wild yeasts found consisted of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (57%), Pichia spp. (28%) and Candida spp. (15%). Using the API ID 32 C kit, 35 different assimilation profiles were obtained for the 124 wild yeast isolates investigated. All isolates were capable of glucose assimilation, whereas only 79% of the isolates assimilated saccharose, 75% maltose, 70% galactose, 65% raffinose and 65% lactate. Lactose, inositol, rhamnose and glucuronate were not assimilated by any of the isolates. The differences in assimilation pattern did not reflect any differences in recovery by the selective principles investigated. The majority of the wild yeast isolates investigated were capable of growth in wort and beer, indicating their possible role as spoilage organisms. The Sacch. cerevisiae isolates were found to be the most hazardous, with some isolates being capable of extensive growth in bottled beer within seventeen days at ambient temperature. PMID:9801196

  17. Alteration of yeast activity by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeast is an important component in microbe based industrial technologies. Due to the techno-economic reasons, the fermentation technique has acquired renewed interest. The effect of γ-radiation on the fermentation reaction has been investigated. The studies show that exposure of the fermentation mixture to γ-radiation at 5 kGy enhance alcohol production, whereas irradiation at higher doses, viz., 10 kGy and 25 kGy caused a considerable reduction in the alcohol yield. Therefore, low dose irradiation of fermentation mixtures can be applied for increasing the alcohol production by about 25%. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  18. Thermotolerant yeasts and application for ethanol production

    OpenAIRE

    To-on, N.; Charernjiratrakul, W.; Dissara, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A total of 70 thermotolerant yeast strains were isolated at 40oC from 145 samples including fruit, leaves, flowers, soils and oil-palm fruits. Six isolates showed maximum growth at 40oC within 18 h. Three isolates (MIY1, MIY48 and MIY57) were selected based on their ability to ferment glucose and sucrose rapidly (24 h) and showed the maximum temperature for growth at 42oC but it was good at 40oC. MIY57 produced 4.6% (v/v) ethanol at 40oC from a medium containing 15% glucose. The optimum culti...

  19. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  20. Assessment of Yeast Aging by Flow Cytometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baszczyňski, Martin; Kuřec, M.; Novák, Pavel; Brányik, Tomáš; Růžička, Marek; Drahoš, Jiří

    Bratislava : Slovak University of Technology, 2009 - (Markoš, J.), s. 317 ISBN 978-80-227-3072-3. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /36./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 25.05.2009-29.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA ČR(CZ) GD104/08/H055; GA ČR GA104/06/1418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : yeast * aging * bud scars Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  1. UBA domain containing proteins in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Semple, Colin A M; Ponting, Chris P;

    2003-01-01

    and transcription. Considering this variety of cell biological processes, it is puzzling that until recently only very few proteins were known to possess the ability to interact specifically with ubiquitin chains. However, several ubiquitin binding proteins have now been identified and the binding domains have been...... characterised on both the functional and structural levels. One example of a widespread ubiquitin binding module is the ubiquitin associated (UBA) domain. Here, we discuss the approximately 15 UBA domain containing proteins encoded in the relatively small genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe...

  2. Flor yeast: new perspectives beyond wine aging

    OpenAIRE

    Legras, Jean Luc; Jaime MORENO-GARCIA; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum o...

  3. Functional differences in yeast protein disulfide isomerases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Westphal, V; Tachibana, C;

    2001-01-01

    PDI1 is the essential gene encoding protein disulfide isomerase in yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, however, contains four other nonessential genes with homology to PDI1: MPD1, MPD2, EUG1, and EPS1. We have investigated the effects of simultaneous deletions of these genes. In several...... essentiality of protein disulfide isomerase-catalyzed oxidation. Most mutant combinations show defects in carboxypeptidase Y folding as well as in glycan modification. There are, however, no significant effects on ER-associated protein degradation in the various protein disulfide isomerase-deleted strains....

  4. The economics of ribosome biosynthesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J R

    1999-11-01

    In a rapidly growing yeast cell, 60% of total transcription is devoted to ribosomal RNA, and 50% of RNA polymerase II transcription and 90% of mRNA splicing are devoted to ribosomal proteins (RPs). Coordinate regulation of the approximately 150 rRNA genes and 137 RP genes that make such prodigious use of resources is essential for the economy of the cell. This is entrusted to a number of signal transduction pathways that can abruptly induce or silence the ribosomal genes, leading to major implications for the expression of other genes as well. PMID:10542411

  5. Flor yeast: new perspectives beyond wine ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-luc eLegras; Jaime eMoreno García; Severino eZara; Giacomo eZara; Teresa eGarcia Martinez; Ilaria Maria Mannazzu; Juan Carlos Mauricio; Anna Lisa Coi; Marc eBou Zeidan; Sylvie eDequin; Juan eMoreno; Marilena eBudroni

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the ageing of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air-liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as the velum...

  6. Flor yeast: new perspectives beyond wine aging

    OpenAIRE

    Legras, Jean Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Pas de clé UT The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen andfermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also kno...

  7. 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones Data detail Data name 5'-end sequence...s of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones Description of data contents cDNA sequence...e Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ...

  8. New yeast-based approaches in production of palmitoleic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolouchová, I.; Sigler, Karel; Schreiberová, O.; Masák, J.; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 192, SEP 2015 (2015), s. 726-734. ISSN 0960-8524 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/0215; GA ČR GA14-00227S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Oleaginous yeasts * Non-oleaginous yeasts * Palmitoleic acid Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.494, year: 2014

  9. Fission yeast mating-type switching: programmed damage and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast follows similar rules as in budding yeast, but the underlying mechanisms are entirely different. Whilst the initiating double-strand cut in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires recombinational repair for survival, the initial damage in Schizosaccharomyces pombe...

  10. The Metabolic Synchronization of Immobilized Yeast Cells: Effect of Matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolyó, Juraj; Mair, T.; Kuncová, Gabriela

    -: -, 2009, s. 1-1. ISBN N. [Conference on Functional Dynamics. Cascais (PT), 02.03.2009-05.03.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : yeast * immobilized yeast cells Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast

  12. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  13. [Determination of the total quantity of carbohydrates in dried yeast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimenko, O A; Ziukova, L A; Fedorovich, R M

    1975-01-01

    Different colourimetric methods for measuring carbohydrates in yeast have been compared. A method using 5% phenol aqueous solution in the presence of concentrated sulphuric acid has been developed to quantitate carbohydrates. The method has been described as applied to an analysis of dry yeast. PMID:1129224

  14. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  15. The yeast flora of the coast redwood, Sequoia sempervirens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelhoven, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Only four yeast species could be isolated from young and perannual shoots of the coast redwood tree, Sequoia sempervirens, and from soil beneath the trees, viz. both varieties of Debaryomyces hansenii, Trichosporon pullulans, T. porosum and an unidentified red basidiomycetous yeast.

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomics applied to the yeast pheromone signaling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruhler, Albrecht; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Mohammed, Shabaz;

    2005-01-01

    /MS/MS) for identification. This integrated phosphoproteomic technology identified and quantified phosphorylation in key regulator and effector proteins of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway, the yeast pheromone response. SILAC encoding of yeast proteomes was achieved by incorporation...

  17. Bipolar budding in yeasts - an electron microscope study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreger-van Rij, N.J.W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1971-01-01

    Bud formation in yeasts with bipolar budding was studied by electron microscopy of thin sections. Budding in yeasts of the species Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Hanseniaspora valbyensis and Wickerhamia fluorescens resulted in concentric rings of scar ridges on the wall of the mother cell. The wall betwe

  18. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573.750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive...

  19. Description of new yeast species – is one strain enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The issue of description of new yeast species on the basis of a single strain is discussed. Single gene sequences, such as those from D1/D2 LSU rRNA, or sequences from ITS1/ITS2 are commonly used as the basis for recognizing new yeast species. Evidence is presented that hybrids and species with poly...

  20. Novel model for wine fermentation including the yeast dying phase

    OpenAIRE

    Borzì, Alfio; Merger, Juri; Müller, Jonas; Rosch, Achim; Schenk, Christina; Schmidt, Dominik; Schmidt, Stephan; Schulz, Volker; Velten, Kai; von Wallbrunn, Christian; Zänglein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel model for wine fermentation including a death phase for yeast and the influence of oxygen on the process. A model for the inclusion of the yeast dying phase is derived and compared to a model taken from the literature. The modeling ability of the several models is analyzed by comparing their simulation results.

  1. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  2. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  3. Thermotolerant yeasts and application for ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To-on, N.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 70 thermotolerant yeast strains were isolated at 40oC from 145 samples including fruit, leaves, flowers, soils and oil-palm fruits. Six isolates showed maximum growth at 40oC within 18 h. Three isolates (MIY1, MIY48 and MIY57 were selected based on their ability to ferment glucose and sucrose rapidly (24 h and showed the maximum temperature for growth at 42oC but it was good at 40oC. MIY57 produced 4.6% (v/v ethanol at 40oC from a medium containing 15% glucose. The optimum cultivation conditions for growth and ethanol production of MIY57 was 5% inoculum into the fermentation medium containing 15% glucose and 1% yeast extract with initial pH of 4.5 on a shaking incubator at 150 rpm at 40oC. MIY57, under these conditions, produced maximum ethanol of 5.0% (v/v after 48 h incubation while S. cerevisiae TISTR 5048 produced only 3.7% (v/v. Maximum cell dry weight was 7.2 g/L (at 18 h, again much higher than that of S. cerevisiae TISTR 5048 (4.1 g/L. Based on morphological, physiological and molecular studies, this strain (MIY57 was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  4. Parameters affecting methanol utilization by yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, M.S.; El-Masry, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Screening of 28 yeast cultures, representing 22 species of various yeasts, with respect to their capabilities to assimilate methanol, has shown that this property was mostly found in certain species of the two genera Hansenula and Candida. When methanol was used as a sole carbon source for a methanol-adapted strain of Hansenula polymorpha, a linear yield response could be obtained with increasing alcohol up to 2% concentration. The amount of inoculum proved to be the decisive factor in determining a priori the ability of the organism to grow at 6% methanol as final concentration. The optimum pH values for growth ranged between 4.5-5.5 with no growth at pH 6.5 or higher. A marked growth stimulation was obtained when the medium was supplied with phosphate up to 0.08 M as final concentration. Within the nitrogen sources tested, corn steep liquor concentrate gave the highest yield of cells. The significance of the obtained results are discussed with reference to feasibilities of application.

  5. Microscopy of Fission Yeast Sexual Lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vjestica, Aleksandar; Merlini, Laura; Dudin, Omaya; Bendezu, Felipe O; Martin, Sophie G

    2016-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been an invaluable model system in studying the regulation of the mitotic cell cycle progression, the mechanics of cell division and cell polarity. Furthermore, classical experiments on its sexual reproduction have yielded results pivotal to current understanding of DNA recombination and meiosis. More recent analysis of fission yeast mating has raised interesting questions on extrinsic stimuli response mechanisms, polarized cell growth and cell-cell fusion. To study these topics in detail we have developed a simple protocol for microscopy of the entire sexual lifecycle. The method described here is easily adjusted to study specific mating stages. Briefly, after being grown to exponential phase in a nitrogen-rich medium, cell cultures are shifted to a nitrogen-deprived medium for periods of time suited to the stage of the sexual lifecycle that will be explored. Cells are then mounted on custom, easily built agarose pad chambers for imaging. This approach allows cells to be monitored from the onset of mating to the final formation of spores. PMID:27022830

  6. An overview of macroautophagy in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved dynamic pathway that functions primarily in a degradative manner. A basal level of macroautophagy occurs constitutively, but this process can be further induced in response to various types of stress including starvation, hypoxia and hormonal stimuli. The general principle behind macroautophagy is that cytoplasmic contents can be sequestered within a transient double-membrane organelle, an autophagosome, which subsequently fuses with a lysosome or vacuole (in mammals, or yeast and plants, respectively), allowing for degradation of the cargo followed by recycling of the resulting macromolecules. Through this basic mechanism, macroautophagy has a critical role in cellular homeostasis; however, either insufficient or excessive macroautophagy can seriously compromise cell physiology, and thus, it needs to be properly regulated. In fact, a wide range of diseases are associated with dysregulation of macroautophagy. There has been substantial progress in understanding the regulation and molecular mechanisms of macroautophagy in different organisms; however, many questions concerning some of the most fundamental aspects of macroautophagy remain unresolved. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about macroautophagy mainly in yeast, including the mechanism of autophagosome biogenesis, the function of the core macroautophagic machinery, the regulation of macroautophagy and the process of cargo recognition in selective macroautophagy, with the goal of providing insights into some of the key unanswered questions in this field. PMID:26908221

  7. Production of glycolipid biosurfactants by basidiomycetous yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-05-01

    BSs (biosurfactants) produced by various micro-organisms show unique properties (e.g. mild production conditions, lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility) compared with chemically synthesized surfactants. The numerous advantages of BSs have prompted applications not only in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries but also in environmental protection and energy-saving technology. Among BSs, glycolipid types are the most promising, owing to their high productivity from renewable resources and versatile biochemical properties. MELs (mannosylerythritol lipids), which are glycolipid BSs abundantly produced by basidiomycetous yeasts such as strains of Pseudozyma, exhibit not only excellent interfacial properties, but also remarkable differentiation-inducing activities against human leukaemia cells. MELs also show high binding affinity towards different immunoglobulins and lectins. Recently, a cationic liposome bearing MEL has been demonstrated to increase dramatically the efficiency of gene transfection into mammalian cells. These features of BSs should broaden their application in new advanced technologies. In the present review the current status of research and development on glycolipid BSs, especially their production by Pseudozyma yeasts, is described. PMID:19341364

  8. Optimization of Fermentation Condition of Yeast Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiuju; XU Li; CUI Yizhe

    2008-01-01

    Culture condition of every phase for fermentation of yeast culture was studied, and its solid and liquid conditions of elaboration were optimized to improve the total counts of living cells.Results showed that microzyme grew best at 30℃ when solid fermented,and the count of the living cells reached the tiptop with pH 5.5.The count of Candida tropicalis could reach 137.96×109 cfu·g-1,the count of Saccharomyces cerevisia could reach 134.62×109 cfu·g-1;the best liquid fermentation condition for cell-wall broken was 50℃ for 28 h,the rate of cell-wall broken could reach 80% at least;the rate of vitamin loss in yeast could be the minimun, the loss rate of vitamin B1 in Candida tropicalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was 8.71% and 19.54% respectively, the loss rate of vitamin B2 was 19.39% and 13.18%,respectively,and the loss rate of vitamin B6 was 6.3% and 3.04%,respectively.

  9. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glieder Anton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta, Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

  10. Yeast diversity and native vigor for flavor phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrau, Francisco; Gaggero, Carina; Aguilar, Pablo S

    2015-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the yeast used widely for beer, bread, cider, and wine production, is the most resourceful eukaryotic model used for genetic engineering. A typical concern about using engineered yeasts for food production might be negative consumer perception of genetically modified organisms. However, we believe the true pitfall of using genetically modified yeasts is their limited capacity to either refine or improve the sensory properties of fermented foods under real production conditions. Alternatively, yeast diversity screening to improve the aroma and flavors could offer groundbreaking opportunities in food biotechnology. We propose a 'Yeast Flavor Diversity Screening' strategy which integrates knowledge from sensory analysis and natural whole-genome evolution with information about flavor metabolic networks and their regulation. PMID:25630239

  11. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  12. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Tibet Kefir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and distribution of yeasts in Tibet kefir were investigated in this study. Five samples of Tibetan kefir from Tibet and surrounding areas were collected for yeast isolation. Based on physiological, biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results, eight species of yeast were isolated and identified from Tibet kefir, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia fermentans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida zeylanoide, Candida parapsilosis, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Kazachstania unispora. Among the test samples, K. marxianus, Ka. unispora and P. fermentans were the highest three species in frequency of occurrence of yeast isolates. C. zeylanoides, C. parapsilosis and R. mucilaginosa were first found the occurrence in Tibet kefir. The results provided new information of yeast composition and biodiversity of Tibet kefir.

  13. Physiological characteristics of the Atlantic Forest native bromeliads: Nidularium campo-alegrense Leme and Aechmea ornata Baker - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v36i1.20215

    OpenAIRE

    Jenny Paola Corredor Prado; Diana Marcela Morales Londonõ; Vivian Almeida; Gustavo Brunetto; Rosete Pescador

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ecological importance of bromeliads, the basic knowledge about the physiological aspects in some species is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to physiologically characterize the species Nidularium campo-alegrense Leme and Aechmea ornata Baker to contribute to a better understanding of their metabolic processes. From mature leaves of bromeliads N. campo-alegrense and A. ornata held at the Agricultural Sciences Center of the Federal University of Santa Catarina, it was qu...

  14. Consumo de insumos agroindustriales por el subsector panificador de Palmira, Valle del Cauca. Indicadores de subsistemas Administrativo, Talento Humano y Operativo Consumption of agro-industrial supplies by the baker subsector of Palmira, Valle, Colombia . Indicators of administrative, operative and human talent subsystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Adarme J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Los indicadores de consumo agroindustrial en las Pymes del subsector panificador resultan apremiantes para el diseño de estrategias de sostenibilidad para los pequeños artesanos del pan. Se evaluaron los subsistemas administrativos, talento humano y operativo en 30 de las 178 organizaciones que conformaron el subsistema panificador de Palmira en el 2005. El consumo estimado anual para el 2004 de harina de trigo fue 2.016 t; 348 t de azúcar; 240 t de queso; 54 t de sal; 492 t de margarina; 99 t de levadura; 151.200 paneles de huevos. En materias primas auxiliares consume 384.000 m3 de gas natural; 1.2 millones de kw de energía eléctrica y 156.000 m3 de agua. El sector genera 681 empleos directos. Se presenta mapa con la ubicación del 86% de las panaderías registradas en la Cámara de Comercio. No existe una sola panadería que en forma integral haya implementado un programa de Buenas Prácticas de Manufactura-BPM, que cumpla con las normas del (INVIMA, que disponga de un sistema de Análisis de Peligros y Puntos Críticos de Control (HACCP, que esté certificada con normas sobre aseguramiento de calidad (ISO 9000, y/o Gestión Ambiental (ISO 14000, con programas de salud ocupacional (OHSAS 18000 y programas de mejora permanente en aspectos administrativos y comerciales.The indicators of agroindustrial consumption in the bakers subsector Pymes play a primary role for designing sustainable strategies for the small craftsman of bread. The administrative, operative and human talent subsystems were evaluated, in 30 of 178 organizations that conformed the bakers subsystems of Palmira on 2005. The estimated annual consumption of wheat flour on 2004 was 2016 t; 348 t of sugar; 240 t of cheese; 54 t of salt; 492 t of margarine; 99 t of yeast; 151200 panels of eggs. With regarding to raw materials it consumes 384000 m3 of natural gas; 1.2 million kw of electric power and 156000 m3 of water. The sector generates 681 direct employments. Map is

  15. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bellon

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade, has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  16. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    OpenAIRE

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentatio...

  17. Biological Effects of Yeast β-Glucans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Petravić-Tominac

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0pt 5.4pt 0pt 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0pt; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} β-Glucans are glucose polymers that naturally occur in yeasts, molds, algae, mushrooms, bacteria, oats and barley. Immunostimulation is one of the most important properties of β-glucans. They are classified as biological response modifiers and because of their biological activities they can be used in human and veterinary medicine and pharmacy. Additionally, β-glucans show interesting physicochemical properties and therefore could be applied in food and feed production as well as in cosmetic and chemical industries. Immunomodulation by β-glucan, both in vitro and in vivo, inhibits cancer cell growth and metastasis and prevents or reduces bacterial infection. In humans, dietary β-glucan lowers blood cholesterol, improves glucose utilization by body cells and also helps wound healing. β-Glucans work, in part, by stimulating the innate immune mechanism to fight a range of foreign challenges and could be used as an adjuvant, in combination with anti infective or antineoplastic agents, radiotherapy, and a range of topical agents and nutrients. The structure of β-glucans depends on the source they are isolated from. Native β-glucan molecules can be linked and branched in several ways. Biological properties of different β-glucan molecules are dependent on their molecular structure. Some authors claim that the β-(1→3, (1→6-glucan derived from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce the highest biological effects. Thus, in this review the β-glucans and their metabolic

  18. Índice de Sentimento do Investidor de Baker e Wurgler (2006 e o spread book-to-market dos IPOs no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseu Martins

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available

    O objetivo deste estudo é testar se o sentimento, pessimista ou otimista, agregado dos investidores pode se relacionar com a diferença entre valor contábil e o valor de mercado das empresas que abriram capital na Bolsa de São Paulo entre 2004 e 2009. Para realizar essa análise, foi utilizado o Índice de Sentimento do Investidor proposto por Baker e Wurgler (2006, adaptado, que utiliza variáveis objetivas para medir o sentimento agregado dos investidores e o spread book-to-market das empresas que realizaram seus IPOs no período observado. Este estudo buscou utilizar proxys exclusivamente quantitativas para a obtenção do índice e a análise feita sobre as duas séries buscou encontrar correlação significativa e não espúria entre elas. Os resultados apontaram que o índice não é capaz de explicar as variações no spread entre o valor contábil e de mercado das empresas que lançaram ações no período observado.

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Urginea maritima (L. Baker, Zhumeria majdae Rech. F. and Wendelbo and Physalis divaricata D. Don Ethanolic Extracts on Mushroom Tyrosinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroogh Namjoyan, Alireza Jahangiri, Mohammad Ebrahim Azemi, Hamideh Mousavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin synthesis from tyrosine. To prevent or treat pigmentation disorders, tyrosinase inhibitors have been used increasingly for medicinal and cosmetic products. The aim of this study is to evaluate inhibitory effects of Urginea maritima (L. Baker, Zhumeria majdae Rech.f. & Wendelbo and Physalis divaricata D.Don on mushroom tyrosinase. Methods: The inhibitory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts of plants against oxidation of L-DOPA (as a substrate by mushroom tyrosinase were investigated. The amount of formed DOPAchrome was determined at 475 nm as optical density. Results: The extracts showed anti-tyrosinase activity weaker than positive control (Kojic acid. The inhibitory activity of tested plants: U.maritima, Z.majdae and P.divaricata against mushroom tyrosinase were 38.61, 29.70 and 25.74 % at 1.67 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: The most tyrosinase inhibitory activity was seen for U.maritima. However more investigations on human tyrosinase, toxicological and clinical studies are needed to confirm its activity.

  20. Unsupported inferences of high-severity fire in historical dry forests of the western United States: response to Williams and Baker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulé, Peter Z.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Brown, Peter M.; Falk, Donald A.; Peterson, David L.; Allen, Craig D.; Aplet, Gregory H.; Battaglia, Mike A.; Binkley, Dan; Farris, Calvin; Keane, Robert E.; Margolis, Ellis Q.; Grissino-Mayer, Henri; Miller, Carol; Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Skinner, Carl; Stephens, Scott L.; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructions of dry western US forests in the late 19th century in Arizona, Colorado and Oregon based on General Land Office records were used by Williams & Baker (2012; Global Ecology and Biogeography, 21, 1042–1052; hereafter W&B) to infer past fire regimes with substantial moderate and high-severity burning. The authors concluded that present-day large, high-severity fires are not distinguishable from historical patterns. We present evidence of important errors in their study. First, the use of tree size distributions to reconstruct past fire severity and extent is not supported by empirical age–size relationships nor by studies that directly quantified disturbance history in these forests. Second, the fire severity classification of W&B is qualitatively different from most modern classification schemes, and is based on different types of data, leading to an inappropriate comparison. Third, we note that while W&B asserted ‘surprising’ heterogeneity in their reconstructions of stand density and species composition, their data are not substantially different from many previous studies which reached very different conclusions about subsequent forest and fire behaviour changes. Contrary to the conclusions of W&B, the preponderance of scientific evidence indicates that conservation of dry forest ecosystems in the western United States and their ecological, social and economic value is not consistent with a present-day disturbance regime of large, high-severity fires, especially under changing climate