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Sample records for bacteroides infections

  1. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Bacteroides zoogleoformans strains isolated from soft tissue infections in cats with strains from periodontal disease in humans.

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    Love, D N; Johnson, J L; Jones, R F; Bailey, M

    1985-01-01

    A total of 11 strains of Bacteroides zoogleoformans were isolated from 11 of 106 different cat subcutaneous "fight wound" abscesses and were among a total of 143 Bacteroides species isolated from these samples. They constituted 3.4% (11 of 325) of all anaerobic isolates. The cat strains and strains of B. zoogleoformans isolated from humans with periodontal disease were similar phenotypically as determined by biochemical reactions, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of soluble protein...

  3. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  4. The Dysregulation of Polyamine Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with Overexpression of c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis Infection

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    Anastasiya V. Snezhkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is well known that the chronic inflammation can promote the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC. Recently, a number of studies revealed a potential association between colorectal inflammation, cancer progression, and infection caused by enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF. Bacterial enterotoxin activates spermine oxidase (SMO, which produces spermidine and H2O2 as byproducts of polyamine catabolism, which, in turn, enhances inflammation and tissue injury. Using qPCR analysis, we estimated the expression of SMOX gene and ETBF colonization in CRC patients. We found no statistically significant associations between them. Then we selected genes involved in polyamine metabolism, metabolic reprogramming, and inflammation regulation and estimated their expression in CRC. We observed overexpression of SMOX, ODC1, SRM, SMS, MTAP, c-Myc, C/EBPβ (CREBP, and other genes. We found that two mediators of metabolic reprogramming, inflammation, and cell proliferation c-Myc and C/EBPβ may serve as regulators of polyamine metabolism genes (SMOX, AZIN1, MTAP, SRM, ODC1, AMD1, and AGMAT as they are overexpressed in tumors, have binding site according to ENCODE ChIP-Seq data, and demonstrate strong coexpression with their targets. Thus, increased polyamine metabolism in CRC could be driven by c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than ETBF infection.

  5. [Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodinamic (PK/PD) evaluation of a short course of oral administration of metronidazole for the management of infections caused by Bacteroides fragilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-León, Felipe; von Plessing-Rossel, Carlos; Villa-Zapata, Lorenzo; Fernández-Rocca, Pola; Sanhueza-Sanhueza, Cindy; Bello-Toledo, Helia; Mella-Montecinos, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole is the antibiotic of choice for the management of infections caused by anaerobes. Its administration requires multiple daily doses causing increased medication errors. Due to its high post-antibiotic effect and rapid concentration-dependent bactericidal activity, administration of this antibiotic in an extended dosing interval would achieve PK/PD parameters effectively. To assess the probability of achieving effective PK/PD relationship with the administration of 1,000 mg every 24 hours of metronidazole for Bacteroides fragilis infections. A clinical trial was conducted in a group of volunteers who received a single oral dose of 500 or 1,000 mg of metronidazole. Determinations of values of Cmax, t max, and AUCC0-24 h. determined using the trapezoidal method, were obtained for a Markov simulation that would allow for determining the likelihood of achieving a AUC0-24 h/MIC ratio above 70 for infections caused by susceptible B. fragilis. Cmax (24,03 ± 6,89 mg/L) and t max (1,20 ± 0.80 hrs) and the value of AUC0-24 h (241.91 ± 48.14 mg * h/L) were determined. The probability of obtaining a AUC0-24 h/MIC ratio greater than 70 was greater than 99%. From a pharmacokinetic perspective, with the administration of a daily dose of 1,000 mg of metronidazole, it is possible to achieve a therapeutic goal of AUC0-24 h/MIC ratio above 70 for the treatment of anaerobic infections.

  6. Efficient Electrotransformation of Bacteroides fragilis▿

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    Ichimura, Minoru; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Wakimoto, Shin; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2010-01-01

    This study describes refined electroporation parameters for efficient transformation of Bacteroides fragilis by plasmids prepared from laboratory strains of Escherichia coli. Development of the method used included determination of the optimal growth conditions for competent cell preparation, selectable antimicrobial resistance markers, electric field strength, and postpulse incubation time. Of the four E. coli-Bacteroides shuttle plasmids tested (pVAL-1, pVAL-2, pNLY1, and pLYL05), pLYL05 co...

  7. Differentiation of nodules of Glycine max : Ultrastructural studies of plant cells and bacteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, D; Mörschel, E

    1978-01-01

    Plants of Glycine max var. Caloria, infected as 14 d old seedlings with a defined titre of Rhizobium japonicum 3Il b85 in a 10 min inoculation test, develop a sharp maximum of nitrogenase activity between 17 and 25 d after infection. This maximum (14±3 nmol C2H4 h(-1) mg nodule fresh weight(-1)), expressed as per mg nodule or per plant is followed by a 15 d period of reduced nitrogen fixation (20-30% of peak activity). 11 d after infection the first bacteroids develop as single cells inside infection vacuoles in the plant cells, close to the cell wall and infection threads. As a cytological marker for peak multiplication of bacteroids and for peak N2-fixation a few days later the association of a special type of nodule mitochondria with amyloplasts is described. 20 d after inoculation, more than 80% of the volume of infected plant cells is occupied by infection vacuoles, mostly containing only one bacteroid. The storage of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate starts to accumulate at both ends of the bacteroids. Non infected plant cells are squeezed between infected cells (25d), with infection vacuoles containing now more than two (up to five) bacteroids per section. Bacteroid development including a membrane envelope is also observed in the intercellular space between plant cells. 35 d after infection, more than 50% of the bacteroid volume is occupied by poly-β-hydroxybutyrate. The ultrastructural differentiation is discussed in relation to some enzymatic data in bacteroids and plant cell cytoplasm during nodule development.

  8. Chemotaxonomy of Bacteroides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, I

    1994-12-01

    The loose definition of Bacteroides, some species of which are important etiologic agents of oral diseases, has enabled isolates with only marginal similarities to be reposited in this genus. Many attempts have been made over the years to improve the taxonomy of this heterogeneous group of bacteria. The present article reviews major chemotaxonomic characters and techniques that have been used for this purpose: pigmentation, metabolites, whole-cell fatty acids, phospholipids, isoprenoid quinones, carbohydrates of lipopolysaccharide, whole-cell proteins, peptidoglycans, enzymes, pyrolysis mass spectrometry, DNA composition, restriction fragment length polymorphisms of DNA and ribosomal (r) RNA, homology of DNA and RNA, DNA-rRNA hybridization, and 16S and 5S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging and sequencing. Despite improvements in their taxonomy, some bacteroides are still misclassified. Suggestions for further improvements in the taxonomy of bacteroides are made.

  9. A case of Bacteroides pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Eun; Park, So-Young; Song, Dong Joon; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-12-01

    Bacteroides pyogenes, a non-spore-forming, anaerobic, gram-negative rod, is a component of the oral flora of animals and has, on occasion, been reported to cause human infection through dog or cat bites. We report the first case of B. pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess with no history of an animal bite. The microorganism was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Species differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens - Back to basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micha Pedersen, Rune; Marmolin, Ea Sofie; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2013-01-01

    We present the results from 16S sequencing and phenotypic tests for differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens, which was not possible with MALDI-TOF MS. Testing with β-glucosidase could differentiate B. dorei from B. vulga....... vulgatus and a negative catalase reaction could identify B. xylanisolvens....

  11. Isolation of bacteriophage host strains of Bacteroides species suitable for tracking sources of animal faecal pollution in water.

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    Gómez-Doñate, Marta; Payán, Andrey; Cortés, Ivania; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-06-01

    Microbial source tracking (MST) methods allow the identification of specific faecal sources. The aim is to detect the sources of faecal pollution in a water body to allow targeted, efficient and cost-effective remediation efforts in the catchment. Bacteriophages infecting selected host strains of Bacteroides species are used as markers to track faecal contaminants in water. By using a suitable Bacteroides host from a given faecal origin, it is possible to specifically detect bacteriophages of this faecal origin. It can thus be used to detect specific phages of Bacteroides for MST. With this objective, we isolated several Bacteroides strains from pig, cow and poultry faeces by applying a previously optimized methodology used to isolate the host strains from humans. The isolated strains belonged to Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. These strains, like most Bacteroides species, detected phages of the Siphoviridae morphology. Using the newly isolated host strains for phage enumeration in a range of samples, we showed that these detect phages in faecal sources that coincide with their own origin (70-100% of the samples), and show no detection or very low percentages of detection of phages from other animal origins (from 0 to 20% of the samples). Only strains isolated from pig wastewater detected phages in 50% of human sewage samples. Nevertheless, those strains detecting phages from faecal origins other than their own detected fewer phages (2-3 log₁₀ pfu·100 ml⁻¹) than the phages detected by the specific strain of the same origin. On the basis of our results, we propose that faecal source tracking with phages infecting specific Bacteroides host strains is a useful method for MST. In addition, the method presented here is feasible in laboratories equipped with only basic microbiological equipment, it is more rapid and cost-effective than other procedures and it does not require highly qualified staff. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology

  12. Evaluation of Bacteroides fragilis GB-124 bacteriophages as novel human-associated faecal indicators in the United States

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    Phages infecting human-associated Bacteroides fragilis (GB-124 phages) have been employed in the European Union (EU) to identify human fecal pollution, but their utility for U.S. was unclear. Primary sewage effluent samples were collected seasonally from seven wastewater treatme...

  13. Escherichia coli hemoglobin protease autotransporter contributes to synergistic abscess formation and heme-dependent growth of Bacteroides fragilis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, B.R.; van Dooren, S.J.M.; Dozois, C.M.; Luirink, S.; Oudega, B.

    2002-01-01

    Intra-abdominal infections (IAI) continue to be a serious clinical problem. Bacterial synergism is an important factor that influences the shift from contamination to IAI, leading to the development of lesions and abscess formation. Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis are particularly abundant

  14. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Bounelis, P.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains

  15. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Bounelis, P.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains.

  16. CRISPR-Cas Systems in Bacteroides fragilis, an Important Pathobiont in the Human Gut Microbiome

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    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Wexler, Hannah M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in bacteria from a wide variety of ecological niches, there are no studies to describe CRISPR-Cas elements in Bacteroides species, the most prevalent anaerobic bacteria in the lower intestinal tract. Microbes of the genus Bacteroides make up ~25% of the total gut microbiome. Bacteroides fragilis comprises only 2% of the total Bacteroides in the gut, yet causes of >70% of Bacteroides infections. The factors causing it to transition from benign resident of the gut microbiome to virulent pathogen are not well understood, but a combination of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of virulence genes and differential transcription of endogenous genes are clearly involved. The CRISPR-Cas system is a multi-functional system described in prokaryotes that may be involved in control both of HGT and of gene regulation. Results: Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) elements in all strains of B. fragilis (n = 109) with publically available genomes were identified. Three different CRISPR-Cas types, corresponding most closely to Type IB, Type IIIB, and Type IIC, were identified. Thirty-five strains had two CRISPR-Cas types, and three strains included all three CRISPR-Cas types in their respective genomes. The cas1 gene in the Type IIIB system encoded a reverse-transcriptase/Cas1 fusion protein rarely found in prokaryotes. We identified a short CRISPR (3 DR) with no associated cas genes present in most of the isolates; these CRISPRs were found immediately upstream of a hipA/hipB operon and we speculate that this element may be involved in regulation of this operon related to formation of persister cells during antimicrobial exposure. Also, blood isolates of B. fragilis did not have Type IIC CRISPR-Cas systems and had atypical Type IIIB CRISPR-Cas systems that were lacking adjacent cas genes. Conclusions: This is the first systematic report of CRISPR-Cas systems in a wide range of B. fragilis strains

  17. CRISPR-Cas Systems in Bacteroides fragilis, an Important Pathobiont in the Human Gut Microbiome

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    Mehrdad Tajkarimi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: While CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in bacteria from a wide variety of ecological niches, there are no studies to describe CRISPR-Cas elements in Bacteroides species, the most prevalent anaerobic bacteria in the lower intestinal tract. Microbes of the genus Bacteroides make up ~25% of the total gut microbiome. Bacteroides fragilis comprises only 2% of the total Bacteroides in the gut, yet causes of >70% of Bacteroides infections. The factors causing it to transition from benign resident of the gut microbiome to virulent pathogen are not well understood, but a combination of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of virulence genes and differential transcription of endogenous genes are clearly involved. The CRISPR-Cas system is a multi-functional system described in prokaryotes that may be involved in control both of HGT and of gene regulation.Results: Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR elements in all strains of B. fragilis (n = 109 with publically available genomes were identified. Three different CRISPR-Cas types, corresponding most closely to Type IB, Type IIIB, and Type IIC, were identified. Thirty-five strains had two CRISPR-Cas types, and three strains included all three CRISPR-Cas types in their respective genomes. The cas1 gene in the Type IIIB system encoded a reverse-transcriptase/Cas1 fusion protein rarely found in prokaryotes. We identified a short CRISPR (3 DR with no associated cas genes present in most of the isolates; these CRISPRs were found immediately upstream of a hipA/hipB operon and we speculate that this element may be involved in regulation of this operon related to formation of persister cells during antimicrobial exposure. Also, blood isolates of B. fragilis did not have Type IIC CRISPR-Cas systems and had atypical Type IIIB CRISPR-Cas systems that were lacking adjacent cas genes.Conclusions: This is the first systematic report of CRISPR-Cas systems in a wide range of B

  18. Spinal epidural abscess caused by Bacteroides fragilis group after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ohyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural abscess (SEA is a rare infection complicated in patients who have some risk factors such as injection-drug use, diabetes mellitus, and several illnesses. However, no case of SEA associated with abortion has been reported. Here we report a case of SEA in a 30-year-old woman after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion. The diagnosis of SEA was done by MRI and pus was drained after the cervical discectomy. Bacteroides fragilis group was cultured from the aspirated pus sample. The patient responded to surgical drainage and antibiotics.

  19. Characteristics of bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the leguminous tree Leucaena glauca.

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    Ishihara, Hironobu; Koriyama, Hiroki; Osawa, Atsushi; Zehirov, Grigor; Yamaura, Masatoshi; Kucho, Ken-ichi; Abe, Mikiko; Higashi, Shiro; Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobia establish symbiosis with legumes. Bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Inverted Repeat Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes undergo terminal differentiation caused by Nodule-specific Cysteine-Rich peptides (NCRs). Microscopic observations of bacteroids and the detection of NCRs in indeterminate nodules of the non-IRLC legume Leucaena glauca were performed. A portion of the bacteroids showed moderate cell elongation, loss of membrane integrity, and multiple nucleoids. The symbiosome contained multiple bacteroids and NCR-like peptides were not detectable. These results indicate that bacteroid differentiation in L. glauca is different from that in IRLC legumes although both hosts form indeterminate nodules.

  20. Prevalence and characterization of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis and toxigenic Clostridium difficile in a Taipei emergency department.

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    Ji, Dar-Der; Huang, I-Hsiu; Lai, Chao-Chih; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Lin, Wei-Chen

    2017-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and toxin-encoding Clostridium difficile (TXCD) are associated with gastroenteritis. Routine anaerobic blood culture for recovery of these anaerobic pathogens is not used for the detection of their toxins, especially for toxin-variant TXCD. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of the genotypes of these anaerobes in patients with acute diarrheal illnesses. The data and samples of 513 patients with gastroenteritis were collected in a Taipei emergency department from March 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. Nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis (NTBF) and ETBF and the toxin genotypes of TXCD were detected by molecular methods. The prevalence rates of NTBF, ETBF, and TXCD infections were 33.14%, 1.56%, and 2.34%, respectively. ETBF infections often occurred in the elderly (average age = 67.13 years) and during the cold, dry winters. TXCD infections were widely distributed in age and often occurred in the warm, wet springs and summers. The symptoms of ETBF-infected patients were significantly more severe than those of NTBF-infected patients. This study identified and analyzed the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical presentations of these anaerobic infections. Future epidemiologic and clinical studies are needed to understand the role of ETBF and TXCD in human gastroenteritis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Studies on Mucopolysaccharidases from Oral Bacteroides sp., especially on Heparinase

    OpenAIRE

    谷口, 裕朗; 藤村, 節夫; 中村, 武

    1982-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharide lyases in the cell extract from a oral strain of Bacteroides sp. produced △4, 5-unsaturated disaccharides from the several substrates including, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate A (ChS-A), chondroitin sulfate C (ChS-C), hyaluronic acid and chondroitin by the elimination reaction. However this enzyme preparation did not degrade chondroitin sulfate B (ChS-B). As for production of heparinase, the presence of heparin in the culture medium was essential. These enzymes were s...

  2. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis group strains to cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin/clavulanate

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    PEIXOTO JÚNIOR Arnaldo Aires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 40 strains of the B. fragilis group was isolated from clinical specimens in two hospital centers in Fortaleza from 1993 to 1997. The most frequently isolated species was Bacteroides fragilis (19 strains and most isolates came from intra-abdominal and wound infections. The susceptibility profile was traced for cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin-clavulanate by using the agar dilution reference method. All isolates were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate (128/2mug/ml. Resistance rates of 15 and 70% were detected to cefoxitin (64mug/ml and cefoperazone (64mug/ml, respectively. Such regional results permit a better orientation in choosing this group of antibiotics for prophylaxis and therapy especially in relation to cefoxitin, which is frequently used in the hospital centers studied.

  3. The underappreciated in vitro activity of tedizolid against Bacteroides fragilis species, including strains resistant to metronidazole and carbapenems.

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    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Leoncio, Elisa S; Merriam, C Vreni

    2017-02-01

    Because Bacteroides fragilis has the ability to develop mechanisms of resistance to almost all antibiotics, we studied the comparative in vitro activity of tedizolid against 124 Bacteroides group species clinical isolates, including carbapenem, metronidazole and piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains. Tedizolid had an MIC 90 of 2 μg/ml (range, 0.5-4 μg/ml) and was 1-4 times more active than linezolid that had an MIC 90 of 8 μg/ml (range, 2-16 μg/ml). It was also active (MICs 0.5-2 μg/ml) against the 27 ertapenem, 2 metronidazole and 12 piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains tested. This suggests that tedizolid may be useful treating infections, including bacteremias, due to resistant B. fragilis group species, as well as, mixed skin and soft tissue infections such as diabetic foot infections caused by Gram-positive aerobes and B. fragilis group species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacteroides cutis,’ a new bacterial species isolated from human skin

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    S. Belkacemi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the main characteristics of ‘Bacteroides cutis’ sp. nov., strain Marseille-P4118T (= CSUR P4118, a new species within the genus Bacteroides. This strain was isolated from a skin sample of a 75-year-old man from Marseille.

  5. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

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    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  6. A Closer Look at Bacteroides: Phylogenetic Relationship and Genomic Implications of a Life in the Human Gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Fredrik H.; Ussery, David; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi genomes to elucidate their phylogenetic relationship and to gain insight into what is separating the gut living Bacteroides and Parabacteroides genera from other Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi species. A comprehensive analysis shows that Bacteroides species have a higher number...... that Bacteroides and Parabacteroides species share a large common core of 1,085 protein families. Genome atlases illustrate that there are few and only small unique areas on the chromosomes of four Bacteroides/Parabacteroides genomes. Functional classification to clusters of othologus groups show that Bacteroides...... species are enriched in carbohydrate transport and metabolism proteins. Classification of proteins in KEGG metabolic pathways gives a detailed view of the genome’s metabolic capabilities that can be linked to its habitat. Bacteroides pectinophilus and Bacteroides capillosus do not cluster together...

  7. Persistence of Bacteroides ovatus under simulated sunlight irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Shengkun

    2014-07-04

    Background: Bacteroides ovatus, a member of the genus Bacteroides, is considered for use in molecular-based methods as a general fecal indicator. However, knowledge on its fate and persistence after a fecal contamination event remains limited. In this study, the persistence of B. ovatus was evaluated under simulated sunlight exposure and in conditions similar to freshwater and seawater. By combining propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection, the decay rates of B. ovatus were determined in the presence and absence of exogenous photosensitizers and in salinity up to 39.5 parts per thousand at 27°C. Results: UVB was found to be important for B. ovatus decay, averaging a 4 log10 of decay over 6 h of exposure without the presence of extracellular photosensitizers. The addition of NaNO2, an exogenous sensitizer producing hydroxyl radicals, did not significantly change the decay rate of B. ovatus in both low and high salinity water, while the exogenous sensitizer algae organic matter (AOM) slowed down the decay of B. ovatus in low salinity water. At seawater salinity, the decay rate of B. ovatus was slower than that in low salinity water, except when both NaNO2 and AOM were present. Conclusion: The results of laboratory experiments suggest that if B. ovatus is released into either freshwater or seawater environment in the evening, 50% of it may be intact by the next morning; if it is released at noon, only 50% may be intact after a mere 5 min of full spectrum irradiation on a clear day. This study provides a mechanistic understanding to some of the important environmental relevant factors that influenced the inactivation kinetics of B. ovatus in the presence of sunlight irradiation, and would facilitate the use of B. ovatus to indicate the occurrence of fecal contamination.

  8. Studies of antibiotic resistant mutants of Bacteroides fragilis obtained by Cs-137 ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azghani, A.O.

    1986-01-01

    The genus Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobic bacillus normally found in the upper respiratory tract, the colon, and the genitourinary system. The project reported here was undertaken because of the high frequency of hospital infections attributed to B. fragilis, and the increased resistance of the bacteria to commonly used antibiotics. Cs-137 gamma irradiation was used to induce antibiotic resistant mutants in B. fragilis in the presence of Escherichia coli B/r membrane fragments, employed as reducing agent. Based on a dose-survival curve, an effective radiation dose of 1.54 x 10 4 R (3.99 C/Kg) was used to induce mutations to rifampicin and tetracycline resistance in the test organism. The antibiotic resistant mutants of B. fragilis were utilized to reveal the mechanism by which this group of organisms becomes resistant to select chemotherapeutic agents. Studies on tetracycline resistant mutants of B. fragilis isolated after irradiation, suggest that the resistance to this antibiotic is associated with the outer membrane permeability. The difference in inhibitory action of rifampicin on RNA polymerase activity, from rifampicin sensitive and resistant strains of B. fragilis, reveals that this enzyme is a possible suitable target for inhibition of bacterial growth in anaerobes by rifampicin

  9. Dual diaminopimelate biosynthesis pathways in Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, André O; Klartag, Ayelet; Gilvarg, Charles; Dobson, Renwick C J; Marques, Felipe Garbelini; Leustek, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium thermocellum were recently found to synthesize diaminopimelate (DAP) by way of LL-DAP aminotransferase. Both species also contain an ortholog of meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase (Ddh), suggesting that they may have redundant pathways for DAP biosynthesis. The B. fragilis Ddh ortholog shows low homology with other examples of Ddh and this species belongs to a phylum, the Bacteriodetes, not previously known to contain this enzyme. By contrast, the C. thermocellum ortholog is well conserved with known examples of Ddh. Using in vitro and in vivo assays both the B. fragilis and C. thermocellum enzymes were found to be authentic examples of Ddh, displaying kinetic properties typical of this enzyme. The result indicates that B. fragilis contains a sequence diverged form of Ddh. Phylogenomic analysis of the microbial genome database revealed that 77% of species with a Ddh ortholog also contain a second pathway for DAP biosynthesis suggesting that Ddh evolved as an ancillary mechanism for DAP biosynthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sphingolipid synthesis deficiency in a mutant of Bacteroides levii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumleve, B.; Lev, M.

    1986-05-01

    Bacteroides levii, an anaerobic bacterium, synthesizes two sphingolipids; the sphingomyelin analogue, ceramide phosphorylethanolamine (CPE), and also ceramide phosphorylglycerol (CPG). The first enzyme in the sphingolipid pathway, 3-ketodihydro-sphingosine (3KDS) synthase, has been partially purified previously. To study subsequent steps in the pathways, mutants defective in sphingolipid synthesis were derived by ethyl methanesulfonate and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Extracts of the mutant, 1075BB, show synthase activity although the cells do not synthesize CPE or CPG. The mutant differs from the wild type in that: (1) synthase activity was much diminished in the mutant, (2) sphingolipid synthesis does not occur in the mutant as evidenced by the absence of spots at sites where CPE and CPG migrate following two-dimensional thin layer chromatography, (3) incorporation of uniformly-labelled (/sup 14/C)serine carbon or (/sup 14/C)3KDS into sphingolipids was not observed in the mutant, (4) following incubation with (/sup 14/C)3KDS, radioactivity corresponding to dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and ceramide were observed in the mutant; no (/sup 14/C)DHS was detected in the wild type, and (5) enhanced incorporation of (/sup 14/C)serine carbon into two lipids not containing phosphorus was found in the mutant. The authors conclude, therefore, that this mutant, 1075BB, has a metabolic block at the terminal biosynthetic steps of sphingolipid synthesis.

  11. Rapid synthesis and metabolism of glutamate in N2-fixing bacteroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, S.O.; Streeter, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Symbiotic nodule bacteroids are thought to support N 2 fixation mainly by metabolizing dicarboxylic acids to CO 2 , generating reductant and ATP required by nitrogenase. Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids were isolated anaerobically and incubated at 2% O 2 with 14 C-labeled succinate, malate, glutamate, or aspartate. 14 CO 2 was collected, and the bacteroid contents separated into neutral, organic acid, and amino acid fractions. The respiration of substrates, relative to their uptake, was malate > glutamate > succinate > aspartate. Analysis of the fractions revealed that will all substrates the radioactivity was found mostly in the amino acid fraction. The labeling of the neutral fraction was negligible and only a small amount of label was found in the organic acid fraction indicating a small pool size. TLC of the amino acid fraction showed the label to be principally in glutamate. Glutamate contained 67, 80, 97, and 88% of the 14 C in the amino acid fraction in bacteroids fed with succinate, malate, glutamate and aspartate, respectively. The data suggest that glutamate may play an important role in the bacteroid function

  12. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates...... of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin...... testing of B. fragilis group isolates for most relevant antibiotics in routine laboratories....

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  14. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by 3 H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in 3 H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin

  15. Energy supply for dinitrogen fixation by Azotobacter vinelandii and by bacteroids of Rhizobium leguminosarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laane, N.C.M.

    1980-01-01

    The central issue of this thesis is how obligate aerobes, such as Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids and Azotobacter vinelandii, generate and regulate the energy supply (in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents) for nitrogenase.
    In an effective

  16. Detection of Bacteroides forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    24 out of 217 infected root canals demonstrated the existence of both types of bacteria, the utility of a 16S rDNA-based PCR detection method showed high sensitivity and high specificity to directly detect B. forsythus, P. gingivalis or other pulpal microorganisms from samples of root canal infections. The results indicated that ...

  17. Polysaccharides utilization in human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: comparative genomics reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Godzik, Adam; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-12-12

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the human gut microbiota, is characterized by its ability to utilize a wide variety of polysaccharides using the extensive saccharolytic machinery that is controlled by an expanded repertoire of transcription factors (TFs). The availability of genomic sequences for multiple Bacteroides species opens an opportunity for their comparative analysis to enable characterization of their metabolic and regulatory networks. A comparative genomics approach was applied for the reconstruction and functional annotation of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Bacteroides genomes. Bioinformatics analysis of promoter regions revealed putative DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 31 orthologous TFs in the Bacteroides. Among the analyzed TFs there are 4 SusR-like regulators, 16 AraC-like hybrid two-component systems (HTCSs), and 11 regulators from other families. Novel DNA motifs of HTCSs and SusR-like regulators in the Bacteroides have the common structure of direct repeats with a long spacer between two conserved sites. The inferred regulatory network in B. thetaiotaomicron contains 308 genes encoding polysaccharide and sugar catabolic enzymes, carbohydrate-binding and transport systems, and TFs. The analyzed TFs control pathways for utilization of host and dietary glycans to monosaccharides and their further interconversions to intermediates of the central metabolism. The reconstructed regulatory network allowed us to suggest and refine specific functional assignments for sugar catabolic enzymes and transporters, providing a substantial improvement to the existing metabolic models for B. thetaiotaomicron. The obtained collection of reconstructed TF regulons is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov).

  18. Possible Origins of CTnBST, a Conjugative Transposon Found Recently in a Human Colonic Bacteroides Strain▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David J.; Shoemaker, Nadja B.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2007-01-01

    A previous survey of Bacteroides isolates suggested that the ermB gene entered Bacteroides spp. recently. Previously, ermB had been found almost exclusively in gram-positive bacteria. In one Bacteroides strain, ermB was located on 100-kb conjugative transposon (CTn) CTnBST. To assess the possible origin of this CTn, we obtained the full DNA sequence of CTnBST and used this information to investigate its possible origins. Over one-half of CTnBST had high sequence identity to a putative CTn found in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis YCH46. This included the ends of the CTn and genes involved in integration, transfer, and excision. However, the region around the ermB gene contained genes that appeared to originate from gram-positive organisms. In particular, a 7-kb segment containing the ermB gene was 100% identical to an ermB region found in the genome of the gram-positive bacterium Arcanobacterium pyogenes. A screen of Bacteroides isolates whose DNA cross-hybridized with a CTnBST probe revealed that several isolates did not carry the 7-kb region, implying that the acquisition of this region may be more recent than the acquisition of the entire CTnBST element by Bacteroides spp. We have also identified other Bacteroides isolates that carry a slightly modified 7-kb region but have no other traces of CTnBST. Thus, it is possible that this 7-kb region could itself be part of a mobile element that has inserted in a Bacteroides CTn. Our results show that CTnBST is a hybrid element which has acquired a portion of its coding region from gram-positive bacteria but which may originally have come from Bacteroides spp. or some related species. PMID:17483268

  19. Possible origins of CTnBST, a conjugative transposon found recently in a human colonic Bacteroides strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David J; Shoemaker, Nadja B; Salyers, Abigail A

    2007-07-01

    A previous survey of Bacteroides isolates suggested that the ermB gene entered Bacteroides spp. recently. Previously, ermB had been found almost exclusively in gram-positive bacteria. In one Bacteroides strain, ermB was located on 100-kb conjugative transposon (CTn) CTnBST. To assess the possible origin of this CTn, we obtained the full DNA sequence of CTnBST and used this information to investigate its possible origins. Over one-half of CTnBST had high sequence identity to a putative CTn found in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis YCH46. This included the ends of the CTn and genes involved in integration, transfer, and excision. However, the region around the ermB gene contained genes that appeared to originate from gram-positive organisms. In particular, a 7-kb segment containing the ermB gene was 100% identical to an ermB region found in the genome of the gram-positive bacterium Arcanobacterium pyogenes. A screen of Bacteroides isolates whose DNA cross-hybridized with a CTnBST probe revealed that several isolates did not carry the 7-kb region, implying that the acquisition of this region may be more recent than the acquisition of the entire CTnBST element by Bacteroides spp. We have also identified other Bacteroides isolates that carry a slightly modified 7-kb region but have no other traces of CTnBST. Thus, it is possible that this 7-kb region could itself be part of a mobile element that has inserted in a Bacteroides CTn. Our results show that CTnBST is a hybrid element which has acquired a portion of its coding region from gram-positive bacteria but which may originally have come from Bacteroides spp. or some related species.

  20. Detection of Bacteroides forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... periodontitis among Chinese patients. 217 patients with chronic periapcial periodontitis were recruited and a total of 266 teeth were collected. The subjects had no systemic diseases, no antibiotics taken, no root canal treatment (RCT) performed on the infected teeth in the last 3 months. The DNA of bacteria ...

  1. Possible misidentification of Bacteroides sp., probably B. ureolyticus as Taylorella equigenitalis: Implications for the laboratory diagnosis of CEM

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, John; Cherie Millar, B.; Xu, Jiru; Buckley, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    International audience; A wild-type isolate with similar morphological and phenotypic properties to Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative bacterial agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM), was referred for molecular identification by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. A species-specific PCR failed to yield a product compatible with that of T. equigenitalis. The direct sequencing of the universal 16S rRNA PCR amplicon suggested the presence of a Bacteroides sp., probably Bacteroides u...

  2. Marsh soils as potential sinks for Bacteroides fecal indicator bacteria, Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge, Georgetown, SC, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Johnson, Heather E.; Duris, Joseph W.; Krauss, Ken W.

    2014-01-01

    A soil core collected in a tidal freshwater marsh in the Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge (Georgetown, SC) exuded a particularly strong odor of cow manure upon extrusion. In order to test for manure and determine its provenance, we carried out microbial source tracking using DNA markers for Bacteroides, a noncoliform, anaerobic bacterial group that represents a broad group of the fecal population. Three core sections from 0-3 cm, 9-12 cm and 30-33 were analyzed for the presence of Bacteroides. The ages of core sediments were estimated using 210Pb and 137Cs dating. All three core sections tested positive for Bacteroides DNA markers related to cow or deer feces. Because cow manure is stockpiled, used as fertilizer, and a source of direct contamination in the Great Pee Dee River/Winyah Bay watershed, it is very likely the source of the Bacteroides that was deposited on the marsh. The mid-points of the core sections were dated as follows: 0-3 cm: 2009; 9-12 cm: 1999, and 30-33 cm: 1961. The presence of Bacteroides at different depths/ages in the soil profile indicates that soils in tidal freshwater marshes are, at the least, capable of being short-term sinks for Bacteroides and, may have the potential to be long-term sinks of stable, naturalized populations.

  3. Multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis group on the rise in Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, G N; Sóki, J; Nagy, E

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of multidrug-resistance (MDR) in a strain of Bacteroides fragilis from a blood culture and abdominal fluid in a Danish patient. The patient had not been travelling for several years and had not received antibiotics prior to the present case. We also summarize the cases that have...... been reported to date of MDR B. fragilis group in Europe. As far as we know, a case like this with MDR B. fragilis has not been described in Scandinavia before....

  4. Genome sequence of the Bacteroides fragilis phage ATCC 51477-B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Shawn A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genome of a fecal pollution indicator phage, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 51477-B1, was sequenced and consisted of 44,929 bases with a G+C content of 38.7%. Forty-six putative open reading frames were identified and genes were organized into functional clusters for host specificity, lysis, replication and regulation, and packaging and structural proteins.

  5. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type b) How to Take Your Child's Temperature Impetigo Infant Botulism Infections That Pets Carry Influenza (Flu) ... Herpes Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Hives (Urticaria) Impetigo Infections That Pets Carry Lyme Disease Measles Molluscum ...

  6. Isolation and characterization of Bacteroides host strain HB-73 used to detect sewage specific phages in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavel, Kannappan; Fujioka, Roger; Ebdon, James; Taylor, Huw

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that Escherichia coli and enterococci are unreliable indicators of fecal contamination in Hawaii because of their ability to multiply in environmental soils. In this study, the method of detecting Bacteroides phages as specific markers of sewage contamination in Hawaii's recreational waters was evaluated because these sewage specific phages cannot multiply under environmental conditions. Bacteroides hosts (GB-124, GA-17), were recovered from sewage samples in Europe and were reported to be effective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in certain geographical areas. However, GB-124 and GA-17 hosts were ineffective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in Hawaii. Bacteroides host HB-73 was isolated from a sewage sample in Hawaii, confirmed as a Bacteroides sp. and shown to recover phages from multiple sources of sewage produced in Hawaii at high concentrations (5.2-7.3 x 10(5) PFU/100 mL). These Bacteroides phages were considered as potential markers of sewage because they also survived for three days in fresh stream water and two days in marine water. Water samples from Hawaii's coastal swimming beaches and harbors, which were known to be contaminated with discharges from streams, were shown to contain moderate (20-187 CFU/100 mL) to elevated (173-816 CFU/100 mL) concentrations of enterococci. These same samples contained undetectable levels (Hawaii and the most likely source of these enterococci is from environmental soil rather than from sewage. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Glycolytic Versatility of Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 and Its Genome Response to Oligo and Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Benítez-Páez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteroides spp. are dominant components of the phylum Bacteroidetes in the gut microbiota and prosper in glycan enriched environments. However, knowledge of the machinery of specific species isolated from humans (like Bacteroides uniformis contributing to the utilization of dietary and endogenous sources of glycans and their byproducts is limited. We have used the cutting-edge nanopore-based technology to sequence the genome of B. uniformis CECT 7771, a human symbiont with a proven pre-clinical efficacy on metabolic and immune dysfunctions in obesity animal models. We have also used massive sequencing approaches to distinguish the genome expression patterns in response to carbon sources of different complexity during growth. At genome-wide level, our analyses globally demonstrate that B. uniformis strains exhibit an expanded glycolytic capability when compared with other Bacteroides species. Moreover, by studying the growth and whole-genome expression of B. uniformis CECT 7771 in response to different carbon sources, we detected a differential growth fitness and expression patterns across the genome depending on the carbon source of the culture media. The dietary fibers used exerted different effects on B. uniformis CECT 7771 activating different molecular pathways and, therefore, allowing the production of different metabolite types with potential impact on gut health. The genome and transcriptome analysis of B. uniformis CECT 7771, in response to different carbon sources, shows its high versatility to utilize both dietary and endogenous glycans along with the production of potentially beneficial end products for both the bacterium and the host, pointing to a mechanistic basis of a mutualistic relationship.

  8. Multiple Signals Govern Utilization of a Polysaccharide in the Gut Bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalm, Nathan D; Townsend, Guy E; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-10-11

    The utilization of simple sugars is widespread across all domains of life. In contrast, the breakdown of complex carbohydrates is restricted to a subset of organisms. A regulatory paradigm for integration of complex polysaccharide breakdown with simple sugar utilization was established in the mammalian gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, whereby sensing of monomeric fructose regulates catabolism of both fructose and polymeric fructans. We now report that a different regulatory paradigm governs utilization of monomeric arabinose and the arabinose polymer arabinan. We establish that (i) arabinan utilization genes are controlled by a transcriptional activator that responds to arabinan and by a transcriptional repressor that responds to arabinose, (ii) arabinose utilization genes are regulated directly by the arabinose-responding repressor but indirectly by the arabinan-responding activator, and (iii) activation of both arabinan and arabinose utilization genes requires a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator necessary for survival in the mammalian gut. Genomic analysis predicts that this paradigm is broadly applicable to the breakdown of other polysaccharides in both B. thetaiotaomicron and other gut Bacteroides spp. The uncovered mechanism enables regulation of polysaccharide utilization genes in response to both the polysaccharide and its breakdown products. Breakdown of complex polysaccharides derived from "dietary fiber" is achieved by the mammalian gut microbiota. This breakdown creates a critical nutrient source for both the microbiota and its mammalian host. Because the availability of individual polysaccharides fluctuates with variations in the host diet, members of the microbiota strictly control expression of polysaccharide utilization genes. Our findings define a regulatory architecture that controls the breakdown of a polysaccharide by a gut bacterium in response to three distinct signals. This architecture integrates perception of a complex

  9. Cloning of Bacteroides fragilis plasmid genes affecting metronidazole resistance and ultraviolet survival in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehnert, G.U.; Abratt, V.R.; Goodman, H.J.; Woods, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Since reduced metronidazole causes DNA damage, resistance to metronidazole was used as a selection method for the cloning of Bacteroides fragilis genes affecting DNA repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli. Genes from B. fragilis Bf-2 were cloned on a recombinant plasmid pMT100 which made E. coli AB1157 and uvrA, B, and C mutant strains more resistant to metronidazole, but more sensitive to far uv irradiation under aerobic conditions. The loci affecting metronidazole resistance and uv sensitivity were linked and located on a 5-kb DNA fragment which originated from the small 6-kb cryptic plasmid pBFC1 present in B. fragilis Bf-2 cells

  10. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Leonard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4,970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3,184 genes were methylated as well as 1,735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states.

  11. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm...the immune system and may be involved in both the response to sepsis and malignancy. For example, in neonatal mice, BMP signaling is a normal part of

  12. Twenty-eight divergent polysaccharide loci specifying within and amongst strain capsule diversity in three strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, S.; Blakely, G.W.; Houston, S.

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the complete genome sequence of Bacteroides fragilis 638R originally isolated in the USA, was made with two previously sequenced strains isolated in the UK (NCTC 9343) and Japan (YCH46). The presence of 10 loci containing genes associated with polysaccharide biosynthesis, each inclu...

  13. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  14. Fermentation of pectin and glucose, and activity of pectin-degrading enzymes in the rabbit caecal bacterium Bacteroides caccae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sirotek, Kamil; Slováková, Lenka; Kopečný, Jan; Marounek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 38, - (2004), s. 327-332 ISSN 0266-8254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/03/0358 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : bacteroides caccae * caecum * metabolism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology , Virology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2004

  15. Salmonella-induced changes in the gut microbiota and immune response genes transcriptome during administration of vancomycin and Bacteroides fragilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Bukina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim. To study Salmonella-induced changes in the intestinal wall microbiota, the expression of Salmonella effector proteins SipA, SopB, SopE2 and transcriptional activity of genes FFAR2, Foxp3, RORγt in rat GALT during administration of vancomycin and B.fragilis. Methods. Investigations of qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbiota of the wall of the small intestine were carried out, and the expression level of rat genes Foxp3, Rorc (Royt, FFAR2 and Salmonella effector proteins SipA, SopB and SopE2 were determined by RT-PCR, the relationship between groups of microorganisms was established. Results. Administration of B.fragilis against the background pre-treatment with vancomycin and Salmonella infection alters the quantitative composition of the microbiota in the wall of the small intestine contents: a decrease in Salmonella spp., E.coli, P.aeruginosa, Proteus spp., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp. and Shigella spp., as well as increasing Bacteroides spp., E.faecalis, E.faecium and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius. The level of expression of Salmonella effector proteins in animals with the combined administration of vancomycin and S.enteritidis (I group, S.typhimurium (II group increased: SopB – 101 and 20 times; SopE2 - 80 and 2 times; SipA - 613 times (II group, and also 5-fold decrease was noted in the I group. Relative normalized number of mRNA of genes FFAR2, Foxp3, RORγt in GALT of rats in groups III and IV increased: FFAR2 - 2.7 and 5.4 times; Foxp3 - 2.5 and 85 times, RORγt level decreased by 70% and only in IV group. Conclusions. Using B.fragilis creates conditions for the correction of Salmonella-induced changes of the intestinal microbiome. Pretreatment of animals with vancomycin causes increased transcriptional activity of genes SipA, SopB and SopE2, except SipA after administration of S.enteritidis. Administration of B.fragilis increases the level of mRNA of genes FFAR2 and Foxp3 in GALT and reduces ROR

  16. The role of efflux pumps in Bacteroides fragilis resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yekani, Mina; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2018-05-01

    The resistance of Bacteroides fragilis to the most antimicrobial agents has been reported in the world. Identification of the microbial resistance mechanisms can play an important role in controlling these resistances. Currently, B. fragilis is resistant to most antibiotics. The multi-drug efflux pumps have been shown to underlie the antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis strains. Two types of these efflux pumps including RND and MATE can be regarded as main structures responsible for antibiotic resistance. Therefore, the strategy for suppressing of this efflux system may be useful in the treatment and control of the multidrug-resistant B. fragilis. The purpose of this study is to review the B. fragilis efflux pumps and their functions in the resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Origins of fermentation products formed during growth of Bacteroides ruminicola on glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountfort, D.O.; Robertson, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Bacteroides ruminicola grown on complex medium with glucose as carbon source gave acetate, CO 2 , formate and succinate as main fermentation products. No evidence was found for significant glucose catabolism by pathways other than the Embden-Meyerhof sequence. However, [U- 14 C] glucose fermentation gave products whose specific radioactivities were much lower than expected. There appear to be two main causes. Firstly, a rapid exchange occurred between metabolic intermediates and CO 2 , probably due to reversibility of the pathway between phosphoenolpyruvate and fumarate. Secondly, non-glucose precursors, mainly peptides and acetate, added to the medium as growth factors, also gave rise to the above end-products. The distortions that such reactions introduce into measurements of ATP molar growth yields based on product analyses and measurements of carbon flux based on radioactivity recovered in products are discussed. (author)

  18. Bacteroides gingivalis-Actinomyces viscosus cohesive interactions as measured by a quantitative binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, S.; Ellen, R.P.; Grove, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    There is limited evidence, mostly indirect, to suggest that the adherence of Bacteroides gingivalis to teeth may be enhanced by the presence of gram-positive dental plaque bacteria like Actinomyces viscosus. The purpose of this study was to carry out direct quantitative assessments of the cohesion of B gingivalis and A. viscosus by using an in vitro assay modeled on the natural sequence in which these two species colonize the teeth. The assay allowed comparisons to be made of the adherence of 3 H-labeled B. gingivalis 2561 and 381 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HA) and A. viscosus WVU627- or T14V-coated S-HA (actinobeads) in equilibrium and kinetics binding studies. A series of preliminary binding studies with 3H-labeled A. viscosus and parallel studies by scanning electron microscopy with unlabeled A. viscosus were conducted to establish a protocol by which actinobeads suitable for subsequent Bacteroides adherence experiments could be prepared. By scanning electron microscopy, the actinobeads had only small gaps of exposed S-HA between essentially irreversibly bound A. viscosus cells. Furthermore, B. gingivalis cells appeared to bind preferentially to the Actinomyces cells instead of the exposed S-HA. B. gingivalis binding to both S-HA and actinobeads was saturable with at least 2 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) cells per ml, and equilibrium with saturating concentrations was reached within 10 to 20 min. B. gingivalis always bound in greater numbers to the actinobeads than to S-HA. These findings provide direct measurements supporting the concept that cohesion with dental plaque bacteria like A. viscosus may foster the establishment of B. gingivalis on teeth by enhancing its adherence

  19. Susceptibility trends of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates from Buenos Aires, Argentina Tendencias en el perfil de sensibilidad de aislamientos del grupo Bacteroides fragilis obtenidos en Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fernández Canigia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the susceptibility trends to seven antibiotics of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates based on three survey studies performed by the Committee of Anaerobic Bacteria between 1989 and 2002. Fifty three, 82 and 65 B. fragilis group isolates were collected during each period. The antimicrobial agents included were: ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam (2:1, cefoxitin, piperacillin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs were determined according to the reference agar dilution method described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI, formerly NCCLS. The most active antibiotics for B. fragilis and non- B. fragilis species throughout the three periods were: imipenem with 99.1 and 100% of activity, respectively, and metronidazole with 100% of activity. The susceptibility to ampicillin-sulbactam showed a decrease, from 100% to 90.3% and to 82.4 % in the last period, for both B. fragilis and non-B. fragilis species, respectively. The overall susceptibility rates for cefoxitin, piperacillin, and clindamycin were significantly different between B. fragilis and non-B. fragilis species (84.2% vs. 56.5%; 85.9% vs. 66.7% and 88.8% vs. 64.7%, respectively, pEl objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar las variaciones en el perfil de sensibilidad frente a siete antimicrobianos de aislamientos del grupo Bacteroides fragilis, mediante el análisis de tres relevamientos realizados por la Subcomisión de Bacterias Anaerobias de la Asociación Argentina de Microbiología (años 1989-1991, 1996-1998 y 1999-2002. En los citados períodos se recolectaron 53, 82 y 65 aislamientos del grupo B. fragilis. Se evaluó la actividad de: ampicilina, ampicilina-sulbactama (2:1, cefoxitina, piperacilina, imipenem, clindamicina y metronidazol. La concentración inhibitoria mínima (CIM se determinó utilizando el método de dilución en agar, según las normas del Clinical and Laboratory

  20. RbohB, a Phaseolus vulgaris NADPH oxidase gene, enhances symbiosome number, bacteroid size, and nitrogen fixation in nodules and impairs mycorrhizal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by respiratory burst oxidative homologs (Rbohs) are involved in numerous plant cell signaling processes, and have critical roles in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Previously, down-regulation of RbohB in Phaseolus vulgaris was shown to suppress ROS production and abolish Rhizobium infection thread (IT) progression, but also to enhance arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization. Thus, Rbohs function both as positive and negative regulators. Here, we assessed the effect of enhancing ROS concentrations, by overexpressing PvRbohB, on the P. vulgaris--rhizobia and P. vulgaris--AMF symbioses. We estimated superoxide concentrations in hairy roots overexpressing PvRbohB, determined the status of early and late events of both Rhizobium and AMF interactions in symbiont-inoculated roots, and analyzed the nodule ultrastructure of transgenic plants overexpressing PvRbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB significantly enhanced ROS production, the formation of ITs, nodule biomass, and nitrogen-fixing activity, and increased the density of symbiosomes in nodules, and the density and size of bacteroides in symbiosomes. Furthermore, PvCAT, early nodulin, PvSS1, and PvGOGAT transcript abundances were elevated in these nodules. By contrast, mycorrhizal colonization was reduced in roots that overexpressed RbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB augmented nodule efficiency by enhancing nitrogen fixation and delaying nodule senescence, but impaired AMF colonization. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Vitamin B12 Uptake by the Gut Commensal Bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Limits the Production of Shiga Toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Cordonnier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC are foodborne pathogens responsible for the development of bloody diarrhea and renal failure in humans. Many environmental factors have been shown to regulate the production of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2, the main virulence factor of EHEC. Among them, soluble factors produced by human gut microbiota and in particular, by the predominant species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron, inhibit Stx2 gene expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the B. thetaiotaomicron-dependent inhibition of Stx2 production by EHEC. We determined that Stx2-regulating molecules are resistant to heat treatment but do not correspond to propionate and acetate, two short-chain fatty acids produced by B. thetaiotaomicron. Moreover, screening of a B. thetaiotaomicron mutant library identified seven mutants that do not inhibit Stx2 synthesis by EHEC. One mutant has impaired production of BtuB, an outer membrane receptor for vitamin B12. Together with restoration of Stx2 level after vitamin B12 supplementation, these data highlight vitamin B12 as a molecule produced by gut microbiota that modulates production of a key virulence factor of EHEC and consequently may affect the outcome of an infection.

  2. Vitamin B12 Uptake by the Gut Commensal Bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Limits the Production of Shiga Toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Le Bihan, Guillaume; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Garrivier, Annie; Harel, Josée; Jubelin, Grégory

    2016-01-05

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are foodborne pathogens responsible for the development of bloody diarrhea and renal failure in humans. Many environmental factors have been shown to regulate the production of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), the main virulence factor of EHEC. Among them, soluble factors produced by human gut microbiota and in particular, by the predominant species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron), inhibit Stx2 gene expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the B. thetaiotaomicron-dependent inhibition of Stx2 production by EHEC. We determined that Stx2-regulating molecules are resistant to heat treatment but do not correspond to propionate and acetate, two short-chain fatty acids produced by B. thetaiotaomicron. Moreover, screening of a B. thetaiotaomicron mutant library identified seven mutants that do not inhibit Stx2 synthesis by EHEC. One mutant has impaired production of BtuB, an outer membrane receptor for vitamin B12. Together with restoration of Stx2 level after vitamin B12 supplementation, these data highlight vitamin B12 as a molecule produced by gut microbiota that modulates production of a key virulence factor of EHEC and consequently may affect the outcome of an infection.

  3. Vitamin B12 Uptake by the Gut Commensal Bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Limits the Production of Shiga Toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Le Bihan, Guillaume; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Garrivier, Annie; Harel, Josée; Jubelin, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are foodborne pathogens responsible for the development of bloody diarrhea and renal failure in humans. Many environmental factors have been shown to regulate the production of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), the main virulence factor of EHEC. Among them, soluble factors produced by human gut microbiota and in particular, by the predominant species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron), inhibit Stx2 gene expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the B. thetaiotaomicron-dependent inhibition of Stx2 production by EHEC. We determined that Stx2-regulating molecules are resistant to heat treatment but do not correspond to propionate and acetate, two short-chain fatty acids produced by B. thetaiotaomicron. Moreover, screening of a B. thetaiotaomicron mutant library identified seven mutants that do not inhibit Stx2 synthesis by EHEC. One mutant has impaired production of BtuB, an outer membrane receptor for vitamin B12. Together with restoration of Stx2 level after vitamin B12 supplementation, these data highlight vitamin B12 as a molecule produced by gut microbiota that modulates production of a key virulence factor of EHEC and consequently may affect the outcome of an infection. PMID:26742075

  4. Possible misidentification of Bacteroides sp., probably B. ureolyticus as Taylorella equigenitalis: implications for the laboratory diagnosis of CEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Xu, J; Buckley, T C

    2001-01-01

    A wild-type isolate with similar morphological and phenotypic properties to Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative bacterial agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM), was referred for molecular identification by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. A species-specific PCR failed to yield a product compatible with that of T. equigenitalis. The direct sequencing of the universal 16S rRNA PCR amplicon suggested the presence of a Bacteroides sp., probably Bacteroides ureolyticus, with no consequent effects on the movement and transportation of the animal. Adoption of such a molecular means of identification through sequencing may aid in the identification of the atypical forms of Taylorella equigenitalis, as recently described, as well as differentiating this species from Taylorella asinigenitalis.

  5. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  6. Simultaneous Detection of Bacteroides forsythus and Prevotella intermedia by 16S rRNA Gene-Directed Multiplex PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Georg; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Seyfarth, Ilse; Lampert, Friedrich; Lütticken, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    In a 16S rRNA gene-directed multiplex PCR, Prevotella intermedia- and Bacteroides forsythus-specific reverse primers were combined with a single conserved forward primer. A 660-bp fragment and an 840-bp fragment that were specific for both species could be amplified simultaneously. A total of 152 clinical samples, subgingival plaque and swabs of three different oral mucosae, from 38 periodontitis patients were used for the evaluation. PMID:10203541

  7. Two new xylanases with different substrate specificities from the human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Iakiviak, Michael; Dodd, Dylan; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2014-04-01

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut.

  8. Assessment of swine-specific bacteriophages of Bacteroides fragilis in swine farms with different antibiotic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leknoi, Yuranan; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the occurrence and specificity of bacteriophages of Bacteroides fragilis in swine farms for their potential application in microbial source tracking. A local B. fragilis host strain, SP25 (DSM29413), was isolated from a pooled swine feces sample taken from a non-antibiotic farm. This strain was highly specific to swine fecal materials because it did not detect bacteriophages in any samples from human sewage, sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, and cats. The reference B. fragilis strain, RYC2056, could detect phages in swine samples but also detected phages in most human sewage and polluted urban canal samples. Phages of SP25 exist in the proximity of certain swine farms, regardless of their antibiotic use (p > 0.05). B. fragilis strain SP25 exhibited relatively high resistance to most of the veterinary antimicrobial agents tested. Interestingly, most farms that were positive for SP25 phages were also positive for RYC2056 phages. In conclusion, the swine-specific SP25 strain has the potential to indicate swine fecal contamination in certain bodies of water. Bacterial isolates with larger distributions are being studied and validated. This study highlights the importance of assessing the abundance of phages in local swine populations before determining their potential applicability for source tracking in local surface waters.

  9. Enterotoxigenic and non-enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis from fecal microbiota of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF is an important part of the human and animal intestinal microbiota and is commonly associated with diarrhea. ETBF strains produce an enterotoxin encoded by the bft gene located in the B. fragilispathogenicity island (BfPAI. Non-enterotoxigenic B. fragilis(NTBF strains lack the BfPAI and usually show two different genetic patterns, II and III, based on the absence or presence of a BfPAI-flanking region, respectively. The incidence of ETBF and NTBF strains in fecal samples isolated from children without acute diarrhea or any other intestinal disorders was determined. All 84 fecal samples evaluated were B. fragilis-positive by PCR, four of them harbored the bft gene, 27 contained the NTBF pattern III DNA sequence, and 52 were considered to be NTBF pattern II samples. One sample was positive for both ETBF and NTBF pattern III DNA sequences. All 19 B. fragilis strains isolated by the culture method were bft-negative, 9 belonged to pattern III and 10 to pattern II. We present an updated overview of the ETBF and NTBF incidence in the fecal microbiota of children from Sao Paulo City, Brazil.

  10. Two New Xylanases with Different Substrate Specificities from the Human Gut Bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-01-24

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut.

  11. Effect of UV irradiation on macromolecular synthesis and colony formation in Bacteroides fragilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, J.P.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation of Bacteroides fragilis cells with far-UV light resulted in the immediate degradation of DNA which continued for 40 to 60 min. During the degradation phase, DNA synthesis was decreased but was never totally inhibited. DNA degradation after irradiation was inhibited by chloramphenicol and caffeine. DNA synthesis in irradiated cells was reduced by chloramphenicol but resumed after 100 min. Irradiated cells continued to synthesize DNA for 40 min in the presence of caffeine but then DNA synthesis was completely inhibited and never recovered. RNA and protein synthesis were decreased by UV irradiation and the degree of inhibition was proportional to the UV dose. Colony formation was not affected immediately by UV irradiation and continued for a dose-dependent period before inhibition. There was an inverse relationship between UV dose and inhibition of colony formatiom which occurred sooner in cells irradiated with lower doses of UV light. The characteristics of DNA synthesis in B. fragilis cells after UV irradiation differ from those in wild-type Escherichia coli cells, where DNA synthesis is stopped immediately by UV irradiation, but resemble those in E. coli recA mutant cells where extensive degradation occurs following UV irradiation. (author)

  12. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarel Adamberg

    Full Text Available The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, changes in pH and microbiota composition, concentrations of produced and consumed metabolites during the growth were determined. The composition of fecal microbiota and profile of metabolites changed in response to substrate (levan and amino acids availability. The main products of levan metabolism were acetic, lactic, butyric, propionic and succinic acids and carbon dioxide. Associated growth of levan-degrading (e.g. Bacteroides and butyric acid-producing (e.g. Faecalibacterium taxa was observed in levan-supplemented media. The study shows that the capacity of levan and possibly also other dietary fibers/prebiotics to modulate the composition and function of colon microbiota can be predicted by using isothermal microcalorimetry of fecal samples linked to metabolite and consortia analyses.

  13. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagawa Todd F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  14. Effect of low fluencies of near-ultraviolet radiation on Bacteroides fragilis survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, H.J.K.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a convenient obligate anaerobe for an investigation on the effect of near-UV irradiation since the authors have shown that it can be maintained in aerobic solutions for at least 6 h without loss in viability. Furthermore, they recently demonstrated that B. fragilis differs from other bacteria in that it is more sensitive to far-UV (254 nm) radiation in the presence of oxygen. The role of oxygen on near-UV survival in B. fragilis, was investigated. The effect of chloramphenicol was also studied. Survival curves are presented. B. fragilis Bf-2 cells irradiated with increasing fluencies of near-UV light under anaerobic conditions showed no loss in viability. A 'V'-shaped survival curve was obtained when cells were irradiated aerobically. After the initial reduction in viability with fluencies up to 1.5 kJ/m 2 further irradiation resulted in the recovery of colony-forming ability which was maximal at 2.6 kJ/m 2 and remained at this level up to fluencies of 4 kJ/m 2 . (Auth.)

  15. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thornton, Roibeard F

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  16. RNA-Seq and microarrays analyses reveal global differential transcriptomes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R between bacteroids and free-living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieli Peng

    Full Text Available Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R occurs either in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its host plant, Astragalus sinicus, or free-living in the soil. The M. huakuii 7653R genome has recently been sequenced. To better understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes that occur in 7653R during bacteroid development, RNA-Seq and Microarrays were used to investigate the differential transcriptomes of 7653R bacteroids and free-living cells. The two approaches identified several thousand differentially expressed genes. The most prominent up-regulation occurred in the symbiosis plasmids, meanwhile gene expression is concentrated to a set of genes (clusters in bacteroids to fulfill corresponding functional requirements. The results suggested that the main energy metabolism is active while fatty acid metabolism is inactive in bacteroid and that most of genes relevant to cell cycle are down-regulated accordingly. For a global analysis, we reconstructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI network for 7653R and integrated gene expression data into the network using Cytoscape. A highly inter-connected subnetwork, with function enrichment for nitrogen fixation, was found, and a set of hubs and previously uncharacterized genes participating in nitrogen fixation were identified. The results described here provide a broader biological landscape and novel insights that elucidate rhizobial bacteroid differentiation, nitrogen fixation and related novel gene functions.

  17. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  18. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.-A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated 45 Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. (author)

  19. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R. (Department of Periodontology, University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.)

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated /sup 45/Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis.

  20. Human Bacteroides and total coliforms as indicators of recent combined sewer overflows and rain events in urban creeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Shannon; Spencer, Susan K.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Stokdyk, Joel; Borchardt, Mark A.; McCarthy, David; Murphy, Heather

    2018-01-01

    Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are a known source of human fecal pollution and human pathogens in urban water bodies, which may present a significant public health threat. To monitor human fecal contamination in water, bacterial fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) are traditionally used. However, because FIOs are not specific to human sources and do not correlate with human pathogens, alternative fecal indicators detected using qPCR are becoming of interest to policymakers. For this reason, this study measured correlations between the number and duration of CSOs and mm of rainfall, concentrations of traditional FIOs and alternative indicators, and the presence of human pathogens in two urban creeks. Samples were collected May–July 2016 and analyzed for concentrations of FIOs (total coliforms and E. coli) using membrane filtration as well as for three alternative fecal indicators (human Bacteroides HF183 marker, human polyomavirus (HPoV), pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)) and nine human pathogens using qPCR. Four of the nine pathogens analyzed were detected at these sites including adenovirus, Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, norovirus, and Salmonella. Among all indicators studied, human Bacteroides and total coliforms were significantly correlated with recent CSO and rainfall events, while E. coli, PMMoV, and HPoV did not show consistent significant correlations. Further, human Bacteroides were a more specific indicator, while total coliforms were a more sensitive indicator of CSO and rainfall events. Results may have implications for the use and interpretation of these indicators in future policy or monitoring programs.

  1. Bacteroides CECT 7771 y su uso en la prevención y tratamiento de sobrepeso, obesidad y alteraciones metabólicas e inmunológicas

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Herranz, Yolanda; Gauffin, Paola; Santacruz, Arlette; Moya Pérez, Ángela; Laparra, José Moisés

    2012-01-01

    Bacteroides CECT 7771 y su uso en la prevención y tratamiento de sobrepeso, obesidad y alteraciones metabólicas e inmunológicas. La presente invención se refiere a una cepa de Bacteroides uniformis con número de depósito CECT 7771, así como a sus componentes celulares, metabolitos y/o moléculas secretadas. Es también objeto de la invención, una composición (nutritiva o farmacéutica) que comprende al menos uno de los productos anteriores. Asimismo, la presente inv...

  2. Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393, a member of the human colonic microbiome, upregulates multiple endoxylanases during growth on xylan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Pereira, Gabriel V; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac

    2016-09-29

    Many human diets contain arabinoxylan, and the ease of genome sequencing coupled with reduced cost have led to unraveling the arsenal of genes utilized by the colonic Bacteroidetes to depolymerize this polysaccharide. The colonic Bacteroidetes with potential to ferment arabinoxylans include Bacteroides intestinalis. In this study, we analyzed the hydrolytic activities of members of a xylan degradation cluster encoded on the genome of Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393. Here, it is demonstrated that a cocktail of the xylanolytic enzymes completely hydrolyze arabinoxylans found in human diets. We show that this bacterium and relatives have evolved and secrete a unique bifunctional endoxylanase/arabinofuranosidase in the same polypeptide. The bifunctional enzyme and other secreted enzymes attack the polysaccharides extracellularly to remove the side-chains, exposing the xylan backbone for cleavage to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. These end products are transported into the cell where a β-xylosidase cleaves the oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. While our experiments focused on B. intestinalis, it is likely that the extracellular enzymes also release nutrients to members of the colonic microbial community that practice cross-feeding. The presence of the genes characterized in this study in other colonic Bacteroidetes suggests a conserved strategy for energy acquisition from arabinoxylan, a component of human diets.

  3. PCR-based detection of resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from intra-abdominal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chau Minh; Tanaka, Kaori; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2013-04-01

    Little information is available on the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes in anaerobes in Japan. To understand the background of antimicrobial resistance in anaerobes involved in intra-abdominal infections, we investigated the distribution of eight antimicrobial resistance genes (cepA, cfiA, cfxA, ermF, ermB, mefA, tetQ, and nim) and a mutation in the gyrA gene in a total of 152 organisms (Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium spp., Porphyromonas spp., Bilophila wadsworthia, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Veillonella spp., gram-positive cocci, and non-spore-forming gram-positive bacilli) isolated between 2003 and 2004 in Japan. The cepA gene was distributed primarily in Bacteroides fragilis. Gene cfxA was detected in about 9 % of the Bacteroides isolates and 75 % of the Prevotella spp. isolates and did not appear to contribute to cephamycin resistance. Two strains of B. fragilis contained the metallo-β-lactamase gene cfiA, but they did not produce the protein product. Gene tetQ was detected in about 81, 44, and 63 % of B. fragilis isolates, other Bacteroides spp., and Prevotella spp. isolates, respectively. The ermF gene was detected in 25, 13, 56, 64, and 16 % of Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium spp., B. wadsworthia, and anaerobic cocci, respectively. Gene mefA was found in only 10 % of the B. fragilis strains and 3 % of the non-B. fragilis strains. Genes nim and ermB were not detected in any isolate. Substitution at position 82 (Ser to Phe) in gyrA was detected in B. fragilis isolates that were less susceptible or resistant to moxifloxacin. This study is the first report on the distribution of resistance genes in anaerobes isolated from intra-abdominal infections in Japan. We expect that the results might help in understanding the resistance mechanisms of specific anaerobes.

  4. Ethnic diversity of gut microbiota: species characterization of Bacteroides fragilis group and genus Bifidobacterium in healthy Belgian adults, and comparison with data from Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Eiji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Makino, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Fujimoto, Junji; Watanabe, Koichi; Watanuki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2013-08-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiota is related to host health, and it is thought that dietary habits may play a role in shaping this composition. Here, we examined the population size and prevalence of six predominant bacterial genera and the species compositions of genus Bifidobacterium (g-Bifid) and Bacteroides fragilis group (g-Bfra) in 42 healthy Belgian adults by quantitative PCR (qPCR) over a period of one month. The population sizes and prevalence of these bacteria were basically stable throughout the study period. The predominant g-Bifid species were Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium longum ss. longum, and the predominant g-Bfra species were Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides uniformis, and Bacteroides ovatus. The Belgian gut microbiota data were then compared with gut microbiota data from 46 Japanese subjects collected according to the same protocol (Matsuki et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70, 167-173, 2004). The population size and prevalence of Bifidobacterium catenulatum group were significantly lower in the Belgian gut microbiota than in the Japanese gut microbiota (P diversity of gut microbiota among ethnic groups. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. First report of metronidazole resistant, nimD-positive, Bacteroides stercoris isolated from an abdominal abscess in a 70-year-old woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, Erik; Nielsen, Hans Linde; Hasman, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    We here present the first case of a metronidazole resistant nimD positive Bacteroides stercoris. The isolate originated from a polymicrobial intra-abdominal abscess in a 70-year-old woman. The nimD gene was detected by use of whole-genome shotgun sequencing and the subsequent use of the ResFinder 2...

  6. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  7. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing, succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone, cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  8. Current Status of Marker Genes of Bacteroides and Related Taxa for Identifying Sewage Pollution in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warish Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial source tracking (MST endeavors to determine sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters by capitalizing on the association of certain microorganisms with the gastrointestinal tract and feces of specific animal groups. Several decades of research have shown that bacteria belonging to the gut-associated order Bacteroidales, and particularly the genus Bacteroides, tend to co-evolve with the host, and are, therefore, particularly suitable candidates for MST applications. This review summarizes the current research on MST methods that employ genes belonging to Bacteroidales/Bacteroides as tracers or “markers” of sewage pollution, including known advantages and deficiencies of the many polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods that have been published since 2000. Host specificity is a paramount criterion for confidence that detection of a marker is a true indicator of the target host. Host sensitivity, or the prevalence of the marker in feces/waste from the target host, is necessary for confidence that absence of the marker is indicative of the absence of the pollution source. Each of these parameters can vary widely depending on the type of waste assessed and the geographic location. Differential decay characteristics of bacterial targets and their associated DNA contribute to challenges in interpreting MST results in the context of human health risks. The HF183 marker, derived from the 16S rRNA gene of Bacteroides dorei and closely related taxa, has been used for almost two decades in MST studies, and is well characterized regarding host sensitivity and specificity, and in prevalence and concentration in sewage in many countries. Other markers such as HumM2 and HumM3 show promise, but require further performance testing to demonstrate their widespread utility. An important limitation of the one-marker-one-assay approach commonly used for MST is that given the complexities of microbial persistence in environmental waters, and

  9. Bacteroides forsythus: sensibilidade a antimicrobianos em amostras de pacientes portadores de periodontite Bacteroides forsythus: sensitivity to antimicrobial agents in samples from patients with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Fraga Moreira LOTUFO

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores realizaram teste de sensibilidade antimicrobiana in vitro (técnica de diluição em ágar para 105 cepas de B. forsythus obtidas de pacientes portadores de periodontite. De acordo com o teste realizado, o microrganismo demonstrou ser sensível ao metronidazol (100% das cepas testadas e à amoxicilina (94% das cepas testadas, enquanto 72% e 65% das cepas foram susceptíveis à tetraciclina e ciprofloxacina, respectivamente. O metronidazol e a amoxicilina parecem ser os antimicrobianos indicados para o tratamento de infecções periodontais nas quais B. forsythus seja o patógeno predominante.An in vitro antimicrobial sensitivity test (technique of agar dilution was carried out for 105 clinical isolates of B. forsythus from patients with periodontitis. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were the most efficient drugs and, thus, are indicated for the treatment of periodontal infections in which this microorganism is the most prevalent pathogen.

  10. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and the cfiA resistance gene in Danish Bacteroides fragilis group isolates since 1973

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Simon Andreas; Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Hansen, Kia Cirkeline Møller

    2017-01-01

    .0%) B. fragilis strains as division II, of which 4 strains, isolated between 2010 and 2015, were resistant to meropenem. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial increases in resistance were found throughout this study. This supports the general perception that antimicrobial resistance in the B. fragilis group has been......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of resistance and the cfiA carbapenemase-producing gene in historical Bacteroides fragilis group isolates. METHODS: Danish clinical B. fragilis group isolates (n = 444) from 1973 to 2015 were identified with Matrix-Assisted Laser...... Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) on the Biotyper platform. Antimicrobial resistance was determined using a disk diffusion screening method and commercial antibiotic gradient strips. Division I (cfiA-negative) and division II (cfiA-positive) B. fragilis strains were...

  11. Twenty-eight divergent polysaccharide loci specifying within and amongst strain capsule diversity in three strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, S.; Blakely, G.W.; Houston, S.

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the complete genome sequence of Bacteroides fragilis 638R originally isolated in the USA, was made with two previously sequenced strains isolated in the UK (NCTC 9343) and Japan (YCH46). The presence of 10 loci containing genes associated with polysaccharide biosynthesis, each...... including a putative Wzx flippase and Wzy polymerase, was confirmed in all three strains, despite a lack of cross-reactivity between NCTC 9343 and 638R surface polysaccharide-specific antibodies by immunolabelling and microscopy. Genomic comparisons revealed an exceptional level of polysaccharide...... biosynthesis locus diversity. Of the 10 divergent polysaccharide associated loci apparent in each strain, none are similar between NCTC9343 and 638R. YCH46 shares one locus with NCTC9343, confirmed by MAb labelling, and a second different locus with 638R, making a total of 28 divergent polysaccharide...

  12. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Debanu; Finn, Robert D.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the BVU2987 gene product from B. vulgatus (UniProt A6L4L1) reveals that members of the new Pfam family PF11396 (domain of unknown function; DUF2874) are similar to β-lactamase inhibitor protein and YpmB. Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA-OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins

  13. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative xylose isomerase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jea-Won; Han, Byeong-Gu; Park, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Jun; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Lee, Byung Il

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BT0793, a putative xylose isomerase, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether 550 as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.10 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron X-rays. The crystal was found to belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a=96.3, b=101.7, c=108.3 Å, α=82.8, β=68.2, γ=83.0°. The asymmetric unit contained eight subunits of xylose isomerase with a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.38 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 48.3%.

  14. Odontogenic infections: Microbiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashi Bahl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the involvement of fascial spaces, their bacteriology, sensitivity to antibiotics and management of odontogenic infection in 100 patients of age less than 60 years. Results: The mandibular 3 rd molar was found to be the most commonly offending tooth, followed by the mandibular 2 nd molar. The submandibular space was the most frequently involved fascial space both in single fascial space infections and multiple fascial space infections. Mixed growth (aerobic and anaerobic was seen in culture smears of 60 patients, only aerobic bacterial growth was seen in 25 patients and anaerobic bacterial growth was seen in culture smears of 15 patients. Streptococcus viridans was the most frequently isolated bacteria among the aerobes, whereas Bacteroides and Prevotella were the most common bacterial species among anaerobes. Empirical antibiotic therapy in the form of Co amoxiclav and Metronidazole was given. Incision and drainage followed by extraction of the offending tooth/teeth was carried out. Conclusion: It was concluded that odontogenic infections were mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were necessary to isolate all pathogens. Successful management of these infections depends on changing the environment through decompression, removal of the etiologic factor and by choosing the proper antibiotic.

  15. Odontogenic infections: Microbiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Rashi; Sandhu, Sumeet; Singh, Kanwardeep; Sahai, Nilanchal; Gupta, Mohita

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the involvement of fascial spaces, their bacteriology, sensitivity to antibiotics and management of odontogenic infection in 100 patients of age less than 60 years. The mandibular 3(rd) molar was found to be the most commonly offending tooth, followed by the mandibular 2(nd) molar. The submandibular space was the most frequently involved fascial space both in single fascial space infections and multiple fascial space infections. Mixed growth (aerobic and anaerobic) was seen in culture smears of 60 patients, only aerobic bacterial growth was seen in 25 patients and anaerobic bacterial growth was seen in culture smears of 15 patients. Streptococcus viridans was the most frequently isolated bacteria among the aerobes, whereas Bacteroides and Prevotella were the most common bacterial species among anaerobes. Empirical antibiotic therapy in the form of Co amoxiclav and Metronidazole was given. Incision and drainage followed by extraction of the offending tooth/teeth was carried out. It was concluded that odontogenic infections were mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were necessary to isolate all pathogens. Successful management of these infections depends on changing the environment through decompression, removal of the etiologic factor and by choosing the proper antibiotic.

  16. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclare, Pierre; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Widmer, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13 C- and 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  17. Purification, crystallization and diffraction studies of the methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from antibiotic-resistant pathogens of the genus Bacteroides from the human intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Veerendra; Mallika, Nagarajan; Sivaraman, J.

    2011-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization and diffraction of two methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from two Bacteroides species of antibiotic-resistant pathogens from the human intestine are reported. The methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from two different Bacteroides species that are antibiotic-resistant pathogens from the human intestine were cloned, overexpressed and purified, yielding approximately 120 mg of each protein from 1 l culture. Apo BT-2972 and BVU-3255 and their complexes with S-adenosylmethionine or S-adenosylhomocysteine were crystallized in four different crystal forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. These crystals diffracted to resolutions ranging from 2.8 to 2.2 Å. Sequence analysis suggested that the two proteins are homologous small-molecule methyltransferases

  18. Vitamin B12 Uptake by the gut commensal bacteria bacteroides thetaiotaomicron limits the production of shiga toxin by enterohemorrhagic escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Le Bihan , Guillaume; Emond-Rheault , Jean-Guillaume; Garrivier, Annie; Harel, Josee; Jubelin, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are foodborne pathogens responsible for the development of bloody diarrhea and renal failure in humans. Many environmental factors have been shown to regulate the production of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), the main virulence factor of EHEC. Among them, soluble factors produced by human gut microbiota and in particular, by the predominant species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron), inhibit Stx2 gene expression. In this study, we investigated t...

  19. Characterisation of a multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolate recovered from blood of a patient in Denmark using whole-genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ank, Nina; Sydenham, Thomas V; Iversen, Lene H

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a patient undergoing extensive abdominal surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy due to primary adenocarcinoma in the sigmoid colon with peritoneal carcinomatosis. During hospitalisation the patient suffered from bacteraemia with a multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fr...... fragilis isolate. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolate resulted in identification of nimE, cfiA and ermF genes corresponding to metronidazole, carbapenem and clindamycin resistance....

  20. Alterations of Bacteroides sp., Neisseria sp., Actinomyces sp., and Streptococcus sp. populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome are associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haifeng; Qian, Guirong; Ren, Zhigang; Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Wei; Ye, Ping; Yang, Yunmei; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-06-23

    The microbiomes of humans are associated with liver and lung inflammation. We identified and verified alterations of the oropharyngeal microbiome and assessed their association with cirrhosis and pneumonia. Study components were as follows: (1) determination of the temporal stability of the oropharyngeal microbiome; (2) identification of oropharyngeal microbial variation in 90 subjects; (3) quantitative identification of disease-associated bacteria. DNAs enriched in bacterial sequences were produced from low-biomass oropharyngeal swabs using whole genome amplification and were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. Whole genome amplification combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis monitored successfully oropharyngeal microbial variations and showed that the composition of each subject's oropharyngeal microbiome remained relatively stable during the follow-up. The microbial composition of cirrhotic patients with pneumonia differed from those of others and clustered together in subgroup analysis. Further, species richness and the value of Shannon's diversity and evenness index increased significantly in patients with cirrhosis and pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Moreover, we identified variants of Bacteroides, Eubacterium, Lachnospiraceae, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus through phylogenetic analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that the populations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, and Actinomycetes increased, while that of Streptococcus decreased in cirrhotic patients with pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Alterations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome were associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

  1. Suppurative otitis and ascending meningoencephalitis associated with Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae in a captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) with toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, Federico; Schapira, Andrea; Anderson, Mark; Clothier, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    A 6-year-old female Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at a zoo in California developed acute ataxia and left-sided circling. Despite intensive care, clinical signs progressed to incoordination and prostration, and the animal was euthanized. At necropsy, the left tympanic cavity was filled with homogeneous suppurative exudate that extended into the cranium expanding the meninges and neuroparenchyma in the lateral and ventral aspect of the caudal ipsilateral brainstem and medulla oblongata. Microscopically, the brainstem showed regional severe suppurative meningoencephalitis with large numbers of neutrophils, fewer macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with fibrin, necrotic cellular debris, hemorrhage, and mineralization, with numerous intralesional Gram-negative bacilli. Bacteroides spp. and Porphyromonas spp. were isolated on anaerobic culture from the meninges, and the bacteria were further characterized by partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae. Bacterial aerobic culture from the meninges yielded very low numbers of mixed flora and Proteus spp., which were considered contaminants. Culture of Mycoplasma spp. from middle ear and meninges was negative. Additionally, Toxoplasma gondii cysts were detected by immunohistochemistry in the heart and brain, and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were detected in serum. The genera Bacteroides and Porphyromonas have been associated with oral disease in marsupials; but not with otitis and meningoencephalitis. The results of the present work highlight the importance of performing anaerobic cultures in the diagnostic investigation of cases of suppurative otitis and meningoencephalitis in macropods. © 2014 The Author(s).

  2. Distribution and Abundance of Human Specific Bacteroides and Relation to Traditional Indicators in an Urban Tropical Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nshimyimana, J.; Shanahan, P.; Thompson, J. R.; Ekklesia, E.; Chua Hock Chye, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria above recreational water quality criteria; their sources and distribution are unknown. The primary goals of this study were to determine the distribution of fecal indicator bacteria in drainages and water bodies in the Kranji reservoir catchment area. Total coliforms, E. coli, and the DNA-based HF marker (targeting a human specific strain of Bacteroides) were quantified in 27 samples collected in January 2009 and 54 samples collected in July 2009. Correlation of HF marker cell equivalents (CE) and E. coli abundance (colony forming units (CFU) or Most Probable Number (MPN)) to different land-use categories revealed potential sources of fecal contamination to the Kranji reservoir. Notably, areas designated as farming/agricultural were associated with the highest levels of E. coli (geometric mean 30,500 CFU/100 ml) and HF marker (1.23±1.13x106 CE/100 ml ± S.D.) while in general lower HF marker and E. coli levels were observed in residential areas, undeveloped areas, and within the Kranji reservoir (i.e. Kranji Reservoir had 2 to 17 MPN/100 ml of E. coli and 103 to 105 HF marker CE/100 ml). A partial survey of potential point sources for fecal contamination within the farming area revealed a wastewater effluent stream with HF marker levels exceeding 107 CE/100ml. As observed in previous studies, total coliforms and E. coli levels were weakly (Rcoliforms) and molecular indicators (HF marker) may be explained by differences in the ability of the respective organisms to grow or survive under aerated tropical conditions. The HF marker sequence matches that of Bacteroides dorei, an obligate anaerobe that is not expected to grow in aerated surface waters. In contrast, numerous studies have demonstrated that total coliforms, including E. coli, are able to

  3. Commensal Bacteroides species induce colitis in host-genotype-specific fashion in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Seth M.; Bijanki, Vinieth N.; Nava, Gerardo M.; Sun, Lulu; Malvin, Nicole P.; Donermeyer, David L.; Dunne, W. Michael; Allen, Paul M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal microbiota is important for induction of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with complex shifts in microbiota composition, but it is unclear whether specific bacterial subsets induce IBD and, if so, whether their proportions in the microbiota are altered during disease. Here we fulfilled Koch’s postulates in host-genotype-specific fashion using a mouse model of IBD with human-relevant disease-susceptibility mutations. From screening experiments we isolated common commensal Bacteroides species, introduced them into antibiotic-pretreated mice, and quantitatively re-isolated them in culture. The bacteria colonized IBD-susceptible and non-susceptible mice equivalently, but induced disease exclusively in susceptible animals. Conversely, commensal Enterobacteriaceae were >100-fold enriched during spontaneous disease but an Enterobacteriaceae isolate failed to induce disease in antibiotic-pretreated mice despite robust colonization. We thus demonstrate that IBD-associated microbiota alterations do not necessarily reflect underlying disease etiology. These findings establish important experimental criteria and a conceptual framework for understanding microbial contributions to IBD. PMID:21575910

  4. Quantitative metabolomics of a xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylose isomerase on glucose and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, M J; Rose, S H; la Grange, D C; Bamba, T; Hasunuma, T; Kondo, A; van Zyl, W H

    2017-10-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot utilize xylose, but the introduction of a xylose isomerase that functions well in yeast will help overcome the limitations of the fungal oxido-reductive pathway. In this study, a diploid S. cerevisiae S288c[2n YMX12] strain was constructed expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylA (XI) and the Scheffersomyces stipitis xyl3 (XK) and the changes in the metabolite pools monitored over time. Cultivation on xylose generally resulted in gradual changes in metabolite pool size over time, whereas more dramatic fluctuations were observed with cultivation on glucose due to the diauxic growth pattern. The low G6P and F1,6P levels observed with cultivation on xylose resulted in the incomplete activation of the Crabtree effect, whereas the high PEP levels is indicative of carbon starvation. The high UDP-D-glucose levels with cultivation on xylose indicated that the carbon was channeled toward biomass production. The adenylate and guanylate energy charges were tightly regulated by the cultures, while the catabolic and anabolic reduction charges fluctuated between metabolic states. This study helped elucidate the metabolite distribution that takes place under Crabtree-positive and Crabtree-negative conditions when cultivating S. cerevisiae on glucose and xylose, respectively.

  5. Structure of a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) family protein from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of a novel MACPF protein, which may play a role in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to host environments in the human gut, was determined and analyzed. Membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) proteins are transmembrane pore-forming proteins that are important in both human immunity and the virulence of pathogens. Bacterial MACPFs are found in diverse bacterial species, including most human gut-associated Bacteroides species. The crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF-domain-containing protein BT-3439 (Bth-MACPF) from B. thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the mammalian intestinal microbiota, has been determined. Bth-MACPF contains a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and two novel C-terminal domains that resemble ribonuclease H and interleukin 8, respectively. The entire protein adopts a flat crescent shape, characteristic of other MACPF proteins, that may be important for oligomerization. This Bth-MACPF structure provides new features and insights not observed in two previous MACPF structures. Genomic context analysis infers that Bth-MACPF may be involved in a novel protein-transport or nutrient-uptake system, suggesting an important role for these MACPF proteins, which were likely to have been inherited from eukaryotes via horizontal gene transfer, in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to the host environment

  6. Analysis of the outer membrane proteome and secretome of Bacteroides fragilis reveals a multiplicity of secretion mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena M Wilson

    Full Text Available Bacteroides fragilis is a widely distributed member of the human gut microbiome and an opportunistic pathogen. Cell surface molecules produced by this organism likely play important roles in colonization, communication with other microbes, and pathogenicity, but the protein composition of the outer membrane (OM and the mechanisms used to transport polypeptides into the extracellular space are poorly characterized. Here we used LC-MS/MS to analyze the OM proteome and secretome of B. fragilis NCTC 9343 grown under laboratory conditions. Of the 229 OM proteins that we identified, 108 are predicted to be lipoproteins, and 61 are predicted to be TonB-dependent transporters. Based on their proximity to genes encoding TonB-dependent transporters, many of the lipoprotein genes likely encode proteins involved in nutrient or small molecule uptake. Interestingly, protease accessibility and biotinylation experiments indicated that an unusually large fraction of the lipoproteins are cell-surface exposed. We also identified three proteins that are members of a novel family of autotransporters, multiple potential type I protein secretion systems, and proteins that appear to be components of a type VI secretion apparatus. The secretome consisted of lipoproteins and other proteins that might be substrates of the putative type I or type VI secretion systems. Our proteomic studies show that B. fragilis differs considerably from well-studied Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli in both the spectrum of OM proteins that it produces and the range of secretion strategies that it utilizes.

  7. Structure of the GH76 α-mannanase homolog, BT2949, from the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Cuskin, Fiona; Spears, Richard J.; Dabin, Jerome; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2015-01-01

    A high-resolution structure of a noncanonical α-mannanase relevant to human health and nutrition has been solved via heavy-atom phasing of a selenomethionine derivative. The large bowel microbiota, a complex ecosystem resident within the gastrointestinal tract of all human beings and large mammals, functions as an essential, nonsomatic metabolic organ, hydrolysing complex dietary polysaccharides and modulating the host immune system to adequately tolerate ingested antigens. A significant member of this community, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, has evolved a complex system for sensing and processing a wide variety of natural glycoproducts in such a way as to provide maximum benefit to itself, the wider microbial community and the host. The immense ability of B. thetaiotaomicron as a ‘glycan specialist’ resides in its enormous array of carbohydrate-active enzymes, many of which are arranged into polysaccharide-utilization loci (PULs) that are able to degrade sugar polymers that are often inaccessible to other gut residents, notably α-mannan. The B. thetaiotaomicron genome encodes ten putative α-mannanases spread across various PULs; however, little is known about the activity of these enzymes or the wider implications of α-mannan metabolism for the health of both the microbiota and the host. In this study, SAD phasing of a selenomethionine derivative has been used to investigate the structure of one such B. thetaiotaomicron enzyme, BT2949, which belongs to the GH76 family of α-mannanases. BT2949 presents a classical (α/α) 6 -barrel structure comprising a large extended surface cleft common to other GH76 family members. Analysis of the structure in conjunction with sequence alignments reveals the likely location of the catalytic active site of this noncanonical GH76

  8. Biochemical and Structural Analyses of Two Cryptic Esterases in Bacteroides intestinalis and their Synergistic Activities with Cognate Xylanases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Daniel; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Schendel, Rachel R; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Wang, Kui; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Mackie, Roderick I; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Cann, Isaac

    2017-08-04

    Arabinoxylans are constituents of the human diet. Although not utilizable by the human host, they can be fermented by colonic bacteria. The arabinoxylan backbone is decorated with arabinose side chains that may be substituted with ferulic acid, thus limiting depolymerization to fermentable sugars. We investigated the polypeptides encoded by two genes upregulated during growth of the colonic bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis on wheat arabinoxylan. The recombinant proteins, designated BiFae1A and BiFae1B, were functionally assigned esterase activities. Both enzymes were active on acetylated substrates, although each showed a higher ferulic acid esterase activity on methyl-ferulate. BiFae1A showed a catalytic efficiency of 12mM s -1 on para-nitrophenyl-acetate, and on methyl-ferulate, the value was 27 times higher. BiFae1B showed low catalytic efficiencies for both substrates. Furthermore, the two enzymes released ferulic acid from various structural elements, and NMR spectroscopy indicated complete de-esterification of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides from wheat bran. BiFae1A is a tetramer based on the crystal structure, whereas BiFae1B is a dimer in solution based on size exclusion chromatography. The structure of BiFae1A was solved to 1.98Å resolution, and two tetramers were observed in the asymmetric unit. A flexible loop that may act as a hinge over the active site and likely coordinates critical interactions with the substrate was prominent in BiFae1A. Sequence alignments of the esterase domains in BiFae1B with the feruloyl esterase from Clostridium thermocellum suggest that both domains lack the flexible hinge in BiFae1A, an observation that may partly provide a molecular basis for the differences in activities in the two esterases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of the GH76 α-mannanase homolog, BT2949, from the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Andrew J. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Cuskin, Fiona [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Spears, Richard J.; Dabin, Jerome; Turkenburg, Johan P. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Harry J., E-mail: harry.gilbert@newcastle.ac.uk [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Davies, Gideon J., E-mail: harry.gilbert@newcastle.ac.uk [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    A high-resolution structure of a noncanonical α-mannanase relevant to human health and nutrition has been solved via heavy-atom phasing of a selenomethionine derivative. The large bowel microbiota, a complex ecosystem resident within the gastrointestinal tract of all human beings and large mammals, functions as an essential, nonsomatic metabolic organ, hydrolysing complex dietary polysaccharides and modulating the host immune system to adequately tolerate ingested antigens. A significant member of this community, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, has evolved a complex system for sensing and processing a wide variety of natural glycoproducts in such a way as to provide maximum benefit to itself, the wider microbial community and the host. The immense ability of B. thetaiotaomicron as a ‘glycan specialist’ resides in its enormous array of carbohydrate-active enzymes, many of which are arranged into polysaccharide-utilization loci (PULs) that are able to degrade sugar polymers that are often inaccessible to other gut residents, notably α-mannan. The B. thetaiotaomicron genome encodes ten putative α-mannanases spread across various PULs; however, little is known about the activity of these enzymes or the wider implications of α-mannan metabolism for the health of both the microbiota and the host. In this study, SAD phasing of a selenomethionine derivative has been used to investigate the structure of one such B. thetaiotaomicron enzyme, BT2949, which belongs to the GH76 family of α-mannanases. BT2949 presents a classical (α/α){sub 6}-barrel structure comprising a large extended surface cleft common to other GH76 family members. Analysis of the structure in conjunction with sequence alignments reveals the likely location of the catalytic active site of this noncanonical GH76.

  10. Degradation of fructans and production of propionic acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are enhanced by shortage of amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe eAdamberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by the catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae, two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (DP > 3. Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h, followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of D-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will be studied in

  11. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation.Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene.B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats.B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to the identification of novel microbial targets

  12. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis by metallo-β-lactamase CcrA from Bacteroides fragilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Le; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Ya-Jun [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Ke-Wu, E-mail: kwyang@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2013-03-20

    Highlights: ► First report the thermokinetic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with CcrA. ► The hydrolysis is a spontaneous and exothermic reaction with order of 1.4. ► Summarized that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among β-lactam antibiotics. - Abstract: One of the most common way that bacteria become resistant to antibiotics is by the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) to hydrolyze the β-lactam-containing antibiotics. In this paper, the thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with B1 subclasses MβL CcrA (carbapenem and cephamycin resistance) from Bacteroides fragilis were determined by microcalorimetry. The activation free energy ΔG{sub ≠}{sup θ} is 87.90 ± 0.03, 88.99 ± 0.01, 89.93 ± 0.04 and 90.93 ± 0.05 kJ mol{sup −1} at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15 K, activation enthalpy ΔH{sub ≠}{sup θ} is 29.21 ± 0.03 kJ mol{sup −1}, activation entropy ΔS{sub ≠}{sup θ} is −200.34 ± 0.08 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, the reaction order is 1.4, and the apparent activation energy E is 31.71 kJ mol{sup −1}. The thermodynamic characterization indicated that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among three kinds of β-lactam-containing antibiotics.

  13. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis by metallo-β-lactamase CcrA from Bacteroides fragilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Le; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Ya-Jun; Yang, Ke-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► First report the thermokinetic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with CcrA. ► The hydrolysis is a spontaneous and exothermic reaction with order of 1.4. ► Summarized that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among β-lactam antibiotics. - Abstract: One of the most common way that bacteria become resistant to antibiotics is by the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) to hydrolyze the β-lactam-containing antibiotics. In this paper, the thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with B1 subclasses MβL CcrA (carbapenem and cephamycin resistance) from Bacteroides fragilis were determined by microcalorimetry. The activation free energy ΔG ≠ θ is 87.90 ± 0.03, 88.99 ± 0.01, 89.93 ± 0.04 and 90.93 ± 0.05 kJ mol −1 at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15 K, activation enthalpy ΔH ≠ θ is 29.21 ± 0.03 kJ mol −1 , activation entropy ΔS ≠ θ is −200.34 ± 0.08 J mol −1 K −1 , the reaction order is 1.4, and the apparent activation energy E is 31.71 kJ mol −1 . The thermodynamic characterization indicated that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among three kinds of β-lactam-containing antibiotics

  14. Detection of Increased Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Prevalence of Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus in the Feces of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Aline Zazeri; Rodrigues, Nathália de Campos; Gonzaga, Marina Ignácio; Paiolo, João Carlos Cicogna; de Souza, Carolina Arantes; Stefanutto, Nadine Aparecida Vicentini; Omori, Wellington Pine; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Brisotti, João Luiz; Matheucci Junior, Euclides; Mariano, Vânia Sammartino; de Oliveira, Gislane Lelis Vilela

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and metabolic endotoxemia have been associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients and correlate these data with inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plasma concentrations. This study was approved by the Ethics Committees from Barretos Cancer Hospital and all individuals signed the informed consent form. Stool samples were required for DNA extraction, and the V3/V4 regions of bacterial 16S were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Peripheral blood was used to quantify inflammatory cytokines and plasma LPS concentrations, by CBA flex and ELISA, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann–Whitney and Spearman’s tests. Analysis of variance, diversity indexes, and analysis of alpha- and beta-diversity were conducted using an annotated Operational Taxonomic Unit table. This study included 20 patients and 22 controls. We observed significant differences (P Prevotella copri, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides rodentium, and Bacteroides xylanisolvens. The proinflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly increased (P Prevotella species, and a positive correlation between the LPS levels and P. copri reads. The P. copri and B. vulgatus species were associated with insulin resistance in previous studies. In this study, we suggested that the prevalence of Gram-negative species in the gut and the increased plasma IL-6 in patients could be linked to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. In conclusion, the P. copri and B. vulgatus species could represent an intestinal microbiota signature, associated with T2D development. Furthermore, the identification of these Gram-negative bacteria, and the detection of inflammatory markers, such as increased IL-6, could be used as diabetes predictive markers in overweight, obese and in genetically predisposed

  15. Detection of Increased Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Prevalence ofPrevotella copriandBacteroides vulgatusin the Feces of Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Aline Zazeri; Rodrigues, Nathália de Campos; Gonzaga, Marina Ignácio; Paiolo, João Carlos Cicogna; de Souza, Carolina Arantes; Stefanutto, Nadine Aparecida Vicentini; Omori, Wellington Pine; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Brisotti, João Luiz; Matheucci Junior, Euclides; Mariano, Vânia Sammartino; de Oliveira, Gislane Lelis Vilela

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and metabolic endotoxemia have been associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients and correlate these data with inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plasma concentrations. This study was approved by the Ethics Committees from Barretos Cancer Hospital and all individuals signed the informed consent form. Stool samples were required for DNA extraction, and the V3/V4 regions of bacterial 16S were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Peripheral blood was used to quantify inflammatory cytokines and plasma LPS concentrations, by CBA flex and ELISA, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann-Whitney and Spearman's tests. Analysis of variance, diversity indexes, and analysis of alpha- and beta-diversity were conducted using an annotated Operational Taxonomic Unit table. This study included 20 patients and 22 controls. We observed significant differences ( P  Prevotella copri, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides rodentium , and Bacteroides xylanisolvens . The proinflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly increased ( P  Prevotella species, and a positive correlation between the LPS levels and P. copri reads. The P. copri and B. vulgatus species were associated with insulin resistance in previous studies. In this study, we suggested that the prevalence of Gram-negative species in the gut and the increased plasma IL-6 in patients could be linked to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. In conclusion, the P. copri and B. vulgatus species could represent an intestinal microbiota signature, associated with T2D development. Furthermore, the identification of these Gram-negative bacteria, and the detection of inflammatory markers, such as increased IL-6, could be used as diabetes predictive markers in overweight, obese and in genetically predisposed

  16. Monocolonization with Bacteroides ovatus protects immunodeficient SCID mice from mortality in chronic intestinal inflammation caused by long-lasting dextran sodium sulfate treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudcovic, Tomáš; Kozáková, Hana; Kolínská, Jiřina; Štěpánková, Renata; Hrnčíř, Tomáš; Tlaskalová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2009), s. 101-110 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/04/0849; GA ČR GA303/08/0367; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/05/2249; GA ČR GA303/06/0974; GA MŠk 2B06053; GA MŠk 2B06155; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : bacteroides ovatus * ulcerative colitis * dextran sulfate sodium colitis Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  17. Detection of Increased Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Prevalence of Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus in the Feces of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Zazeri Leite

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal dysbiosis and metabolic endotoxemia have been associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients and correlate these data with inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides (LPS plasma concentrations. This study was approved by the Ethics Committees from Barretos Cancer Hospital and all individuals signed the informed consent form. Stool samples were required for DNA extraction, and the V3/V4 regions of bacterial 16S were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Peripheral blood was used to quantify inflammatory cytokines and plasma LPS concentrations, by CBA flex and ELISA, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann–Whitney and Spearman’s tests. Analysis of variance, diversity indexes, and analysis of alpha- and beta-diversity were conducted using an annotated Operational Taxonomic Unit table. This study included 20 patients and 22 controls. We observed significant differences (P < 0.01 in the microbiota composition (beta-diversity between patients and controls, suggesting intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients. The prevalent species found in patients’ feces were the Gram-negatives Prevotella copri, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides rodentium, and Bacteroides xylanisolvens. The proinflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6 was significantly increased (P < 0.05 in patients’ plasma and LPS levels were decreased. We find correlations between the proinflammatory interferon-gamma with Gram-negatives Bacteroides and Prevotella species, and a positive correlation between the LPS levels and P. copri reads. The P. copri and B. vulgatus species were associated with insulin resistance in previous studies. In this study, we suggested that the prevalence of Gram-negative species in the gut and the increased plasma IL-6 in patients could be linked to low

  18. In Vitro Anaerobic Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model to Simulate the Bactericidal Activity of Levornidazole Against Bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiali; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yuancheng; Liang, Wang; Wu, Shi

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to correlate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters with PD indices of levornidazole against Bacteroides fragilis and to calculate the PK/PD target value for levornidazole to attain its expected maximal bactericidal effect using an in vitro anaerobic dynamic PK/PD model. An anaerobic dynamic PK/PD model was developed in vitro. The scheme for PK modeling was designed according to the PK parameters of levornidazole in the human body. The device of 2-compartment PK/PD model was constructed by using digital control of flow rate to simulate 4 regimens of single-dose intravenous infusion of levornidazole to determine the bactericidal activity of levornidazole against the 3 strains of B fragilis within 72 hours. PD parameters such as reduction of colony count within 24 hours (∆Log 24h ), area under bactericidal curve (AUBC), and 2-hour initial killing rate (IKR) were calculated and correlated with PK/PD parameters. Sigmoid E max model of levornidazole was established to calculate PK/PD target values to attain corresponding PD effect. PK and PD validation proved the stability of the model in simulating levornidazole against B fragilis and the precision and accuracy in the results of PK modeling. C max and AUC 0-24h found only -1.46% and -6.72% differences from the values in vivo. Our study found that ∆Log 24h , AUBC, and IKR were more correlated with AUC 0-24h /MIC and C max /MIC than with %T>MIC. According to ∆Log 24h , the PK/PD target values of AUC 0-24h /MIC, C max /MIC, and %T>MIC of levornidazole against B fragilis were 157.6%, 14.1%, and 56.4%, respectively. Our findings are useful for optimizing the clinical dosing regimen of levornidazole sodium chloride injection to attain maximal bactericidal effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Consistency in the host specificity and host sensitivity of the Bacteroides HF183 marker for sewage pollution tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W; Masters, N; Toze, S

    2012-10-01

    The host specificity (H-SPF) and host sensitivity (H-SNV) values of the sewage-associated HF183 Bacteroides marker in the current study were compared with the previously published studies in South East Queensland (SEQ), Australia, by testing a large number of wastewater and faecal DNA samples (n=293) from 11 target and nontarget host groups. This was carried out to obtain information on the consistency in the H-SPF and H-SNV values of the HF183 marker for sewage pollution tracking in SEQ. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used to determine the presence/absence of the HF183 marker in wastewater and faecal DNA samples. Among the human composite wastewater (n=59) from sewage treatment plants and individual human (n=20) faecal DNA samples tested, 75 (95%) were PCR positive for the HF183 marker. The overall H-SNV of this marker in target host group was 0·95 (maximum of 1·00). Among the 214 nontarget animal faecal DNA samples tested, 201 (94%) samples were negative for the HF183 marker. Six chicken, five dog and two bird faecal DNA samples, however, were positive for the marker. The overall H-SPF of the HF183 marker to differentiate between target and nontarget faecal DNA samples was 0·94 (maximum of 1·00). The H-SNV (0·95) and H-SPF (0·94) values obtained in this study was slightly lower than previous studies (H-SNV value of 1·00 in 2007 and 1·00 in 2009; H-SPF value of 1·00 in 2007 and 0·99 in 2009). Nonetheless, the overall high H-SNV (0·98) and H-SPF (0·97) values of the HF183 marker over the past 4 years (i.e. 2007-2011) suggest that the HF183 marker can be reliably used for the detection of sewage pollution in environmental waters in SEQ. In the current study, the HF183 marker was detected in small number nontarget animal faecal samples. Care should be taken to interpret results obtained from catchments or waterways that might be potentially contaminated with dog faecal matter or poultry litter. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety of ‘heat-treated milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Poulsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA NDA Panel was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘pasteurised milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food (NF) in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97. Pasteurised or ultra-high-temp......Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA NDA Panel was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘pasteurised milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food (NF) in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97. Pasteurised or ultra......-high-temperature-treated milk is used for the fermentation process with B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964. After fermentation the product is heat treated for one hour at 75 °C to ensure the absence of viable B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964. The Panel considers the information provided on the identity and characterisation of B....... xylanisolvens DSM 23964 to be sufficient. The production process encompasses standard techniques used by the dairy industry, is sufficiently described by the applicant and does not give rise to safety concerns. The Panel considers that the information provided on the production process and on the content...

  1. Surgical infections: a microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Saini

    Full Text Available Surgical infections are mostly polymicrobial, involving both aerobes and anaerobes. One hundred seventeen cases comprised of abscesses (n=51, secondary peritonitis (n=25, necrotizing fascitis (n=22 and wounds with devitalized tissues (n=19 were studied. The number of microorganisms isolated per lesion was highest in secondary peritonitis (2.32. The aerobe/ anaerobe ratio was 0.81 in secondary peritonitis and 1.8 in necrotizing fascitis. Most secondary peritonitis (80%, necrotizing fascitis (75% and wounds with devitalized tissues (66.7% were polymicrobial. Common microorganisms isolated in our study were E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis and Peptostreptococcus spp. The most effective antibiotics for S. aureus were clindamycin (79.1% and cefuroxime (70.8%. For Gram-negatives (Klebsiella spp., E. coli and Proteus spp., the most effective antibiotics were cefotaxime, ceftizoxime, amikacin and ciprofloxacin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was maximally sensitive to amikacin (35.2% and ciprofloxacin (35.2%. The greatest degree of multidrug resistance to all the drugs was found in P. aeruginosa (52.9%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (33.3%, Proteus spp. (33.3%, E. coli (22.2%, and S. aureus (12.5%. All the anaerobes that we isolated were 100% sensitive to metronidazole and chloramphenicol, followed by clindamycin (95% to 100%. Apart from antibiotic therapy, non-antimicrobial methods, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy and debridement also play an important role in the treatment of surgical infections.

  2. In vitro activity of trovafloxacin against Bacteroides fragilis in mixed culture with either Escherichia coli or a vancomycin- resistant strain of Enterococcus faecium determined by an anaerobic time-kill technique.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E.T. Stearne (Lorna); C. Kooi; W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma); I.C. Gyssens (Inge)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractTo determine the efficacy of trovafloxacin as a possible treatment for intra-abdominal abscesses, we have developed an anaerobic time-kill technique using different inocula to study the in vitro killing of Bacteroides fragilis in pure culture or in mixed

  3. Microbial enterotypes, inferred by the prevotella-to-bacteroides ratio, remained stable during a 6-month randomized controlled diet intervention with the new nordic diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Licht, Tine Rask; Poulsen, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the human gut microbiota can be divided into enterotypes based on the abundance of specific bacterial groups; however, the biological significance and stability of these enterotypes remain unresolved. Here, we demonstrated that subjects (n = 62) 18 to 65 years old...... with central obesity and components of metabolic syndrome could be grouped into two discrete groups simply by their relative abundance of Prevotella spp. divided by Bacteroides spp. (P/B ratio) obtained by quantitative PCR analysis. Furthermore, we showed that these groups remained stable during a 6-month......, controlled dietary intervention, where the effect of consuming a diet in accord with the new Nordic diet (NND) recommendations as opposed to consuming the average Danish diet (ADD) on the gut microbiota was investigated. In this study, subjects (with and without stratification according to P/B ratio) did...

  4. Pre-treatment microbial Prevotella-to-Bacteroides ratio, determines body fat loss success during a 6-month randomized controlled diet intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, M F; Roager, Henrik Munch; Larsen, T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the abundance of specific bacterial genera, the human gut microbiota can be divided into two relatively stable groups that might play a role in personalized nutrition. We studied these simplified enterotypes as prognostic markers for successful body fat loss on two different diets. A total....... divided by Bacteroides spp. (P/B ratio) obtained by quantitative PCR analysis. Modifications of dietary effects of pre-treatment P/B group were examined by linear mixed models. Among individuals with high P/B the NND resulted in a 3.15 kg (95%CI 1.55;4.76, Pfat loss compared to ADD...... to lose body fat on diets high in fiber and wholegrain than subjects with a low P/B-ratio....

  5. Pre-treatment microbial Prevotella-to-Bacteroides ratio, determines body fat loss success during a 6-month randomized controlled diet intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, M F; Roager, Henrik Munch; Larsen, T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the abundance of specific bacterial genera, the human gut microbiota can be divided into two relatively stable groups that might play a role in personalized nutrition. We studied these simplified enterotypes as prognostic markers for successful body fat loss on two different diets. A total...... of 62 participants with increased waist circumference were randomly assigned to receive an ad libitum New Nordic Diet (NND) high in fiber/wholegrain or an Average Danish Diet (ADD) for 26 weeks. Participants were grouped into two discrete enterotypes by their relative abundance of Prevotella spp....... divided by Bacteroides spp. (P/B ratio) obtained by quantitative PCR analysis. Modifications of dietary effects of pre-treatment P/B group were examined by linear mixed models. Among individuals with high P/B the NND resulted in a 3.15 kg (95%CI 1.55;4.76, Ploss compared to ADD...

  6. Prebiotic effects of wheat arabinoxylan related to the increase in bifidobacteria, Roseburia and Bacteroides/Prevotella in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyrinck, Audrey M; Possemiers, Sam; Druart, Céline; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Backer, Fabienne; Cani, Patrice D; Larondelle, Yvan; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of gut microbiota--known as dysbiosis--has been proposed to contribute to the development of obesity, thereby supporting the potential interest of nutrients targeting the gut with beneficial effect for host adiposity. We test the ability of a specific concentrate of water-extractable high molecular weight arabinoxylans (AX) from wheat to modulate both the gut microbiota and lipid metabolism in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese mice. Mice were fed either a control diet (CT) or a HF diet, or a HF diet supplemented with AX (10% w/w) during 4 weeks. AX supplementation restored the number of bacteria that were decreased upon HF feeding, i.e. Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and Roseburia spp. Importantly, AX treatment markedly increased caecal bifidobacteria content, in particular Bifidobacterium animalis lactis. This effect was accompanied by improvement of gut barrier function and by a lower circulating inflammatory marker. Interestingly, rumenic acid (C18:2 c9,t11) was increased in white adipose tissue due to AX treatment, suggesting the influence of gut bacterial metabolism on host tissue. In parallel, AX treatment decreased adipocyte size and HF diet-induced expression of genes mediating differentiation, fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation and inflammation, and decreased a key lipogenic enzyme activity in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Furthermore, AX treatment significantly decreased HF-induced adiposity, body weight gain, serum and hepatic cholesterol accumulation and insulin resistance. Correlation analysis reveals that Roseburia spp. and Bacteroides/Prevotella levels inversely correlate with these host metabolic parameters. Supplementation of a concentrate of water-extractable high molecular weight AX in the diet counteracted HF-induced gut dysbiosis together with an improvement of obesity and lipid-lowering effects. We postulate that hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity effects are related to changes in gut

  7. Monitoring Bacteroides spp. markers, nutrients, metals and Escherichia coli in soil and leachate after land application of three types of municipal biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Crystal A; Jordan, Katerina S; Habash, Marc B; Dunfield, Kari E

    2015-03-01

    A lysimeter-based field study was done to monitor the transfer of culturable Escherichia coli, general (ALLBAC), human (Hf183) and swine (PIG-BAC-1) specific 16S rRNA Bacteroides spp. markers, nutrients and metals through soils and leachate over time following land application of a CP1/Class A as well as two CP2/Class B municipal biosolids (MBs). Hf183 markers were detected up to six days following application in soils receiving dewatered and liquid MBs, but not in leachate, suggesting their use in source tracking is better suited for recent pollution events. The CP2/Class B biosolids and swine manure contributed the highest microbial load with E. coli loads (between 2.5 and 3.7 log CFU (100 mL)(-1)) being greater than North American concentration recommendations for safe recreational water. ALLBAC persisted in soils and leachate receiving all treatments and was detected prior to amendment application demonstrating its unsuitability for identifying the presence of fecal pollution. A significant increase in NO₃-N (for Lystek and dewatered MBs) and total-P (for dewatered and liquid MBs) in leachate was observed in plots receiving the CP1/Class A and CP2/Class B type MBs which exceeded North American guidelines, suggesting impact to surface water. Metal (As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni, Se, Zn and Hg) transfer was negligible in soil and leachate samples receiving all treatments. This study is one of the first to examine the fate of E. coli and Bacteroides spp. markers in situ following the land application of MBs where surface runoff does not apply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation in 2 children with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and its impact on their growth and gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Ritu; Garg, Shashank; Song, Yang; Girotra, Mohit; Cuffari, Carmen; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Dutta, Sudhir K

    2014-11-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is recognized as an alternative therapeutic modality for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI); however, data on its efficacy in children are lacking, including its effect on their growth and fecal microbiota. We report on 2 young children (<3 years old) who failed available therapeutics for RCDI, but responded remarkably well to FMT. Besides resolution of clinical features of C difficile infection (CDI), FMT administration led to marked improvement in their growth, along with increased microbiota diversity, especially proportion of Bacteroides. Our 2 cases illustrate the efficacy of FMT in children with RCDI and its positive effect on their growth and gut microbiota.

  9. Medicago truncatula ENOD40-1 and ENOD40-2 are both involved in nodule initiation and bacteroid development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, X.; Hontelez, J.; Lillo, A.; Guarnerio, C.; Peut, van de D.; Fedorova, E.; Bisseling, T.; Franssen, H.

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of a nitrogen-fixing root nodule on legumes requires the induction of mitotic activity of cortical cells leading to the formation of the nodule primordium and the infection process by which the bacteria enter this primordium. Several genes are up-regulated during these processes,

  10. Staphylococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including Skin infections Pneumonia ...

  11. Ascending necrotizing fasciitis of the face following odontogenic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eugene; Hirsch, Elliot M; Steinberg, Jordan P; Olsson, Alexis B

    2012-05-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face is a rare but extremely dangerous complication of dental infection associated with a nearly 30% mortality rate. This infection spreads rapidly along the superficial fascial planes of the head and neck and can lead to severe disfigurement. Reports in the literature of cases of NF of the face caused by dental infection are few. We report such a case in a 36-year-old woman and review the current standards of diagnosis and management. The patient initially presented with pain and severe swelling in the left side of her face subsequent to a dental infection. The symptoms had progressed quickly and had not improved with administration of oral antibiotics in the outpatient setting. The patient had no palpable crepitus despite its classic association with NF. The infection also took a rare, ascending route of spread with involvement of the temporalis muscle. Cultures taken during debridement grew Streptococcus anginosus and Bacteroides. Biopsies of involved muscle showed histologic evidence of necrosis. Through early surgical intervention including aggressive debridement, and the adjunctive use of appropriate antibiotics, the patient recovered with minimal loss of facial mass and no skin loss. Although NF of the face is rare, the surgeon must maintain a high index of suspicion with any patient presenting after a dental infection with rapid progression of swelling and a disproportionate amount of pain that is unresponsive to antibiotics.

  12. In Silico Analysis of the Small Molecule Content of Outer Membrane Vesicles Produced by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Indicates an Extensive Metabolic Link between Microbe and Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Bryant

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the gut microbiota and its host are of central importance to the health of the host. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs are produced ubiquitously by Gram-negative bacteria including the gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. These vesicles can interact with the host in various ways but until now their complement of small molecules has not been investigated in this context. Using an untargeted high-coverage metabolomic approach we have measured the small molecule content of these vesicles in contrasting in vitro conditions to establish what role these metabolites could perform when packed into these vesicles. B. thetaiotaomicron packs OMVs with a highly conserved core set of small molecules which are strikingly enriched with mouse-digestible metabolites and with metabolites previously shown to be associated with colonization of the murine GIT. By use of an expanded genome-scale metabolic model of B. thetaiotaomicron and a potential host (the mouse we have established many possible metabolic pathways between the two organisms that were previously unknown, and have found several putative novel metabolic functions for mouse that are supported by gene annotations, but that do not currently appear in existing mouse metabolic networks. The lipidome of these OMVs bears no relation to the mouse lipidome, so the purpose of this particular composition of lipids remains unclear. We conclude from this analysis that through intimate symbiotic evolution OMVs produced by B. thetaiotaomicron are likely to have been adopted as a conduit for small molecules bound for the mammalian host in vivo.

  13. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of Bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from Brazilian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Paula Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110 and non-diarrheic (n=65 fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic, and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  14. [Anaerobes analysis in 80 cases with ora maxillofacial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y F

    1999-12-01

    OBJECTIVE:To define the infection types of 80 cases of ora-maxillofacial infection and investigate its anaerobes' distribution and the role of the anaerobes' metabolic products in their identification.METHODS:We isolated and cultured anaerobes from the purulent specimen and applied the gasliquid chromatograph (GLC) technique to analyze the anaerobes' metabolic products to define their genera and species in the meantime.RESULTS:Bacteria were isolated from all of the purulent specimen.Isolation rate of bacteria was 100.00% and isolation rate of anaerobes,which distributed in 8 genera,29 species,was 95.00%. The higher detectable rate of them were respectively peptostreptococcus,petococcus,bacteroides,fusobacterium,verillonella,eubacterium. The rate of mixed infection was 80.00%. The proportion ratio of aerobes and anaerobes was 1:1.08.CONCLUSION:Oral-maxillofacial infection mostly belongs to endogenous mixed infection in which anaerobes are preponderant bacteria. GLC technique is a effective,sensitive,selective and specific method for defining anaerobes' genera and species through analyzing their metabolic products. It is a promising and recommendable rapid anaerobes' identification method comparatively at present.

  15. Postpartum infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Peder; Petersen, Line Kirkeby; Kragstrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    % of all women had experienced one or more self-reported episode of infection. Breast infections (12%) were most frequent, followed by wound (3%), airway (3%), vaginal (3%) and urinary tract infections (3%), endometritis (2%) and "other infections" (2%). Of the women with an infection, 66% (265 of 395...

  16. Susceptibility to Campylobacter infection is associated with the species composition of the human fecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicksved, Johan; Ellström, Patrik; Engstrand, Lars; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2014-09-16

    The gut microbiota is essential for human health, but very little is known about how the composition of this ecosystem can influence and respond to bacterial infections. Here we address this by prospectively studying the gut microbiota composition before, during, and after natural Campylobacter infection in exposed poultry abattoir workers. The gut microbiota composition was analyzed with 16S amplicon sequencing of fecal samples from poultry abattoir workers during the peak season of Campylobacter infection in Sweden. The gut microbiota compositions were compared between individuals who became culture positive for Campylobacter and those who remained negative. Individuals who became Campylobacter positive had a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.007) and Escherichia (P = 0.002) species than those who remained culture negative. Furthermore, this group had a significantly higher abundance of Phascolarctobacterium (P = 0.017) and Streptococcus (P = 0.034) sequences than the Campylobacter-negative group, which had an overrepresentation of Clostridiales (P = 0.017), unclassified Lachnospiraceae (P = 0.008), and Anaerovorax (P = 0.015) sequences. Intraindividual comparisons of the fecal microbiota compositions yielded small differences over time in Campylobacter-negative participants, but significant long-term changes were found in the Campylobacter-positive group (P microbiota reduces resistance to Campylobacter colonization in humans and that Campylobacter infection can have long-term effects on the composition of the human fecal microbiota. Studies using mouse models have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of the gut microbiota in resistance to bacterial enteropathogen colonization. The relative abundances of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides species have been pointed out as important determinants of susceptibility to Gram-negative pathogens in general and Campylobacter infection in particular. In this study, we assessed the

  17. Pinworm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinworm infection Overview Pinworm infection is the most common type of intestinal worm infection in the United States and one of the most common worldwide. Pinworms are thin and white, measuring about 1/4 ...

  18. Structures of complexes of a metal-independent glycosyltransferase GT6 from Bacteroides ovatus with UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) and its hydrolysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tram T K; Stinson, Brittany; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K Ravi

    2014-03-21

    Mammalian members of glycosyltransferase family 6 (GT6) of the CAZy database have a GT-A fold containing a conserved Asp-X-Asp (DXD) sequence that binds an essential metal cofactor. Bacteroides ovatus GT6a represents a GT6 clade found in more than 30 Gram-negative bacteria that is similar in sequence to the catalytic domains of mammalian GT6, but has an Asn(95)-Ala-Asn(97) (NXN) sequence substituted for the DXD motif and metal-independent catalytic activity. Co-crystals of a low activity mutant of BoGT6a (E192Q) with UDP-GalNAc contained protein complexes with intact UDP-GalNAc and two forms with hydrolysis products (UDP plus GalNAc) representing an initial closed complex and later open form primed for product release. Two cationic residues near the C terminus of BoGT6a, Lys(231) and Arg(243), interact with the diphosphate moiety of UDP-GalNAc, but only Lys(231) interacts with the UDP product and may function in leaving group stabilization. The amide group of Asn(95), the first Asn of the NXN motif, interacts with the ribose moiety of the substrate. This metal-independent GT6 resembles its metal-dependent homologs in undergoing conformational changes on binding UDP-GalNAc that arise from structuring the C terminus to cover this substrate. It appears that in the GT6 family, the metal cofactor functions specifically in binding the UDP moiety in the donor substrate and transition state, actions that can be efficiently performed by components of the polypeptide chain.

  19. The symbiotic bacterial surface factor polysaccharide A on Bacteroides fragilis inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in human fetal enterocytes via toll receptors 2 and 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Jiang

    Full Text Available Colonizing bacteria interacting with the immature, unlike the mature, human intestine favors inflammation over immune homeostasis. As a result, ten percent of premature infants under 1500 grams weight develop an inflammatory necrosis of the intestine after birth, e.g., necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. NEC is a major health problem in this population causing extensive morbidity and mortality and an enormous expenditure of health care dollars. NEC can be prevented by giving preterm infants their mother's expressed breast milk or ingesting selective probiotic organisms. Vaginally delivered, breast fed newborns develop health promoting bacteria ("pioneer" bacteria which preferentially stimulate intestinal host defense and anti-inflammation. One such "pioneer" organism is Bacteroides fragilis with a polysaccharide (PSA on its capsule. B. fragilis has been shown developmentally in intestinal lymphocytes and dendritic cells to produce a balanced T-helper cell (TH1/TH2 response and to reduce intestinal inflammation by activity through the TLR2 receptor stimulating IL-10 which inhibits IL-17 causing inflammation. No studies have been done on the role of B. fragilis PSA on fetal enterocytes and its increased inflammation. Accordingly, using human and mouse fetal intestinal models, we have shown that B. fragilis with PSA and PSA alone inhibits IL-1β-induced IL-8 inflammation in fetal and NEC intestine. We have also begun to define the mechanism for this unique inflammation noted in fetal intestine. We have shown that B. fragilis PSA anti-inflammation requires both the TLR2 and TLR4 receptor and is in part mediated by the AP1 transcription factor (TLR2 which is developmentally regulated. These observations may help to devise future preventative treatments of premature infants against NEC.

  20. Effects of Diet on Resource Utilization by a Model Human Gut Microbiota Containing Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, a Symbiont with an Extensive Glycobiome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNulty, Nathan [Washington University, St. Louis; Wu, Meng [Washington University, St. Louis; Erickson, Alison L [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Martens, Eric C [University of Michigan; Pudlo, Nicholas A [University of Michigan; Muegge, Brian [Washington University, St. Louis; Henrissat, Bernard [Universite d' Aix-Marseille I & II; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Gordon, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis

    2013-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is an important metabolic organ, yet little is known about how its individual species interact, establish dominant positions, and respond to changes in environmental factors such as diet. In this study, gnotobiotic mice were colonized with an artificial microbiota comprising 12 sequenced human gut bacterial species and fed oscillating diets of disparate composition. Rapid, reproducible, and reversible changes in the structure of this assemblage were observed. Time-series microbial RNA-Seq analyses revealed staggered functional responses to diet shifts throughout the assemblage that were heavily focused on carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. High-resolution shotgun metaproteomics confirmed many of these responses at a protein level. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, proved exceptionally fit regardless of diet. Its genome encoded more carbohydrate active enzymes than any previously sequenced member of the Bacteroidetes. Transcriptional profiling indicated that B. cellulosilyticus WH2 is an adaptive forager that tailors its versatile carbohydrate utilization strategy to available dietary polysaccharides, with a strong emphasis on plant-derived xylans abundant in dietary staples like cereal grains. Two highly expressed, diet-specific polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) in B. cellulosilyticus WH2 were identified, one with characteristics of xylan utilization systems. Introduction of a B. cellulosilyticus WH2 library comprising .90,000 isogenic transposon mutants into gnotobiotic mice, along with the other artificial community members, confirmed that these loci represent critical diet-specific fitness determinants. Carbohydrates that trigger dramatic increases in expression of these two loci and many of the organism s 111 other predicted PULs were identified by RNA-Seq during in vitro growth on 31 distinct carbohydrate substrates, allowing us to better interpret in vivo RNA-Seq and proteomics data. These results offer insight

  1. Management of odontogenic space infection with microbiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta; Kambalimath, Deepashri H; Gupta, K C

    2014-06-01

    Dental infection has plagued humankind for as long as our civilization has been a fight against microorganisms by man dates back to ancient civilization. The discoveries of antibiotics are encouraging trends towards conquest of the microbial infection. This study emphasizes the detection of pathogenic microorganisms by microbiological examination and culture of specimens representative of the infection, importance of early and correct diagnosis of infections, prompt treatment and supportive care. The age group most commonly involved was in the third and fourth decades of life. Extraction followed by incision and drainage was done. The most commonly involved space was submandibular followed by buccal space. Thirty isolates were obtained. 43 % of the strains were strict anaerobes and 39 % were aerobes, with mixed growth was seen in 18.52 %. Amongst aerobes alpha hemolytic Streptococcus aureus and Peptostreptococcus as anaerobes were the most predominant followed by Bacteroides and Prevotella. Mixed aerobic and anaerobic isolates were obtained from 18.52 % of total cases. Overall resistance to Penicillin was 22 %, amongst aerobes. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic acid combination performed better, as 100 % strains were sensitive to it. The results of this study saw a changing trend in terms of predominance of anaerobic bacteria over aerobic ones.

  2. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, I.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation of a rabbit single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody for specific detection of Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 in both free-living and bacteroid forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Nguyen Xuan; Pruksametanan, Natcha; Srila, Witsanu; Yuttavanichakul, Watcharin; Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Teaumroong, Neung; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2017-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for the detection of specific nitrogen-fixing bacteria in both free-living and bacteroid forms is essential for the development and application of biofertilizer. Traditionally, a polyclonal antibody generated from an immunized rabbit was used for detection. However, the disadvantages of using a polyclonal antibody include limited supply and cross-reactivity to related bacterial strains. This is the first report on the application of phage display technology for the generation of a rabbit recombinant monoclonal antibody for specific detection and monitoring of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in both free-living form and in plant nodules. Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9, a broad host range soil bacteria, originally isolated from the root nodules of Aeschynomene americana in Thailand was used as a model in this study. A recombinant single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody library was constructed from the spleen of a rabbit immunized with DOA9. After three rounds of biopanning, one specific phage-displayed scFv antibody, designated bDOA9rb8, was identified. Specific binding of this antibody was confirmed by phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (phage ELISA). The phage antibody could bind specifically to DOA9 in both free-living cells (pure culture) and bacteroids inside plant nodules. In addition to phage ELISA, specific and robust immunofluorescence staining of both free-living and bacteroid forms could also be observed by confocal-immunofluorescence imaging, without cross-reactivity with other tested bradyrhizobial strains. Moreover, specific binding of free scFv to DOA9 was also demonstrated by ELISA. This recombinant antibody can also be used for the study of the molecular mechanism of plant-microbe interactions in the future.

  5. The gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron influences the virulence potential of the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O103:H25.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildegunn Iversen

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC is associated with severe gastrointestinal disease. Upon entering the gastrointestinal tract, EHEC is exposed to a fluctuating environment and a myriad of other bacterial species. To establish an infection, EHEC strains have to modulate their gene expression according to the GI tract environment. In order to explore the interspecies interactions between EHEC and an human intestinal commensal, the global gene expression profile was determined of EHEC O103:H25 (EHEC NIPH-11060424 co-cultured with B. thetaiotaomicron (CCUG 10774 or grown in the presence of spent medium from B. thetaiotaomicron. Microarray analysis revealed that approximately 1% of the EHEC NIPH-11060424 genes were significantly up-regulated both in co-culture (30 genes and in the presence of spent medium (44 genes, and that the affected genes differed between the two conditions. In co-culture, genes encoding structural components of the type three secretion system were among the most affected genes with an almost 4-fold up-regulation, while the most affected genes in spent medium were involved in chemotaxis and were more than 3-fold up-regulated. The operons for type three secretion system (TTSS are located on the Locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE pathogenicity island, and qPCR showed that genes of all five operons (LEE1-LEE5 were up-regulated. Moreover, an increased adherence to HeLa cells was observed in EHEC NIPH-11060424 exposed to B. thetaiotaomicron. Expression of stx2 genes, encoding the main virulence factor of EHEC, was down-regulated in both conditions (co-culture/spent medium. These results show that expression of EHEC genes involved in colonization and virulence is modulated in response to direct interspecies contact between cells, or to diffusible factors released from B. thetaiotaomicron. Such interspecies interactions could allow the pathogen to recognize its predilection site and modulate its behaviour accordingly, thus increasing

  6. Odontogenic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E

    2017-04-01

    The pathogenesis of odontogenic infection is polymicrobial, consisting of various facultative and strict anaerobes. The dominant isolates are strictly anaerobic gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci. The periapical infection is the most common form of odontogenic infection. Although odontogenic infections are usually confined to the alveolar ridge vicinity, they can spread into deep fascial spaces. Cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, airway obstruction, and mediastinitis are possible complications of dental infections. The most important element in treating odontogenic infections is elimination of the primary source of the infection with antibiotics as adjunctive therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Viljoen

    Full Text Available Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a the presence and b the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5. We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05, age (FDR = 0.03 or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01. Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  8. The Fumarate Reductase of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, unlike That of Escherichia coli, Is Configured so that It Does Not Generate Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Imlay, James A

    2017-01-03

    The impact of oxidative stress upon organismal fitness is most apparent in the phenomenon of obligate anaerobiosis. The root cause may be multifaceted, but the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) likely plays a key role. ROS are formed when redox enzymes accidentally transfer electrons to oxygen rather than to their physiological substrates. In this study, we confirm that the predominant intestinal anaerobe Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron generates intracellular ROS at a very high rate when it is aerated. Fumarate reductase (Frd) is a prominent enzyme in the anaerobic metabolism of many bacteria, including B. thetaiotaomicron, and prior studies of Escherichia coli Frd showed that the enzyme is unusually prone to ROS generation. Surprisingly, in this study biochemical analysis demonstrated that the B. thetaiotaomicron Frd does not react with oxygen at all: neither superoxide nor hydrogen peroxide is formed. Subunit-swapping experiments indicated that this difference does not derive from the flavoprotein subunit at which ROS normally arise. Experiments with the related enzyme succinate dehydrogenase discouraged the hypothesis that heme moieties are responsible. Thus, resistance to oxidation may reflect a shift of electron density away from the flavin moiety toward the iron-sulfur clusters. This study shows that the autoxidizability of a redox enzyme can be suppressed by subtle modifications that do not compromise its physiological function. One implication is that selective pressures might enhance the oxygen tolerance of an organism by manipulating the electronic properties of its redox enzymes so they do not generate ROS. Whether in sediments or pathogenic biofilms, the structures of microbial communities are configured around the sensitivities of their members to oxygen. Oxygen triggers the intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the sensitivity of a microbe to oxygen likely depends upon the rates at which ROS are formed

  9. Hymenobacter roseosalivarius gen. nov., sp. nov. from continental Antartica soils and sandstone: bacteria of the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides line of phylogenetic descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, P; Ludwig, W; Hethke, C; Sittig, M; Hoffmann, B; Gallikowski, C A

    1998-08-01

    Aseptically collected sandstone and soil samples from the antarctic Dry Valleys were inoculated into oligotrophic media and incubated under low light intensities. A total of 41 Gram-negative isolates were obtained with reddish colonies spreading on agar. A sandstone isolate and four soil strains were characterized further. They were nearly identical in morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties. They produced large amounts of extracellular polymer and utilized for growth: glucose, saccharose, mannitol, sorbitol, L-aspartate, malate and acetate, but not D-ribose, adonitol, DL-alanine, glutamate, glycolate, lactate or succinate. All strains hydrolyzed gelatin, starch, casein, xylan, Tweens 80 or 60 and dead or living yeast cells, but not cellulose or pectin. Nitrate was not reduced, ethanol was not oxidized and acid was not produced from maltose, mannitol or dulcitol. Ammonia was not produced from peptone. They were strictly aerobic. Major fatty acids were n 16:1 d 9, n 16:1 d 11, n 17:1 d 11, and i 15:0. The strains contained the quinone MK-7 and phosphatidylethanolamine as the main phospholipid. The base ratio ranged from 55 to 61 mol% G+C. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis of strains AA-688 and AA-718 showed these to be identical and to represent a special phylogenetic group within the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides major line of descent. Three soil strains labeled "Taxeobacter" Txc1, Txg1, and Txo1 (Reichenbach, 1992) belonged to the same group but had lower sequence similarities (<95%). Some of their characteristics were different from those of the antarctic strains: the utilization of C-compounds, hydrolysis of polymers, temperature tolerances, major fatty acids and base ratios. Txc1 and Txg1 may later have to be considered as members of this group, possibly on the species level, while Txo1 could represent a different related genus. It is concluded that the five antarctic strains represent a new genus and species for which the name

  10. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter infection is a common foodborne illness. You usually get it from eating contaminated food, especially raw ... You can also get it from drinking contaminated water or raw milk, or handling infected animal feces ( ...

  11. Staphylococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis), and a number of skin infections (eg, impetigo, pimples, boils). Staphylococcus aureus also causes toxin-related ... cases clear up in 7 to 10 days. Impetigo is a common and contagious skin infection in ...

  12. Rotavirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  13. Vaginal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around your vagina , or a problem with your vaginal discharge (fluid). If you've had sexual contact with ... discharge Types of vaginal infections Ways to avoid vaginal infections Abnormal discharge top You may wonder if the fluid, or ...

  14. Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Fungal Infections KidsHealth / For Kids / Fungal Infections What's in this ...

  15. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...

  16. Predictive factors for lower extremity amputations in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zameer Aziz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of diabetic foot infections (DFIs and its predictive factors for lower extremity amputations. A prospective study of 100 patients with DFIs treated at the National University Hospital of Singapore were recruited in the study during the period of January 2005–June 2005. A protocol was designed to document patient's demographics, type of DFI, presence of neuropathy and/or vasculopathy and its final outcome. Predictive factors for limb loss were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the study population was 59.8 years with a male to female ratio of about 1:1 and with a mean follow-up duration of about 24 months. All patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common DFIs included abscess (32%, wet gangrene (29%, infected ulcers (19%, osteomyelitis (13%, necrotizing fasciitis (4% and cellulitis (3%. Thirteen patients were treated conservatively, while surgical debridement or distal amputation was performed in 59 patients. Twenty-eight patients had major amputations (below or above knee performed. Forty-eight percent had monomicrobial infections compared with 52% with polymicrobial infections. The most common pathogens found in all infections (both monomicrobial and polymicrobial were Staphylococcus aureus (39.7%, Bacteroides fragilis (30.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.0% and Streptococcus agalactiae (21.0%. Significant univariate predictive factors for limb loss included age above 60 years, gangrene, ankle-brachial index (ABI <0.8, monomicrobial infections, white blood cell (WBC count ≥ 15.0×109/L, erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥100 mm/hr, C-reactive protein ≥15.0 mg/dL, hemoglobin (Hb ≤10.0g/dL and creatinine ≥150 µmol/L. Upon stepwise logistic regression, only gangrene, ABI <0.8, WBC ≥ 15.0×109/L and Hb ≤10.0g/dL were significant.

  17. TORCH infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Natalie; Duchon, Jennifer; Zachariah, Philip

    2015-03-01

    TORCH infections classically comprise toxoplasmosis, Treponema pallidum, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, hepatitis viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, and other infections, such as varicella, parvovirus B19, and enteroviruses. The epidemiology of these infections varies; in low-income and middle-income countries, TORCH infections are major contributors to prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence of infection may be seen at birth, in infancy, or years later. For many of these pathogens, treatment or prevention strategies are available. Early recognition, including prenatal screening, is key. This article covers toxoplasmosis, parvovirus B19, syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Femoral vein thrombophlebitis and septic pulmonary embolism due to a mixed anaerobic infection including Solobacterium moorei: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Claire A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary foci of necrobacillosis infection outside the head and neck are uncommon but have been reported in the urogenital or gastrointestinal tracts. Reports of infection with Solobacterium moorei are rare. Case presentation A 37-year-old male intravenous drug user was admitted with pain in his right groin, fever, rigors and vomiting following a recent injection into the right femoral vein. Admission blood cultures grew Fusobacterium nucleatum, Solobacterium moorei and Bacteroides ureolyticus. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous penicillin and metronidazole. Conclusion This case report describes an unusual case of femoral thrombophlebitis with septic pulmonary embolism associated with anaerobic organisms in a groin abscess. Solobacterium moorei, though rarely described, may also have clinically significant pathogenic potential.

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  20. Kidney Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms. If you're being treated for a urinary tract infection but your signs and symptoms aren't improving, make an appointment. Severe kidney ... Seek immediate medical attention if you have kidney infection symptoms combined with ... that enter your urinary tract through the tube that carries urine from ...

  1. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity ... Body Campylobacter are a type of bacteria that produce infections in the GI tract. They are a major bacterial cause of diarrheal sickness among children in the United States. You may hear ...

  2. Giardia infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardia, or giardiasis, is an infection of the small intestine. A tiny parasite called Giardia lamblia causes it. ... from some of the medicines used to treat giardia are: Metallic ... used to treat the infection can be harmful to the unborn baby.

  3. [Intrauterine infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2006-09-10

    A broad variety of microorganisms are capable of causing fetal infections. Among viral agents prominent are the human cytomegaly virus (HCMV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), human immundeficiency virus (HIV), varicella, herpes zooster, rubella, parvovirus B19, measles and the hepatitis B and C viruses. Protozoa such as toxoplasma and spirocheta pallida, causing congenital syphilis are equally important. Bacterial infections are responsible for in uterus aquired listeriosis, tuberculosis, and group B streptococcus infections. Fungi including candida albicans complete the circle of infections pathogens. Infectious microrganisms may reach the fetus through the placenta are may ascend through the birth canal. The quoted pathological agents threaten the health and life of the fetus directly by the biological derangements they cause and also by inducing abortion or premature birth. The clinical manifestations include retarded growth, central nervous system damage and skin lesions. The invariable therapeutic measures vary but in general, are limited value in cases of in utero acquired infections.

  4. Rotavirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sue E.; Ramani, Sasirekha; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Svensson, Lennart; Hagbom, Marie; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.; O’Ryan, Miguel; Kang, Gagandeep; Desselberger, Ulrich; Estes, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Rotavirus infections are a leading cause of severe, dehydrating gastroenteritis in children rotavirus over a decade ago, rotavirus infections still result in >200,000 deaths annually, mostly in low-income countries. Rotavirus primarily infects enterocytes and induces diarrhoea through the destruction of absorptive enterocytes (leading to malabsorption), intestinal secretion stimulated by rotavirus non-structural protein 4 and activation of the enteric nervous system. In addition, rotavirus infections can lead to antigenaemia (which is associated with more severe manifestations of acute gastroenteritis) and viraemia, and rotavirus can replicate in systemic sites, although this is limited. Reinfections with rotavirus are common throughout life, although the disease severity is reduced with repeat infections. The immune correlates of protection against rotavirus reinfection and recovery from infection are poorly understood, although rotavirus-specific immunoglobulin A has a role in both aspects. The management of rotavirus infection focuses on the prevention and treatment of dehydration, although the use of antiviral and anti-emetic drugs can be indicated in some cases. PMID:29119972

  5. Nail infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, K T; Bonar, P L

    1989-04-01

    Nail infections are and will continue to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to all foot physicians. Attention to basic concepts of accurate detailed history and physical examination will aid in the determination of the etiology of these infections. Following basic guidelines of incision and drainage, gram stain, soaks, and antibiotics will be the cornerstone of initial treatment of pyogenic infections. Upon resolution of the acute infection a permanent treatment plan can be constituted based on the etiology. Nail infections of mycotic nature require an understanding by both patient and doctor as to the difficulty and resistance to treatment of this problem. It is the authors' opinion that aggressive persistent treatment will provide the best long-term result when dealing with mycotic infections. This may require nail removal, local and systemic treatment as well as change in shoe environment. As we have seen and is stated throughout this text, the nail and its pathologic processes can be a mirror of systemic disease. Many times a dystrophic infected nail may be the initial clinical presentation of a much more involved disease process. It is the responsibility and duty of all foot physicians to have a total understanding of knowledge of normal and pathologic process that affect the nail plates, nail bed, and surrounding nail proper. I hope this article will stimulate the foot physician to approach the disease of the nail with a high index of suspicion and respect.

  6. Norovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you experience severe vomiting, bloody stools, abdominal pain or dehydration. Causes Noroviruses are highly contagious and are shed in the feces of infected humans and animals. Methods of transmission include: Eating contaminated food Drinking ...

  7. MRSA Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Runny nose MRSA infection Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  8. Pinworm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and vomiting Pinworm infection Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  9. Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your bloodstream. (You may have heard the term bacterial endocarditis , subacute bacterial endocarditis , or SBE. These terms are used for endocarditis ... to repair or replace the damaged valve. Tags: bacterial endocarditis , endocardium , infection of the heart , subacute bacterial endocarditis ( ...

  10. Staph Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Impetigo (pronounced: im-puh-TIE-go) is a superficial skin infection that mostly happens in young children, ... and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours ...

  11. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tur) bacteria live in the intestines of many wild and domestic animals. They can pass to humans ... matter (poop) from an infected person (especially a child in diapers). Household pets can carry and spread ...

  12. Anaerobic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a dental infection or procedure such as a tooth extraction or oral surgery or after trauma to the ... diagnosed, your doctor may treat it with intravenous antibiotics (eg, penicillin, ampicillin) for 4 to 6 weeks, ...

  13. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ... by bacteria or fungal organisms. Spinal infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. ...

  14. Tapeworm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tapeworm (Taenia solium) is greater in areas of Latin America, China, sub-Saharan Africa or Southeast Asia where ... as well as seizures, meningitis, hydrocephalus or dementia. Death can occur in severe cases of infection. Organ ...

  15. Hookworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestinal wall and suck blood, which results in iron deficiency anemia and protein loss. Adult worms and larvae are ... problems that may result from hookworm infection include: Iron deficiency anemia , caused by loss of blood Nutritional deficiencies Severe ...

  16. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  17. Protozoan Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    definitive hosts. Felines are required to maintain the life cycle in nature, since incidental hosts do not excrete the parasite in their faeces . Humans ...PROTOZOA WITH NON-SPECIFIC DEFENCES IV. IMMUNOTHERAPEUTIC APPROACHES V. CONCLUSION REFERENCES I. INTRODUCTION Numerous genera of protozoa infect humans ...aetiologic agents of human disease in tropical and subtropical regions. Small animals serve as reservoirs of infection; the organism is transmitted between

  18. Cerebral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karampekios, Spyros [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Hesselink, John [UCSD, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Despite the development of many effective antibiotic therapies and the general improvement in hygiene and health care systems all over the world, the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) infection has increased significantly in the past 15 years. This can be attributed primarily to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its devastating effect on the immune system and secondarily to various immunosuppressive agents that are being used in aggressive cancer treatment and in organ transplantations. The brain particularly is protected from infection by the calvarium, meninges and blood brain barrier. However, different types of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, can reach the brain hematogenously or, less likely, by direct extension from an adjacent infected focus. The early detection and specific diagnosis of infection are of great importance, since brain infections are potentially treatable diseases. Imaging studies play a crucial role in the diagnostic process, along with the history (exposure to infectious agents), host factors (open head trauma, CSF leak, sinusitis, otitis, immune status), physical examination and laboratory analysis of CSF. (orig.)

  19. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections > A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections (PDF, ... To receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are most often caused ...

  20. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  1. In vivo efficacy of humanized ceftaroline fosamil-avibactam exposures in a polymicrobial infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalodi, Amira A; Crandon, Jared L; Williams, Gregory; Nicolau, David P

    2013-11-01

    Although Gram-positive cocci are the most common pathogens in diabetic foot infections, these infections often are polymicrobial. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of a simulated human dose of 600 mg ceftaroline fosamil-600 mg avibactam every 8 h as a 1-h infusion in a polymicrobial in vivo murine model. Seven isolates were used (3 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] isolates, 1 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA] isolate, 1 Escherichia coli isolate, 1 Enterobacter cloacae isolate, and 1 Bacteroides fragilis isolate) in various combinations in an immunocompromised polymicrobial tissue infection to assess the efficacy of the simulated regimen. Each infection was comprised of at least one S. aureus isolate with a MIC of 0.25 to 1 μg/ml and one Enterobacteriaceae isolate with a MIC of 1 or 4 μg/ml. Eight of 16 infections also included B. fragilis, with a MIC of 0.5 μg/ml, as a third organism. Efficacy was evaluated after 24 h as the change in log10 CFU from the level of 0-h controls. Efficacy was seen against all isolate combinations, with at least a 1-log kill against Enterobacteriaceae and a minimum of a 2-log kill against S. aureus and B. fragilis isolates. These bacterial reductions correlate with free drug concentration above the MIC (fT>MIC) produced by the humanized regimen of 100, 86, and 56% at MICs of 1, 2, and 4 μg/ml, respectively. The humanized regimen of 600 mg ceftaroline fosamil-600 mg avibactam every 8 h as a 1-h infusion showed predictable efficacy against all infections tested in this model. These data support further clinical investigation of ceftaroline fosamil-avibactam for the treatment of polymicrobial tissue infections.

  2. Baylisascaris Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-27

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing baylisascariasis and on providing patients at risk of Baylisascaris infection with prevention messages.  Created: 8/27/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  3. Metapneumovirus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT), an acute upper respiratory tract infection of turkeys, and is also associated with swollen head syndrome (SHS) in chickens and egg production losses in layers. Since the first TRT reported in the late 1970s in South Africa, the virus...

  4. Hand Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treated early enough, soaks and oral antibiotics may cure the infection. If pus has formed under the skin, surgery to drain the pus is needed. Chronic paronychia is caused by fungus; this usually occurs in people whose hands are frequently wet (such as dishwashers). The cuticle ...

  5. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... blocked, fluid can build up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when ...

  6. Giardia Infection (Giardiasis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardia infection (giardiasis) Overview Giardia infection is an intestinal infection marked by abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea and bouts of watery diarrhea. Giardia infection is caused by a microscopic parasite ...

  7. Fish tapeworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish tapeworm infection is an intestinal infection with a parasite found in fish. ... The fish tapeworm ( Diphyllobothrium latum ) is the largest parasite that infects humans. Humans become infected when they eat raw ...

  8. Severe deep neck space infections and mediastinitis of odontogenic origin: clinical relevance and implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzer, Susanne; Pfeiffer, Jens; Becker, Silke; Ridder, Gerd Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Early diagnosis and aggressive antimicrobial and surgical treatment are essential to successfully treat extensive cervico-mediastinal abscesses of odontogenic origin. Patient management should be performed by experienced clinicians well trained in managing possible complications. We recommend close clinical and radiological postoperative follow-up investigations with early surgical re-intervention if necessary. While neck infections affecting the perimandibular space have a high prevalence and their clinical aspects have repeatedly been discussed, further spread of the inflammation and life-threatening situations have rarely been described. The objective was to determine clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of severe neck infections of odontogenic origin. Emphasis was placed on grave descending deep neck space infections, sometimes resulting in mediastinitis as a life-threatening complication. We reviewed 10 patients with severe odontogenic abscesses treated during an 8-year interval in a single center. The submandibular space was the most frequently encountered location of deep neck space infections. Mediastinitis was found in five patients. The most frequent causative bacteria were Streptococcus and Bacteroides species. All patients underwent intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical therapy. Mediastinotomy was inevitable in five cases and thoracotomy in one case. All patients survived.

  9. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  10. Infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sénior, Juan Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a disease caused by colonization and proliferation of infectious agents on the endothelial surface of the heart. Its clinical presentation is variable, depending upon conditions of the patient, such as immunosuppression, presence of prosthetic material, intravenous drug use, and the etiologic agent. Diagnosis is usually established through the addition of elements such as medical history, physical examination, results of blood cultures, echocardiography and other aids. We present the case of an adult male who came to the hospital with fever and symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. The presence of a systolic murmur was documented in the aortic area, and the echocardiogram revealed severe valve regurgitation and a vegetating lesion on the bicuspid aortic valve. He required valve replacement and completed antibiotic treatment based on the sensitivity of the Streptococcus mitis strain that was demonstrated in the blood cultures.

  11. Arenavirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The infectious syndromes associated with arenaviruses in South America are four: febrile syndrome of viral origin; Haemorrhagic fevers with or without neurological involvement; Aseptic meningitis and meningo-encephalitis. Among the Arenavirus of the new world is the Tacaribe complex where the viruses are found: Junín (Argentina, Guanarito (Venezuela, Machupo (Bolivia and Sabiá (Brazil, which are characterized by hemorrhagic fevers. In Colombia the arenavirus Pichindé was isolated in 1965, from the rodent Oryzomys albigularis, in the valley of Pichindé (Valle del Cauca. This arenavirus produces a persistent infection in its host and is not pathogenic for the man. There is evidence of the circulation of the Guanarito virus in rodents from Córdoba, but there are no cases diagnosed in humans; In Colombia, the genome of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was detected in the brains of rodents Mus musculus. The diagnosis is based on the knowledge of local epidemiology and the suspicion of a patient with fever in endemic areas, where infections such as malaria, dengue and leptospirosis, sepsis of bacterial origin and rickectomy have been excluded. Virus isolation in the feverish period is the gold standart, but it implies contact with the virus that is highly infectious, which represents a public health problem. Serology has been used for diagnosis, but there is no commercial evidence and only research groups and large public health laboratories have these tests. Most of the patients present a moderate severity, which needs adequate hydration, antipyretics and anti-inflammatories. All patients with severe signs should be aggressively treated. The use of drugs has not demonstrated a decrease in mortality but a significant reduction in viremia.

  12. Real-time analysis of gut flora in Entamoeba histolytica infected patients of Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Anil Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and the ingestion of quadrinucleate cyst of E. histolytica from fecally contaminated food or water initiates infection. Excystation occurs in the lumen of small intestine, where motile and potentially invasive trophozoites germinate from cysts. The ability of trophozoites to interact and digest gut bacteria is apparently important for multiplication of the parasite and its pathogenicity; however the contribution of resident bacterial flora is not well understood. We quantified the population of Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Clostridium coccoides subgroup, Eubacterium, Campylobacter, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Sulphur reducing bacteria using genus specific primers in healthy (N = 22 vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive, N = 17 stool samples by Real-time PCR. Results Absolute quantification of Bacteroides (p = .001, Closrtridium coccoides subgroup (p = 0.002, Clostridium leptum subgroup (p = 0.0001, Lactobacillus (p = 0.037, Campylobacter (p = 0.0014 and Eubacterium (p = 0.038 show significant drop in their population however, significant increase in Bifdobacterium (p = 0.009 was observed where as the population of Ruminococcus (p = 0.33 remained unaltered in healthy vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive. We also report high prevalence of nimE gene in stool samples of both healthy volunteers and amebic patients. No significant decrease in nimE gene copy number was observed before and after the treatment with antiamebic drug. Conclusions Our results show significant alteration in predominant gut bacteria in E. histolytica infected individuals. The frequent episodes of intestinal amoebic dysentery thus result in depletion of few predominant genera in gut that may lead to poor digestion and absorption of food in intestine. It further disturbs

  13. Real-time analysis of gut flora in Entamoeba histolytica infected patients of Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anil Kumar; Verma, Ravi; Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2012-08-22

    Amebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and the ingestion of quadrinucleate cyst of E. histolytica from fecally contaminated food or water initiates infection. Excystation occurs in the lumen of small intestine, where motile and potentially invasive trophozoites germinate from cysts. The ability of trophozoites to interact and digest gut bacteria is apparently important for multiplication of the parasite and its pathogenicity; however the contribution of resident bacterial flora is not well understood. We quantified the population of Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Clostridium coccoides subgroup, Eubacterium, Campylobacter, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Sulphur reducing bacteria using genus specific primers in healthy (N = 22) vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive, N = 17) stool samples by Real-time PCR. Absolute quantification of Bacteroides (p = .001), Closrtridium coccoides subgroup (p = 0.002), Clostridium leptum subgroup (p = 0.0001), Lactobacillus (p = 0.037), Campylobacter (p = 0.0014) and Eubacterium (p = 0.038) show significant drop in their population however, significant increase in Bifdobacterium (p = 0.009) was observed where as the population of Ruminococcus (p = 0.33) remained unaltered in healthy vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive). We also report high prevalence of nimE gene in stool samples of both healthy volunteers and amebic patients. No significant decrease in nimE gene copy number was observed before and after the treatment with antiamebic drug. Our results show significant alteration in predominant gut bacteria in E. histolytica infected individuals. The frequent episodes of intestinal amoebic dysentery thus result in depletion of few predominant genera in gut that may lead to poor digestion and absorption of food in intestine. It further disturbs the homeostasis between gut epithelium and

  14. Toward Understanding Phage:Host Interactions in the Rumen; Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Phages Infecting Rumen Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind A. Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rumen is known to harbor dense populations of bacteriophages (phages predicted to be capable of infecting a diverse range of rumen bacteria. While bacterial genome sequencing projects are revealing the presence of phages which can integrate their DNA into the genome of their host to form stable, lysogenic associations, little is known of the genetics of phages which utilize lytic replication. These phages infect and replicate within the host, culminating in host lysis, and the release of progeny phage particles. While lytic phages for rumen bacteria have been previously isolated, their genomes have remained largely uncharacterized. Here we report the first complete genome sequences of lytic phage isolates specifically infecting three genera of rumen bacteria: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, and Streptococcus. All phages were classified within the viral order Caudovirales and include two phage morphotypes, representative of the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families. The phage genomes displayed modular organization and conserved viral genes were identified which enabled further classification and determination of closest phage relatives. Co-examination of bacterial host genomes led to the identification of several genes responsible for modulating phage:host interactions, including CRISPR/Cas elements and restriction-modification phage defense systems. These findings provide new genetic information and insights into how lytic phages may interact with bacteria of the rumen microbiome.

  15. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of perianal infections in adult patients with acute leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yuan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perianal infection is a common problem for patients with acute leukemia. However, neutropenia and bleeding tendency are relatively contraindicated to surgical intervention. The epidemiology, microbiology, clinical manifestations and outcomes of perianal infection in leukemic patients are also rarely discussed. METHOD: The medical records of 1102 adult patients with acute leukemia at a tertiary medical center in Taiwan between 2001 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. RESULT: The prevalence of perianal infection was 6.7% (74 of 1102 in adult patients with acute leukemia. Twenty-three (31% of the 74 patients had recurrent episodes of perianal infections. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia had higher recurrent rates than acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients (p = 0.028. More than half (n = 61, 53% of the perianal infections were caused by gram-negative bacilli, followed by gram-positive cocci (n = 36, 31%, anaerobes (n = 18, 15% and Candida (n = 1, 1% from pus culture. Eighteen patients experienced bacteremia (n = 24 or candidemia (n = 1. Overall 41 (68% of 60 patients had polymicrobial infection. Escherichia coli (25% was the most common micro-organism isolated, followed by Enterococcus species (22%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (13%, and Bacteroides species (11%. Twenty-five (34% of 74 patients received surgical intervention. Acute leukemia patients with surgically managed anal fistulas tended to have fewer recurrences (p = 0.067. Four (5% patients died within 30 days after diagnosis of perianal infection. Univariate analysis of 30-day survival revealed the elderly (≧ 65 years (p = 0.015 and patients with shock (p<0.001 had worse outcome. Multivariate analysis showed septic shock to be the independent predictive factor of 30-day crude mortality of perianal infections (p = 0.016. CONCLUSION: Perianal infections were common and had high recurrence rate in adult patients with acute

  16. Hantavirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Guzmán T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are the causative agents of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in humans in the Americas; The primary reservoirs are in the rodents of the subfamily Sigmodontinae. In South America, cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome caused by numerous viral genotypes have been diagnosed. In Colombia, different serological studies have reported the circulation of hantavirus in humans and rodents. These viruses act in an intimate association with a rodent species that serves as a reservoir and have a distribution around the wild rodent, being limited to a specific geographic region. In South America, the first HPS-associated hantavirus was described in 1993 in Brazil and was called Juquitiva and from 1993 to 2012, more than 1400 cases had been identified in Brazil. This syndrome should be suspected in all patients with respiratory distress syndrome of unclear etiology, in areas endemic for the disease, especially if accompanied by fever, marked leukocytosis and thrombocytopenia and bilateral interstitial infiltrates. Hemorrhagic febrile syndrome has not yet been described in the Americas. There are no clinical or laboratory signs that are pathognomonic of hantavirus infection. The treatment is based on adequate hydration, use of antipyretics and anti-inflammatories and patients with signs of severity should establish a more aggressive management. Triage is indispensable, patients with co-morbidities have a higher mortality risk and therefore should be hospitalized. Future research in Colombia should be directed to multidisciplinary studies that include viral isolation, different clinical forms of case presentation, epidemiological differences, risk factors, and taxonomy of viruses and rodents.

  17. [Rotavirus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Rotaviruses are genetically highly variable, non-enveloped viruses with a double-stranded, segmented ribonucleic acid genome. They are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. In children aged less than 5 years, they are the most frequent agent of severe acute diarrheal illnesses. In less developed countries, rotavirus diseases are one of the most frequent causes of death in infants and little children. Typically, symptomatic rotavirus diseases in infants (70 years) arise with sudden onset of watery diarrhoea with high risk of dehydration, accompanied by vomiting and, in several cases, unspecific respiratory symptoms such as cold and sore throat. In adults aged less than 70 years, illnesses due to rotavirus appear generally mild or as travel diarrhoea. Although rotavirus infections are considered to by systemic, extraintestinal manifestations such as rotavirus central nervous system diseases are relatively rare. Rotaviruses are transmitted primarily from person-to-person by the faecal-oral route. Treatment of rotavirus diarrhoea is usually symptomatic and comprises a sufficient fluid and electrolyte substitution. Although nitazoxanide and some other drugs show high efficacy against rotavirus in vitro and in vivo, there is currently no recommended specific antiviral therapy. For prophylaxis, special attention should be paid to adequate hygienic rules. Because of the high stability of rotaviruses to changing environmental conditions, disinfection should be performed applying disinfectants with proven activity against rotaviruses. In Germany, two efficient and secure live vaccines against rotaviruses have been approved. Their application, however, is not generally recommended.

  18. Metabolic Imaging of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawal, Ismaheel; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ankrah, Alfred; Vorster, Mariza; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Govender, Thavendran; Sathekge, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic imaging has come to occupy a prominent place in the diagnosis and management of microbial infection. Molecular probes available for infection imaging have undergone a rapid evolution starting with nonspecific agents that accumulate similarly in infection, sterile inflammation, and

  19. Infections and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    During pregnancy, some common infections like the common cold or a skin infection do not usually cause serious problems. ... of the infections that can be dangerous during pregnancy include Bacterial vaginosis (BV) Group B strep (GBS) ...

  20. Ear infection - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family history of ear infections Not being breastfed Pacifier use Recent ear infection Recent illness of any ... lead to fewer ear infections. DO NOT use pacifiers. Breastfeed -- this makes a child much less prone ...

  1. Urinary tract infection - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000521.htm Urinary tract infection - adults To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection, or UTI, is an infection of the urinary ...

  2. Urinary tract infection - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000505.htm Urinary tract infection - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection is an infection of the urinary tract. This ...

  3. Listeria Infection (Listeriosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria infection Overview Listeria infection is a foodborne bacterial illness that can be very serious for pregnant women and people with impaired immune systems. Listeria infection is most commonly contracted by eating improperly ...

  4. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk ...

  5. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk ...

  6. Arcanobacterium Haemolyticum Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity ... ) haemolyticum is an organism that most often causes infections and illnesses in teenagers and young adults. The infection is spread from person to person, ...

  7. [Hantavirus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strady, C; Jaussaud, R; Remy, G; Penalba, C

    2005-03-12

    Hantaviruses are cosmopolite anthropozoonosis considered as an emerging disease. Four pathogenic types for humans and part of the Bunyaviridae species are hosted by rodents and have been isolated: the Sin nombre virus responsible for the severe American respiratory form; the Hantaan and Seoul viruses responsible for hemorrhagic fevers with renal syndrome (HFRS) of severe to moderate expression in Asia and also in the Balkans; the Puumala virus responsible for HFRS of moderate expression or the socalled nephropathia epidemica in Europe. The Puumala virus is responsible for a minor form of the disease that is observed in areas of the Occidental sector of the ex-URSS, in Scandinavia and in the rest of Europe, notably in the North-East of France. The epidemic episodes occur every three years. They follow the proliferation of rodents, notably russet voles, the reservoir hosts, and their degree of infection. The concept of an occupation at risk in 20 to 49 year-old men (working in forests, agriculture, living near a forest, contact with wood) in an endemic area has not always been found. Its clinical form can vary greatly in its presentation. Basically it is a severe algic influenza syndrome accompanied by acute myopia in 38% of cases, but is nearly pathognomonic in the context. Respiratory involvement is frequent but benign. The initial syndrome can suggest an abdominal or urological surgical emergency, which is source of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. Early biological examination reveals thrombopenia and proteinuria. Then more or less severe acute kidney failure appears in slightly more than 50% of cases. Although it usually regresses with symptomatic treatment, after effects remain in some patients. The environmental changes, the geographical distribution depending on the biotope, the dynamics and behaviour of rodents and the viral circulation between them and its transmission to human beings and its risk factors must continue to be studied in order to gain

  8. Fungus Infections: Preventing Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fungus Infections: Preventing Recurrence Share | Doctors have excellent treatments for skin fungus infections that occur on the feet, nails, groin, ...

  9. Pityrosporum Infection In HIV Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P K

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased colonization of Malassezia furfur organism has been reported in patients with HIV infection. Pityriasis versicolour and pityrosporum folliculitis arise from overgrowth of M. furfur. It is also thought to have a significant role in the pathogenesis of seborrhoeic dermatitis and is one of the earliest clinical markers of HIV infection. The present study was to note the occurrence and significance of these infections in HIV infected patients. The present study was to note the occurrence and significance of these infections in HIV infected patients. The occurrence of pityrosporum infection was 13.5% (25 cases amongst 185 HIV serpositive patients in HIV infected cases in our study. Mean age of the affected patients was 31.7 years and male to female ratio was 1.5:1. The main mode of acquisition of HIV infection was heterosexual (19 cases. Tinea versicolour was seen in 10 (40% cases, seborrhoeic was found to be more explosive in onset and involving extensive areas with severe inflammation. Extensive tinea versicolour and seborrhoeic dermatitis were seen in three cases with pityrosporum infections. Nine of the pityrosporum infections were observed in HIV group IV, which is equivalent of AIDS. To conclude, seborrhoeic dermatitis in patients with HIV/AIDS may have some unique features and may be used as a clinical marker of AIDS.

  10. Salivary gland infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections will return. Complications are not common. Possible Complications Complications may include: Abscess of salivary gland Infection returns ... cases, salivary gland infections cannot be prevented. Good oral hygiene may prevent some cases of bacterial infection. ... BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  11. Fungal toenail infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Fungal toenail infection (onychomycosis) is characterised as infection of part or all of the toenail unit, which includes the nail plate, the nail bed, and the nail matrix. Over time, the infection causes discoloration and distortion of part or all of the nail unit. Fungal infections are reported to cause 23% of foot diseases and 50% of nail conditions in people seen by dermatologists, but are less common in the general population, affecting 3% to 12% of people.Infection can cause discomfo...

  12. Fungal toenail infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Fungal toenail infection (onychomycosis) is characterised as infection of part or all of the toenail unit, which includes the nail plate, the nail bed, and the nail matrix. Over time, the infection causes discoloration and distortion of part or all of the nail unit. Fungal infections are reported to cause 23% of foot diseases and 50% of nail conditions in people seen by dermatologists, but are less common in the general population, affecting 3% to 5% of people.Infection can cause discomfor...

  13. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, C.L.F.; Griffith, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented

  14. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  15. Analysis of the intestinal microbiota of oligosaccharide fed mice exhibiting reduced resistance to Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A; Bergström, A; Andersen, J B; Hansen, M; Lahtinen, S J; Wilcks, A; Licht, T R

    2010-09-01

    Certain indigestible carbohydrates, known as prebiotics, are claimed to be beneficial for gut health through a selective stimulation of certain gut microbes including bifidobacteria. However, stimulation of such microbes does not necessarily imply a preventive effect against pathogen infection. We recently demonstrated a reduced resistance to Salmonella infection in mice fed diets containing fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) or xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS). In the present study, faecal and caecal samples from the same mice were analysed in order to study microbial changes potentially explaining the observed effects on the pathogenesis of Salmonella. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the microbiota in faecal samples from mice fed FOS or XOS were different from faecal samples collected before the feeding trial as well as from faecal profiles generated from control animals. This difference was not seen for caecal profiles. Further analysis of faecal samples by real-time PCR demonstrated a significant increase in the Bacteroidetes phylum, the Bacteroides fragilis group and in Bifidobacterium spp. in mice fed FOS or XOS. The observed bifidogenic effect was more pronounced for XOS than for FOS. The Firmicutes phylum and the Clostridium coccoides group were reduced by both FOS and XOS. Surprisingly, no significant differences were detected between faecal samples collected before and after pathogen challenge in any of the groups. Furthermore, no effect of diets on caecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids was recorded. In conclusion, diets supplemented with FOS or XOS induced a number of microbial changes in the faecal microbiota of mice. The observed effects of XOS were qualitatively similar to those of FOS, but the most prominent bifidogenic effect was seen for XOS. An increased level of bifidobacteria is thus not in itself preventive against Salmonella infection, since the same XOS or FOS-fed mice were previously reported to be more severely

  16. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hours There are different levels of wound infections: Superficial -- the infection is in the skin area only ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  17. Learn About Cronobacter Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Learn About Cronobacter Infection Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... but infections in young infants can be deadly. Learn what steps you can take to protect your ...

  18. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  19. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  20. Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  1. Fungal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... touching the infected area. Diagnosis Skin scrapings or cultures Doctors may suspect a fungal infection when they ...

  2. Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Salmonella Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  3. Prevent Infections in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... birth. Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly (a birth defect where a baby’s head and ... CMV) can cause problems for some babies, including microcephaly and hearing loss. A woman who is infected ...

  4. Infection After Hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Hemsell

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis and advances in technology have reduced operative site infections after hysterectomy to a minimum. Pelvic infections are the most common infection type and respond promptly to a variety of parenteral single-agent and combination antibiotic regimens. Oral antibiotic regimens following parenteral therapy are unnecessary. Abdominal incision infections are less common than pelvic infections, less common than seromas or hematomas, and usually do not require antimicrobial therapy. Abscesses or infected hematomas require parenteral antimicrobial therapy, and drainage of those located above the cuff will predictably shorten therapy time. With early discharge from the hospital, many infections will not become evident until after the patient is home. For that reason, it is important that the patient's discharge instructions outline symptoms and signs associated with these infections so she can present for care at the earliest possible time.

  5. Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Rotavirus Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  6. Fungus Infections: Tinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fungus Infections Share | Tinea is the name given to ... Most people will develop some resistance to skin fungus after being infected. Others appear to have a ...

  7. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  8. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis (IE) is a disease of increasing importance, with more patients infected, increasing frequency of health-care associated infections and increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistances. The typical clinical presentation is a subacute course with fever...... or ceftriaxone. E. faecalis infective endocarditis continues to be a very serious disease with considerable percentages of high-level gentamicin resistant strains and in-hospital mortality around 20%. Strategies to prevent E. faecalis IE, improve diagnostics, optimize treatment and reduce morbidity...

  9. Pleural Infection and Empyema

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Increasing incidence of pleural infection has been reported worldwide in recent decades. The pathogens responsible for pleural infection are changing and differ from those in community acquired pneumonia. The main treatments for pleural infection are antibiotics and drainage of infected pleural fluid. The efficacy of intrapleural fibrinolytics remains unclear, although a recent randomized control study showed that the novel combination of tissue plasminogen activator and deoxyribonuclease had...

  10. Brucella Infection in HIV Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the possible correlation between Brucella and HIV infections. Iran is a country where HIV infection is expanding and Brucellosis is prevalent. In the present study, 184 HIV infected patients were assigned and for all of them HIV infection was confirmed by western blot test. In order to identify the prevalence rate of Brucella infection and systemic brucellosis in these subjects, sera samples were obtained and Brucella specific serological tests were performed to reveal antibody titers. Detailed history was taken and physical examination was carried out for all of patients. 11 (6% subjects had high titers but only 3 of them were symptomatic. Most of these subjects were injection drug user (IDU men and one was a rural woman. Considering both prevalence rates of Brucella infection (3% and symptomatic brucellosis (0.1% in Iran, our HIV positive patients show higher rates of Brucella infection and systemic brucellosis. Preserved cellular immunity of participants and retention of granulocytes activity may explain this poor association; whereas other explanations such as immunological state difference and non-overlapping geographical distribution of the 2 pathogens have been mentioned by various authors.

  11. Dermatophilus congolensis human infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towersey, L; Martins, E de C; Londero, A T; Hay, R J; Soares Filho, P J; Takiya, C M; Martins, C C; Gompertz, O F

    1993-08-01

    Four cases of human dermatophilosis observed in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, are reported. Data that suggest nail infection by Dermatophilus congolensis are presented. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranged from an asymptomatic infection to a pustular eruption. Our findings suggest that epidermal Langerhans cells play a role in the pathogenesis of the infection.

  12. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Bundgaard, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Because of the nephrotoxic effects of aminoglycosides, the Danish guidelines on infective endocarditis were changed in January 2007, reducing gentamicin treatment in enterococcal infective endocarditis from 4 to 6 weeks to only 2 weeks. In this pilot study, we compare outcomes in patients...... with Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis treated in the years before and after endorsement of these new recommendations....

  13. Cutaneous infections in wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eugene K; Deweber, Kevin; Berry, James W; Wilckens, John H

    2013-09-01

    Cutaneous infections are common in wrestlers. Although many are simply a nuisance in the everyday population, they can be problematic to wrestlers because such infections may result in disqualification from practice or competition. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are therefore important. Medline and PubMed databases, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate were searched through 2012 with the following keywords in various combinations: skin infections, cutaneous infections, wrestlers, athletes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, skin and soft tissue infections, tinea corporis, tinea capitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster, molluscum contagiosum, verruca vulgaris, warts, scabies, and pediculosis. Relevant articles found in the primary search, and selected references from those articles were reviewed for pertinent clinical information. The most commonly reported cutaneous infections in wrestlers are herpes simplex virus infections (herpes gladiatorum), bacterial skin and soft tissue infections, and dermatophyte infections (tinea gladiatorum). The clinical appearance of these infections can be different in wrestlers than in the community at large. For most cutaneous infections, diagnosis and management options in wrestlers are similar to those in the community at large. With atypical presentations, testing methods are recommended to confirm the diagnosis of herpes gladiatorum and tinea gladiatorum. There is evidence to support the use of prophylactic medications to prevent recurrence of herpes simplex virus and reduce the incidence of dermatophyte infections in wrestlers.

  14. State of cavity microbiota of the colon in breastfed children with acute enterocolitis with infection of breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Sydorchuk

    2017-02-01

    ± m = (4.37 ± 0.38 lg CFU/ml. Breastfeeding with milk infected by Staphylococcus leads to a decrease of population of Bifidobacterium by 43.03 % (3 orders, Lactobacillus — by 32.24 % (2 orders. With the decline of population of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli in the intestinal microbiocenosis, the colonization resistance of intestinal mucosa becomes disturbed, which promotes colonization of the intestine, especially the colon, with opportunistic Enterobacteria — hemolytic Escherichia (E.coli Hly+ in 16.48 % of children with acute enterocolitis, Proteus — in 22.53 %, Citrobacter — in 3.77 %, Peptococci — in 15.09 %, Peptostreptococci — in 55.42 % and Staphylococcus — in 91.43 % of cases. In addition, in the colon of children with acute enterocolitis breastfed with the infected milk, there is an increase of population levels of Bacteroides by 32.59 % (2 orders. Furthermore, there is a growth in population levels of Peptostreptococci in the colon by 61.50 % (3 orders, and contamination with Peptococci ((9.13 ± 0.37 lg CFU/g. Reduced concentration of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli among other components of ecosystem also leads to an increase of the population level of E.coli by 19.07 % (2 orders in the colon of children with enterocolitis. In the experimental group of children, Staphylococci were isolated from all sick children in concentration (6.16 ± 0.12 lg CFU/g that is 2.92 times higher than in healthy children fed naturally with uninfected milk. Thus, the growth of the population level of Staphylococci in the colon of infants suffering from enterocolitis may be linked, according to our point of view, on the one hand, with the constant contamination of the gastrointestinal tract due to breastfeeding to milk containing ((4.37 ± 0.38 lg CFU/g Staphylococci, and, on the other hand, to the changes of colonization resistance of the colon mucosa as a result of decline in population level of the major part of the large intestine

  15. Fungal toenail infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Fungal toenail infection (onychomycosis) is characterised as infection of part or all of the toenail unit, which includes the nail plate, the nail bed, and the nail matrix. Over time, the infection causes discoloration and distortion of part or all of the nail unit. Fungal infections are reported to cause 23% of foot diseases and 50% of nail conditions in people seen by dermatologists, but are less common in the general population, affecting 3-5% of people.Infection can cause discomfort in...

  16. Cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Karl Oliver; Hamprecht, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Due to the severe risk of long-term sequelae, prenatal cytomegalovirus infection is of particular importance amongst intrauterine viral infections. This review summarizes the current knowledge about CMV infection in pregnancy. A search of the Medline and Embase database was done for articles about CMV infection in pregnany. We performed a detailed review of the literature in view of diagnosis, epidemiology and management of CMV infection in pregnancy. The maternal course of the infection is predominantly asymptomatic; the infection often remains unrecognized until the actual fetal manifestation. Typical ultrasound signs that should arouse suspicion of intrauterine CMV infection can be distinguished into CNS signs such as ventriculomegaly or microcephaly and extracerebral infection signs such as hepatosplenomegaly or hyperechogenic bowel. Current treatment strategies focus on hygienic measures to prevent a maternal CMV infection during pregnancy, on maternal application of hyperimmunoglobulines to avoid materno-fetal transmission in case of a maternal seroconversion, and on an antiviral therapy in case the materno-fetal transmission have occurred. CMV infection in pregnancy may result in a severe developmental disorder of the newborn. This should be taken into account in the treatment of affected and non-affected pregnant women.

  17. Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia L. Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of joint prostheses is becoming increasingly common, especially for the hip and knee. Infection is considered to be the most devastating of prosthesis-related complications, leading to prolonged hospitalization, repeated surgical intervention, and even definitive loss of the implant. The main risk factors to periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs are advanced age, malnutrition, obesity, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection at an advanced stage, presence of distant infectious foci, and antecedents of arthroscopy or infection in previous arthroplasty. Joint prostheses can become infected through three different routes: direct implantation, hematogenic infection, and reactivation of latent infection. Gram-positive bacteria predominate in cases of PJI, mainly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PJIs present characteristic signs that can be divided into acute and chronic manifestations. The main imaging method used in diagnosing joint prosthesis infections is X-ray. Computed tomography (CT scan may assist in distinguishing between septic and aseptic loosening. Three-phase bone scintigraphy using technetium has high sensitivity, but low specificity. Positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET presents very divergent results in the literature. Definitive diagnosis of infection should be made by isolating the microorganism through cultures on material obtained from joint fluid puncturing, surgical wound secretions, surgical debridement procedures, or sonication fluid. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic infections in arthroplasty cases. Treatment in a single procedure is appropriate in carefully selected cases.

  18. Obesity and nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, R; Karppelin, M; Syrjänen, J

    2013-09-01

    The prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) is a major goal in modern healthcare. Intrinsic, patient-related factors may contribute to the risk of HCAIs. To review the association between obesity and the risk and outcome of HCAIs. A PubMed search of relevant studies on obesity and nosocomial infections and obesity and dosing of antimicrobials. Search terms were: 'obesity', 'infection', 'nosocomial infection', 'surgical site infection', 'critical care unit', 'bacteremia', 'urinary tract infection', 'health care associated infection'. Obesity has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of HCAIs in several studies. The association is most clear in cardiac, vascular, orthopaedic and gastrointestinal surgery. Body mass index (BMI) data are frequently recorded in patients undergoing surgical and invasive procedures. The recording of BMI data is not systematic in the literature and in many studies median BMI of the control group or reference group (normal weight) also indicates overweight or obesity. Thus, clear BMI cut-offs for increased infection risk cannot be determined. Obesity is frequently associated with underdosing of antimicrobials in both prophylaxis and treatment of HCAIs. Studies indicate that obesity affects the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs. However, there are no dosing recommendations for antimicrobial use in obesity. Obesity increases the risk of nosocomial infections and is frequently associated with underdosing of antimicrobials in both prophylaxis and treatment of HCAIs. A challenge in future hospital hygiene prevention lies in our capacity to combat obesity epidemics. © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging of hepatic infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, D.J.; Hanbidge, A.E.; O'Malley, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented

  20. Imaging of hepatic infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, D.J. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)]. E-mail: doyledj@hotmail.com; Hanbidge, A.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada); O' Malley, M.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented.

  1. Imaging of Periprosthetic Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carty, Fiona

    2013-05-22

    Periprosthetic infection is one of the most challenging and difficult complications in orthopaedics. It can result in significant patient distress and disability, with repeated surgeries, increased cost and utilization of medical resources, and in rare cases even mortality. The biggest challenge to date is the correct diagnosis of periprosthetic infection and implementation of effective treatment regimens capable of eradicating the organism. This article reviews the various modalities used in the imaging of periprosthetic and post-arthroplasty infection.

  2. Pregnancy and HIV infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mete Sucu; Cihan Cetin; Mehmet Ozsurmeli; Ghanim Khatib; Ceren Cetin; Cuneyt Evruke

    2016-01-01

    The management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection is progressing rapidly. In developed countries, the perinatal transmission rates have decreased from 20-30% to 1-2% with the use of antiretroviral therapy and cesarean section. Interventions for the prevention of prenatal transmission has made the prenatal care of pregnant patients with HIV infection more complex. Rapid development of standard care and continuing increase in the distribution of HIV infection has required clinician...

  3. Pets and Pasteurella Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... present in some children, including an infection of the joints ( arthritis ), bones (osteomyelitis), and tendons (tenosynovitis). Less frequently, youngsters may have pneumonia , urinary tract ...

  4. Metabolic Imaging of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Ismaheel; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ankrah, Alfred; Vorster, Mariza; Kruger, Hendrik G; Govender, Thavendran; Sathekge, Mike

    2017-11-01

    Metabolic imaging has come to occupy a prominent place in the diagnosis and management of microbial infection. Molecular probes available for infection imaging have undergone a rapid evolution starting with nonspecific agents that accumulate similarly in infection, sterile inflammation, and neoplastic tissue and then extending to more targeted probes that seek to identify specific microbial species. This focus review describes the metabolic and molecular imaging techniques currently available for clinical use in infection imaging and those that have demonstrated promising results in preclinical studies with the potential for clinical applications. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  5. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  6. Freshwater Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections as a result of freshwater exposure or trauma are fortunately rare. Etiologic agents are varied, but commonly include filamentous fungi and Candida. This narrative review describes various sources of potential freshwater fungal exposure and the diseases that may result, including fungal keratitis, acute otitis externa and tinea pedis, as well as rare deep soft tissue or bone infections and pulmonary or central nervous system infections following traumatic freshwater exposure during natural disasters or near-drowning episodes. Fungal etiology should be suspected in appropriate scenarios when bacterial cultures or molecular tests are normal or when the infection worsens or fails to resolve with appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  7. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  8. Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S.A.; Novak, Z.; Pati, S.; Boppana, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is recognized as the most common congenital viral infection in humans and an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. This recognition of the clinical importance of invasive CMV disease in the setting of immunodeficiency and in children with congenital CMV infection has led to the development of new diagnostic procedures for the rapid identification of immunocompromised individuals with CMV disease, as well as fetuses and infants with congenital infection. Diagnosis of acute maternal CMV infection by the presence of IgM and low IgG avidity requires confirmation of fetal infection which is typically performed by CMV PCR of the amniotic fluid. Viral culture of the urine and saliva obtained within the first two weeks of life continue to be the gold standard for diagnosis of congenitally infected infants. PCR assays of dried blood spots from infants have not been shown to have sufficient sensitivity for the identification of most infants with congenital CMV infection. However, saliva PCR assays are currently being assessed as a useful screening method for congenital CMV infection. In the immunocompromised host, newer rapid diagnostic assays such as pp65 antigenemia and real-time CMV PCR of blood or plasma have allowed for preemptive treatment reducing morbidity and mortality. However, lack of standardized real-time PCR protocols hinders the comparison of the data across different centers and the development of uniform guidelines for the management of invasive CMV infections in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:21827433

  9. Corneal ulcers and infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial keratitis; Fungal keratitis; Acanthamoeba keratitis; Herpes simplex keratitis ... infection with bacteria, viruses, fungi, or a parasite. Acanthamoeba keratitis occurs in contact lens users. It is ...

  10. Bacterial profile and patterns of antimicrobial drug resistance in intra-abdominal infections: Current experience in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Shree

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Bacterial isolates from intra-abdominal infections, in particular, peritonitis and their unpredictable antimicrobial resistance patterns, continue to be a matter of concern not only globally but regionally too. Aim: An attempt in the present study was made to study the patterns of drug resistance in bacterial isolates, especially gram negative bacilli in intra-abdominal infections (IAI in our hospital. Materials and Methods: From 100 cases of peritonitis, identification of isolates was done as per recommended methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL testing were performed following the CLSI guidelines. Results: A total of 133 clinical isolates were obtained, of which 108 were aerobes and 22 anaerobes. Fungal isolates were recovered in only three cases. Escherichia coli (47/108 emerged as the most predominant pathogen followed by Klebsiella spp. (27/108, while Bacteroides fragilis emerged as the predominant anaerobe (12/22. Among coliforms, 61.7% E. coli and 74.1% Klebsiella spp. were ESBL positive. A high level of resistance was observed for beta lactams, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ertapenem. Ertapenem resistance (30-41% seen in coliforms, appears as an important issue. Imipenem, tigecycline, and colistin were the most consistently active agents tested against ESBL producers. Conclusion: Drug resistance continues to be a major concern in isolates from intra-abdominal infections. Treatment with appropriate antibiotics preceded by antimicrobial resistance testing aided by early diagnosis, adequate surgical management, and knowledge of antibiotic - resistant organisms appears effective in reducing morbidity and mortality in IAI cases.

  11. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mucous membranes or nonintact skin (see Chapter 8, Health Care Workers ). EPIDEMIOLOGY HIV infection occurs worldwide. As of the end of 2014, an estimated 37 million people were living with HIV infection. Although sub-Saharan Africa has experienced a substantial decline in the number ...

  12. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  13. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worldwide and affects persons of all ages and socioeconomic levels. It is the most common worm infection ... spread? Pinworm infection is spread by the fecal-oral route, that is by the ... medications. A health care provider should be consulted before treating a ...

  14. Infections complicating cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Salvatore; Brocca, Alessandra; Mareso, Sara; Angeli, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk of bacterial infections. Bacterial infections induce systemic inflammation that may lead to organ failure and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) resulting in a high risk of short term mortality. The early diagnosis and treatment of bacterial infections is essential to improve the patient's prognosis. However, in recent years, the spread of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial infections has reduced the efficacy of commonly used antibiotics such as third generation cephalosporins. In patients at high risk of MDR bacteria, such as those with nosocomial infections, the early administration of broad spectrum antibiotics has been shown to improve the prognosis. However, early de-escalation of antibiotics is recommended to reduce a further increase in antibiotic resistance. Strategies to prevent acute kidney injury and other organ failures should be implemented. Although prophylaxis of bacterial infections with antibiotics improves the prognosis in selected patients, their use should be limited to patients at high risk of developing infections. In this article, we review the pathogenesis and management of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the development of SSI. Complications associated with surgical site infections7. • Longer hospital stay with risk of acquiring other hospital acquired infections like pneumonia. • Require more surgical procedures. • Risk for development of resistance to antibiotics. • Risk for development of necrotizing fasciitis with skin loss.

  16. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back of the nose believed to play a role in immune system activity. This function may make them particularly vulnerable to infection, inflammation and swelling. Because adenoids are near the ... likely to play a role in ear infections in children because children have ...

  17. Pulmonary infections after tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauser Jabeen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Limited diagnostic and therapeutic capacities compounded by nonavailability of essential antimicrobials in most high-TB-burden countries pose great challenges to physicians involved in the management of these infections. These infections affect the overall outcome and lead to high cost for public health systems.

  18. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic

  19. Polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic foot ulcer biofilm infections determined using bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot E Dowd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic extremity ulcers are associated with chronic infections. Such ulcer infections are too often followed by amputation because there is little or no understanding of the ecology of such infections or how to control or eliminate this type of chronic infection. A primary impediment to the healing of chronic wounds is biofilm phenotype infections. Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common, disabling, and costly complications of diabetes. Here we seek to derive a better understanding of the polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic extremity ulcer infections. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a new bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP approach we have evaluated the bacterial diversity of 40 chronic diabetic foot ulcers from different patients. The most prevalent bacterial genus associated with diabetic chronic wounds was Corynebacterium spp. Findings also show that obligate anaerobes including Bacteroides, Peptoniphilus, Fingoldia, Anaerococcus, and Peptostreptococcus spp. are ubiquitous in diabetic ulcers, comprising a significant portion of the wound biofilm communities. Other major components of the bacterial communities included commonly cultured genera such as Streptococcus, Serratia, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. CONCLUSIONS: In this article, we highlight the patterns of population diversity observed in the samples and introduce preliminary evidence to support the concept of functional equivalent pathogroups (FEP. Here we introduce FEP as consortia of genotypically distinct bacteria that symbiotically produce a pathogenic community. According to this hypothesis, individual members of these communities when they occur alone may not cause disease but when they coaggregate or consort together into a FEP the synergistic effect provides the functional equivalence of well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, giving the biofilm community the factors necessary to maintain chronic biofilm infections

  20. Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection - UTI) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Urinary Tract & How It Works Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection—UTI) in Adults View or Print All Sections ... Bladder infections are the most common type of urinary tract infection (UTI), but any part of your urinary tract ...

  1. HPV Infection in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Palefsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While much is known about the natural history of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV infection and its consequences, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer, relatively little is known about the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and diseases in men. In part this reflects difficulties in penile sampling and visual assessment of penile lesions. Anal HPV infection and disease also remain poorly understood. Although HPV is transmitted sexually and infects the genitals of both sexes, the cervix remains biologically more vulnerable to malignant transformation than does the penis or anus in men. An understanding of male HPV infection is therefore important in terms of reducing transmission of HPV to women and improving women's health. However, it is also important due to the burden of disease in men, who may develop both penile and anal cancer, particularly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Improved sampling techniques of the male genitalia and cohort studies in progress should provide important information on the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and disease in men, including risk factors for HPV acquisition and transmission. The impact of HPV vaccination in women on male anogenital HPV infection will also need to be assessed.

  2. Candida infection of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Candida infection of the skin is a yeast infection ...

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis Genital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. O’Connell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Etiology, transmission and protection: Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI globally. However, C. trachomatis also causes trachoma in endemic areas, mostly Africa and the Middle East, and is a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Epidemiology, incidence and prevalence: The World Health Organization estimates 131 million new cases of C. trachomatis genital infection occur annually. Globally, infection is most prevalent in young women and men (14-25 years, likely driven by asymptomatic infection, inadequate partner treatment and delayed development of protective immunity. Pathology/Symptomatology: C. trachomatis infects susceptible squamocolumnar or transitional epithelial cells, leading to cervicitis in women and urethritis in men. Symptoms are often mild or absent but ascending infection in some women may lead to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID, resulting in reproductive sequelae such as ectopic pregnancy, infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Complications of infection in men include epididymitis and reactive arthritis. Molecular mechanisms of infection: Chlamydiae manipulate an array of host processes to support their obligate intracellular developmental cycle. This leads to activation of signaling pathways resulting in disproportionate influx of innate cells and the release of tissue damaging proteins and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Treatment and curability: Uncomplicated urogenital infection is treated with azithromycin (1 g, single dose or doxycycline (100 mg twice daily x 7 days. However, antimicrobial treatment does not ameliorate established disease. Drug resistance is rare but treatment failures have been described. Development of an effective vaccine that protects against upper tract disease or that limits transmission remains an important goal.

  4. Infection with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, D Y; Kerimoglu, U; Oto, A; Erguven, S; Arslan, S; Unal, S; Batman, F; Bayraktar, Y

    2005-11-01

    Fascioliasis, caused by the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, is an infection that occurs worldwide, although humans are accidental hosts. F. hepatica infection comprises two stages, hepatic and biliary, with different signs and symptoms. Stool examination and ELISA can be used for the initial diagnosis. Radiographic techniques, such as computerised tomography and ultrasonography, as well as magnetic resonance imaging, are used widely for confirmation and follow-up of the disease. Invasive techniques, such as percutaneous cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and liver biopsy, may aid in the diagnosis but are not essential. Triclabendazole is recommended as the first-line agent for the treatment of F. hepatica infection, with bithionol as an alternative.

  5. Pregnancy and Toxoplasma Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Cetin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by a protozoa named Toxoplasma gondii. It is a very important disease because it is related to fetal anomalies and poor perinatal outcomes like abortus and stillbirth. It spreads via uncooked meat and contaminated food. Timely and appropriate treatment and management of this infection prenatally reduces the risk of serious neurological sequelae. Therefore it is crucial that clinician who takes care of pregnant women know this infection deeply. In this review we aimed to summarize the prenatal diagnosis, complications and treatment of toxoplasma infection. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 457-466

  6. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  7. Submandibular space infection: a potentially lethal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to review the clinical characteristics and management of submandibular space infections and to identify the predisposing factors of life-threatening complications. This was a retrospective study at a tertiary academic center. We retrieved and evaluated the records of all patients admitted to the University of Padua Otolaryngology Clinic at Treviso Regional Hospital with the diagnosis of submandibular space infection for the period 1998-2006. The following variables were reviewed: demographic data, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, associated systemic diseases, bacteriology, imaging studies, medical and surgical treatment, and complications. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was undertaken using a forward stepwise technique. Multivariate analysis identified four risk factors for complications. Anterior visceral space involvement (odds ratio (OR) 54.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.80-511.22) and diabetes mellitus (OR 17.46; 95% CI 2.10-145.29) were the most important predictive factors in the model. Logistic regression analysis also confirmed other comorbidities (OR 11.66; 95% CI 1.35-100.10) and bilateral submandibular swelling (OR 10.67; 95% CI 2.73-41.75) as independent predictors for life-threatening complications. Airway obstruction and spread of the infection to the mediastinum are the most troublesome complications of submandibular space infections. Therefore, the maintenance of a secure airway is paramount. Patients with cellulitis and small abscesses can respond to antibiotics alone. Surgical drainage should be performed in patients with larger abscesses, Ludwig's angina, anterior visceral space involvement, and in those who do not respond to antibiotic treatment. Moreover, the clinical assessment in patients with comorbidities, especially diabetes mellitus, requires a high level of suspicion for potential life-threatening complications. Early surgical drainage should always be considered in these patients, even in

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs ...

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs ...

  11. Neuroinvasive flavivirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, Gregorius J.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    Flaviviruses, including Dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, and Tick-borne encephalitis virus, are major emerging human pathogens, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Many clinically important flaviviruses elicit CNS diseases in infected hosts, including traditional "hemorrhagic"

  12. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  13. Healthcare Associated Infections - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - national data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  14. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other immune disorders, or hepatitis People who are undergoing chemotherapy or treatment with other drugs that suppress the immune system Skin that is inflamed or damaged by sunburn, scratching, or other trauma is more likely to become infected. In fact, ...

  15. Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discomfort Frequent, painful urination Blood in urine Urethra (urethritis) Burning with urination Discharge When to see a ... opening to the bladder. Infection of the urethra (urethritis). This type of UTI can occur when GI ...

  16. Chlamydia Pneumoniae Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary ... Pneumoniae Infections Page Content Article Body When you hear the word chlamydia, you might think of the sexually transmitted disease (STD) by that ...

  17. Ear Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ear Infection in Children - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Middle ...

  18. INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS: MODERN COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Vinogradova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristic features of the modern course of infective endocarditis. Unresolved questions of classification of diseaseand drug therapy are discussed. Clearly defined indications for surgical treatment of endocarditis.

  19. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  20. Immunity to parasitic infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamb, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    ... may be manipulated to develop therapeutic interventions against parasitic infection. For easy reference, the most commonly studied parasites are examined in individual chapters written by investigators at the forefront of their field...

  1. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Toxoplasmosis General Information Toxoplasmosis FAQs Toxoplasmosis & Pregnancy FAQs Epidemiology & ...

  2. Pediatric HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ayesha; Rathore, Mobeen H

    2012-01-01

    As this article was written, celebrating another World AIDS Day, which falls on December 1 each year, was just days away. Not only is this a time to reflect on all the success with the treatment and management of HIV infection, in particular MTCT but also a time to reflect on the challenges ahead. As champions of children, pediatricians need to be more vocal in educating patients, families, and their communities about the risks of sexually transmitted infections and HIV infection and the need for testing as part of routine primary care. This needs to be the norm rather than the exception. All persons should be aware of their HIV status; until and unless this approach is taken, new infections will continue to be seen in young people, and even those who are aware of their status will continue to be wary of seeking care.

  3. Chlamydial infections - male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Chlamydial infections - male URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  4. Giardia Infection (Giardiasis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wash your hands. This is the simplest and best way to prevent most kinds of infection. Wash your ... supply is likely to be unsafe, drink and brush your teeth with bottled water that you open yourself. Don' ...

  5. Healthcare Associated Infections - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measures - provider data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  6. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  7. Small Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  8. Testing for TB Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  9. Viruses infecting bivalve molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan; Novoa, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are filter feeders and as a consequence they may bioaccumulate in their tissues viruses that infect humans and higher vertebrates. However, there have also been described mortalities of bivalve molluscs associated with viruses belonging to different families. Mass mortalities of adult Portuguese oysters, Crassostrea angulata, among French livestocks (between 1967 and 1973) were associated with irido-like virus infections. Herpesviruses were reported in the eastern oyster, Pac...

  10. An Infected Mediastinal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Lawson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a 43-year-old patient who had a mediastinal mass that became infected after a transbronchial needle aspirate biopsy. A paraspinal, extrapleural window with a saline-lidocaine mixture was created that allowed the placement of a percutaneous drainage catheter into the infected lesion. This procedure resulted in an excellent clinical outcome, and obviated the need for a thoracotomy and more invasive surgical management.

  11. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes (Mucor, Rhizopus ).6 reduce...below the infected burn wound . If the infection was controlled by these measures and the patient’s condition permit- ted, the involved area was...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and

  12. Probiotics and Gastrointestinal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, Robert A.; Versalovic, James

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The use of probiotics to prevent and treat a variety of diarrheal diseases has gained favor in recent years. Examples where probiotics have positively impacted gastroenteritis will be highlighted. However, the overall efficacy of these treatments and the mechanisms by which probiotics ameliorate gastrointestinal infections are mostly unknown. We will discuss possible m...

  13. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofi...

  14. Nonprimary Cytomegalovirus Fetal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sofia; Gonçalves, Daniela; Taipa, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Maria do Céu

    2016-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common congenital viral infection, causing hearing, visual and psychomotor impairment. Preexisting maternal CMV immunity substantially reduces, but not eliminates, the risk of fetal infection and affectation. This article is about a case of nonprimary maternal CMV infection during pregnancy, with vertical transmission, resulting in severe fetal affectation. Preconceptional analysis indicated maternal CMV past infection. Pregnancy progressed uneventfully until the 20th week ultrasound (US), which revealed cerebral abnormalities: thin and hyperechogenic cerebral cortex with prominent lateral ventricles, bilateral periventricular hyperechogenicities, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and absent corpus callosum. The MRI suggested these findings were compatible with congenital infection rather than primary brain malformation.The fetal karyotype was normal. The title of CMV's IgG antibodies almost tripled. Since the first semester, analysis of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CMV DNA in the amniotic fluid was negative. The pregnancy was terminated at 23 weeks. Neuropathological findings at autopsy showed severe brain lesions associated with CMV infection. Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  15. Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs other than HIV have reappeared as an important public health problem in developed countries (1. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, research and treatment of the 'classic' STIs - gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia - were a major focus of infectious diseases practice and research. There were large outbreaks of syphilis in parts of Canada (2, penicillin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae was a concern (3, and high rates of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with complications of pelvic inflammatory disease and ectopic pregnancy were being reported (4,5. Then, HIV infection emerged, with its spectre of a wasting, early death. There was no effective treatment, and safe sexual practices were embraced and adhered to by high-risk populations as the only effective way to avoid infection. These practices effectively prevented other STIs; rates of syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia infection plummeted in developed countries (5. For at least a decade, it appeared that HIV might be an end to all STIs, at least for some parts of the world. STIs continued unabated in developing countries, as many epidemiological and therapeutic studies explored the association of STIs with HIV infection.

  16. Sternal mycobacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sternal mycobacterial infections are rare. Due to the rarity, its clinical characteristics, diagnoses, and regular management strategies are still scanty. A total of 76 articles on this topic were obtained by a comprehensive literature collection. The clinical features, diagnosis, management strategies and prognosis were carefully analyzed. There were totally 159 patients including 152 (95% cases of tuberculosis (TB and seven (5% cases of non-TB sternal infections. Sternal mycobacterial infections can be categorized into three types: Primary, secondary, and postoperative, according to the pathogenesis; and categorized into isolated, peristernal, and multifocal, according to the extent of the lesions. Microbiological investigation is more sensitive than medical imaging and Mantoux tuberculin skin test in the diagnosis of sternal infections. Most patients show good responses to the standard four-drug regimen and a surgical intervention was necessary in 28.3% patients. The prognoses of the patients are good with a very low mortality. A delayed diagnosis of sternal mycobacterial infections may bring about recurrent sternal infections and sustained incurability. An early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic regimens may significantly improve the patients' outcomes.

  17. Bilateral simultaneous infective keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Annie, Lai Hiu; Ray, Manotosh

    2017-08-01

    To analyze the demographics, risk factors, clinical and microbiological characteristics of cases of bilateral simultaneous infective keratitis. In this retrospective case series, patients with clinical evidence of bilateral simultaneous infective keratitis were identified from January 1, 2011 to August 31, 2016. Demographics, risk factors, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and treatment outcomes were analyzed. Five patients (ten eyes) with bilateral simultaneous infective keratitis were identified. The mean age was 32.8 years (SD,±8.8; range, 24-44). All the patients were disposable soft contact lens wearers before presentation. The average size of the infiltrate was 4.76mm 2 (SD±9.0; range, 0.2-31.34). A total of 4 types of bacteria were isolated, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most frequently isolated bacteria involving 5 eyes of four patients. Infection resolved with medical treatment in 9 eyes, 1 patient required therapeutic corneal transplantation for impending corneal perforation. The average time taken for infection to resolve was 6.7days (SD±4.5; range, 2-16). In this case series, the most common risk factor of bilateral simultaneous microbial keratitis was use of soft disposable contact lens and the most commonly isolated bacteria was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bilateral simultaneous infective keratitis is uncommon and is a serious complication of contact lens use in immunocompetent adult patients. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Bacterial biofilms and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, I; Del Pozo, J L; Penadés, J R; Leiva, J

    2005-01-01

    In developed countries we tend to think of heart disease and the numerous forms of cancer as the main causes of mortality, but on a global scale infectious diseases come close, or may even be ahead: 14.9 million deaths in 2002 compared to cardiovascular diseases (16.9 million deaths) and cancer (7.1 million deaths) (WHO report 2004). The infectious agents responsible for human mortality have evolved as medical techniques and hygienic measures have changed. Modern-day acute infectious diseases caused by specialized bacterial pathogens such as diphtheria, tetanus, cholera, plague, which represented the main causes of death at the beginning of XX century, have been effectively controlled with antibiotics and vaccines. In their place, more than half of the infectious diseases that affect mildly immunocompromised patients involve bacterial species that are commensal with the human body; these can produce chronic infections, are resistant to antimicrobial agents and there is no effective vaccine against them. Examples of these infections are the otitis media, native valve endocarditis, chronic urinary infections, bacterial prostatitis, osteomyelitis and all the infections related to medical devices. Direct analysis of the surface of medical devices or of tissues that have been foci of chronic infections shows the presence of large numbers of bacteria surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix, which has been named the "biofilm". Inside the biofilm, bacteria grow protected from the action of the antibodies, phagocytic cells and antimicrobial treatments. In this article, we describe the role of bacterial biofilms in human persistent infections.

  19. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Goebel, Cristine; de Mattos Oliveira, Flávio; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ubiquitous yeast widely used in industry and it is also a common colonizer of the human mucosae. However, the incidence of invasive infection by these fungi has significantly increased in the last decades. To evaluate the infection by S. cerevisiae in a hospital in southern Brazil during a period of 10 years (2000-2010). Review of medical records of patients infected by this fungus. In this period, 6 patients were found to be infected by S. cerevisiae. The age range of the patients was from 10 years to 84. Urine, blood, ascitic fluid, peritoneal dialysis fluid, and esophageal biopsy samples were analyzed. The predisposing factors were cancer, transplant, surgical procedures, renal failure, use of venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, hospitalization in Intensive Care Unit, diabetes mellitus, chemotherapy, corticosteroid use, and parenteral nutrition. Amphotericin B and fluconazole were the treatments of choice. Three of the patients died and the other 3 were discharged from hospital. We must take special precautions in emerging infections, especially when there are predisposing conditions such as immunosuppression or patients with serious illnesses. The rapid and specific diagnosis of S. cerevisiae infections is important for therapeutic decision. Furthermore, epidemiological and efficacy studies of antifungal agents are necessary for a better therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Postoperative spine infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Domenico Parchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of post-operative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication.

  1. Necrotizing soft tissue infections - a multicentre, prospective observational study (INFECT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madsen, M.B.; Skrede, S.; Bruun, T.; Arnell, P.; Rosén, A.; Nekludov, M.; Karlsson, Y.; Bergey, F.; Saccenti, E.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.P.; Perner, A.; Norrby-Teglund, A.; Hyldegaard, O.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The INFECT project aims to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs). The INFECT observational study is part of the INFECT project with the aim of studying the clinical profile of patients with NSTIs and correlating

  2. CIED infection with either pocket or systemic infection presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Møller-Hansen, Michael; Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    -up no relapses and two cases of new infections were noted (2.8%). CONCLUSIONS: CIED infection with systemic or pocket infection was difficult to distinguish in clinical presentation and outcome. Complete device removal and antibiotic treatment of long duration was safe and without relapses....... infection during the period from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. CIED infections were categorized as systemic or pocket infections. Treatment included complete removal of the device, followed by antibiotic treatment of six weeks. RESULTS: Seventy-one device removals due to infection (32 systemic...

  3. A Metaproteomics Approach to Elucidate Host and Pathogen Protein Expression during Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassek, Christian; Burghartz, Melanie; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Otto, Andreas; Hentschker, Christian; Fuchs, Stephan; Bernhardt, Jörg; Jauregui, Ruy; Neubauer, Rüdiger; Becher, Dörte; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Riedel, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Long-term catheterization inevitably leads to a catheter-associated bacteriuria caused by multispecies bacterial biofilms growing on and in the catheters. The overall goal of the presented study was (1) to unravel bacterial community structure and function of such a uropathogenic biofilm and (2) to elucidate the interplay between bacterial virulence and the human immune system within the urine. To this end, a metaproteomics approach combined with in vitro proteomics analyses was employed to investigate both, the pro- and eukaryotic protein inventory. Our proteome analyses demonstrated that the biofilm of the investigated catheter is dominated by three bacterial species, that is, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Morganella morganii, and Bacteroides sp., and identified iron limitation as one of the major challenges in the bladder environment. In vitro proteome analysis of P. aeruginosa and M. morganii isolated from the biofilm revealed that these opportunistic pathogens are able to overcome iron restriction via the production of siderophores and high expression of corresponding receptors. Notably, a comparison of in vivo and in vitro protein profiles of P. aeruginosa and M. morganii also indicated that the bacteria employ different strategies to adapt to the urinary tract. Although P. aeruginosa seems to express secreted and surface-exposed proteases to escape the human innate immune system and metabolizes amino acids, M. morganii is able to take up sugars and to degrade urea. Most interestingly, a comparison of urine protein profiles of three long-term catheterized patients and three healthy control persons demonstrated the elevated level of proteins associated with neutrophils, macrophages, and the complement system in the patient's urine, which might point to a specific activation of the innate immune system in response to biofilm-associated urinary tract infections. We thus hypothesize that the often asymptomatic nature of catheter-associated urinary tract infections

  4. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Current management of fungal infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meis, J.F.G.M.; Verweij, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    The management of superficial fungal infections differs significantly from the management of systemic fungal infections. Most superficial infections are treated with topical antifungal agents, the choice of agent being determined by the site and extent of the infection and by the causative organism,

  6. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Med 1998;24:206-16. Alangaden GJ. Nosocomial Fungal Infections: Epidemiology, Infection Control, and Prevention. Infectious Disease Clinics ... 25:201-25. Zilberberg MD, Shorr AF. Fungal infections in the ICU. Infect Dis ... D. Nosocomial aspergillosis and building construction. Med Mycol 2009;47 ...

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth / For Teens / Urinary Tract Infections What's in ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the ...

  8. Infected nonunion of tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Madhav Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infected nonunions of tibia pose many challenges to the treating surgeon and the patient. Challenges include recalcitrant infection, complex deformities, sclerotic bone ends, large bone gaps, shortening, and joint stiffness. They are easy to diagnose and difficult to treat. The ASAMI classification helps decide treatment. The nonunion severity score proposed by Calori measures many parameters to give a prognosis. The infection severity score uses simple clinical signs to grade severity of infection. This determines number of surgeries and allows choice of hardware, either external or internal for definitive treatment. Co-morbid factors such as smoking, diabetes, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and hypovitaminosis D influence the choice and duration of treatment. Thorough debridement is the mainstay of treatment. Removal of all necrotic bone and soft tissue is needed. Care is exercised in shaping bone ends. Internal fixation can help achieve union if infection was mild. Severe infections need external fixation use in a second stage. Compression at nonunion site achieves union. It can be combined with a corticotomy lengthening at a distant site for equalization. Soft tissue deficit has to be covered by flaps, either local or microvascular. Bone gaps are best filled with the reliable technique of bone transport. Regenerate bone may be formed proximally, distally, or at both sites. Acute compression can fill bone gaps and may need a fibular resection. Gradual reduction of bone gap happens with bone transport, without need for fibulectomy. When bone ends dock, union may be achieved by vertical or horizontal compression. Biological stimulus from iliac crest bone grafts, bone marrow aspirate injections, and platelet concentrates hasten union. Bone graft substitutes add volume to graft and help fill defects. Addition of rh-BMP-7 may help in healing albeit at a much higher cost. Regeneration may need stimulation and augmentation. Induced

  9. [Atherosclerosis and infection?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, K

    2006-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is guided by chronicle inflammation process. In the last decades of the 20th century, studies considering infection another possible risk factor of atherosclerosis development were written. Helicobacter pylori, Porphyromas gingivalis, some viruses but most frequently Chlamydia pneumonie are infection agens mentioned in these studies. Some of them emphasize also combined infections caused by more pathogenic factors having influence on vascular inflammation. Serological, epidemiological, histological and imunological studies show the pathogenic influence of acute or chronic infections. Many studies selected makrolid antibiotics as treatment in patients with ischaemic heart disease. However, existing experience with antibiotics did not bring clear results. These studies have mentioned the fact antibiotics have not been indicated as treatment in patients with acute or chronic vascular system infliction by atherosclerosis. Since the experimental and clinical research of influence of inflammations on the development of atherosclerosis moved forward a lot, no exact evidence of this complicated pathogenic mechanism was given. It will obviously take some time to confirm whether the relation between infections and artherosclerosis is causal, i.e. initiating the pathogenic process, accelerating it or keeping it alive.

  10. Chlamydiaceae infections in pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schautteet Katelijn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria. They are responsible for a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. In pigs, Chlamydia suis, Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia psittaci have been isolated. Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs are associated with different pathologies such as conjunctivitis, pneumonia, pericarditis, polyarthritis, polyserositis, pseudo-membranous or necrotizing enteritis, periparturient dysgalactiae syndrome, vaginal discharge, return to oestrus, abortion, mummification, delivery of weak piglets, increased perinatal and neonatal mortality and inferior semen quality, orchitis, epididymitis and urethritis in boars. However, Chlamydiaceae are still considered as non-important pathogens because reports of porcine chlamydiosis are rare. Furthermore, Chlamydiaceae infections are often unnoticed because tests for Chlamydiaceae are not routinely performed in all veterinary diagnostic laboratories and Chlamydiaceae are often found in association with other pathogens, which are sometimes more easily to detect. However, recent studies have demonstrated that Chlamydiaceae infections in breeding sows, boars and piglets occur more often than thought and are economically important. This paper presents an overview on: the taxonomy of Chlamydiaceae occurring in pigs, diagnostic considerations, epidemiology and pathology of infections with Chlamydiaceae in pigs, public health significance and finally on prevention and treatment of Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs.

  11. Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Agnese Latino

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis (C.t. infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease in Europe and in developed countries. The main biological features and pathogenic mechanisms of C.t. infection are summarized in this review. It usually occurs without symptoms and often goes undiagnosed. If untreated, it can cause severe consequences for women, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, ectopic pregnancy and tubal infertility. Several studies have found that Chlamydia is more common among young women <25 years old, with multiple sexual partners within six months and non protected intercourses. Because re-infection rates are high, complications may be reduced if partners are treated and women re-tested. This paper emphasizes the importance of counselling and prevention programs and underlines that selective screening of high-risk population remains an essential component of C.t. control. In the last years, the detection of C.t. infection has been improved in sensitivity and specificity.We describe the main diagnostic techniques, from culture, enzyme immunoassay (EIA, direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA to the new DNA-based test systems. Actually, NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests are regarded as the gold standard diagnostic techniques for chlamydial infections.

  12. [Atypical mycobacterial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautzenberg, B; Mercat, A

    1994-10-22

    Infrequent and forgotten before the advent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections are now often encountered, predominately in patients positive for the human immune deficiency virus (HIV). In non-AIDS patients, Mycobacterium kansasii, M. avium and M. xenopi are the most common causal agents of pulmonary mycobacterial infections. Nodes and skin diseases are less frequent. M. kansasii infections are treated for 12 months with a standard combination of rifampin, isoniazid and ethambutol. The treatment for M. xenopi and M. avium infections have not yet been standardized. The AIDS epidemia has modified the epidemiology of these disease and there has been a 10-fold increase in incidence. Disseminated M. avium infections occur in 15% of patients at end-stage AIDS. This new epidemia has triggered research leading to the discovery of new diagnostic procedure including blood culture media for mycobacteria, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and new active drugs. New active macrolides such as clarithromycine and azithromycine are active against M. avium and new rifampicin-related drugs such as rifabutine and new quinolones are under investigation.

  13. [Clinically documented fungal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakeya, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2008-12-01

    Proven fungal infections are diagnosed by histological/microbiological evidence of fungi at the site of infection and positive blood culture (fungemia). However, invasive diagnosing examinations are not always applied for all of immunocompromised patients. Clinically documented invasive fungal infections are diagnosed by typical radiological findings such as halo sign on chest CT plus positive serological/molecular evidence of fungi. Serological tests of Aspergillus galactomannan antigen and beta-glucan for aspergillosis and cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan antigen for cryptococcosis are useful. Hence, none of reliable serological tests for zygomycosis are available so far. In this article, risk factors, sign and symptoms, and diagnostic methods for clinically documented cases of invasive aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis, and zygomycosis with diabates, are reviewed.

  14. Pregnancy and HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Sucu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection is progressing rapidly. In developed countries, the perinatal transmission rates have decreased from 20-30% to 1-2% with the use of antiretroviral therapy and cesarean section. Interventions for the prevention of prenatal transmission has made the prenatal care of pregnant patients with HIV infection more complex. Rapid development of standard care and continuing increase in the distribution of HIV infection has required clinicians taking care of pregnants to have current information. Therefore, in our review we aimed to summarize the prenatal course, treatment and preventive methods for perinatal transmission of HIV. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 522-535

  15. Apoptosis in Pneumovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinout A. Bem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumovirus infections cause a wide spectrum of respiratory disease in humans and animals. The airway epithelium is the major site of pneumovirus replication. Apoptosis or regulated cell death, may contribute to the host anti-viral response by limiting viral replication. However, apoptosis of lung epithelial cells may also exacerbate lung injury, depending on the extent, the timing and specific location in the lungs. Differential apoptotic responses of epithelial cells versus innate immune cells (e.g., neutrophils, macrophages during pneumovirus infection can further contribute to the complex and delicate balance between host defense and disease pathogenesis. The purpose of this manuscript is to give an overview of the role of apoptosis in pneumovirus infection. We will examine clinical and experimental data concerning the various pro-apoptotic stimuli and the roles of apoptotic epithelial and innate immune cells during pneumovirus disease. Finally, we will discuss potential therapeutic interventions targeting apoptosis in the lungs.

  16. Superficial fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brendan P

    2012-04-01

    Tinea capitis, tinea corporis, and pityriasis versicolor are common superficial fungal infections in the pediatric population. • Tinea capitis is the most common dermatophyte infection worldwide. In North America, the cause is almost exclusively T tonsurans. Diagnosis of tinea capitis usually can be made by clinical features alone, especially when occipital or postauricular lymphadenopathy is present. Skin scrapings prepared with potassium hydroxide for microscopic examination, or a cotton swab for fungal culture, usually are diagnostic. • Treatment of tinea capitis requires systemic antifungal therapy. Terbinafine and griseofulvin are both effective against T tonsurans and are FDA-approved for this indication in children. • Adjunctive topical therapy for the patient and household contacts decreases transmission of this infection. • Topical antifungal therapy usually is effective for tinea corporis and pityriasis versicolor. However, recurrences of pityriasis versicolor are common.

  17. Zika virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laval, F; Leparc-Goffart, I; Meynard, J-B; Daubigny, H; Simon, F; Briolant, S

    2016-05-01

    Since its discovery in 1947 in Uganda, the Zika virus (ZIKV) remained in the shadows emerging in 2007 in Micronesia, where hundreds of dengue-like syndromes were reported. Then, in 2013-2014, it was rife in French Polynesia, where the first neurological effects were observed. More recently, its arrival in Brazil was accompanied by an unusually high number of children with microcephaly born to mothers infected with ZIKV during the first trimester of pregnancy. In 2016, the World Health Organization declared ZIKV infection to be a public health emergency and now talks about a ZIKV pandemic. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about ZIKV infection, successively addressing its transmission, epidemiology, clinical aspects, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention before discussing some perspectives.

  18. Imaging spinal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection involving the vertebral column, including the bone, intervertebral disk, and paravertebral soft tissues is critical and early diagnosis and directed treatment is paramount. Different infectious organisms present with variable imaging characteristics, which when examined in conjunction with the clinical history, can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately prevent patient morbidity and mortality. This article discusses the pathophysiology of infection of the vertebral column, as well as the imaging findings of bacterial, tuberculous, and fungal spondylitis/spondylodiskitis. We review the imaging findings utilizing plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as a discussion regarding advanced imaging techniques.

  19. Surgical infections with Mycoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Prag, Jørgen Brorson; Jensen, J S

    1997-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are common inhabitants of the human genital tract. Evidence for an aetiological role in pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, post-abortion and post-partum fever has been presented. There are sporadic reports of Mycoplasma causing serious extra...... extragenital infection such as septicemia, septic arthritis, neonatal meningitis and encephalitis. We review 38 cases of surgical infections with Mycoplasma.......Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are common inhabitants of the human genital tract. Evidence for an aetiological role in pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, post-abortion and post-partum fever has been presented. There are sporadic reports of Mycoplasma causing serious...

  20. Dipylidium caninum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Raúl Romero; Ruiz, Aurora Candil; Feregrino, Raul Romero; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Feregrino, Rodrigo Romero; Zavala, Jorge Tay

    2011-11-15

    Dipylidium caninum is a cestode that requires from the participation of an arthropod in its life cycle. This parasitosis occurs in dogs and cats, and occasionally in human beings. Human cases of D caninum infection have been reported in Europe, Philippines, China, Japan, Latin America and the United States; mostly children, one third of them being infants under 6 months old. The diagnosis of this disease is done by the parasitological study of the feces, observing the characteristics of the gravid proglottids. The treatment is performed by administering broad-spectrum anthelmintics. The authors report a case of a rare infection in a Mexican child.

  1. Neglected Parasitic Infections: Toxocariasis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-05

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States. Neglected Parasitic Infections are a group of diseases that afflict vulnerable populations and are often not well studied or diagnosed. A subject matter expert from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis.  Created: 1/5/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM); Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 1/9/2012.

  2. Imaging of Odontogenic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardini, Shaza; Gohel, Anita

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic infections represent a common clinical problem in patients of all ages. The presence of teeth enables the direct spread of inflammatory products from dental caries, trauma, and/or periodontal disease into the maxilla and mandible. The radiographic changes seen depend on the type and duration of the inflammatory process and host body response. Imaging plays a central role in identifying the source of infection and the extent of the disease spread and in detecting any complications. Many different imaging modalities can be used. The radiographic features associated with acute and chronic inflammatory processes are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhariwal, Neha Shashikant; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Harakuni, Sheetal; Sogi, Suma; Assudani, Harsha G; Mistry, Laresh Naresh

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and Camellia sinensis (green tea) as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric) showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001). The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea). The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important role in eradicating the population of predominant micro-organisms in treating these teeth with

  4. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Shashikant Dhariwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric and Camellia sinensis (green tea as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. Statistical Analysis: SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001. The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea. Conclusion: The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important

  5. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS AND CERVICAL CYTOLOGY IN HIV INFECTED WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasuki Shanmugam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND As on 2015 Human immunodeficiency virus estimations in India, people living with HIV are 21.17 lakhs, women with HIV constituting 2/5th of the total. The prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and malignancy are more in HIV infected people. Cervical cancer is one of the leading cancers among Indian women. HIV infection and sexually transmitted infections, Human Papilloma Virus infection in particular act synergistic in predisposing to cervical neoplasia. Undetected cervical cancer may increase the mortality of HIV infected women. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a case control study done at STI clinic of tertiary hospital of South India involving 100 HIV infected women and 50 HIV uninfected women as control. STI screening and cervical cytology was done for both the group. RESULTS Sociodemographic profile was similar for both the groups pertaining to Age, Occupation, Literacy. 80% of women in study group and control group were married and monogamous. 34% of HIV infected women had early sexual debut because of early marriage (P value .006. 86% of HIV infected and 40% of HIV uninfected women had sexually transmitted infections. (P value .000.Abnormal cervical cytology was found more in HIV infected women. Inflammatory smear was found in 65% of HIV infected women and in 42% of HIV uninfected women. Epithelial cell abnormalities were found in 25% of HIV infected women and in 2% of control group. High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was found in 4% of study group and none in control group. CONCLUSION Prevalence of STI and abnormal cervical cytology are more common in HIV infected women. Sexually transmitted infections, HIV and HPV in particular, are the proven risk factors of cervical malignancy .So prevention of cervical cancer lies in controlling STI and preventing HPV infection by early vaccination. Screening for STI and periodic Pap smear screening should be ideally done for all HIV infected women as per NACO guidelines.

  6. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, TS; van der Graaf, WTA; Tappero, JW; Asiedu, K

    1999-01-01

    After tuberculosis and leprosy, Buruli-ulcer disease (caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans) is the third most common mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent people. Countries in which the disease is endemic have been identified, predominantly in areas of tropical rain forest; the

  7. (HLB) infected citrus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Citrus grown in Malaysia have been infected since 1990 and large areas of citrus orchards had to be eradicated. The pathogen belongs to the genus Candi- datus Liberibacter. It is a phloem limited and fastidious bacteria. HLB pathogen is transmitted by citrus psyllid. Diaphorina citri in Asia and America, ...

  8. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  9. Wound Infections PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about how to avoid a wound infection after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  10. Mycoplasma genitalium Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-02-08

    Dr. Lisa Manhart, a professor of Epidemiology and Global Health with the Center for AIDS and STD at the University of Washington, discusses Mycoplasma genitalium Infections.  Created: 2/8/2018 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/8/2018.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of peptic ulcers, and it can also cause gastritis and stomach cancer. About 30 to 40 percent of people in the United States get an H. pylori infection. Most people get it as a child. ... This can lead to gastritis or a peptic ulcer. Researchers aren't sure ...

  12. Infections and endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Tymen T.; Mairuhu, Albert T. A.; de Kruif, Martijn D.; Klein, Saskia K.; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; ten Cate, Hugo; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Levi, Marcel; van Gorp, Eric C. M.

    2003-01-01

    Systemic infection by various pathogens interacts with the endothelium and may result in altered coagulation, vasculitis and atherosclerosis. Endothelium plays a role in the initiation and regulation of both coagulation and fibrinolysis. Exposure of endothelial cells may lead to rapid activation of

  13. Vitamin C and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemilä, Harri

    2017-03-29

    In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose-response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6-8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3-4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

  14. Investigating Shigella sonnei Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-17

    Dr. Nancy Strockbine, Chief of the Escherichia and Shigella Reference Unit at CDC, discusses Shigella sonnei infections.  Created: 11/17/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  15. Sexually transmitted infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Sexually transmitted infections: Prevalence, knowledge and treatment practices among female sex workers in a cosmopolitan city in Nigeria. Adekemi O Sekoni*, Oluwakemi O Odukoya, Adebayo T Onajole, Kofoworola A Odeyemi. Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  17. Vitamin C and Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose–response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6–8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3–4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

  18. Psychogenic "HIV infection"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sno, H. N.; Storosum, J. G.; Wortel, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    The case of a man who falsely represented himself as being HIV positive is reported. In less than one year he was admitted twice with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. The diagnoses malingering and factitious disorder were consecutively made. Early recognition of Factitious Disorder is essential

  19. Metabolic Effects of Infection,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    P., Jr.- ystemic and regional arterioveno shunting in 9:181, 1977. endotoxic m septic shock in dogs . Surg Forum :55, 1976. Weisel, R. D., Vito, L...proteins, accelera- L., and Nichols. B. L. (eds.): Symposium on Impact of Infection on tion of hepatic gluconeogenesis , ureagenesis and Nutritional Status of

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  1. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  2. Middle Ear Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to develop a serious illness. What if a child with a middle ear infection is in great pain and discomfort? The mainstay of pain management for AOM is medications such as acetominophen ... before the child's bedtime. Fortunately, by 24 hours about 60 percent ...

  3. Odontogenic Orofacial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertossi, Dario; Barone, Antonio; Iurlaro, Antonio; Marconcini, Simone; De Santis, Daniele; Finotti, Marco; Procacci, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Acute dental abscess is a frequent and sometimes underestimated disease of the oral cavity. The acute dental abscess usually occurs secondary to caries, trauma, or failed endodontic treatment. After the intact pulp chamber is opened, colonization of the root canals takes place with a variable set of anaerobic bacteria, which colonize the walls of the necrotic root canals forming a specialized mixed anaerobic biofilm. Asymptomatic necrosis is common. However, abscess formation occurs when these bacteria and their toxic products breach into the periapical tissues through the apical foramen and induce acute inflammation and pus formation. The main signs and symptoms of the acute dental abscess (often referred to as a periapical abscess or infection) are pain, swelling, erythema, and suppuration usually localized to the affected tooth, even if the abscess can eventually spread causing a severe odontogenic infection which is characterized by local and systemic involvement culminating in sepsis syndrome. The vast majority of dental abscesses respond to antibiotic treatment, however, in some patients surgical management of the infection may be indicated. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of the patients with dental orofacial infections referred to the Unit of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University of Verona from 1991 to 2011 has been performed.

  4. Diagnosis of bacterial infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rapid and easy-to-use test for bacterial infections. Clearly, this is a very ... detect antigens or specific antibodies, e.g. group A streptococcal antigen testing can be employed to reduce antibiotic use. Culture-based tests are often ... White blood cell count 12 000 cells/mm³; or the presence of >10% ...

  5. Viral infection of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheik, A.R.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Lavik, G.; Foster, R.A.; Musat, N.; Adam, B.; Kuypers, M.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa is an ecologically important bloom-forming phytoplankton, which sequesters substantial amounts of inorganic carbon and can form carbon-enriched chitinous star-like structures. Viruses infecting P.globosa (PgVs) play a significant regulatory role in population dynamics of the host

  6. Varicella zoster virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Anne A.; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gershon, Michael D.; Gilden, Don; Grose, Charles; Hambleton, Sophie; Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Oxman, Michael N.; Seward, Jane F.; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), which can be severe in immunocompromised individuals, infants and adults. Primary infection is followed by latency in ganglionic neurons. During this period, no virus particles are produced and no obvious neuronal damage occurs. Reactivation of the virus leads to virus replication, which causes zoster (shingles) in tissues innervated by the involved neurons, inflammation and cell death — a process that can lead to persistent radicular pain (postherpetic neuralgia). The pathogenesis of postherpetic neuralgia is unknown and it is difficult to treat. Furthermore, other zoster complications can develop, including myelitis, cranial nerve palsies, meningitis, stroke (vasculopathy), retinitis, and gastroenterological infections such as ulcers, pancreatitis and hepatitis. VZV is the only human herpesvirus for which highly effective vaccines are available. After varicella or vaccination, both wild-type and vaccine-type VZV establish latency, and long-term immunity to varicella develops. However, immunity does not protect against reactivation. Thus, two vaccines are used: one to prevent varicella and one to prevent zoster. In this Primer we discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of VZV infections, with an emphasis on the molecular events that regulate these diseases. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/14×VI1 PMID:27188665

  7. Salmonella Infections in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bula-Rudas, Fernando J; Rathore, Mobeen H; Maraqa, Nizar F

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella are gram-negative bacilli within the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Animals (pets) are an important reservoir for nontyphoidal Salmonella, whereas humans are the only natural host and reservoir for Salmonella Typhi. Salmonella infections are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They account for an estimated 2.8 billion cases of diarrheal disease each year. The transmission of Salmonella is frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated water and food of animal origin, and it is facilitated by conditions of poor hygiene. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infections have a worldwide distribution, whereas most typhoidal Salmonella infections in the United States are acquired abroad. In the United States, Salmonella is a common agent for food-borne–associated infections. Several outbreaks have been identified and are most commonly associated with agricultural products. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection is usually characterized by a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent hosts in industrialized countries, but it may also cause invasive disease in vulnerable individuals (eg, children less than 1 year of age, immunocompromised). Antibiotic treatment is not recommended for treatment of mild to moderate gastroenteritis by nontyphoidal Salmonella in immunocompetent adults or children more than 1 year of age. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in infants less than 3 months of age, because they are at higher risk for bacteremia and extraintestinal complications. Typhoid (enteric) fever and its potential complications have a significant impact on children, especially those who live in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of typhoid fever has become challenging because of the emergence of Salmonella Typhi strains that are resistant to classically used first-line agents: ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. The

  8. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eligio Pizzigallo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”. Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis. The etiopathogenetic role of EBV is demonstrated only in a well-examined subgroup of patients, while in most of the remaining cases this role should be played by other infectious agents - able to remain in a latent or persistent way in the host – or even by not infectious agents (toxic, neuroendocrine, methabolic, etc.. However, the pathogenetic substrate of the different etiologic forms seems to be the same, much probably represented by the oxidative damage due to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines as a response to the triggering event (infectious or not infectious. Anyway, recently the scientists turned their’s attention to the genetic predisposition of the subjects affected by the syndrome, so that in the last years the genetic studies, together with those of molecular biology, received a great impulse

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for ... a bladder infection, your doctor will order some medicine for you to take to kill the bacteria. ...

  10. HIV/AIDS and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Having HIV/AIDS weakens your body's immune system. It destroys the white blood cells that fight infection. This puts ... such as crypto (cryptosporidiosis) and toxo (toxoplasmosis) Having HIV/AIDS can make infections harder to treat. People ...

  11. Infective endocarditis, 1984 through 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Hagelskjaer, L H; Tvede, M

    1997-01-01

    To characterize the epidemiology and the clinical and microbiological spectrum of infective endocarditis in a Danish population.......To characterize the epidemiology and the clinical and microbiological spectrum of infective endocarditis in a Danish population....

  12. Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Soil-transmitted helminth infections Fact sheet Updated September 2017 Key facts Soil-transmitted helminth infections are caused by different species ...

  13. Side Effects: Infection and Neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection and neutropenia can be serious side effects during cancer treatment. Chemotherapy can increase your risk. Learn how to prevent infection during treatment. Find out what signs and symptoms to call the doctor about.

  14. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection before anyone else can see there's anything wrong with you. That's why it's important to talk ... kidney infection and you should see a doctor right away. What Will the Doctor Do? First, your ...

  15. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a urinary tract infection before anyone else can see there's anything wrong with you. That's why it's ... signs of a kidney infection and you should see a doctor right away. What Will the Doctor ...

  17. Tapeworm infection - beef or pork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapeworm infection is caused by eating the raw or undercooked meat of infected animals. Cattle usually carry Taenia saginata ( T saginata ). Pigs carry Taenia solium (T solium) . In the human intestine, the young form of ...

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) ... a bladder infection, your doctor will order some medicine for you to take to kill the bacteria. ...

  20. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals ... Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) ...

  1. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if I Have a UTI? You may notice signs of a urinary tract infection before anyone else ... it smell bad when you pee? These are signs that you might have a bladder infection, so ...

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection, which is a type of UTI. You may also hear a bladder infection called cystitis (say: ... harmful bacteria keep spreading. From the bladder, they may head into one of the ureters and climb ...

  3. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & ... para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety ... Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports ...

  6. Necrotizing soft-tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrenholz, D H

    1988-02-01

    A variety of infections are encountered by the practicing surgeon. Uncommonly, a patient presents with minimal external manifestations of a deep surgical soft-tissue infection. Early aggressive intervention is required to minimize the morbidity in these often debilitated patients.

  7. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Aggarwal, BS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 71-year-old woman with a history of metastatic ovarian cancer presented with sudden onset, rapidly progressing painful rash in the genital region and lower abdominal wall. She was febrile to 103°F, heart rate was 114 beats per minute, and respiratory rate was 24 per minute. Her exam was notable for a toxic-appearing female with extensive areas of erythema, tenderness, and induration to her lower abdomen, intertriginous areas, and perineum with intermittent segments of crepitus without hemorrhagic bullae or skin breakdown. Significant findings: Computed tomography (CT of the abdominal and pelvis with intravenous (IV contrast revealed inflammatory changes, including gas and fluid collections within the ventral abdominal wall extending to the vulva, consistent with a necrotizing soft tissue infection. Discussion: Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious infection of the skin and soft tissues that requires an early diagnosis to reduce morbidity and mortality. Classified into several subtypes based on the type of microbial infection, necrotizing fasciitis can rapidly progress to septic shock or death if left untreated.1 Diagnosing necrotizing fasciitis requires a high index of suspicion based on patient risk factors, presentation, and exam findings. Definitive treatment involves prompt surgical exploration and debridement coupled with IV antibiotics.2,3 Clinical characteristics such as swelling, disproportionate pain, erythema, crepitus, and necrotic tissue should be a guide to further diagnostic tests.4 Unfortunately, lab values such as white blood cell count and lactate imaging studies have high sensitivity but low specificity, making the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis still largely a clinical one.4,5 CT is a reliable method to exclude the diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infections (sensitivity of 100%, but is only moderately reliable in correctly identifying such infections (specificity of 81%.5 Given the emergent

  8. Hand infections: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Türker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hand infections are common, usually resulting from an untreated injury. In this retrospective study, we report on hand infection cases needing surgical drainage in order to assess patient demographics, causation of infection, clinical course, and clinical management.Methods. Medical records of patients presenting with hand infections, excluding post-surgical infections, treated with incision and debridement over a one-year period were reviewed. Patient demographics; past medical history; infection site(s and causation; intervals between onset of infection, hospital admission, surgical intervention and days of hospitalization; gram stains and cultures; choice of antibiotics; complications; and outcomes were reviewed.Results. Most infections were caused by laceration and the most common site of infection was the palm or dorsum of the hand. Mean length of hospitalization was 6 days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, beta-hemolytic Streptococcus and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly cultured microorganisms. Cephalosporins, clindamycin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, penicillin, vancomycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were major antibiotic choices. Amputations and contracture were the primary complications.Conclusions. Surgery along with medical management were key to treatment and most soft tissue infections resolved without further complications. With prompt and appropriate care, most hand infection patients can achieve full resolution of their infection.

  9. Urinary tract infections in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections in women, with half of all women experiencing at least one in their lifetime.1 Of the women affected, 25-30% develop recurrent infections unrelated to any functional or anatomical abnormality of the urinary tract.2 Most UTIs in women are episodes of acute.

  10. Prophylactic Antibiotics and Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Elbur, Abubaker Ibrahim; M.A., Yousif; El-Sayed, Ahmed S.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infections account for 14%-25% of all nosocomial infections. The main aims of this study were to audit the use of prophylactic antibiotic, to quantify the rate of post-operative wound infection, and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in general surgery.

  11. Infection imaging in nuclear medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Regardless of advances in medicine, infection continues to play a major role in patients' morbidity and mortality. Nuclear medicine techniques have an important role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harbouring infection. Many different agents may be used in an attempt to image infection. ere are ...

  12. Varicella infection modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  13. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria......-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial...

  14. Stop C. difficile Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-06

    This podcast is based on the March 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. C. difficile is a germ that causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 deaths in the US each year. This podcast helps health care professionals learn how to prevent C. difficile infections.  Created: 3/6/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/6/2012.

  15. Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  16. Advances in infection control

    OpenAIRE

    Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several initiatives took place in recent years in relation to nosocomial infection control in order to increase patient safety. Some of these initiatives will be commented in this brief review. RESUMO Várias iniciativas aconteceram nos últimos anos em relação ao controle das infecções no ambiente hospitalar para aumentar a segurança do paciente. Algumas dessas iniciativas são comentadas nesta breve revisão.

  17. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  18. Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    generalized. Clinically, the like- controlled Pseudomonas burn wound infection in most lihood of septicemia appears to increase as the area of patients (2,4...31 patients, dida, Coccidiodes, Phycomyces, and Rhizopus . In 69 of pneumonia was the primary septic process in 27 (20 of these 75 patients (92%), the...carried out as described above and appropriate systemic anti- to which the invading organisms were sensitive and fungal agents are employed to control

  19. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing...

  20. An unusual mycobacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sotello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of atypical mycobacterial or nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM infections has increased during the last three decades with the emergence of HIV/AIDS and more use of immunosuppressive treatments. We present a case of pulmonary mycobacterial infection secondary to Mycobacterium kansasii in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and malnutrition. M. kansasii is a ubiquitous organism, most commonly found in the southern and central regions of the US. It can occur as a colonizer, but when it produces disease it usually involves the lung. The American Thoracic Society (ATS and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA have issued criteria to differentiate casual NTM isolation from true pulmonary NTM disease. Among the NTM infections, M. Kansasii is the pathogen which causes a clinical picture which most resembles pulmonary tuberculosis. It can produce a bronchiectasis, nodular lesions, and/or fibrocavitary infiltrates on x-rays. Treatment requires a rifampin based regimen, usually combined with isoniazid and ethambutol. If rifampin resistance is present, macrolides, quinolones, or sulfas are usually recommended.

  1. Chikungunya infection in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Menezes Bezerra Duarte

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: the infection of chikungunya virus presents clinical manifestations variables, particularly in infants in which may present multiple cutaneous manifestations. Description: a case series study was carried out in an analytical character of 14 infants (>28 days to < 2 years old admitted in a hospital between November 2015 and January 2016 with suspected case of chikungunya, by a specific IgM reactive serology. Patients positive for dengue fever, Zika virus, bacterial infections and other exanthematic diseases were excluded. Fever and cutaneous alterations were the most frequent clinical manifestations in 100% of the cases, followed by irritability (64.3%, vomits and arthralgia/arthritis in 35.7% each. Three children presented alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid compatible to meningitis. Anemia frequency was 85.7%. The median white blood cells count was 7.700/mm3 (2.600 to 20.300/mm3. High levels of aminotransferases were observed in three cases (230 to 450 U/L. Antibiotic therapy was indicated in 64.3% of the cases. Two infants needed opioid derivatives for analgesia while others took acetaminophen and/or dipyrone. Discussion: the study shows evident multi-systemic involvement of chikungunya infection in infants. The treatment is supportive, giving special attention to hydration, analgesia, skin care, and rational use of antibiotic therapy.

  2. Infections and vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Konstantinos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    To review recent evidence for infection rates in patients with systemic vasculitides, the role of specific infectious agents in the pathogenesis of vasculitis and recent breakthroughs in the treatment of virus-associated vasculitides. In well designed recent studies, infections were found to be common during the first 6-12 months in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to contribute significantly to increased mortality during this period. New therapeutic schemes with lower cyclophosphamide doses and shorter corticosteroid courses were associated with decreased infectious rates in elderly patients with AAV whereas a prednisone dose greater than 10 mg/day at the end of the first year were associated with increased infectious-related mortality in patients with GCA. Recently, a potential role for varicella zoster virus in GCA pathogenesis has been proposed but more data are needed in order to establish a causal relationship. Finally, preliminary data show excellent short-term efficacy and safety of the new, interferon-free, oral antiviral agents in the treatment of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Infections continue to be one of the main causes of mortality in patients with systemic vasculitides, emphasizing the need for safer immunosuppressive therapies and appropriate prophylaxis.

  3. Infection and Pulp Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahng G. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex has been a great challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Previous work has shown that the presence of prior infection may influence the characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space after regenerative endodontic treatment. The formation of ectopic tissues such as periodontal ligament, bone, and cementum has been observed in the root canal space of immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis, while the regeneration of dentin and pulp has been identified in previously non-infected teeth. The current regenerative endodontic therapy utilizes disinfection protocols, which heavily rely on chemical irrigation using conventional disinfectants. From a microbiological point of view, the current protocols may not allow a sufficiently clean root canal microenvironment, which is critical for dentin and pulp regeneration. In this article, the significance of root canal disinfection in regenerating the pulp-dentin complex, the limitations of the current regenerative endodontic disinfection protocols, and advanced disinfection techniques designed to reduce the microorganisms and biofilms in chronic infection are discussed.

  4. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Frequently Asked Questions about Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is ... an incision above the pubis. What is a urinary tract infection? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection ...

  5. Cryptic Leishmania infantum infection in Italian HIV infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubino Raffaella

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a protozoan diseases caused in Europe by Leishmania (L. infantum. Asymptomatic Leishmania infection is more frequent than clinically apparent disease. Among HIV infected patients the risk of clinical VL is increased due to immunosuppression, which can reactivate a latent infection. The aims of our study were to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic L. infantum infection in HIV infected patients and to study a possible correlation between Leishmania parasitemia and HIV infection markers. Methods One hundred and forty-five HIV infected patients were screened for the presence of anti-Leishmania antibodies and L. infantum DNA in peripheral blood. Statistical analysis was carried out by using a univariate regression analysis. Results Antibodies to L. infantum were detected in 1.4% of patients. L. infantum DNA was detected in 16.5% of patients. Significant association for PCR-Leishmania levels with plasma viral load was documented (p = 0.0001. Conclusion In our area a considerable proportion of HIV infected patients are asymptomatic carriers of L. infantum infection. A relationship between high HIV viral load and high parasitemic burden, possibly related to a higher risk of developing symptomatic disease, is suggested. PCR could be used for periodic screening of HIV patients to individuate those with higher risk of reactivation of L. infantum infection.

  6. Pulmonary infection in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seog Joon; Im, Jung Gi; Seong, Chang Kyu; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and radiological manifestations of pulmonary infection in patients with AIDS. We reviewed the medical records and analyzed retrospectively analysed the chest radiographs(n=3D24) and CT scans(n=3D11) of 26 patients with AIDS who had been followed up at our institute from 1987 to June 1998. Pulmonary infections were confirmed by sputum smear and culture(n=3D18), pleural examination(n=3D3), bronchoalveolar lavage(n=3D3), autopsy(n=3D4), transbronchial lung biopsy(n=3D1) or clinical history(n=3D9). The study group included 23 men and three women aged 25-54(average 35.2) years. We correlated the radiologic findings with CD4 lymphocyte counts. Pulmonary infections included tuberculosis(n=3D22), pneumocystis carinii pneumonia(n=3D9), cytomegalovirus(n=3D3), and unidentified bacterial pneumonia(n=3D2). Radiologically pulmonary tuberculosis was classified as primary tuberculosis(n=3D11;mean CD4 counts:41.3 cells/mm 3 ) and post-primary tuberculosis(n=3D11;mean CD4 counts:251.3cells/mm 3 ). CT findings of tuberculosis included lymphadenitis(n=3D6), bronchogenic spread(n=3D5), large consolidation(n=3D4), esophago-mediastinal fistula(n=3D2), and cavity(n=3D1). Tuberculosis in AIDS responded rapidly to anti-TB medication with complete or marked resolution of lesions within three months. Radiologic findings of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included diffuse ground glass opacities, cysts, and reticular opacities. Tuberculosis was the most common infection in patients with AIDS in Korea, and this is attributed to the high prevalence of tuberculosis. Radiological findings varied with CD4+cell count, showing those of primary tuberculosis as a patient's CD4+ cell count decreased. Pulmonary tuberculosis in AIDS responded rapidly to anti-Tb medication. =20

  7. Circoviral infections in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivetić Vojin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Circoviral infections in swine have appeared only recently and they today attract the attention of large numbers of researchers all over the world. They represent a great mystery, an unknown in veterinary medicine, both in our country and in the world. The causes of these infections are circoviruses, called after the DNA which is shaped like a circle. A large number of authors today believe the PCV-2 causes two pathological entities in weaned piglets which are known as porcine multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS and porcine dermatitis nephropathy syndrome (PDNS. Current investigations indicate that there is a causal connection between these two syndromes. These two new diseases, which have recently spread all over the world, cause serious losses, great concern and confusion, especially when they occur simultaneously or in a sequence in the same herd, or in parallel with other pathogenes, primarily with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV and the porcine parvovirus (PPV. PMWS was first described in Canada in 1991. It most often affect pigs aged 5-12 weeks. The main clinical expression, depending on the stage of progression is diarrhea, delayed development or depressed growth, stuntedness, dyspnea ictherus, eyelid swelling, and lymphadenopathy. More rarely, there are neurological symptoms. Prominent suppression of the immune system is the main characteristic of PMWS, and a wave of secondary bacterial infection is also observed. PDNS is a new disease of economic importance, which mostly affects older swine, from 5 weeks to 5 months of age. The most prominent clinical symptoms in seriously ill piglets is extensive dermatitis, mostly on the chest, abdomen, haunches and forelegs, with the appearance of purple-red swellings of different shape and size. The swine are depressive febrile, anorectic, all of which leads to stunted growth. They are inactive. Mortality is often about 15%. PDNS is a differentially diagnostically

  8. Coconut and Salmonella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Carl P.; Mosbach, Klaus; Bibit, Venuso C.; Watson, Colin H.

    1967-01-01

    Raw, unprocessed coconut supports the growth of salmonellae as well as that of other enteric bacteria, salmonellae being particularly resistant to subsequent desiccation. Original contamination is not due to carriers or to polluted water supplies, but to contact with bacteria-containing soils followed by dispersion via infected coconut milk and shells. Pasteurization of raw coconut meat in a water bath at 80 C for 8 to 10 min effectively killed such bacteria, did not injure the product, and provided a prophylactic method now widely used by the coconut industry. PMID:5340650

  9. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Gurugama Padmalal; Garg Pankaj; Perera Jennifer; Wijewickrama Ananda; Seneviratne Suranjith

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host...

  10. Necrotizing soft tissue infections - a multicentre, prospective observational study (INFECT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Skrede, S.; Bruun, T.

    2018-01-01

    Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC) score and 90-day mortality; 90-day mortality in patients with and without acute kidney injury (AKI) and LRINEC score of six and above or below six; and association between affected body part at arrival and microbiological findings. Exploratory outcomes include......Background: The INFECT project aims to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs). The INFECT observational study is part of the INFECT project with the aim of studying the clinical profile of patients with NSTIs and correlating...... univariate analyses of baseline characteristics associations with 90-day mortality. The statistical analyses will be conducted in accordance with the predefined statistical analysis plan. Conclusion: Necrotizing soft tissue infections result in severe morbidity and mortality. The INFECT study...

  11. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  12. Congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Soo Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is currently the most common agent of congenital infection and the leading infectious cause of brain damage and hearing loss in children. Symptomatic congenital CMV infections usually result from maternal primary infection during early pregnancy. One half of symptomatic infants have cytomegalic inclusion disease (CID, which is characterized by involvement of multiple organs, in particular, the reticuloendothelial and central nervous system (CNS. Moreover, such involvement may or may not include ocular and auditory damage. Approximately 90% of infants with congenital infection are asymptomatic at birth. Preterm infants with perinatal CMV infection can have symptomatic diseases such as pneumonia, hepatitis, and thrombocytopenia. Microcephaly and abnormal neuroradiologic imaging are associated with a poor prognosis. Hearing loss may occur in both symptomatic and asymptomatic infants with congenital infection and may progress through childhood. Congenital infection is defined by the isolation of CMV from infants within the first 3 weeks of life. Ganciclovir therapy can be considered for infants with symptomatic congenital CMV infection involving the CNS. Pregnant women of seronegative state should be counseled on the importance of good hand washing and other control measures to prevent CMV infection. Heat treatment of infected breast milk at 72?#608;for 5 seconds can eliminate CMV completely.

  13. Immunology of pediatric HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicole H; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2013-07-01

    Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV's perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Nosocomial Fungal Infections: Epidemiology, Infection Control, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleyman, Geehan; Alangaden, George J

    2016-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients and in the immunocompromised population. This article reviews the current epidemiology of nosocomial fungal infections in adult patients, with an emphasis on invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Recently published recommendations and guidelines for the control and prevention of these nosocomial fungal infections are summarized in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Submasseteric Infection: A Rare, Deep Space Cheek Infection Causing Trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard H; Bahadori, Robert S; Willis, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Submasseteric space infections are rare at any age but particularly so in primary school children. The origin of the infection is usually odontogenic, from pericoronitis in a third molar. Submasseteric inflammation is a deep facial space inflammation, often progressing to mature abscess, and usually misdiagnosed as staphylococcal or streptococcal lymphadenitis or pyogenic parotitis. The hallmark of a masticatory space infection is trismus. The cardinal signs of this infection include a firm mass in the body of the masseter muscle with overlying cellulitis with trismus.

  16. Mesadenitis and herpetic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Fatkullina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The variants of the course of chronic herpesvirus infection in children with the involvement of several mesenteric lymph nodes in the process and the formation of inflammatory conglomerates – mesenterite (mesadenite are considered. Possible etiological factors of mesenteritis, morphological changes in affected lymph nodes: nonspecific hyperplasia, in some cases – necrosis and suppuration, are given. Clinical cases of mesenteritis against chronic herpesvirus infections in preschool children are described with a detailed description of clinical manifestations in the form of prolonged fever, chronic intoxication, attacks of abdominal pain accompanied by an unstable stool. Dynamics of the main laboratory markers of herpesvirus activity is given, changes in the indices of instrumental methods of investigation are tracked. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms of the formation of such manifestations of the disease, the role of the systemic inflammatory response and therapeutic approaches with the use of antiviral drugs and glucocorticosteroids are discussed.

  17. Enterovirus D68 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Esposito

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available First described in 1962 in children hospitalized for pneumonia and bronchiolitis, the Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68 is an emergent viral pathogen. Since its discovery, during the long period of surveillance up to 2005, EV-D68 was reported only as a cause of sporadic outbreaks. In recent years, many reports from different countries have described an increasing number of patients with respiratory diseases due to EV-D68 associated with relevant clinical severity. In particular, an unexpectedly high number of children have been hospitalized for severe respiratory disease due to EV-D68, requiring intensive care such as intubation and mechanical ventilation. Moreover, EV-D68 has been associated with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction in children, which has caused concerns in the community. As no specific antiviral therapy is available, treatment is mainly supportive. Moreover, because no vaccines are available, conventional infection control measures (i.e., standard, for contacts and droplets in both community and healthcare settings are recommended. However, further studies are required to fully understand the real importance of this virus. Prompt diagnosis and continued surveillance of EV-D68 infections are essential to managing and preventing new outbreaks. Moreover, if the association between EV-D68 and severe diseases will be confirmed, the development of adequate preventive and therapeutic approaches are a priority.

  18. Cryptococcosis infection among HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zineb Tlamcani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis is commonly known as a central nervous system infection due to Cryptococcus neoformans. It is one of the most frequent infections in AIDS patients. Disseminated cryptococcosis appears in almost one third of these patients. In this review, we will discuss the clinical presentation of cryptococcal infections among HIV patients and various methods of diagnosis, such as India ink, latex agglutination test and culture.

  19. [Community-acquired respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Vivas, J; Rubio Alonso, M; Corral, O; Pacheco, S; Agudo, E; Picazo, J J

    1997-01-01

    Respiratory infections are the most frequent reason for primary health care consultation. Although generally not severe, they are responsible for a large number of days of laboral and scholar absenteeism and an excessive use of antibiotics. The clinical and epidemiologic data of extrahospitalary infections in primary health care centers throughout Spain were collected according to the one day cut off system repeated trimestrally over one year. Data of 3,732 days of consultation were collected in which a total of 144,608 patients were attended. Of these, 20,614 had respiratory infections and 11,684 extrarespiratory infections. The most frequent processes were pharyngitis (33.7%), common cold (31.7%) followed by bronchitis (18.7%), otitis (11%), influenza (4.6%), laryngitis (4%), sinusitis (3.6%) and pneumonia (1.8%). Antibiotic treatment was prescribed in 13,488 patients (65%). The type of antibiotic was analyzed in the 11,977 patients treated for only one infection. Penicillins were the antibiotics most used followed by cephalosporins. The antibiotic prescribed was considered adequate in 70% of the 8,484 patients treated for potentially bacterial infection. A total of 3,493 patients had infection considered to be of viral etiology. Twenty-two percent of the patients attending a primary health care center presented infection and of these two out of three cases had respiratory infection. Pharyngitis and common cold were the most frequent processes observed. Two thirds of the patients consulting for respiratory infection received antibiotic treatment, with 29.2% being diagnosed with infections considered to be of viral etiology. The empiric treatment chosen for the two thirds of the potentially bacterial infections was considered as adequate.

  20. What's trending in infection control?

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Brett G..; Petrie, Dayna.; Morton, Lindsay.; Dancer, Stephanie J..

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the trends in infection control peer-reviewed journals, mainstream media, and blogs written by infection control professionals DESIGN Narrative and scoping reviews METHODS Narrative and scoping reviews were performed to identify trending infection prevention and control topics from international journals, national news websites, newspapers, and so-called grey literature throughout 2015. Data were analyzed using word frequencies, and results are displayed in word clouds. R...

  1. Immunological aspects of Giardia infections

    OpenAIRE

    Heyworth, Martin F.

    2014-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, particularly antibody deficiency, predisposes to increased intensity and persistence of Giardia infections. Giardia-infected immunocompetent hosts produce serum and intestinal antibodies against Giardia trophozoites. The number of Giardia muris trophozoites, in mice with G. muris infection, is reduced by intra-duodenal administration of anti-G. muris antibody. Giardia intestinalis antigens that are recognised by human anti-trophozoite antibodies include variable (variant-spe...

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals ...

  3. Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Maria Ruiz Lopes

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is caused by an intracellular protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii, which has a wide geographical distribution. The main infection routes are ingestion of cysts from raw or badly-cooked meat, ingestion of oocysts from substrates contaminated with the feces of infected felines and congenital transmission by tachyzoites. The congenital form results in a severe systemic disease, because if the mother is infected for the first time during gestation, she can present a temporary parasitemia that will infect the fetus. Many of the clinical symptoms are seen in congenitally-infected children, from a mild disease to serious signs, such as mental retardation. Early diagnosis during the pregnancy is highly desirable, allowing prompt intervention in cases of infection, through treatment of pregnant women, reducing the probability of fetal infection and consequent substantial damage to the fetus. Conventional tests for establishment of a fetal diagnosis of toxoplasmosis include options from serology to PCR. Prevention of human toxoplasmosis is based on care to avoid infection, understanding the disease and serological exams during gestation. Pregnant women should be tested serologically from three months gestation, until one month after childbirth. Inclusion of serology for congenital toxoplasmosis along with the basic Guthrie test for PKU is of fundamental importance for early diagnosis of infection and so that treatment is initiated, in order to avoid possible sequels in the infant.

  4. Infections and Ischemic Stroke Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Grabska, Katarzyna; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Członkowska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background. Infections increase the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) and may worsen IS prognosis. Adverse effects of in-hospital infections on stroke outcome were also reported. We aimed to study the prevalence of pre- and poststroke infections and their impact on IS outcome. Methods. We analysed clinical data of 2066 IS patients to assess the effect of pre-stroke and post-stroke infections on IS severity, as well as short-term (up to 30 days) and long-term (90 days) outcome. The independent i...

  5. HIV and co-infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  6. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Suresh B.; Ross, Shannon A.; Fowler, Karen B.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of hearing loss and neurologic disabilities in children worldwide. Infants with symptomatic congenital CMV infection at birth are at significantly increased risk for developing adverse long-term outcomes. The vast majority of infants with congenital CMV infection have no clinical findings at birth (asymptomatic infants), and about 10%–15% of these children develop long-term sequelae. Currently, predictors of adverse outcome in asymptomatic congenital CMV infection are not known, and it is important that future studies address this issue. PMID:24257422

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available [Skip to Content] for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  11. Dermatologic manifestations of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rafael Tomaz; Tiberto, Larissa Rezende; Bello, Viviane Nardin Monte; Lima, Margarete Aparecida Jacometo; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado de

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, infective endocarditis still shows considerable morbidity and mortality rates. The dermatological examination in patients with suspected infective endocarditis may prove very useful, as it might reveal suggestive abnormalities of this disease, such as Osler's nodes and Janeway lesions. Osler's nodes are painful, purple nodular lesions, usually found on the tips of fingers and toes. Janeway lesions, in turn, are painless erythematous macules that usually affect palms and soles. We report a case of infective endocarditis and highlight the importance of skin examination as a very important element in the presumptive diagnosis of infective endocarditis.

  12. Murine model of rotavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, N; Franco, M A; Greenberg, H B

    1997-01-01

    The murine model of homologous rotavirus infection has been used to study the determinants of protection. The local IgA immune response appears to be the critical factor in generating protective immunity after natural infection. A series of knockout mice were used to evaluate the contribution of T cells and B cells to immunity and resolution from primary infection. Both arms of immune system played a role in the resolution of primary infection but antibody was much more important for prevention of reinfection.

  13. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  14. Prophylaxis of vertical HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowska, Malgorzata; Pniewska, Anna; Pilarczyk, Malgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Domagalski, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    An appropriate management of HBV infection is the best strategy to finally reduce the total burden of HBV infection. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is responsible for more than one third of chronic HBV infections worldwide. Because HBV infection in infancy or early childhood often leads to chronic infection, appropriate prophylaxis and management of HBV in pregnancy is crucial to prevent MTCT. The prevention of HBV vertical transmission is a complex task and includes: universal HBV screening of pregnant women, administration of antivirals in the third trimester of pregnancy in women with high viral load and passive-active HBV immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis B immune globulin in newborns of all HBV infected women. Universal screening of pregnant women for HBV infection, early identification of HBV DNA level in HBV-infected mothers, maternal treatment with class B according to FDA antivirals and passive/active anti-HBV immunoprophylaxis to newborns of HBV-positive mothers are crucial strategies for reducing vertical HBV transmission rates. Consideration of caesarean section in order to reduce the risk of vertical HBV transmission should be recommend in HBV infected pregnant women with high viral load despite antiviral therapy or when the therapy in the third trimester of pregnancy is not available.

  15. How serious are oral infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqain, Zaid H; Newman, Laurence; Hyde, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    Life-threatening conditions following dental infections have been rare since antibiotics were introduced into the world of medicine. However, infections spreading through the soft tissues of the head and neck are encountered occasionally and mortality is still reported as a result of sepsis or airway embarrassment. A case of Ludwig's angina from odontogenic infection that progressed into mediastinitis and pericarditis is presented. The steps adopted in the management of this case highlight the significance of early recognition and diagnosis of the source of deep cervical infections, the importance of securing the airway, effecting surgical drainage and aggressive intravenous antibiotic therapy.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...... in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  17. (Penicillium) marneffei infection in a returning HIV-infected traveller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of disseminated fatal Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in an HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatmentexperienced South African woman who had travelled to mainland China. The 37-year-old woman was admitted to a private hospital in fulminant septic shock and died within 12 h of admission.

  18. (Penicillium) marneffei infection in a returning HIV-infected traveller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of disseminated fatal Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in an HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatment- experienced South African woman who had travelled to mainland China. The 37-year-old woman was admitted to a private hospital in fulminant septic shock and died within 12 h of admission.

  19. Zika virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Scholler, Amalie Skak; Buus, Soren

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that has drawn worldwide attention due to its association to neurologic complications, particularly severe congenital malformations. While ZIKV can replicate efficiently and cause disease in human hosts, it fails to replicate to substantial titers...... mice by introducing the virus directly in the brain via intracerebral (i.c.) inoculation. In this way, the antigen is precisely placed at the site of interest, evading the first line of defense, and thus rendering the mice susceptible to infection. We found that, while intravenous (i.v.) inoculation...... of two different strains of WT mice with low doses of ZIKV does not result in viremia, it is nevertheless able to induce both cell-mediated and humoral immunity as well as clinical protection against subsequent i.c challenge with lethal doses of the virus. In order to determine the contribution of key...

  20. Pathogenesis of Candida infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odds, F C

    1994-09-01

    Candida infections of the skin and superficial mucosal sites are the result of an interplay between fungal virulence and host defenses. Epidermal proliferation and T-lymphocyte immune responses are expressed by the host to combat fungal invasion, but inflammatory responses and nonspecific inhibitors also probably play a role. Candida albicans can express at least three types of surface adhesion molecules to colonize epithelial surfaces, plus an aspartyl proteinase enzyme able to facilitate initial penetration of keratinized cells. Deeper penetration of keratinized epithelia is assisted by hypha formation, and C. albicans hyphae may use contact sensing (thigmotropism) as a guiding mechanism. Pathogenesis requires differential expression of virulence factors at each new stage of the process: a propensity for rapid alteration of the expressed phenotype in C. albicans may therefore be a significant factor in establishing the comparatively high pathogenic potential of this species.

  1. Severe Measles Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafat, Cédric; Klouche, Kada; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Roch, Antoine; Machado, Sonia; Sonneville, Romain; Guisset, Olivier; Pujol, Wilfried; Guérin, Claude; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Mrozek, Natacha; Darmon, Michaël; Chemouni, Frank; Schmidt, Matthieu; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Abstract France has recently witnessed a nationwide outbreak of measles. Data on severe forms of measles in adults are lacking. We sought to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, treatment, and prognostic aspects of the disease in adult patients who required admission to an intensive care unit (ICU). We performed a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 36 adults admitted to a total of 64 ICUs throughout France for complications of measles from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2011. All cases of measles were confirmed by serologic testing and/or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The cohort consisted of 21 male and 15 female patients, with a median age of 29.2 years (25th–75th interquartile range [IQR], 27.2–34.2 yr) and a median Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II) of 13 (IQR, 9–18). Among the 26 patients whose measles vaccination status was documented, none had received 2 injections. One patient had developed measles during childhood. Underlying comorbid conditions included chronic respiratory disease in 9 patients, immunosuppression in 7 patients, and obesity in 3 patients, while measles affected 5 pregnant women. Respiratory complications induced by measles infection led to ICU admission in 32 cases, and measles-related neurologic complications led to ICU admission in 2 cases. Two patients were admitted due to concurrent respiratory and neurologic complications. Bacterial superinfection of measles-related airway infection was suspected in 28 patients and was documented in 8. Four cases of community-acquired pneumonia, 6 cases of ventilator-associated pneumonia, 1 case of tracheobronchitis, and 2 cases of sinusitis were microbiologically substantiated. Of 11 patients who required mechanical ventilation, 9 developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among the patients with ARDS, extraalveolar air leak complications occurred in 4 cases. Five patients died, all of whom were severely immunocompromised. On follow-up, 1 patient had

  2. Streptococcus suis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  3. Zika Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Yershova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus disease — an infectious disease caused by a virus of the same name from the Flaviviridae family. The main route of transmission of the virus is the infection through the blood during a bite by tropical mosquitoes of Aedes genus and sexual contact with a patient. Only in Brazil in 2015 Zika fever affected a half million people. There is a serious risk of further spread of the infection, for this reason, the disease has been given a status of pandemic. The incubation period is 3 to 12 days. In 75 % of cases, Zika fever is asymptomatic. Symptomatic form is usually occurs in a mild, rarely — in moderate-to-severe form. The symptoms — weakness, often low-grade fever, chills, heada­che, retro-orbital pain, myalgia and arthralgia, maculopapular rash on the face and body. Conjunctivitis, intolerance of bright light develop. Nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhea, cough, sore throat, lymphadenopathy occur less often. Cases of death in people with fever Zika are extremely rare. In areas, where Zika fever outbreak is detected, an increased number of children born with microcephaly is recorded. The disease is diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction. Drugs for the treatment and vaccines for the prevention of the disease do not exist. Conventional antiviral drugs are ineffective. The only way of medical exposure is symptomatic treatment. After recovery, lifelong immunity is formed. Protection against disease is only avoiding mosquito bites in areas where there is Zika fever.

  4. The Eosinophil in Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Karen A; Loy, Michael

    2016-04-01

    First described by Paul Ehrlich in 1879, who noted its characteristic staining by acidophilic dyes, for many years, the eosinophil was considered to be an end-effector cell associated with helminth infections and a cause of tissue damage. Over the past 30 years, research has helped to elucidate the complexity of the eosinophil's function and establish its role in host defense and immunity. Eosinophils express an array of ligand receptors which play a role in cell growth, adhesion, chemotaxis, degranulation, and cell-to-cell interactions. They play a role in activation of complement via both classical and alternative pathways. Eosinophils synthesize, store and secrete cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. They can process antigen, stimulate T cells, and promote humoral responses by interacting with B cells. Eosinophils can function as antigen presenting cells and can regulate processes associated with both T1 and T2 immunity. Although long known to play a role in defense against helminth organisms, the interactions of eosinophils with these parasites are now recognized to be much more complex. In addition, their interaction with other pathogens continues to be investigated. In this paper, we review the eosinophil's unique biology and structure, including its characteristic granules and the effects of its proteins, our developing understanding of its role in innate and adaptive immunity and importance in immunomodulation, and the part it plays in defense against parasitic, viral, fungal and bacterial infections. Rather than our worst enemy, the eosinophil may, in fact, be one of the most essential components in host defense and immunity.

  5. [Infected knee prostheses. Part 2: chronic late infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, P; Thoele, P; Heppert, V

    2013-06-01

    Treatment of late and chronic infections, which require the replacement of all the infected implant material. All infections lasting more than 4 weeks that have been proven to be bacterial and/or obvious signs of infection. Unsuitable for anesthesia, high acute infection with sepsis and risk for bacteremia with danger to life, large soft tissue damage where plastic surgery coverage is not possible. Arthrotomy, synovectomy, removal of all foreign bodies including all residue of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), jet lavage, spacer, drainage, wound closure or temporary closure using vacuum sealing. Bed rest with a leg brace and drainage until daily drainage volume is exchange of the spacer. In the literature, the success rate for both the one-stage or the two-stage procedure is about 80-95%. In our very nonhomogeneous collective the overall rate of success is about 81%.

  6. Raccoon Roundworm Infection PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-27

    This 60 second PSA describes the signs and symptoms of and ways to prevent Baylisascaris infection, a parasitic roundworm infection that is spread through raccoon feces.  Created: 8/27/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a kidney infection , and it's serious because it can damage the kidneys and make you very sick. How Do I Know if I Have a UTI? You may notice signs of a urinary tract infection before anyone else can see there's anything wrong with you. That's why ...

  8. Trichinella infection and clinical disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Meyer, C N; Krantz, T

    1996-01-01

    Trichinellosis is caused by ingestion of insufficiently cooked meat contaminated with infective larvae of Trichinella species. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from no apparent infection to severe and even fatal disease. We report two illustrative cases of trichinellosis. Returning...

  9. Immunotherapy of Congenital SIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Yudi n Hs these infants do not die of opportunistic with nef-deleted SIV (18). Tl.d, all adult Robert A. Rasmussen infections in our biocontainment... Zhang YJ, Putkonen P, Albert J, et al.: Stable biological and anti- genic characteristics of HIV-2sBt" 69 in nonpathogenic infection of macaques

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  11. Children, HIV infection and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, A; Machera, F

    1988-12-01

    Virtually all pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases result from either vertical infection (transmission from mother to child before or at birth) or infection through transfusion with blood products that contain the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The risk of passing HIV infection on to an unborn child is about 25-30% if the mother is essentially healthy and higher if the mother is already showing signs of AIDS. Since maternal antibodies can persist in the infant's blood for as long as 15 months after birth, it is difficult to tell whether a positive HIV test result in an infant under this age is valid. The clinical case definition of pediatric AIDS requires the presence of 2 major signs (weight loss or abnormally slow growth, chronic diarrhea for more than 1 months, or prolonged or intermittent fever for more than 1 month) and 2 minor signs (generalized lymph node enlargement, oropharyngeal candidiasis, recurrent infections, generalized dementia, persistent cough for more than 1 month, or confirmed infection with HIV in the mother). However, diagnosis is complicated by the fact that signs and symptoms associated with HIV infection are similar to those of other treatable diseases common among children in developing countries (e.g., malnutrition, tuberculosis, and chronic diarrhea). Mothers are advised to continue breastfeeding, even where HIV indication is indicated, since there is no evidence that nursing is a significant route of infection. In addition, there is no evidence that immunizations given by trained health workers using sterile equipment transmit HIV infection.

  12. Serious fungal infections in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, K; Farooqi, J; Mirza, S; Denning, D; Zafar, A

    2017-06-01

    The true burden of fungal infection in Pakistan is unknown. High-risk populations for fungal infections [tuberculosis (TB), diabetes, chronic respiratory diseases, asthma, cancer, transplant and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection] are numerous. Here, we estimate the burden of fungal infections to highlight their public health significance. Whole and at-risk population estimates were obtained from the WHO (TB), BREATHE study (COPD), UNAIDS (HIV), GLOBOCAN (cancer) and Heartfile (diabetes). Published data from Pakistan reporting fungal infections rates in general and specific populations were reviewed and used when applicable. Estimates were made for the whole population or specific populations at risk, as previously described in the LIFE methodology. Of the 184,500,000 people in Pakistan, an estimated 3,280,549 (1.78%) are affected by a serious fungal infection, omitting all cutaneous infection, oral candidiasis and allergic fungal sinusitis, which we could not estimate. Compared with other countries, the rates of candidaemia (21/100,000) and mucormycosis (14/100,000) are estimated to be very high, and are based on data from India. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis rates are estimated to be high (39/100,000) because of the high TB burden. Invasive aspergillosis was estimated to be around 5.9/100,000. Fungal keratitis is also problematic in Pakistan, with an estimated rate of 44/100,000. Pakistan probably has a high rate of certain life- or sight-threatening fungal infections.

  13. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... The following information was extracted from the bed- letters of patients identified as having shunt infections: age; sex; primary diagnosis; preceding operative procedure (primary insertion or revision of an existing shunt); time interval between_ operation and diagnosis of infection; CSF fmdings; and site of.

  14. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  15. Viral Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Li (Juan)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractMuch of liver pathology is related to infection with HBV and HCV and it is important to define factors associated with clinical behavior of disease following infection with these viruses. Thus in this thesis I first focus on the natural history of chronic viral diseases associated

  16. Serological markers in HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. M.; Goudsmit, J.; de Wolf, F.; Coutinho, R. A.; van der Noordaa, J.

    1988-01-01

    HIV antigenaemia can be detected at or possibly before the onset of clinical symptoms of primary HIV infection. Approximately one week after the onset of HIV antigenaemia, a primary anti-HIV IgM response may occur. A week later, generally within 3 to 6 weeks after infection, anti-HIV IgG can be

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... get up into the bladder more easily and cause an infection there. Some of the bacteria that cause UTIs normally live in your intestines. Each time ... bladder. If the bacteria go there, they can cause a bladder infection, which is a type of ...

  18. Imaging fungal infections in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O.; Sathekge, Mike M; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.

    Fungal infections in children rarely occur, but continue to have a high morbidity and mortality despite the development of newer antifungal agents. It is essential for these infections to be diagnosed at the earliest possible stage so appropriate treatment can be initiated promptly. The addition of

  19. THE HAEMATOLOGY OF HIV INFECTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infections, e.g. giardiasis and amoebiasis, and with ileal dysfunction. BONE MARROW SUPPRESSION. Marrow suppression may be due to extensive infiltration by TB, but is more commonly related to cytomegalovirus. (CMV) reactivation, uncontrolled HIV infection and malignant infiltration. Numerous studies have failed to.

  20. Update on bacterial nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereket, W; Hemalatha, K; Getenet, B; Wondwossen, T; Solomon, A; Zeynudin, A; Kannan, S

    2012-08-01

    With increasing use of antimicrobial agents and advance in lifesaving medical practices which expose the patients for invasive procedures, are associated with the ever increasing of nosocomial infections. Despite an effort in hospital infection control measures, health care associated infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality adding additional health care expenditure which may leads to an economic crisis. The problem is further complicated with the emergence of difficult to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) microorganism in the hospital environment. Virtually every pathogen has the potential to cause infection in hospitalized patients but only limited number of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria are responsible for the majority of nosocomial infection. Among them Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococci takes the leading. Many intrinsic and extrinsic factors predispose hospitalized patients for these pathogens. Following simple hospital hygienic practices and strictly following standard medical procedures greatly reduces infection to a significant level although not all nosocomial infections are avoidable. The clinical spectrum caused by nosocomial pathogens depend on body site of infection, the involving pathogen and the patient's underlying condition. Structural and non structural virulence factors associated with the bacteria are responsible for the observed clinical manifestation. Bacteria isolation and characterization from appropriate clinical materials with antimicrobial susceptibility testing is the standard of laboratory diagnosis.

  1. Neurological Consequences of Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used in some patients. Vaccines are in the development and human clinical trial stages, which shows that vaccines may help prevent initial CMV infection or decrease the severity of symptoms. × Treatment Since the virus remains in the person for life, there is no treatment to eliminate CMV infection. ...

  2. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  3. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? ...

  5. [Infections due to Mycobacterium simiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martos, Pedro; García-Agudo, Lidia; González-Moya, Enrique; Galán, Fátima; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium simiae is a slow-growing photochromogenic environmental mycobacterium, first described in 1965. Rarely associated with human infections, possibly due to its limited pathogenicity, it mainly produces lung infection in immunocompetent elderly patients with underlying lung disease, and in disseminated infections in immunosuppressed young patients with AIDS. A microbiological culture is needed to confirm the clinical suspicion, and genetic sequencing techniques are essential to correctly identify the species. Treating M. simiae infections is complicated, owing to the multiple resistance to tuberculous drugs and the lack of correlation between in vitro susceptibility data and in vivo response. Proper treatment is yet to be defined, but must include clarithromycin combined with other antimicrobials such as moxifloxacin and cotrimoxazole. It is possible that M. simiae infections are undiagnosed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Obesity and risk of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Kathrine Agergård; Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Petersen, Mikkel Steen

    2015-01-01

    prescription of antimicrobials. Obesity was associated with risk of hospital-based treatment for infection (women: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 1.9; men: HR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.9). For specific infections, obesity was associated with increased risk of abscesses (both sexes......), infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (men), and respiratory tract infections and cystitis (women). Similarly, obesity was associated with filled prescriptions of antimicrobials overall (women: HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14, 1.30; men: HR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.33) and particularly......BACKGROUND: It is well known that obesity complicates the course of several diseases. However, it is unknown whether obesity affects the risk of infection among healthy individuals. METHODS: We included 37,808 healthy participants from the Danish Blood Donor Study, who completed a questionnaire...

  7. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  8. Antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a wide range of infections, from those related to exogenous devices, such as catheters or prosthetic joints, to chronic tissue infections such as those occurring in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic treatment due...... to multiple tolerance mechanisms (phenotypic resistance). This causes persistence of biofilm infections in spite of antibiotic exposure which predisposes to antibiotic resistance development (genetic resistance). Understanding the interplay between phenotypic and genetic resistance mechanisms acting...... on biofilms, as well as appreciating the diversity of environmental conditions of biofilm infections which influence the effect of antibiotics are required in order to optimize the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections. Here, we review the current knowledge on phenotypic and genetic resistance...

  9. [Fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkoudakis, Emmanouil; Realdi, Giuseppe; Dore, Maria Pina

    2005-06-01

    In immunocompetent subjects fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon. Candida esophagitis remains the single most common fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts or in H. pylori- infected patients who receive antibiotic therapy. Enteric fungal infections are uncommon even in HIV-infected patients. Antifungal agents such as amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and the various formulations of itraconazole are effective for most cases.

  10. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483.65 Public... Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection... development and transmission of disease and infection. (a) Infection control program. The facility must...

  11. Kingella kingae infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Ehud; Rudensky, Bernard; Karasik, Michael; Itzchaki, Menachem; Schlesinger, Yechiel

    2006-07-01

    Kingella kingae is a beta-hemolytic gram-negative bacillus. It was first described in the 1960's by EO King and has been reported as a cause of osteo-articular pediatric infections since the early 1980's. We performed a retrospective review of all pediatric cases of invasive K. kingae infection between 1997 and 2002, in order to define the incidence, clinical presentation and outcome of invasive K. kingae infections in a pediatric population. During the study period, a total of 24 pediatric patients with K. kingae infection were identified. There were 15 blood culture isolates of K. kingae, out of a total of 1151 (1.3%) positive blood cultures, and 9 synovial fluid culture isolates out of a total of 76 (11.8%) positive synovial fluids. Fifteen patients had osteo-articular infections and 9 had primary bacteremia without osteo-articular infection. Outcome was favorable in all cases and only in 2 patients with knee joint infection was surgical intervention performed, by means of formal knee arthrotomy. All patients recovered uneventfully, in 7 cases without any intervention and in the others with intravenous or oral antibiotic. In conclusion, invasive K. kingae infection is not uncommon in Israel. It usually has a mild course and thus is not always detected and treated. As K. kingae grows best in blood culture broth, blood and joint fluid should always be inoculated into blood culture bottles in suspected cases. This bacterium is highly sensitive to betalactame antibiotics and infection resolves quickly with antibiotic treatment. Surgical intervention for osteo-articular infection is seldom indicated.

  12. Ultrasound markers of fetal infection part 1: viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailão, Luiz Antonio; Osborne, Newton G; Rizzi, Maria Christina S; Bonilla-Musoles, Fernando; Duarte, Geraldo; Bailão, Teresa Cristina R Sicchieri

    2005-12-01

    Diagnosis of fetal infection has depended on identification of pathogens by means of microbiological cultures, immunologic techniques, and special molecular biology techniques that can identify organisms known or suspected of being associated with adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Rubella, cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), for example, are capable of gaining access to the amniotic cavity and producing fetal infection, even when amniotic membranes are intact. Intrauterine invasion by viruses can be associated with maternal symptoms of infection or can be completely silent. In many instances extensive fetal compromise with irreversible structural damage or fetal death will have occurred by the time infection is confirmed by culture or other histopathological methods. The evidence of fetal infection may be as subtle as nascent intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), mildly inappropriate calcification of fetal organs, placenta, cord, and membranes, and failure to adequately develop fetal fat reserves. The evidence of infection may be as dramatic as obvious fetal malformation, severe central nervous system structural damage, or fetal death. Sonography is capable of detecting most of the grave alterations and some of the subtle effects that are typical of fetal infection.

  13. Fosfomycin i.v. for Treatment of Severely Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    Bacterial Infections; Bone Diseases, Infectious; Osteomyelitis; Central Nervous System Bacterial Infections; Meningitis, Bacterial; Encephalitis; Brain Abscess; Urinary Tract Infections; Respiratory Tract Infections; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Skin Diseases, Bacterial; Soft Tissue Infections; Intraabdominal Infections; Sepsis; Bacteremia; Endocarditis, Bacterial

  14. FEVER AS INDICATOR TO SECONDARY INFECTION IN DENGUE VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soegeng Soegijanto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue Virus Infections are distributed in tropical and sub-tropical regions and transmitted by the mosquitoes such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Dengue virus can cause dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome or dengue and severe dengue classified by World Health Organization. Beside it concurrent infection virus salmonella had been found some cases who showed fever more than 7 days. Concurrent infection with two agents can result in an illness having overlapping symptoms creating a diagnostic dilemma for treating physician, such as dengue fever with typhoid fever. The aim of this research is detection of dengue virus and secondary infection with Salmonella typhi in patients suspected dengue virus infection. Detection of dengue virus and Salmonella typhi using immunochromatography test such as NS1, IgG/IgM for dengue virus infection, and IgM/IgG Salmonella and blood culture. The fifty children with dengue virus infection came to Soerya hospital and 17 cases suspected dengue virus infection, five cases showed a positive NS1 on the second day of fever and one case concurrent with clinical manifestation of convulsi on the third days of fever there were five cases only showed positive. It was showed in this study that on the fourth to six day of fever in dengue virus infection accompanied by antibody IgM & IgG dengue. There were 12 cases showed the clinical manifestation of concurrent dengue viral infection and Salmonella, all of them showed a mild clinical manifestation and did not show plasma leakage and shock. In this study we found the length of stay of concurrent Dengue Virus Infection and Salmonella infection is more than 10 days. These patients were also more likely to have co-existing haemodynamic disturbances and bacterial septicaemia which would have required treatment with inotropes and antibiotics. This idea is very important to make update dengue viral management to decrease mortality in outbreak try to

  15. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Racciatti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”.

    Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis

  16. Microbiology of systemic fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of systemic fungal infections in the past two decades has been overwhelming. Earlier, it was pathogenic dimorphic fungi, which were known to cause systemic infections. However, starting from the 1960s, opportunistic fungi started causing more number of infections, especially in the immunocompromised host. More recently, newer and less common fungal agents are being increasingly associated with infection in immunosuppressed hosts. Amongst dimorphic fungi, infections due to Histoplasma capsulatum and Penicillium marneffei are increasingly reported in patients with AIDS in India. H. capsulatum is found country wide, but P. marneffei remains restricted to Manipur state. Although both varieties of C. neoformans , C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A & D, and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B & C are reported in India, most of the cases reported are of serotype A. Increased incidence of cryptococcosis is reported from all centers with the emergence of AIDS. Systemic infection due to species under Candida , Aspergillus and zygomycetes is widely prevalent in nosocomial setting, and outbreaks due to unusual fungi are reported occasionally from tertiary care centers. This global change in systemic fungal infections has emphasized the need to develop good diagnostic mycology laboratories in this country and to recognize this increasingly large group of potential fungal pathogens.

  17. INFECTIONS IN THALASSEMIA AND HEMOGLOBINOPATHIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Maria Ricerca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical approach to thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies, specifically Sickle Cell Disease (SCD, based on transfusions, iron chelation and bone marrow transplantation has ameliorated their prognosis. Nevertheless, infections still may cause serious complications in these patients. The susceptibility to infections in thalassemia and SCD arises both from a large spectrum of immunological abnormalities and from exposure to specific infectious agents. Four fundamental issues will be focused upon as central causes of immune dysfunction: the diseases themselves; iron overload, transfusion therapy and the role of the spleen. Thalassemia and SCD differ in their pathogenesis and clinical course. It will be outlined how these differences affect immune dysfunction, the risk of infections and the types of most frequent infections in each disease. Moreover, since transfusions are a fundamental tool for treating these patients, their safety is paramount in reducing the risks of infections. In recent years, careful surveillance worldwide and improvements in laboratory tests reduced greatly transfusion transmitted infections, but the problem is not completely resolved. Finally, selected topics will be discussed regarding Parvovirus B19 and transfusion transmitted infections as well as the prevention of infectious risk postsplenectomy or in presence of functional asplenia.

  18. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DrugFacts » Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Email Facebook Twitter Revised April 2018 What's the relationship between drug use and viral infections? People who engage in ...

  19. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk ...

  20. Streptococcal Infections: Not A or B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print Share Streptococcal Infections: Not A or B Page Content Article Body While many streptococcal infections can be categorized as Group A or B, other streptococcal infections do not fall into either ...

  1. Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Infections: Symptoms, Causes & Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Nontuberculosis Mycobacteria NTM Symptoms, Causes & Risk Factors The symptoms caused by NTM infection ... Low-grade fever Night sweats Weight loss What Causes NTM Lung Infections? NTM lung infections are caused ...

  2. Human genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, T.S.; Johnson, M.D.; Scott, W.K.; Joosten, L.A.B.; van der Meer, J.W.; Perfect, J.R.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Infections with Candida spp. have different manifestations in humans, ranging from mucosal to bloodstream and deep-seated disseminated infections. Immunocompromised patients have increased susceptibility to these types of infections, due to reduced capacity to elicit effective innate or adaptive

  3. Congenital parasitic infections: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine; Deloron, Philippe; Peyron, François

    2012-02-01

    This review defines the concepts of maternal-fetal (congenital) and vertical transmissions (mother-to-child) of pathogens and specifies the human parasites susceptible to be congenitally transferred. It highlights the epidemiological features of this transmission mode for the three main congenital parasitic infections due to Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium sp. Information on the possible maternal-fetal routes of transmission, the placental responses to infection and timing of parasite transmission are synthesized and compared. The factors susceptible to be involved in parasite transmission and development of congenital parasitic diseases, such as the parasite genotypes, the maternal co-infections and parasitic load, the immunological features of pregnant women and the capacity of some fetuses/neonates to overcome their immunological immaturity to mount an immune response against the transmitted parasites are also discussed and compared. Analysis of clinical data indicates that parasitic congenital infections are often asymptomatic, whereas symptomatic newborns generally display non-specific symptoms. The long-term consequences of congenital infections are also mentioned, such as the imprinting of neonatal immune system and the possible trans-generational transmission. The detection of infection in pregnant women is mainly based on standard serological or parasitological investigations. Amniocentesis and cordocentesis can be used for the detection of some fetal infections. The neonatal infection can be assessed using parasitological, molecular or immunological methods; the place of PCR in such neonatal diagnosis is discussed. When such laboratory diagnosis is not possible at birth or in the first weeks of life, standard serological investigations can also be performed 8-10 months after birth, to avoid detection of maternal transmitted antibodies. The specific aspects of treatment of T. gondii, T. cruzi and Plasmodium congenital infections are

  4. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig; Boegler, Karen; Carver, Scott; MacMillan, Martha; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i) saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii) the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii) FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes) is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue); (iv) salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v) saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis and suggest

  5. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  6. Susceptible-infected-recovered and susceptible-exposed-infected models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tome, Tania; De Oliveira, Mario J, E-mail: oliveira@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-03-04

    Two stochastic epidemic lattice models, the susceptible-infected-recovered and the susceptible-exposed-infected models, are studied on a Cayley tree of coordination number k. The spreading of the disease in the former is found to occur when the infection probability b is larger than b{sub c} = k/2(k - 1). In the latter, which is equivalent to a dynamic site percolation model, the spreading occurs when the infection probability p is greater than p{sub c} = 1/(k - 1). We set up and solve the time evolution equations for both models and determine the final and time-dependent properties, including the epidemic curve. We show that the two models are closely related by revealing that their relevant properties are exactly mapped into each other when p = b/[k - (k - 1)b]. These include the cluster size distribution and the density of individuals of each type, quantities that have been determined in closed forms.

  7. Systematic Search for Primary Immunodeficiency in Adults With Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Complement Deficiency; Antibody Deficiency; Chronic Sinus Infection; Meningitis, Bacterial; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Otitis Media; Streptococcal Infection; Neisseria Infections; Haemophilus Influenza; Pneumococcal Infections

  8. Controlled Human Infection for Vaccination Against Streptococcus Pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-07

    Streptococcus Pyogenes Pharyngitis; Streptococcus Pharyngitis; Strep Throat; Streptococcus Pyogenes Infection; Group A Streptococcus: B Hemolytic Pharyngitis; Group A Streptococcal Infection; Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections; Bacterial Infections

  9. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed.

  10. Prediction of eyespot infection risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Váòová

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to design a prediction model for eyespot (Tapesia yallundae infection based on climatic factors (temperature, precipitation, air humidity. Data from experiment years 1994-2002 were used to study correlations between the eyespot infection index and individual weather characteristics. The model of prediction was constructed using multiple regression when a separate parameter is assigned to each factor, i.e. the frequency of days with optimum temperatures, humidity, and precipitation. The correlation between relative air humidity and precipitation and the infection index is significant.

  11. Pulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choneva, I.; Abadjieva, D.; Kirilov, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The lung is one of the most commonly affected organs in immunocompromised patients. Primary complication is pulmonary infection which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although radiography and CT, as main diagnostic tools are reliable and credible methods, often there is difficulty with the correct diagnose. The reasons for this are that immunocompromised patients are potentially susceptible to infection by various microorganisms and that the radiographic findings are rarely specific for detecting a particular pathogen. What you will learn : Our objective is to present general nosological classification of pulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients, and to evaluate and analyze new imaging methods and discuss their correlation with the clinical setting, which aims to facilitate the diagnosis and to take a decision for the treatment. The experience indicates that a clinical environment conducive the immunocompromised patients to infection with certain pathogens, thereby changing the frequency of their occurrence. The most commonly cited fungal infections, cytomegalovirus infections, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) of which convincing is the Imaging diagnosis primarily in fungal infections, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and less accurate - in bacterial and viral infections. Discussion: The term 'immunocompromised' describes a subject with an increased risk for life-threatening infection as a result of congenital or acquired abnormalities of the immune system. Over the past few decades, the number of immunocompromised patients has grown considerably, reflecting the increased use of immunosuppressive drugs, and the syndrome of acquired immunodeficiency. Given the high incidence of pulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients (lung is one of the most commonly affected organs, such as lung infection is about 75% of pulmonary complications), rapid and accurate diagnosis is important

  12. Fungal infection of the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praneenararat S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Surat PraneenararatDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, ThailandAbstract: Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application.Keywords: fungus, colitis, large bowel, large intestine

  13. Trichinella infection and clinical disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Meyer, C N; Krantz, T

    1996-01-01

    Trichinellosis is caused by ingestion of insufficiently cooked meat contaminated with infective larvae of Trichinella species. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from no apparent infection to severe and even fatal disease. We report two illustrative cases of trichinellosis. Returning....... Life-threatening cardiopulmonary, renal and central nervous system complications developed. The patient recovered after several months. Her husband, who also ate the pork, did not have clinical symptoms, but an increased eosinophil count and a single larva in a muscle biopsy confirmed infection...

  14. Infection after primary hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The aim of the present study was to assess incidence of and risk factors for infection after hip arthroplasty in data from 3 national health registries. We investigated differences in risk patterns between surgical site infection (SSI) and revision due to infection after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and hemiarthroplasty (HA). Materials and methods This observational study was based on prospective data from 2005–2009 on primary THAs and HAs from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR), the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR), and the Norwegian Surveillance System for Healthcare–Associated Infections (NOIS). The Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) was used for evaluation of case reporting. Cox regression analyses were performed with revision due to infection as endpoint for data from the NAR and the NHFR, and with SSI as the endpoint for data from the NOIS. Results The 1–year incidence of SSI in the NOIS was 3.0% after THA (167/5,540) and 7.3% after HA (103/1,416). The 1–year incidence of revision due to infection was 0.7% for THAs in the NAR (182/24,512) and 1.5% for HAs in the NHFR (128/8,262). Risk factors for SSI after THA were advanced age, ASA class higher than 2, and short duration of surgery. For THA, the risk factors for revision due to infection were male sex, advanced age, ASA class higher than 1, emergency surgery, uncemented fixation, and a National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) risk index of 2 or more. For HAs inserted after fracture, age less than 60 and short duration of surgery were risk factors of revision due to infection. Interpretation The incidences of SSI and revision due to infection after primary hip replacements in Norway are similar to those in other countries. There may be differences in risk pattern between SSI and revision due to infection after arthroplasty. The risk patterns for revision due to infection appear to be different for HA and THA. PMID:22066562

  15. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pancreatic infection with Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, R; Serrano-Heranz, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans have been implicated as pathogens in intravascular (bloodstream, intravascular devices, endocarditis) and extravascular (arthritis, osteomielitis, endophtalmitis) infections. C. parapsilosis, however, is rarely implicated in intra-abdominal infections (peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis, complicating surgery or solid-organ transplantation). We describe a case of a 48-y-old male with acute pancreatitis who had a pancreatic abscess produced by primary C. parapsilosis infection. Although he received adequate treatment with antifungal medication and surgical drainage, the outcome was fatal. Because the clinical findings are indistinguishable from bacterial abscesses, Candida species should be considered in cases of complicated pancreatitis, in order to establish a prompt adequate treatment.

  17. Riemerella Anatipestifer Infection in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. X. Li*, Y. Tang, J. Y. Gao, C. H. Huang1 and M. J. Ding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer (RA is the causative agent of septicemic and exudative disease for a variety of bird species. Although RA had been isolated from chickens, whether can bring damages to them is not unrevealed yet. In this study, we report a flock of SanHuang chickens infected by RA with 15% morbidity and less than 8% mortality. The infection is further substantiated by case duplicate. The tested chickens demonstrate typical signs of pericarditis, air sacculitis and perihepatitis that are completely consistent with the field outbreak. The results suggest that RA is pathogenic to SanHuang chickens, which can then be theoretically and practicably incorporated into its infection spectrum.

  18. [Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynans, Sylwia; Dzieciątkowski, Tomasz; Młynarczyk, Grażyna

    2013-09-11

    Human adenoviruses belong to the Adenoviridae family and they are divided into seven species, including 56 types. Adenoviruses are common opportunistic pathogens that are rarely associated with clinical symptoms in immunocompetent patients. However, they are emerging pathogens causing morbidity and mortality in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplants, HIV infected patients and patients with primary immune deficiencies. Clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic viraemia to respiratory and gastrointestinal disease, haemorrhagic cystitis and severe disseminated illness. There is currently no formally approved therapy for the treatment of adenovirus infections. This article presents current knowledge about adenoviruses, their pathogenicity and information about available methods to diagnose and treat adenoviral infections.

  19. Xylose metabolism in Bacteroides xylanolyticus X5-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesterveld, S.

    1994-01-01

    Plant cell walls represent a major part of the available biomass on earth. They are mainly composed of the energy-rich polymers lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose. For many decades, research is done to exploit agricultural and forestry wastes as renewable resources. Much research was

  20. Xylan degradation by the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides xylanolyticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schyns, P.J.Y.M.L.

    1997-01-01

    Plant cell walls are the major reservoir of fixed carbon in nature. The mineralization of the fiber material, the so called lignocellulosic complex, proceeds almost exclusively by microbial processes in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. In anaerobic microbial processes the energy of

  1. Effect of hyperbaric air on endotoxin from Bacteroides fragilis strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chmelař, D.; Kašíková, A.; Martineková, P.; Hájek, M.; Rozložník, M.; Brabec, Marek; Janečková, J.; Vobejdová, J.; Čižnár, I.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 3 (2018), s. 283-290 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : endotoxin * hyperbaric condition Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.521, year: 2016

  2. Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  3. Rare Infections: Yersinia Enterocolitica and Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Text Size Email Print Share Rare Infections: Yersinia Enterocolitica and Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis Page Content Article Body Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are bacterial infections that are ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... no matter how busy you are. Water and cranberry juice are two good choices. Those trips to ... help wash bacteria out of your body and cranberry juice may actually help prevent another infection. If ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  7. Infections in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez de Santiago, Enrique; Albillos Martínez, Agustín; López-Sanromán, Antonio

    2017-05-10

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease constitute a population with a special predisposition to develop bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Iatrogenic immunosuppression, frequent contact with healthcare facilities and surgical interventions are some of the risk factors that explain why these infections are one of the main causes of morbi-mortality in this disease. Some of these infections follow a subtle and paucisymptomatic evolution; their diagnosis and management may become a real challenge for the attending physician if their screening is not systematized or they are not considered in the differential diagnosis. The objective of this review is to provide an update from a practical and concise perspective on the knowledge regarding the epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the most common infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & ... KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary ...

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe ... More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Your pee smells bad. These things happen because bacteria have caused an infection somewhere in your urinary ... shorter than boys' urethras. The shorter urethra means bacteria can get up into the bladder more easily ...

  11. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site ...

  12. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for ... also want to stay away from foods and drinks that contain caffeine , such as cola or tea. ...

  13. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... kidney infection and you should see a doctor right away. What Will the Doctor Do? First, your ... consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, ...

  14. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & ... 237 milliliters) of urine in your bladder, your brain tells you it's time to find a bathroom. ...

  15. Urinary Tract Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UTI (Urinary Tract Infection) - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Urine Sample -- Female (Clean Catch) - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ... a UTI, he or she will want to test your urine. You'll have to go into ...

  17. Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taskesen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 57-69

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ... also want to stay away from foods and drinks that contain caffeine , such as cola or tea. ...

  20. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...