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Sample records for bacteroides gingivalis antigens

  1. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.-A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R.

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated 45 Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. (author)

  2. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R. (Department of Periodontology, University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.)

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated /sup 45/Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis.

  3. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Bounelis, P.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains

  4. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Bounelis, P.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains.

  5. Detection of Bacteroides forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    24 out of 217 infected root canals demonstrated the existence of both types of bacteria, the utility of a 16S rDNA-based PCR detection method showed high sensitivity and high specificity to directly detect B. forsythus, P. gingivalis or other pulpal microorganisms from samples of root canal infections. The results indicated that ...

  6. Bacteroides gingivalis-Actinomyces viscosus cohesive interactions as measured by a quantitative binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, S.; Ellen, R.P.; Grove, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    There is limited evidence, mostly indirect, to suggest that the adherence of Bacteroides gingivalis to teeth may be enhanced by the presence of gram-positive dental plaque bacteria like Actinomyces viscosus. The purpose of this study was to carry out direct quantitative assessments of the cohesion of B gingivalis and A. viscosus by using an in vitro assay modeled on the natural sequence in which these two species colonize the teeth. The assay allowed comparisons to be made of the adherence of 3 H-labeled B. gingivalis 2561 and 381 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HA) and A. viscosus WVU627- or T14V-coated S-HA (actinobeads) in equilibrium and kinetics binding studies. A series of preliminary binding studies with 3H-labeled A. viscosus and parallel studies by scanning electron microscopy with unlabeled A. viscosus were conducted to establish a protocol by which actinobeads suitable for subsequent Bacteroides adherence experiments could be prepared. By scanning electron microscopy, the actinobeads had only small gaps of exposed S-HA between essentially irreversibly bound A. viscosus cells. Furthermore, B. gingivalis cells appeared to bind preferentially to the Actinomyces cells instead of the exposed S-HA. B. gingivalis binding to both S-HA and actinobeads was saturable with at least 2 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) cells per ml, and equilibrium with saturating concentrations was reached within 10 to 20 min. B. gingivalis always bound in greater numbers to the actinobeads than to S-HA. These findings provide direct measurements supporting the concept that cohesion with dental plaque bacteria like A. viscosus may foster the establishment of B. gingivalis on teeth by enhancing its adherence

  7. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by 3 H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in 3 H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin

  8. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  9. Immunogenicity of a cholera toxin B subunit Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbrial antigen fusion protein expressed in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Geum; Huy, Nguyen-Xuan; Kim, Mi-Young; Jeong, Dong-Keun; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik; Langridge, William H R; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2009-02-01

    The gram-negative anaerobic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis initiates periodontal disease through fimbrial attachment to saliva-coated oral surfaces. To study the effects of immunomodulation on enhancement of subunit vaccination, the expression in E. coli and immunogenicity of P. gingivalis fimbrial protein (FimA) linked to the C-terminus of the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) were investigated. Complementary DNAs encoding the P. gingivalis 381 fimbrillin protein sequence FimA1 (amino acid residues 1-200) and FimA2 (amino acid residues 201-337) were cloned into an E. coli expression vector downstream of a cDNA fragment encoding the immunostimulatory CTB. CTB-FimA1 and CTB-FimA2 fusion proteins synthesized in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells were purified under denaturing conditions by Ni2+-NTA affinity column chromatography. Renaturation of the CTB-FimA1 and CTB-FimA2 fusion proteins, permitted identification of CTB-FimA pentamers and restored CTB binding activity to GM1-ganglioside to provide a biologically active CTB-FimA fusion protein. Mice orally inoculated with purified CTB-FimA1 or CTB-FimA2 fusion proteins generated measurable FimA1 and FimA2 IgG antibody titers, while no serum fimbrial IgG antibodies were detected when mice were inoculated with FimA1 or FimA2 proteins alone. Immunoblot analysis confirmed that sera from mice immunized with CTB linked to FimA1 or FimA2 contained antibodies specific for P. gingivalis fimbrial proteins. In addition, mice immunized with FimA2 or CTB-FimA2 generated measurable intestinal IgA titers indicating the presence of fimbrial antibody class switching. Further, mice orally immunized with CTB-FimA1 generated higher IgA antibody titers than mice inoculated with FimA1 alone. The experimental data show that the immunostimulatory molecule CTB enhances B cell-mediated immunity against linked P. gingivalis FimA fusion proteins, in comparison to immunization with FimA protein alone. Thus, linkage of CTB to P. gingivalis fimbrial

  10. Subcloning of the 200-kDa Porphyromonas gingivalis antigen gene and inhibition of hemagglutination by an antibody against the recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Tsutomu; Hayakawa, Mitsuo; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2004-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major etiologic agent of periodontitis and exhibits hemagglutinating and adherence activities. We previously succeeded in molecular cloning the 200-kDa cell-surface antigenic protein (200-k AP), designated pMD101, that is recognized in sera from periodontitis patients, and identified the 200-k AP as a hemagglutinin A (HagA) derivative. HagA is one of the hemagglutinins known to be a useful vaccine against periodontitis. HagA has four large, contiguous, direct repeats and the repeat unit is believed to contain the hemagglutinin domain. Because production of 200-k AP was low in the Escherichia coli host, it was difficult to obtain large amounts of recombinant protein. In this study, we attempt to subclone the gene encoding the useful antigen from pMD101 in an effort to obtain large quantities. A subclone, designated pMD160, encoding a fusion protein of 80-kDa HagA and maltose-binding protein was successfully constructed, and the novel clone produced relatively large amounts of recombinant protein. DNA nucleotide sequences of the pMD160 insert demonstrated that the 80-kDa protein contained a short hemagglutinin motif and a direct repeat unit region. The recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity and rabbit antiserum was raised. The antibody was capable of inhibiting the hemagglutinating activity of P. gingivalis. These findings suggest that novel 80-kDa HagA derivative proteins can be produced efficiently from E. coli hosts and these may be useful in developing immunotherapy against periodontitis infected by P. gingivalis.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Jung; Jun, Hye-Kyoung; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Invasion of periodontal pathogens into periodontal tissues is an important step that can cause tissue destruction in periodontal diseases. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen and its gingipains are key virulence factors. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a bridge organism that mediates coadhesion of disease-causing late colonizers such as P. gingivalis and early colonizers during the development of dental biofilms. The aim of this study was to investigate how P. gingivalis , in particular its gingipains, influences the invasion of coinfecting F. nucleatum into gingival epithelial cells. When invasion of F. nucleatum was analyzed after 4 h of infection, invasion of F. nucleatum was suppressed in the presence of P. gingivalis compared with during monoinfection. However, coinfection with a gingipain-null mutant of P. gingivalis did not affect invasion of F. nucleatum . Inhibition of PI3K reduced invasion of F. nucleatum . P. gingivalis inactivated the PI3K/AKT pathway, which was also dependent on gingipains. Survival of intracellular F. nucleatum was promoted by P. gingivalis with Arg gingipain mutation. The results suggest that P. gingivalis , in particular its gingipains, can affect the invasion of coinfecting F. nucleatum through modulating intracellular signaling of the host cells.

  12. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis serotypes to pocket epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierickx, K; Pauwels, M; Laine, ML; Van Eldere, J; Cassiman, JJ; van Winkelhoff, AJ; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key pathogen in periodontitis, is able to adhere to and invade the pocket epithelium. Different capsular antigens of P gingivalis have been identified (K-serotyping). These P gingivalis capsular types show differences in adhesion capacity to human cell lines

  13. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation.Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene.B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats.B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to the identification of novel microbial targets

  14. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  15. Detection of Bacteroides forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... periodontitis among Chinese patients. 217 patients with chronic periapcial periodontitis were recruited and a total of 266 teeth were collected. The subjects had no systemic diseases, no antibiotics taken, no root canal treatment (RCT) performed on the infected teeth in the last 3 months. The DNA of bacteria ...

  16. Efficient Electrotransformation of Bacteroides fragilis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ichimura, Minoru; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Wakimoto, Shin; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2010-01-01

    This study describes refined electroporation parameters for efficient transformation of Bacteroides fragilis by plasmids prepared from laboratory strains of Escherichia coli. Development of the method used included determination of the optimal growth conditions for competent cell preparation, selectable antimicrobial resistance markers, electric field strength, and postpulse incubation time. Of the four E. coli-Bacteroides shuttle plasmids tested (pVAL-1, pVAL-2, pNLY1, and pLYL05), pLYL05 co...

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Enersen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Marginal periodontitis is not a homogeneous disease but is rather influenced by an intricate set of host susceptibility differences as well as diversities in virulence among the harbored organisms. It is likely that clonal heterogeneity of subpopulations with both high and low levels of pathogenicity exists among organisms harbored by individuals with negligible, slight, or even severe periodontal destruction. Therefore, specific virulent clones of periodontal pathogens may cause advanced and/or aggressive periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a predominant periodontal pathogen that expresses a number of potential virulence factors involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, and accumulated evidence shows that its expression of heterogenic virulence properties is dependent on clonal diversity. Fimbriae are considered to be critical factors that mediate bacterial interactions with and invasion of host tissues, with P. gingivalis shown to express two distinct fimbria-molecules, long and short fimbriae, on the cell surface, both of which seem to be involved in development of periodontitis. Long fimbriae are classified into six types (I to V and Ib based on the diversity of fimA genes encoding FimA (a subunit of long fimbriae. Studies of clones with type II fimA have revealed their significantly greater adhesive and invasive capabilities as compared to other fimA type clones. Long and short fimbriae induce various cytokine expressions such as IL-1α, IL-β, IL-6, and TNF-α, which result in alveolar bone resorption. Although the clonal diversity of short fimbriae is unclear, distinct short fimbria-molecules have been found in different strains. These fimbriae variations likely influence the development of periodontal disease.

  18. Chemotaxonomy of Bacteroides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, I

    1994-12-01

    The loose definition of Bacteroides, some species of which are important etiologic agents of oral diseases, has enabled isolates with only marginal similarities to be reposited in this genus. Many attempts have been made over the years to improve the taxonomy of this heterogeneous group of bacteria. The present article reviews major chemotaxonomic characters and techniques that have been used for this purpose: pigmentation, metabolites, whole-cell fatty acids, phospholipids, isoprenoid quinones, carbohydrates of lipopolysaccharide, whole-cell proteins, peptidoglycans, enzymes, pyrolysis mass spectrometry, DNA composition, restriction fragment length polymorphisms of DNA and ribosomal (r) RNA, homology of DNA and RNA, DNA-rRNA hybridization, and 16S and 5S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging and sequencing. Despite improvements in their taxonomy, some bacteroides are still misclassified. Suggestions for further improvements in the taxonomy of bacteroides are made.

  19. Proteomic peptide scan of porphyromonas gingivalis fima type ii for searching potential b-cell epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    LUCCHESE, A.; GUIDA, A.; CAPONE, G.; DONNARUMMA, G.; LAINO, L.; PETRUZZI, M.; SERPICO, R.; SILVESTRE, F.; GARGARI, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose To identify potential antigenic targets for Porphyromonas gingivalis vaccine development. Materials and methods In the present study, we analyzed the Porphyromonas gingivalis, fimA type II primary amino acid sequence and characterized the similarity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level. Results We found that exact peptide-peptide profiling of the fimbrial antigen versus the human proteome shows that only 19 out of 344 fimA type II pentapeptides are uniquely owned by the bacterial protein. Conclusions The concept that protein immunogenicity is allocated in rare peptide sequences and the search the Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA type II sequence for peptides unique to the bacterial protein and absent in the human host, might be used in new therapeutical approaches as a significant adjunct to current periodontal therapies. PMID:28042435

  20. Serum antibodies to Porphyromonas gingivalis chaperone HtpG predict health in periodontitis susceptible patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E Shelburne

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Chaperones are ubiquitous conserved proteins critical in stabilization of new proteins, repair/removal of defective proteins and immunodominant antigens in innate and adaptive immunity. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory infection associated with infection by Porphyromonas gingivalis that culminates in the destruction of the supporting structures of the teeth. We previously reported studies of serum antibodies reactive with the human chaperone Hsp90 in gingivitis, a reversible form of gingival disease confined to the oral soft tissues. In those studies, antibodies were at their highest levels in subjects with the best oral health. We hypothesized that antibodies to the HSP90 homologue of P. gingivalis (HtpG might be associated with protection/resistance against destructive periodontitis.ELISA assays using cloned HtpG and peptide antigens confirmed gingivitis subjects colonized with P. gingivalis had higher serum levels of anti-HtpG and, concomitantly, lower levels of attachment loss. Additionally, serum antibody levels to P. gingivalis HtpG protein were higher in healthy subjects compared to patients with either chronic or aggressive periodontitis. We found a negative association between tooth attachment loss and anti-P. gingivalis HtpG (p = 0.043 but not anti-Fusobacterium nucleatum (an oral opportunistic commensal HtpG levels. Furthermore, response to periodontal therapy was more successful in subjects having higher levels of anti-P. gingivalis HtpG before treatment (p = 0.018. There was no similar relationship to anti-F. nucleatum HtpG levels. Similar results were obtained when these experiments were repeated with a synthetic peptide of a region of P. gingivalis HtpG.OUR RESULTS SUGGEST: 1 anti-P. gingivalis HtpG antibodies are protective and therefore predict health periodontitis-susceptable patients; 2 may augment the host defence to periodontitis and 3 a unique peptide of P. gingivalis HtpG offers significant potential as an

  1. Effect of irradiation on the Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study was to observe a direct effect of irradiation on the periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). P. gingivalis 2561 was exposed to irradiation with a single absorbed dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Changes in viability and antibiotic sensitivity, morphology, transcription, and protein profile of the bacterium after irradiation were examined by pour plating method, disc diffusion method, transmission electron microscopy, RT-PCR, and immunoblot, respectively. Viability of irradiated P. gingivalis drastically reduced as irradiation dose was increased. Irradiated P. gingivalis was found to have become more sensitive to antibiotics as radiation dose was increased. With observation under the transmission electron microscope, the number of morphologically abnormal cells was increased with increasing of irradiation dose. In RT-PCR, decrease in the expression of fim A and sod was observed in irradiated P. gingivalis. In immunoblot, change of profile in irradiated P. gingivalis was found in a number of proteins including 43-kDa fimbrillin. These results suggest that irradiation may affect the cell integrity of P. gingivalis, which is manifested by the change in cell morphology and antibiotic sensitivity, affecting viability of the bacterium.

  2. Effect of irradiation on the Porphyromonas gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe a direct effect of irradiation on the periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). P. gingivalis 2561 was exposed to irradiation with a single absorbed dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Changes in viability and antibiotic sensitivity, morphology, transcription, and protein profile of the bacterium after irradiation were examined by pour plating method, disc diffusion method, transmission electron microscopy, RT-PCR, and immunoblot, respectively. Viability of irradiated P. gingivalis drastically reduced as irradiation dose was increased. Irradiated P. gingivalis was found to have become more sensitive to antibiotics as radiation dose was increased. With observation under the transmission electron microscope, the number of morphologically abnormal cells was increased with increasing of irradiation dose. In RT-PCR, decrease in the expression of fim A and sod was observed in irradiated P. gingivalis. In immunoblot, change of profile in irradiated P. gingivalis was found in a number of proteins including 43-kDa fimbrillin. These results suggest that irradiation may affect the cell integrity of P. gingivalis, which is manifested by the change in cell morphology and antibiotic sensitivity, affecting viability of the bacterium.

  3. Species differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens - Back to basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micha Pedersen, Rune; Marmolin, Ea Sofie; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2013-01-01

    We present the results from 16S sequencing and phenotypic tests for differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens, which was not possible with MALDI-TOF MS. Testing with β-glucosidase could differentiate B. dorei from B. vulga....... vulgatus and a negative catalase reaction could identify B. xylanisolvens....

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis evasion of autophagy and intracellular killing by human myeloid dendritic cells involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 crosstalk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R El-Awady

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs, is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs. We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs.

  5. Porphyromonas gingivalis evasion of autophagy and intracellular killing by human myeloid dendritic cells involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, Ahmed R; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B; Palani, Chithra D; Arce, Roger M; Waller, Jennifer L; Genco, Caroline A; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V; Cutler, Christopher W

    2015-02-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs.

  6. New approaches to combat Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In nature, bacteria predominantly reside in structured, surface-attached communities embedded in a self-produced, extracellular matrix. These so-called biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many infections, as they are difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to antimicrobials and host defense mechanisms. This review focusses on the biofilm-forming periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. Current knowledge on the virulence mechanisms underlying P. gingivalis biofilm formation is presented. In addition, oral infectious diseases in which P. gingivalis plays a key role are described, and an overview of conventional and new therapies for combating P. gingivalis biofilms is given. More insight into this intriguing pathogen might direct the development of better strategies to combat oral infections. PMID:28473880

  7. Purinergic signaling during Porphyromonas gingivalis infection

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    Cássio Luiz Coutinho Almeida-da-Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances unraveling mechanisms of host–pathogen interactions in innate immunity, the participation of purinergic signaling in infection-driven inflammation remains an emerging research field with many unanswered questions. As one of the most-studied oral pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a keystone pathogen with a central role in development of periodontal disease. This pathogen needs to evade immune-mediated defense mechanisms and tolerate inflammation in order to survive in the host. In this review, we summarize evidence showing that purinergic signaling modulates P. gingivalis survival and cellular immune responses, and discuss the role played by inflammasome activation and cell death during P. gingivalis infection. Keywords: Purinergic receptors, Innate immunity, Porphyromonas gingivalis, P2X7 receptor, Oral microbes, Inflammasome

  8. In vitro cytokine responses to periodontal pathogens: generalized aggressive periodontitis is associated with increased IL-6 response to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, T S; Holmstrup, Palle; Bendtzen, K

    2010-01-01

    with GAgP and 10 controls stimulated with periodontal pathogens or a control antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT) in the presence of autologous serum. The pathogens used were Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum, either as type strains or bacteria isolated from...

  9. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis in biofilms to amoxicillin, doxycycline and metronidazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.

    2002-01-01

    Biofilm, Porphyromonas gingivalis, susceptibility testing, amoxicillin, doxycycline, metronidazole......Biofilm, Porphyromonas gingivalis, susceptibility testing, amoxicillin, doxycycline, metronidazole...

  10. Anti-HmuY antibodies specifically recognize Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY protein but not homologous proteins in other periodontopathogens.

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    Michał Śmiga

    Full Text Available Given the emerging evidence of an association between periodontal infections and systemic conditions, the search for specific methods to detect the presence of P. gingivalis, a principal etiologic agent in chronic periodontitis, is of high importance. The aim of this study was to characterize antibodies raised against purified P. gingivalis HmuY protein and selected epitopes of the HmuY molecule. Since other periodontopathogens produce homologs of HmuY, we also aimed to characterize responses of antibodies raised against the HmuY protein or its epitopes to the closest homologous proteins from Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia. Rabbits were immunized with purified HmuY protein or three synthetic, KLH-conjugated peptides, derived from the P. gingivalis HmuY protein. The reactivity of anti-HmuY antibodies with purified proteins or bacteria was determined using Western blotting and ELISA assay. First, we found homologs of P. gingivalis HmuY in P. intermedia (PinO and PinA proteins and T. forsythia (Tfo protein and identified corrected nucleotide and amino acid sequences of Tfo. All proteins were overexpressed in E. coli and purified using ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic chromatography and gel filtration. We demonstrated that antibodies raised against P. gingivalis HmuY are highly specific to purified HmuY protein and HmuY attached to P. gingivalis cells. No reactivity between P. intermedia and T. forsythia or between purified HmuY homologs from these bacteria and anti-HmuY antibodies was detected. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that P. gingivalis HmuY protein may serve as an antigen for specific determination of serum antibodies raised against this bacterium.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis: Major Periodontopathic Pathogen Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Jaroslav; Podzimek, Stepan; Sommerova, Pavla; Lyuya-Mi, Yelena; Bartova, Jirina; Janatova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, Jarmila; Duskova, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe that is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and is a member of more than 500 bacterial species that live in the oral cavity. This anaerobic bacterium is a natural member of the oral microbiome, yet it can become highly destructive (termed pathobiont) and proliferate to high cell numbers in periodontal lesions: this is attributed to its arsenal of specialized virulence factors. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of one of the main periodontal pathogens—Porphyromonas gingivalis. This bacterium, along with Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, constitute the “red complex,” a prototype polybacterial pathogenic consortium in periodontitis. This review outlines Porphyromonas gingivalis structure, its metabolism, its ability to colonize the epithelial cells, and its influence upon the host immunity. PMID:24741603

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis: Major Periodontopathic Pathogen Overview

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    Jaroslav Mysak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe that is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and is a member of more than 500 bacterial species that live in the oral cavity. This anaerobic bacterium is a natural member of the oral microbiome, yet it can become highly destructive (termed pathobiont and proliferate to high cell numbers in periodontal lesions: this is attributed to its arsenal of specialized virulence factors. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of one of the main periodontal pathogens—Porphyromonas gingivalis. This bacterium, along with Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, constitute the “red complex,” a prototype polybacterial pathogenic consortium in periodontitis. This review outlines Porphyromonas gingivalis structure, its metabolism, its ability to colonize the epithelial cells, and its influence upon the host immunity.

  13. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  14. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

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    Ingar Olsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  15. Sialylation of Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS and its effect on bacterial-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaric, Svetislav S; Lappin, Mark J; Fulton, Catherine R; Lundy, Fionnuala T; Coulter, Wilson A; Irwin, Christopher R

    2017-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis produces different LPS isoforms with significant structural variations of their lipid A and O-antigen moieties that can affect its pro-inflammatory and bone-resorbing potential. We show here, for the first time, that P. gingivalis LPS isolated from W83 strain is highly sialylated and possesses significantly reduced inflammatory potential compared with less sialylated ATCC 33277 strain LPS. Nevertheless, the reduction in the endotoxin activity is not mediated by the presence of sialic acid LPS moieties as the sialic acid-free LPS produced by the mutant W83 strain exhibits a similar inflammatory potential to the wild type strain. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the interaction between the sialic acid LPS moieties and the inhibitory CD33 receptor is prevented by endogenously expressed sialic acid on the surface of THP-1 cells that cannot be out-competed by sialic acid containing P. gingivalis LPS. The present study also highlights the importance of endogenous sialic acid as a 'self-associated molecular pattern' and CD33 receptors in modulation of innate immune response as human gingival fibroblasts, which do not express CD33 receptors, and desialylated THP-1 cells have both been found to have much higher spontaneous IL-8 production than naïve THP-1 cells.

  16. Oxidative stress resistance in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Leroy G; McKenzie, Rachelle ME; Robles, Antonette; Fletcher, Hansel M

    2012-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a black-pigmented, Gram-negative anaerobe, is an important etiologic agent of periodontal disease. The harsh inflammatory condition of the periodontal pocket implies that this organism has properties that will facilitate its ability to respond and adapt to oxidative stress. Because the stress response in the pathogen is a major determinant of its virulence, a comprehensive understanding of its oxidative stress resistance strategy is vital. We discuss multiple mechanisms and systems that clearly work in synergy to defend and protect P. gingivalis against oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species. The involvement of multiple hypothetical proteins and/or proteins of unknown function in this process may imply other unique mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22439726

  17. Bone loss and aggravated autoimmune arthritis in HLA-DRβ1-bearing humanized mice following oral challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, Indra; Karydis, Anastasios; Luo, Jiwen; Prislovsky, Amanda; Whittington, Karen B; Rosloniec, Edward F; Dong, Chen; Novack, Deborah V; Mydel, Piotr; Zheng, Song Guo; Radic, Marko Z; Brand, David D

    2016-10-26

    The linkage between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis is well established. Commonalities among the two are that both are chronic inflammatory diseases characterized by bone loss, an association with the shared epitope susceptibility allele, and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. To explore immune mechanisms that may connect the two seemingly disparate disorders, we measured host immune responses including T-cell phenotype and anti-citrullinated protein antibody production in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR1 humanized C57BL/6 mice following exposure to the Gram-negative anaerobic periodontal disease pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. We measured autoimmune arthritis disease expression in mice exposed to P. gingivalis, and also in arthritis-resistant mice by flow cytometry and multiplex cytokine-linked and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We also measured femoral bone density by microcomputed tomography and systemic cytokine production. Exposure of the gingiva of DR1 mice to P. gingivalis results in a transient increase in the percentage of Th17 cells, both in peripheral blood and cervical lymph nodes, a burst of systemic cytokine activity, a loss in femoral bone density, and the generation of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Importantly, these antibodies are not produced in response to P. gingivalis treatment of wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and P. gingivalis exposure triggered expression of arthritis in arthritis-resistant mice. Exposure of gingival tissues to P. gingivalis has systemic effects that can result in disease pathology in tissues that are spatially removed from the initial site of infection, providing evidence for systemic effects of this periodontal pathogen. The elicitation of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in an HLA-DR1-restricted fashion by mice exposed to P. gingivalis provides support for the role of the shared epitope in both periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The ability of P. gingivalis to induce disease

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis: predominant pathogen in chronic periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Perfecto, Donald; Dpto. de CC. Básicas. Laboratorio de Microbiología Facultad de Odontología Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.; Moromi Nakata, Hilda; Dpto. de CC. Básicas. Laboratorio de Microbiología Facultad de Odontología Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.; Martínez Cadillo, Elba; Dpto. de CC. Básicas. Laboratorio de Microbiología Facultad de Odontología Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram negative bacillus predominant in chronic periodontitis, multiple virulence factors make it extremely aggressive. In the gingival sulcus find the conditions for growth,interacting with the host produces a slow but steady destruction of periodontal tissue. Its dominance has been considered a risk factor for systemic inflammatory diseases such as myocardial infarction. Although its susceptibility to a variety of drugs makes possible its handling with antimicrob...

  19. Biogenesis and function of Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the keystone pathogens associated with chronic periodontitis. All P. gingivalis strains examined thus far produce outer membrane vesicles. Recent studies have found that vesicles possess some well-known virulence factors of P. gingivalis such as adhesins, toxins and proteolytic enzymes. Carrying most of the characteristic features of their parent P. gingivalis cells, vesicles communicate with host cells and other members of microbial biofilms, resulting in the transmission of virulence factors into these host cells and the formation of pathogenic bacteria-dominated microbial communities. An in-depth understanding of both the nature and role of vesicles in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis is both important and timely, particularly when speaking of periodontitis and its related systemic effects. PMID:26343879

  20. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

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    Ingar Olsen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells.

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola synergistic polymicrobial biofilm development.

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    Ying Zhu

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology and interactions between key bacterial species are strongly implicated as contributing to disease progression. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia have all been implicated as playing roles in disease progression. P. gingivalis cell-surface-located protease/adhesins, the gingipains, have been suggested to be involved in its interactions with several other bacterial species. The aims of this study were to determine polymicrobial biofilm formation by P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia, as well as the role of P. gingivalis gingipains in biofilm formation by using a gingipain null triple mutant. To determine homotypic and polymicrobial biofilm formation a flow cell system was employed and the biofilms imaged and quantified by fluorescent in situ hybridization using DNA species-specific probes and confocal scanning laser microscopy imaging. Of the three species, only P. gingivalis and T. denticola formed mature, homotypic biofilms, and a strong synergy was observed between P. gingivalis and T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilm formation. This synergy was demonstrated by significant increases in biovolume, average biofilm thickness and maximum biofilm thickness of both species. In addition there was a morphological change of T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilms when compared with homotypic biofilms, suggesting reduced motility in homotypic biofilms. P. gingivalis gingipains were shown to play an essential role in synergistic polymicrobial biofilm formation with T. denticola.

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola synergistic polymicrobial biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Dashper, Stuart G; Chen, Yu-Yen; Crawford, Simon; Slakeski, Nada; Reynolds, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology and interactions between key bacterial species are strongly implicated as contributing to disease progression. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia have all been implicated as playing roles in disease progression. P. gingivalis cell-surface-located protease/adhesins, the gingipains, have been suggested to be involved in its interactions with several other bacterial species. The aims of this study were to determine polymicrobial biofilm formation by P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia, as well as the role of P. gingivalis gingipains in biofilm formation by using a gingipain null triple mutant. To determine homotypic and polymicrobial biofilm formation a flow cell system was employed and the biofilms imaged and quantified by fluorescent in situ hybridization using DNA species-specific probes and confocal scanning laser microscopy imaging. Of the three species, only P. gingivalis and T. denticola formed mature, homotypic biofilms, and a strong synergy was observed between P. gingivalis and T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilm formation. This synergy was demonstrated by significant increases in biovolume, average biofilm thickness and maximum biofilm thickness of both species. In addition there was a morphological change of T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilms when compared with homotypic biofilms, suggesting reduced motility in homotypic biofilms. P. gingivalis gingipains were shown to play an essential role in synergistic polymicrobial biofilm formation with T. denticola.

  3. An outbreak of bovine meningoencephalomyelitis with identification of Halicephalobus gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi; Hansen, Mette Sif; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Halicephalobus gingivalis is an opportunistic parasite which is known to cause fatal meningoencephalomyelitis primarily in equines but sporadically also in humans. In April 2014, laboratory examination of the head of a young dairy calf, euthanized due to severe central nervous system symptoms...... from another three calves in the herd. This is the first scientific publication of H. gingivalis induced meningoencephalomyelitis in ruminants. As ante mortem diagnosis is a major challenge, the infection may easily remain undiagnosed in cattle....

  4. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  5. Antimicrobial effect of blue light using Porphyromonas gingivalis pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Sasaki, Haruka; Toyama, Toshizo; Araki, Mitsunori; Fujioka, Jun; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Hamada, Nobushiro; Yoshino, Fumihiko

    2017-07-12

    The development of antibiotics cannot keep up with the speed of resistance acquired by microorganisms. Recently, the development of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been a necessary antimicrobial strategy against antibiotic resistance. Among the wide variety of bacteria found in the oral flora, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is one of the etiological agents of periodontal disease. aPDT has been studied for periodontal disease, but has risks of cytotoxicity to normal stained tissue. In this study, we performed aPDT using protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), an intracellular pigment of P. gingivalis, without an external photosensitizer. We confirmed singlet oxygen generation by PpIX in a blue-light irradiation intensity-dependent manner. We discovered that blue-light irradiation on P. gingivalis is potentially bactericidal. The sterilization mechanism seems to be oxidative DNA damage in bacterial cells. Although it is said that no resistant bacteria will emerge using aPDT, the conventional method relies on an added photosensitizer dye. PpIX in P. gingivalis is used in energy production, so aPDT applied to PpIX of P. gingivalis should limit the appearance of resistant bacteria. This approach not only has potential as an effective treatment for new periodontal diseases, but also offers potential antibacterial treatment for multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  6. Mechanisms by which Porphyromonas gingivalis evades innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Abdi

    Full Text Available The oral cavity is home to unique resident microbial communities whose interactions with host immunity are less frequently studied than those of the intestinal microbiome. We examined the stimulatory capacity and the interactions of two oral bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum, on Dendritic Cell (DC activation, comparing them to the effects of the well-studied intestinal microbe Escherichia coli (E. coli. Unlike F. nucleatum and E. coli, P. gingivalis failed to activate DCs, and in fact silenced DC responses induced by F. nucleatum or E. coli. We identified a variant strain of P. gingivalis (W50 that lacked this immunomodulatory activity. Using biochemical approaches and whole genome sequencing to compare the two substrains, we found a point mutation in the hagA gene. This protein is though to be involved in the alteration of the PorSS/gingipain pathway, which regulates protein secretion into the extracellular environment. A proteomic comparison of the secreted products of the two substrains revealed enzymatic differences corresponding to this phenotype. We found that P. gingivalis secretes gingipain(s that inactivate several key proinflammatory mediators made by DCs and/or T cells, but spare Interleukin-1 (IL-1 and GM-CSF, which can cause capillary leaks that serve as a source of the heme that P. gingivalis requires for its survival, and GM-CSF, which can cause epithelial-cell growth. Taken together, our results suggest that P. gingivalis has evolved potent mechanisms to modulate its virulence factors and dampen the innate immune response by selectively inactivating most proinflammatory cytokines.

  7. The effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on pregnancy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, A; van Pampus, M G; Aarnoudse, J G; van der Schans, C P; Abbas, F; Faas, M M

    OBJECTIVE: Periodontitis, mostly associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, has frequently been related to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We therefore investigated whether lipopolysaccharides of P. gingivalis (Pg-LPS) induced pregnancy complications in the rat. METHODS: Experiment 1: pregnant rats (day

  8. The atherogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis evades circulating phagocytes by adhering to erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows the bacter......A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows...

  9. TRANSMISSION OF Porphyromonas gingivalis FROM CAREGIVERS TO CHILDREN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assya Krasteva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal diseases are socially significant diseases, which occur in adults but in children and adolescents as well. Despite a low prevalence of aggressive periodontitis at a young age, its severity is a challenge for pediatric dentistry. The goal of this study is to find if the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis among children whose parents suffer from periodontal diseases is greater than among children with healthy parents. Methods:- Polymerase chain reaction (PCR.- Culture method. When PCR was used P.gingivalis was found in 35.5% of parents with periodontitis and in 6,5% of their children, children with healthy parents and their parents. No statistically significant relation (P>0.05 between periodontal parents and their children was found. When culture method was used P.gingivalis was not detected.Studying such correlations and standardizing methods of detection could contribute the evaluation of periodontal disease risk in adolescents.

  10. A novel Porphyromonas gingivalis enzyme: An atypical dipeptidyl peptidase III with an ARM repeat domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altijana Hromić-Jahjefendić

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis, an asaccharolytic Gram-negative oral anaerobe, is a major pathogen associated with adult periodontitis, a chronic infective disease that a significant percentage of the human population suffers from. It preferentially utilizes dipeptides as its carbon source, suggesting the importance of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP types of enzyme for its growth. Until now DPP IV, DPP5, 7 and 11 have been extensively investigated. Here, we report the characterization of DPP III using molecular biology, biochemical, biophysical and computational chemistry methods. In addition to the expected evolutionarily conserved regions of all DPP III family members, PgDPP III possesses a C-terminal extension containing an Armadillo (ARM type fold similar to the AlkD family of bacterial DNA glycosylases, implicating it in alkylation repair functions. However, complementation assays in a DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli strain indicated the absence of alkylation repair function for PgDPP III. Biochemical analyses of recombinant PgDPP III revealed activity similar to that of DPP III from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and in the range between activities of human and yeast counterparts. However, the catalytic efficiency of the separately expressed DPP III domain is ~1000-fold weaker. The structure and dynamics of the ligand-free enzyme and its complex with two different diarginyl arylamide substrates was investigated using small angle X-ray scattering, homology modeling, MD simulations and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX. The correlation between the experimental HDX and MD data improved with simulation time, suggesting that the DPP III domain adopts a semi-closed or closed form in solution, similar to that reported for human DPP III. The obtained results reveal an atypical DPP III with increased structural complexity: its superhelical C-terminal domain contributes to peptidase activity and influences DPP III interdomain dynamics. Overall, this

  11. Inhibition of gingipains prevents Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced preterm birth and fetal death in pregnant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takii, Ryosuke; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Tsukuba, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2018-04-05

    Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates that infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis which is a major periodontal pathogen, causes preterm birth and low birth weight. However, virulence factors of P. gingivalis responsible for preterm birth/low birth weight remain to be elucidated. In this study, using P. gingivalis-infected pregnant mice as an in vivo model, we investigated whether gingipains-cysteine proteinases produced by P. gingivalis-affect preterm birth and low birth weight. We found that intravenous infection of pregnant mice with P. gingivalis induced higher accumulation of the bacterium in the placenta than that in other organs. Compared to infection with P. gingivalis wild-type, infection with a gingipain-deficient P. gingivalis mutant KDP136 led to significant reduction in preterm birth and pregnancy loss. Although repetitive low-level infections of P. gingivalis failed to induce preterm birth and fetal death, it induced suppressive effects on IFN-γ production. Therapeutically, treatment with ginginpain inhibitors prevented fetal death and preterm birth caused by P. gingivalis infection and resulted in recovery of IFN-γ suppression caused by repetitive chronic P. gingivalis infection. These results indicate that gingipains are major virulence factors of P. gingivalis responsible for preterm birth/low birth, and gingipain inhibitors may be useful not only as a therapeutic agent for periodontal diseases, but also as a preventive medicine for preterm birth/low birth weight. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics of bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the leguminous tree Leucaena glauca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hironobu; Koriyama, Hiroki; Osawa, Atsushi; Zehirov, Grigor; Yamaura, Masatoshi; Kucho, Ken-ichi; Abe, Mikiko; Higashi, Shiro; Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobia establish symbiosis with legumes. Bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Inverted Repeat Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes undergo terminal differentiation caused by Nodule-specific Cysteine-Rich peptides (NCRs). Microscopic observations of bacteroids and the detection of NCRs in indeterminate nodules of the non-IRLC legume Leucaena glauca were performed. A portion of the bacteroids showed moderate cell elongation, loss of membrane integrity, and multiple nucleoids. The symbiosome contained multiple bacteroids and NCR-like peptides were not detectable. These results indicate that bacteroid differentiation in L. glauca is different from that in IRLC legumes although both hosts form indeterminate nodules.

  13. Natural antigenic differences in the functionally equivalent extracellular DNABII proteins of bacterial biofilms provide a means for targeted biofilm therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, C J; Davey, M E; Bakaletz, L O; Goodman, S D

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria that persist in the oral cavity exist within complex biofilm communities. A hallmark of biofilms is the presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which consists of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins, including the DNABII family of proteins. The removal of DNABII proteins from a biofilm results in the loss of structural integrity of the eDNA and the collapse of the biofilm structure. We examined the role of DNABII proteins in the biofilm structure of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Co-aggregation with oral streptococci is thought to facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis within the biofilm community. We demonstrate that DNABII proteins are present in the EPS of both S. gordonii and P. gingivalis biofilms, and that these biofilms can be disrupted through the addition of antisera derived against their respective DNABII proteins. We provide evidence that both eDNA and DNABII proteins are limiting in S. gordonii but not in P. gingivalis biofilms. In addition, these proteins are capable of complementing one another functionally. We also found that whereas antisera derived against most DNABII proteins are capable of binding a wide variety of DNABII proteins, the P. gingivalis DNABII proteins are antigenically distinct. The presence of DNABII proteins in the EPS of these biofilms and the antigenic uniqueness of the P. gingivalis proteins provide an opportunity to develop therapies that are targeted to remove P. gingivalis and biofilms that contain P. gingivalis from the oral cavity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Endothelin Regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Production of Inflammatory Cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Yeon Son

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a very common oral inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of supporting connective and osseous tissues of the teeth. Although the exact etiology is still unclear, Gram-negative bacteria, especially Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival pockets are thought to be one of the major etiologic agents of periodontitis. Endothelin (ET is a family of three 21-amino acid peptides, ET-1, -2, and -3, that activate G protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB. Endothelin is involved in the occurrence and progression of various inflammatory diseases. Previous reports have shown that ET-1 and its receptors, ETA and ETB are expressed in the periodontal tissues and, that ET-1 levels in gingival crevicular fluid are increased in periodontitis patients. Moreover, P. gingivalis infection has been shown to induce the production of ET-1 along with other inflammatory cytokines. Despite these studies, however, the functional significance of endothelin in periodontitis is still largely unknown. In this study, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms of ET-1 action in periodontitis using human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs. ET-1 and ETA, but not ETB, were abundantly expressed in HGECs. Stimulation of HGECs with P. gingivalis or P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide increased the expression of ET-1 and ETA suggesting the activation of the endothelin signaling pathway. Production of inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, TNFα, and IL-6, was significantly enhanced by exogenous ET-1 treatment, and this effect depended on the mitogen-activated protein kinases via intracellular Ca2+ increase, which resulted from the activation of the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway. The inhibition of the endothelin receptor-mediated signaling pathway with the dual receptor inhibitor, bosentan, partially ameliorated alveolar bone loss and immune cell infiltration. These results suggest that endothelin plays an important role in P. gingivalis

  15. Changes in Expression of the Membrane Receptors CD14, MHC-II, SR-A, and TLR4 in Tissue-Specific Monocytes/Macrophages Following Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunfang; Liu, Chongwu; Luo, Kai; Li, Yanfen; Jiang, Jun; Yan, Fuhua

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to provide a theoretical foundation for understanding the relationship between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases by examining the inflammatory effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on monocytes/macrophages isolated from tissues distinct from the oral cavity in normal and hyperlipidemic New Zealand white rabbits. Macrophages were isolated from four separate tissues (mononuclear cells from blood, alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and Kupffer cells) from both normal and hyperlipidemic New Zealand white rabbits. Cells were either stimulated for 24 h in vitro with P. gingivalis-LPS or Escherichia coli-LPS, or were pre-treated with IL-10 before P. gingivalis-LPS treatment. RNA was isolated and the expression of SR-A, TLR4, CD14, and MHC-II measured by RT-PCR. For MHC-II, the suppression effects of P. gingivalis-LPS were similar to the effects of E. coli-LPS in all macrophages examined. In general, the magnitude of the effects of P. gingivalis-LPS on gene expression was lower than that of E. coli-LPS, and there were differences in the relative membrane receptors between the two, implying that the two LPSs stimulate different responses. IL-10 increased the expression of the defensive receptor SR-A and decreased the expression of CD14, TLR4, and the antigen-presenting molecule MHC-II in all types of macrophages examined, regardless of hyperlipidemic state. These data are consistent with an anti-inflammatory effect of IL-10. P. gingivalis-LPS is an activator of gene expression in macrophages isolated from tissues distinct from the oral cavity.

  16. The efficacy of sarang semut extract (Myrmecodia pendens Merr & Perry in inhibiting Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfan M. Alibasyah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis is a pathogenic bacteria present in the oral cavity involved in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis and biofilm. This mass of microorganisms represents one of the virulent factors of P. gingivalis which plays an important role as an attachment initiator in host cells. Sarang semut is a natural material possessing the ability to inhibit the growth of P. gingivalis. Purpose: This study aims to analyze the effect of sarang semut extract on the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm. Methods: The study used methanol sarang semut extract and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and phosphomycin as a positive control. Treatment was initiated by means of culturing. Biofilm test and P. gingivalis biofilm formation observation were subsequently performed by means of a light microscope at a magnification of 400x. Results: The formation of P. gingivalis biofilms tended to increase at 3, 6, and 9 hours. Results of the violet crystal test showed that concentrations of 100% and 75% of the sarang semut extract successfully inhibited the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm according to the incubation time. Meanwhile, the sarang semut extracts at concentrations of 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.125% resulted in weak inhibition of the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm. The biofilm mass profile observed by a microscope tended to decrease as an indicator of the effects of the sarang semut extract. Conclusion: Sarang semut extract can inhibit the formation of P. gingivalis biofilm, especially at concentrations of 100% and 75%. Nevertheless, phosphomycin has stronger antibiofilm of P. gingivalis effects than those of the sarang semut extract at all of the concentrations listed above.

  17. Gene expression changes in Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 after inoculation in rat oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Qian; Pan, Chun-Ling; Liu, Jun-Chao; Wang, Hong-Yan; Tan, Li-Si; Pan, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of chronic periodontitis was due to not only periodontal pathogens, but also the interaction between periodontal pathogens and host. The aim of this study is to investigate the alterations in gene expression in Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.gingivalis) W83 after inoculation in rat oral cavity. Results P.gingivalis W83 inoculation in rat oral cavity caused inflammatory responses in gingival tissues and destroyed host alveolar bone. Microarray analysis revealed that 42 ...

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis entry into gingival epithelial cells modulated by Fusobacterium nucleatum is dependent on lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Atsushi; Kokubu, Eitoyo; Inagaki, Satoru; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Lamont, Richard J; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Host cell invasion by a major periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in host-pathogen interactions in periodontal and cardiovascular diseases. The present study sought to gain insight into the underlying mechanism(s) involved in previously demonstrated fusobacterial modulation of host cell invasion by P. gingivalis. An immortalized human gingival cell line Ca9-22 was dually infected with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Fusobacterium nucleatum TDC 100, and intracellular invasion was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). SEM observation showed that P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum formed consortia and were in the process of penetrating into Ca9-22 by 30-60 min after infection. In CSLM, Ca9-22 cells that contained both P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were frequently observed after 2 h, although cells that contained exclusively P. gingivalis were also found. Infection by P. gingivalis and/or F. nucleatum revealed evident colocalization with a lipid raft marker, GM1-containing membrane microdomains. In an antibiotic protection assay, depletion of epithelial plasma membrane cholesterol resulted in a significant reduction of recovered P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum (∼33% of untreated control; p nucleatum significantly enhanced host cell invasion by P. gingivalis 33277, its serine phophatase SerB mutant and complemented strains, suggesting that the SerB does not play a major role in this fusobacterial enhancement of P. gingivalis invasion. Thus, the interaction between F. nucleatum and host cells may be important in the fusobacterial enhancement of P. gingivalis invasion. Collectively, these results suggest that lipid raft-mediated process is at least one of the potential mechanisms involved in fusobacterium-modulated host cell invasion by P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A case of Bacteroides pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Eun; Park, So-Young; Song, Dong Joon; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-12-01

    Bacteroides pyogenes, a non-spore-forming, anaerobic, gram-negative rod, is a component of the oral flora of animals and has, on occasion, been reported to cause human infection through dog or cat bites. We report the first case of B. pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess with no history of an animal bite. The microorganism was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies on Mucopolysaccharidases from Oral Bacteroides sp., especially on Heparinase

    OpenAIRE

    谷口, 裕朗; 藤村, 節夫; 中村, 武

    1982-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharide lyases in the cell extract from a oral strain of Bacteroides sp. produced △4, 5-unsaturated disaccharides from the several substrates including, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate A (ChS-A), chondroitin sulfate C (ChS-C), hyaluronic acid and chondroitin by the elimination reaction. However this enzyme preparation did not degrade chondroitin sulfate B (ChS-B). As for production of heparinase, the presence of heparin in the culture medium was essential. These enzymes were s...

  1. Spheres of influence: Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, M J; Dashper, S G; Slakeski, N; Chen, Y-Y; Reynolds, E C

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are asymmetrical single bilayer membranous nanostructures produced by Gram-negative bacteria important for bacterial interaction with the environment. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis, produces OMVs that act as a virulence factor secretion system contributing to its pathogenicity. Despite their biological importance, the mechanisms of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated. The ~14 times more curvature of the OMV membrane than cell outer membrane (OM) indicates that OMV biogenesis requires energy expenditure for significant curvature of the OMV membrane. In P. gingivalis, we propose that this may be achieved by upregulating the production of certain inner or outer leaflet lipids, which causes localized outward curvature of the OM. This results in selection of anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) and associated C-terminal domain (CTD) -family proteins on the outer surface due to their ability to accommodate the curvature. Deacylation of A-LPS may further enable increased curvature leading to OMV formation. Porphyromonas gingivalis OMVs that are selectively enriched in CTD-family proteins, largely the gingipains, can support bacterial coaggregation, promote biofilm development and act as an intercessor for the transport of non-motile bacteria by motile bacteria. The P. gingivalis OMVs are also believed to contribute to host interaction and colonization, evasion of immune defense mechanisms, and destruction of periodontal tissues. They may be crucial for both micro- and macronutrient capture, especially heme and probably other assimilable compounds for its own benefit and that of the wider biofilm community. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Inactive Gingipains from P. gingivalis Selectively Skews T Cells toward a Th17 Phenotype in an IL-6 Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowczyk, Izabela; Wong, Alicia; Potempa, Barbara; Babyak, Olena; Lech, Maciej; Lamont, Richard J; Potempa, Jan; Koziel, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Gingipain cysteine proteases are considered key virulence factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis . They significantly influence antibacterial and homeostatic functions of macrophages, neutrophils, the complement system, and cytokine networks. Recent data indicate the role of P. gingivalis in T cell differentiation; however, the involvement of gingipains in this process remains elusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of danger signals triggered by the gingipains on the generation of Th17 cells, which play a key role in protection against bacterial diseases but may cause chronic inflammation and bone resorption. To this end we compared the effects of the wild-type strain of P. gingivalis (W83) with its isogenic mutant devoid of gingipain activity (ΔKΔRAB), and bacterial cells pretreated with a highly-specific inhibitor of gingipains activity (KYTs). Antigen presenting cells (APCs), both professional (dendritic cells), and non-professional (gingival keratinocytes), exposed to viable bacteria expressed high amounts of cytokines (IL-6, IL-21, IL-23). These cytokines are reported to either stimulate or balance the Th17-dependent immune response. Surprisingly, cells infected with P. gingivalis devoid of gingipain activity showed increased levels of all tested cytokines compared to bacteria with fully active enzymes. The effect was dependent on both the reduction of cytokine proteolysis and the lack of cross-talk with other bacterial virulence factors, including LPS and fimbriae that induce de novo synthesis of cytokines. The profile of lymphocyte T differentiation from naive T cells showed enhanced generation of Th17 in response to bacteria with inactive gingipains. Moreover, we found that gingipain-dependent induction of Th17 cells was highly specific, since other T cell-subsets remained unchanged. Finally, inhibition of IL-6 signaling in dendritic cells led to a significant depletion of the Th17 population. Cumulatively, this study

  3. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly – if not exclusively – belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis. PMID:24983705

  4. Comparison of real-time PCR and culture for detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutaga, Khalil; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.

    2003-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in destructive periodontal disease in humans. Detection and quantification of this microorganism are relevant for diagnosis and treatment planning. The prevalence and quantity of P. gingivalis in subgingival plaque samples of periodontitis patients were

  5. Varying hemin concentrations affect Porphyromonas gingivalis strains differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Manabu; Cueno, Marni E; Tamura, Muneaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2016-05-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis requires heme to grow, however, heme availability and concentration in the periodontal pockets vary. Fluctuations in heme concentration may affect each P. gingivalis strain differently, however, this was never fully demonstrated. Here, we elucidated the effects of varying hemin concentrations in representative P. gingivalis strains. Throughout this study, representative P. gingivalis strains [FDC381 (type I), MPWIb-01 (type Ib), TDC60 (type II), ATCC49417 (type III), W83 (type IV), and HNA99 (type V)] were used and grown for 24 h in growth media under varying hemin concentrations (5 × , 1 × , 0.5 × , 0.1 × ). Samples were lysed and protein standardized. Arg-gingipain (Rgp), H2O2, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were subsequently measured. We focused our study on 24 h-grown strains which excluded MPWIb-01 and HNA99. Rgp activity among the 4 remaining strains varied with Rgp peaking at: 1 × for FDC381, 5 × for TDC60, 0.5 × for ATCC49417, 5 × and 0.5 × for W83. With regards to H2O2 and SOD amounts: FDC381 had similar H2O2 amounts in all hemin concentrations while SOD levels varied; TDC60 had the lowest H2O2 amount at 1 × while SOD levels became higher in relation to hemin concentration; ATCC49417 also had similar H2O2 amounts in all hemin concentrations while SOD levels were higher at 1 × and 0.5 × ; and W83 had statistically similar H2O2 and SOD amounts regardless of hemin concentration. Our results show that variations in hemin concentration affect each P. gingivalis strain differently. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. In vitro cytokine responses to periodontal pathogens: generalized aggressive periodontitis is associated with increased IL-6 response to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, T S; Holmstrup, Palle; Bendtzen, K

    2010-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is an inflammatory condition resulting in destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. We examined the production of IL-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-12 and IL-10 in cultures of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from 10 patients...... with GAgP and 10 controls stimulated with periodontal pathogens or a control antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT) in the presence of autologous serum. The pathogens used were Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum, either as type strains or bacteria isolated from...... responses induced by Pr. intermedia, F. nucleatum and TT was similar in the two groups. A reduced IL-12p70 response to Pr. intermedia and F. nucleatum was observed in smokers compared to non-smoking patients (P

  7. Diagnostic evaluation of a nanobody with picomolar affinity toward the protease RgpB from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Leonard, Paul; Kaczmarek, Jakub Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the major periodontitis-causing pathogens. P. gingivalis secretes a group of proteases termed gingipains, and in this study we have used the RgpB gingipain as a biomarker for P. gingivalis. We constructed a naive camel nanobody library and used phage display...

  8. Molecular mechanisms of Porphyromonas gingivalis-host cell interaction on periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Nakayama

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis is a major oral pathogen and associated with periodontal diseases including periodontitis and alveolar bone loss. In this review, we indicate that two virulence factors, which are hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR and cysteine proteases “gingipains”, expressed by P. gingivalis have novel functions on the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis produces three types of gingipains and concomitantly several adhesin domains. Among the adhesin domains, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR, also called HGP15, has the function of induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8 expression in human gingival epithelial cells, indicating the possibility that HbR is associated with P. gingivalis-induced periodontal inflammation. On bacteria-host cells contact, P. gingivalis induces cellular signaling alteration in host cells. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and Akt are well known to play a pivotal role in various cellular physiological functions including cell survival and glucose metabolism in mammalian cells. Recently, we demonstrated that gingipains attenuate the activity of PI3K and Akt, which might have a causal influence on periodontal diseases by chronic infection to the host cells from the speculation of molecular analysis. In this review, we discuss new molecular and biological characterization of the virulence factors from P. gingivalis.

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Prevotella nigrescens spp. Isolated in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés, María T.; Chung, Whasun O.; Roberts, Marilyn C.; Fierro, José F.

    1998-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 143 Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Prevotella nigrescens isolates to 18 antimicrobial agents were tested. All P. gingivalis isolates were susceptible. In contrast, some Prevotella spp. (17%) were resistant to β-lactams, erythromycin, clindamycin, or tetracycline and carried resistance genes, ermF or tetQ, or β-lactamases.

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Prevotella nigrescens spp. Isolated in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, María T.; Chung, Whasun O.; Roberts, Marilyn C.; Fierro, José F.

    1998-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 143 Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Prevotella nigrescens isolates to 18 antimicrobial agents were tested. All P. gingivalis isolates were susceptible. In contrast, some Prevotella spp. (17%) were resistant to β-lactams, erythromycin, clindamycin, or tetracycline and carried resistance genes, ermF or tetQ, or β-lactamases. PMID:9797247

  11. In vitro invasion and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in gingival fibroblasts: role of the capsule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irshad, M.; van der Reijden, W.A.; Crielaard, W.; Laine, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium involved in periodontitis and peri-implantitis that can invade and survive inside host cells in vitro. P. gingivalis can invade human gingival fibroblasts (GF), but no data are available about the role of P. gingivalis’ capsule in GF

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis suppresses invasion of Fusobacterium nucleatum into gingival epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Jung; Jun, Hye-Kyoung; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasion of periodontal pathogens into periodontal tissues is an important step that can cause tissue destruction in periodontal diseases. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen and its gingipains are key virulence factors. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a bridge organism that mediates coadhesion of disease-causing late colonizers such as P. gingivalis and early colonizers during the development of dental biofilms. The aim of this study was to investigate how P. gingivalis, in particular its gingipains, influences the invasion of coinfecting F. nucleatum into gingival epithelial cells. When invasion of F. nucleatum was analyzed after 4 h of infection, invasion of F. nucleatum was suppressed in the presence of P. gingivalis compared with during monoinfection. However, coinfection with a gingipain-null mutant of P. gingivalis did not affect invasion of F. nucleatum. Inhibition of PI3K reduced invasion of F. nucleatum. P. gingivalis inactivated the PI3K/AKT pathway, which was also dependent on gingipains. Survival of intracellular F. nucleatum was promoted by P. gingivalis with Arg gingipain mutation. The results suggest that P. gingivalis, in particular its gingipains, can affect the invasion of coinfecting F. nucleatum through modulating intracellular signaling of the host cells. PMID:28748028

  13. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic diversity in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis: molecular mechanisms and biological consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, Gena D; Kerr, Jennifer E; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that colonizes the human oral cavity. It is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic periodontal disease affecting half of the adult population in the USA. To survive in the oral cavity, these bacteria must colonize dental plaque biofilms in competition with other bacterial species. Long-term survival requires P. gingivalis to evade host immune responses, while simultaneously adapting to the changing physiology of the host and to alterations in the plaque biofilm. In reflection of this highly variable niche, P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species and in this review the authors summarize genetic diversity as it relates to pathogenicity in P. gingivalis. Recent studies revealing a variety of mechanisms by which adaptive changes in genetic content can occur are also reviewed. Understanding the genetic plasticity of P. gingivalis will provide a better framework for understanding the host–microbe interactions associated with periodontal disease. PMID:23642116

  15. Bacteroides cutis,’ a new bacterial species isolated from human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Belkacemi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the main characteristics of ‘Bacteroides cutis’ sp. nov., strain Marseille-P4118T (= CSUR P4118, a new species within the genus Bacteroides. This strain was isolated from a skin sample of a 75-year-old man from Marseille.

  16. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svintradze, David V. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Peterson, Darrell L. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0614 (United States); Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States); Wright, H. Tonie, E-mail: xrdproc@vcu.edu [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0614 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each.

  17. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svintradze, David V.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P.; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-01-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each

  18. Macrophage subset sensitivity to endotoxin tolerisation by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Foey

    Full Text Available Macrophages (MΦs determine oral mucosal responses; mediating tolerance to commensal microbes and food whilst maintaining the capacity to activate immune defences to pathogens. MΦ responses are determined by both differentiation and activation stimuli, giving rise to two distinct subsets; pro-inflammatory M1- and anti-inflammatory/regulatory M2- MΦs. M2-like subsets predominate tolerance induction whereas M1 MΦs predominate in inflammatory pathologies, mediating destructive inflammatory mechanisms, such as those in chronic P.gingivalis (PG periodontal infection. MΦ responses can be suppressed to benefit either the host or the pathogen. Chronic stimulation by bacterial pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as LPS, is well established to induce tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of MΦ subsets to suppression by P. gingivalis. CD14(hi and CD14(lo M1- and M2-like MΦs were generated in vitro from the THP-1 monocyte cell line by differentiation with PMA and vitamin D3, respectively. MΦ subsets were pre-treated with heat-killed PG (HKPG and PG-LPS prior to stimulation by bacterial PAMPs. Modulation of inflammation was measured by TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 ELISA and NFκB activation by reporter gene assay. HKPG and PG-LPS differentially suppress PAMP-induced TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 but fail to suppress IL-1β expression in M1 and M2 MΦs. In addition, P.gingivalis suppressed NFκB activation in CD14(lo and CD14(hi M2 regulatory MΦs and CD14(lo M1 MΦs whereas CD14(hi M1 pro-inflammatory MΦs were refractory to suppression. In conclusion, P.gingivalis selectively tolerises regulatory M2 MΦs with little effect on pro-inflammatory CD14(hi M1 MΦs; differential suppression facilitating immunopathology at the expense of immunity.

  19. Relationship between quantitative measurement of Porphyromonas gingivalis on dental plaque with periodontal status of patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiyanti, Stephani; Soeroso, Yuniarti; Sunarto, Hari; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a narrowing of coronary artery due to plaque build-up. [1] Chronic periodontitis increases risk of cardiovascular disease. P.gingivalis is linked to both diseases. Objective: to analyse quantitative difference of P.gingivalis on dental plaque and its relationship with periodontal status of CHD patient and control. Methods: Periodontal status of 66 CHD patient and 40 control was checked. Subgingival plaque was isolated and P.gingivalis was measured using real-time PCR. Result: P.gingivalis of CHD patient differs from control. P.gingivalis is linked to pocket depth of CHD patient. Conclusion: P.gingivalis count of CHD patient is higher than control. P.gingivalis count is not linked to any periodontal status, except for pocket depth of CHD patient.

  20. Bacterial Adhesion of Porphyromonas Gingivalis on Provisional Fixed Prosthetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Kesim, Servet; Kaya, Esma; Özbilge, Hatice; Kiliç, Kerem; Çölgeçen, Özlem

    2010-01-01

    Background: When provisional restorations are worn for long term period, the adhesion of bacteria becomes a primary factor in the development of periodontal diseases. The aims of this study were to evaluate the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion of four different provisional fixed prosthodon-tic materials. Methods: Ten cylindrical specimens were prepared from bis-acrylic composites (PreVISION CB and Protemp 3 Garant), a light-polymerized composite (Revotek LC), and a polymethyl methacrylate-based (Dentalon) provisional fixed prosthodontic materials. Surface roughness was assessed by profilometry. The bacterial adhesion test was applied using Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and spectro-fluorometric method. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Dunnett t-tests. Results: All tested materials were significantly rougher than glass (P provisional fixed prosthodontic materials. Conclusion: The quantity of bacterial adhesion and surface roughness differed among the assessed provisional fixed prosthodontic materials. The light-polymerized provisional material Revotek LC had rougher surface and more bacterial adhesion compared with the others. PMID:21448445

  1. Different frequencies of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection in cancers of the upper digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiang; Liu, Yiwen; Kong, Jinyu; Gu, Bianli; Qi, Yijun; Wang, Xinshuai; Sun, Man; Chen, Pan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Huizhi; Zhou, Fuyou; Gao, Shegan

    2017-09-28

    The high incidence rate of multiple carcinomas in the upper digestive tract is often explained in terms of involvement of the same underlying risk factors. It has been reported that the oral bacterium Streptococcus anginosus is associated with esophageal, gastric, and pharyngeal cancers. We previously reported occurrence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) DNA in esophagus cancer. In this study, the presence of P. gingivalis in specimens of various types of cancer from the upper digestive tract was investigated. Here we report that P. gingivalis was preferentially and frequently present in specimens of esophageal cancer as well as in those from dysplasia of the esophagus but rarely in matched noncancerous portions and are quite low or absent in cancers from the cardia or stomach. Therefore, it led us to propose that, the microorganism does not survive in conditions of high acidity. We then investigate the pH dependence of survival of P. gingivalis as well as the acid tolerance of it. We found that, exposure to acidic buffers of a wide range of pH values led to a decline in colony forming units of P. gingivalis, thus, providing a possible explanation for variations in frequencies of P. gingivalis infection in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and red complex in coronary plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, Jaideep; Mahendra, Little; Felix, John; Romanos, Georgios E

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to detect the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and red complex in the coronary plaque of patients with coronary artery disease. The study population consisted of 51 patients with chronic periodontitis undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. DNA was extracted from subgingival and coronary atherosclerotic plaque samples. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify the part of 16S rRNA gene to detect the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA), and Treponema denticola were detected in 0%, 31.4%, 45.1%, 39.2%, and 51% of the atherosclerotic plaque samples, respectively. In both subgingival and coronary atherosclerotic plaque samples, Tannerella forsythia was detected in 19.6%, Porphyromonas gingivalis in 39.2%, Porphyromonas gingivalis (fimA) in 33.3%, and Treponema denticola in 35.3% of the samples. The study confirmed the detection of red complex bacteria in coronary plaque samples. However Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans could not be detected in these samples. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Porphyromonas gingivalis decreases osteoblast proliferation through IL-6-RANKL/OPG and MMP-9/TIMPs pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal pathogen, is closely associated with inflammatory alveolar bone resorption. This bacterium exerts its pathogenic effect indirectly through multiple virulence factors, such as lipopolysaccharides, fimbriae, and proteases. Another possible pathogenic path may be through a direct interaction with the host′s soft and hard tissues (e.g., alveolar bone, which could lead to periodontitis. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the direct effect of live and heat-inactivated P gingivalis on bone resorption, using an in vitro osteoblast culture model. Results: Optical microscopy and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide MTT assay revealed that live P gingivalis induced osteoblast detachment and reduced their proliferation. This effect was specific to live bacteria and was dependent on their concentration. Live P gingivalis increased IL-6 mRNA expression and protein production and downregulated RANKL and OPG mRNA expression. The effect of live P gingivalis on bone resorption was strengthened by an increase in MMP-9 expression and its activity. This increase was accompanied by an increase in TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 mRNA expression and protein production by osteoblasts infected with live P gingivalis. Conclusion: Overall, the results suggest that direct contact of P gingivalis with osteoblasts induces bone resorption through an inflammatory pathway that involves IL-6, RANKL/OPG, and MMP-9/TIMPs.

  4. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis Four rag Locus Genotypes in Patients of Orthodontic Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yang; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a major etiological agent in periodontal diseases and implied to result in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. rag locus is a pathogenicity island found in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Four rag locus variants are different in pathogenicity of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Moreover, there are different racial and geographic differences in distribution of rag locus genotypes. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genotypes in 102 gingival crevicular fluid samples from 57 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 25 cases of periodontitis patients and 20 cases of periodontally healthy people through a 16S rRNA-based PCR and a multiplex PCR. The correlations between Porphyromona.gingivalis/rag locus and clinical indices were analyzed. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genes in periodontitis group was the highest among three groups and higher in orthodontic gingivitis than healthy people (porthodontic gingivitis and mild-to-moderate periodontitis in Shandong. Porphyromonas.gingivalis carrying rag-1 has the strong virulence and could be associated with severe periodontitis. PMID:23593379

  5. A Closer Look at Bacteroides: Phylogenetic Relationship and Genomic Implications of a Life in the Human Gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Fredrik H.; Ussery, David; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi genomes to elucidate their phylogenetic relationship and to gain insight into what is separating the gut living Bacteroides and Parabacteroides genera from other Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi species. A comprehensive analysis shows that Bacteroides species have a higher number...... that Bacteroides and Parabacteroides species share a large common core of 1,085 protein families. Genome atlases illustrate that there are few and only small unique areas on the chromosomes of four Bacteroides/Parabacteroides genomes. Functional classification to clusters of othologus groups show that Bacteroides...... species are enriched in carbohydrate transport and metabolism proteins. Classification of proteins in KEGG metabolic pathways gives a detailed view of the genome’s metabolic capabilities that can be linked to its habitat. Bacteroides pectinophilus and Bacteroides capillosus do not cluster together...

  6. Persistence of Bacteroides ovatus under simulated sunlight irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Shengkun

    2014-07-04

    Background: Bacteroides ovatus, a member of the genus Bacteroides, is considered for use in molecular-based methods as a general fecal indicator. However, knowledge on its fate and persistence after a fecal contamination event remains limited. In this study, the persistence of B. ovatus was evaluated under simulated sunlight exposure and in conditions similar to freshwater and seawater. By combining propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection, the decay rates of B. ovatus were determined in the presence and absence of exogenous photosensitizers and in salinity up to 39.5 parts per thousand at 27°C. Results: UVB was found to be important for B. ovatus decay, averaging a 4 log10 of decay over 6 h of exposure without the presence of extracellular photosensitizers. The addition of NaNO2, an exogenous sensitizer producing hydroxyl radicals, did not significantly change the decay rate of B. ovatus in both low and high salinity water, while the exogenous sensitizer algae organic matter (AOM) slowed down the decay of B. ovatus in low salinity water. At seawater salinity, the decay rate of B. ovatus was slower than that in low salinity water, except when both NaNO2 and AOM were present. Conclusion: The results of laboratory experiments suggest that if B. ovatus is released into either freshwater or seawater environment in the evening, 50% of it may be intact by the next morning; if it is released at noon, only 50% may be intact after a mere 5 min of full spectrum irradiation on a clear day. This study provides a mechanistic understanding to some of the important environmental relevant factors that influenced the inactivation kinetics of B. ovatus in the presence of sunlight irradiation, and would facilitate the use of B. ovatus to indicate the occurrence of fecal contamination.

  7. Immunoglobulin G antibodies against Porphyromonas gingivalis or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in cardiovascular disease and periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Reinholdt, Jesper; Enevold, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to elucidate whether levels of circulating antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis correlate to loss of attachment, as a marker for periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Design: Sera were collected from 576 participants...

  8. Moderate effect of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain Gel) on Porphyromonas gingivalis growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Clemens; Jawor, Przemyslaw; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Hägewald, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the antibacterial effects of Emdogain Gel or its constituents on the growth of the suspected periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. The effects of the proteins of enamel matrix derivative (EMD), the commercial product Emdogain Gel or its vehicle propylene glycol alginate (PGA) (Straumann, Switzerland) on P. gingivalis growth were determined by two methods: broth dilution assay (BDA) and agar diffusion assay (ADA). BDA-Emdogain Gel inhibited moderately the growth of P. gingivalis, whereas EMD showed no effect. The PGA vehicle inhibited the growth completely. ADA-Emdogain Gel resulted in some inhibition in growth but was not significantly different from control. EMD revealed no zone of inhibition. PGA demonstrated statistically significant zones of inhibition. Emdogain Gel shows moderate antibacterial activities against P. gingivalis. These properties seem to be due to the PGA component of the gel preparation.

  9. Halicephalobus gingivalis (Nematoda) infection in a Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza, R; Schiller, C A; Stover, J; Smith, P J; Greiner, E C

    2000-03-01

    A 6-yr-old female Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi) with a disseminated rhabditiform nematode infection is described. Antemortem clinical signs were limited to blindness and abnormal behavior believed to be caused by a recurrent nematode-induced uveitis. Histologic examination of the kidneys, heart, eyes, uterus, and lymph nodes revealed granulomas containing multiple sections of rhabditiform nematodes. Most of the recovered nematodes were larval stages with only a few adult females noted. The adults measured 243-297 microm x 11-16 microm (x = 269 x 14 microm). The distinctive rhabditiform esophagi had corpus:isthmus:bulb proportions of 19:11:5. On the basis of adult morphology, the nematode was identified as Halicephalobus gingivalis. This is the first report of this parasite in a zebra and indicates that this parasitic granulomatous disease should be considered in zebras with neurologic disease.

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on Volatile Sulfur Compound Production by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Nao; Higuchi, Takuya; Nakajima, Masato; Fujimoto, Akie; Morita, Hiromitsu; Yoneda, Masahiro; Hanioka, Takashi; Hirofuji, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral anaerobes are the major compounds responsible for oral malodor. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 is recognized as an antiplaque probiotic bacterium. In this study, the effect of E. faecium WB2000 on VSC production by Porphyromonas gingivalis was evaluated, and the mechanism of inhibition of oral malodor was investigated. P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 was cultured in the presence of four lactic acid bacteria, including E. faecium WB2000. Subsequently, P....

  11. Pyocyanina contributory factor in haem acquisition and virulence enhancement of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the lung [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Benedyk

    Full Text Available Several recent studies show that the lungs infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are often co-colonised by oral bacteria including black-pigmenting anaerobic (BPA Porphyromonas species. The BPAs have an absolute haem requirement and their presence in the infected lung indicates that sufficient haem, a virulence up-regulator in BPAs, must be present to support growth. Haemoglobin from micro-bleeds occurring during infection is the most likely source of haem in the lung. Porphyromonas gingivalis displays a novel haem acquisition paradigm whereby haemoglobin must be firstly oxidised to methaemoglobin, facilitating haem release, either by gingipain proteolysis or capture via the haem-binding haemophore HmuY. P. aeruginosa produces the blue phenazine redox compound, pyocyanin. Since phenazines can oxidise haemoglobin, it follows that pyocyanin may also facilitate haem acquisition by promoting methaemoglobin production. Here we show that pyocyanin at concentrations found in the CF lung during P. aeruginosa infections rapidly oxidises oxyhaemoglobin in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrate that methaemoglobin formed by pyocyanin is also susceptible to proteolysis by P. gingivalis Kgp gingipain and neutrophil elastase, thus releasing haem. Importantly, co-incubation of oxyhaemoglobin with pyocyanin facilitates haem pickup from the resulting methemoglobin by the P. gingivalis HmuY haemophore. Mice intra-tracheally challenged with viable P. gingivalis cells plus pyocyanin displayed increased mortality compared to those administered P. gingivalis alone. Pyocyanin significantly elevated both methaemoglobin and total haem levels in homogenates of mouse lungs and increased the level of arginine-specific gingipain activity from mice inoculated with viable P. gingivalis cells plus pyocyanin compared with mice inoculated with P. gingivalis only. These findings indicate that pyocyanin, by promoting haem availability through methaemoglobin formation and

  12. Regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in Porphyromonas gingivalis-accelerated periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yohei; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Ando, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease. Recent studies have suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an important role in the development of chronic inflammation. We investigated a possible association between the inflammasome in gingival inflammation and bone loss induced by P. gingivalis infection using NLRP3-deficient mice. Wild-type and NLRP3-deficient mice were injected orally with P. gingivalis. We assessed alveolar bone loss, expression of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β, pro-IL-18, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in gingival tissue, as well as IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 production and caspase-1 activity in peritoneal macrophages. Porphyromonas gingivalis challenge significantly increased alveolar bone loss; gingival gene expression of pro-IL-1β, pro-IL-18, and RANKL; production of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6; and caspase-1 activity in peritoneal macrophages of wild-type mice, but did not affect NLRP3-deficient mice. Meanwhile, OPG mRNA expression in gingival tissue and peritoneal IL-6 production were significantly higher in NLRP3-knockout mice. Porphyromonas gingivalis activated innate immune cells via the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome, followed by a response from the IL-1 family, is critical in periodontal disease induced by wild-type P. gingivalis challenge via sustained inflammation.

  13. Roles of the host oxidative immune response and bacterial antioxidant rubrerythrin during Porphyromonas gingivalis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Mydel

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The efficient clearance of microbes by neutrophils requires the concerted action of reactive oxygen species and microbicidal components within leukocyte secretory granules. Rubrerythrin (Rbr is a nonheme iron protein that protects many air-sensitive bacteria against oxidative stress. Using oxidative burst-knockout (NADPH oxidase-null mice and an rbr gene knockout bacterial strain, we investigated the interplay between the phagocytic oxidative burst of the host and the oxidative stress response of the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Rbr ensured the proliferation of P. gingivalis in mice that possessed a fully functional oxidative burst response, but not in NADPH oxidase-null mice. Furthermore, the in vivo protection afforded by Rbr was not associated with the oxidative burst responses of isolated neutrophils in vitro. Although the phagocyte-derived oxidative burst response was largely ineffective against P. gingivalis infection, the corresponding oxidative response to the Rbr-positive microbe contributed to host-induced pathology via potent mobilization and systemic activation of neutrophils. It appeared that Rbr also provided protection against reactive nitrogen species, thereby ensuring the survival of P. gingivalis in the infected host. The presence of the rbr gene in P. gingivalis also led to greater oral bone loss upon infection. Collectively, these results indicate that the host oxidative burst paradoxically enhances the survival of P. gingivalis by exacerbating local and systemic inflammation, thereby contributing to the morbidity and mortality associated with infection.

  14. Antibacterial effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark essential oil on Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Yi; Shi, Yan-Qin; Pan, Xian-Hua; Lu, Yan-Hua; Cao, Ping

    2018-01-09

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark essential oil (CBEO) and its principal constituent cinnamaldehyde against Porphyromonas gingivalis and to elucidate the antibacterial mechanism. GC-MS analysis showed that cinnamaldehyde was the major constituent in CBEO (57.97%). The minimum inhibition concentrations (MICs) of CBEO and cinnamaldehyde were 6.25 μg/mL and 2.5 μM for P. gingivalis, respectively. Nucleic acid and protein leakage was observed with increasing concentrations of CBEO and cinnamaldehyde. Additionally, propidium iodide uptake assays revealed CBEO and cinnamaldehyde at 1 × MIC impaired P. gingivalis membrane integrity by enhancing cell permeability. Morphological changes in P. gingivalis cells were observed by scanning electron microscopy, which indicated cell membrane destruction. To further determine the anti-biofilm effect, relative biofilm formation and established biofilms were examined, which demonstrated that both CBEO and cinnamaldehyde at sub-MIC levels inhibited P. gingivalis biofilm formation by 74.5% and 67.3% separately, but only CBEO slightly decreased established biofilms by 33.5% at 4 × MIC. These results suggest the potential of CBEO as a natural antimicrobial agent against periodontal disease. Furthermore, cinnamaldehyde was confirmed to be the antibacterial substance of CBEO with inhibitory action against P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Various Essential Oils at Varying Concentrations against Periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Deswal, Himanshu; Agarwal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.gingivalis) is a notorious perio-pathogen with the ability to evade host defense mechanism and invade into the periodontal tissues. Many antimicrobial agents have been tested that curb its growth, although these agents tend to produce side effects such as antibiotic resistance and opportunistic infections. Therefore search for naturally occurring anti-microbials with lesser side effects is the need of the hour. Aim The aim of this study was to substantiate the antimicrobial activity of various essential oils; eucalyptus oil, chamomile oil, tea tree oil and turmeric oil against P. gingivalis. Materials and Methods Pure cultures of P. gingivalis were grown on selective blood agar. Antimicrobial efficacy of various concentrations of essential oils (0%, 25%, 50% and 100%) was assessed via disc diffusion test. Zone of inhibition were measured around disc after 48 hours in millimeters. Results Zones of inhibition were directly proportional to the concentration of essential oils tested. At 100% concentration all the tested oils possess antimicrobial activity against P.gingivalis with eucalyptus oil being most effective followed by tea tree oil, chamomile oil and turmeric oil. Conclusion All essential oils tested were effective against P.gingivalis. After testing for their clinical safety they could be developed into local agents to prevent and treat periodontitis. PMID:27790572

  16. Deep Sequencing of Porphyromonas gingivalis and comparative transcriptome analysis of a LuxS mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanoi eHirano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major etiological agent and chronic and aggressive forms of periodontal disease. The organism is an assacharolytic anaerobe and is a constituent of mixed species biofilms in a variety of microenvironments in the oral cavity. P. gingivalis expresses a range of virulence factors over which it exerts tight control. High-throughput sequencing technologies provide the opportunity to relate functional genomics to basic biology. In this study we report qualitative and quantitative RNA-Seq analysis of the transcriptome of P. gingivalis. We have also applied RNA-Seq to the transcriptome of a ΔluxS mutant of P. gingivalis deficient in AI-2-mediated bacterial communication. The transcriptome analysis confirmed the expression of all predicted ORFs for strain ATCC 33277, including 854 hypothetical proteins, and allowed the identification of hitherto unknown transcriptional units. Twelve noncoding RNAs were identified, including 11 small RNAs and one cobalamine riboswitch. Fifty seven genes were differentially regulated in the LuxS mutant. Addition of exogenous synthetic 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD, AI-2 precursor to the ΔluxS mutant culture complemented expression of a subset of genes, indicating that LuxS is involved in both AI-2 signaling and non-signaling dependent systems in P. gingivalis. This work provides an important dataset for future study of P. gingivalis pathophysiology and further defines the LuxS regulon in this oral pathogen.

  17. Investigation of Entamoeba gingivalis and Trichomonas tenax in Periodontitis or Gingivitis Patients in Kayseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Süleyman; Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Hamamcı, Berna; Alkan, Arzu; Şişman, Yıldıray; Esen, Çağrı; Kolay, Melike

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Entamoeba gingivalis and Trichomonas tenax in periodontitis and gingivitis patients. The study consisted of 107 periodontitis patients and 68 gingivitis patients. Bacterial plaque samples were collected with a curette from the deepest pocket in each quadrant and placed into separate tubes containing sterile 0.9% saline solution. Samples were examined at a magnification of ×400 by light microscopy. Cultivation for T. tenax was performed using the same samples, and the cultures were examined after 48 hours. E. gingivalis was present in the samples from 38 periodontitis patients, whereas T. tenax was present in samples from only 3 periodontitis patients. Both E. gingivalis and T. tenax were found together in the samples from 2 periodontitis patients. In total, 22 and 2 gingivitis patients were found to be infected with E. gingivalis and with T. tenax, respectively. Only 1 gingivitis patient was found to be infected with both E. gingivalis and T. tenax. In our study, oral protozoa were found in a high percentage in periodontitis and gingivitis patients. We believe that the prevalence of E. gingivalis and T. tenax should be determined via new studies and, in particular, the protection principles should be complied with.

  18. Characterization of Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 23726 adhesins involved in strain-specific attachment to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jane; Shokeen, Bhumika; Haake, Susan K; Lux, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adherence is an essential virulence factor in pathogenesis and infection. Fusobacterium nucleatum has a central role in oral biofilm architecture by acting as a bridge between early Gram-positive and late Gram-negative colonizers that do not otherwise adhere to each other. In this study, we survey a key adherence interaction of F. nucleatum with Porphyromonas gingivalis, and present evidence that multiple fusobacterial adhesins have a role in the attachment of F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 to P. gingivalis in a highly strain-dependent manner. Interaction between these species displayed varying sensitivities to arginine, galactose and lactose. Arginine was found to hamper coaggregation by at least 62% and up to 89% with several P. gingivalis strains and galactose inhibition ranged from no inhibition up to 58% with the same P. gingivalis strains. Lactose consistently inhibited F. nucleatum interaction with these P. gingivalis strains ranging from 40% to 56% decrease in coaggregation. Among the adhesins involved are the previously described Fap2 and surprisingly, RadD, which was described in an earlier study for its function in attachment of F. nucleatum to Gram-positive species. We also provide evidence for the presence of at least one additional adhesin that is sensitive to arginine but unlike Fap2 and RadD, is not a member of the autotransporter family type of fusobacterial large outer membrane proteins. The strain-specific binding profile of multiple fusobacterial adhesins to P. gingivalis highlights the heterogeneity and complexity of interspecies interactions in the oral cavity.

  19. Differentiation of nodules of Glycine max : Ultrastructural studies of plant cells and bacteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, D; Mörschel, E

    1978-01-01

    Plants of Glycine max var. Caloria, infected as 14 d old seedlings with a defined titre of Rhizobium japonicum 3Il b85 in a 10 min inoculation test, develop a sharp maximum of nitrogenase activity between 17 and 25 d after infection. This maximum (14±3 nmol C2H4 h(-1) mg nodule fresh weight(-1)), expressed as per mg nodule or per plant is followed by a 15 d period of reduced nitrogen fixation (20-30% of peak activity). 11 d after infection the first bacteroids develop as single cells inside infection vacuoles in the plant cells, close to the cell wall and infection threads. As a cytological marker for peak multiplication of bacteroids and for peak N2-fixation a few days later the association of a special type of nodule mitochondria with amyloplasts is described. 20 d after inoculation, more than 80% of the volume of infected plant cells is occupied by infection vacuoles, mostly containing only one bacteroid. The storage of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate starts to accumulate at both ends of the bacteroids. Non infected plant cells are squeezed between infected cells (25d), with infection vacuoles containing now more than two (up to five) bacteroids per section. Bacteroid development including a membrane envelope is also observed in the intercellular space between plant cells. 35 d after infection, more than 50% of the bacteroid volume is occupied by poly-β-hydroxybutyrate. The ultrastructural differentiation is discussed in relation to some enzymatic data in bacteroids and plant cell cytoplasm during nodule development.

  20. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors.

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    Graziela Murta Barbosa

    Full Text Available It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P

  1. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Graziela Murta; Colombo, Andrea Vieira; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P. gingivalis and P

  2. First evidence of genetic intraspecific variability and occurrence of Entamoeba gingivalis in HIV(+)/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembranelli, Sibeli B S; Souto, Fernanda O; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Richinho, Túlio T; Nunes, Poliana L; Nascentes, Gabriel A N; Ferreira, Thatiana B; Correia, Dalmo; Lages-Silva, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba gingivalis is considered an oral commensal but demonstrates a pathogenic potential associated with periodontal disease in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, this study evaluated the occurrence, opportunistic conditions, and intraspecific genetic variability of E. gingivalis in HIV(+)/AIDS patients. Entamoeba gingivalis was studied using fresh examination (FE), culture, and PCR from bacterial plaque samples collected from 82 HIV(+)/AIDS patients. Genetic characterization of the lower ribosomal subunit of region 18S (18S-SSU rRNA) was conducted in 9 positive samples using low-stringency single specific primer PCR (LSSP-PCR) and sequencing analysis. Entamoeba gingivalis was detected in 63.4% (52/82) of the samples. No association was detected between the presence of E. gingivalis and the CD4(+) lymphocyte count (≤200 cells/mm(3) (p = 0.912) or viral load (p = 0.429). The LSSP-PCR results helped group E. gingivalis populations into 2 polymorphic groups (68.3% similarity): group I, associated with 63.6% (7/11) of the samples, and group II, associated with 36.4% (4/11) of the samples, which shared 74% and 83.7% similarity and association with C and E isolates from HIV(-) individuals, respectively. Sequencing of 4 samples demonstrated 99% identity with the reference strain ATCC 30927 and also showed 2 divergent clusters, similar to those detected by LSSP-PCR. Opportunistic behavior of E. gingivalis was not detected, which may be related to the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy by all HIV(+)/AIDS patients. The high occurrence of E. gingivalis in these patients can be influenced by multifactorial components not directly related to the CD4(+) lymphocyte counts, such as cholesterol and the oral microbiota host, which could mask the potential opportunistic ability of E. gingivalis. The identification of the 18S SSU-rRNA polymorphism by LSSP-PCR and sequencing analysis provides the first evidence of genetic variability in E. gingivalis

  3. The Porphyromonas gingivalis ferric uptake regulator orthologue binds hemin and regulates hemin-responsive biofilm development.

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    Catherine A Butler

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative pathogen associated with the biofilm-mediated disease chronic periodontitis. P. gingivalis biofilm formation is dependent on environmental heme for which P. gingivalis has an obligate requirement as it is unable to synthesize protoporphyrin IX de novo, hence P. gingivalis transports iron and heme liberated from the human host. Homeostasis of a variety of transition metal ions is often mediated in Gram-negative bacteria at the transcriptional level by members of the Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur superfamily. P. gingivalis has a single predicted Fur superfamily orthologue which we have designated Har (heme associated regulator. Recombinant Har formed dimers in the presence of Zn2+ and bound one hemin molecule per monomer with high affinity (Kd of 0.23 µM. The binding of hemin resulted in conformational changes of Zn(IIHar and residue 97Cys was involved in hemin binding as part of a predicted -97C-98P-99L- hemin binding motif. The expression of 35 genes was down-regulated and 9 up-regulated in a Har mutant (ECR455 relative to wild-type. Twenty six of the down-regulated genes were previously found to be up-regulated in P. gingivalis grown as a biofilm and 11 were up-regulated under hemin limitation. A truncated Zn(IIHar bound the promoter region of dnaA (PGN_0001, one of the up-regulated genes in the ECR455 mutant. This binding decreased as hemin concentration increased which was consistent with gene expression being regulated by hemin availability. ECR455 formed significantly less biofilm than the wild-type and unlike wild-type biofilm formation was independent of hemin availability. P. gingivalis possesses a hemin-binding Fur orthologue that regulates hemin-dependent biofilm formation.

  4. Unprimed, M1 and M2 Macrophages Differentially Interact with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Roselind S Lam

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis. Tissue macrophages are amongst the first immune cells to respond to bacteria and depending on the cytokine profile at the infection site, macrophages are primed to react to infection in different ways. Priming of naive macrophages with IFN-γ produces a classical pro-inflammatory, antibacterial M1 macrophage after TLR ligation, whereas priming with IL-4 induces an anti-inflammatory tissue-repair M2 phenotype. Previous work has shown that M1 are preferentially generated in gingival tissue following infection with P. gingivalis. However, few studies have investigated the interactions of macrophage subsets with P. gingivalis cells. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of naive, M1 and M2 macrophages to phagocytose P. gingivalis and investigate how this interaction affects both the bacterial cell and the macrophage. M1 and M2 macrophages were both found to have enhanced phagocytic capacity compared with that of naive macrophages, however only the naive and M1 macrophages were able to produce a respiratory burst in order to clear the bacteria from the phagosome. P. gingivalis was found to persist in naive and M2, but not M1 macrophages for 24 hours. Phagocytosis of P. gingivalis also induced high levels of TNF-α, IL-12 and iNOS in M1 macrophages, but not in naive or M2 macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with P. gingivalis at high bacteria to macrophage ratios, while inducing an inflammatory response, was also found to be deleterious to macrophage longevity, with high levels of apoptotic cell death found in macrophages after infection. The activation of M1 macrophages observed in this study may contribute to the initiation and maintenance of a pro-inflammatory state during chronic periodontitis.

  5. Dual diaminopimelate biosynthesis pathways in Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, André O; Klartag, Ayelet; Gilvarg, Charles; Dobson, Renwick C J; Marques, Felipe Garbelini; Leustek, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium thermocellum were recently found to synthesize diaminopimelate (DAP) by way of LL-DAP aminotransferase. Both species also contain an ortholog of meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase (Ddh), suggesting that they may have redundant pathways for DAP biosynthesis. The B. fragilis Ddh ortholog shows low homology with other examples of Ddh and this species belongs to a phylum, the Bacteriodetes, not previously known to contain this enzyme. By contrast, the C. thermocellum ortholog is well conserved with known examples of Ddh. Using in vitro and in vivo assays both the B. fragilis and C. thermocellum enzymes were found to be authentic examples of Ddh, displaying kinetic properties typical of this enzyme. The result indicates that B. fragilis contains a sequence diverged form of Ddh. Phylogenomic analysis of the microbial genome database revealed that 77% of species with a Ddh ortholog also contain a second pathway for DAP biosynthesis suggesting that Ddh evolved as an ancillary mechanism for DAP biosynthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sphingolipid synthesis deficiency in a mutant of Bacteroides levii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumleve, B.; Lev, M.

    1986-05-01

    Bacteroides levii, an anaerobic bacterium, synthesizes two sphingolipids; the sphingomyelin analogue, ceramide phosphorylethanolamine (CPE), and also ceramide phosphorylglycerol (CPG). The first enzyme in the sphingolipid pathway, 3-ketodihydro-sphingosine (3KDS) synthase, has been partially purified previously. To study subsequent steps in the pathways, mutants defective in sphingolipid synthesis were derived by ethyl methanesulfonate and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Extracts of the mutant, 1075BB, show synthase activity although the cells do not synthesize CPE or CPG. The mutant differs from the wild type in that: (1) synthase activity was much diminished in the mutant, (2) sphingolipid synthesis does not occur in the mutant as evidenced by the absence of spots at sites where CPE and CPG migrate following two-dimensional thin layer chromatography, (3) incorporation of uniformly-labelled (/sup 14/C)serine carbon or (/sup 14/C)3KDS into sphingolipids was not observed in the mutant, (4) following incubation with (/sup 14/C)3KDS, radioactivity corresponding to dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and ceramide were observed in the mutant; no (/sup 14/C)DHS was detected in the wild type, and (5) enhanced incorporation of (/sup 14/C)serine carbon into two lipids not containing phosphorus was found in the mutant. The authors conclude, therefore, that this mutant, 1075BB, has a metabolic block at the terminal biosynthetic steps of sphingolipid synthesis.

  7. Inhibitory and bactericidal power of mangosteen rind extract towards Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans (Laboratory test

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    Ina Hendiani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The bacteria that cause the occurrence of pathogens of periodontal disease are gram negative anaerobes. These bacteria include Pophyromonas Gingivalis and Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans. Mangosteen skin extract is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti microbial, and anti oxidant properties. The extract of the mangosteen peel is altered in gel preparation in order to streamline its clinical application in periodontal disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the antibacterial power of the ginger mangosteen tree extract gel against Pophyromonas gingivalis and Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans (Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans. Methods: This research was conducted by experimental laboratory. Mangosteen fruit extract gel with concentration of 100%, 50%, 25%, 12,5%, 6,25%, 3,125% and 0,78% were tested against Pophyromonas Gingivalis and Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans with agar diffusion method. Results and Discussion: The results of this study indicate that for Actinobacilus Aggregatibacter bacteria minimal inhibitory concentration at a concentration of 6.25% with a diameter of 13,5mm inhibition. Minimal bactericidal concentration at 12,5% concentration with 14,7mm inhibitory diameter. In the test of Pophyromonas Gingivalis bacteria, minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained at a concentration of 1.56% and a minimum bactericidal concentration was obtained at a concentration of 3.125%. Conclusion: The conclusion that mangosteen peel skin gel extract can inhibit bacterial growth and is bactericidal against Pophyromonas Gingivalis and Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans (Aggregatibacter Actinomycetecomitans.

  8. Placental Trophoblast Responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis Mediated by Toll-like Receptor-2 and -4

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    Banun Kusumawardani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophoblast participates in preventing allorecognition and controlling pathogens that compromise fetal wellbeing. Toll-like receptors recognize conserved sequences on the pathogens surface and trigger effector cell functions. Porphyromonas gingivalis is thought to spread to the umbilical cord and cause fetal growth restriction. Objective: To characterize expression and function of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in trophoblast cells from Porphyromonas gingivalisinfected pregnant rats. Methods: Live Porphyromonas gingivalis were challenged into the maxillary first molar subgingival sulcus of female rats before and/or during pregnancy and sacrified on gestational day (GD 14 and 20. Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected by API-ZYM system in the maternal blood of the retro-orbital venous plexus and the umbilical cord. TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions in trophoblast cells was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: Porphyromonas gingivalis was first detected in the maternal blood and finally spread to the umbilical cord. Syncytiotrophoblast, spongitrophoblast and trophoblastic giant cell in treated groups had significantly higher expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 than control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Syncytiotrophoblast, spongitrophoblast and trophoblastic giant cell are able to recognize Porphyromonas gingivalis through TLR-2 and TLR-4 expression. The ligation of TLR-2 and TLR-4 promoted cytokine production and induced trophoblast cell death. These findings strengthen links between periodontal disease and fetal growth restriction.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.150

  9. Genes Contributing to Porphyromonas gingivalis Fitness in Abscess and Epithelial Cell Colonization Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel P.; Hutcherson, Justin A.; Wang, Yan; Nowakowska, Zuzanna M.; Potempa, Jan; Yoder-Himes, Deborah R.; Scott, David A.; Whiteley, Marvin; Lamont, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is an important cause of serious periodontal diseases, and is emerging as a pathogen in several systemic conditions including some forms of cancer. Initial colonization by P. gingivalis involves interaction with gingival epithelial cells, and the organism can also access host tissues and spread haematogenously. To better understand the mechanisms underlying these properties, we utilized a highly saturated transposon insertion library of P. gingivalis, and assessed the fitness of mutants during epithelial cell colonization and survival in a murine abscess model by high-throughput sequencing (Tn-Seq). Transposon insertions in many genes previously suspected as contributing to virulence showed significant fitness defects in both screening assays. In addition, a number of genes not previously associated with P. gingivalis virulence were identified as important for fitness. We further examined fitness defects of four such genes by generating defined mutations. Genes encoding a carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, a replication-associated recombination protein, a nitrosative stress responsive HcpR transcription regulator, and RNase Z, a zinc phosphodiesterase, showed a fitness phenotype in epithelial cell colonization and in a competitive abscess infection. This study verifies the importance of several well-characterized putative virulence factors of P. gingivalis and identifies novel fitness determinants of the organism. PMID:28900609

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola Mixed Microbial Infection in a Rat Model of Periodontal Disease

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    Raj K. Verma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are periodontal pathogens that express virulence factors associated with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that P. gingivalis and T. denticola are synergistic in terms of virulence; using a model of mixed microbial infection in rats. Groups of rats were orally infected with either P. gingivalis or T. denticola or mixed microbial infections for 7 and 12 weeks. P. gingivalis genomic DNA was detected more frequently by PCR than T. denticola. Both bacteria induced significantly high IgG, IgG2b, IgG1, IgG2a antibody levels indicating a stimulation of Th1 and Th2 immune response. Radiographic and morphometric measurements demonstrated that rats infected with the mixed infection exhibited significantly more alveolar bone loss than shaminfected control rats. Histology revealed apical migration of junctional epithelium, rete ridge elongation, and crestal alveolar bone resorption; resembling periodontal disease lesion. These results showed that P. gingivalis and T. denticola exhibit no synergistic virulence in a rat model of periodontal disease.

  11. Thrombospondin-1 production is enhanced by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide in THP-1 cells.

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    Misa Gokyu

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. Monocytes and macrophages stimulated by periodontopathic bacteria induce inflammatory mediators that cause tooth-supporting structure destruction and alveolar bone resorption. In this study, using a DNA microarray, we identified the enhanced gene expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 in human monocytic cells stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS. TSP-1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is upregulated during the inflammatory process. Recent studies have suggested that TSP-1 is associated with rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and osteoclastogenesis. TSP-1 is secreted from neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, which mediate immune responses at inflammatory regions. However, TSP-1 expression in periodontitis and the mechanisms underlying TSP-1 expression in human monocytic cells remain unknown. Here using real-time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that TSP-1 mRNA expression level was significantly upregulated in inflamed periodontitis gingival tissues and in P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells. TSP-1 was expressed via Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and TLR4 pathways. In P. gingivalis LPS stimulation, TSP-1 expression was dependent upon TLR2 through the activation of NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, IL-17F synergistically enhanced P. gingivalis LPS-induced TSP-1 production. These results suggest that modulation of TSP-1 expression by P. gingivalis plays an important role in the progression and chronicity of periodontitis. It may also contribute a new target molecule for periodontal therapy.

  12. Compromised inflammatory cytokine response to P. gingivalis LPS by fibroblasts from inflamed human gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Tracy R; Ge, Shaohua; Bartold, P Mark

    2018-03-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the in vitro cytokine response of gingival fibroblasts (GF's) from healthy and inflamed human gingival tissues and to assess whether GF's from inflamed gingivae are capable of mounting a secondary inflammatory response after exposure to P. gingivalis LPS. GF's were obtained from healthy donors and periodontitis patients and cultured in vitro. Cells were exposed to P. gingivalis LPS for 24h before measurement of MCP-1, GRO, IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF using a bead-based multiplex assay. Statistical comparisons were made between LPS-exposed GF's and unstimulated cells as well as the two patient groups by two-way ANOVA. GF's exposed to P. gingivalis LPS significantly increased their production of MCP-1, GRO, IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF compared to unstimulated cells. GF's isolated from inflamed tissue from periodontitis patients demonstrated consistently less cytokine production after exposure to P. gingivalis LPS, most notably for GRO and IL-6. The current study demonstrates that GF's play an active role in the inflammatory response in periodontal disease by producing a number of chemokines and cytokines. Furthermore, inflamed GF's may be compromised in their ability to mount an adequate secondary immune response in relation to chemokine/cytokine production. The compromised inflammatory cytokine response of inflamed human gingival fibroblasts to P. gingivalis LPS may impact on their ability to recruit and activate inflammatory cells while maintaining persistent inflammation, a key feature of periodontal disease.

  13. Role of sodium in the RprY-dependent stress response in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Karthik Krishnan

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe which is strongly associated with periodontal disease. Environmental changes in the gingival sulcus trigger the growth of P. gingivalis and a concurrent shift from periodontal health to disease. Bacteria adjust their physiology in response to environmental changes and gene regulation by two-component phospho-relay systems is one mechanism by which such adjustments are effected. In P. gingivalis RprY is an orphan response regulator and previously we showed that the RprY regulon included genes associated with oxidative stress and sodium metabolism. The goals of the present study were to identify environmental signals that induce rprY and clarify the role of the regulator in the stress response. In Escherichia coli an RprY-LacZ fusion protein was induced in sodium- depleted medium and a P. gingivalis rprY mutant was unable to grow in similar medium. By several approaches we established that sodium depletion induced up-regulation of genes involved in oxidative stress. In addition, we demonstrated that RprY interacted directly with the promoters of several molecular chaperones. Further, both genetic and transcription data suggest that the regulator acts as a repressor. We conclude that RprY is one of the regulators that controls stress responses in P. gingivalis, possibly by acting as a repressor since an rprY mutant showed a superstress reponse in sodium-depleted medium which we propose inhibited growth.

  14. Infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis exacerbates endothelial injury in obese mice.

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    Min Ao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A number of studies have revealed a link between chronic periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in obese patients. However, there is little information about the influence of periodontitis-associated bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, on pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity. METHODS: In vivo experiment: C57BL/6J mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD or normal chow diet (CD, as a control. Pg was infected from the pulp chamber. At 6 weeks post-infection, histological and immunohistochemical analysis of aortal tissues was performed. In vitro experiment: hTERT-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HuhT1 were used to assess the effect of Pg/Pg-LPS on free fatty acid (FFA induced endothelial cells apoptosis and regulation of cytokine gene expression. RESULTS: Weaker staining of CD31 and increased numbers of TUNEL positive cells in aortal tissue of HFD mice indicated endothelial injury. Pg infection exacerbated the endothelial injury. Immunohistochemically, Pg was detected deep in the smooth muscle of the aorta, and the number of Pg cells in the aortal wall was higher in HFD mice than in CD mice. Moreover, in vitro, FFA treatment induced apoptosis in HuhT1 cells and exposure to Pg-LPS increased this effect. In addition, Pg and Pg-LPS both attenuated cytokine production in HuhT1 cells stimulated by palmitate. CONCLUSIONS: Dental infection of Pg may contribute to pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by accelerating FFA-induced endothelial injury.

  15. Rapid synthesis and metabolism of glutamate in N2-fixing bacteroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, S.O.; Streeter, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Symbiotic nodule bacteroids are thought to support N 2 fixation mainly by metabolizing dicarboxylic acids to CO 2 , generating reductant and ATP required by nitrogenase. Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids were isolated anaerobically and incubated at 2% O 2 with 14 C-labeled succinate, malate, glutamate, or aspartate. 14 CO 2 was collected, and the bacteroid contents separated into neutral, organic acid, and amino acid fractions. The respiration of substrates, relative to their uptake, was malate > glutamate > succinate > aspartate. Analysis of the fractions revealed that will all substrates the radioactivity was found mostly in the amino acid fraction. The labeling of the neutral fraction was negligible and only a small amount of label was found in the organic acid fraction indicating a small pool size. TLC of the amino acid fraction showed the label to be principally in glutamate. Glutamate contained 67, 80, 97, and 88% of the 14 C in the amino acid fraction in bacteroids fed with succinate, malate, glutamate and aspartate, respectively. The data suggest that glutamate may play an important role in the bacteroid function

  16. Inhibitory Effect ofEnterococcus faeciumWB2000 on Volatile Sulfur Compound Production byPorphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nao; Higuchi, Takuya; Nakajima, Masato; Fujimoto, Akie; Morita, Hiromitsu; Yoneda, Masahiro; Hanioka, Takashi; Hirofuji, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral anaerobes are the major compounds responsible for oral malodor. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 is recognized as an antiplaque probiotic bacterium. In this study, the effect of E. faecium WB2000 on VSC production by Porphyromonas gingivalis was evaluated, and the mechanism of inhibition of oral malodor was investigated. P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 was cultured in the presence of four lactic acid bacteria, including E. faecium WB2000. Subsequently, P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, W50, W83, and two clinical isolates were cultured in the presence or absence of E. faecium WB2000, and the emission of VSCs from spent culture medium was measured by gas chromatography. The number of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in mixed culture with E. faecium WB2000 decreased at 6 h, and the rate of decrease was higher than that in mixed cultures with the other lactic acid bacteria. The numbers of five P. gingivalis strains decreased at similar rates in mixed culture with E. faecium WB2000. The concentration of methyl mercaptan was lower in spent culture medium from P. gingivalis and E. faecium WB2000 cultures compared with that from P. gingivalis alone. Therefore, E. faecium WB2000 may reduce oral malodor by inhibiting the growth of P. gingivalis and neutralizing methyl mercaptan.

  17. The Porphyromonas gingivalis ferric uptake regulator orthologue does not regulate iron homeostasis

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    Catherine Butler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that has an absolute requirement for iron which it transports from the host as heme and/or Fe2+. Iron transport must be regulated to prevent toxic effects from excess metal in the cell. P. gingivalis has one ferric uptake regulator (Fur orthologue encoded in its genome called Har, which would be expected to regulate the transport and usage of iron within this bacterium. As a gene regulator, inactivation of Har should result in changes in gene expression of several genes compared to the wild-type. This dataset (GEO accession number GSE37099 provides information on expression levels of genes in P. gingivalis in the absence of Har. Surprisingly, these genes do not relate to iron homeostasis.

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis is highly sensitive to inhibitors of a proton-pumping ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Mizuki; Shimoyama, Yu; Ishikawa, Taichi; Sasaki, Minoru; Futai, Masamitsu; Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi

    2018-04-15

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a well-known Gram-negative bacterium that causes periodontal disease. The bacterium metabolizes amino acids and peptides to obtain energy. An ion gradient across its plasma membrane is thought to be essential for nutrient import. However, it is unclear whether an ion-pumping ATPase responsible for the gradient is required for bacterial growth. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of protonophores and inhibitors of a proton-pumping ATPase on the growth of P. gingivalis. Among the compounds examined, curcumin and citreoviridin appreciably reduced the bacterial growth. Furthermore, these compounds inhibited the ATPase activity in the bacterial membrane, where the A-type proton-pumping ATPase (A-ATPase) is located. This study suggests that curcumin and citreoviridin inhibit the bacterial growth by inhibiting the A-ATPase in the P. gingivalis membrane. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro Resistance Testing of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia to Triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Deema; Tanner, Anne

    2016-04-01

    To determine the sensitivity of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia to triclosan, and determine if these bacteria develop resistance to triclosan upon prolonged exposure. Susceptibility to triclosan was tested against three periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and T. forsythia. Escherichia coli strains sensitive and resistant to triclosan were used as biological controls to confirm the efficacy of triclosan in the assays. Agar plates were prepared locally with vitamin K and hemin-supplemented medium. Porphyromonas gingivalis and P. intermedia did not grow on plates containing ≥ 2 μg/ml triclosan, while T. forsythia did not grow on ≥ 1.66 μg/ml. Colonies of P. intermedia resistant to triclosan developed after prolonged incubation at 2 μg/ml, but this resistance disappeared during subculture in the absence of triclosan. No significant resistance to triclosan was detected for these species. Dental products containing triclosan can be beneficial in controlling periodontal disease.

  20. Effect of Citrus aurantifolia swingle essential oils on methyl mercaptan production of Porphyromonas gingivalis

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    Anindya Prima Yusinta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Halitosis is a term used to describe an unpleasant odors emanating timely from oral cavity. The unpleasant smell of breath most common caused from volatile sulphure compound (VSC. Methyl mercaptan is the major component of VSC. P. gingivalis produced large amount of methyl mercaptan. The essential oils of Citrus aurantifolia swingle contain antibacterial component. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of essential oil of Citrus aurantifolia swingle on the production of methyl mercaptan compounds in P. gingivalis. Methods: Bacterial suspension of P. gingivalis in TSB medium with 108 CFU/ml concentration cultured in a microplate and added by the essential oils of Citrus aurantifolia swingle with 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% concentration. Distilled water was used as negative control and 0.2% Chlorhexidine mouthwash was used as a positive control. Microplate was incubated anaerobically for 48 hours. After the periode of incubation, 0.6% methionine as the exogenous substrate and 0.06% DTNB as a reagen for determining methyl mercaptan concentration were added to each wells. The microplate was futher incubated for 12 hours. Concentration of methyl mercaptan produced by the P. gingivalis was measured spectrophotometrically using microplate reader at 415 nm. Results: One-way ANOVA showed that the essential oil of Citrus aurantifolia swingle take effect on the concentration of methyl mercaptan produced by P. gingivalis. LSD test results indicated that there was a significant difference of methyl mercaptan concentration between treatment groups of the essential oils of Citrus aurantifolia swingle and distilled water that used as negative control. Conclusion: The essential oil of Citrus aurantifolia swingle has decreased the production of methyl mercaptan produced by P. gingivalis.Latar belakang: Halitosis adalah istilah yang digunakan untuk menggambarkan bau tidak sedap yang berasal dari rongga mulut. Penyebab utama halitosis

  1. Involvement of a periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis on the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Masato; Naka, Shuhei; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Wada, Koichiro; Endo, Hiroki; Mawatari, Hironori; Imajo, Kento; Nomura, Ryota; Hokamura, Kazuya; Ono, Masafumi; Murata, Shogo; Tohnai, Iwai; Sumida, Yoshio; Shima, Toshihide; Kuboniwa, Masae; Umemura, Kazuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Amano, Atsuo; Okanoue, Takeshi; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2012-02-16

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that is closely associated with multiple factors such as obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, other risk factors for the development of NAFLD are unclear. With the association between periodontal disease and the development of systemic diseases receiving increasing attention recently, we conducted this study to investigate the relationship between NAFLD and infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a major causative agent of periodontitis. The detection frequencies of periodontal bacteria in oral samples collected from 150 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (102 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and 48 with non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) patients) and 60 non-NAFLD control subjects were determined. Detection of P. gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria were detected by PCR assay. In addition, effect of P. gingivalis-infection on mouse NAFLD model was investigated. To clarify the exact contribution of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis, non-surgical periodontal treatments were also undertaken for 3 months in 10 NAFLD patients with periodontitis. The detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NAFLD patients was significantly higher than that in the non-NAFLD control subjects (46.7% vs. 21.7%, odds ratio: 3.16). In addition, the detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NASH patients was markedly higher than that in the non-NAFLD subjects (52.0%, odds ratio: 3.91). Most of the P. gingivalis fimbria detected in the NAFLD patients was of invasive genotypes, especially type II (50.0%). Infection of type II P. gingivalis on NAFLD model of mice accelerated the NAFLD progression. The non-surgical periodontal treatments on NAFLD patients carried out for 3 months ameliorated the liver function parameters, such as the serum levels of AST and ALT. Infection with high-virulence P. gingivalis might be an additional risk factor for the

  2. Persistent Exposure to Porphyromonas gingivalis Promotes Proliferative and Invasion Capabilities, and Tumorigenic Properties of Human Immortalized Oral Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Fengxue; Liu, Junchao; Guo, Yan; Li, Chen; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, Hongyan; Zhao, Haijiao; Pan, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies revealed a significant association between oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Porphyromonas gingivalis , a major pathogen of periodontal disease. As a keystone pathogen of periodontitis, P. gingivalis is known not only to damage local periodontal tissues, but also to evade the host immune system and eventually affect systemic health. However, its role in OSCC has yet to be defined. To explore the underlying effect of chronic P. gingivalis infection on OSCC and to identify relevant biomarkers as promising targets for therapy and prevention, we established a novel model by exposing human immortalized oral epithelial cells (HIOECs) to P. gingivalis at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) for 5-23 weeks. The P. gingivalis infected HIOECs were monitored for tumor biological alteration by proliferation, wound healing, transwell invasion, and gelatin zymography assays. Microarray and proteomic analyses were performed on HIOECs infected with P. gingivalis for 15 weeks, and some selected data were validated by quantitative real-time PCR and (or) western blot on cells infected for 15 and 23 weeks. Persistent exposure to P. gingivalis caused cell morphological changes, increased proliferation ability with higher S phase fraction in the cell cycle, and promoted cell migratory and invasive properties. In combining results of bioinformatics analyses and validation assays, tumor-related genes such as NNMT, FLI1, GAS6, lncRNA CCAT1, PDCD1LG2, and CD274 may be considered as the key regulators in tumor-like transformation in response to long-time exposure of P. gingivalis . In addition, some useful clinical biomarkers and novel proteins were also presented. In conclusion, P. gingivalis could promote tumorigenic properties of HIOECs, indicating that chronic P. gingivalis infection may be considered as a potential risk factor for oral cancer. The key regulators detected from the present model might be used in monitoring the development of OSCC with

  3. Prevalence of fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis in adolescent orthodontic patients.

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    Shuang Pan

    Full Text Available The placement of fixed orthodontic appliances may alter the composition of oral microbiota and has the potential risk of periodontal complication. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae play a critical role in colonization of P. gingivalis in subgingival regions. In this study, we investigated the association between the prevalence of P. gingivalis-specific fimA genotypes and periodontal health status in adolescent orthodontic patients, to identify the pathogencity of P. gingivalis during orthodontic therapy.Sixty-one adolescent orthodontic patients were enrolled in the case group, while the control group consisted of 56 periodontally healthy adolescents. At baseline (T0, clinical parameter (gingival index was tested, and subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the lower incisors. The incidences of P. gingivalis and fimA genotypes were detected by polymerase chain reaction. All parameters were reassessed after 1 month (T1, 2 months (T2, 3 months (T3, and 6 months (T4 in the case group and then compared with those of the controls.Both microbiological and clinical parameters from orthodontic patients started to increase after placement of fixed appliances. Maximum values were reached at 3 months after placement and followed by their decreases at six months. However, the microbiological and clinical parameters in the case group were significantly higher than those of the control group. The GI of fimA II, IV-positive samples was significantly higher than that of negative samples.P. gingivalis carrying fimA II or IV was closely related to orthodontic gingivitis. In addition, proper oral hygiene control could lead to little increase in dental plaque accumulation, and exert a beneficial effect to periodontal tissues.

  4. Effects of d-valine on periodontal or peri-implant pathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hua; Li, Baosheng; Wang, Heling; Cai, Qing; Quan, Xu; Cui, Yunxia; Meng, Weiyan

    2018-03-01

    When presented with a surface or an interface, bacteria often grow as biofilms in which cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation on implants is an initiating factor for their failure. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary etiologic bacteria of initiation and progression of periodontal disease. This microorganism is also the risk factor of many systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and pulmonary infection. To date, no medication that can remove such biofilm has been accepted for clinical use. D-valine (D-val) can reportedly inhibit the formation of biofilm and/or trigger the scattering of mature biofilm. Accordingly, this study investigated the effects of d-val on single-species P. gingivalis biofilms in vitro. P. gingivalis grown in brain heart infusion culture with or without d-val was inoculated in 24- or 96-well plates. After incubation for 72 hours, biomass via crystal violet staining, extracellular polysaccharide production by biofilms, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine the d-val concentration that can effectively prevent P. gingivalis biofilm formation. Experimental results showed that d-val effectively inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations ≥50 mM (mMol/L), and that d-val inhibition increased with increased concentration. Moreover, at high concentrations, the bacterial form changed from the normal baseball form into a rodlike shape. d-val also notably affected extracellular polysaccharide production by P. gingivalis. d-val can inhibit P. gingivalis biofilm formation, and high concentrations can affect bacterial morphology. © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology.

  5. Porphyromonas gingivalis mediated periodontal disease and atherosclerosis: disparate diseases with commonalities in pathogenesis through TLRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Furthermore hyperlipidemic mice deficient in TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 signaling exhibit diminished inflammatory responses and decreased atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence has implicated specific infectious agents including the periodontal disease pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in the progression of atherosclerosis. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. We have established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate immune signaling in the context of local and distant chronic inflammation induced by this pathogen. We have demonstrated that P. gingivalis requires TLR2 to induce oral inflammatory bone lose in mice. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that P. gingivalis infection accelerates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice with an associated increase in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in atherosclerotic lesions. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms driving infection, and chronic inflammation during atherosclerosis may ultimately provide new targets for therapy.

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis displays a competitive advantage over Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultured biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, K; Fujise, O; Miura, M; Hamachi, T; Maeda, K

    2013-06-01

    Biofilm formation occurs through the events of cooperative growth and competitive survival among multiple species. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are important periodontal pathogens. The aim of this study was to demonstrate competitive or cooperative interactions between these two species in co-cultured biofilm. P. gingivalis strains and gingipain mutants were cultured with or without A. actinomycetemcomitans. Biofilms formed on glass surfaces were analyzed by crystal violet staining and colony counting. Preformed A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms were treated with P. gingivalis culture supernatants. Growth and proteolytic activities of gingipains were also determined. Monocultured P. gingivalis strains exhibited a range of biofilm-formation abilities and proteolytic activities. The ATCC33277 strain, noted for its high biofilm-formation ability and proteolytic activity, was found to be dominant in biofilm co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans. In a time-resolved assay, A. actinomycetemcomitans was primarily the dominant colonizer on a glass surface and subsequently detached in the presence of increasing numbers of ATCC33277. Detachment of preformed A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm was observed by incubation with culture supernatants from highly proteolytic strains. These results suggest that P. gingivalis possesses a competitive advantage over A. actinomycetemcomitans. As the required biofilm-formation abilities and proteolytic activities vary among P. gingivalis strains, the diversity of the competitive advantage is likely to affect disease recurrence during periodontal maintenance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Inhibitory effects of lactoferrin on growth and biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2009-08-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is an iron-binding antimicrobial protein present in saliva and gingival crevicular fluids, and it is possibly associated with host defense against oral pathogens, including periodontopathic bacteria. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro effects of LF-related agents on the growth and biofilm formation of two periodontopathic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, which reside as biofilms in the subgingival plaque. The planktonic growth of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was suppressed for up to 5 h by incubation with >or=130 microg/ml of human LF (hLF), iron-free and iron-saturated bovine LF (apo-bLF and holo-bLF, respectively), and >or=6 microg/ml of bLF-derived antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B (LFcin B); but those effects were weak after 8 h. The biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia over 24 h was effectively inhibited by lower concentrations (>or=8 microg/ml) of various iron-bound forms (the apo, native, and holo forms) of bLF and hLF but not LFcin B. A preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was also reduced by incubation with various iron-bound bLFs, hLF, and LFcin B for 5 h. In an examination of the effectiveness of native bLF when it was used in combination with four antibiotics, it was found that treatment with ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, and minocycline in combination with native bLF for 24 h reduced the amount of a preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis compared with the level of reduction achieved with each agent alone. These results demonstrate the antibiofilm activity of LF with lower iron dependency against P. gingivalis and P. intermedia and the potential usefulness of LF for the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases and as adjunct therapy for periodontal diseases.

  8. The Cytochrome bd Oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis Contributes to Oxidative Stress Resistance and Dioxygen Tolerance.

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    Julia Leclerc

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is an etiologic agent of periodontal disease in humans. The disease is associated with the formation of a mixed oral biofilm which is exposed to oxygen and environmental stress, such as oxidative stress. To investigate possible roles for cytochrome bd oxidase in the growth and persistence of this anaerobic bacterium inside the oral biofilm, mutant strains deficient in cytochrome bd oxidase activity were characterized. This study demonstrated that the cytochrome bd oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis, encoded by cydAB, was able to catalyse O2 consumption and was involved in peroxide and superoxide resistance, and dioxygen tolerance.

  9. Interactions of clinical isolates of Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens with Porphyromonas gingivalis in biofilm formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Graziela Murta Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia e Prevotella nigrescens são espécies comumente associadas Porphyromonas gingivalis. os objetivos foram verificar a co-agregação entre cepas de P. intermedia, P. nigrescens e P. gingivalis; quantificar a biomassa, avaliar a proporção dos microrganismos nos biofilmes mistos; verificar a interferência do co-cultivo pela técnica de dois compartimentos, avaliar os biofilmes em ensaios de Hibridização In Situ (FISH) e verificar o papel dos genes PINA0102 e PIN0398 de P. interm...

  10. Laser antisepsis of Phorphyromonas gingivalis in vitro with dental lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.

    2004-05-01

    It has been shown that both pulsed Nd:YAG (1064nm) and continuous diode (810nm) dental lasers kill pathogenic bacteria (laser antisepsis), but a quantitative method for determining clinical dosimetry does not exist. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to quantify the efficacy of ablation of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) in vitro for two different lasers. The ablation thresholds for the two lasers were compared in the following manner. The energy density was measured as a function of distance from the output of the fiber-optic delivery system. Pg cultures were grown on blood agar plates under standard anaerobic conditions. Blood agar provides an approximation of gingival tissue for the wavelengths tested in having hemoglobin as a primary absorber. Single pulses (Nd:YAG: 100- Œs diode: 100-msec) of laser energy were delivered to Pg colonies and the energy density was increased until the appearance of a small plume was observed coincident with a laser pulse. The energy density at this point defines the ablation threshold. Ablation thresholds to a single pulse were determined for both Pg and for blood agar alone. The large difference in ablation thresholds between the pigmented pathogen and the host matrix for pulsed-Nd:YAG represented a significant therapeutic ratio and Pg was ablated without visible effect on the blood agar. Near threshold the 810-nm diode laser destroyed both the pathogen and the gel. Clinically, the pulsed Nd:YAG may selectively destroy pigmented pathogens leaving the surrounding tissue intact. The 810-nm diode laser may not demonstrate this selectivity due to its longer pulse length and greater absorption by hemoglobin.

  11. Effect of simulated high-altitude hypoxia on Porphyromonas gingivalis

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    Jing-jing HUANG

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of simulated high-altitude hypoxia on the detection rate and endotoxin level of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg of subgingival bacterial plagues in rabbit periodontitis models. Methods Forty male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, namely, normoxia control group (group A1, normoxia experimental group (group A2, hypoxia control group (group B1, and hypoxia experimental group (group B2. Each group included 10 rabbits. Periodontitis models was established in groups A2 and B2 combined by ligating both lower central incisors with steel ligature and feeding periodontitis diets, and then the animals were housed in a hypoxia chamber (simulating 5000m altitude, 23h per day. Groups A1 and A2 were raised normal diet in normoxia environment. After eight weeks, the rabbit periodontitis model was evaluated by observing radiographic features of the X-ray films and histopathologic changes under a light microscope. Subgingival plague sample from periodontal pockets on both lower central incisors were collected for isolation, culture and identification of Pg, and for detection of the endotoxin level. Results The histopathologic observation and X-ray examination results showed that the periodontitis of rabbits in group B2 was significantly more severe than that in group A2. The detection rates of Pg in group A1, A2, B1 and B2 was 0%, 50%, 55% and 95% (P < 0.05. Pg detection rate and endotoxin level were higher in group B2 (95%, 0.46±0.04EU/ml than in group A2 (50%, 0.38±0.02EU/ml, P < 0.05. Conclusions The process speed and damage degree of periodontitis in hypoxic environment is higher than that in normoxic environment. Moreover, the hypoxic environment is more suitable in the colonization of Pg with higher endotoxin level in subgingival plague.

  12. Development and evaluation of a saliva-based chair-side diagnostic for the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis

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    Neil M. O'Brien-Simpson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key pathogen in the polymicrobial biofilm that is associated with the oral disease chronic periodontitis. A number of studies have shown that in humans the level of P. gingivalis in the polymicrobial biofilm is positively correlated with disease progression. The aim of this study was to develop a P. gingivalis diagnostic that has high specificity and sensitivity for P. gingivalis using a range of laboratory and clinical isolates and then compare the efficacy of the diagnostic with RTPCR using samples from chronic periodontitis patients and age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Key parameters for the kit were to use saliva as the biological fluid as this is a most convenient medium for chair-side sampling and to give a positive reading for the reported threshold for detection of 5×105 P. gingivalis cells/mL that indicates disease progression. We initially screened a range of monoclonal antibodies for recognition of the P. gingivalis conserved virulence factor RgpA-Kgp complex and identified two mAbs that could be used in a capture and detection ELISA system. These mAbs were used to formulate and manufacture the GC P. gingivalis saliva diagnostic kit used in the study. To validate the saliva kit, saliva (P. gingivalis free was spiked with known concentrations of viable P. gingivalis whole cells of W50, 381, A7A1-28, and ATCC 33277; P. gingivalis clinical isolates; P. gingivalis vesicles; and the secreted form of the RgpA-Kgp complex. Laboratory findings indicated that the kit was able to detect all laboratory and clinical isolate strains of P. gingivalis at 5×104/mL to 5×105/mL. It was also able to detect the RgpA-Kgp complex and vesicles at 5×104 and 5×105 cell equivalent doses, respectively. Saliva and plaque were then collected from 50 subjects with moderate–severe chronic periodontitis and 50 age- and sex-matched subjects with healthy periodontium. Real-time PCR was utilised to analyse levels of P

  13. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates...... of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin...... testing of B. fragilis group isolates for most relevant antibiotics in routine laboratories....

  14. Influence of age and immunization on development of gingivitis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekic, P; Klausen, B; Friis-Hasché, E

    1989-01-01

    To study the effect of age and antigenic priming on the development of gingivitis, 33 healthy rats were placed in contact with Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Bacteroides gingivalis. On days 0, 3, 7, and 14 after inoculation, the gingival condition...

  15. Active invasion of oral and aortic tissues by Porphyromonas gingivalis in mice causally links periodontitis and atherosclerosis.

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    Irina M Velsko

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is a leading cause of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident, and independent associations with periodontal disease (PD are reported. PD is caused by polymicrobial infections and aggressive immune responses. Genomic DNA of Porphyromonas gingivalis, the best-studied bacterial pathogen associated with severe PD, is detected within atherosclerotic plaque. We examined causal relationships between chronic P. gingivalis oral infection, PD, and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoEnull mice. ApoEnull mice (n = 24 were orally infected with P. gingivalis for 12 and 24 weeks. PD was assessed by standard clinical measurements while the aorta was examined for atherosclerotic lesions and inflammatory markers by array. Systemic inflammatory markers serum amyloid A, nitric oxide, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein were analyzed. P. gingivalis infection elicited specific antibodies and alveolar bone loss. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected viable P. gingivalis within oral epithelium and aorta, and genomic DNA was detected within systemic organs. Aortic plaque area was significantly increased in P. gingivalis-infected mice at 24 weeks (P<0.01. Aortic RNA and protein arrays indicated a strong Th2 response. Chronic oral infection with P. gingivalis results in a specific immune response, significant increases in oral bone resorption, aortic inflammation, viable bacteria in oral epithelium and aorta, and plaque development.

  16. Recognition of Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipain epitopes by natural IgM binding to malondialdehyde modified low-density lipoprotein.

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    S Pauliina Turunen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Increased risk for atherosclerosis is associated with infectious diseases including periodontitis. Natural IgM antibodies recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns on bacteria, and oxidized lipid and protein epitopes on low-density lipoprotein (LDL and apoptotic cells. We aimed to identify epitopes on periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis recognized by natural IgM binding to malondialdehyde (MDA modified LDL. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mouse monoclonal IgM (MDmAb specific for MDA-LDL recognized epitopes on P. gingivalis on flow cytometry and chemiluminescence immunoassays. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with P. gingivalis induced IgM, but not IgG, immune response to MDA-LDL and apoptotic cells. Immunization of LDLR(-/- mice with P. gingivalis induced IgM, but not IgG, immune response to MDA-LDL and diminished aortic lipid deposition. On Western blot MDmAb bound to P. gingivalis fragments identified as arginine-specific gingipain (Rgp by mass spectrometry. Recombinant domains of Rgp produced in E. coli were devoid of phosphocholine epitopes but contained epitopes recognized by MDmAb and human serum IgM. Serum IgM levels to P. gingivalis were associated with anti-MDA-LDL levels in humans. CONCLUSION: Gingipain of P. gingivalis is recognized by natural IgM and shares molecular identity with epitopes on MDA-LDL. These findings suggest a role for natural antibodies in the pathogenesis of two related inflammatory diseases, atherosclerosis and periodontitis.

  17. Diagnostic evaluation of a nanobody with picomolar affinity toward the protease RgpB from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Leonard, Paul; Kaczmarek, Jakub Zbigniew; Veillard, Florian; Enghild, Jan Johannes; O'Kennedy, Richard; Sroka, Aneta; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2011-08-15

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the major periodontitis-causing pathogens. P. gingivalis secretes a group of proteases termed gingipains, and in this study we have used the RgpB gingipain as a biomarker for P. gingivalis. We constructed a naive camel nanobody library and used phage display to select one nanobody toward RgpB with picomolar affinity. The nanobody was used in an inhibition assay for detection of RgpB in buffer as well as in saliva. The nanobody was highly specific for RgpB given that it did not bind to the homologous gingipain HRgpA. This indicated the presence of a binding epitope within the immunoglobulin-like domain of RgpB. A subtractive inhibition assay was used to demonstrate that the nanobody could bind native RgpB in the context of intact cells. The nanobody bound exclusively to the P. gingivalis membrane-bound RgpB isoform (mt-RgpB) and to secreted soluble RgpB. Further cross-reactivity studies with P. gingivalis gingipain deletion mutants showed that the nanobody could discriminate between native RgpB and native Kgp and RgpA in complex bacterial samples. This study demonstrates that RgpB can be used as a specific biomarker for P. gingivalis detection and that the presented nanobody-based assay could supplement existing methods for P. gingivalis detection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and its relationship with herpesvirus in Indian subjects with chronic periodontitis: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak M Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen that is commonly harbored in the dental plaque of humans. The aim of this study was to look into the prevalence of P. gingivalis and its association with herpesvirus in Indian subjects. This is probably the first study on the association of this bacterium with herpesvirus in Indians. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consists of 200 subjects, with 100 subjects each in the healthy group and the chronic periodontitis (CP group. Upon plaque collection, one portion of the samples was immediately plated, on culture media that is selective for P. gingivalis. Total colony-forming units (CFU/mL from each plate was recorded. The remaining plaque sample was subjected to DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed using specific primers for Cytomegalovirus (CMV and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV. The data are analyzed using the chi-square test, Spearman's rho correlation coefficient, and Mann–Whitney U test. Results: P. gingivalis was detected in 66% of the subjects with CP and in 40% in the healthy group, and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.00023. The correlation of clinical parameters with P. gingivalis showed a significant positive correlation, indicating that higher levels of clinical parameters were associated with higher CFUs of P. gingivalis in culture. The comparison of the presence of P. gingivalis between herpesvirus-negative and -positive cases showed that CMV-positive cases had significantly higher levels of this bacterium. Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the earlier finding of P. gingivalis presence in significantly higher levels in CP subjects and in CMV-positive sites. In addition, there was a positive association of the bacterium with clinical parameters.

  19. Xylitol, an anticaries agent, exhibits potent inhibition of inflammatory responses in human THP-1-derived macrophages infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunjoo; Na, Hee Sam; Kim, Sheon Min; Wallet, Shannon; Cha, Seunghee; Chung, Jin

    2014-06-01

    Xylitol is a well-known anticaries agent and has been used for the prevention and treatment of dental caries. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of xylitol are evaluated for possible use in the prevention and treatment of periodontal infections. Cytokine expression was stimulated in THP-1 (human monocyte cell line)-derived macrophages by live Porphyromonas gingivalis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a commercial multiplex assay kit were used to determine the effects of xylitol on live P. gingivalis-induced production of cytokine. The effects of xylitol on phagocytosis and the production of nitric oxide were determined using phagocytosis assay, viable cell count, and Griess reagent. The effects of xylitol on P. gingivalis adhesion were determined by immunostaining, and costimulatory molecule expression was examined by flow cytometry. Live P. gingivalis infection increased the production of representative proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, in a multiplicity of infection- and time-dependent manner. Live P. gingivalis also enhanced the release of cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-12 p40, eotaxin, interferon γ-induced protein 10, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1. The pretreatment of xylitol significantly inhibited the P. gingivalis-induced cytokines production and nitric oxide production. In addition, xylitol inhibited the attachment of live P. gingivalis on THP-1-derived macrophages. Furthermore, xylitol exerted antiphagocytic activity against both Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis. These findings suggest that xylitol acts as an anti-inflammatory agent in THP-1-derived macrophages infected with live P. gingivalis, which supports its use in periodontitis.

  20. Altered T-cell responses by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Hazem Khalaf

    Full Text Available Several studies support an association between the chronic inflammatory diseases periodontitis and atherosclerosis with a crucial role for the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. However, the interplay between this pathogen and the adaptive immune system, including T-cells, is sparsely investigated. Here we used Jurkat T-cells to determine the effects of P. gingivalis on T-cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. We show that viable P. gingivalis targets IL-2 expression at the protein level. Initial cellular events, including ROS production and [Ca(2+](i, were elevated in response to P. gingivalis, but AP-1 and NF-κB activity dropped below basal levels and T-cells were unable to sustain stable IL-2 accumulation. IL-2 was partially restored by Leupeptin, but not by Cathepsin B Inhibitor, indicating an involvement of Rgp proteinases in the suppression of IL-2 accumulation. This was further confirmed by purified Rgp that caused a dose-dependent decrease in IL-2 levels. These results provide new insights of how this periodontal pathogen evades the host adaptive immune system by inhibiting IL-2 accumulation and thus attenuating T-cell proliferation and cellular communication.

  1. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana

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    Alejandra Herrera Herrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase. The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration. Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future.

  2. Decreased interleukin-2 responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Tanja Skuldbøl; Løbner, Morten; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    with disease-relevant pathogens. METHODS: Mononuclear cells (MNCs) from 10 white patients with GAgP and 10 white controls were stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 33277 (Pg), Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 49256 (Fn), and similar...

  3. Cytokine production induced by non-encapsulated and encapsulated Porphyromonas gingivalis strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, A.; Dekker, D.C.; van Pampus, M.G.; Harmsen, H.J.; Aarnoudse, J.G.; Abbas, F.; Faas, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although the exact reason is not known, encapsulated gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are more virulent than non-encapsulated strains. Since difference in virulence properties may be due to difference in cytokine production following recognition of the bacteria or their

  4. Candida and Porphyromonas gingivalis: the effect on wound closure in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverman, Thijs M.; Laheij, Alexa M. G. A.; de Soet, Johannes J.; de Lange, Jan; Rozema, Frederik R.

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms play a role in oral mucositis after cancer therapy. The current study explored the hypothesis that Candida spp. alone and together with Porphyromonas gingivalis cause delayed healing of oral ulcerations due to the inhibition of wound closure. An in vitro scratch assay model was used

  5. Effects of aging on endotoxin tolerance induced by lipopolysaccharides derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Li, Hui; Yang, Mi-Fang; Shu, Wei; Sun, Meng-Jun; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a bacterially induced chronic inflammatory disease. Exposure of the host to periodontal pathogens and their virulence factors induces a state of hyporesponsiveness to subsequent stimulations, termed endotoxin tolerance. Aging has a profound effect on immune response to bacteria challenge. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of aging on endotoxin tolerance induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) LPS in murine peritoneal macrophages. We studied the cytokine production (TNF-α and IL-10) and Toll-like receptor 2, 4 (TLR2, 4) gene and protein expressions in peritoneal macrophages from young (2-month-old) and middle-aged (12-month-old) ICR mice following single or repeated P. gingivalis LPS or E. coli LPS stimulation. Pretreatment of peritoneal macrophages with P. gingivalis LPS or E. coli LPS resulted in a reduction in TNF-α production and an increase in IL-10 production upon secondary stimulation (plead to the incontrollable periodontal inflammation in older adults.

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis within placental villous mesenchyme and umbilical cord stroma is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanterpool, Sizzle F.; Been, Jasper V.; Houben, Michiel L.; Nikkels, Peter G J; De Krijger, Ronald R.; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Kramer, Boris W.; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Reyes, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), a common oral pathobiont, is implicated in preterm birth. Our aim was to determine if the location of Pg within placental and/or umbilical cord sections was associated with a specific delivery diagnosis at preterm delivery (histologic

  7. Protein Profile of Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis Cell Isolated from Chronic Periodontitis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Setyadarma Loviamanda

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis are two of the specific microorganisms that frequently occurs in chronic periodontitis. As protein plays an important role in bacteria's life and its virulence factor, we tried to explore variation in P. intermedia and P. gingivalis cell protein profile which isolated from different periodontl pocket depth of chronic periodontitis patient. P. intermedia and P. gingivalis were identified using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR technique, and its protein profile were evaluated using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate - Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. SDS-PAGE result showed that there were significant difference between protein profile of P. intermedia cell which isolated from slhallow and deep pocket with dominant proteins of molecular weight 200 kDa, 110 kDa, 40 kDa, and 25 kDa, however, relationship between pocket depth and P. intermedia cell protein pofile could not be concluded because unrepresentative number of P. intermedia colonies. In the other hand the variation in P. gingivalis cell protein profile was not influenced by pocket depth with dominant protein called hemin binding protein (HbBp.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v17i1.110

  8. Entamoeba gingivalis infection in Okigwe Urban,I mo State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba gingivalis is often regarded as a harmless parasite and thus not much attention is paid to it. This study aims at highlighting the pathogenicity of this parasite. Swabs of the buccal surfaces were collected from 764 inhabitants of Okigwe Urban between December 2003 and August 2004.

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

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    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  10. Energy supply for dinitrogen fixation by Azotobacter vinelandii and by bacteroids of Rhizobium leguminosarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laane, N.C.M.

    1980-01-01

    The central issue of this thesis is how obligate aerobes, such as Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids and Azotobacter vinelandii, generate and regulate the energy supply (in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents) for nitrogenase.
    In an effective

  11. Prospects for treatment of Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated disease – immune-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Reynolds

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth associated with a polymicrobial biofilm (subgingival plaque accreted to the tooth which results in destruction of the tooth's supporting tissues. A characteristic feature of the disease-associated plaque is the emergence of proteolytic species. One of these species, Porphyromonas gingivalis has recently been described as a keystone pathogen as it dysregulates the host immune response to favour the polymicrobial biofilm disrupting homeostasis to cause dysbiosis and disease. The level of P. gingivalis in subgingival plaque above threshold levels (~10% of total bacterial cell load has been demonstrated to predict imminent clinical attachment loss (disease progression in humans. Porphyromonas gingivalis is found as microcolonies in the superficial layers of subgingival plaque adjacent to the periodontal pocket epithelium which helps explain the strong association with underlying tissue inflammation and disease at relatively low proportions (10% of the total bacterial cell load of the plaque. The mouse periodontitis model has been used to show that inflammation is essential to allow establishment of P. gingivalis at the levels in plaque (10% or greater of total bacterial cell load necessary to produce dysbiosis and disease. The extracellular proteinases “gingipains” (RgpA/B and Kgp of P. gingivalis have been implicated as major virulence factors that are critical for dysbiosis and disease. This has resulted in the strategy of targeting the gingipains by vaccination. We have produced a recombinant immunogen which induces an immune response in mice that neutralises the proteolytic and host/bacterial binding functions of the gingipains. Using this immunogen as a therapeutic vaccine in mice already infected with P. gingivalis, we have shown that inflammation and alveolar bone loss can be substantially reduced. The protection was characterised by a predominant Th2

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection induced reproductive abnormalities in mice

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    Ke-min WEI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To establish a pregnant mouse model infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g, and investigate the relationship of P.g infection to prematurity and associated birth abnormalities. Methods  Fifty two female mice were randomly divided into P.g infection group (n=26 and control group (n=26. Mice in P.g infection group were anesthetized, the pulp cavity of the first molar was opened and directly injected with W83 strain P.g, and the tooth was then filled. Six weeks after infection, the mice were mated with males and the formation of vagina plug was recorded as 0d. The P.g extracted from the granulation tissue in tooth root was cultivated. The pregnant days and the connatal body weight of infant mouse were recorded, the serum and placental tissue were collected to assess the systemic and local conditions during pregnancy. Results  After periodontal P.g infection, the TNF-α, IL-17, IL -6 and IL -1βlevels in peripheral blood sera increased significantly. The average gestation was shorter in P.g infection group (18.25d than in control group (20.45d, P<0.01, and the connatal body weight of infant mouse was also less in the former than in the latter (P<0.01. Immunohistochemistry and PCR revealed the existence of P.g in placenta tissue. P.g infection caused premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption, degeneration and necrosis of trophoblastic and endothelial cells; significantly increased the number of neutrophils and macrophages in placenta tissues, and increased the expression of local TNF-αand COX-2 inflammatory factors at the same time. In P.g infection group, the expressions of CD-31 in endothelial cells of placenta tissues and the apoptotic factor caspase-3 decreased, and the DNA oxidative damage index 8-OHdG increased. Conclusions  P.g infection in female mice may cause premature birth and lower connatal body weight of infant mouse, and increase the expression of serous and local inflammatory factors in the placenta

  13. Diagnostic evaluation of a nanobody with picomolar affinity toward the protease RgpB from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    OpenAIRE

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Leonard, Paul; Kaczmarek, Jakub Zbigniew; Veillard, Florian; Enghild, Jan Johannes; O'Kennedy, Richard; Sroka, Aneta; Clausen, Rasmus Praetorius; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the major periodontitis-causing pathogens. P. gingivalis secretes a group of proteases, termed gingipains, and in this study we have utilized the RgpB gingipain as a biomarker for P. gingivalis. We constructed a naïve camel nanobody library and used phage display to select one nanobody towards RgpB with picomolar affinity. The nanobody was used in an inhibition assay for detection of RgpB in buffer as well as in saliva. The nanobody was highly specific for R...

  14. Genomic comparison of invasive and rare non-invasive strains reveals Porphyromonas gingivalis genetic polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Dolgilevich

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are shown to invade human cells in vitro with different invasion efficiencies, varying by up to three orders of magnitude.We tested the hypothesis that invasion-associated interstrain genomic polymorphisms are present in P. gingivalis and that putative invasion-associated genes can contribute to P. gingivalis invasion.Using an invasive (W83 and the only available non-invasive P. gingivalis strain (AJW4 and whole genome microarrays followed by two separate software tools, we carried out comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis.We identified 68 annotated and 51 hypothetical open reading frames (ORFs that are polymorphic between these strains. Among these are surface proteins, lipoproteins, capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis enzymes, regulatory and immunoreactive proteins, integrases, and transposases often with abnormal GC content and clustered on the chromosome. Amplification of selected ORFs was used to validate the approach and the selection. Eleven clinical strains were investigated for the presence of selected ORFs. The putative invasion-associated ORFs were present in 10 of the isolates. The invasion ability of three isogenic mutants, carrying deletions in PG0185, PG0186, and PG0982 was tested. The PG0185 (ragA and PG0186 (ragB mutants had 5.1×103-fold and 3.6×103-fold decreased in vitro invasion ability, respectively.The annotation of divergent ORFs suggests deficiency in multiple genes as a basis for P. gingivalis non-invasive phenotype. Access the supplementary material to this article: Supplement, table (see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  15. Transcriptional Profiling of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Response to Porphyromonas gingivalis Secreted Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Durga; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen highly implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. It can exert its effects to a number of cells, including osteogenic bone marrow stromal cells which are important for homeostastic capacity of the tissues. By employing gene microarray technology, this study aimed to describe the overall transcriptional events (>2-fold regulation) elicited by P. gingivalis secreted products in bone marrow stromal cells, and to dissect further the categories of genes involved in bone metabolism, inflammatory and immune responses. After 6 h of challenge with P. gingivalis, 271 genes were up-regulated whereas 209 genes were down-regulated, whereas after 24 h, these numbers were 259 and 109, respectively. The early (6 h) response was characterised by regulation of genes associated with inhibition of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and loss of structural integrity, whereas the late (24 h) response was characterised by induction of chemokines, cytokines and their associated intracellular pathways (such as NF-κB), mediators of connective tissue and bone destruction, and suppression of regulators of osteogenic differentiation. The most strongly up-regulated genes were lipocalin 2 (LCN2) and serum amyloid A3 (SAA3), both encoding for proteins of the acute phase inflammatory response. Collectively, these transcriptional changes elicited by P. gingivalis denote that the fundamental cellular functions are hindered, and that the cells acquire a phenotype commensurate with propagated innate immune response and inflammatory-mediated tissue destruction. In conclusion, the global transcriptional profile of bone marrow stromal cells in response to P. gingivalis is marked by deregulated homeostatic functions, with implications in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:22937121

  16. Strawberry Extract’s Effects on Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis Biofilms in vitro

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    Armelia Sari Widyarman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis are oral bacteria related to root canal infection and periodontal disease pathogenesis. Strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa fruit are rich in vitamins and minerals, have antibacterial and antioxidant effects. Objective: This study investigated the inhibition effect of strawberry extract on monospecies and multispecies E. faecalis and P. gingivalis bacteria grown as biofilms in vitro. Methods: This study used E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. It analyzed the effect of strawberry extract on bacteria biofilm formation using a biofilm assay on microplate wells. Five concentrations of strawberry extracts were used (100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.25%, and the inhibition effect was observed after a 1h, 3h, 6h, and 24h incubation period. Biofilms without the strawberry extract were used as the negative controls, and crystal violet and safranin (0.5%w/v were used to count the biofilm mass. The biofilms grown on microplates were counted using an ELISA reader at 450 nm after 200 mL of 90% ethanol was added to attract the absorbed stain. The strawberry extract inhibition effectiveness on the biofilm formation of each bacterium tested was analyzed using one-way Anova, where p<0.05 was defined as a significant difference. Result: The strawberry extract inhibited the tested monospecies and multispecies bacteria biofilm formation. The optimal strawberry extract concentration for the inhibition of either monospecies biofilms was 100%. However, the optimal incubation time for the strawberry extract to inhibit the multispecies biofilm formation was 24h, which was the study’s biofilm maturity phase. Conclusions: The 100% strawberry extract concentration inhibited the formation of both the monospecies and multispecies E. faecalis and P. gingivalis biofilms. Future studies are needed to evaluate the potential of strawberry extract as an alternative dental

  17. An RNA-seq screen of P. gingivalis LPS treated human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yufeng; Sun, Mengjun; Xia, Yiru; Shu, Rong

    2018-04-01

    In gingival tissues, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is the most critical stimulator for inducing inflammatory response. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) are the major constituents of gingival connective tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate P. gingivalis LPS induced whole transcriptional profile in HGFs and the potential crosstalk between microRNAs (miRNAs) and inflammatory cytokines. RNA-seq was performed on HGFs with and without P. gingivalis LPS treatment. The gene expression of selected inflammatory cytokines and miRNAs induced by LPS at different time points was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein expression of chemokines was further confirmed by ELISA. Interestingly, most of the significantly changed genes (198/204) were up-regulated at 4 h after 10 μg/ml LPS stimulation, including inflammatory cytokines and miRNAs. Confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, the mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 showed single up-regulation peak (4 h/6 h) after 1 μg/ml and 10 μg/ml LPS treatment. Similarly, 1 μg/ml LPS induced single up-regulation peak (8 h) of miRNA-146a, -146b and -155 expression. However, 10 μg/ml LPS induced the increased expression of miRNA-146a and -155 at both early stage (2 h/4 h) and late stage (24 h). Taken together, we investigated P. gingivalis LPS induced whole transcriptional profile, and the different behaviors of miRNA expression induced by different doses of LPS in HGFs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional Analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmistrz, Michał; Dudek, Bartosz; Staniec, Dominika; Rodriguez Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Bochtler, Matthias; Potempa, Jan; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) system provides prokaryotic cells with an adaptive and heritable immune response to foreign genetic elements, such as viruses, plasmids, and transposons. It is present in the majority of Archaea and almost half of species of Bacteria. Porphyromonas gingivalis is an important human pathogen that has been proven to be an etiological agent of periodontitis and has been linked to systemic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease. At least 95% of clinical strains of P. gingivalis carry CRISPR arrays, suggesting that these arrays play an important function in vivo. Here we show that all four CRISPR arrays present in the P. gingivalis W83 genome are transcribed. For one of the arrays, we demonstrate in vivo activity against double-stranded DNA constructs containing protospacer sequences accompanied at the 3' end by an NGG protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM). Most of the 44 spacers present in the genome of P. gingivalis W83 share no significant similarity with any known sequences, although 4 spacers are similar to sequences from bacteria found in the oral cavity and the gastrointestinal tract. Four spacers match genomic sequences of the host; however, none of these is flanked at its 3' terminus by the appropriate PAM element. The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) system is a unique system that provides prokaryotic cells with an adaptive and heritable immunity. In this report, we show that the CRISPR-Cas system of P. gingivalis, an important human pathogen associated with periodontitis and possibly also other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease, is active and provides protection from foreign genetic elements. Importantly, the data presented here may be useful for better understanding the communication between cells in larger bacterial communities and

  19. Polysaccharides utilization in human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: comparative genomics reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Godzik, Adam; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-12-12

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the human gut microbiota, is characterized by its ability to utilize a wide variety of polysaccharides using the extensive saccharolytic machinery that is controlled by an expanded repertoire of transcription factors (TFs). The availability of genomic sequences for multiple Bacteroides species opens an opportunity for their comparative analysis to enable characterization of their metabolic and regulatory networks. A comparative genomics approach was applied for the reconstruction and functional annotation of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Bacteroides genomes. Bioinformatics analysis of promoter regions revealed putative DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 31 orthologous TFs in the Bacteroides. Among the analyzed TFs there are 4 SusR-like regulators, 16 AraC-like hybrid two-component systems (HTCSs), and 11 regulators from other families. Novel DNA motifs of HTCSs and SusR-like regulators in the Bacteroides have the common structure of direct repeats with a long spacer between two conserved sites. The inferred regulatory network in B. thetaiotaomicron contains 308 genes encoding polysaccharide and sugar catabolic enzymes, carbohydrate-binding and transport systems, and TFs. The analyzed TFs control pathways for utilization of host and dietary glycans to monosaccharides and their further interconversions to intermediates of the central metabolism. The reconstructed regulatory network allowed us to suggest and refine specific functional assignments for sugar catabolic enzymes and transporters, providing a substantial improvement to the existing metabolic models for B. thetaiotaomicron. The obtained collection of reconstructed TF regulons is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov).

  20. Possible Origins of CTnBST, a Conjugative Transposon Found Recently in a Human Colonic Bacteroides Strain▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David J.; Shoemaker, Nadja B.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2007-01-01

    A previous survey of Bacteroides isolates suggested that the ermB gene entered Bacteroides spp. recently. Previously, ermB had been found almost exclusively in gram-positive bacteria. In one Bacteroides strain, ermB was located on 100-kb conjugative transposon (CTn) CTnBST. To assess the possible origin of this CTn, we obtained the full DNA sequence of CTnBST and used this information to investigate its possible origins. Over one-half of CTnBST had high sequence identity to a putative CTn found in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis YCH46. This included the ends of the CTn and genes involved in integration, transfer, and excision. However, the region around the ermB gene contained genes that appeared to originate from gram-positive organisms. In particular, a 7-kb segment containing the ermB gene was 100% identical to an ermB region found in the genome of the gram-positive bacterium Arcanobacterium pyogenes. A screen of Bacteroides isolates whose DNA cross-hybridized with a CTnBST probe revealed that several isolates did not carry the 7-kb region, implying that the acquisition of this region may be more recent than the acquisition of the entire CTnBST element by Bacteroides spp. We have also identified other Bacteroides isolates that carry a slightly modified 7-kb region but have no other traces of CTnBST. Thus, it is possible that this 7-kb region could itself be part of a mobile element that has inserted in a Bacteroides CTn. Our results show that CTnBST is a hybrid element which has acquired a portion of its coding region from gram-positive bacteria but which may originally have come from Bacteroides spp. or some related species. PMID:17483268

  1. Possible origins of CTnBST, a conjugative transposon found recently in a human colonic Bacteroides strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David J; Shoemaker, Nadja B; Salyers, Abigail A

    2007-07-01

    A previous survey of Bacteroides isolates suggested that the ermB gene entered Bacteroides spp. recently. Previously, ermB had been found almost exclusively in gram-positive bacteria. In one Bacteroides strain, ermB was located on 100-kb conjugative transposon (CTn) CTnBST. To assess the possible origin of this CTn, we obtained the full DNA sequence of CTnBST and used this information to investigate its possible origins. Over one-half of CTnBST had high sequence identity to a putative CTn found in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis YCH46. This included the ends of the CTn and genes involved in integration, transfer, and excision. However, the region around the ermB gene contained genes that appeared to originate from gram-positive organisms. In particular, a 7-kb segment containing the ermB gene was 100% identical to an ermB region found in the genome of the gram-positive bacterium Arcanobacterium pyogenes. A screen of Bacteroides isolates whose DNA cross-hybridized with a CTnBST probe revealed that several isolates did not carry the 7-kb region, implying that the acquisition of this region may be more recent than the acquisition of the entire CTnBST element by Bacteroides spp. We have also identified other Bacteroides isolates that carry a slightly modified 7-kb region but have no other traces of CTnBST. Thus, it is possible that this 7-kb region could itself be part of a mobile element that has inserted in a Bacteroides CTn. Our results show that CTnBST is a hybrid element which has acquired a portion of its coding region from gram-positive bacteria but which may originally have come from Bacteroides spp. or some related species.

  2. High resistance against clindamycin, metronidazole and amoxicillin in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolates of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Carlos M; López, Mayra A; Guzmán, Isabel C

    2010-11-01

    To test the antimicrobial sensitivity of two periodontal pathogens to a panel of five orally administrable antibiotics in periodontal disease. A total of 69 isolates of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis were processed using culture and biochemical tests. Selected colonies of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of clindamycin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, moxifloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Susceptibility testing revealed a sensitivity of 100% of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis to moxifloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid but moderate susceptibilities were found for the rest of antibiotics agents evaluated. The widespread use of antibiotics is reflected in the level of resistance of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis in patients with periodontal infections. This suggests that antibiotic susceptibility testing is necessary to determine efficacy of antimicrobial agents. Clinical studies with antibiotics should take these differences into account.

  3. Phenotypic identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis validated with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Thomas E; Sautter, Jacqueline D; Getreu, Adam; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2016-05-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major bacterial pathogen in human periodontitis. This study used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to assess the accuracy of a rapid phenotypic identification scheme for detection of cultivable P. gingivalis in human subgingival plaque biofilms. A total of 314 fresh cultivable subgingival isolates from 38 adults with chronic periodontitis were presumptively identified on anaerobically-incubated enriched Brucella blood agar primary isolation plates as P. gingivalis based on dark-pigmented colony morphology, lack of a brick-red autofluorescence reaction under long-wave ultraviolet light, and a positive CAAM fluorescence test for trypsin-like enzyme activity. Each presumptive P. gingivalis isolate, and a panel of other human subgingival bacterial species, were subjected to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis using a benchtop mass spectrometer equipped with software containing mass spectra for P. gingivalis in its reference library of bacterial protein profiles. A MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry log score of ≥1.7 was required for species identification of the subgingival isolates. All 314 (100%) presumptive P. gingivalis subgingival isolates were confirmed as P. gingivalis with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis (Cohen's kappa coefficient = 1.0). MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry log scores between 1.7 and 1.9, and ≥2.0, were found for 92 (29.3%) and 222 (70.7%), respectively, of the presumptive P. gingivalis clinical isolates. No other tested bacterial species was identified as P. gingivalis by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Rapid phenotypic identification of cultivable P. gingivalis in human subgingival biofilm specimens was found to be 100% accurate with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. These findings provide validation for the continued use of P. gingivalis research data based on this species identification methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dental Infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis Induces Preterm Birth in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ao

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have revealed a link between dental infection and preterm birth or low birth weight (PTB/LBW, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Progress in understanding the associated mechanisms has been limited in part by lack of an animal model for chronic infection-induced PTB/LBW, mimicking pregnancy under conditions of periodontitis. We aimed to establish a mouse model of chronic periodontitis in order to investigate the link between periodontitis and PTB/LBW.To establish chronic inflammation beginning with dental infection, we surgically opened mouse (female, 8 weeks old 1st molar pulp chambers and directly infected with w83 strain Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g., a keystone periodontal pathogen. Mating was initiated at 6 wks post-infection, by which time dental granuloma tissue had developed and live P.g. was cultured from extracted tooth root, which serves as a persistent source of P.g. The gestational day (gd and birth weight were recorded during for P.g.-infected and control mice, and serum and placental tissues were collected at gd 15 to evaluate the systemic and local conditions during pregnancy.Dental infection with P.g. significantly increased circulating TNF-α (2.5-fold, IL-17 (2-fold, IL-6 (2-fold and IL-1β (2-fold. The P.g.-infected group delivered at gd 18.25 vs. gd 20.45 in the non-infected control (NC group (p < 0.01, and pups exhibited LBW compared to controls (p < 0.01. P.g. was localized to placental tissues by immunohistochemistry and PCR, and defects in placental tissues of P.g. infected mice included premature rupture of membrane, placental detachment, degenerative changes in trophoblasts and endothelial cells, including necrotic areas. P.g. infection caused significantly increased numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs and macrophages in placental tissues, associated with increased local expression of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α and COX-2. Further placental tissue

  5. Association of Porphyromonas gingivalis with high levels of stress-induced hormone cortisol in chronic periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Carlos M; Guzmán, Isabel C

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the occurrence of periodontopathogens with cortisol levels in chronic periodontitis patients. Seventy-five chronic periodontitis patients were invited to participate in the present study. Cortisol levels in serum were measured using an immunoassay method. Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected by polymerase chain reaction using primers designed to target the respective 16S rRNA gene sequences. Severe chronic periodontitis patients showed higher mean levels of cortisol (P < 0.05). Twenty-six patients had hypercortisolemia. High cortisol levels showed a positive significant correlation with P. gingivalis (r = 0.237, P < 0.01). Of the 26 patients with hypercortisolemia, 81% had P. gingivalis, of which 86% had severe chronic periodontitis (P < 0.001). There were higher levels of cortisol with the presence of P. gingivalis (478.65 ± 122.57 vs 402.58 ± 139.60, P = 0.01). The adjusted logistic regression model showed a significant association between high cortisol levels and P. gingivalis (odds ratio = 1.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.6-1.8). This research offers support for the association between P. gingivalis and higher levels of cortisol in chronic periodontitis patients. These results suggest that high levels of cortisol could increase the occurrence of P. gingivalis in the biofilm. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Heme acquisition mechanisms of Porphyromonas gingivalis - strategies used in a polymicrobial community in a heme-limited host environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, J W; Olczak, T

    2017-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a main etiologic agent and key pathogen responsible for initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis requires heme as a source of iron and protoporphyrin IX for its survival and the ability to establish an infection. Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to accumulate a defensive cell-surface heme-containing pigment in the form of μ-oxo bisheme. The main sources of heme for P. gingivalis in vivo are hemoproteins present in saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and erythrocytes. To acquire heme, P. gingivalis uses several mechanisms. Among them, the best characterized are those employing hemagglutinins, hemolysins, and gingipains (Kgp, RgpA, RgpB), TonB-dependent outer-membrane receptors (HmuR, HusB, IhtA), and hemophore-like proteins (HmuY, HusA). Proteins involved in intracellular heme transport, storage, and processing are less well characterized (e.g. PgDps). Importantly, P. gingivalis may also use the heme acquisition systems of other bacteria to fulfill its own heme requirements. Porphyromonas gingivalis displays a novel paradigm for heme acquisition from hemoglobin, whereby the Fe(II)-containing oxyhemoglobin molecule must first be oxidized to methemoglobin to facilitate heme release. This process not only involves P. gingivalis arginine- and lysine-specific gingipains, but other proteases (e.g. interpain A from Prevotella intermedia) or pyocyanin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Porphyromonas gingivalis is then able to fully proteolyze the more susceptible methemoglobin substrate to release free heme or to wrest heme from it directly through the use of the HmuY hemophore. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Porphyromonas gingivalis/Host Interactome Shows Enrichment in GWASdb Genes Related to Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris J. Carter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is of established etiology in which polymicrobial synergistic ecology has become dysbiotic under the influence of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Following breakdown of the host's protective oral tissue barriers, P. gingivalis migrates to developing inflammatory pathologies that associate with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Periodontal disease is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders (CVD, type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM, AD and other chronic diseases, whilst T2DM exacerbates periodontitis. This study analyzed the relationship between the P. gingivalis/host interactome and the genes identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the aforementioned conditions using data from GWASdb (P < 1E-03 and, in some cases, from the NCBI/EBI GWAS database (P < 1E-05. Gene expression data from periodontitis or P. gingivalis microarray was compared to microarray datasets from the AD hippocampus and/or from carotid artery plaques. The results demonstrated that the host genes of the P. gingivalis interactome were significantly enriched in genes deposited in GWASdb genes related to cognitive disorders, AD and dementia, and its co-morbid conditions T2DM, obesity, and CVD. The P. gingivalis/host interactome was also enriched in GWAS genes from the more stringent NCBI-EBI database for AD, atherosclerosis and T2DM. The misregulated genes in periodontitis tissue or P. gingivalis infected macrophages also matched those in the AD hippocampus or atherosclerotic plaques. Together, these data suggest important gene/environment interactions between P. gingivalis and susceptibility genes or gene expression changes in conditions where periodontal disease is a contributory factor.

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase, a key contributor in the pathogenesis of experimental periodontal disease and experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, Neville; Bright, Richard; Marino, Victor; Marchant, Ceilidh; Cantley, Melissa; Haynes, David; Butler, Catherine; Dashper, Stuart; Reynolds, Eric; Bartold, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the suggested role of Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) in the relationship between the aetiology of periodontal disease and experimentally induced arthritis and the possible association between these two conditions. A genetically modified PAD-deficient strain of P. gingivalis W50 was produced. The effect of this strain, compared to the wild type, in an established murine model for experimental periodontitis and experimental arthritis was assessed. Experimental periodontitis was induced following oral inoculation with the PAD-deficient and wild type strains of P. gingivalis. Experimental arthritis was induced via the collagen antibody induction process and was monitored by assessment of paw swelling and micro-CT analysis of the radio-carpal joints. Experimental periodontitis was monitored by micro CT scans of the mandible and histological assessment of the periodontal tissues around the mandibular molars. Serum levels of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and P. gingivalis were assessed by ELISA. The development of experimental periodontitis was significantly reduced in the presence of the PAD-deficient P. gingivalis strain. When experimental arthritis was induced in the presence of the PAD-deficient strain there was less paw swelling, less erosive bone damage to the joints and reduced serum ACPA levels when compared to the wild type P. gingivalis inoculated group. This study has demonstrated that a PAD-deficient strain of P. gingivalis was associated with significantly reduced periodontal inflammation. In addition the extent of experimental arthritis was significantly reduced in animals exposed to prior induction of periodontal disease through oral inoculation of the PAD-deficient strain versus the wild type. This adds further evidence to the potential role for P. gingivalis and its PAD in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and exacerbation of arthritis. Further studies are now needed to elucidate the mechanisms

  9. NOX1/2 activation in human gingival fibroblasts by Fusobacterium nucleatum facilitates attachment of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sun Hee; Song, Ji-Eun; Kim, Suhee; Cho, Sung-Hyun; Lim, Yun Kyong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kook, Min-Suk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal diseases are infectious polymicrobial inflammatory diseases that lead to destruction of the periodontal ligament, gingiva, and alveolar bone. Sequential colonization of a broad range of bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, is an important phenomenon in this disease model. F. nucleatum is a facultative anaerobic species thought to be a key mediator of dental plaque maturation due to its extensive coaggregation with other oral bacteria, while P. gingivalis is an obligate anaerobic species that induces gingival inflammation by secreting various virulence factors. The formation of a bacterial complex by these two species is central to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during bacterial infections and are involved in intracellular signaling. However, the impact of oral bacteria-induced ROS on the ecology of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis has yet to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated ROS production induced in primary human oral cells by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and its effect on the formation of their bacterial complexes and further host cell apoptosis. We found that in primary human gingival fibroblasts (GFs), two NADPH oxidase isoforms, NOX1 and NOX2, were activated in response to F. nucleatum infection but not P. gingivalis infection. Accordingly, increased NADPH oxidase activity and production of superoxide anion were observed in GFs after F. nucleatum infection, but not after P. gingivalis infection. Interestingly, in NOX1, NOX2, or NOX1/NOX2 knockdown cells, the number of P. gingivalis decreased when the cells were coinfected with F. nucleatum. A similar pattern of host cell apoptosis was observed. This implies that F. nucleatum contributes to attachment of P. gingivalis by triggering activation of NADPH oxidase in host cells, which may provide an environment more favorable to strict anaerobic bacteria and have a subsequent effect on apoptosis of

  10. Catecholamines promote the expression of virulence and oxidative stress genes in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, T S; Closs, P; Poppi, T; Franco, G C; Cortelli, J R; Groppo, F C; Cogo, K

    2014-10-01

    Stress has been identified as an important risk factor in the development of many infectious diseases, including periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative oral anaerobic bacterium, is considered an important pathogen in chronic periodontitis. Microorganisms, including P. gingivalis, that participate in infectious diseases have been shown to respond to catecholamines released during stress processes by modifying their growth and virulence. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline on the growth, antimicrobial susceptibility and gene expression in P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis was incubated in the presence of adrenaline and noradrenaline (100 μm) for different time-periods in rich (Tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.2% yeast extract, 5 μg/mL of hemin and 1 μg/mL of menadione) and poor (serum-SAPI minimal medium and serum-SAPI minimal medium supplemented with 5 μg/mL of hemin and 1 μg/mL of menadione) media, and growth was evaluated based on absorbance at 660 nm. Bacterial susceptibility to metronidazole was examined after exposure to adrenaline and noradrenaline. The expression of genes involved in iron acquisition, stress oxidative protection and virulence were also evaluated using RT-quantitative PCR. Catecholamines did not interfere with the growth of P. gingivalis, regardless of nutritional or hemin conditions. In addition, bacterial susceptibility to metronidazole was not modified by exposure to adrenaline or noradrenaline. However, the expression of genes related to iron acquisition (hmuR), oxidative stress (tpx, oxyR, dps, sodB and aphC) and pathogenesis (hem, hagA and ragA) were stimulated upon exposure to adrenaline and/or noradrenaline. Adrenaline and noradrenaline can induce changes in gene expression related to oxidative stress and virulence factors in P. gingivalis. The present study is, in part, a step toward understanding the stress-pathogen interactions that may

  11. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis facilitates the development and progression of destructive arthritis through its unique bacterial peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna J Maresz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis are two prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases in humans and are associated with each other both clinically and epidemiologically. Recent findings suggest a causative link between periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis via bacteria-dependent induction of a pathogenic autoimmune response to citrullinated epitopes. Here we showed that infection with viable periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83 exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in a mouse model, as manifested by earlier onset, accelerated progression and enhanced severity of the disease, including significantly increased bone and cartilage destruction. The ability of P. gingivalis to augment CIA was dependent on the expression of a unique P. gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD, which converts arginine residues in proteins to citrulline. Infection with wild type P. gingivalis was responsible for significantly increased levels of autoantibodies to collagen type II and citrullinated epitopes as a PPAD-null mutant did not elicit similar host response. High level of citrullinated proteins was also detected at the site of infection with wild-type P. gingivalis. Together, these results suggest bacterial PAD as the mechanistic link between P. gingivalis periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Detection of antimicrobial activity of banana peel (Musa paradisiaca L.) on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Suraj Premal; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S; Shivanaikar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Banana is used widely because of its nutritional values. In past, there are studies that show banana plant parts, and their fruits can be used to treat the human diseases. Banana peel is a part of banana fruit that also has the antibacterial activity against microorganisms but has not been studied extensively. Since, there are no studies that relate the antibacterial activity of banana peel against periodontal pathogens. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of banana peel extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans). Standard strains of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were used in this study which was obtained from the in-house bacterial bank of Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology at Maratha Mandal's Nathajirao G. Halgekar Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre. The banana peel extract was prepared, and the antibacterial activity was assessed using well agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration was assessed using serial broth dilution method. In the current study, both the tested microorganisms showed antibacterial activity. In well diffusion method, P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans showed 15 mm and 12 mm inhibition zone against an alcoholic extract of banana peel, respectively. In serial broth dilution method P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were sensitive until 31.25 μg/ml dilutions. From results of the study, it is suggested that an alcoholic extract of banana peel has antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  14. Structure of the GH76 α-mannanase homolog, BT2949, from the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Cuskin, Fiona; Spears, Richard J.; Dabin, Jerome; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2015-01-01

    A high-resolution structure of a noncanonical α-mannanase relevant to human health and nutrition has been solved via heavy-atom phasing of a selenomethionine derivative. The large bowel microbiota, a complex ecosystem resident within the gastrointestinal tract of all human beings and large mammals, functions as an essential, nonsomatic metabolic organ, hydrolysing complex dietary polysaccharides and modulating the host immune system to adequately tolerate ingested antigens. A significant member of this community, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, has evolved a complex system for sensing and processing a wide variety of natural glycoproducts in such a way as to provide maximum benefit to itself, the wider microbial community and the host. The immense ability of B. thetaiotaomicron as a ‘glycan specialist’ resides in its enormous array of carbohydrate-active enzymes, many of which are arranged into polysaccharide-utilization loci (PULs) that are able to degrade sugar polymers that are often inaccessible to other gut residents, notably α-mannan. The B. thetaiotaomicron genome encodes ten putative α-mannanases spread across various PULs; however, little is known about the activity of these enzymes or the wider implications of α-mannan metabolism for the health of both the microbiota and the host. In this study, SAD phasing of a selenomethionine derivative has been used to investigate the structure of one such B. thetaiotaomicron enzyme, BT2949, which belongs to the GH76 family of α-mannanases. BT2949 presents a classical (α/α) 6 -barrel structure comprising a large extended surface cleft common to other GH76 family members. Analysis of the structure in conjunction with sequence alignments reveals the likely location of the catalytic active site of this noncanonical GH76

  15. Structure of the GH76 α-mannanase homolog, BT2949, from the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Andrew J. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Cuskin, Fiona [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Spears, Richard J.; Dabin, Jerome; Turkenburg, Johan P. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Harry J., E-mail: harry.gilbert@newcastle.ac.uk [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Davies, Gideon J., E-mail: harry.gilbert@newcastle.ac.uk [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    A high-resolution structure of a noncanonical α-mannanase relevant to human health and nutrition has been solved via heavy-atom phasing of a selenomethionine derivative. The large bowel microbiota, a complex ecosystem resident within the gastrointestinal tract of all human beings and large mammals, functions as an essential, nonsomatic metabolic organ, hydrolysing complex dietary polysaccharides and modulating the host immune system to adequately tolerate ingested antigens. A significant member of this community, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, has evolved a complex system for sensing and processing a wide variety of natural glycoproducts in such a way as to provide maximum benefit to itself, the wider microbial community and the host. The immense ability of B. thetaiotaomicron as a ‘glycan specialist’ resides in its enormous array of carbohydrate-active enzymes, many of which are arranged into polysaccharide-utilization loci (PULs) that are able to degrade sugar polymers that are often inaccessible to other gut residents, notably α-mannan. The B. thetaiotaomicron genome encodes ten putative α-mannanases spread across various PULs; however, little is known about the activity of these enzymes or the wider implications of α-mannan metabolism for the health of both the microbiota and the host. In this study, SAD phasing of a selenomethionine derivative has been used to investigate the structure of one such B. thetaiotaomicron enzyme, BT2949, which belongs to the GH76 family of α-mannanases. BT2949 presents a classical (α/α){sub 6}-barrel structure comprising a large extended surface cleft common to other GH76 family members. Analysis of the structure in conjunction with sequence alignments reveals the likely location of the catalytic active site of this noncanonical GH76.

  16. Possible misidentification of Bacteroides sp., probably B. ureolyticus as Taylorella equigenitalis: Implications for the laboratory diagnosis of CEM

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, John; Cherie Millar, B.; Xu, Jiru; Buckley, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    International audience; A wild-type isolate with similar morphological and phenotypic properties to Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative bacterial agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM), was referred for molecular identification by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. A species-specific PCR failed to yield a product compatible with that of T. equigenitalis. The direct sequencing of the universal 16S rRNA PCR amplicon suggested the presence of a Bacteroides sp., probably Bacteroides u...

  17. Comparison of Bacteroides zoogleoformans strains isolated from soft tissue infections in cats with strains from periodontal disease in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Love, D N; Johnson, J L; Jones, R F; Bailey, M

    1985-01-01

    A total of 11 strains of Bacteroides zoogleoformans were isolated from 11 of 106 different cat subcutaneous "fight wound" abscesses and were among a total of 143 Bacteroides species isolated from these samples. They constituted 3.4% (11 of 325) of all anaerobic isolates. The cat strains and strains of B. zoogleoformans isolated from humans with periodontal disease were similar phenotypically as determined by biochemical reactions, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of soluble protein...

  18. Isolation of bacteriophage host strains of Bacteroides species suitable for tracking sources of animal faecal pollution in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Doñate, Marta; Payán, Andrey; Cortés, Ivania; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-06-01

    Microbial source tracking (MST) methods allow the identification of specific faecal sources. The aim is to detect the sources of faecal pollution in a water body to allow targeted, efficient and cost-effective remediation efforts in the catchment. Bacteriophages infecting selected host strains of Bacteroides species are used as markers to track faecal contaminants in water. By using a suitable Bacteroides host from a given faecal origin, it is possible to specifically detect bacteriophages of this faecal origin. It can thus be used to detect specific phages of Bacteroides for MST. With this objective, we isolated several Bacteroides strains from pig, cow and poultry faeces by applying a previously optimized methodology used to isolate the host strains from humans. The isolated strains belonged to Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. These strains, like most Bacteroides species, detected phages of the Siphoviridae morphology. Using the newly isolated host strains for phage enumeration in a range of samples, we showed that these detect phages in faecal sources that coincide with their own origin (70-100% of the samples), and show no detection or very low percentages of detection of phages from other animal origins (from 0 to 20% of the samples). Only strains isolated from pig wastewater detected phages in 50% of human sewage samples. Nevertheless, those strains detecting phages from faecal origins other than their own detected fewer phages (2-3 log₁₀ pfu·100 ml⁻¹) than the phages detected by the specific strain of the same origin. On the basis of our results, we propose that faecal source tracking with phages infecting specific Bacteroides host strains is a useful method for MST. In addition, the method presented here is feasible in laboratories equipped with only basic microbiological equipment, it is more rapid and cost-effective than other procedures and it does not require highly qualified staff. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology

  19. Marsh soils as potential sinks for Bacteroides fecal indicator bacteria, Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge, Georgetown, SC, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Johnson, Heather E.; Duris, Joseph W.; Krauss, Ken W.

    2014-01-01

    A soil core collected in a tidal freshwater marsh in the Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge (Georgetown, SC) exuded a particularly strong odor of cow manure upon extrusion. In order to test for manure and determine its provenance, we carried out microbial source tracking using DNA markers for Bacteroides, a noncoliform, anaerobic bacterial group that represents a broad group of the fecal population. Three core sections from 0-3 cm, 9-12 cm and 30-33 were analyzed for the presence of Bacteroides. The ages of core sediments were estimated using 210Pb and 137Cs dating. All three core sections tested positive for Bacteroides DNA markers related to cow or deer feces. Because cow manure is stockpiled, used as fertilizer, and a source of direct contamination in the Great Pee Dee River/Winyah Bay watershed, it is very likely the source of the Bacteroides that was deposited on the marsh. The mid-points of the core sections were dated as follows: 0-3 cm: 2009; 9-12 cm: 1999, and 30-33 cm: 1961. The presence of Bacteroides at different depths/ages in the soil profile indicates that soils in tidal freshwater marshes are, at the least, capable of being short-term sinks for Bacteroides and, may have the potential to be long-term sinks of stable, naturalized populations.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kiyoshi, E-mail: k-ito@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Xu, Yue; Yamada, Nozomi; Onohara, Yuko; Ito, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    P. gingivalis prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data have been collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. A recombinant form of prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase from Porphyromonas gingivalis has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using potassium sodium tartrate as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 149.4, c = 159.7 Å. The crystals are most likely to contain one subunit of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, with a V{sub M} value of 3.14 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the BL5 station of the Photon Factory.

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis: An Overview of Periodontopathic Pathogen below the Gum Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Kah Yan; Song, Keang Peng; Chan, Kok Gan

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease represents a group of oral inflammatory infections initiated by oral pathogens which exist as a complex biofilms on the tooth surface and cause destruction to tooth supporting tissues. The severity of this disease ranges from mild and reversible inflammation of the gingiva (gingivitis) to chronic destruction of connective tissues, the formation of periodontal pocket and ultimately result in loss of teeth. While human subgingival plaque harbors more than 500 bacterial species, considerable research has shown that Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, is the major etiologic agent which contributes to chronic periodontitis. This black-pigmented bacterium produces a myriad of virulence factors that cause destruction to periodontal tissues either directly or indirectly by modulating the host inflammatory response. Here, this review provides an overview of P. gingivalis and how its virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis with other microbiome consortium in oral cavity. PMID:26903954

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kiyoshi; Xu, Yue; Yamada, Nozomi; Onohara, Yuko; Ito, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    P. gingivalis prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data have been collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. A recombinant form of prolyl tripeptidyl aminopeptidase from Porphyromonas gingivalis has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using potassium sodium tartrate as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6 3 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 149.4, c = 159.7 Å. The crystals are most likely to contain one subunit of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, with a V M value of 3.14 Å 3 Da −1 . Diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the BL5 station of the Photon Factory

  3. Development of a simple chemically defined medium for Porphyromonas gingivalis: requirement for alpha-ketoglutarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, P; Batten, J E; Curtis, M A

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a simple, defined medium for the growth of laboratory and clinical isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis. A medium was designed in which the carbon and nitrogen requirements were provided by a single protein source--bovine serum albumin. High cell yields were achieved in this medium but growth was accompanied by a heavy blackening of the cells due to the deposition of metal sulfide(s), most probably iron(II) sulfide, at the cell surface. Good growth in the absence of blackening was achieved when the iron salt in the medium was substituted with alpha-ketoglutarate. The resultant alpha-ketoglutarate/BSA medium was able to support the growth of all laboratory and clinical P. gingivalis strains examined and should prove useful in the investigation of the physiology and nutritional regulation of virulence of this organism.

  4. Evaluation of Emdogain® antimicrobial effectiveness against biofilms containing the keystone pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Jérôme; Toma, Selena; Dos Santos-Gonçalvez, Ana-Maria; Leprince, Julian; Leloup, Gaëtane; Brecx, Michel

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Emdogain® (EMD) against biofilms containing the periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. A brain-Heart infusion broth inoculated with S. gordonii and P. gingivalis was perfused (7-d, anaerobiosis) through a closed circuit containing two Robbins devices as to form biofilms. The latter were then treated for 2 min with various antimicrobials (Chlorhexidine (CHX) 0.2%, Povidone iodine (PVI) 5%, PVI 10%, essential oils (EO), EO ZeroTM or EMD) (n=8) and cell densities were calculated and compared. In the present in vitro model, Emdogain® was not statistically effective (p>0.05) in killing biofilm bacteria unlike the other tested molecules.

  5. Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis in dental caries with periapical granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risya Cilmiaty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries with necrotic pulp is a multifactorial disease that attacks enamel involving tooth pulp. The anaerobic bacteria infection in the pulp chamber could induce the formation of periapical granuloma. However, the presence of the most frequently anaerobic bacteria identified in apical periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, in periapical granuloma have not been confirmed. Purpose: The aims of study were to determine the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in dental caries with necrotic pulp and to determine its relation to periapical granuloma. Methods: Thirty-six patients of dental caries with necrotic pulp in Dr. Moewardi General Hospital in Surakarta, Indonesia were involved and classified into two groups, the group of patients with periapical granuloma and the group of patients without periapical granuloma. The caries tooth was extracted, and the chronic periapical tissue was swabbed and cultured on blood agar medium in anaerobic condition. The bacterial DNA was extracted from the positive cultures and subjected for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Results: Periapical granuloma was more likely found in women (OR 5.5, 95% CI=1.277-23.693; RR 2.5, 95% CI= 1.025-6.100. Black colonies bacteria were associated with periapical granuloma (OR 2.2, 95% CI=0.517-9.594; RR 1.5, 95% CI=0.655-3.623. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia were detected in group with or without periapical granuloma, however, only Prevotella intermedia was associated with periapical granuloma (OR 1.6, 95% CI=0.418-5.903; RR 1.3, 95% CI=0.653-2.393. Conclusion: The presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in periapical granuloma were confirmed, however, only Prevotella intermedia were associated with periapical granuloma.Latar belakang: Karies gigi dengan pulpa nekrosis adalah penyakit multifaktorial yang menyerang enamel hingga ruang pulpa gigi. Infeksi bakteri anaerob

  6. Multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis group on the rise in Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, G N; Sóki, J; Nagy, E

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of multidrug-resistance (MDR) in a strain of Bacteroides fragilis from a blood culture and abdominal fluid in a Danish patient. The patient had not been travelling for several years and had not received antibiotics prior to the present case. We also summarize the cases that have...... been reported to date of MDR B. fragilis group in Europe. As far as we know, a case like this with MDR B. fragilis has not been described in Scandinavia before....

  7. Genome sequence of the Bacteroides fragilis phage ATCC 51477-B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Shawn A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genome of a fecal pollution indicator phage, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 51477-B1, was sequenced and consisted of 44,929 bases with a G+C content of 38.7%. Forty-six putative open reading frames were identified and genes were organized into functional clusters for host specificity, lysis, replication and regulation, and packaging and structural proteins.

  8. ANTIGENIC PROMOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Yu; Cinader, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with p-azobenzene arsonic acid derivatives of human serum albumin (HA-As) or of dissociated keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The IgM response to the hapten was evaluated in terms of the number of hapten-specific plaque-forming cells in the lymph node draining the injection site. In some experiments, antibody was measured by agglutination of tanned and sensitized erythrocytes. The hapten response of animals immunized with HA-As was increased (promoting effect) when the animals were injected with one of several structurally unrelated macromolecules: keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), horse spleen ferritin (HSF), lysozyme (Lys), alum-precipitated human gamma globulin (alum-precipitated HGG). Different macromolecules differed in the magnitude of the promoting effect they induced, e.g., promotion by the associated form of KLH was greater than that by the dissociated form; alum-precipitated HGG was a better promoter than was soluble HGG. The relative magnitude of promotion by different macromolecules (associated vs. dissociated KLH, alum-precipitated vs. soluble HGG) correlated with the relative magnitude of the carrier effect, as judged by the hapten response induced by p-azobenzene arsonic acid conjugated to various proteins. Promotion was detected by agglutination assay of circulating antibody, by plaque assay of cells from the popliteal lymph node draining the site of preinjection, but not by plaque assay of cells from the contralateral lymph node. Promotion was dependent on the dose of the promoting macromolecule and on the dose of the hapten-protein conjugate. It was not observed in animals tolerant to the promoting macromolecule. Inhibition (i.e. antigenic competition), rather than promotion, was observed upon a secondary response to the preinjected macromolecule or when the hapten-protein conjugate was incorporated in Freund's adjuvant. PMID:15776570

  9. Involvement of a periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis on the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoneda Masato

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that is closely associated with multiple factors such as obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, other risk factors for the development of NAFLD are unclear. With the association between periodontal disease and the development of systemic diseases receiving increasing attention recently, we conducted this study to investigate the relationship between NAFLD and infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, a major causative agent of periodontitis. Methods The detection frequencies of periodontal bacteria in oral samples collected from 150 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (102 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and 48 with non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL patients and 60 non-NAFLD control subjects were determined. Detection of P. gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria were detected by PCR assay. In addition, effect of P. gingivalis-infection on mouse NAFLD model was investigated. To clarify the exact contribution of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis, non-surgical periodontal treatments were also undertaken for 3 months in 10 NAFLD patients with periodontitis. Results The detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NAFLD patients was significantly higher than that in the non-NAFLD control subjects (46.7% vs. 21.7%, odds ratio: 3.16. In addition, the detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NASH patients was markedly higher than that in the non-NAFLD subjects (52.0%, odds ratio: 3.91. Most of the P. gingivalis fimbria detected in the NAFLD patients was of invasive genotypes, especially type II (50.0%. Infection of type II P. gingivalis on NAFLD model of mice accelerated the NAFLD progression. The non-surgical periodontal treatments on NAFLD patients carried out for 3 months ameliorated the liver function parameters, such as the serum levels of AST and ALT. Conclusions Infection with high-virulence P

  10. Effects of aging on endotoxin tolerance induced by lipopolysaccharides derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a bacterially induced chronic inflammatory disease. Exposure of the host to periodontal pathogens and their virulence factors induces a state of hyporesponsiveness to subsequent stimulations, termed endotoxin tolerance. Aging has a profound effect on immune response to bacteria challenge. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of aging on endotoxin tolerance induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS and Escherichia coli (E. coli LPS in murine peritoneal macrophages.We studied the cytokine production (TNF-α and IL-10 and Toll-like receptor 2, 4 (TLR2, 4 gene and protein expressions in peritoneal macrophages from young (2-month-old and middle-aged (12-month-old ICR mice following single or repeated P. gingivalis LPS or E. coli LPS stimulation. Pretreatment of peritoneal macrophages with P. gingivalis LPS or E. coli LPS resulted in a reduction in TNF-α production and an increase in IL-10 production upon secondary stimulation (p<0.05, and the markedly lower levels of TNF-α and higher levels of IL-10 were observed in macrophages from young mice compared with those from middle-aged mice (p<0.05. In addition, LPS restimulations also led to the significantly lower expression levels of TLR2, 4 mRNA and protein in macrophages from young mice (p<0.05.Repeated LPS stimulations triggered endotoxin tolerance in peritoneal macrophages and the ability to develop tolerance in young mice was more excellent. The impaired ability to develop endotoxin tolerance resulted from aging might be related to TLR2, 4 and might lead to the incontrollable periodontal inflammation in older adults.

  11. Effect of nicotine and porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on endothelial cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na An

    Full Text Available Smoking is considered a significant risk factor for both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Endothelial cells play an important role in the progression of both diseases. In the present study, we investigated in vitro the impact of nicotine on functional properties of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS of periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. HUVECs were stimulated with different concentrations of nicotine (10 µM-10 mM and/or P. gingivalis LPS. Expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and interleukin-8 were measured on both gene and protein levels. Cell proliferation/viability, apoptosis, and migration were also investigated. Nicotine at a concentration of 10 mM significantly decreased P. gingivalis LPS-induced expression of all investigated proteins after 4 h stimulation, while lower nicotine concentrations had no significant effect on protein expression with or without P. gingivalis LPS. Proliferation/viability of HUVECs was also significantly inhibited by 10-mM nicotine but not by lower concentrations. Migration of HUVECs was significantly decreased by nicotine at concentrations of 1-10 mM. Nicotine at a concentration similar to that observed in the serum of smokers had no significant effect on the functional properties of HUVECs. However, high concentrations of nicotine, similar to that observed in the oral cavity of smokers, inhibited the inflammatory response of HUVECs. This effect of nicotine might be associated with decreased gingival bleeding indices in smoking periodontitis patients.

  12. Effect of nicotine and porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Na; Andrukhov, Oleh; Tang, Yan; Falkensammer, Frank; Bantleon, Hans-Peter; Ouyang, Xiangying; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is considered a significant risk factor for both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Endothelial cells play an important role in the progression of both diseases. In the present study, we investigated in vitro the impact of nicotine on functional properties of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. HUVECs were stimulated with different concentrations of nicotine (10 µM-10 mM) and/or P. gingivalis LPS. Expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and interleukin-8 were measured on both gene and protein levels. Cell proliferation/viability, apoptosis, and migration were also investigated. Nicotine at a concentration of 10 mM significantly decreased P. gingivalis LPS-induced expression of all investigated proteins after 4 h stimulation, while lower nicotine concentrations had no significant effect on protein expression with or without P. gingivalis LPS. Proliferation/viability of HUVECs was also significantly inhibited by 10-mM nicotine but not by lower concentrations. Migration of HUVECs was significantly decreased by nicotine at concentrations of 1-10 mM. Nicotine at a concentration similar to that observed in the serum of smokers had no significant effect on the functional properties of HUVECs. However, high concentrations of nicotine, similar to that observed in the oral cavity of smokers, inhibited the inflammatory response of HUVECs. This effect of nicotine might be associated with decreased gingival bleeding indices in smoking periodontitis patients.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction promoted by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide as a possible link between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bullon, Pedro; Cordero, Mario D.; Quiles, José L.; Morillo, J.M.; Ramirez Tortosa, Maria Carmen; Battino, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the factors that could explain the athophysiological mechanism of inflammatory conditions that occur in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and periodontitis. Such inflammatory response is often evoked by specific bacteria, as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key factor in this process. The aim of this research was to study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from periodontitis patients and to eva...

  14. Antimicrobial peptide inhibition of Porphyromonas gingivalis 381-induced hemagglutination is improved with a synthetic decapeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Douglas R; Jeffrey, Nicole R; Dubey, Vinod S; Leung, Kai P

    2009-12-01

    The effects of various antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) on disrupting the hemagglutinating ability of cellular components of the putative oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis were examined. AMP inhibition of P. gingivalis 381-induced hemagglutination using vesicles (VES) or outer membrane (OM) preparations was determined within standardized hemagglutination assays using various mammalian erythrocytes. A synthetic decapeptide (KSL-W) and its truncated peptide analogs were evaluated and compared with selected classes of AMPs derived from naturally occurring innate defense peptides. All tested AMPs were effective in disrupting P. gingivalis-induced hemagglutination among tested erythrocytes, with the exception of magainin I and the truncated KSL-W analogs. LL-37 was generally the most potent followed by histatin 5. The synthetic decapeptide (KSL-W) was found to be similar to the histatin 8 peptide in terms of inhibitory effect. In addition, co-application assays (with selected oral-related AMPs+/-KSL-W) were employed to determine if co-application procedures would improve hemagglutination abrogation above that of oral-related AMPs alone. These experiments revealed that the KSL-W peptide improved hemagglutination inhibition above that of each of the oral-related peptides (histatin 5 and 8, LL-37) alone. Among mammalian erythrocytes, significant peptide-induced hemagglutination was observed for the cathelicidin class AMPs, LL-37 and indolicidin (>or=25 and >or=100 microM respectively). In contrast, KSL-W did not induce erythrocyte agglutination throughout any concentration range tested (0.1-1000 microM). Our results suggest that several AMPs are effective in disrupting P. gingivalis 381-induced hemagglutination and that the co-application of a small, synthetically derived peptide may serve to augment the role of local host AMPs engaged in innate defense.

  15. Detection and comparison of specific hemin binding by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins, G R; Wood, D P; Birchmeier, K R

    1997-01-01

    A radioligand assay was designed to detect and compare specific hemin binding by the periodontal anaerobic black-pigmenting bacteria (BPB) Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. The assay included physiological concentrations of the hemin-binding protein rabbit serum albumin (RSA) to prevent self-aggregation and nonspecific interaction of hemin with cellular components. Under these conditions, heme-starved P. intermedia cells (two strains) expressed a single binding site species ...

  16. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY in Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Filho, I. S.; Meyer, R.; Olczak, T.; Xavier, M. T.; Trindade, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease, with participation of bacterial, environmental, and host factors. It results from synergistic and dysbiotic multispecies microorganisms, critical “keystone pathogens,” affecting the whole bacterial community. The purpose of this study was to review the role of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the immunopathogenesis of chronic periodontitis, with special attention paid to HmuY. The host response during periodontitis involves the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of tooth-supporting tissues. In this proinflammatory process, the ability of P. gingivalis to evade the host immune response and access nutrients in the microenvironment is directly related to its survival, proliferation, and infection. Furthermore, heme is an essential nutrient for development of these bacteria, and HmuY is responsible for its capture from host heme-binding proteins. The inflammatory potential of P. gingivalis HmuY has been shown, including induction of high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and CCL2, decreased levels of IL-8, and increased levels of anti-HmuY IgG and IgG1 antibodies in individuals with chronic periodontitis. Therefore, the HmuY protein might be a promising target for therapeutic strategies and for development of diagnostic methods in chronic periodontitis, especially in the case of patients with chronic periodontitis not responding to treatment, monitoring, and maintenance therapy. PMID:27403039

  17. Bactericidal effect of a 405-nm diode laser on Porphyromonas gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotoku, Y; Kato, J; Akashi, G; Hirai, Y; Ishihara, K

    2009-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of 405-nm diode laser irradiation on periodontopathic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro. A diluted suspension of P. gingivalis was irradiated directly with a 405-nm diode laser under conditions of 100 mW-10 sec, 100 mW-20 sec, 200 mW-5 sec, 200 mW-10 sec, 200 mW-20 sec, 400 mW-5 sec, 400 mW-10 sec, and 400 mW-20 sec. The energy density ranged from 2.0 to 16.0 J/cm 2 . The irradiated bacterial suspension was spread on a blood agar plate and growth of the colonies was examined after an anaerobic culture for 7 days. Bacterial growth was inhibited under all irradiation conditions, but the bactericidal effect of the 405-nm diode laser depended on the energy density. More than 97% of bacterial growth was inhibited with irradiation at an energy density > 4.0 J/cm 2 . The mechanism of the bactericidal effect is photochemical, rather than photothermal. These findings suggest that a 405-nm diode laser has a high bactericidal effect on P. gingivalis

  18. Manipulation of Neutrophils by Porphyromonas gingivalis in the Development of Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochalska, Maja; Potempa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the chronic periodontal disease is associated with a skewed host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis , that accounts for the majority of periodontal tissue damage. Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in periodontal pockets and depending on the stage of the disease, also plentiful PMNs are present in the inflamed gingival tissue and the gingival crevice. They are the most efficient phagocytes and eliminate pathogens by a variety of means, which are either oxygen-dependent or -independent. However, these secretory lethal weapons do not strictly discriminate between pathogens and host tissue. Current studies describe conflicting findings about neutrophil involvement in periodontal disease. On one hand literature indicate that hyper-reactive neutrophils are the main immune cell type responsible for this observed tissue damage and disease progression. Deregulation of neutrophil survival and functions, such as chemotaxis, migration, secretion of antimicrobial peptides or enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species, contribute to observed tissue injury and the clinical signs of periodontal disease. On the other hand neutrophils deficiencies in patients and mice also result in periodontal phenotype. Therefore, P. gingivalis represents a periodontal pathogen that manipulates the immune responses of PMNs, employing several virulence factors, such as gingipains, serine proteases, lipid phosphatases, or fimbriae. This review will sum up studies devoted to understanding different strategies utilized by P. gingivalis to manipulate PMNs survival and functions in order to inhibit killing by a granular content, prolong inflammation, and gain access to nutrient resources.

  19. Bactericidal effect of a 405-nm diode laser on Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoku, Y.; Kato, J.; Akashi, G.; Hirai, Y.; Ishihara, K.

    2009-05-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of 405-nm diode laser irradiation on periodontopathic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro. A diluted suspension of P. gingivalis was irradiated directly with a 405-nm diode laser under conditions of 100 mW-10 sec, 100 mW-20 sec, 200 mW-5 sec, 200 mW-10 sec, 200 mW-20 sec, 400 mW-5 sec, 400 mW-10 sec, and 400 mW-20 sec. The energy density ranged from 2.0 to 16.0 J/cm2. The irradiated bacterial suspension was spread on a blood agar plate and growth of the colonies was examined after an anaerobic culture for 7 days. Bacterial growth was inhibited under all irradiation conditions, but the bactericidal effect of the 405-nm diode laser depended on the energy density. More than 97% of bacterial growth was inhibited with irradiation at an energy density > 4.0 J/cm2. The mechanism of the bactericidal effect is photochemical, rather than photothermal. These findings suggest that a 405-nm diode laser has a high bactericidal effect on P. gingivalis.

  20. Attenuation of Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection by α-amylase and pentamidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Miao, Yu-Song; Fu, Yun; Li, Xi-Ting; Yu, Shao-Jie

    2015-08-01

    The Porphyromonas gingivalis bacterium is one of the most influential pathogens in oral infections. In the current study, the antimicrobial activity of α-amylase and pentamidine against Porphyromonas gingivalis was evaluated. Their in vitro inhibitory activity was investigated with the agar overlay technique, and the minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations were determined. Using the bactericidal concentration, the antimicrobial actions of the inhibitors were investigated. In the present study, multiple techniques were utilized, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), general structural analysis and differential gene expression analysis. The results obtained from SEM and bactericidal analysis indicated a notable observation; the pentamidine and α-amylase treatment destroyed the structure of the bacterial cell membranes, which led to cell death. These results were used to further explore these inhibitors and the mechanisms by which they act. Downregulated expression levels were observed for a number of genes coding for hemagglutinins and gingipains, and various genes involved in hemin uptake, chromosome replication and energy production. However, the expression levels of genes associated with iron storage and oxidative stress were upregulated by α-amylase and pentamidine. A greater effect was noted in response to pentamidine treatment. The results of the present study demonstrate promising therapeutic potential for α-amylases and pentamidine. These molecules have the potential to be used to develop novel drugs and broaden the availability of pharmacological tools for the attenuation of oral infections caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

  1. Structure determination and analysis of a haemolytic gingipain adhesin domain from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, N.; Yun, P.; Nadkarni, M.A.; Ghadikolaee, N.B.; Nguyen, K.A.; Lee, M.; Hunter, N.; Collyer, C.A. (Sydney)

    2010-08-27

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is an obligately anaerobic bacterium recognized as an aetiological agent of adult periodontitis. P. gingivalis produces cysteine proteinases, the gingipains. The crystal structure of a domain within the haemagglutinin region of the lysine gingipain (Kgp) is reported here. The domain was named K2 as it is the second of three homologous structural modules in Kgp. The K2 domain structure is a 'jelly-roll' fold with two anti-parallel {beta}-sheets. This fold topology is shared with adhesive domains from functionally diverse receptors such as MAM domains, ephrin receptor ligand binding domains and a number of carbohydrate binding modules. Possible functions of K2 were investigated. K2 induced haemolysis of erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner that was augmented by the blocking of anion transport. Further, cysteine-activated arginine gingipain RgpB, which degrades glycophorin A, sensitized erythrocytes to the haemolytic effect of K2. Cleaved K2, similar to that found in extracted Kgp, lacks the haemolytic activity indicating that autolysis of Kgp may be a staged process which is artificially enhanced by extraction of the protein. The data indicate a functional role for K2 in the integrated capacity conferred by Kgp to enable the porphyrin auxotroph P. gingivalis to capture essential haem from erythrocytes.

  2. Manipulation of Neutrophils by Porphyromonas gingivalis in the Development of Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Sochalska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the chronic periodontal disease is associated with a skewed host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, that accounts for the majority of periodontal tissue damage. Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in periodontal pockets and depending on the stage of the disease, also plentiful PMNs are present in the inflamed gingival tissue and the gingival crevice. They are the most efficient phagocytes and eliminate pathogens by a variety of means, which are either oxygen-dependent or -independent. However, these secretory lethal weapons do not strictly discriminate between pathogens and host tissue. Current studies describe conflicting findings about neutrophil involvement in periodontal disease. On one hand literature indicate that hyper-reactive neutrophils are the main immune cell type responsible for this observed tissue damage and disease progression. Deregulation of neutrophil survival and functions, such as chemotaxis, migration, secretion of antimicrobial peptides or enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species, contribute to observed tissue injury and the clinical signs of periodontal disease. On the other hand neutrophils deficiencies in patients and mice also result in periodontal phenotype. Therefore, P. gingivalis represents a periodontal pathogen that manipulates the immune responses of PMNs, employing several virulence factors, such as gingipains, serine proteases, lipid phosphatases, or fimbriae. This review will sum up studies devoted to understanding different strategies utilized by P. gingivalis to manipulate PMNs survival and functions in order to inhibit killing by a granular content, prolong inflammation, and gain access to nutrient resources.

  3. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 infection by the periodontopathic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis involves histone modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Okamoto, Takashi

    2009-03-15

    Latently infected cells harbor the HIV-1 proviral DNA genome primarily integrated into heterochromatin, allowing the persistence of transcriptionally silent proviruses. Hypoacetylation of histone proteins by histone deacetylases (HDAC) is involved in the maintenance of HIV-1 latency by repressing viral transcription. In addition, periodontal diseases, caused by polymicrobial subgingival bacteria including Porphyromonas gingivalis, are among the most prevalent infections of mankind. Here we demonstrate the effects of P. gingivalis on HIV-1 replication. This activity could be ascribable to the bacterial culture supernatant but not to other bacterial components such as fimbriae or LPS. We found that this HIV-1-inducing activity was recovered in the lower molecular mass (HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter upon stimulation with bacterial culture supernatant concomitantly with the association of acetylated histone and RNA polymerase II. We thus found that P. gingivalis could induce HIV-1 reactivation via chromatin modification and that butyric acid, one of the bacterial metabolites, is responsible for this effect. These results suggest that periodontal diseases could act as a risk factor for HIV-1 reactivation in infected individuals and might contribute to the systemic dissemination of the virus.

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis manipulates complement and TLR signaling to uncouple bacterial clearance from inflammation and promote dysbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Tomoki; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Abe, Toshiharu; Jotwani, Ravi; Triantafilou, Martha; Triantafilou, Kathy; Hashim, Ahmed; Hoch, Shifra; Curtis, Michael A.; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Lambris, John D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Certain low-abundance bacterial species, such as the periodontitis-associated oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis can subvert host immunity to remodel a normally symbiotic microbiota into a dysbiotic, disease-provoking state. However, such pathogens also exploit inflammation to thrive in dysbiotic conditions. How these bacteria evade immunity while maintaining inflammation is unclear. As previously reported, P. gingivalis remodels the oral microbiota into a dysbiotic state by exploiting complement. Now we show that in neutrophils P. gingivalis disarms a host-protective TLR2-MyD88 pathway via proteasomal degradation of MyD88, whereas it activates an alternate TLR2-Mal-PI3K pathway. This alternate TLR2-Mal-PI3K pathway blocks phagocytosis, provides ‘bystander’ protection to otherwise susceptible bacteria, and promotes dysbiotic inflammation in vivo. This mechanism to disengage bacterial clearance from inflammation required an intimate crosstalk between TLR2 and the complement receptor C5aR, and can contribute to the persistence of microbial communities that drive dysbiotic diseases. PMID:24922578

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Melittin on Porphyromonas Gingivalis LPS-Stimulated Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woon-Hae; An, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Gwon, Mi-Gyeong; Gu, Hyemin; Jeon, Minji; Kim, Min-Kyung; Han, Sang-Mi; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2018-02-05

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that contributes to the destruction of the gingiva. Porphyromonas gingivalis ( P. gingivalis ) can cause periodontitis via its pathogenic lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Melittin, a major component of bee venom, is known to have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. However, the role of melittin in the inflammatory response has not been elucidated in periodontitis-like human keratinocytes. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of melittin on a P. gingivalis LPS (PgLPS)-treated HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. The cytotoxicity of melittin was measured using a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, and a Cell Counting Kit-8. The effect of melittin on PgLPS-induced inflammation was determined with Western blot, real-time quantitative PCT, and immunofluorescence. PgLPS increased the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Moreover, PgLPS induced activation of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B/Akt. Melittin also inhibited the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by suppressing the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, ERK, and Akt. Melittin attenuates the PgLPS-induced inflammatory response and could therefore be applied in the treatment of periodontitis for anti-inflammatory effects.

  6. Porphyromonas gulae Has Virulence and Immunological Characteristics Similar to Those of the Human Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzo, Jason C; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Orth, Rebecca K; Mitchell, Helen L; Dashper, Stuart G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a significant problem in companion animals, and yet little is known about the disease-associated microbiota. A major virulence factor for the human periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis is the lysyl- and arginyl-specific proteolytic activity of the gingipains. We screened several Porphyromonas species isolated from companion animals-P. asaccharolytica, P. circumdentaria, P. endodontalis, P. levii, P. gulae, P. macacae, P. catoniae, and P. salivosa-for Lys- and Arg-specific proteolytic activity and compared the epithelial and macrophage responses and induction of alveolar bone resorption of the protease active species to that of Porphyromonas gingivalis Only P. gulae exhibited Lys-and Arg-specific proteolytic activity. The genes encoding the gingipains (RgpA/B and Kgp) were identified in the P. gulae strain ATCC 51700 and all publicly available 12 draft genomes of P. gulae strains. P. gulae ATCC 51700 induced levels of alveolar bone resorption in an animal model of periodontitis similar to those in P. gingivalis W50 and exhibited a higher capacity for autoaggregation and binding to oral epithelial cells with induction of apoptosis. Macrophages (RAW 264.7) were found to phagocytose P. gulae ATCC 51700 and the fimbriated P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 at similar levels. In response to P. gulae ATCC 51700, macrophages secreted higher levels of cytokines than those induced by P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 but lower than those induced by P. gingivalis W50, except for the interleukin-6 response. Our results indicate that P. gulae exhibits virulence characteristics similar to those of the human periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis and therefore may play a key role in the development of periodontitis in companion animals. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Wild Bitter Melon Leaf Extract Inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Inflammation: Identification of Active Compounds through Bioassay-Guided Isolation

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    Tzung-Hsun Tsai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis has been identified as one of the major periodontal pathogens. Activity-directed fractionation and purification processes were employed to identify the anti-inflammatory active compounds using heat-killed P. gingivalis-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells in vitro. Five major fractions were collected from the ethanol/ethyl acetate extract of wild bitter melon (Momordica charantia Linn. var. abbreviata Ser. leaves and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity against P. gingivalis. Among the test fractions, Fraction 5 effectively decreased heat-killed P. gingivalis-induced interleukin (IL-8 and was subjected to separation and purification by using chromatographic techniques. Two cucurbitane triterpenoids were isolated from the active fraction and identified as 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol (1 and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al (2 by comparing spectral data. Treatments of both compounds in vitro potently suppressed P. gingivalis-induced IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β levels and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in THP-1 cells. Both compounds effectively inhibited the mRNA levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase (COX-2 in P. gingivalis-stimulated gingival tissue of mice. These findings imply that 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al could be used for the development of novel therapeutic approaches against P. gingivalis infections.

  8. Metabolic Remodeling, Inflammasome Activation, and Pyroptosis in Macrophages Stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Its Outer Membrane Vesicles

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    Andrew J. Fleetwood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the bacterial species most closely associated with periodontitis and can shed large numbers of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs, which are increasingly thought to play a significant role in bacterial virulence and pathogenicity. Macrophages are amongst the first immune cells to respond to bacteria and their products, so we sought to directly compare the response of macrophages to P. gingivalis or its purified OMVs. Macrophages stimulated with OMVs produced large amounts of TNFα, IL-12p70, IL-6, IL-10, IFNβ, and nitric oxide compared to cells infected with P. gingivalis, which produced very low levels of these mediators. Both P. gingivalis and OMVs induced a shift in macrophage metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS to glycolysis, which was supported by enhanced lactate release, decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption with reduced spare respiratory capacity, as well as increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Corresponding to this metabolic shift, gene expression analysis of macrophages infected with P. gingivalis or stimulated with OMVs revealed a broad transcriptional upregulation of genes critical to glycolysis and a downregulation of genes associated with the TCA cycle. Upon examination of inflammasome signaling and pyroptosis it was found that P. gingivalis did not activate the inflammasome in macrophages as the mature forms of caspase-1, IL-1β, and IL-18 were not detected and there was no extracellular release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH or 7-AAD staining. In comparison, macrophages stimulated with OMVs potently activated caspase-1, produced large amounts of IL-1β, IL-18, released LDH, and were positive for 7-AAD indicative of pyroptotic cell death. These data directly quantitate the distinct effects of P. gingivalis and its OMVs on macrophage inflammatory phenotype, mitochondrial function, inflammasome activation, and pyroptotic cell death that may have potential

  9. CRISPR-Cas Systems in Bacteroides fragilis, an Important Pathobiont in the Human Gut Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Wexler, Hannah M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in bacteria from a wide variety of ecological niches, there are no studies to describe CRISPR-Cas elements in Bacteroides species, the most prevalent anaerobic bacteria in the lower intestinal tract. Microbes of the genus Bacteroides make up ~25% of the total gut microbiome. Bacteroides fragilis comprises only 2% of the total Bacteroides in the gut, yet causes of >70% of Bacteroides infections. The factors causing it to transition from benign resident of the gut microbiome to virulent pathogen are not well understood, but a combination of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of virulence genes and differential transcription of endogenous genes are clearly involved. The CRISPR-Cas system is a multi-functional system described in prokaryotes that may be involved in control both of HGT and of gene regulation. Results: Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) elements in all strains of B. fragilis (n = 109) with publically available genomes were identified. Three different CRISPR-Cas types, corresponding most closely to Type IB, Type IIIB, and Type IIC, were identified. Thirty-five strains had two CRISPR-Cas types, and three strains included all three CRISPR-Cas types in their respective genomes. The cas1 gene in the Type IIIB system encoded a reverse-transcriptase/Cas1 fusion protein rarely found in prokaryotes. We identified a short CRISPR (3 DR) with no associated cas genes present in most of the isolates; these CRISPRs were found immediately upstream of a hipA/hipB operon and we speculate that this element may be involved in regulation of this operon related to formation of persister cells during antimicrobial exposure. Also, blood isolates of B. fragilis did not have Type IIC CRISPR-Cas systems and had atypical Type IIIB CRISPR-Cas systems that were lacking adjacent cas genes. Conclusions: This is the first systematic report of CRISPR-Cas systems in a wide range of B. fragilis strains

  10. CRISPR-Cas Systems in Bacteroides fragilis, an Important Pathobiont in the Human Gut Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Tajkarimi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: While CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in bacteria from a wide variety of ecological niches, there are no studies to describe CRISPR-Cas elements in Bacteroides species, the most prevalent anaerobic bacteria in the lower intestinal tract. Microbes of the genus Bacteroides make up ~25% of the total gut microbiome. Bacteroides fragilis comprises only 2% of the total Bacteroides in the gut, yet causes of >70% of Bacteroides infections. The factors causing it to transition from benign resident of the gut microbiome to virulent pathogen are not well understood, but a combination of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of virulence genes and differential transcription of endogenous genes are clearly involved. The CRISPR-Cas system is a multi-functional system described in prokaryotes that may be involved in control both of HGT and of gene regulation.Results: Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR elements in all strains of B. fragilis (n = 109 with publically available genomes were identified. Three different CRISPR-Cas types, corresponding most closely to Type IB, Type IIIB, and Type IIC, were identified. Thirty-five strains had two CRISPR-Cas types, and three strains included all three CRISPR-Cas types in their respective genomes. The cas1 gene in the Type IIIB system encoded a reverse-transcriptase/Cas1 fusion protein rarely found in prokaryotes. We identified a short CRISPR (3 DR with no associated cas genes present in most of the isolates; these CRISPRs were found immediately upstream of a hipA/hipB operon and we speculate that this element may be involved in regulation of this operon related to formation of persister cells during antimicrobial exposure. Also, blood isolates of B. fragilis did not have Type IIC CRISPR-Cas systems and had atypical Type IIIB CRISPR-Cas systems that were lacking adjacent cas genes.Conclusions: This is the first systematic report of CRISPR-Cas systems in a wide range of B

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, CXCL8 and CCL2 by neutrophils from localized aggressive periodontitis and healthy donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, C; Kantarci, A; Holmstrup, P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Porphyromonas gingivalis is regarded as a significant contributor in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and certain systemic diseases, including atherosclerosis. P. gingivalis occasionally translocates from periodontal pockets into the circulation, where it adheres to red...

  12. Virulencia y variabilidad de Porphyromonas gingivalis y Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans y su asociación a la periodontitis Virulence and variability on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and their association to periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Díaz Zúñiga

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Las periodontitis son un conjunto de patologías de naturaleza inflamatoria y etiología infecciosa producidas por el biofilm patogénico subgingival. Porphyromonas gingivalis y Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans son bacterias periodonto-patógenas que pueden causar daño directo a las estructuras periodontales a través de los diversos factores de virulencia que expresan. Sobre la base de estos factores de virulencia, distintos genotipos y serotipos bacterianos se han descrito, cada uno de ellos con una potencial variable patogenicidad. En esta revisión bibliográfica se describen diferentes factores de virulencia de P. gingivalis y A. actinomycetemcomitans y se discute la variable inmunogenicidad y patogenicidad de los distintos genotipos y serotipos descritos para ellos. Tanto P. gingivalis como A. actinomycetemcomitans poseen diversos factores de virulencia asociados al inicio, progresión y severidad de las periodontitis. En P. gingivalis, los factores de virulencia para los cuales se describen distintos genotipos y/o serotipos son fimbria, LPS y cápsula bacteriana, y en A. actinomycetemcomitans son leucotoxina A, Cdt y LPS. Cada uno de estos distintos genotipos y serotipos induce una respuesta inmuno-inflamatoria diferente en el hospedero y, por lo tanto, se podrían asociar a una variable patogenicidad y podrían determinar las características clínicas de la enfermedad.Periodontitis represents a heterogenic group of periodontal infections elicited by bacteria residing at the subgingival biofilm. Although this biofilm is constituted by a broad variety of bacterial species, only a limited number has been associated with the periodontitis aetiology, among them Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Both P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans express a number of virulence factors that contribute to direct tissue damage and, based on them, distinct genotypes and serotypes have been described, each one

  13. Plant-derived pectin nanocoatings to prevent inflammatory cellular response of osteoblasts following Porphyromonas gingivalis infection

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    Meresta A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anna Meresta,1 Justyna Folkert,1 Timo Gaber,2 Korneliusz Miksch,1 Frank Buttgereit,2 Jacqueline Detert,2 Nicole Pischon,3,* Katarzyna Gurzawska3,4,* 1Environmental Biotechnology Department, Faculty of Power and Environmental, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland; 2Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, 3Department of Periodontology, Charité University Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 4Oral Surgery Department, The School of Dentistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Bioengineered plant-derived Rhamnogalacturonan-Is (RG-Is from pectins are potential candidates for surface nanocoating of medical devices. It has recently been reported that RG-I nanocoatings may prevent bacterial infection and improve the biocompatibility of implants. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro impact of bioengineered RG-I nanocoatings on osteogenic capacity and proinflammatory cytokine response of murine osteoblasts following Porphyromonas gingivalis infection.Methods: Murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts and isolated primary calvarial osteoblasts from C57BL/6J (B6J osteoblasts mice were infected with P. gingivalis and incubated on tissue culture polystyrene plates with or without nanocoatings of unmodified RG-Is isolated from potato pulps (PU or dearabinanated RG-Is (PA. To investigate a behavior of infected osteoblasts cultured on RG-Is cell morphology, proliferation, metabolic activity, mineralization and osteogenic and pro-inflammatory gene expression were examined.Results: Following P. gingivalis infection, PA, but not PU, significantly promoted MC3T3-E1 and BJ6 osteoblasts proliferation, metabolic activity, and calcium deposition. Moreover, Il-1b, Il-6, TNF-α, and Rankl gene expressions were downregulated in cells cultured on PU and to a higher extent on PA as compared to the corresponding control, whereas Runx, Alpl, Col1a1, and Bglap gene expressions were upregulated vice

  14. Hemin binding by Porphyromonas gingivalis strains is dependent on the presence of A-LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, M; Aduse-Opoku, J; Paramonov, N A; Hashim, A; Curtis, M A

    2017-10-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative black pigmenting anaerobe that is unable to synthesize heme [Fe(II)-protoporphyrin IX] or hemin [Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX-Cl], which are important growth/virulence factors, and must therefore derive them from the host. Porphyromonas gingivalis expresses several proteinaceous hemin-binding sites, which are important in the binding/transport of heme/hemin from the host. It also synthesizes several virulence factors, namely cysteine-proteases Arg- and Lys-gingipains and two lipopolysaccharides (LPS), O-LPS and A-LPS. The gingipains are required for the production of the black pigment, μ-oxo-bisheme {[Fe(III)PPIX] 2 O}, which is derived from hemoglobin and deposited on the bacterial cell-surface leading to the characteristic black colonies when grown on blood agar. In this study we investigated the role of LPS in the deposition of μ-oxo-bisheme on the cell-surface. A P. gingivalis mutant defective in the biosynthesis of Arg-gingipains, namely rgpA/rgpB, produces brown colonies on blood agar and mutants defective in Lys-gingipain (kgp) and LPS biosynthesis namely porR, waaL, wzy, and pg0129 (α-1, 3-mannosyltransferase) produce non-pigmented colonies. However, only those mutants lacking A-LPS showed reduced hemin-binding when cells in suspension were incubated with hemin. Using native, de-O-phosphorylated and de-lipidated LPS from P. gingivalis W50 and porR strains, we demonstrated that hemin-binding to O-polysaccharide (PS) and to the lipid A moiety of LPS was reduced compared with hemin-binding to A-PS. We conclude that A-LPS in the outer-membrane of P. gingivalis serves as a scaffold/anchor for the retention of μ-oxo-bisheme on the cell surface and pigmentation is dependent on the presence of A-LPS. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Oral Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Expression Profiles of TGF-β and TLR Pathways in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia Challenged Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Kubra; Ekinci, Fatma Yesim; Korachi, May

    2015-04-01

    The presence of certain oral pathogens at implant sites can hinder the osseointegration process. However, it is unclear how and by what microorganisms it happens. This study investigated whether the presence of oral pathogens of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia individually, play a role in the failure of bone formation by determining the expression profiles of Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β/Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) and Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) pathways in challenged osteoblasts. Cell viability of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia challenged osteoblasts were determined by WST assay. Changes in osteoblast morphology and inhibition of mineralization were observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Von Kossa staining, respectively. Expression of TGF-β and TLR pathway genes on challenged cells were identified by RT profiler array. Both P. gingivalis and P. intermedia challenges resulted in reduced viability and mineralization of osteoblasts. Viability was reduced to 56.8% (P. gingivalis) and 52.75% (P. intermedia) at 1000 multiplicity. Amongst 48 genes examined, expressions of BMPER, SMAD1, IL8 and NFRKB were found to be highly upregulated by both bacterial challenges (Fold Change > 4). P. gingivalis and P. intermedia could play a role in implant failure by changing the expression profiles of genes related to bone formation and resorption.

  16. The role of coaggregation between Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum on the host response to mixed infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, David; Shapira, Lior; Weiss, Ervin I; Houri-Haddad, Yael

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the role of coaggregation between Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum on the virulence of the mixed infection in mice. Inhibition of coaggregation was carried out using lactose. In vitro, inhibition of coaggregation was verified using a coaggregation assay. In vivo, the virulence of the mixed infection, with and without coaggregation, was examined in a model of experimental periodontitis in mice. The local host response to the mixed infection, with or without coaggregation, was examined using the subcutaneous chamber model of infection. Lactose inhibited the coaggregation between P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum at all the tested concentrations (1-0.0625 M). Surprisingly, the addition of lactose to the mixed infection increased the severity of experimental periodontitis (as measured by alveolar bone loss) compared with mixed infection with coaggregating bacteria. The addition of lactose to the mixed infection resulted in mild attenuation of TNFα and IL-1β levels. In addition, inhibition of coaggregation resulted in inhibition of the phagocytosis of F. nucleatum and augmentation of the phagocytosis of P. gingivalis. The ability of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum to coaggregate may limit their ability to induce experimental periodontitis in a mixed infection model. Moreover, there is a shift in the phagocytosis pattern of the bacteria with the annulment of coaggregeaiton, with a reduction in F. nucleatum phagocytosis and amplification of P. gingivalis phagocytosis. The increased virulence of the mixed infection without coaggregation may surprisingly lay in the sustention of F. nucleatum in the infected sites. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

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    Marwan Mansoor Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM, often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I and proteinase K. Methods: F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results: Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion: DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions.

  18. Assessing the Antimicrobial Effect of the Essential Oil of Myrtus communis on the Clinical Isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Azita; Khosropanah, Hengameh; Bazargani, Abdollah; Abed, Molud; Emami, Amir

    2013-11-01

    One of the major diseases affecting the oral health is periodontal disease. Various therapeutic methods have been introduced to eliminate the periodonto-pathic subgingival microflora. Among these, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) has a major role in the pathogenesis of different forms of periodontal diseases. The present study investigated the antimicrobial effect of the essential oil of Myrtus communis on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) as the most destructive periodontal pathogens. The subjects included 27 male and 3 female patients with advanced chronic periodontitis. The mean age of the patients was 47.6 ± 2.0 years old. P. gingivalis was isolated from the samples and identified by various diagnostic tests, including Gram staining, Indol test, and fluorescent test. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the essential oil against isolated P. gingivalis was determined by broth micro-dilution method. In this study, 0.12 - 64 μL/mL Myrtus communis essence were used for 30 P. gingivalis isolates and the MIC50 and MIC90 concentration of Myrtus communis essence against the isolates was equal to 1 and 8 μL/mL respectively. The results showed that Myrtus communis has antimicrobial effects against P. gingivalis. Further studies are suggested to include this essence in therapeutic protocols of periodontal disease.

  19. Analysis of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis locus of Porphyromonas gingivalis and development of a K1-specific polymerase chain reaction-based serotyping assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, J.; Crielaard, W.; Winkelhoff A.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objective: Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative obligate anaerobe that is strongly associated with severe periodontitis. Previous reports showed an association of P. gingivalis capsular polysaccharide with virulence. The K1 capsular polysaccharide was found to be more

  20. Comparing culture, real-time PCR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology for detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in patients with or without peri-implant infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galassi, F.; Kaman, W.E.; Anssari Moin, D.; van der Horst, J.; Wismeijer, D.; Crielaard, W.; Laine, M.L.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bikker, F.J.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective:  The aim of the study was to compare the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology with commonly used diagnostic methods in salivary and subgingival plaque samples from subjects with dental implants. P. gingivalis

  1. Isolation and characterization of Bacteroides host strain HB-73 used to detect sewage specific phages in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavel, Kannappan; Fujioka, Roger; Ebdon, James; Taylor, Huw

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that Escherichia coli and enterococci are unreliable indicators of fecal contamination in Hawaii because of their ability to multiply in environmental soils. In this study, the method of detecting Bacteroides phages as specific markers of sewage contamination in Hawaii's recreational waters was evaluated because these sewage specific phages cannot multiply under environmental conditions. Bacteroides hosts (GB-124, GA-17), were recovered from sewage samples in Europe and were reported to be effective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in certain geographical areas. However, GB-124 and GA-17 hosts were ineffective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in Hawaii. Bacteroides host HB-73 was isolated from a sewage sample in Hawaii, confirmed as a Bacteroides sp. and shown to recover phages from multiple sources of sewage produced in Hawaii at high concentrations (5.2-7.3 x 10(5) PFU/100 mL). These Bacteroides phages were considered as potential markers of sewage because they also survived for three days in fresh stream water and two days in marine water. Water samples from Hawaii's coastal swimming beaches and harbors, which were known to be contaminated with discharges from streams, were shown to contain moderate (20-187 CFU/100 mL) to elevated (173-816 CFU/100 mL) concentrations of enterococci. These same samples contained undetectable levels (Hawaii and the most likely source of these enterococci is from environmental soil rather than from sewage. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of the antibacterial activity of simvastatin against periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Emani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Objective: Statin treatment, apart from its hypolipidemic action has proven its antimicrobial activity by improving the survival rate of patients with severe systemic bacterial infections. Periodontitis is an inflammatory disorder of tooth supporting structures caused by a group of specific microorganisms. The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of pure simvastatin drug against the primary periodontal pathogens. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans using serial dilution method. Results: MIC of simvastatin against P. gingivalis was 2 μg/ml and A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to be <1 μg/ml which requires further dilutions to determine the exact value. Conclusions: Data suggests a potent antimicrobial activity of simvastatin against both A. actinomycetemcomitans and P gingivalis. Hence simvastatin can be prescribed as a dual action drug in patients with both hyperlipidemia and periodontal disease.

  3. Alpha-mangostin suppresses IL-6 and IL-8 expression in P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiemwattana, Ichaya; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 expression in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). HGFs were challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS and then treated with various concentrations of alpha-mangostin. The cytotoxicity was determined using MTS assay and cytokine expressions were evaluated by Real-time PCR and ELISA. The results showed that 5 μg/ml P. gingivalis LPS and alpha-mangostin at 1 µg/ml or less did not affect the viability of HGFs. Alpha-mangostin reduced IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA and protein in P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated HGFs. These findings suggested that alpha-mangostin might be used as an adjunct to the periodontal therapy.

  4. The Glycolytic Versatility of Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 and Its Genome Response to Oligo and Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Benítez-Páez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteroides spp. are dominant components of the phylum Bacteroidetes in the gut microbiota and prosper in glycan enriched environments. However, knowledge of the machinery of specific species isolated from humans (like Bacteroides uniformis contributing to the utilization of dietary and endogenous sources of glycans and their byproducts is limited. We have used the cutting-edge nanopore-based technology to sequence the genome of B. uniformis CECT 7771, a human symbiont with a proven pre-clinical efficacy on metabolic and immune dysfunctions in obesity animal models. We have also used massive sequencing approaches to distinguish the genome expression patterns in response to carbon sources of different complexity during growth. At genome-wide level, our analyses globally demonstrate that B. uniformis strains exhibit an expanded glycolytic capability when compared with other Bacteroides species. Moreover, by studying the growth and whole-genome expression of B. uniformis CECT 7771 in response to different carbon sources, we detected a differential growth fitness and expression patterns across the genome depending on the carbon source of the culture media. The dietary fibers used exerted different effects on B. uniformis CECT 7771 activating different molecular pathways and, therefore, allowing the production of different metabolite types with potential impact on gut health. The genome and transcriptome analysis of B. uniformis CECT 7771, in response to different carbon sources, shows its high versatility to utilize both dietary and endogenous glycans along with the production of potentially beneficial end products for both the bacterium and the host, pointing to a mechanistic basis of a mutualistic relationship.

  5. Multiple Signals Govern Utilization of a Polysaccharide in the Gut Bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalm, Nathan D; Townsend, Guy E; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-10-11

    The utilization of simple sugars is widespread across all domains of life. In contrast, the breakdown of complex carbohydrates is restricted to a subset of organisms. A regulatory paradigm for integration of complex polysaccharide breakdown with simple sugar utilization was established in the mammalian gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, whereby sensing of monomeric fructose regulates catabolism of both fructose and polymeric fructans. We now report that a different regulatory paradigm governs utilization of monomeric arabinose and the arabinose polymer arabinan. We establish that (i) arabinan utilization genes are controlled by a transcriptional activator that responds to arabinan and by a transcriptional repressor that responds to arabinose, (ii) arabinose utilization genes are regulated directly by the arabinose-responding repressor but indirectly by the arabinan-responding activator, and (iii) activation of both arabinan and arabinose utilization genes requires a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator necessary for survival in the mammalian gut. Genomic analysis predicts that this paradigm is broadly applicable to the breakdown of other polysaccharides in both B. thetaiotaomicron and other gut Bacteroides spp. The uncovered mechanism enables regulation of polysaccharide utilization genes in response to both the polysaccharide and its breakdown products. Breakdown of complex polysaccharides derived from "dietary fiber" is achieved by the mammalian gut microbiota. This breakdown creates a critical nutrient source for both the microbiota and its mammalian host. Because the availability of individual polysaccharides fluctuates with variations in the host diet, members of the microbiota strictly control expression of polysaccharide utilization genes. Our findings define a regulatory architecture that controls the breakdown of a polysaccharide by a gut bacterium in response to three distinct signals. This architecture integrates perception of a complex

  6. Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection on post-transcriptional regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in mice

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    Miyazawa Haruna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontal disease is suggested to increase the risk of atherothrombotic disease by inducing dyslipidemia. Recently, we demonstrated that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, which is known to play a critical role in the regulation of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol levels, is elevated in periodontitis patients. However, the underlying mechanisms of elevation of PCSK9 in periodontitis patients are largely unknown. Here, we explored whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative periodontopathic bacterium, -induced inflammatory response regulates serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels using animal models. Methods We infected C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally with Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative strain of periodontopathic bacteria, and evaluated serum PCSK9 levels and the serum lipid profile. PCSK9 and LDL receptor (LDLR gene and protein expression, as well as liver X receptors (Lxrs, inducible degrader of the LDLR (Idol, and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor (Srebf2 gene expression, were examined in the liver. Results P. gingivalis infection induced a significant elevation of serum PCSK9 levels and a concomitant elevation of total and LDL cholesterol compared with sham-infected mice. The LDL cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with PCSK9 levels. Expression of the Pcsk9, Ldlr, and Srebf2 genes was upregulated in the livers of the P. gingivalis-infected mice compared with the sham-infected mice. Although Pcsk9 gene expression is known to be positively regulated by sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP2 (human homologue of Srebf2, whereas Srebf2 is negatively regulated by cholesterol, the elevated expression of Srebf2 found in the infected mice is thought to be mediated by P. gingivalis infection. Conclusions P. gingivalis infection upregulates PCSK9 production via upregulation of Srebf2, independent of cholesterol levels. Further studies

  7. Prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in Japanese patients with generalized chronic and aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Takayama, Saori; Makino-Oi, Asako; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Ota, Mikio; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and levels of major periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in subgingival plaque samples of a group of Japanese patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). A total of 40 patients with clinical diagnosis of AgP or CP and 10 periodontally healthy volunteers were subjected to clinical and microbiological analysis. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The prevalence of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia was relatively high in patients with periodontitis: over 60% of AgP or CP patients harbored these pathogens whereas they were not detected in the subgingival plaque samples from periodontally healthy individuals. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were relatively frequently detected together in AgP and CP patients. No significant differences in the prevalence or level of the 3 pathogens were found between periodontitis groups. The proportion of T. forsythia was approximately 4-fold higher in CP group than in AgP group (P = 0.02). In periodontitis patients, a significant positive correlation was found between periodontal parameters (probing depth and clinical attachment level) and the numbers of total bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. No distinct pattern of the subgingival profile of these pathogens was discerned between the two disease entities, except for the difference in the proportion of T. forsythia. The red complex bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were highly prevalent in this population of Japanese AgP and CP patients, collaborating their roles in periodontitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficiency of Nanotube Surface-Treated Dental Implants Loaded with Doxycycline on Growth Reduction of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Babu, Jegdish; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Patel, Sweetu; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    The prevalence of peri-implant infection in patients with dental implants has been shown to range from 28% to 56%. A nanotube-modified implant surface can deliver antibiotics locally and suppress periodontal pathogenic bacterial growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the deliverability of antibiotics via a nanotube-modified implant. Dental implants with a nanotube surface were fabricated and loaded with doxycycline. Afterward, each dental implant with a nanotube surface was placed into 2-mL tubes, removed from solution, and placed in a fresh solution daily for 28 days. Experimental samples from 1, 2, 4, 16, 24, and 28 days were used for this evaluation. The concentration of doxycycline was measured using spectrophotometric analysis at 273-nm absorbance. The antibacterial effect of doxycycline was evaluated by supplementing Porphyromonas gingivalis (P gingivalis) growth media with the solution collected from the dental implants at the aforementioned time intervals for a period of 48 hours under anaerobic conditions. A bacterial viability assay was used to evaluate P gingivalis growth at 550-nm absorbance. Doxycycline concentration varied from 0.33 to 1.22 μg/mL from day 1 to day 28, respectively. A bacterial viability assay showed the highest P gingivalis growth at day 1 (2 nm) and the lowest at day 4 (0.17 nm), with a gradual reduction from day 1 to day 4 of approximately 87.5%. The subsequent growth pattern was maintained and slightly increased from baseline in approximately 48.3% from day 1 to day 24. The final P gingivalis growth measured at day 28 was 29.4% less than the baseline growth. P gingivalis growth was suppressed in media supplemented with solution collected from dental implants with a nanotube surface loaded with doxycycline during a 28-day time interval.

  9. Detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H; Qi, Z; Jiang, H; Zhao, J; Liu, Z; Tang, Z

    2012-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of three black-pigmented bacterial species (Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia) using microarray technology in root canals of teeth associated with primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. Microbial samples were taken from root canals of 80 teeth with pulp necrosis and primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. DNA extracted from the samples was amplified by PCR with universal bacterial primers based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, and the products hybridized with the microarrays in which the specific oligonucleotide probes were added. The results of hybridization were screened by a confocal laser scanner. Pearson chi-square test and the two-sided Fisher exact test were used to analyse whether a significant association existed between the species and symptoms as well as in co-existence of two target organisms by a statistical software package (SAS 8.02). The 16S rRNA gene microarray detected at least one of the three test species in 76% of the study teeth. P. endodontalis, P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were found in 50%, 33% and 45%, respectively. A significant association was found in the presence of the pair P. endodontalis / P. gingivalis (P < 0.005). Both P. endodontalis (P <0.05) and P. gingivalis (P <0.005) had a statistically significant association with the presence of a sinus tract. The simultaneous presence of P. endodontalis and P. gingivalis was also associated with the presence of a sinus tract (P<0.005) and abscess formation (P<0.05). The three black-pigmented bacteria were prevalent in teeth with pulp necrosis and primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. P. gingivalis and P. endodontalis were associated with the presence of sinus tract and abscess formation. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  10. Influence of periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis and cigarette smoking on systemic anti-citrullinated peptide antibody titres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, David F; Apatzidou, Danae; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Oliver-Bell, Jessica; Butcher, John P; Kinane, Denis F; Riggio, Marcello P; Venables, Patrick; McInnes, Iain B; Culshaw, Shauna

    2013-10-01

    Anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) responses may precede clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis. Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase can citrullinate proteins possibly inducing autoimmunity in susceptible individuals. To determine whether periodontitis, carriage of P. gingivalis, smoking and periodontal therapy influence ACPA titres. Serum and plaque samples were collected from 39 periodontitis patients before and after non-surgical periodontal treatment, and from 36 healthy subjects. Carriage of P. gingivalis was determined by PCR of plaque DNA. ACPA was determined by anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Anti-P. gingivalis titres were determined by ELISA. Untreated periodontitis patients had higher anti-CCP antibody titres than healthy controls [three patients (8%) greater than manufacturer suggested assay diagnostic threshold (5 Assay Units/AU) versus none (0%); mean ± SEM: 1.37 ± 0.23 versus 0.40 ± 0.10 AU, p Periodontitis patients who smoked demonstrated lower anti-P. gingivalis (15956 ± 4385 versus 2512 ± 1290 Units/ml, p smoking periodontitis patients (smokers: 1.31 ± 0.35; non-smokers: 1.41 ± 0.32 AU). Healthy smokers demonstrated elevated anti-CCP titres (0.75 ± 0.19 AU), at levels between healthy non-smokers (0.15 ± 0.05 AU) and non-smoker periodontitis patients. Six months after periodontal treatment, there were significant reductions in anti-CCP (non-smokers p periodontitis, P. gingivalis infection may be responsible for inducing autoimmune responses that characterize rheumatoid arthritis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cloning of Bacteroides fragilis plasmid genes affecting metronidazole resistance and ultraviolet survival in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehnert, G.U.; Abratt, V.R.; Goodman, H.J.; Woods, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Since reduced metronidazole causes DNA damage, resistance to metronidazole was used as a selection method for the cloning of Bacteroides fragilis genes affecting DNA repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli. Genes from B. fragilis Bf-2 were cloned on a recombinant plasmid pMT100 which made E. coli AB1157 and uvrA, B, and C mutant strains more resistant to metronidazole, but more sensitive to far uv irradiation under aerobic conditions. The loci affecting metronidazole resistance and uv sensitivity were linked and located on a 5-kb DNA fragment which originated from the small 6-kb cryptic plasmid pBFC1 present in B. fragilis Bf-2 cells

  12. Spinal epidural abscess caused by Bacteroides fragilis group after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion

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    Masaki Ohyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural abscess (SEA is a rare infection complicated in patients who have some risk factors such as injection-drug use, diabetes mellitus, and several illnesses. However, no case of SEA associated with abortion has been reported. Here we report a case of SEA in a 30-year-old woman after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion. The diagnosis of SEA was done by MRI and pus was drained after the cervical discectomy. Bacteroides fragilis group was cultured from the aspirated pus sample. The patient responded to surgical drainage and antibiotics.

  13. Effect of extracytoplasmic function sigma factors on autoaggregation, hemagglutination, and cell surface properties of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Eitoyo; Okamoto-Shibayama, Kazuko; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a bacterium frequently isolated from chronic periodontal lesions and is involved in the development of chronic periodontitis. To colonize the gingival crevice, P. gingivalis has to adapt to environmental stresses. Microbial gene expression is regulated by transcription factors such as those in two-component systems and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. ECF sigma factors are involved in the regulation of environmental stress response genes; however, the roles of individual ECF sigma factors are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functions, including autoaggregation, hemagglutination, gingipain activity, susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, and surface structure formation, of P. gingivalis ECF sigma factors encoded by SigP (PGN_0274), SigCH (PGN_0319), PGN_0450, PGN_0970, and SigH (PGN_1740). Various physiological aspects of the sigP mutant were affected; autoaggregation was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.001), hemagglutination activity was markedly reduced, and enzymatic activities of Kgp and Rgps were significantly decreased (p < 0.001). The other mutants also showed approximately 50% reduction in Rgps activity. Kgp activity was significantly reduced in the sigH mutant (p < 0.001). No significant differences in susceptibilities to tetracycline and ofloxacin were observed in the mutants compared to those of the wild-type strain. However, the sigP mutant displayed an increased susceptibility to ampicillin, whereas the PGN_0450 and sigH mutants showed reduced susceptibility. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed increased levels of outer membrane vesicles formed at the cell surfaces of the sigP mutant. These results indicate that SigP is important for bacterial surface-associated activities, including gingipain activity, autoaggregation, hemagglutination, vesicle formation, and antimicrobial susceptibility. PMID:28931045

  14. Expression, purification and characterization of enoyl-ACP reductase II, FabK, from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hevener, Kirk E.; Mehboob, Shahila; Boci, Teuta; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC)

    2012-10-25

    The rapid rise in bacterial drug resistance coupled with the low number of novel antimicrobial compounds in the discovery pipeline has led to a critical situation requiring the expedient discovery and characterization of new antimicrobial drug targets. Enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis pathway, FAS-II, are distinct from their mammalian counterparts, FAS-I, in terms of both structure and mechanism. As such, they represent attractive targets for the design of novel antimicrobial compounds. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase II, FabK, is a key, rate-limiting enzyme in the FAS-II pathway for several bacterial pathogens. The organism, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is a causative agent of chronic periodontitis that affects up to 25% of the US population and incurs a high national burden in terms of cost of treatment. P. gingivalis expresses FabK as the sole enoyl reductase enzyme in its FAS-II cycle, which makes this a particularly appealing target with potential for selective antimicrobial therapy. Herein we report the molecular cloning, expression, purification and characterization of the FabK enzyme from P. gingivalis, only the second organism from which this enzyme has been isolated. Characterization studies have shown that the enzyme is a flavoprotein, the reaction dependent upon FMN and NADPH and proceeding via a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism to reduce the enoyl substrate. A sensitive assay measuring the fluorescence decrease of NADPH as it is converted to NADP{sup +} during the reaction has been optimized for high-throughput screening. Finally, protein crystallization conditions have been identified which led to protein crystals that diffract x-rays to high resolution.

  15. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Jennifer E Kerr

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions.

  16. Chlorhexidine varnishes effectively inhibit Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans - An in vivo study

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    George Ashwin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlorhexidine varnish (Cervitec- Ivoclar Vivadent- Liechtenstein is a sustained-release delivery system that can provide protection against white spots and gingivitis, which are common iatrogenic side effects of orthodontic treatment. Chlorhexidine in varnish form does not depend on patient compliance, does not stain teeth or alter taste sensation like the mouth rinse. Materials and Methods : A split-mouth technique was followed in the treatment of 30 patients selected by stringent selection criteria, evaluating a single application of the test varnish on two randomly allotted quadrants along with a placebo on the other two quadrants. Streptococcus mutans counts responsible for white spots and P. gingivalis count [using PCR test] responsible for gingivitis were done at the start of the study, and then 1 and 3 months later. Results: The chlorhexidine varnish reduced the Streptococci mutans count at the end of 1 month, and this reduction was statistically significant. At the end of 3 months, there was no difference in the S. mutans counts between the two groups. There was a statistically significant reduction in the P. gingivalis count at the end of both 1 and 3 months in comparison to the placebo group. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine varnishes are capable of reducing S. mutans and P. gingivalis and gingivitis, thus improving the overall oral health of the patient. The side effects of chlorhexidine mouth rinses are not seen with this varnish. An application schedule of at least once a month is recommended as the effectiveness is reduced comparatively at the end of 3 months.

  17. High In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Pac-525 against Porphyromonas gingivalis Biofilms Cultured on Titanium

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    Ji-yin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the potential of short antimicrobial peptides (AMPs as alternative antibacterial agents during the treatment of peri-implantitis, the cytotoxic activity of three short AMPs, that is, Pac-525, KSL-W, and KSL, was determined using the MTT assay. The antimicrobial activity of these AMPs, ranging in concentration from 0.0039 mg/mL to 0.5 mg/mL, against the predominant planktonic pathogens, including Streptococcus sanguis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, involved in peri-implantitis was investigated. Furthermore, 2-day-old P. gingivalis biofilms cultured on titanium surfaces were treated with Pac-525 and subsequently observed and analysed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. The average cell proliferation curve indicated that there was no cytotoxicity due to the three short AMPs. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values of Pac-525 were 0.0625 mg/mL and 0.125 mg/mL, respectively, for P. gingivalis and 0.0078 mg/mL and 0.0156 mg/mL, respectively, for F. nucleatum. Using CLSM, we confirmed that compared to 0.1% chlorhexidine, 0.5 mg/mL of Pac-525 caused a significant decrease in biofilm thickness and a decline in the percentage of live bacteria. These data indicate that Pac-525 has unique properties that might make it suitable for the inhibition the growth of pathogenic bacteria around dental implants.

  18. Antibacterial TAP-mimic electrospun polymer scaffold: effects on P. gingivalis-infected dentin biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Maria Tereza P; Evans, Joshua D; Gregory, Richard L; Valera, Marcia C; Bottino, Marco C

    2016-03-01

    This study sought to investigate, in vitro, the effects of a recently developed triple antibiotic paste (TAP)-mimic polymer nanofibrous scaffold against Porphyromonas gingivalis-infected dentin biofilm. Dentin specimens (4 × 4 × 1 mm(3)) were prepared from human canines. The specimens were sterilized, inoculated with P. gingivalis (ATCC 33277), and incubated for 1 week to allow for biofilm formation. Infected dentin specimens were exposed for 3 days to the following treatments: antibiotic-free polydioxanone scaffold (PDS, control), PDS + 25 wt% TAP [25 mg of each antibiotic (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline) per mL of the PDS polymer solution], or a saturated TAP-based solution (50 mg of each antibiotic per mL of saline solution). In order to serve as the negative control, infected dentin specimens were left untreated (bacteria only). To determine the antimicrobial efficacy of the TAP-mimic scaffold, a colony-forming unit (CFU) per milliliter (n = 10/group) measurement was performed. Furthermore, additional specimens (n = 2/group) were prepared to qualitatively study biofilm inhibition via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistics were performed, and significance was set at the 5% level. Both the TAP-mimic scaffold and the positive control (TAP solution) led to complete bacterial elimination, differing statistically (p scaffolds (2.7 log10 CFU/mL) and the negative control (5.9 log10 CFU/mL). The obtained data revealed significant antimicrobial properties of the novel PDS-based TAP-mimic scaffold against an established P. gingivalis-infected dentin biofilm. Collectively, the data suggest that the proposed nanofibrous scaffold might be used as an alternative to the advocated clinical gold standard (i.e., TAP) for intracanal disinfection prior to regenerative endodontics.

  19. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the "Perioceutics" Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Xuan; Zhu, Cai-Lian; He, Zhi-Yan; Liang, Jing-Ping; Song, Zhong-Chen

    2016-01-01

    "Perioceutics" including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential "perioceutics" treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon) on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS)-induced inflammation. Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence factors (kgp, rgpA, rgpB, hag

  20. Green tea catechins potentiate the effect of antibiotics and modulate adherence and gene expression in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier-Larente, Jade; Morin, Marie-Pierre; Grenier, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    A number of studies have brought evidence that green tea catechins may contribute to periodontal health. The objective of this study was to investigate the ability of a green tea extract and its principal constituent epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) to potentiate the antibacterial effects of antibiotics (metronidazole, tetracycline) against Porphyromonas gingivalis, and to modulate the adherence to oral epithelial cells and expression of genes coding for virulence factors and the high temperature requirement A (HtrA) stress protein in P. gingivalis. A broth microdilution assay was used to determine the antibacterial activity of the green tea extract and EGCG. The synergistic effects of either compounds in association with metronidazole or tetracycline were evaluated using the checkerboard technique. A fluorescent assay was used to determine bacterial adherence to oral epithelial cells. The modulation of gene expression in P. gingivalis was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. The Vibrio harveyi bioassay was used for monitoring quorum sensing inhibitory activity. The MIC values of the green tea extract on P. gingivalis ranged from 250 to 1000 μg/ml, while those of EGCG ranged from 125 to 500 μg/ml. A marked synergistic effect on P. gingivalis growth was observed for the green tea extract or EGCG in combination with metronidazole. Both the green tea extract and EGCG caused a dose-dependent inhibition of P. gingivalis adherence to oral epithelial cells. On the one hand, green tea extract and EGCG dose-dependently inhibited the expression of several P. gingivalis genes involved in host colonization (fimA, hagA, hagB), tissue destruction (rgpA, kgp), and heme acquisition (hem). On the other hand, both compounds increased the expression of the stress protein htrA gene. The ability of the green tea extract and EGCG to inhibit quorum sensing may contribute to the modulation of gene expression. This study explored the preventive and therapeutic potential of green tea

  1. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the "Perioceutics" Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    Full Text Available "Perioceutics" including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential "perioceutics" treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS-induced inflammation.Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence factors (kgp, rgp

  2. Opportunistic Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Modulates Danger Signal ATP-Mediated Antibacterial NOX2 Pathways in Primary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoAnn S. Roberts

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major opportunistic pathogen in the etiology of chronic periodontitis, successfully survives in human gingival epithelial cells (GECs. P. gingivalis abrogates the effects of a host danger molecule, extracellular ATP (eATP/P2X7 signaling, such as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS via the mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOX from primary GECs. However, antimicrobial functions of ROS production are thoroughly investigated in myeloid-lineage immune cells and have not been well-understood in epithelial cells. Therefore, this study characterizes antibacterial NOX2 generated ROS and host downstream effects in P. gingivalis infected human primary GECs. We examined the expression of NOX isoforms in the GECs and demonstrate eATP stimulation increased the mRNA expression of NOX2 (p < 0.05. Specific peptide inhibition of NOX2 significantly reduced eATP-mediated ROS as detected by DCFDA probe. The results also showed P. gingivalis infection can temporally modulate NOX2 pathway by reorganizing the localization and activation of cytosolic molecules (p47phox, p67phox, and Rac1 during 24 h of infection. Investigation into downstream biocidal factors of NOX2 revealed an eATP-induced increase in hypochlorous acid (HOCl in GECs detected by R19-S fluorescent probe, which is significantly reduced by a myeloperoxidase (MPO inhibitor. MPO activity of the host cells was assayed and found to be positively affected by eATP treatment and/or infection. However, P. gingivalis significantly reduced the MPO product, bactericidal HOCl, in early times of infection upon eATP stimulation. Analysis of the intracellular levels of a major host-antioxidant, glutathione during early infection revealed a substantial decrease (p < 0.05 in reduced glutathione indicative of scavenging of HOCl by P. gingivalis infection and eATP treatment. Examination of the mRNA expression of key enzymes in the glutathione synthesis pathway displayed a marked

  3. Photodynamic destruction of Porphyromonas gingivalis induced by delta-aminolaevulinic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieron, Aleksander; Wiczkowski, Andrzej; Adamek, Mariusz; Dyla, Lucja; Mazur, Sebastian; Wierucka-Mlynarczyk, Beata

    2004-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of a novel modalities which has recently been exploited to eradicate various microorganisms. In our study we have evaluated bactericidal efficacy of PDT in the presence of 5-δ aminolaevulinic acid (ALA). Porphyromonas gingivalis were incubated with increasing concentration of ALA and subsequently irradiated by progressive light doses. Complete killing effect was obtained for bacteria irradiated with 25J/cm2 in ALA solution final concentration of 1mM, 5mM, 10mM. Statistical analysis has revealed ALA concentration to be a major factor responsible for eradication of bacteria. The latter may be attributable to the known ALA dark toxicity.

  4. DNA-based adaptive immunity protect host from infection-associated periodontal bone resorption via recognition of Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaozhe; LaRosa, Karen B; Kawai, Toshihisa; Taubman, Martin A

    2014-01-03

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) is one of a constellation of oral organisms associated with human chronic periodontitis. While adaptive immunity to periodontal pathogen proteins has been investigated and is an important component of periodontal bone resorption, the effect of periodontal pathogen DNA in eliciting systemic and mucosal antibody and modulating immune responses has not been investigated. Rowett rats were locally injected with whole genomic Pg DNA in alum. Escherichia coli (Ec) genomic DNA, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) genomic DNA, and saline/alum injected rats served as controls. After various time points, serum IgG and salivary IgA antibody to Ec, Fn or Pg were detected by ELISA. Serum and salivary antibody reactions with Pg surface antigens were determined by Western blot analyses and the specific antigen was identified by mass spectrometry. Effects of genomic DNA immunization on Pg bacterial colonization and experimental periodontal bone resorption were also evaluated. Sera from Pg DNA, Ec DNA and Fn DNA-injected rats did not react with Ec or Fn bacteria. Serum IgG antibody levels to Pg and Pg surface extracts were significantly higher in animals immunized with Pg DNA as compared to the control groups. Rats injected with Pg DNA demonstrated a strong serum IgG and salivary IgA antibody reaction solely to Pg fimbrillin (41kDa), the major protein component of Pg fimbriae. In the Pg DNA-immunized group, the numbers of Pg bacteria in oral cavity and the extent of periodontal bone resorption were significantly reduced after Pg infection. This study suggests that infected hosts may select specific genes from whole genomic DNA of the periodontal pathogen for transcription and presentation. The results indicate that the unique gene selected can initiate a host protective immune response to the parent bacterium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Leonard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4,970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3,184 genes were methylated as well as 1,735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states.

  6. Modulation of inflammasome activity by Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis and associated systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammasomes are large multiprotein complexes localized in the cytoplasm of the cell. They are responsible for the maturation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β and IL-18 as well as for the activation of inflammatory cell death, the so-called pyroptosis. Inflammasomes assemble in response to cellular infection, cellular stress, or tissue damage; promote inflammatory responses and are of great importance in regulating the innate immune system in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis and several chronic systemic diseases. In addition to sensing cellular integrity, inflammasomes are involved in the homeostatic mutualism between the indigenous microbiota and the host. There are several types of inflammasomes of which NLRP3 is best characterized in microbial pathogenesis. Many opportunistic bacteria try to evade the innate immune system in order to survive in the host cells. One of these is the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis which has been shown to have several mechanisms of modulating innate immunity by limiting the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Among them, ATP-/P2X7- signaling is recently associated not only with periodontitis but also with development of several systemic diseases. The present paper reviews multiple mechanisms through which P. gingivalis can modify innate immunity by affecting inflammasome activity.

  7. Acute Toxicity and the Effect of Andrographolide on Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Hyperlipidemia in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M. Jamil; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of andrographolide on hyperlipidemia induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis in rats. Thirty male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into five groups as follows: group 1 (vehicle) and four experimental groups (groups 2, 3, 4, and 5) were challenged orally with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 (0.2 mL of 1.5 ×1012 bacterial cells/mL in 2% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)) five times a week for one month to induce hyperlipidemia. Then, group 3 received a standard oral treatment with simvastatin 100 mg/kg, and groups 4 and 5 received oral treatment with andrographolide 20 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively, for another month. The results showed that total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) were reduced significantly in groups treated with andrographolide. The malondialdehyde (MDA) level was low in treated groups, while antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly increased in these groups (P andrographolide reduce the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatic tissue cells. An acute toxicity test did not show any toxicological symptoms in rats. PMID:23844365

  8. Acute Toxicity and the Effect of Andrographolide on Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Hyperlipidemia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Al Batran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effect of andrographolide on hyperlipidemia induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis in rats. Thirty male Sprague Dawley (SD rats were divided into five groups as follows: group 1 (vehicle and four experimental groups (groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 were challenged orally with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 (0.2 mL of bacterial cells/mL in 2% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS five times a week for one month to induce hyperlipidemia. Then, group 3 received a standard oral treatment with simvastatin 100 mg/kg, and groups 4 and 5 received oral treatment with andrographolide 20 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively, for another month. The results showed that total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C, and triglycerides (TG were reduced significantly in groups treated with andrographolide. The malondialdehyde (MDA level was low in treated groups, while antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were significantly increased in these groups (. Liver tissues of the groups treated with andrographolide reduce the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatic tissue cells. An acute toxicity test did not show any toxicological symptoms in rats.

  9. PERIODONTAL DISEASE AND BONE PATHOGENESIS: THE CROSSTALK BETWEEN CYTOKINES AND PORPHYROMONAS GINGIVALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballini, A; Cantore, S; Farronato, D; Cirulli, N; Inchingolo, F; Papa, F; Malcangi, G; Inchingolo, A D; Dipalma, G; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Santacroce, L; Coscia, M F; Pettini, F; De Vito, D; Scacco, S

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the most frequent cause of tooth loss among adults. It is defined as a plaque-induced inflammation of the periodontal tissues that results in a loss of support of the affected teeth. This process is characterized by destruction of the periodontal attachment apparatus, increased bone resorption with loss of crestal alveolar bone, apical migration of the epithelial attachment, and formation of periodontal pockets. Although the presence of periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis is a prerequisite, the progression of periodontal disease is dependent on the host response to pathogenic bacteria that colonize the tooth surface. Nowadays, a growing body of literature has accumulated to investigate the association between bone diseases, periodontal pathogens and periodontal diseases. The integration of pathogen-associated molecular patterns from microorganisms with their surface receptors in the immune cells, induces the production of several cytokines and chemokines that present either a pro- and/or anti-inflammatory role and the activation of mechanisms of controlling this and the related disease, such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review focuses on the evidence and significance of bone host cell invasion by Porphyromonas gingivalis in the pathogenesis of bone disorders, as well as the different lines of evidence supporting the role of cytokines in bone diseases.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis Periodontal Infection and Its Putative Links with Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim K. Singhrao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are inflammatory conditions affecting the global adult population. In the pathogenesis of PD, subgingival complex bacterial biofilm induces inflammation that leads to connective tissue degradation and alveolar bone resorption around the teeth. In health, junctional epithelium seals the gingiva to the tooth enamel, thus preventing bacteria from entering the gingivae. Chronic PD involves major pathogens (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia which have an immune armoury that can circumvent host’s immune surveillance to create and maintain an inflammatory mediator rich and toxic environment to grow and survive. The neurodegenerative condition, AD, is characterised by poor memory and specific hallmark proteins; periodontal pathogens are increasingly being linked with this dementing condition. It is therefore becoming important to understand associations of periodontitis with relevance to late-onset AD. The aim of this review is to discuss the relevance of finding the keystone periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis in AD brains and its plausible contribution to the aetiological hypothesis of this dementing condition.

  11. Coinfection with Fusobacterium nucleatum can enhance the attachment and invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans to human gingival epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Guo, Hongmei; Wang, Xijun; Lu, Yang; Yang, Chunyu; Yang, Pishan

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate effects of coinfection of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) with Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) on their adhering and invasive capacity to human gingival epithelial cells as well as the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) in human gingival epithelial cells. P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were tested for their ability to attach and invade a human gingival epithelial cell line (Ca9-22) alone or coinfecting with F. nucleatum. Also, expression levels of IL-8 and hBD-2 were detected respectively using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) when Ca9-22 cells were infected with P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans alone or coinfecting with F. nucleatum. F. nucleatum, P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were allowed to adhere and invade Ca9-22 cells, either each strain alone or under coinfection. The adhering and invasive abilities of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were significantly greater when they were coincubated with F. nucleatum (Pnucleatum. Also, galactose disrupted this inhibition on the expression of IL-8 and hBD-2. These results suggested coinfection with F. nucleatum can enhance adhesion and invasion of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans to Ca9-22 cells, as well as inhibition on host innate immune response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cloning and expression of the superoxide dismutase gene of the feline strain of Porphyromonas gingivalis: immunological recognition of the protein by cats with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Daria N; Redwin, Judith; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2002-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that feline members of the genus Porphyromonas are of consequence in periodontal disease in cats. Several possible virulence factors from feline strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis have been described that have similarities to those of human P. gingivalis. Both human and feline strains of P. gingivalis produce superoxide dismutase (SOD) which has been proposed as modulator of the inflammatory response during infection. The objective of this study was to clone the superoxide dismutase gene of feline P. gingivalis, to compare the characteristics of its product with that of the native enzyme and to determine its immunoreactivity in cats with periodontal disease. The sod gene of the feline strain Veterinary Pathology and Bacteriology (VPB) 3457 of P. gingivalis was amplified by PCR and cloned in frame with the alpha-peptide of the LacZ gene of E. coli in plasmid pUC19. This construct expressed SOD activity in E. coli with characteristics similar to those of the native SOD enzyme of P. gingivalis human strain 381 and the parent feline strain VPB 3457. The recombinant SOD had an apparent molecular weight of 54,700+/-1300 (S.E.M.) and was inactivated by 5mM hydrogen peroxide but not by 2mM KCN. There was a significant association (P=0.005) between the immunoreactivity of cats to P. gingivalis VPB 3457 soluble whole cell proteins on immunoblots and their responsiveness to the SOD protein. This suggests that cats showing a marked serum responsiveness to P. gingivalis itself, react to the SOD enzyme and further supports the role of feline P. gingivalis in periodontal disease.

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis and related bacteria: from colonial pigmentation to the type IX secretion system and gliding motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, K

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative, non-motile, anaerobic bacterium implicated as a major pathogen in periodontal disease. P. gingivalis grows as black-pigmented colonies on blood agar, and many bacteriologists have shown interest in this property. Studies of colonial pigmentation have revealed a number of important findings, including an association with the highly active extracellular and surface proteinases called gingipains that are found in P. gingivalis. The Por secretion system, a novel type IX secretion system (T9SS), has been implicated in gingipain secretion in studies using non-pigmented mutants. In addition, many potent virulence proteins, including the metallocarboxypeptidase CPG70, 35 kDa hemin-binding protein HBP35, peptidylarginine deiminase PAD and Lys-specific serine endopeptidase PepK, are secreted through the T9SS. These findings have not been limited to P. gingivalis but have been extended to other bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Many Bacteroidetes species possess the T9SS, which is associated with gliding motility for some of these bacteria. PMID:25546073

  14. Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate Extract: In Vivo Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis in Galleria mellonella Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Aparecida Procópio Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increase of bacterial resistance, medicinal alternatives are being explored. Punica granatum L. is an effective herbal extract with broad spectrum of action and bactericidal, antifungal, anthelmintic potential and being able to modulate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of pomegranate glycolic extract (PGE against the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis by using Galleria mellonella as in vivo model. Fifteen larvae were used per group. Injection of high concentration (200, 100, and 25 mg/mL of PGE showed a toxic effect, leading them to death. A suspension of P. gingivalis (106 cells/mL was inoculated in the left last proleg and PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL were injected into the right proleg. The larvae were then kept at 37°C under the dark. Injection of PGE at any dose statistically improved larvae survival rates. The data were analysed (log-rank test, Mantel-Cox, P<0.05 and showed that all concentrations of PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL presented higher larval survival rates, with significant statistical difference in relation to control group (P. gingivalis. In conclusion, the PGE had antimicrobial action against P. gingivalis in vivo model using G. mellonella.

  15. Phenotypic identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis validated with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E; Sautter, Jacqueline D; Getreu, Adam; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    OBJECTIVE: Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major bacterial pathogen in human periodontitis. This study used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to assess the accuracy of a rapid phenotypic identification scheme for detection of cultivable P.

  16. Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) Extract: In Vivo Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis in Galleria mellonella Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecida Procópio Gomes, Livia; Alves Figueiredo, Lívia Mara; Corrêa Geraldo, Barbara Maria; Isler Castro, Kelly Cristine; Ruano de Oliveira Fugisaki, Luciana; Olavo Cardoso Jorge, Antônio; Dias de Oliveira, Luciane; Campos Junqueira, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increase of bacterial resistance, medicinal alternatives are being explored. Punica granatum L. is an effective herbal extract with broad spectrum of action and bactericidal, antifungal, anthelmintic potential and being able to modulate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of pomegranate glycolic extract (PGE) against the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis by using Galleria mellonella as in vivo model. Fifteen larvae were used per group. Injection of high concentration (200, 100, and 25 mg/mL) of PGE showed a toxic effect, leading them to death. A suspension of P. gingivalis (106 cells/mL) was inoculated in the left last proleg and PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL) were injected into the right proleg. The larvae were then kept at 37°C under the dark. Injection of PGE at any dose statistically improved larvae survival rates. The data were analysed (log-rank test, Mantel-Cox, P < 0.05) and showed that all concentrations of PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL) presented higher larval survival rates, with significant statistical difference in relation to control group (P. gingivalis). In conclusion, the PGE had antimicrobial action against P. gingivalis in vivo model using G. mellonella. PMID:27668280

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis Stimulates TLR2-PI3K Signaling to Escape Immune Clearance and Induce Bone Resorption Independently of MyD88

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    Hasnaa Makkawi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic periodontal pathogen that persists in dysbiotic mixed-species biofilms alongside a dense inflammatory infiltrate of neutrophils and other leukocytes in the subgingival areas of the periodontium. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 mediates the inflammatory response to P. gingivalis and TLR2-deficient mice resist alveolar bone resorption following oral challenge with this organism. Although, MyD88 is an adaptor protein considered necessary for TLR2-induced inflammation, we now report for the first time that oral challenge with P. gingivalis leads to alveolar bone resorption in the absence of MyD88. Indeed, in contrast to prototypical TLR2 agonists, such as the lipopeptide Pam3CSK4 that activates TLR2 in a strictly MyD88-dependent manner, P. gingivalis strikingly induced TLR2 signaling in neutrophils and macrophages regardless of the presence or absence of MyD88. Moreover, genetic or antibody-mediated inactivation of TLR2 completely reduced cytokine production in P. gingivalis-stimulated neutrophils or macrophages, suggesting that TLR2 plays a non-redundant role in the host response to P. gingivalis. In the absence of MyD88, inflammatory TLR2 signaling in P. gingivalis-stimulated neutrophils or macrophages depended upon PI3K. Intriguingly, TLR2-PI3K signaling was also critical to P. gingivalis evasion of killing by macrophages, since their ability to phagocytose this pathogen was reduced in a TLR2 and PI3K-dependent manner. Moreover, within those cells that did phagocytose bacteria, TLR2-PI3K signaling blocked phago-lysosomal maturation, thereby revealing a novel mechanism whereby P. gingivalis can enhance its intracellular survival. Therefore, P. gingivalis uncouples inflammation from bactericidal activity by substituting TLR2-PI3K in place of TLR2-MyD88 signaling. These findings further support the role of P. gingivalis as a keystone pathogen, which manipulates the host inflammatory response in a way

  18. Twenty-eight divergent polysaccharide loci specifying within and amongst strain capsule diversity in three strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, S.; Blakely, G.W.; Houston, S.

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the complete genome sequence of Bacteroides fragilis 638R originally isolated in the USA, was made with two previously sequenced strains isolated in the UK (NCTC 9343) and Japan (YCH46). The presence of 10 loci containing genes associated with polysaccharide biosynthesis, each inclu...

  19. Evaluation of Bacteroides fragilis GB-124 bacteriophages as novel human-associated faecal indicators in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phages infecting human-associated Bacteroides fragilis (GB-124 phages) have been employed in the European Union (EU) to identify human fecal pollution, but their utility for U.S. was unclear. Primary sewage effluent samples were collected seasonally from seven wastewater treatme...

  20. Escherichia coli hemoglobin protease autotransporter contributes to synergistic abscess formation and heme-dependent growth of Bacteroides fragilis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, B.R.; van Dooren, S.J.M.; Dozois, C.M.; Luirink, S.; Oudega, B.

    2002-01-01

    Intra-abdominal infections (IAI) continue to be a serious clinical problem. Bacterial synergism is an important factor that influences the shift from contamination to IAI, leading to the development of lesions and abscess formation. Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis are particularly abundant

  1. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  2. Fermentation of pectin and glucose, and activity of pectin-degrading enzymes in the rabbit caecal bacterium Bacteroides caccae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sirotek, Kamil; Slováková, Lenka; Kopečný, Jan; Marounek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 38, - (2004), s. 327-332 ISSN 0266-8254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/03/0358 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : bacteroides caccae * caecum * metabolism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology , Virology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2004

  3. Enzyme-labeled Antigen Method: Development and Application of the Novel Approach for Identifying Plasma Cells Locally Producing Disease-specific Antibodies in Inflammatory Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lesions of autoimmune and infectious diseases, plasma cells are frequently observed. Antigens recognized by antibodies produced by the plasma cells mostly remain unclear. A new technique identifying these corresponding antigens may give us a breakthrough for understanding the disease from a pathophysiological viewpoint, simply because the immunocytes are seen within the lesion. We have developed an enzyme-labeled antigen method for microscopic identification of the antigen recognized by specific antibodies locally produced in plasma cells in inflammatory lesions. Firstly, target biotinylated antigens were constructed by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system or through chemical biotinylation. Next, proteins reactive to antibodies in tissue extracts were screened and antibody titers were evaluated by the AlphaScreen method. Finally, with the enzyme-labeled antigen method using the biotinylated antigens as probes, plasma cells producing specific antibodies were microscopically localized in fixed frozen sections. Our novel approach visualized tissue plasma cells that produced 1) autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, 2) antibodies against major antigens of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis or radicular cyst, and 3) antibodies against a carbohydrate antigen, Strep A, of Streptococcus pyogenes in recurrent tonsillitis. Evaluation of local specific antibody responses expectedly contributes to clarifying previously unknown processes in inflammatory disorders

  4. Association of serum immunoglobulin-G to Porphyromonas gingivalis with acute cerebral infarction in the Chinese population

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    Zhang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: There is evidence supporting an association between ischemic stroke and periodontitis in western countries. Differing genetic backgrounds and lifestyles among populations may affect this association. The aim of our study was to determine whether antibody titers to Porphyromonas gingivalis are associated with acute cerebral infarction in the Chinese population. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 88 acute cerebral infarction patients and 40 healthy control subjects. Serum immunoglobulin-G (IgG antibody to P. gingivalis was analyzed by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. Serum lipids were determined with the automatic biochemical analyzer. Fibrinogen was measured using automated coagulation analyzer. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were quantified using commercial ELISA kits. The intima-media thickness of the common carotid arteries (IMT-CCA was measured by ultrasonography. Results: The results showed that P. gingivalis IgG antibody levels were significantly higher in acute cerebral infarction cases than in healthy controls (mean ± standard deviation, 11.06 ± 1.49 vs. 9.15 ± 1.70, P < 0.001. There were significant correlations of P. gingivalis IgG titer with total cholesterol (r = 0.34, P = 0.001, low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.39, P < 0.001, apolipoprotein-B (r = 0.30, P = 0.004, hs-CRP (r = 0.35, P = 0.001, IL-6 (r = 0.27, P = 0.011, and IMT-CCA (left: r = 0.306, P = 0.004; right: r = 0.241, P = 0.024. Conclusion: Antibody titers to P. gingivalis are associated with acute cerebral infarction in the Chinese population.

  5. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  6. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, Burton

    1973-01-01

    An antigenic analysis of the alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from dental plaque was performed by use of antisera against a strain of Streptococcus sanguis (M-5) which was isolated from dental plaque. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony tests of Rantz and Randall extracts of 45 strains gave positive reactions with the M-5 antisera. These strains represented 60% of the strains tested. The number of antigens which could be identified in these extracts varied from one to five and were designated a to e. The a antigen was found in 36 of the strains tested, including reference strains of S. sanguis and the group H streptococci. The strains reacting with the M-5 antisera were divided into two majors types: type I consisted of 23 strains in which the a antigen was found alone or with one or more of the c, d, and e antigens; type II consisted of 13 strains in which both the a and b antigens were found with or without one or more of the c, d, and e antigens. The remaining strains contained, either singly or in combination, the b, c, d, and e antigens but not the a antigen. Biochemical tests of representatives of each serotype and reference strains indicated that strains reacting with M-5 antisera were S. sanguis. These findings suggest that S. sanguis strains share common physiological and serological properties. Images PMID:4633291

  7. Chronic oral infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis accelerates atheroma formation by shifting the lipid profile.

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    Tomoki Maekawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested that periodontal disease increases the risk of atherothrombotic disease. Atherosclerosis has been characterized as a chronic inflammatory response to cholesterol deposition in the arteries. Although several studies have suggested that certain periodontopathic bacteria accelerate atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, the mechanistic link between cholesterol accumulation and periodontal infection-induced inflammation is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We orally infected C57BL/6 and C57BL/6.KOR-Apoe(shl (B6.Apoeshl mice with Porphyromonas gingivalis, which is a representative periodontopathic bacterium, and evaluated atherogenesis, gene expression in the aorta and liver and systemic inflammatory and lipid profiles in the blood. Furthermore, the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS from P. gingivalis on cholesterol transport and the related gene expression was examined in peritoneal macrophages. Alveolar bone resorption and elevation of systemic inflammatory responses were induced in both strains. Despite early changes in the expression of key genes involved in cholesterol turnover, such as liver X receptor and ATP-binding cassette A1, serum lipid profiles did not change with short-term infection. Long-term infection was associated with a reduction in serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol but not with the development of atherosclerotic lesions in wild-type mice. In B6.Apoeshl mice, long-term infection resulted in the elevation of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, LDL and total cholesterols in addition to the reduction of HDL cholesterol. This shift in the lipid profile was concomitant with a significant increase in atherosclerotic lesions. Stimulation with P. gingivalis LPS induced the change of cholesterol transport via targeting the expression of LDL receptor-related genes and resulted in the disturbance of regulatory mechanisms of the cholesterol level in macrophages

  8. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis group strains to cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin/clavulanate

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    PEIXOTO JÚNIOR Arnaldo Aires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 40 strains of the B. fragilis group was isolated from clinical specimens in two hospital centers in Fortaleza from 1993 to 1997. The most frequently isolated species was Bacteroides fragilis (19 strains and most isolates came from intra-abdominal and wound infections. The susceptibility profile was traced for cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin-clavulanate by using the agar dilution reference method. All isolates were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate (128/2mug/ml. Resistance rates of 15 and 70% were detected to cefoxitin (64mug/ml and cefoperazone (64mug/ml, respectively. Such regional results permit a better orientation in choosing this group of antibiotics for prophylaxis and therapy especially in relation to cefoxitin, which is frequently used in the hospital centers studied.

  9. The role of efflux pumps in Bacteroides fragilis resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yekani, Mina; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2018-05-01

    The resistance of Bacteroides fragilis to the most antimicrobial agents has been reported in the world. Identification of the microbial resistance mechanisms can play an important role in controlling these resistances. Currently, B. fragilis is resistant to most antibiotics. The multi-drug efflux pumps have been shown to underlie the antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis strains. Two types of these efflux pumps including RND and MATE can be regarded as main structures responsible for antibiotic resistance. Therefore, the strategy for suppressing of this efflux system may be useful in the treatment and control of the multidrug-resistant B. fragilis. The purpose of this study is to review the B. fragilis efflux pumps and their functions in the resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Origins of fermentation products formed during growth of Bacteroides ruminicola on glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountfort, D.O.; Robertson, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Bacteroides ruminicola grown on complex medium with glucose as carbon source gave acetate, CO 2 , formate and succinate as main fermentation products. No evidence was found for significant glucose catabolism by pathways other than the Embden-Meyerhof sequence. However, [U- 14 C] glucose fermentation gave products whose specific radioactivities were much lower than expected. There appear to be two main causes. Firstly, a rapid exchange occurred between metabolic intermediates and CO 2 , probably due to reversibility of the pathway between phosphoenolpyruvate and fumarate. Secondly, non-glucose precursors, mainly peptides and acetate, added to the medium as growth factors, also gave rise to the above end-products. The distortions that such reactions introduce into measurements of ATP molar growth yields based on product analyses and measurements of carbon flux based on radioactivity recovered in products are discussed. (author)

  11. Human Primary Epithelial Cells Acquire an Epithelial-Mesenchymal-Transition Phenotype during Long-Term Infection by the Oral Opportunistic Pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis

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    Jungnam Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a host-adapted oral pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis that successfully survives and persists in the oral epithelium. Recent studies have positively correlated periodontitis with increased risk and severity of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Intriguingly, the presence of P. gingivalis enhances tumorigenic properties independently of periodontitis and has therefore been proposed as a potential etiological agent for OSCC. However, the initial host molecular changes induced by P. gingivalis infection which promote predisposition to cancerous transformation through EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, has never been studied in human primary cells which more closely mimic the physiological state of cells in vivo. In this study, we examine for the first time in primary oral epithelial cells (OECs the expression and activation of key EMT mediators during long-term P. gingivalis infection in vitro. We examined the inactive phosphorylated state of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (p-GSK3β over 120 h P. gingivalis infection and found p-GSK3β, an important EMT regulator, significantly increases over the course of infection (p < 0.01. Furthermore, we examined the expression of EMT-associated transcription factors, Slug, Snail, and Zeb1 and found significant increases (p < 0.01 over long-term P. gingivalis infection in protein and mRNA expression. Additionally, the protein expression of mesenchymal intermediate filament, Vimentin, was substantially increased over 120 h of P. gingivalis infection. Analysis of adhesion molecule E-cadherin showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in expression and a loss of membrane localization along with β-catenin in OECs. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs 2, 7, and 9 are all markedly increased with long-term P. gingivalis infection. Finally, migration of P. gingivalis infected cells was evaluated using scratch assay in which primary OEC monolayers were wounded and treated with

  12. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, Halina [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Wojaczynski, Jacek [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Mariusz [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw [Laboratory of Biophysics, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, 50-148 Wroclaw (Poland); Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Teresa, E-mail: Teresa.Olczak@biotech.uni.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-05-29

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  13. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtowicz, Halina; Wojaczynski, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw; Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw; Olczak, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and 1 H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  14. A two-component system regulates hemin acquisition in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

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    Jodie C Scott

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe associated with infection of the periodontia. The organism has a small number of two-component signal transduction systems, and after comparing genome sequences of strains W83 and ATCC 33277 we discovered that the latter was mutant in histidine kinase (PGN_0752, while the cognate response regulator (PGN_0753 remained intact. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling and ChIP-seq assays were carried out with an ATCC 33277 transconjugant containing the functional histidine kinase from strain W83 (PG0719. The data showed that the regulon of this signal transduction system contained genes that were involved in hemin acquisition, including gingipains, at least three transport systems, as well as being self-regulated. Direct regulation by the response regulator was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, the system appears to be activated by hemin and the regulator acts as both an activator and repressor.

  15. Susceptibility trends of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates from Buenos Aires, Argentina Tendencias en el perfil de sensibilidad de aislamientos del grupo Bacteroides fragilis obtenidos en Buenos Aires, Argentina

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    L. Fernández Canigia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the susceptibility trends to seven antibiotics of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates based on three survey studies performed by the Committee of Anaerobic Bacteria between 1989 and 2002. Fifty three, 82 and 65 B. fragilis group isolates were collected during each period. The antimicrobial agents included were: ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam (2:1, cefoxitin, piperacillin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs were determined according to the reference agar dilution method described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI, formerly NCCLS. The most active antibiotics for B. fragilis and non- B. fragilis species throughout the three periods were: imipenem with 99.1 and 100% of activity, respectively, and metronidazole with 100% of activity. The susceptibility to ampicillin-sulbactam showed a decrease, from 100% to 90.3% and to 82.4 % in the last period, for both B. fragilis and non-B. fragilis species, respectively. The overall susceptibility rates for cefoxitin, piperacillin, and clindamycin were significantly different between B. fragilis and non-B. fragilis species (84.2% vs. 56.5%; 85.9% vs. 66.7% and 88.8% vs. 64.7%, respectively, pEl objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar las variaciones en el perfil de sensibilidad frente a siete antimicrobianos de aislamientos del grupo Bacteroides fragilis, mediante el análisis de tres relevamientos realizados por la Subcomisión de Bacterias Anaerobias de la Asociación Argentina de Microbiología (años 1989-1991, 1996-1998 y 1999-2002. En los citados períodos se recolectaron 53, 82 y 65 aislamientos del grupo B. fragilis. Se evaluó la actividad de: ampicilina, ampicilina-sulbactama (2:1, cefoxitina, piperacilina, imipenem, clindamicina y metronidazol. La concentración inhibitoria mínima (CIM se determinó utilizando el método de dilución en agar, según las normas del Clinical and Laboratory

  16. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

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    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  17. The Hemoglobin Receptor Protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis Inhibits Receptor Activator NF-κB Ligand-Induced Osteoclastogenesis from Bone Marrow Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, Yuji; Hotokezaka, Hitoshi; Ohara, Naoya; Naito, Mariko; Sakai, Eiko; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Narita, Yuka; Kitaura, Hideki; Yoshida, Noriaki; Nakayama, Koji

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular proteinaceous factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, that influence receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow macrophages were investigated. The culture supernatant of P. gingivalis had the ability to inhibit RANKL-induced in vitro osteoclastogenesis. A major protein of the culture supernatant, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR), suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent f...

  18. Regulation of caspase-3 expression to maintain fetal growth in Porphyromonas gingivalis-infected pregnant rats

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    Banun Kusumawardani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease has been involved in a variety of systemic disorders and suspected as a potential risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Periodontal pathogenic bacteria may actively regulate embryonic development, implantation and placental trophoblast cell invasion. This study aimed to analyze the role of TNF-α, IL-10 and caspase-3 to maintain fetal growth in Porphyromonasgingivalis-infected pregnant rats. Female rats were infected with live-Porphyromonas gingivalis at concentration of 2x109 cells/ml into subgingival sulcus area of the maxillary first molar before and during pregnancy. They were sacrificed on gestational day (GD-14 and GD20. The weight and length of placentas and fetuses were evaluated. The expression of TNF-α, IL-10 and caspase-3 in macrophages and trophoblast cells were detected by immunohistochemistry. On GD14, TNF-α (R2=0.416;P=0.000 and IL-10 (R2=0.187;P=0.012 had an important role to increase expression of caspase-3 in the placenta, but only TNF-α (R2=0.393;P=0.000 was able to increase the expression of caspase-3 on GD20. TNF-α and caspase-3 also had an important role (P0.000. The increasing expressions of TNF-α and IL-10 did not only enhance immune protection, but also maintained the trophoblast cells survival by regulating expression of caspase-3. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection in maternal periodontal tissue can lead to decrease in placental weight, fetal weight and fetal length which mediated by increasing expression of TNF-α, IL-10 and caspase-3 in the placenta.

  19. Stem cells rescue cardiomyopathy induced by P. gingivalis-LPS via miR-181b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tung-Sheng; Battsengel, Sarnai; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Pan, Lung-Fa; Lin, Yueh-Min; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Lin, Feng-Huei; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-12-11

    Systemic inflammation induced by bacterial infection is one of several causative agents for cardiovascular disorders in patients with periodontal disease. Experimental results indicate that miRNAs play important roles in systemic inflammation induced by endotoxins. Further evidence states that stem cell based therapy shows potential in the treatment of inflammatory responses induced by sepsis. This study investigates if stem cells show protective effects on cardiomyocyte damage induced by porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) through regulating miRNAs. H9c2 cardiomyoblasts and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) were damaged using Pg-LPS in this study. Pg-LPS damaged H9c2 or NRCMs were then rescued using adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The experimental results reveal that Pg-LPS treatment is capable of inducing TLR4/NFκB axis activation, cell death signaling and IGF1R/PI3 K/Akt axis suppression. miR181b was downregulated in Pg-LPS damaged H9c2/NRCMs. All markers were improved in H9c2/NRCMs cocultured with ADSC. miR181b mimic and inhibitor confirmed that miR181b plays a central role in regulating the cardio protective effect on Pg-LPS damaged H9c2/NRCMs cocultured with ADSC. miR181b acts as potential therapeutic marker in cardiomyopathy induced by Pg-LPS. Transplantation of adipose-derived stem cells show potential in the treatment of cardiomyopathy induced by porphyromonas gingivalis endotoxin via regulation of miR181b. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Exposure to Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS during macrophage polarisation leads to diminished inflammatory cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Louise A; Bennett, Jon H; Abate, Wondwossen; Jackson, Simon K

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of concurrent LPS and cytokine priming, reflective of the in vivo milieu, on macrophage production of key periodontitis associated cytokines TNF, IL-1β and IL-6. THP-1 cells were pre-treated with combinations of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), concurrently with polarising cytokines IFNγ and IL-4, or PMA as a non-polarised control. Production of key periodontitis associated cytokines in response to subsequent LPS challenge were measured by enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with cells incubated with IFNγ or IL-4 alone in the "polarisation" phase, macrophages that were incubated with LPS during the first 24h displayed a down-regulation of TNF and IL-1β production upon secondary LPS treatment in the "activation" phase. In all three macrophage populations (M0, M1 and M2), pre-treatment with P. gingivalis LPS during the polarisation process led to a significant decrease in TNF production in response to subsequent activation by LPS (p=0.007, p=0.002 and p=0.004, respectively). Pre-treatment with E. coli LPS also led to a significant down-regulation in TNF production in all three macrophage populations (pLPS during polarisation also led to the down-regulation of IL-1β in the M1 population (pLPS challenge, whereby production of key periodontitis associated cytokines TNF and IL-1β is reduced after exposure to LPS during the polarisation phase, even in the presence of inflammatory polarising cytokines. This diminished cytokine response may lead to the reduced ability to clear infection and transition to chronic inflammation seen in periodontitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Variabilidad de la síntesis de RANKL por linfocitos T frente a distintos serotipos capsulares de Porphyromonas gingivalis Variability in the RANKL synthesis by T lymphocytes in response to different Porphyromonas gingivalis capsular serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Navarrete

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Propósito: Las periodontitis representan un grupo heterogéneo de infecciones periodontales cuya etiología son las bacterias residentes en el biofilm subgingival. Aunque este biofilm está constituido por una amplia variedad de especies bacterianas, sólo un número limitado de especies, como Porphyromonas gingivalis, se ha asociado a la etiología de la enfermedad. P. gingivalis expresa diversos factores de virulencia que pueden causar daño directo a los tejidos del hospedero; sin embargo, su mayor patogenicidad involucra la inducción de una respuesta inmuno-inflamatoria, durante la cual se secretan una amplia variedad de citoquinas, quimioquinas y mediadores inflamatorios que pueden inducir la destrucción de los tejidos de soporte de los dientes y la pérdida de ellos. Método: En esta investigación, se evaluó si los distintos serotipos capsulares (K de P. gingivalis pueden determinar los niveles de síntesis de RANKL, citoquina clave en la destrucción del hueso alveolar durante la periodontitis. Para ello, se cuantificaron los niveles de expresión de RANKL mediante PCR cuantitativa y los niveles de secreción mediante ELISA en linfocitos T activados en presencia de los serotipos capsulares K1-K6 de P. gingivalis, y estos se correlacionaron a los niveles de expresión de los factores de transcripción asociados a cada uno de los fenotipos de linfocitos efectores: Th1 (T-bet, Th2 (GATA-3, Th17 (RORC2 y Treg (Foxp3. Resultados: Mayores niveles de expresión y secreción de RANKL fueron detectados en linfocitos T activados en presencia de los serotipos K1 y K2 de P. gingivalis, en comparación a los detectados ante los otros serotipos. Además, estos mayores niveles de RANKL se correlacionaron positivamente con los niveles de expresión de RORC2. Conclusión: Estos datos demuestran que la síntesis de RANKL por linfocitos T se restringe a ciertos serotipos capsulares de P. gingivalis (K1 y K2 y permiten sugerir que los serotipos K1 y K2

  2. Efficacy of a solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor electric toothbrush on P. gingivalis biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takenori; Hirai, Naoki; Oishi, Yasuhiro; Uswak, Gerry; Komiyama, Kunio; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2015-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of a solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor electric toothbrush on Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm. P. gingivalis cells were cultivated on sterilized coverslips under anaerobic conditions and were used as a biofilm. To evaluate the efficacy of the solar-powered TiO2 electric toothbrush on the P. gingivalis biofilm, the bacterial cell biofilm coverslips were placed into sterilized phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and brushed for 1 minute. Following mechanical brushing, the coverslips were stained with 1% crystal violet (CV) for 10 seconds at room temperature. The efficacy of P. gingivalis biofilm removal by the solar-powered TiO2 electric toothbrush was measured through the absorbance of the CV-stained solution containing the removed biofilm at 595 nm. The antimicrobial effect of the solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor was evaluated by the P. gingivalis bacterial count in PBS by blacklight irradiation for 0 to 60 minutes at a distance of 7 cm. The electrical current though the solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor was measured by a digital multimeter. The biofilm removal by the solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biofilm removal rate of the solar-powered TiO2 electric toothbrush was 90.1 ± 1.4%, which was 1.3-fold greater than that of non-solar-powered electric toothbrushes. The solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor significantly decreased P. gingivalis cells and biofilm microbial activity in a time-dependent manner (P< 0.01). The electrical current passing through the solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor was 70.5 ± 0.1 µA, which was a 27-fold higher intensity than the non-solar-powered brush. SEM analysis revealed that the solar-powered TiO2 semiconductor caused a biofilm disruption and that cytoplasmic contents were released from the microbial cells.

  3. Identification of Dipeptidyl-Peptidase (DPP)5 and DPP7 in Porphyromonas endodontalis, Distinct from Those in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimata, Haruka; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Baba, Tomomi T; Hoshino, Tomonori; Fujiwara, Taku; Shimoyama, Yu; Kimura, Shigenobu; Nemoto, Takayuki K

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs) that liberate dipeptides from the N-terminal end of oligopeptides are crucial for the growth of Porphyromonas species, anaerobic asaccharolytic gram negative rods that utilize amino acids as energy sources. Porphyromonas endodontalis is a causative agent of periapical lesions with acute symptoms and Asp/Glu-specific DPP11 has been solely characterized in this organism. In this study, we identified and characterized two P. endodontalis DPPs, DPP5 and DPP7. Cell-associated DPP activity toward Lys-Ala-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (MCA) was prominent in P. endodontalis ATCC 35406 as compared with the Porphyromonas gingivalis strains ATCC 33277, 16-1, HW24D1, ATCC 49417, W83, W50, and HNA99. The level of hydrolysis of Leu-Asp-MCA by DPP11, Gly-Pro-MCA by DPP4, and Met-Leu-MCA was also higher than in the P. gingivalis strains. MER236725 and MER278904 are P. endodontalis proteins belong to the S9- and S46-family peptidases, respectively. Recombinant MER236725 exhibited enzymatic properties including substrate specificity, and salt- and pH-dependence similar to P. gingivalis DPP5 belonging to the S9 family. However, the kcat/Km figure (194 µM-1·sec-1) for the most potent substrate (Lys-Ala-MCA) was 18.4-fold higher as compared to the P. gingivalis entity (10.5 µM-1·sec-1). In addition, P. endodontalis DPP5 mRNA and protein contents were increased several fold as compared with those in P. gingivalis. Recombinant MER278904 preferentially hydrolyzed Met-Leu-MCA and exhibited a substrate specificity similar to P. gingivalis DPP7 belonging to the S46 family. In accord with the deduced molecular mass of 818 amino acids, a 105-kDa band was immunologically detected, indicating that P. endodontalis DPP7 is an exceptionally large molecule in the DPP7/DPP11/S46 peptidase family. The enhancement of four DPP activities was conclusively demonstrated in P. endodontalis, and remarkable Lys-Ala-MCA-hydrolysis was achieved by qualitative and quantitative

  4. Effects of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin (LL-37) on immortalized gingival fibroblasts infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and irradiated with 625-nm LED light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JiSun; Kim, SangWoo; Lim, WonBong; Choi, HongRan; Kim, OkJoon

    2015-11-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis causes chronic inflammatory diseases (periodontal diseases) that destroy the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Antimicrobial peptides are crucial components of the host defense response required to maintain cellular homeostasis during microbial invasion. Because light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation influences the host defense response against bacterial infections, we investigated its effect on immortalized gingival fibroblasts (IGFs) infected with P. gingivalis. IGFs were incubated with P. gingivalis following LED irradiation at 425, 525, and 625 nm. The dark 1 group comprised noninfected, nonirradiated IGFs, and the dark 2 group comprised nonirradiated IGFs infected with P. gingivalis. These groups served as controls. Infected cells and controls were assayed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and were subjected to RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses to determine the levels of expression of antimicrobial peptides. LED irradiation enhanced the bactericidal effects of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in cells infected with P. gingivalis. Irradiation at 625 nm decreased inflammatory responses involving the release of prostaglandin E2 induced by ROS in P. gingivalis-infected IGFs. LED irradiation at 625 nm induces an anti-inflammatory response that elicits the production of antimicrobial peptides, providing an efficacious method of treatment for periodontal diseases.

  5. Comparison of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharides Clinically Isolated from Root Canal Infection in the Induction of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Frederico C; Leite, Fábio R M; Nóbrega, Letícia M M; Endo, Marcos S; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Darveau, Richard P; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) purified from Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis strains, both isolated from primary endodontic infection (PEI) in the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α released by macrophage cells. Moreover, LPS was purified from F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis American Type Collection (ATCC) and its biological activity was compared to respectively clinical isolates strains. F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis strains clinically isolated from PEI had their identification confirmed by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. LPS from F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and their respective ATCC strains were extracted by using Tri-reagent method. Macrophages (Raw 264.7) were stimulated with LPS at 100 ng/mL for 4, 8 and 12 h. Secretion of IL-1 β and TNF-α was also determined. Paired t-test, repeated measures ANOVA and one-way ANOVA were employed. All LPS induced significant production of IL-1β and TNF-α, with the former being secreted at higher levels than the latter in all time-points. F. nucleatum induced a higher expression of both cytokines compared to P. gingivalis (pnucleatum and P. gingivalis LPS presented different patterns of activation against macrophages as seen by the IL-1β and TNF-α production, which may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of apical periodontitis. Moreover, clinical and ATCC strains grown under the same in vitro environment conditions presented similar biological activity.

  6. Dual Action of Myricetin on Porphyromonas gingivalis and the Inflammatory Response of Host Cells: A Promising Therapeutic Molecule for Periodontal Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grenier

    Full Text Available Periodontitis that affects the underlying structures of the periodontium, including the alveolar bone, is a multifactorial disease, whose etiology involves interactions between specific bacterial species of the subgingival biofilm and the host immune components. In the present study, we investigated the effects of myricetin, a flavonol largely distributed in fruits and vegetables, on growth and virulence properties of Porphyromonas gingivalis as well as on the P. gingivalis-induced inflammatory response in host cells. Minimal inhibitory concentration values of myricetin against P. gingivalis were in the range of 62.5 to 125 μg/ml. The iron-chelating activity of myricetin may contribute to the antibacterial activity of this flavonol. Myricetin was found to attenuate the virulence of P. gingivalis by reducing the expression of genes coding for important virulence factors, including proteinases (rgpA, rgpB, and kgp and adhesins (fimA, hagA, and hagB. Myricetin dose-dependently prevented NF-κB activation in a monocyte model. Moreover, it inhibited the secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 by P. gingivalis-stimulated gingival fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study brought clear evidence that the flavonol myricetin exhibits a dual action on the periodontopathogenic bacterium P. gingivalis and the inflammatory response of host cells. Therefore, myricetin holds promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment/prevention of periodontitis.

  7. Modelación por homología de la proteína Luxs de Porphyromonas gingivalis cepa W83 Modelling by homology of Luxs protein in Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83

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    A Díaz Caballero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: En las proteínas no se logra siempre su cristalización, de buen tamaño y de buena calidad para someterla a difracción de rayos X. De tal manera que se abre un campo para el desarrollo de estudios teóricos moleculares y proteínicos, que permiten la representación de las moléculas en tres dimensiones, proporcionando una información espacial para estudiar la interacción entre ligandos y receptores macromoleculares. Materialesy Métodos: Estudio In silico, a partir del análisis de secuencias primarias de seis diferentes proteínas LuxS cristalizadas de diversas bacterias, se seleccionó la proteína 1J6X del Helicobacter pylori, por su similaridad con la secuencia de la proteína LuxS en Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis cepa W83, para producir un modelo por homología de esta proteína, utilizando los programas Sybyl y MOE. Se realizó un acoplamiento con el ligando natural para evaluar la reproducibilidad del modelo en un ambiente biológico. Resultados: Se desarrolló el modelado de la proteína LuxS de P. gingivalis cepa W83, que permite el acercamiento a una estructura que se propone, por la interacción entre la proteína y su ligando natural. El modelo generado con recursos computacionales logró una correcta estructura molecular que aceptó la realización de diversos cálculos. El acoplamiento demostró una cavidad donde se logran diversas posiciones del ligando con buenos resultados. Conclusiones: Se obtuvo un modelo 3D para la proteína LuxS en la P. gingivalis cepa W83 validado por diferentes métodos computacionales con una adecuada reproducibilidad biológica por medio del acoplamiento molecular.Background: Crystallization is not always achieved for all proteins in a good size and a good quality for X-ray diffraction. So that condition opens a field for the development of theoretical molecular and protein studies allowing the representation of the molecules in 3D, providing spatial information to study

  8. Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis y su relación con la expresión de quorum sensing Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and its relation to quorum sensing expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Díaz Caballero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Los mecanismos de señalización bacteriana desempeñan un papel fundamental en el establecimiento y progresión de la enfermedad periodontal. Dadas estas circunstancias es crucial profundizar en el entendimiento de estos mecanismos para intentar proveer estrategias terapéuticas novedosas. El presente artículo de revisión, de carácter narrativo, tiene como objetivo conducir un análisis crítico de la evidencia disponible sobre la influencia de Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg y expresión de quorum sensing (Qs en enfermedad periodontal. Se realizó una búsqueda a través de bases de datos como Ovid (MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Hinari. El conocimiento actual de estos mecanismos ofrece la posibilidad de desarrollar nuevos y profundos estudios (teóricos y experimentales sobre la expresión del QS en pacientes con enfermedad periodontal y permitirá un novedoso campo de investigación con el que no se cuenta en la actualidad. Desde su descubrimiento, el QS se vislumbra como un espacio de investigación valioso en el cual se debe insistir de manera permanente. La anterior evidencia permite concluir que a través de la regulación de la expresión de determinados genes en bacterias como la PG, se puede efectuar la inhibición de la formación de las biopelículas que tiene efectos directos e indirectos sobre el desarrollo de la enfermedad periodontal.The bacterial signaling mechanisms play a key role in the establishment and progression of periodontal disease. Due to these circumstances it is crucial to deepen in the understanding of these mechanisms to try to provide novel therapeutic strategies. The objective of present narrative literature review was to make a critical analyze of the available evidence on the influence of Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG and the quorum sensing expression in periodontal disease. Using the Ovid (MEDLINE ScienceDirect, Hinari database we made a search. The current knowledge of these mechanisms offers the possibility of

  9. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  10. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis DNA in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghotaslou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis DNA in the synovial fluid and rheumatoid arthritis. The synovial fluid samples were collected from 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 20 patients with not suffering from rheumatism, overall 42 patients were investigated. The presence of P. gingivalis DNA was evaluated by the real-time PCR method. There was a significant relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and non-rheumatoid arthritis with the DNA number (Pv 0.05. DNA of periodontal pathogens can be found in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients. It shows oral bacteria may play a role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Possible misidentification of Bacteroides sp., probably B. ureolyticus as Taylorella equigenitalis: implications for the laboratory diagnosis of CEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Xu, J; Buckley, T C

    2001-01-01

    A wild-type isolate with similar morphological and phenotypic properties to Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative bacterial agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM), was referred for molecular identification by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. A species-specific PCR failed to yield a product compatible with that of T. equigenitalis. The direct sequencing of the universal 16S rRNA PCR amplicon suggested the presence of a Bacteroides sp., probably Bacteroides ureolyticus, with no consequent effects on the movement and transportation of the animal. Adoption of such a molecular means of identification through sequencing may aid in the identification of the atypical forms of Taylorella equigenitalis, as recently described, as well as differentiating this species from Taylorella asinigenitalis.

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide induces cognitive dysfunction, mediated by neuronal inflammation via activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Chunbo; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Huiwen; Dong, Jiachen; Lu, Weili; Song, Zhongchen; Zhou, Wei

    2018-02-09

    Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (P. gingivalis-LPS) is one of the major pathogenic factors of chronic periodontitis (CP). Few reports on the correlation between P. gingivalis-LPS and cognitive function exist. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of P. gingivalis-LPS on cognitive function and the associated underlying mechanism in C57BL/6 mice. The C57BL/6 mice were injected with P. gingivalis-LPS (5 mg kg -1 ) either with or without Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor (TAK-242, 5 mg kg -1 ). After 7 days, behavioral alterations were assessed with the open field test (OFT), Morris water maze (MWM) test, and passive avoidance test (PAT). The activation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice was observed by immunohistochemistry. The expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8), TLRs (TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4), and CD14 and the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway (IRAK1, p65, and p-p65) in the cerebral cortex of the mice were evaluated by RT-PCR, ELISA, and western blot. The OFT showed that P. gingivalis-LPS did not affect the initiative and activity of mice. Administration of P. gingivalis-LPS significantly impaired spatial learning and memory during the MWM test and attenuated the ability of passive avoidance learning during the PAT. Both astrocytes and microglia were activated in the cortex and hippocampus. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8) was upregulated by P. gingivalis-LPS in the cortex. In addition, the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was activated (TLR4, CD14, IRAK1, and p-p65). These effects were effectively alleviated by TAK-242. Administration of P. gingivalis-LPS can lead to learning and memory impairment in C57BL/6 mice. This impairment is mediated by activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway. Our study suggests that P. gingivalis-LPS-induced neuroinflammation plays an important role

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix extracted from mono- and dual-species biofilms of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Marwan Mansoor Ali; Pettersen, Veronika Kuchařová; Nerland, Audun H; Wiker, Harald G; Bakken, Vidar

    2017-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis are members of a complex dental biofilm associated with periodontal disease. In this study, we cultured F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis as mono- and dual-species biofilms, and analyzed the protein composition of the biofilms extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM) by high-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis was used for identification of proteins and sequence-based functional characterization for their classification and prediction of possible roles in EPM. We identified 542, 93 and 280 proteins in the matrix of F. nucleatum, P. gingivalis, and the dual-species biofilm, respectively. Nearly 70% of all EPM proteins in the dual-species biofilm originated from F. nucleatum, and a majority of these were cytoplasmic proteins, suggesting an enhanced lysis of F. nucleatum cells. The proteomic analysis also indicated an interaction between the two species: 22 F. nucleatum proteins showed differential levels between the mono and dual-species EPMs, and 11 proteins (8 and 3 from F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis, respectively) were exclusively detected in the dual-species EPM. Oxidoreductases and chaperones were among the most abundant proteins identified in all three EPMs. The biofilm matrices in addition contained several known and hypothetical virulence proteins, which can mediate adhesion to the host cells and disintegration of the periodontal tissues. This study demonstrated that the biofilm matrix of two important periodontal pathogens consists of a multitude of proteins whose amounts and functionalities vary largely. Relatively high levels of several of the detected proteins might facilitate their potential use as targets for the inhibition of biofilm development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of viable vs. dead Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis using selective quantitative real-time PCR with propidium monoazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M C; Marín, M J; Figuero, E; Llama-Palacios, A; Herrera, D; Sanz, M

    2013-04-01

    One of the major disadvantages of DNA-based microbial diagnostics is their inability to differentiate DNA between viable and dead microorganisms, which could be important when studying etiologically relevant pathogens. The aim of this investigation was to optimize a method for the selective detection and quantification of only viable Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis cells by combining quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and propidium monoazide (PMA). Three different concentrations of PMA (10, 50 or 100 μm) were added to suspensions of 10(6) (CFU)/mL of viable/dead A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis cells. After DNA isolation, qPCR was carried out using specific primers and probes for the tested bacteria. PMA was further tested with different mixtures containing varying ratios of viable and dead cells. The efficacy of PMA to detect viable/dead cells was tested by analysis of variance. For these specific bacterial pathogens, 100 μm PMA resulted in a significant reduction of qPCR amplification with dead cells (10(6) CFU/mL), while with viable cells no significant inhibition was detected. PMA was also effective in detecting selectively viable cells by qPCR detection, when mixtures of varying ratios of viable and dead bacteria were used. This study demonstrated the efficiency of PMA for differentiating viable and dead A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis cells. This method of PMA-qPCR may be useful for monitoring new antimicrobial strategies and for assessing the pathogenic potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis in different oral conditions when using molecular diagnostic methods. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Prevalence of genital tract infection with Entamoeba gingivalis among copper T 380A intrauterine device users in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Ashraf A; El-Malky, Mohamed M

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to study the prevalence and potential pathogenicity of E. gingivalis in the genital tracts of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) users. A prospective study conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department and Fertility Care Unit, Mansoura University Hospital, Egypt. The study was carried out on 87 IUD users and 87 nonusers. The copper T 380A IUD was removed from each woman and washed with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) pH 7.4; the IUD wash was centrifuged. The sediment was resuspended in 2 ml PBS and divided into two portions. One portion was used for preparation of direct and iron hematoxylin-stained smears. Direct smears and stained smears were examined for detailed morphology. The second portion of the sediment was used for DNA extraction and subsequent PCR amplification targeting the small subunit ribosomal RNA of E. gingivalis. The parasite was found in 12.64% of IUD users and in 6.9% of non users (p>.3). It was found that 90.9% of those harboring E. gingivalis in their genital tract had the parasite in their oral cavity. The percentage of genital infection in IUD users increased with low level of education, rural areas, insertion in primary health-care center and among those not washing hands before checking the strings. In the infected cases, vaginal discharge was more common (81.8%) than in noninfected cases (32.9%), such difference was statistically significant (p<.05). Also, excessive vaginal discharge is more common than backache and menorrhagia in the infected cases. Higher incidence of E. gingivalis infection in IUD users is related to oral cavity infection, residence, the facility where they inserted their IUD and washing hands attitude before checking the strings. We recommend treatment of gingival infection, proper counseling and medical education on oral and genital tract hygiene for IUD users. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis are associated with ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease in humans: an in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Salomon Ghizoni

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the role of periodontal disease in the development of stroke or cerebral infarction in patients by evaluating the clinical periodontal conditions and the subgingival levels of periodontopathogens. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with ischemic (I-CVA or hemorrhagic (H-CVA cerebrovascular episodes (test group and 60 systemically healthy patients (control group were evaluated for: probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing and plaque index. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were both identified and quantified in subgingival plaque samples by conventional and real-time PCR, respectively. RESULTS: The test group showed a significant increase in each of the following parameters: pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, plaque index and number of missing teeth when compared to control values (p<0.05, unpaired t-test. Likewise, the test group had increased numbers of sites that were contaminated with P. gingivalis (60%x10%; p<0.001; chi-squared test and displayed greater prevalence of periodontal disease, with an odds ratio of 48.06 (95% CI: 5.96-387.72; p<0.001. Notably, a positive correlation between probing depth and the levels of P. gingivalis in ischemic stroke was found (r=0.60; p=0.03; Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test. A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA was not detected in any of the groups by conventional or real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke patients had deeper pockets, more severe attachment loss, increased bleeding on probing, increased plaque indexes, and in their pockets harbored increased levels of P. gingivalis. These findings suggest that periodontal disease is a risk factor for the development of cerebral hemorrhage or infarction. Early treatment of periodontitis may counteract the development of cerebrovascular episodes.

  17. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  18. Simultaneous Detection of Bacteroides forsythus and Prevotella intermedia by 16S rRNA Gene-Directed Multiplex PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Georg; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Seyfarth, Ilse; Lampert, Friedrich; Lütticken, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    In a 16S rRNA gene-directed multiplex PCR, Prevotella intermedia- and Bacteroides forsythus-specific reverse primers were combined with a single conserved forward primer. A 660-bp fragment and an 840-bp fragment that were specific for both species could be amplified simultaneously. A total of 152 clinical samples, subgingival plaque and swabs of three different oral mucosae, from 38 periodontitis patients were used for the evaluation. PMID:10203541

  19. Efecto antibacteriano del extracto etanólico del botoncillo (ACMELLA REPENS sobre Porphyromona gingivalis: Estudio in Vitro

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    Andrea Lizbeth Chamorro Benalcázar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar el efecto antibacteriano del extracto etanólico de Botoncillo (Acmella repens en diferentes concentraciones sobre la cepa de Porphyromona gingivalis. Materiales y metodos: En el presente estudio experimental, fueron utilizadas 24 cajas Petri con agar sangre, se inoculó P. gingivalis, y se colocaron discos con diferentes concentraciones del extracto etanólico de Botoncillo (25%, 50% y 100%, como sustancias control Clorhexidina al 0,12% y suero fisiológico. A los 7 días de incubación se midieron con una regla milimetrada los halos de inhibición formados alrededor de los respectivos discos. Resultados: el extracto de Botoncillo al 100% mostró diferencias significativas en comparación con la concentración del 25% y 50% (0 < 0.05. Al comparar el extracto de Botoncillo al 100% con la Clorhexidina 0,12% se observó valores de inhibición más altos para Clorhexidina 0,12%. Conclusión: El extracto etanólico de Botoncillo presentó un efecto antibacteriano sobre P. gingivalis.

  20. HmuY haemophore and gingipain proteases constitute a unique syntrophic system of haem acquisition by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Smalley

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Haem (iron protoporphyrin IX is both an essential growth factor and virulence regulator for the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, which acquires it mainly from haemoglobin via the sequential actions of the R- and K-specific gingipain proteases. The haem-binding lipoprotein haemophore HmuY and its cognate receptor HmuR of P. gingivalis, are responsible for capture and internalisation of haem. This study examined the role of the HmuY in acquisition of haem from haemoglobin and the cooperation between HmuY and gingipain proteases in this process. Using UV-visible spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, HmuY was demonstrated to wrest haem from immobilised methaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin. Haem extraction from oxyhaemoglobin was facilitated after oxidation to methaemoglobin by pre-treatment with the P. gingivalis R-gingipain A (HRgpA. HmuY was also capable of scavenging haem from oxyhaemoglobin pre-treated with the K-gingipain (Kgp. This is the first demonstration of a haemophore working in conjunction with proteases to acquire haem from haemoglobin. In addition, HmuY was able to extract haem from methaemalbumin, and could bind haem, either free in solution or from methaemoglobin, even in the presence of serum albumin.

  1. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) RNAs in the Porphyromonas gingivalis CRISPR-Cas I-C System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmistrz, Michal; Rodriguez Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Krochmal, Daniel; Staniec, Dominika; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2017-12-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-CRISPR-associated protein) system is unique to prokaryotes and provides the majority of bacteria and archaea with immunity against nucleic acids of foreign origin. CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are the key element of this system, since they are responsible for its selectivity and effectiveness. Typical crRNAs consist of a spacer sequence flanked with 5' and 3' handles originating from repeat sequences that are important for recognition of these small RNAs by the Cas machinery. In this investigation, we studied the type I-C CRISPR-Cas system in Porphyromonas gingivalis , a human pathogen associated with periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and aspiration pneumonia. We demonstrated the importance of the 5' handle for crRNA recognition by the effector complex and consequently activity, as well as secondary trimming of the 3' handle, which was not affected by modifications of the repeat sequence. IMPORTANCE Porphyromonas gingivalis , a clinically relevant Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, is one of the major etiologic agents of periodontitis and has been linked with the development of other clinical conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and aspiration pneumonia. The presented results on the biogenesis and functions of crRNAs expand our understanding of CRISPR-Cas cellular defenses in P. gingivalis and of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. The Distribution of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Patients with Alcoholic Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sender-Janeczek, Aleksandra; Ziętek, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Both drinking and periodontal disease are serious health and social problems. Findings on the effect of alcohol consumption on periodontal disease are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in patients with alcoholic disease, the composition of the main periopathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The study was conducted on 25 alcoholics from the Department of Alcohol Addiction Closed Treatment and 25 non-alcoholic patients from the Department of Periodontology, Wroclaw Medical University. Subgingival biofilm samples were obtained from the 4 deepest sites (≥ 4 mm). The presence of 4 bacterial taxa was analysed using the PCR technique. The prevalence of bacterial species was significantly different between groups. Alcoholics showed significantly higher mean DNA counts for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola. In the qualitative analysis, no difference was observed between the groups. The study showed no statistically significant association between the amount of alcohol consumed and the composition of subgingival flora in patients suffering from alcoholism. Alcoholics demonstrated the presence of pathogenic bacteria in similar amounts to people diagnosed with chronic periodontal disease, but showed significantly higher mean DNA counts for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola but there is no correlation between the amount of alcohol consumption and the level of periopathogens.

  3. Baicalin downregulates Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-upregulated IL-6 and IL-8 expression in human oral keratinocytes by negative regulation of TLR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Luo

    Full Text Available Periodontal (gum disease is one of the main global oral health burdens and severe periodontal disease (periodontitis is a leading cause of tooth loss in adults globally. It also increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a key virulent attribute that significantly contributes to periodontal pathogenesis. Baicalin is a flavonoid from Scutellaria radix, an herb commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating inflammatory diseases. The present study examined the modulatory effect of baicalin on P. gingivalis LPS-induced expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in human oral keratinocytes (HOKs. Cells were pre-treated with baicalin (0-80 µM for 24 h, and subsequently treated with P. gingivalis LPS at 10 µg/ml with or without baicalin for 3 h. IL-6 and IL-8 transcripts and proteins were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK proteins was analyzed by western blot. A panel of genes related to toll-like receptor (TLR signaling was examined by PCR array. We found that baicalin significantly downregulated P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated expression of IL-6 and IL-8, and inhibited P. gingivalis LPS-activated NF-κB, p38 MAPK and JNK. Furthermore, baicalin markedly downregulated P. gingivalis LPS-induced expression of genes associated with TLR signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows that baicalin may significantly downregulate P. gingivalis LPS-upregulated expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in HOKs via negative regulation of TLR signaling.

  4. The bcp gene in the bcp-recA-vimA-vimE-vimF operon is important in oxidative stress resistance in Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N A; McKenzie, R M E; Fletcher, H M

    2011-02-01

    The ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis to overcome oxidative stress in the inflammatory environment of the periodontal pocket is critical for its survival. We have previously demonstrated that the recA locus, which carries the bacterioferritin co-migratory protein (bcp) gene and has a unique genetic architecture, plays a role in virulence regulation and oxidative stress resistance in P. gingivalis. To further characterize the bcp gene, which was confirmed to be part of the bcp-recA-vimA-vimE-vimF operon, we created a P. gingivalis bcp-defective isogenic mutant (FLL302) by allelic exchange. Compared with the wild-type, FLL302 had a similar growth rate, black pigmentation, β-hemolysis and UV sensitivity. Although there was no change in the distribution of gingipain activity, there was a 30% reduction in both Arg-X and Lys-X activities in the mutant strain compared with the wild-type. When exposed to 0.25 mm hydrogen peroxide, P. gingivalis FLL302 was more sensitive than the wild-type. In addition, the cloned P. gingivalis bcp gene increased resistance to 0.25 mm hydrogen peroxide in a bcp-defective Escherichia coli mutant. The mutant also demonstrated decreased aerotolerance when compared with the wild-type. Porphyromonas gingivalis FLL302 and the wild-type strain had similar virulence profiles in a mouse model of virulence. These observations suggest that the bcp gene may play a role in oxidative stress resistance but has a decreased functional significance in the pathogenic potential of P. gingivalis. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Experimental periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis does not alter the onset or severity of diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Yang, H; Ding, Y; Aprecio, R; Zhang, W; Wang, Q; Li, Y

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is believed to increase the risk and severity of periodontitis. However, less evidence is available on the converse effects of periodontitis on diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate to what degree experimental periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis might influence the onset and severity of diabetes in different mouse models. Twenty-eight male Tallyho/JngJ mice (type 2 diabetes), 20 male streptozotocin-induced diabetes C57BL/6J mice (type 1 diabetes) and 20 male C57BL/6J mice at 4 wks of age were evenly divided into two groups: periodontal infection and sham infection. Periodontitis was induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 (P. gingivalis) oral inoculation before the development of diabetes. Sham-infected mice received vehicle as control. P. gingivalis in the oral cavity were identified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Fasting glucose, body weight and food intake levels were monitored and glucose tolerance tests were performed to assess glucose homeostasis for the onset and progression of diabetes. The level of alveolar bone loss and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined in week 20 when mice were killed. Mice in the infection groups developed more alveolar bone loss than those in sham-infection groups (Tallyho p = 0.021; C57-STZ p = 0.014; C57 p = 0.035). Hyperglycemic mice exhibited significantly more bone loss compared to those normal glucose mice (Tallyho vs. C57 p = 0.029; C57-STZ vs. C57 p = 0.024). The level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was consistent with that of periodontal bone loss and hyperglycemia. There was no significant effect of mouse species on the amount of bone loss at the same level of blood glucose. No statistically significant difference or trend in glucose metabolism was found between the infection and sham-infection group. Diabetes enhanced the risk for periodontal disease induced by P. gingivalis. However, no converse impact was found between this periodontal

  6. Two new xylanases with different substrate specificities from the human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Iakiviak, Michael; Dodd, Dylan; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2014-04-01

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut.

  7. Assessment of swine-specific bacteriophages of Bacteroides fragilis in swine farms with different antibiotic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leknoi, Yuranan; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the occurrence and specificity of bacteriophages of Bacteroides fragilis in swine farms for their potential application in microbial source tracking. A local B. fragilis host strain, SP25 (DSM29413), was isolated from a pooled swine feces sample taken from a non-antibiotic farm. This strain was highly specific to swine fecal materials because it did not detect bacteriophages in any samples from human sewage, sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, and cats. The reference B. fragilis strain, RYC2056, could detect phages in swine samples but also detected phages in most human sewage and polluted urban canal samples. Phages of SP25 exist in the proximity of certain swine farms, regardless of their antibiotic use (p > 0.05). B. fragilis strain SP25 exhibited relatively high resistance to most of the veterinary antimicrobial agents tested. Interestingly, most farms that were positive for SP25 phages were also positive for RYC2056 phages. In conclusion, the swine-specific SP25 strain has the potential to indicate swine fecal contamination in certain bodies of water. Bacterial isolates with larger distributions are being studied and validated. This study highlights the importance of assessing the abundance of phages in local swine populations before determining their potential applicability for source tracking in local surface waters.

  8. Enterotoxigenic and non-enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis from fecal microbiota of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF is an important part of the human and animal intestinal microbiota and is commonly associated with diarrhea. ETBF strains produce an enterotoxin encoded by the bft gene located in the B. fragilispathogenicity island (BfPAI. Non-enterotoxigenic B. fragilis(NTBF strains lack the BfPAI and usually show two different genetic patterns, II and III, based on the absence or presence of a BfPAI-flanking region, respectively. The incidence of ETBF and NTBF strains in fecal samples isolated from children without acute diarrhea or any other intestinal disorders was determined. All 84 fecal samples evaluated were B. fragilis-positive by PCR, four of them harbored the bft gene, 27 contained the NTBF pattern III DNA sequence, and 52 were considered to be NTBF pattern II samples. One sample was positive for both ETBF and NTBF pattern III DNA sequences. All 19 B. fragilis strains isolated by the culture method were bft-negative, 9 belonged to pattern III and 10 to pattern II. We present an updated overview of the ETBF and NTBF incidence in the fecal microbiota of children from Sao Paulo City, Brazil.

  9. Two New Xylanases with Different Substrate Specificities from the Human Gut Bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-01-24

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut.

  10. Effect of UV irradiation on macromolecular synthesis and colony formation in Bacteroides fragilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, J.P.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation of Bacteroides fragilis cells with far-UV light resulted in the immediate degradation of DNA which continued for 40 to 60 min. During the degradation phase, DNA synthesis was decreased but was never totally inhibited. DNA degradation after irradiation was inhibited by chloramphenicol and caffeine. DNA synthesis in irradiated cells was reduced by chloramphenicol but resumed after 100 min. Irradiated cells continued to synthesize DNA for 40 min in the presence of caffeine but then DNA synthesis was completely inhibited and never recovered. RNA and protein synthesis were decreased by UV irradiation and the degree of inhibition was proportional to the UV dose. Colony formation was not affected immediately by UV irradiation and continued for a dose-dependent period before inhibition. There was an inverse relationship between UV dose and inhibition of colony formatiom which occurred sooner in cells irradiated with lower doses of UV light. The characteristics of DNA synthesis in B. fragilis cells after UV irradiation differ from those in wild-type Escherichia coli cells, where DNA synthesis is stopped immediately by UV irradiation, but resemble those in E. coli recA mutant cells where extensive degradation occurs following UV irradiation. (author)

  11. Prevalence and characterization of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis and toxigenic Clostridium difficile in a Taipei emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dar-Der; Huang, I-Hsiu; Lai, Chao-Chih; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Lin, Wei-Chen

    2017-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and toxin-encoding Clostridium difficile (TXCD) are associated with gastroenteritis. Routine anaerobic blood culture for recovery of these anaerobic pathogens is not used for the detection of their toxins, especially for toxin-variant TXCD. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of the genotypes of these anaerobes in patients with acute diarrheal illnesses. The data and samples of 513 patients with gastroenteritis were collected in a Taipei emergency department from March 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. Nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis (NTBF) and ETBF and the toxin genotypes of TXCD were detected by molecular methods. The prevalence rates of NTBF, ETBF, and TXCD infections were 33.14%, 1.56%, and 2.34%, respectively. ETBF infections often occurred in the elderly (average age = 67.13 years) and during the cold, dry winters. TXCD infections were widely distributed in age and often occurred in the warm, wet springs and summers. The symptoms of ETBF-infected patients were significantly more severe than those of NTBF-infected patients. This study identified and analyzed the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical presentations of these anaerobic infections. Future epidemiologic and clinical studies are needed to understand the role of ETBF and TXCD in human gastroenteritis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarel Adamberg

    Full Text Available The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, changes in pH and microbiota composition, concentrations of produced and consumed metabolites during the growth were determined. The composition of fecal microbiota and profile of metabolites changed in response to substrate (levan and amino acids availability. The main products of levan metabolism were acetic, lactic, butyric, propionic and succinic acids and carbon dioxide. Associated growth of levan-degrading (e.g. Bacteroides and butyric acid-producing (e.g. Faecalibacterium taxa was observed in levan-supplemented media. The study shows that the capacity of levan and possibly also other dietary fibers/prebiotics to modulate the composition and function of colon microbiota can be predicted by using isothermal microcalorimetry of fecal samples linked to metabolite and consortia analyses.

  13. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagawa Todd F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  14. Studies of antibiotic resistant mutants of Bacteroides fragilis obtained by Cs-137 ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azghani, A.O.

    1986-01-01

    The genus Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobic bacillus normally found in the upper respiratory tract, the colon, and the genitourinary system. The project reported here was undertaken because of the high frequency of hospital infections attributed to B. fragilis, and the increased resistance of the bacteria to commonly used antibiotics. Cs-137 gamma irradiation was used to induce antibiotic resistant mutants in B. fragilis in the presence of Escherichia coli B/r membrane fragments, employed as reducing agent. Based on a dose-survival curve, an effective radiation dose of 1.54 x 10 4 R (3.99 C/Kg) was used to induce mutations to rifampicin and tetracycline resistance in the test organism. The antibiotic resistant mutants of B. fragilis were utilized to reveal the mechanism by which this group of organisms becomes resistant to select chemotherapeutic agents. Studies on tetracycline resistant mutants of B. fragilis isolated after irradiation, suggest that the resistance to this antibiotic is associated with the outer membrane permeability. The difference in inhibitory action of rifampicin on RNA polymerase activity, from rifampicin sensitive and resistant strains of B. fragilis, reveals that this enzyme is a possible suitable target for inhibition of bacterial growth in anaerobes by rifampicin

  15. Effect of low fluencies of near-ultraviolet radiation on Bacteroides fragilis survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, H.J.K.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a convenient obligate anaerobe for an investigation on the effect of near-UV irradiation since the authors have shown that it can be maintained in aerobic solutions for at least 6 h without loss in viability. Furthermore, they recently demonstrated that B. fragilis differs from other bacteria in that it is more sensitive to far-UV (254 nm) radiation in the presence of oxygen. The role of oxygen on near-UV survival in B. fragilis, was investigated. The effect of chloramphenicol was also studied. Survival curves are presented. B. fragilis Bf-2 cells irradiated with increasing fluencies of near-UV light under anaerobic conditions showed no loss in viability. A 'V'-shaped survival curve was obtained when cells were irradiated aerobically. After the initial reduction in viability with fluencies up to 1.5 kJ/m 2 further irradiation resulted in the recovery of colony-forming ability which was maximal at 2.6 kJ/m 2 and remained at this level up to fluencies of 4 kJ/m 2 . (Auth.)

  16. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thornton, Roibeard F

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  17. Cholesterol crystals enhance TLR2- and TLR4-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of monocytes to the proatherogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Køllgaard

    Full Text Available Cholesterol deposits and pro-inflammatory cytokines play an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a predominant cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Epidemiological evidence has linked periodontal disease (PD with atherosclerotic CVD. Accordingly, viable periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, have been found in atherosclerotic plaques in humans and mice. We aimed to determine whether cholesterol crystals (CHCs and oral bacteria synergize in the stimulation of human monocytes. Incubation of human monocytes with CHCs induced secretion of interleukin (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8. Moreover, CHCs markedly enhanced secretion of IL-1β by monocytes stimulated with the toll-like receptor (TLR 4 agonist Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and the TLR2 agonist Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. Notably, CHCs also enhanced IL-1β secretion induced by P. gingivalis LPS and IL-1β secretion induced by whole P. gingivalis bacteria. This enhancement was abrogated by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors Z-YVAD-FMK and glibenclamide. CHCs had no effect on cytokine production induced by P. gingivalis gingipains. Taken together, our findings support that CHCs, via stimulation of NLRP3 inflammasomes, act in synergy with the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis to promote monocyte secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines.

  18. Cholesterol crystals enhance TLR2- and TLR4-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of monocytes to the proatherogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Køllgaard, Tania; Enevold, Christian; Bendtzen, Klaus; Hansen, Peter R; Givskov, Michael; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus H

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol deposits and pro-inflammatory cytokines play an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a predominant cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiological evidence has linked periodontal disease (PD) with atherosclerotic CVD. Accordingly, viable periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, have been found in atherosclerotic plaques in humans and mice. We aimed to determine whether cholesterol crystals (CHCs) and oral bacteria synergize in the stimulation of human monocytes. Incubation of human monocytes with CHCs induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-8. Moreover, CHCs markedly enhanced secretion of IL-1β by monocytes stimulated with the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 agonist Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the TLR2 agonist Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. Notably, CHCs also enhanced IL-1β secretion induced by P. gingivalis LPS and IL-1β secretion induced by whole P. gingivalis bacteria. This enhancement was abrogated by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors Z-YVAD-FMK and glibenclamide. CHCs had no effect on cytokine production induced by P. gingivalis gingipains. Taken together, our findings support that CHCs, via stimulation of NLRP3 inflammasomes, act in synergy with the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis to promote monocyte secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines.

  19. Comparison of Experimental Diabetic Periodontitis Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is one of the severe complications in diabetic patients and gingival epithelium plays an initial role on the onset and progression of this disease. However the potential mechanism is yet sufficiently understood. Meanwhile, the research on the correlational experimental animal models was also insufficient. Here, we established periodontitis with type 2 diabetes in db/db and Tallyho/JngJ (TH mice and periodontitis with type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin induced diabetes C57BL/6J (STZ-C57 mice by oral infection of periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis W50. We demonstrated that periodontal infected mice with high blood glucose levels showed dramatically more alveolar bone loss than their counterparts, in which infected db/db mice exhibited the most bone defects. No contrary impact could be observed between this periodontal infection and onset and severity of diabetes. The expressions of PTPN2 were inhibited whereas the expression of JAK1, STAT1, and STAT3 increased dramatically in gingival epithelia and the serum TNF-α also significantly increased in the mice with diabetic periodontitis. Our results indicated that the variations of inflammation-related protein expressions in gingival epithelia might lead to the phenotype differences in the mice with diabetic periodontitis.

  20. Evaluation of the Effect of Andrographolide on Atherosclerotic Rabbits Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Al Batran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic evidence has demonstrated significant associations between atherosclerosis and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg. We had investigated the effect of andrographolide (AND on atherosclerosis induced by Pg in rabbits. For experimental purpose, we separated thirty male white New Zealand rabbits into 5 groups. Group 1 received standard food pellets; Groups 2–5 were orally challenged with Pg; Group 3 received atorvastatin (AV, 5 mg/kg, and Groups 4-5 received 10 and 20 mg/kg of AND, respectively, over 12 weeks. Groups treated with AND showed significant decrease in TC, TG, and LDL levels (P<0.05 and significant increase in HDL level in the serum of rabbits. Furthermore, the treated groups (G3–G5 exhibited reductions in interleukins (IL-1β and IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP as compared to atherogenicgroup (G2. The histological results showed that the thickening of atherosclerotic plaques were less significant in treated groups (G3–G5 compared with atherogenicgroup (G2. Also, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA staining decreased within the plaques of atherogenicgroup (G2, while it was increased in treated groups (G3–G5. Lastly, groups treated with AV and AND (G3–G5 showed significant reduction of CD36 expression (P<0.05 compared to atherogenicgroup (G2. These results substantially proved that AND contain antiatherogenic activity.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction promoted by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide as a possible link between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, Pedro; Cordero, Mario David; Quiles, José Luis; Morillo, Juan Manuel; del Carmen Ramirez-Tortosa, Maria; Battino, Maurizio

    2011-05-15

    Oxidative stress is one of the factors that could explain the pathophysiological mechanism of inflammatory conditions that occur in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and periodontitis. Such inflammatory response is often evoked by specific bacteria, as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key factor in this process. The aim of this research was to study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from periodontitis patients and to evaluate the influence of LPS on fibroblasts to better understand the pathophysiology of periodontitis and its relationship with CVD. PBMCs from patients showed lower CoQ10 levels and citrate synthase activity, together with high levels of ROS production. LPS-treated fibroblasts provoked increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction by a decrease in mitochondrial protein expression, mitochondrial mass, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Our study supports the hypothesis that LPS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction could be at the origin of oxidative stress in periodontal patients. Abnormal PBMC performance may promote oxidative stress and alter cytokine homeostasis. In conclusion, mitochondrial dysfunction could represent a possible link to understanding the interrelationships between two prominent inflammatory diseases: periodontitis and CVD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RNA-Seq and microarrays analyses reveal global differential transcriptomes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R between bacteroids and free-living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieli Peng

    Full Text Available Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R occurs either in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its host plant, Astragalus sinicus, or free-living in the soil. The M. huakuii 7653R genome has recently been sequenced. To better understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes that occur in 7653R during bacteroid development, RNA-Seq and Microarrays were used to investigate the differential transcriptomes of 7653R bacteroids and free-living cells. The two approaches identified several thousand differentially expressed genes. The most prominent up-regulation occurred in the symbiosis plasmids, meanwhile gene expression is concentrated to a set of genes (clusters in bacteroids to fulfill corresponding functional requirements. The results suggested that the main energy metabolism is active while fatty acid metabolism is inactive in bacteroid and that most of genes relevant to cell cycle are down-regulated accordingly. For a global analysis, we reconstructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI network for 7653R and integrated gene expression data into the network using Cytoscape. A highly inter-connected subnetwork, with function enrichment for nitrogen fixation, was found, and a set of hubs and previously uncharacterized genes participating in nitrogen fixation were identified. The results described here provide a broader biological landscape and novel insights that elucidate rhizobial bacteroid differentiation, nitrogen fixation and related novel gene functions.

  3. A monkey antigen crossreacting with carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E.; Vuento, M.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1976-01-01

    Normal monkey tissues were found to contain an antigen which crossreacts immunologically with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) of the human digestive tract. The monkey antigen reacted with complete or partial identity to the normal crossreacting antigen (NCA) in humans when tested in immunodiffusion against anti-CEA or anti-NCA. Extracts of monkey tissues inhibited in radioimmunoassays measuring human NCA. It is possible that monkey foetuses and colonic tumours contain CEA. Images Fig. 1 PMID:823952

  4. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-430 ISSN 0001-2815. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2001

  6. CD antigens 2002

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2002), s. 3877-3880 ISSN 0006-4971. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.631, year: 2002

  7. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2002), s. 2083-2086 ISSN 0022-1767. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.014, year: 2002

  8. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2001), s. 401-406 ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2001

  9. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2001), s. 556-562 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2001

  10. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2001), s. 2841-2847 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2001

  11. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 2 (2001), s. 81-85 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.604, year: 2001

  12. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2002), s. 71-76 ISSN 0893-3952. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2002

  13. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2001), s. 685-690 ISSN 0741-5400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.516, year: 2001

  14. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2001), s. 1095-1098 ISSN 0953-8178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2001

  15. β-endorphin antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of antigens comprising β-endorphin, βsub(h)-endorphin, or βsub(c)-endorphin, in covalent conjugation with human gammaglobulin as immunogenic carrier material, and an antibody having the property of specifically binding β-endorphin or fragments thereof, containing the (6-15) residue sequence. (U.K.)

  16. Modulation of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α) and its receptor CXCR4 in Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced periodontal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiang; Nemoto, Eiji; Hong, Guang; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2016-07-22

    The production of chemokines by tissue resident cells during inflammation is considered one of the main mechanisms involved in the formation of inflammatory infiltrates. Fibroblasts are the main resident cell type in gingival and periodontal ligament tissues, and their ability to produce chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α) and its receptor CXCR4 under stimulation by gram negative bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, commonly found in periodontal infections was investigated. Western blots were used to assess SDF-1α and CXCR4 protein expression levels in human gingival fibroblast cells (HGF-1) induced by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from P. gingivalis in the presence or absence of LY294002, a highly selective inhibitor of PI-3K/Akt. RT-PCR and quantitative Real-time PCR was performed using gingival mRNAs from periodontitis patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the expression and subcellular localization of SDF-1α and CXCR4, together with NF-kβ phosphorylation, in specimens from patients with periodontitis and in an experimental rat periodontitis model. We found that P. gingivalis LPS up-regulated SDF-1α and CXCR4 protein levels and elevated phosphorylation of the SDF-1α-responsive NF-kβ and Akt at 24 h in HGF-1 cells. SDF-1α and CXCR4 mRNA and protein expression levels were high in all patients with periodontitis. In the P. gingivalis-induced rat experimental periodontitis model, SDF-1α and CXCR4 immunoreactivity was higher in gingival and periodontal ligament tissues compared to the control. Our data showed that PI-3K/Akt is an upstream participant in the P. gingivalis LPS-mediated induction of SDF-1α. Taken together, these results suggest that the chemokine SDF-1α and its receptor CXCR4 contribute to P. gingivalis-induced periodontal inflammation.

  17. Bactericidal Effect of Extracts and Metabolites of Robinia pseudoacacia L. on Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis Causing Dental Plaque and Periodontal Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Kumar Patra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mouth cavity hosts many types of anaerobic bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which cause periodontal inflammatory diseases and dental caries. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antibacterial potential of extracts of Robinia pseudoacacia and its different fractions, as well as some of its natural compounds against oral pathogens and a nonpathogenic reference bacteria, Escherichia coli. The antibacterial activity of the crude extract and the solvent fractions (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol of R. pseudoacacia were evaluated against S. mutans, P. gingivalis and E. coli DH5α by standard micro-assay procedure using conventional sterile polystyrene microplates. The results showed that the crude extract was more active against P. gingivalis (100% growth inhibition than against S. mutans (73% growth inhibition at 1.8 mg/mL. The chloroform and hexane fractions were active against P. gingivalis, with 91 and 97% growth inhibition, respectively, at 0.2 mg/mL. None of seven natural compounds found in R. pseudoacacia exerted an antibacterial effect on P. gingivalis; however, fisetin and myricetin at 8 µg/mL inhibited the growth of S. mutans by 81% and 86%, respectively. The crude extract of R. pseudoacacia possesses bioactive compounds that could completely control the growth of P. gingivalis. The antibiotic activities of the hexane and chloroform fractions suggest that the active compounds are hydrophobic in nature. The results indicate the effectiveness of the plant in clinical applications for the treatment of dental plaque and periodontal inflammatory diseases and its potential use as disinfectant for various surgical and orthodontic appliances.

  18. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehara Tadamichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. Results We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2–12 h, P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24–36 h the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. Conclusion The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  19. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnowey, Sonya; Ansai, Toshihiro; Bitko, Vira; Nakayama, Koji; Takehara, Tadamichi; Barik, Sailen

    2006-03-08

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2-12 h), P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24-36 h) the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp) suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  20. Human Bacteroides and total coliforms as indicators of recent combined sewer overflows and rain events in urban creeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Shannon; Spencer, Susan K.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Stokdyk, Joel; Borchardt, Mark A.; McCarthy, David; Murphy, Heather

    2018-01-01

    Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are a known source of human fecal pollution and human pathogens in urban water bodies, which may present a significant public health threat. To monitor human fecal contamination in water, bacterial fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) are traditionally used. However, because FIOs are not specific to human sources and do not correlate with human pathogens, alternative fecal indicators detected using qPCR are becoming of interest to policymakers. For this reason, this study measured correlations between the number and duration of CSOs and mm of rainfall, concentrations of traditional FIOs and alternative indicators, and the presence of human pathogens in two urban creeks. Samples were collected May–July 2016 and analyzed for concentrations of FIOs (total coliforms and E. coli) using membrane filtration as well as for three alternative fecal indicators (human Bacteroides HF183 marker, human polyomavirus (HPoV), pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)) and nine human pathogens using qPCR. Four of the nine pathogens analyzed were detected at these sites including adenovirus, Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, norovirus, and Salmonella. Among all indicators studied, human Bacteroides and total coliforms were significantly correlated with recent CSO and rainfall events, while E. coli, PMMoV, and HPoV did not show consistent significant correlations. Further, human Bacteroides were a more specific indicator, while total coliforms were a more sensitive indicator of CSO and rainfall events. Results may have implications for the use and interpretation of these indicators in future policy or monitoring programs.

  1. Assessment of antibacterial effect of cinnamon on growth of porphyromons gingivalis from chronic periodontitis patients with deep pockets (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Amoian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : Antibiotics are commonly used for controlling the growth of porphyromons gingivalis (P.g which is one of the most important etiologic factors in the periodontal diseases. Different side effects of synthetics and chemical drugs such as increasing the drug resistancy in the human pathogens have led to study on the herbal antibacterial effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of cinnamon on the growth of porphyromons gingivalis in chronic periodontitis patients with deep pockets.   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, samples were provided from patients having pockets. After culturing the microorganism and diagnosis of P.g by gram staining and biochemical tests, cinnamon in different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1500 mg/ml with oil solvent were prepared and placed by disks in the cultures medium. Positive controls were amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamycin . Oil was negative control. Then the plates were incubated for 24 hours in 37 0 C and then non-growth halos by disk diffusion method, MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and MBC (Minimum Bactericidal Concentration were determined. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA test.   Results: The results showed that the cinnamon at the concentration of MIC=750 mg/ml had the inhibitory effects of bacteria and at the concentration of MIC=1500 mg/ml had killing effect. However, this antibacterial effect compared with commonly used antibiotics (amoxicillin, metronidazole, was much weaker (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Cinnamon showed an antimicrobial effect on porphyromonas gingivalis in chronic periodontitis patients with deep pockets.

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens in endodontic lesions detected by culture and by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, B P F A; Jacinto, R C; Pinheiro, E T; Sousa, E L R; Zaia, A A; Ferraz, C C R; Souza-Filho, F J

    2005-08-01

    he aim of this study was to investigate the presence of four black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, in endodontic infections by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Microbial samples were obtained from 50 teeth with untreated necrotic pulps (primary infection) and from 50 teeth with failing endodontic treatment (secondary infection). Microbiological strict anaerobic techniques were used for serial dilution, plating, incubation, and identification. For PCR detection, the samples were analyzed using species-specific primers of 16S rDNA and the downstream intergenic spacer region. Culture and PCR detected the test species in 13/100 and 50/100 of the study teeth, respectively. The organisms were cultured from 11/50 (22%) of primarily infected root canal samples and from 2/50 (4%) of secondary root canal samples. PCR detection identified the target species in 32/50 (64%) and 18/50 (36%) of primary and secondary infections, respectively. P. gingivalis was rarely isolated by culture methods (1%), but was the most frequently identified test species by PCR (38%). Similarly, P. endodontalis was not recovered by culture from any tooth studied, but was detected by PCR in 25% of the sampled teeth. PCR-based identification also showed higher detection rates of P. intermedia (33%) and P. nigrescens (22%) than culture (13%). In conclusion, P. gingivalis, P. endodontalis, P. intermedia, and P. nigrescens were identified more frequently in teeth with necrotic pulp than in teeth with failing endodontic treatment. Also, a higher frequency of black-pigmented species was detected by PCR than by culture.

  3. Melatonin Receptor Agonists as the “Perioceutics” Agents for Periodontal Disease through Modulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Virulence and Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cai-Lian; He, Zhi-Yan; Liang, Jing-Ping; Song, Zhong-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Aim “Perioceutics” including antimicrobial therapy and host modulatory therapy has emerged as a vital adjunctive treatment of periodontal disease. Melatonin level was significantly reduced in patients with periodontal diseases suggesting melatonin could be applied as a potential “perioceutics” treatment of periodontal diseases. This study aims to investigate the effects of melatonin receptor agonists (melatonin and ramelteon) on Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence and Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS)-induced inflammation. Methods Effects of melatonin receptor agonists on Porphyromonas gingivalis planktonic cultures were determined by microplate dilution assays. Formation, reduction, and viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms were detected by crystal violet staining and MTT assays, respectively. Meanwhile, biofilms formation was also observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The effects on gingipains and hemolytic activities of Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated using chromogenic peptides and sheep erythrocytes. The mRNA expression of virulence and iron/heme utilization was assessed using RT-PCR. In addition, cell viability of melatonin receptor agonists on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was evaluated by MTT assays. After pretreatment of melatonin receptor agonists, HGFs were stimulated with Pg-LPS and then release of cytokines (IL-6 and lL-8) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Melatonin and ramelteon did exhibit antimicrobial effects against planktonic culture. Importantly, they inhibited biofilm formation, reduced the established biofilms, and decreased biofilm viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Furthermore, they at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) concentrations markedly inhibited the proteinase activities of gingipains and hemolysis in a dose-dependent manner. They at sub-MIC concentrations significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of virulence

  4. Vitamin D inhibits the growth of and virulence factor gene expression by Porphyromonas gingivalis and blocks activation of the nuclear factor kappa B transcription factor in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, D; Morin, M-P; Fournier-Larente, J; Chen, H

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2 D3 ), a fat-soluble secosteroid hormone, has a positive impact on periodontal health through diverse mechanisms. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of 1,25(OH)2 D3 on the growth of and virulence factor gene expression by the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. The effect of 1,25(OH)2 D3 on P. gingivalis-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor in monocytes was also assessed. A broth microdilution assay was used to determine the antibacterial activity of 1,25(OH)2 D3 . The modulation of virulence factor gene expression in P. gingivalis was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. NF-κB activation was assessed using a human monocytic cell line stably transfected with a luciferase reporter containing NF-κB binding sites. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 1,25(OH)2 D3 against P. gingivalis ranged from 3.125 to 6.25 μg/mL. Moreover, a partial synergistic effect was observed when 1,25(OH)2 D3 was used in association with metronidazole. 1,25(OH)2 D3 attenuated the virulence of P. gingivalis by reducing the expression of genes coding for important virulence factors, including adhesins (fimA, hagA and hagB) and proteinases (rgpA, rgpB and kgp). 1,25(OH)2 D3 dose-dependently prevented P. gingivalis-induced NF-κB activation in a monocyte model. Our study suggested that 1,25(OH)2 D3 selectively inhibits the growth of and virulence factor gene expression by P. gingivalis, in addition to attenuating NF-κB activation by this periodontopathogen. This dual action on P. gingivalis and the inflammatory response of host cells may be of particular interest with a view to developing a novel and inexpensive preventive/therapeutic strategy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prevalence of actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and prophyromonas gingivalis in subgingival microflora of patients with aggressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paknejad M.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the best ways for treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis (AP is identification and elimination of etiologic factors specially two microorganisms Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg in patients harboring them. Purpose: This study determines the prevalence of Aa and Pg and its correlation with age, sex and the number of family members as well as probing pocket depth (PPD in active sites of AP patients, referred to department of periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional, descriptive study, 54 sites (PPD> 5mm in 15 patients were considered for culture. Marginal gingiva was dried and sampling performed by paperpoint (#30. The selective medium for Aa, was Trypticase Soy Agar-Bacitracin- Vancomycin (TSBV and for Pg was Brucella agar. Results were analyzed using Fisher and Chi-Square statistical tests. Results: Thirteen patients or 38 sites (70.4% were identified as Aa positive and 3 patients or 10 sites (18.4% were Pg positive. There was no significant relation between the presence of Aa and sex or age (P=0.086. Pg was more prevalent in men compared with women (P<0.0001 but with regard to age there was no statistical difference between men and women. Aa had a significant positive correlation with PPD (P=0.002, which was not true for Pg. In addition, the number of positive sites showed a significant negative correlation with the number of family members. Conclusion: Based on the present study, the prevalence of Aa in deep pockets in patients with AP is higher than Pg.

  6. Leptomeningeal Cells Transduce Peripheral Macrophages Inflammatory Signal to Microglia in Reponse to Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS

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    Yicong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here that the leptomeningeal cells transduce inflammatory signals from peripheral macrophages to brain-resident microglia in response to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2, TLR4, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase was mainly detected in the gingival macrophages of chronic periodontitis patients. In in vitro studies, P.g. LPS induced the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β from THP-1 human monocyte-like cell line and RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. Surprisingly, the mean mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in leptomeningeal cells after treatment with the conditioned medium from P.g. LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were significantly higher than those after treatment with P.g. LPS alone. Furthermore, the mean mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in microglia after treatment with the conditioned medium from P.g. LPS-stimulated leptomeningeal cells were significantly higher than those after P.g. LPS alone. These observations suggest that leptomeninges serve as an important route for transducing inflammatory signals from macrophages to microglia by secretion of proinflammatory mediators during chronic periodontitis. Moreover, propolis significantly reduced the P.g. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1 β production by leptomeningeal cells through inhibiting the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. Together with the inhibitory effect on microglial activation, propolis may be beneficial in preventing neuroinflammation during chronic periodontitis.

  7. Porphyromonas Gingivalis Elevated High-Mobility Group Box 1 Levels After Myocardial Infarction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisuwantha, Rungtiwa; Shiheido, Yuka; Aoyama, Norio; Sato, Hiroki; Kure, Keitetsu; Laosrisin, Narongsak; Izumi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2017-10-21

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein released from necrotic cells, inducing inflammatory responses. Epidemiological studies suggested a possible association between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Due to tissue damage and necrosis of cardiac cells following myocardial infarction (MI), HMGB1 is released, activating an inflammatory reaction. However, it remains unclear whether periodontitis is also involved in myocardial damage. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) after MI in mice.C57BL/6J wild type mice in post-MI were inoculated with P.g. in the infected group (P.g.-inoculated MI group) and with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) in the control group (PBS-injected MI group). Plasma samples and twelve tissue samples from mice hearts after MI were obtained. We determined the expression of HMGB1 by ELISA and immunohistochemistry.The level of HMGB1 protein in the P.g.-inoculated MI group was significantly higher than in the PBS-injected MI group on day 5, but not on day 14. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that HMGB1 was mainly expressed in cardiomyocytes, immune cells, and vascular endothelial cells in the PBS-injected MI group, while HMGB1 was seen broadly in degenerated cardiomyocytes, extracellular fields, immune cells, and vascular endothelial cells in the P.g.-inoculated MI group. A significant increase in the number of HMGB1 positive cells was observed in the P.g.-inoculated MI group compared to the PBS-injected MI group.Infection with P.g. after MI enhanced myocardial HMGB1 expression. There is a possible relationship between periodontitis and post-infarction myocardial inflammation through HMGB-1.

  8. Porphyromonas Gingivalis and E-coli induce different cytokine production patterns in pregnant women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke M Faas

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pregnant individuals of many species, including humans, are more sensitive to various bacteria or their products as compared with non-pregnant individuals. Pregnant individuals also respond differently to different bacteria or their products. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated whether the increased sensitivity of pregnant women to bacterial products and their heterogeneous response to different bacteria was associated with differences in whole blood cytokine production upon stimulation with bacteria or their products. METHODS: Blood samples were taken from healthy pregnant and age-matched non-pregnant women and ex vivo stimulated with bacteria or LPS from Porphyromonas Gingivalis (Pg or E-coli for 24 hrs. TNFα, IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-12 and IL-10 were measured using a multiplex Luminex system. RESULTS: We observed a generally lower cytokine production after stimulation with Pg bacteria or it's LPS as compared with E-coli bacteria. However, there was also an effect of pregnancy upon cytokine production: in pregnant women the production of IL-6 upon Pg stimulation was decreased as compared with non-pregnant women. After stimulation with E-coli, the production of IL-12 and TNFα was decreased in pregnant women as compared with non-pregnant women. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that cytokine production upon bacterial stimulation of whole blood differed between pregnant and non-pregnant women, showing that the increased sensitivity of pregnant women may be due to differences in cytokine production. Moreover, pregnancy also affected whole blood cytokine production upon Pg or E-coli stimulation differently. Thus, the different responses of pregnant women to different bacteria or their products may result from variations in cytokine production.

  9. Bacteroides CECT 7771 y su uso en la prevención y tratamiento de sobrepeso, obesidad y alteraciones metabólicas e inmunológicas

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Herranz, Yolanda; Gauffin, Paola; Santacruz, Arlette; Moya Pérez, Ángela; Laparra, José Moisés

    2012-01-01

    Bacteroides CECT 7771 y su uso en la prevención y tratamiento de sobrepeso, obesidad y alteraciones metabólicas e inmunológicas. La presente invención se refiere a una cepa de Bacteroides uniformis con número de depósito CECT 7771, así como a sus componentes celulares, metabolitos y/o moléculas secretadas. Es también objeto de la invención, una composición (nutritiva o farmacéutica) que comprende al menos uno de los productos anteriores. Asimismo, la presente inv...

  10. Human platelet antigens - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2014-02-01

    To date, 33 human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) have been identified on six functionally important platelet glycoprotein (GP) complexes and have been implicated in alloimmune platelet disorders including foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and multitransfusion platelet refractoriness (MPR). The greatest number of recognized HPA (20 of 33) resides on the GPIIb/IIIa complex, which serves as the receptor for ligands important in mediating haemostasis and inflammation. These include HPA-1a, the most commonly implicated HPA in FNAIT and PTP in Caucasian populations. Other platelet GP complexes, GPIb/V/IX, GPIa/IIa and CD109, express the remaining 13 HPAs. Of the recognized HPAs, 12 occur as six serologically and genetically defined biallelic 'systems' where the -a form designates the higher frequency allele and the -b form, the lower. Twenty-one other HPAs are low-frequency or rare antigens for which postulated higher frequency -a alleles have not yet been identified as antibody specificities. In addition to the HPA markers, platelets also express ABO and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens; antibodies directed at the former are occasionally important in FNAIT, and to the latter, in MPR. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. The underappreciated in vitro activity of tedizolid against Bacteroides fragilis species, including strains resistant to metronidazole and carbapenems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Leoncio, Elisa S; Merriam, C Vreni

    2017-02-01

    Because Bacteroides fragilis has the ability to develop mechanisms of resistance to almost all antibiotics, we studied the comparative in vitro activity of tedizolid against 124 Bacteroides group species clinical isolates, including carbapenem, metronidazole and piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains. Tedizolid had an MIC 90 of 2 μg/ml (range, 0.5-4 μg/ml) and was 1-4 times more active than linezolid that had an MIC 90 of 8 μg/ml (range, 2-16 μg/ml). It was also active (MICs 0.5-2 μg/ml) against the 27 ertapenem, 2 metronidazole and 12 piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains tested. This suggests that tedizolid may be useful treating infections, including bacteremias, due to resistant B. fragilis group species, as well as, mixed skin and soft tissue infections such as diabetic foot infections caused by Gram-positive aerobes and B. fragilis group species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393, a member of the human colonic microbiome, upregulates multiple endoxylanases during growth on xylan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Pereira, Gabriel V; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac

    2016-09-29

    Many human diets contain arabinoxylan, and the ease of genome sequencing coupled with reduced cost have led to unraveling the arsenal of genes utilized by the colonic Bacteroidetes to depolymerize this polysaccharide. The colonic Bacteroidetes with potential to ferment arabinoxylans include Bacteroides intestinalis. In this study, we analyzed the hydrolytic activities of members of a xylan degradation cluster encoded on the genome of Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393. Here, it is demonstrated that a cocktail of the xylanolytic enzymes completely hydrolyze arabinoxylans found in human diets. We show that this bacterium and relatives have evolved and secrete a unique bifunctional endoxylanase/arabinofuranosidase in the same polypeptide. The bifunctional enzyme and other secreted enzymes attack the polysaccharides extracellularly to remove the side-chains, exposing the xylan backbone for cleavage to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. These end products are transported into the cell where a β-xylosidase cleaves the oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. While our experiments focused on B. intestinalis, it is likely that the extracellular enzymes also release nutrients to members of the colonic microbial community that practice cross-feeding. The presence of the genes characterized in this study in other colonic Bacteroidetes suggests a conserved strategy for energy acquisition from arabinoxylan, a component of human diets.

  13. Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Glomerular Endothelial Cells and Promotion of Diabetic Nephropathy by Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Yuji; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Tsuruga, Eichi

    2014-01-01

    The toll-like receptor (TLR) has been suggested as a candidate cause for diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have reported the TLR4 expression in diabetic mouse glomerular endothelium. The study here investigates the effects of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is a ligand for TLR2 and TLR4 in diabetic nephropathy. In laser-scanning microscopy of glomeruli of streptozotocin- and a high fat diet feed-induced type I and type II diabetic mice, TLR2 localized on the glomerular endothelium and proximal tubule epithelium. The TLR2 mRNA was detected in diabetic mouse glomeruli by in situ hybridization and in real-time PCR of the renal cortex, the TLR2 mRNA amounts were larger in diabetic mice than in non-diabetic mice. All diabetic mice subjected to repeated LPS administrations died within the survival period of all of the diabetic mice not administered LPS and of all of the non-diabetic LPS-administered mice. The LPS administration promoted the production of urinary protein, the accumulation of type I collagen in the glomeruli, and the increases in IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β in the renal cortex of the glomeruli of the diabetic mice. It is thought that blood TLR ligands like Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS induce the glomerular endothelium to produce cytokines which aid glomerulosclerosis. Periodontitis may promote diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24835775

  14. LptO (PG0027) Is Required for Lipid A 1-Phosphatase Activity in Porphyromonas gingivalis W50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Minnie; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Hashim, Ahmed; McPhail, Graham; Luklinska, Zofia; Haurat, M Florencia; Feldman, Mario F; Curtis, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) rich in virulence factors, including cysteine proteases and A-LPS, one of the two lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) produced by this organism. Previous studies had suggested that A-LPS and PG0027, an outer membrane (OM) protein, may be involved in OMV formation. Their roles in this process were examined by using W50 parent and the Δ PG0027 mutant strains. Inactivation of PG0027 caused a reduction in the yield of OMVs. Lipid A from cells and OMVs of P. gingivalis W50 and the Δ PG0027 mutant strains were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Lipid A from W50 cells contained bis-P-pentaacyl, mono-P-pentaacyl, mono-P-tetraacyl, non-P-pentaacyl, and non-P-tetraacyl species, whereas lipid A from Δ PG0027 mutant cells contained only phosphorylated species; nonphosphorylated species were absent. MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem MS of mono-P-pentaacyl ( m / z 1,688) and mono-P-tetraacyl ( m / z 1,448) lipid A from Δ PG0027 showed that both contained lipid A 1-phosphate, suggesting that the Δ PG0027 mutant strain lacked lipid A 1-phosphatase activity. The total phosphatase activities in the W50 and the Δ PG0027 mutant strains were similar, whereas the phosphatase activity in the periplasm of the Δ PG0027 mutant was lower than that in W50, supporting a role for PG0027 in lipid A dephosphorylation. W50 OMVs were enriched in A-LPS, and its lipid A did not contain nonphosphorylated species, whereas lipid A from the Δ PG0027 mutant (OMVs and cells) contained similar species. Thus, OMVs in P. gingivalis are apparently formed in regions of the OM enriched in A-LPS devoid of nonphosphorylated lipid A. Conversely, dephosphorylation of lipid A through a PG0027-dependent process is required for optimal formation of OMVs. Hence, the relative proportions of nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated lipid A appear to be crucial for OMV formation in this organism. IMPORTANCE

  15. Cholesterol crystals enhance TLR2-and TLR4-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of monocytes to the proatherogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køllgaard, Tania Maria Simonsen; Enevold, Christian; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    , including Porphyromonas gingivalis, have been found in atherosclerotic plaques in humans and mice. We aimed to determine whether cholesterol crystals (CHCs) and oral bacteria synergize in the stimulation of human monocytes. Incubation of human monocytes with CHCs induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β...

  16. Site-specific O-Glycosylation on the MUC2 Mucin Protein Inhibits Cleavage by the Porphyromonas gingivalis Secreted Cysteine Protease (RgpB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Sjoerd; Subramani, Durai B; Bäckström, Malin

    2013-01-01

    that are protease-resistant and has cysteine-rich N and C termini responsible for polymerization. Culture supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium that secretes proteases responsible for periodontitis, cleaved the MUC2 C-terminal region, whereas the N-terminal region was unaffected. The active enzyme...

  17. LPS from Porphyromonas gingivalis increases the sensitivity of contractile response mediated by endothelin-B (ET(B)) receptors in cultured endothelium-intact rat coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Bahareh; Holmstrup, Palle; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine if lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) modifies the vasomotor responses to Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and Sarafotoxin 6c (S6c) in rat coronary arteries. The arteries were studied directly or following organ culture for 24h in absence...

  18. A challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis differentially affects the osteoclastogenesis potential of periodontal ligament fibroblasts from periodontitis patients and non-periodontitis donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokos, D.; Scheres, N.; Schoenmaker, T.; Everts, V.; de Vries, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) may cause an immune-inflammatory response in host cells leading to bone degradation by osteoclasts. We investigated the osteoclast-inducing capacity of periodontal ligament fibroblasts from periodontitis patients and non-periodontitis donors after a challenge with

  19. Stimulation of prostanoids and IL-8 production in human gingival fibroblasts by Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS is associated with MEK/ERK signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ling Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Our data indicate that P. gingivalis LPS stimulates gene expression of differential inflammatory mediators (COX-2 and IL-8 as well as prostanoids and IL-8 production in GFs. These events are associated with MEK/ERK signaling and crucial in the pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal diseases.

  20. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Human Telomerase-Derived Peptide on P. gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Its Mechanism in Human Dental Pulp Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Jin Ko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered with inducing pulpal inflammation and has lipopolysaccharide (LPS as an inflammatory stimulator. GV1001 peptide has anticancer and anti-inflammation activity due to inhibiting activation of signaling molecules after penetration into the various types of cells. Therefore, this study examined inhibitory effect of GV1001 on dental pulp cells (hDPCs stimulated by P. gingivalis LPS. The intracellular distribution of GV1001 was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to determine the expression levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines. The role of signaling by MAP kinases (ERK and p38 was explored using Western blot analysis. The effect of GV1001 peptide on hDPCs viability was measured by MTT assay. GV1001 was predominantly located in hDPC cytoplasm. The peptide inhibited P. gingivalis LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in hDPCs without significant cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GV1001 treatment markedly inhibited the phosphorylation of MAP kinases (ERK and p38 in LPS-stimulated hDPCs. GV1001 may prevent P. gingivalis LPS-induced inflammation of apical tissue. Also, these findings provide mechanistic insight into how GV1001 peptide causes anti-inflammatory actions in LPS-stimulated pulpitis without significantly affecting cell viability.

  1. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Ghanbari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as photosensitizers on F. nucleatum was not shown.

  2. Draft Whole-Genome Sequences of Periodontal PathobiontsPorphyromonas gingivalis,Prevotella intermedia, andTannerella forsythiaContain Phase-Variable Restriction-Modification Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Richard D; Crawford, Liam A; Ralph, Joseph D; Wanford, Joseph J; Vartoukian, Sonia R; Hijazi, Karolin; Wade, William; Oggioni, Marco R

    2017-11-16

    Periodontal disease comprises mild to severe inflammatory host responses to oral bacteria that can cause destruction of the tooth-supporting tissue. We report genome sequences for 18 clinical isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis , Prevotella intermedia , and Tannerella forsythia , Gram-negative obligate anaerobes that play a role in the periodontal disease process. Copyright © 2017 Haigh et al.

  3. Ethnic diversity of gut microbiota: species characterization of Bacteroides fragilis group and genus Bifidobacterium in healthy Belgian adults, and comparison with data from Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Eiji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Makino, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Fujimoto, Junji; Watanabe, Koichi; Watanuki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2013-08-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiota is related to host health, and it is thought that dietary habits may play a role in shaping this composition. Here, we examined the population size and prevalence of six predominant bacterial genera and the species compositions of genus Bifidobacterium (g-Bifid) and Bacteroides fragilis group (g-Bfra) in 42 healthy Belgian adults by quantitative PCR (qPCR) over a period of one month. The population sizes and prevalence of these bacteria were basically stable throughout the study period. The predominant g-Bifid species were Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium longum ss. longum, and the predominant g-Bfra species were Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides uniformis, and Bacteroides ovatus. The Belgian gut microbiota data were then compared with gut microbiota data from 46 Japanese subjects collected according to the same protocol (Matsuki et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70, 167-173, 2004). The population size and prevalence of Bifidobacterium catenulatum group were significantly lower in the Belgian gut microbiota than in the Japanese gut microbiota (P diversity of gut microbiota among ethnic groups. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. First report of metronidazole resistant, nimD-positive, Bacteroides stercoris isolated from an abdominal abscess in a 70-year-old woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, Erik; Nielsen, Hans Linde; Hasman, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    We here present the first case of a metronidazole resistant nimD positive Bacteroides stercoris. The isolate originated from a polymicrobial intra-abdominal abscess in a 70-year-old woman. The nimD gene was detected by use of whole-genome shotgun sequencing and the subsequent use of the ResFinder 2...

  5. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  6. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing, succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone, cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  7. Investigation of arginine A-specific cysteine proteinase gene expression profiling in clinical Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates against photokilling action of the photo-activated disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Bahador, Abbas

    2018-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a significant root canal pathogen capable of causing endodontic infections, which during their treatment may receive sub-lethal doses of photo-activated disinfection (sPAD). As sPAD can influence microbial virulence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of sPAD on gene expression level of arginine A-specific cysteine proteinase (rgpA), as one of the underlying virulence factors involved in the development of endodontic infection via P. gingivalis strains. To find out the sPAD against 16 clinical isolates of PAD-resistant P. gingivalis that were isolated in vivo, we used toluidine blue O (TBO), methylene blue (MB), and indocyanine green (ICG) as the photosensitizers, which were excited with specific wavelength of light in vitro. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was then applied to monitor gene expression of rgpA in P. gingivalis isolates to characterize its virulence agent and understand the effect of sPAD on its pathogenicity. Maximal sPAD that could not decrease the count of P. gingivalis isolates were 6.25, 15.6, and 25 μg/mL at fluencies of 171.87, 15.6, and 93.75 J/cm 2 for TBO, ICG, and MB, respectively. ICG-sPAD could suppress the rgpA gene expression about 14-fold, while MB and TBO-mediated sPAD could cause the attenuation of rgpA expression about 4.9- and 11.6-fold, respectively. ICG-sPAD with the maximum ability to reduce rgpA gene expression compared with other photosensitizers can be an appropriate candidate for the treatment of endodontic infections.

  8. Multidrug-resistant oral Capnocytophaga gingivalis responsible for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Elodie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Fosse, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    Capnocytophaga genus was recently known to highly contribute to the beta-lactam (BL) and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance gene reservoir in the oral microbiota (BL: bla CSP-1 and bla CfxA ; MLS: erm(F) and erm(C)). But fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance remains uncommon in literature, without available data on resistance mechanisms. For the first time, a case of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was described in a 78-year-old immunocompetent patient due to a multidrug-resistant Capnocytophaga gingivalis isolate with significant microbiological finding. C.gingivalis acquired resistance to third generation cephalosporins (bla CfxA3 gene), MLS (erm(F) gene), and fluoroquinolones. Genetics of the resistance, unknown as regards fluoroquinolone, was investigated and a substitution in QRDR of GyrA was described (Gly80Asn substitution) for the first time in the Capnocytophaga genus. A comprehensive literature review of Capnocytophaga spp. extra-oral infection was conducted. Including the present report, on 43 cases, 7 isolates were BL-resistant (17%), 4 isolates were MLS-resistant (9.5%) and 4 isolates were FQ-resistant (9.5%). The studied clinical isolate of C.gingivalis was the only one to combine resistance to the three groups of antibiotics BL, MLS and FQ. Four cases of Capnocytophaga lung infection were reported, including three infections involving C. gingivalis (two FQ resistant) and one involving C. sputigena. This multidrug-resistant C. gingivalis isolate illustrated the role of oral flora as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance and its contribution to the limitation of effective antibiotics in severe respiratory infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Habibollah; Mousavi, Seyed Amir; Forouzanfar, Ali; Zakeri, Mahdi; Shafaee, Hooman; Shahnaseri, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    According to the development of resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria following treatment with antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, alternative approaches such as lethal photosensitization are being used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of visible light and laser beam radiation in conjugation with three different photosensitizers on the survival of two main periodontopathogenic bacteria including Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in different exposure periods. In this in vitro prospective study, strains of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. were exposed to visible light at wavelengths of 440 nm and diode laser light, Gallium-Arsenide, at wavelength of 830 nm in the presence of a photosensitizer (erythrosine, curcuma, or hydrogen peroxide). They were exposed 1-5 min to each light. Each experiment was repeated 3 times for each strain of bacteria. Data were analyzed by two-ways ANOVA and least significant difference post-hoc tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. After 4 days the colonies were counted. Viability of P. gingivalis was reduced 10% and 20% subsequent to exposure to visible light and diode laser, respectively. The values were 65% and 75% for F. nucleatum in a period of 5-min, respectively. Exposure to visible light or laser beam in conjugation with the photosensitizers suspension caused significant reduction in the number of P. gingivalis in duration of 5-min, suggesting a synergic phototoxic effect. However, the survival rate of F. nucleatum following the exposure to laser with hydrogen peroxide, erythrosine and rhizome of Curcuma longa (curcumin) after 5-min was 10%, 20% and 90% respectively. Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as photosensitizers on F. nucleatum was not shown.

  10. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  11. Current Status of Marker Genes of Bacteroides and Related Taxa for Identifying Sewage Pollution in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warish Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial source tracking (MST endeavors to determine sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters by capitalizing on the association of certain microorganisms with the gastrointestinal tract and feces of specific animal groups. Several decades of research have shown that bacteria belonging to the gut-associated order Bacteroidales, and particularly the genus Bacteroides, tend to co-evolve with the host, and are, therefore, particularly suitable candidates for MST applications. This review summarizes the current research on MST methods that employ genes belonging to Bacteroidales/Bacteroides as tracers or “markers” of sewage pollution, including known advantages and deficiencies of the many polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods that have been published since 2000. Host specificity is a paramount criterion for confidence that detection of a marker is a true indicator of the target host. Host sensitivity, or the prevalence of the marker in feces/waste from the target host, is necessary for confidence that absence of the marker is indicative of the absence of the pollution source. Each of these parameters can vary widely depending on the type of waste assessed and the geographic location. Differential decay characteristics of bacterial targets and their associated DNA contribute to challenges in interpreting MST results in the context of human health risks. The HF183 marker, derived from the 16S rRNA gene of Bacteroides dorei and closely related taxa, has been used for almost two decades in MST studies, and is well characterized regarding host sensitivity and specificity, and in prevalence and concentration in sewage in many countries. Other markers such as HumM2 and HumM3 show promise, but require further performance testing to demonstrate their widespread utility. An important limitation of the one-marker-one-assay approach commonly used for MST is that given the complexities of microbial persistence in environmental waters, and

  12. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and the cfiA resistance gene in Danish Bacteroides fragilis group isolates since 1973

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Simon Andreas; Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Hansen, Kia Cirkeline Møller

    2017-01-01

    .0%) B. fragilis strains as division II, of which 4 strains, isolated between 2010 and 2015, were resistant to meropenem. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial increases in resistance were found throughout this study. This supports the general perception that antimicrobial resistance in the B. fragilis group has been......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of resistance and the cfiA carbapenemase-producing gene in historical Bacteroides fragilis group isolates. METHODS: Danish clinical B. fragilis group isolates (n = 444) from 1973 to 2015 were identified with Matrix-Assisted Laser...... Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) on the Biotyper platform. Antimicrobial resistance was determined using a disk diffusion screening method and commercial antibiotic gradient strips. Division I (cfiA-negative) and division II (cfiA-positive) B. fragilis strains were...

  13. Twenty-eight divergent polysaccharide loci specifying within and amongst strain capsule diversity in three strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, S.; Blakely, G.W.; Houston, S.

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the complete genome sequence of Bacteroides fragilis 638R originally isolated in the USA, was made with two previously sequenced strains isolated in the UK (NCTC 9343) and Japan (YCH46). The presence of 10 loci containing genes associated with polysaccharide biosynthesis, each...... including a putative Wzx flippase and Wzy polymerase, was confirmed in all three strains, despite a lack of cross-reactivity between NCTC 9343 and 638R surface polysaccharide-specific antibodies by immunolabelling and microscopy. Genomic comparisons revealed an exceptional level of polysaccharide...... biosynthesis locus diversity. Of the 10 divergent polysaccharide associated loci apparent in each strain, none are similar between NCTC9343 and 638R. YCH46 shares one locus with NCTC9343, confirmed by MAb labelling, and a second different locus with 638R, making a total of 28 divergent polysaccharide...

  14. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Debanu; Finn, Robert D.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the BVU2987 gene product from B. vulgatus (UniProt A6L4L1) reveals that members of the new Pfam family PF11396 (domain of unknown function; DUF2874) are similar to β-lactamase inhibitor protein and YpmB. Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA-OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins

  15. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative xylose isomerase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jea-Won; Han, Byeong-Gu; Park, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Jun; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Lee, Byung Il

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BT0793, a putative xylose isomerase, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether 550 as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.10 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron X-rays. The crystal was found to belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a=96.3, b=101.7, c=108.3 Å, α=82.8, β=68.2, γ=83.0°. The asymmetric unit contained eight subunits of xylose isomerase with a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.38 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 48.3%.

  16. Antimicrobial test of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. ethanol extract againts Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus sanguis using agar method (In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenni Indriani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of natural materials in the world of health tends to increase every single year, including  in dentistry. Due to the increased of resistance to antibiotics, the development and new innovations to obtain a new antimicrobial agent. Some potential sources of plants have been studied. One of the natural plants is used as drinks, food, medicine and antimicrobial agent is Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn commonly known as Roselle. Several major Gram-negative bacteria are related to periodontal disease such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.gingivalis, The dominant species of Gram-positive including Streptococcus sanguis(S.sanguis. The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate the Roselle ethanol extract against P.gingivalis bacteria (Gram negative bacteria and S. sanguis (Gram positive bacteria with a concentration of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%. The in vitro study of antibacterial effectiveness of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. ethanol extract on P.gingivalis and S. sanguis. Natrium Agar (NA solution was poured into a glass plate which had previously been sterilized and then left in place until the medium solidified. P.gingivalis and S.sanguis bacterial cultures were inoculated with inscribed which had solidified. Then put paper disk which had previously been saturated with Roselle extract samples with a concentration of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, and the negative control at the surface of the medium (Ampicillin and incubated for 1 day. Clear zone is formed then observed and measured. There are 24 samples, consisting of 12 samples  P.gingivalis and S.sanguis 12 samples, given intervention roselle flower extract with four types of concentrations to determine the minimum inhibitory consentration (MIC. The observations show that the extensive zone of inhibition concentration of 2.5% a broad zone of inhibition is the smallest among other concentration, both of S.sanguins and P.gingivalis. Meanwhile, the average increases the

  17. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  18. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  19. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value...

  20. New concept in allergy: Non-allergic rats becomes allergic after induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a theory, seemingly it is impossible that allergic diseases, including asthma, are the result of exposure to a transmissible agent. The fact that nearly all children with asthma are allergic, but only a small proportion of allergic children have asthma, at least raises the possibility that other factors are involved. Interestingly, non-allergic children become allergic after their parents came from working in allergic people for several months. Recent research revealed that periodontal pathogens are also transmissible from mother and caregivers to infants.Therefore, it is logical that non-allergic children could become allergic after exposed to periodontopathic bacteria. However, the mechanism is still unclear. Purpose: The objective of this study is to verify a new concept that non-allergic rat may become allergic after exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide. Methods: Randomized control series design experimental study was conducted to 24 male Wistar rats, two experimental groups and one control group. One group was subjected to intrasulcular injection of PgLPS1435/1450. Tissue examination were done for allergy biomarkers with peroxidase immunohistochemistry for leukotriene C4 (LTC4 and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP in bronchus tissue. Serum level examination of interleukin 4 (IL-4, and immunoglobulin E (IgE was done with ELISA. Data were analyzes using ANOVA. Results: after four days, LTC4 and ECP expression increased significantly (p=0.001; even insignificant, IL-4 and IgE serum level also increased. Conclusion: PgLPS is able to stimulate immunocompetent cells which changed the host immune response of non-allergic rats. Therefore, it is possible that they become allergic.Latar belakang: Menurut teori, penularan penyakit alergi termasuk asma merupakan hal yang mustahil. Fakta menunjukkn bahwa hampir semua anak penderita asma mempunyai alergi, tetapi tidak semua anak alergi menderita asma, sehingga mungkin

  1. Unique structure and stability of HmuY, a novel heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Wójtowicz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection, survival, and proliferation of pathogenic bacteria in humans depend on their capacity to impair host responses and acquire nutrients in a hostile environment. Among such nutrients is heme, a co-factor for oxygen storage, electron transport, photosynthesis, and redox biochemistry, which is indispensable for life. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major human bacterial pathogen responsible for severe periodontitis. It recruits heme through HmuY, which sequesters heme from host carriers and delivers it to its cognate outer-membrane transporter, the TonB-dependent receptor HmuR. Here we report that heme binding does not significantly affect the secondary structure of HmuY. The crystal structure of heme-bound HmuY reveals a new all-beta fold mimicking a right hand. The thumb and fingers pinch heme iron through two apical histidine residues, giving rise to highly symmetric octahedral iron co-ordination. The tetrameric quaternary arrangement of the protein found in the crystal structure is consistent with experiments in solution. It shows that thumbs and fingertips, and, by extension, the bound heme groups, are shielded from competing heme-binding proteins from the host. This may also facilitate heme transport to HmuR for internalization. HmuY, both in its apo- and in its heme-bound forms, is resistant to proteolytic digestion by trypsin and the major secreted proteases of P. gingivalis, gingipains K and R. It is also stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. In conclusion, these studies reveal novel molecular properties of HmuY that are consistent with its role as a putative virulence factor during bacterial infection.

  2. Effect of gallium aluminium arsenide diode laser therapy on Porphyromonas gingivalis in chronic periodontitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoman, H A; Diab, H M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this randomized, controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of 685-nm gallium aluminium arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser therapy (1.6 J cm -2 ) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Thirty-two patients aged 35-60 years old who had chronic periodontitis met the eligibility criteria. They were randomly assigned to two equal groups: scaling and root planing were performed in the SRP group, while scaling, root planing and laser irradiation of periodontal pockets were performed in the SRP + DL group. Subgingival plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect P. gingivalis-colonized sites, and common clinical indices were evaluated before and 2 months after treatment. Clinical examination included gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and gingival bleeding index (GBI), all of which were recorded. Data from 30 patients [19 women and 11 men; mean age, 48.4 (5.4) years old] were analysed. There were statistically significant improvements in GI, PD, CAL and GBI for the SRP + DL group compared to SRP group but no significant difference in PI between the groups. Additionally, the percentage of P. gingivalis-positive sites in the SRP + DL group decreased from 80% (12/15) to 20% (3/15) after laser irradiation (P < 0.05). No significant changes were noted in the SRP group. GaAlAs diode laser irradiation of diseased periodontal pockets at 685 nm and 1.6 J cm -2 seemed to be an effective adjuvant to mechanical instrumentation to treat chronic periodontitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure

  4. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclare, Pierre; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Widmer, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13 C- and 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  5. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  6. Colonoscopy and carcinoembryonic antigen variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita G; Nunes, Ana; Meira, Tânia; Carreira, Olga; Pires, Ana M; Freitas, João

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1) before bowel cleaning, (2) before colonoscopy and (3) immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by "Sandwich" immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F) were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years). Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1), (2) and (3), respectively. An increase in value (2) compared with (1) was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018), mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2) to (3) (P = 1.3x10-7). A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  7. Meningo-encefalite equina da Halicephalobus gingivalis: contributo casistico nell’ambito delle attività di sorveglianza della Febbre del Nilo occidentale (West Nile disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Di Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Un cavallo di 7 anni è stato abbattuto dopo aver manifestato una grave sindrome neurologica a rapida evoluzione. Campioni tessutali sono stati inviati al Centro Studi Malattie Esotiche dell’Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell’Abruzzo e del Molise “G. Caporale” (Istituto G. Caporale per gli accertamenti diagnostici del caso. Gli esami per le più comuni virosi neurologiche equine non hanno evidenziato la presenza di infezioni in atto. Istologicamente, si è osservata a livello encefalico la presenza di manicotti perivascolari e numerosi corpi parassitari, morfologicamente riferibili a Halicephalobus gingivalis. Il rinvenimento ha consentito di formulare la diagnosi di meningo-encefalite da H. gingivalis. Il caso riportato conferma che le encefaliti parassitarie devono essere annoverate nella diagnosi differenziale delle encefalopatie equine e sottolinea l’utilità dell’approccio diagnostico multidisciplinare.

  8. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia to dentin and titanium with sandblasted and acid etched surface coated with serum and serum proteins - An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Sigrun; Kindblom, Christian; Mizgalska, Danuta; Magdoń, Anna; Jurczyk, Karolina; Sculean, Anton; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the adhesion of selected bacterial strains incl. expression of important virulence factors at dentin and titanium SLA surfaces coated with layers of serum proteins. Dentin- and moderately rough SLA titanium-discs were coated overnight with human serum, or IgG, or human serum albumin (HSA). Thereafter, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, or a six-species mixture were added for 4h and 24h. The number of adhered bacteria (colony forming units; CFU) was determined. Arg-gingipain activity of P. gingivalis and mRNA expressions of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia proteases and T. forsythia protease inhibitor were measured. Coating specimens never resulted in differences exceeding 1.1 log10 CFU, comparing to controls, irrespective the substrate. Counts of T. forsythia were statistically significantly higher at titanium than dentin, the difference was up to 3.7 log10 CFU after 24h (p=0.002). No statistically significant variation regarding adhesion of the mixed culture was detected between surfaces or among coatings. Arg-gingipain activity of P. gingivalis was associated with log10 CFU but not with the surface or the coating. Titanium negatively influenced mRNA expression of T. forsythia protease inhibitor at 24h (p=0.026 uncoated, p=0.009 with serum). The present findings indicate that: a) single bacterial species (T. forsythia) can adhere more readily to titanium SLA than to dentin, b) low expression of T. forsythia protease inhibitor may influence the virulence of the species on titanium SLA surfaces in comparison with teeth, and c) surface properties (e.g. material and/or protein layers) do not appear to significantly influence multi-species adhesion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals and their susceptibility to endodontic treatment procedures: A molecular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Because apical periodontitis is recognizably an infectious disease, elimination or reduction of intracanal bacteria is of utmost importance for optimum treatment outcome. Objective. The prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals was studied Also, the effect of endodontic therapy by using intracanal medicaments, calcium hydroxide paste (CH or gutta-percha points containing calcium hydroxide (CH-GP or chlorhexidine (CHX-GP on these microorganisms was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Methods. Fifty-one patients with chronic apical periodontitis were randomly allocated in one of the following groups according to the intracanal medicament used: CH, CH-GP and CHX-GP group. Bacterial samples were taken upon access (S1, after chemomechanical instrumentation (S2 and after 15-day medication (S3. PCR assay was used to detect the presence of selected bacteria. Results. E. faecalis was detected in 49% (25/51 and P. gingivalis in 17.6% (9/51 of the samples. Samples which showed no bacterial presence at S1 were excluded from further analysis. Overall analysis of all 29 samples revealed significant differences between S1 and S2 (p<0.001, S2 and S3 (p<0.05, and S1 and S3 (p<0.001. When distinction was made between the intracanal medications, there was a significant difference in the number of PCR positive samples between S1 and S2, S1 and S3, but not between S2 and S3 samples. Conclusion. E. faecalis is more prevalent than P. gingivalis in primary endodontic infection. Intracanal medication in conduction with instrumentation and irrigation efficiently eliminates E. faecalis and P. gingivalis from infected root canals.

  10. The role of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and neutrophil extracellular traps in the interaction between neutrophils and the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, K; Demirel, I; Khalaf, H; Bengtsson, T

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophils are regarded as the sentinel cells of innate immunity and are found in abundance within the gingival crevice. Discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) within the gingival pockets prompted us to probe the nature of the interactions of neutrophils with the prominent periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Some of the noted virulence factors of this Gram-negative anaerobe are gingipains: arginine gingipains (RgpA/B) and lysine gingipain (Kgp). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of gingipains in phagocytosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, NETs and CXCL8 modulation by using wild-type strains and isogenic gingipain mutants. Confocal imaging showed that gingipain mutants K1A (Kgp) and E8 (RgpA/B) induced extracellular traps in neutrophils, whereas ATCC33277 and W50 were phagocytosed. The viability of both ATCC33277 and W50 dwindled as the result of phagocytosis and could be salvaged by cytochalasin D, and the bacteria released high levels of lipopolysaccharide in the culture supernatant. Porphyromonas gingivalis induced reactive oxygen species and CXCL8 with the most prominent effect being that of the wild-type strain ATCC33277, whereas the other wild-type strain W50 was less effective. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a significant CXCL8 expression by E8. All the tested P. gingivalis strains increased cytosolic free calcium. In conclusion, phagocytosis is the primary neutrophil response to P. gingivalis, although NETs could play an accessory role in infection control. Although gingipains do not seem to directly regulate phagocytosis, NETs or oxidative burst in neutrophils, their proteolytic properties could modulate the subsequent outcomes such as nutrition acquisition and survival by the bacteria. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. miR-146a regulates inflammatory cytokine production in Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B cells by targeting IRAK1 but not TRAF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaoyun; Hu, Yang; Deng, Shu; Deng, Jiayin; Yu, Xinbo; Huang, Grace; Kawai, Toshihisa; Han, Xiaozhe

    2018-03-01

    It has been suggested that microRNAs (miRs) are involved in the immune regulation of periodontitis. However, it is unclear whether and how miRs regulate the function of B cells in the context of periodontitis. This study is to explore the role of miR-146a on the inflammatory cytokine production of B cells challenged by Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Primary B cells were harvested from mouse spleen. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B cells in the presence or absence of P. gingivalis LPS and/or miR-146a. Bioinformatics, luciferase reporter assay and overexpression assay were used to explore the binding target of miR-146a. Our results showed that miR-146a level in B cells was elevated by P. gingivalis LPS stimulation, and the mRNA expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β, 6 and 10, and IL-1 receptor associated kinase-1 (IRAK1), but not TNF receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6), were also upregulated. The expression levels of IL-1β, 6, 10 and IRAK1 were reduced in the presence of miR-146a mimic, but were elevated by the addition of miR-146a inhibitor. MiR-146a could bind with IRAK1 3' untranslated region (UTR) but not TRAF6 3'-UTR. Overexpression of IRAK1 reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-146a on IL-1β, 6 and 10. In summary, miR-146a inhibits inflammatory cytokine production in B cells through directly targeting IRAK1, suggesting a regulatory role of miR-146a in B cell-mediated periodontal inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of photo-activated disinfection effectiveness with methylene blue against Porphyromonas gingivalis involved in endodontic infection: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Chiniforush, Nasim; Raoofian, Reza; Pourakbari, Babak; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Bazarjani, Farzaneh; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    Eradication or suppression of microbial pathogens is a major goal in endodontic infection therapy. Sub-lethal doses of photo-activated disinfection (sPAD) as a new treatment method might be able to control the microorganisms involved in endodontic infections normally treated with PAD. This study evaluated the effect of sPAD using methylene blue (MB) in combination with diode laser irradiation on the growth and biofilm formation ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis as an endodontic pathogen. The anti-microbial and anti-biofilm potential of sPAD against P. gingivalis were assessed at sub-lethal doses of MB and irradiation by diode laser on colony forming unit and crystal violet assays, respectively. MB-sPAD using 25μg/mL at a fluency of 117.18J/cm 2 and 50-100μg/mL at a fluency of 93.75J/cm 2 significantly P. gingivalis growth when compared to the control. MB at 100μg/mL at a fluency of 117.18J/cm 2 in MB-mediated PAD showed a significant inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in P. gingivalis compared with MB-sPAD. High doses of MB-mediated sPAD exhibited anti-microbial and anti-biofilm potential activity, whereas lower doses of MB-mediated sPAD did not display this ability. Therefore, the dose of PAD used in vivo should be taken into account for endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gestational Day-Dependent Expression of Interleukin-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha in Porphyromonas gingivalis-infected Pregnant Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Banun Kusumawardani; Marsetyawan HNE Soesatyo; Djaswadi Dasuki; Widya Asmara

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction remains a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Porphyromonas gingivaliscan induce placental inflammatory response resulting in fetal growth restriction. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the potential utility of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in rat placental tissues to understand whether these events were causally related. Methods: Female rats were infected with live-Porphyromonas gingivalis at concentratio...

  14. Validation of a multiplex qPCR assay for the identification and quantification of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis: In vitro and subgingival plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, M J; Ambrosio, N; Herrera, D; Sanz, M; Figuero, E

    2018-04-01

    To validate a multiplex qPCR (m-qPCR) assay for the simultaneous identification and quantification of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival samples. In vitro samples: DNA combinations of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis in similar or different concentrations were prepared. qPCR and m-qPCR were performed using the same primers and hydrolysis probes specific for 16SrRNA genes. Results were analyzed using intra-class (ICCs) and Lin's correlation coefficients (r) based on quantification cycle (Cq) values. Subgingival plaque samples: a cross-sectional study analyzing subgingival plaque samples harvested from periodontally-healthy and chronic periodontitis patients. Samples were processed by either qPCR or m-qPCR targeting both bacteria. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and Lińs correlation coefficients (r) were calculated using CFU/mL as primary outcome. In vitro samples: m-qPCR yielded a good reproducibility (coefficients of variation around 1% and ICCs > 0.99) for both bacterial species. m-qPCR achieved detection limits and specificity similar to qPCR. An excellent concordance (r = 0.99) was observed between m-qPCR and qPCR for A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis without statistical significant differences between both methods Subgingival plaque samples: a high sensitivity (above 80%) and specificity (100%) was obtained with the m-qPCR for both bacteria. The m-qPCR yielded a good concordance in Cq values, showing a good level of agreement between qPCR and m-qPCR. The tested m-qPCR method was successful in the simultaneous quantification of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity on subgingival plaque samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular pathways underlying inhibitory effect of antimicrobial peptide Nal-P-113 on bacteria biofilms formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 by DNA microarray

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong-yan; Lin, Li; Tan, Li-si; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Cheng, Jya-Wei; Pan, Ya-ping

    2017-01-01

    Background Wound-related infection remains a major challenge for health professionals. One disadvantage in conventional antibiotics is their inability to penetrate biofilms, the main protective strategy for bacteria to evade irradiation. Previously, we have shown that synthetic antimicrobial peptides could inhibit bacterial biofilms formation. Results In this study, we first delineated how Nal-P-113, a novel antimicrobial peptide, exerted its inhibitory effects on Porphyromonas gingivalis W83...

  16. Detection and quantification of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus oralis in blood samples with different microbiological identification methods: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, María José; Ambrosio, Nagore; Virto, Leire; Diz, Pedro; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano; Figuero, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Culture-based methods (culture broth bottles or lysis methods) have been the standard for detecting bacteremia. More recently, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was proposed as a more sensitive and specific test although none of them has been validated for the identification of periodontal pathogens (fastidious growing bacteria) in blood samples. To compare the ability to detect and quantify Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus oralis (alone or in combination) in blood samples with three culture techniques [direct anaerobic culturing (DAC), haemo-culture (BACTEC), and lysis-centrifugation (LC)] and a non-culture dependent approach (qPCR) in an in vitro study. Blood samples from 12 periodontally healthy volunteers were contaminated with three concentrations [10 4 ,10 2 and 10 1 colony forming units (CFU)/mL] of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and S. oralis, alone or in combination. Samples were analysed by DAC, BACTEC, LC and qPCR. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, kappa index and Lińs correlation coefficients were calculated. DAC, LC and qPCR were able to detect the three target species at all concentrations. An excellent concordance (correlation coefficient r: 0.92-1) was observed between DAC and the reference standard (sensitivity raging 93.33-100% and specificity 88.89-100%) values. BACTEC was not able to identify P. gingivalis in any of the performed experiments. qPCR provided false negative results for S.oralis. DAC showed the best results for the proper identification and quantification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and S. oralis, alone or in combination, in blood samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio in peri-implant gingiva exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Shuto, Takahiro; Wachi, Takanori; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Nikawa, Hiroki; Makihira, Seicho

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose: The prevalence of peri-implant diseases, including peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, is increasing. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathological mechanisms of inflammation and alveolar bone resorption in peri-implant tissues. To do this, we fabricated inflamed gingiva around mini-implants in the palatine processes of rats using lipopolysaccharide derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g-LPS). Materials and methods: Pure titanium mini-implants wer...

  18. Purification, crystallization and diffraction studies of the methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from antibiotic-resistant pathogens of the genus Bacteroides from the human intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Veerendra; Mallika, Nagarajan; Sivaraman, J.

    2011-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization and diffraction of two methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from two Bacteroides species of antibiotic-resistant pathogens from the human intestine are reported. The methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from two different Bacteroides species that are antibiotic-resistant pathogens from the human intestine were cloned, overexpressed and purified, yielding approximately 120 mg of each protein from 1 l culture. Apo BT-2972 and BVU-3255 and their complexes with S-adenosylmethionine or S-adenosylhomocysteine were crystallized in four different crystal forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. These crystals diffracted to resolutions ranging from 2.8 to 2.2 Å. Sequence analysis suggested that the two proteins are homologous small-molecule methyltransferases

  19. Molecular pathways underlying inhibitory effect of antimicrobial peptide Nal-P-113 on bacteria biofilms formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 by DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Lin, Li; Tan, Li-Si; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Cheng, Jya-Wei; Pan, Ya-Ping

    2017-02-17

    Wound-related infection remains a major challenge for health professionals. One disadvantage in conventional antibiotics is their inability to penetrate biofilms, the main protective strategy for bacteria to evade irradiation. Previously, we have shown that synthetic antimicrobial peptides could inhibit bacterial biofilms formation. In this study, we first delineated how Nal-P-113, a novel antimicrobial peptide, exerted its inhibitory effects on Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 biofilms formation at a low concentration. Secondly, we performed gene expression profiling and validated that Nal-P-113 at a low dose significantly down-regulated genes related to mobile and extrachromosomal element functions, transport and binding proteins in Porphyromonas gingivalis W83. These findings suggest that Nal-P-113 at low dose is sufficient to inhibit the formation of biofilms although Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 may maintain its survival in the oral cavity. The newly discovered molecular pathways may add the knowledge of developing a new strategy to target bacterial infections in combination with current first-line treatment in periodontitis.

  20. Bee Venom Inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines through Suppression of NF-κB and AP-1 Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woon-Hae Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, especially its lipopolysaccharides (LPS, is one of major pathogens that cause periodontitis. Bee venom (BV has been widely used as a traditional medicine for various diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial effects of BV. However, a direct role and cellular mechanism of BV on periodontitis-like human keratinocytes have not been explored. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of BV against P. gingivalis LPS (PgLPS-induced HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. The anti-inflammatory effect of BV was demonstrated by various molecular biological methods. The results showed that PgLPS increased the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR-4 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and interferon (IFN-γ. In addition, PgLPS induced activation of the signaling pathways of inflammatory cytokines-related transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1. BV effectively inhibited those pro-inflammatory cytokines through suppression of NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. These results suggest that administration of BV attenuates PgLPS-induced inflammatory responses. Furthermore, BV may be a useful treatment to anti-inflammatory therapy for periodontitis.

  1. Bee Venom Inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines through Suppression of NF-κB and AP-1 Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woon-Hae; An, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Gwon, Mi-Gyeong; Gu, Hyemin; Park, Jae-Bok; Sung, Woo Jung; Kwon, Yong-Chul; Park, Kyung-Duck; Han, Sang Mi; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2016-11-10

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis ( P. gingivalis ), especially its lipopolysaccharides (LPS), is one of major pathogens that cause periodontitis. Bee venom (BV) has been widely used as a traditional medicine for various diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial effects of BV. However, a direct role and cellular mechanism of BV on periodontitis-like human keratinocytes have not been explored. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of BV against P. gingivalis LPS (PgLPS)-induced HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. The anti-inflammatory effect of BV was demonstrated by various molecular biological methods. The results showed that PgLPS increased the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and interferon (IFN)-γ. In addition, PgLPS induced activation of the signaling pathways of inflammatory cytokines-related transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1). BV effectively inhibited those pro-inflammatory cytokines through suppression of NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. These results suggest that administration of BV attenuates PgLPS-induced inflammatory responses. Furthermore, BV may be a useful treatment to anti-inflammatory therapy for periodontitis.

  2. Suppression by Ghrelin of Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Constitutive Nitric Oxide Synthase S-Nitrosylation and Apoptosis in Salivary Gland Acinar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw L. Slomiany

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal inflammatory responses to periodontopathic bacterium, P. gingivalis, and its key virulence factor, LPS, are characterized by a massive rise in epithelial cell apoptosis and the disturbances in NO signaling pathways. Here, we report that the LPS-induced enhancement in rat sublingual salivary gland acinar cell apoptosis and NO generation was associated with the suppression in constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS activity and a marked increase in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. We demonstrate that the detrimental effect of the LPS on cNOS was manifested by the enzyme protein S-nitrosylation, that was susceptible to inhibition by iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. Further, we show that a peptide hormone, ghrelin, countered the LPS-induced changes in apoptosis and cNOS activity. This effect of ghrelin was reflected in the decrease in cNOS S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation. Our findings imply that P. gingivalis-induced disturbances in the acinar cell NO signaling pathways result from upregulation in iNOS-derived NO that causes cNOS S-nitrosylation that interferes with its activation through phosphorylation. We also show that ghrelin protection against P. gingivalis-induced disturbances involves cNOS activation associated with a decrease in its S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation.

  3. Antigenic relationships among four herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, W T; Plummer, G

    1973-06-01

    Common viral antigens were detected, by fluorescent-antibody studies, in cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1, squirrel monkey herpesvirus 1, bovine rhinotracheitis, and equine abortion viruses. The two primate viruses showed slight cross-neutralization.

  4. HLA-B27 antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human leukocyte antigen B27; Ankylosing spondylitis-HLA; Psoriatic arthritis-HLA; Reactive arthritis-HLA ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ( ESR ) Rheumatoid factor X-rays HLA testing is also used to match donated tissue ...

  5. Vitamin B12 Uptake by the gut commensal bacteria bacteroides thetaiotaomicron limits the production of shiga toxin by enterohemorrhagic escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Le Bihan , Guillaume; Emond-Rheault , Jean-Guillaume; Garrivier, Annie; Harel, Josee; Jubelin, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are foodborne pathogens responsible for the development of bloody diarrhea and renal failure in humans. Many environmental factors have been shown to regulate the production of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), the main virulence factor of EHEC. Among them, soluble factors produced by human gut microbiota and in particular, by the predominant species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron), inhibit Stx2 gene expression. In this study, we investigated t...

  6. Characterisation of a multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolate recovered from blood of a patient in Denmark using whole-genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ank, Nina; Sydenham, Thomas V; Iversen, Lene H

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a patient undergoing extensive abdominal surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy due to primary adenocarcinoma in the sigmoid colon with peritoneal carcinomatosis. During hospitalisation the patient suffered from bacteraemia with a multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fr...... fragilis isolate. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolate resulted in identification of nimE, cfiA and ermF genes corresponding to metronidazole, carbapenem and clindamycin resistance....

  7. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  8. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lin Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades there has been a progressive understanding that epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen is an important sensitization route in patients with atopic dermatitis. A murine protein-patch model has been established, and an abundance of data has been obtained from experiments using this model. This review discusses the characteristics of epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen, the induced immune responses, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic potential.

  9. Alterations of Bacteroides sp., Neisseria sp., Actinomyces sp., and Streptococcus sp. populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome are associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haifeng; Qian, Guirong; Ren, Zhigang; Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Wei; Ye, Ping; Yang, Yunmei; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-06-23

    The microbiomes of humans are associated with liver and lung inflammation. We identified and verified alterations of the oropharyngeal microbiome and assessed their association with cirrhosis and pneumonia. Study components were as follows: (1) determination of the temporal stability of the oropharyngeal microbiome; (2) identification of oropharyngeal microbial variation in 90 subjects; (3) quantitative identification of disease-associated bacteria. DNAs enriched in bacterial sequences were produced from low-biomass oropharyngeal swabs using whole genome amplification and were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. Whole genome amplification combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis monitored successfully oropharyngeal microbial variations and showed that the composition of each subject's oropharyngeal microbiome remained relatively stable during the follow-up. The microbial composition of cirrhotic patients with pneumonia differed from those of others and clustered together in subgroup analysis. Further, species richness and the value of Shannon's diversity and evenness index increased significantly in patients with cirrhosis and pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Moreover, we identified variants of Bacteroides, Eubacterium, Lachnospiraceae, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus through phylogenetic analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that the populations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, and Actinomycetes increased, while that of Streptococcus decreased in cirrhotic patients with pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Alterations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome were associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

  10. Suppurative otitis and ascending meningoencephalitis associated with Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae in a captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) with toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, Federico; Schapira, Andrea; Anderson, Mark; Clothier, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    A 6-year-old female Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at a zoo in California developed acute ataxia and left-sided circling. Despite intensive care, clinical signs progressed to incoordination and prostration, and the animal was euthanized. At necropsy, the left tympanic cavity was filled with homogeneous suppurative exudate that extended into the cranium expanding the meninges and neuroparenchyma in the lateral and ventral aspect of the caudal ipsilateral brainstem and medulla oblongata. Microscopically, the brainstem showed regional severe suppurative meningoencephalitis with large numbers of neutrophils, fewer macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with fibrin, necrotic cellular debris, hemorrhage, and mineralization, with numerous intralesional Gram-negative bacilli. Bacteroides spp. and Porphyromonas spp. were isolated on anaerobic culture from the meninges, and the bacteria were further characterized by partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae. Bacterial aerobic culture from the meninges yielded very low numbers of mixed flora and Proteus spp., which were considered contaminants. Culture of Mycoplasma spp. from middle ear and meninges was negative. Additionally, Toxoplasma gondii cysts were detected by immunohistochemistry in the heart and brain, and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were detected in serum. The genera Bacteroides and Porphyromonas have been associated with oral disease in marsupials; but not with otitis and meningoencephalitis. The results of the present work highlight the importance of performing anaerobic cultures in the diagnostic investigation of cases of suppurative otitis and meningoencephalitis in macropods. © 2014 The Author(s).

  11. Distribution and Abundance of Human Specific Bacteroides and Relation to Traditional Indicators in an Urban Tropical Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nshimyimana, J.; Shanahan, P.; Thompson, J. R.; Ekklesia, E.; Chua Hock Chye, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria above recreational water quality criteria; their sources and distribution are unknown. The primary goals of this study were to determine the distribution of fecal indicator bacteria in drainages and water bodies in the Kranji reservoir catchment area. Total coliforms, E. coli, and the DNA-based HF marker (targeting a human specific strain of Bacteroides) were quantified in 27 samples collected in January 2009 and 54 samples collected in July 2009. Correlation of HF marker cell equivalents (CE) and E. coli abundance (colony forming units (CFU) or Most Probable Number (MPN)) to different land-use categories revealed potential sources of fecal contamination to the Kranji reservoir. Notably, areas designated as farming/agricultural were associated with the highest levels of E. coli (geometric mean 30,500 CFU/100 ml) and HF marker (1.23±1.13x106 CE/100 ml ± S.D.) while in general lower HF marker and E. coli levels were observed in residential areas, undeveloped areas, and within the Kranji reservoir (i.e. Kranji Reservoir had 2 to 17 MPN/100 ml of E. coli and 103 to 105 HF marker CE/100 ml). A partial survey of potential point sources for fecal contamination within the farming area revealed a wastewater effluent stream with HF marker levels exceeding 107 CE/100ml. As observed in previous studies, total coliforms and E. coli levels were weakly (Rcoliforms) and molecular indicators (HF marker) may be explained by differences in the ability of the respective organisms to grow or survive under aerated tropical conditions. The HF marker sequence matches that of Bacteroides dorei, an obligate anaerobe that is not expected to grow in aerated surface waters. In contrast, numerous studies have demonstrated that total coliforms, including E. coli, are able to

  12. Structural Insights into the PorK and PorN Components of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorasia, Dhana G; Veith, Paul D; Hanssen, Eric G; Glew, Michelle D; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Nakayama, Koji; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) has been recently discovered and is specific to Bacteroidetes species. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen for periodontitis, utilizes the T9SS to transport many proteins including the gingipain virulence factors across the outer membrane and attach them to the cell surface via a sortase-like mechanism. At least 11 proteins have been identified as components of the T9SS including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN and PorP, however the precise roles of most of these proteins have not been elucidated and the structural organization of these components is unknown. In this study, we purified PorK and PorN complexes from P. gingivalis and using electron microscopy we have shown that PorN and the PorK lipoprotein interact to form a 50 nm diameter ring-shaped structure containing approximately 32-36 subunits of each protein. The formation of these rings was dependent on both PorK and PorN, but was independent of PorL, PorM and PorP. PorL and PorM were found to form a separate stable complex. PorK and PorN were protected from proteinase K cleavage when present in undisrupted cells, but were rapidly degraded when the cells were lysed, which together with bioinformatic analyses suggests that these proteins are exposed in the periplasm and anchored to the outer membrane via the PorK lipid. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the interaction between PorK and PorN and further revealed that they interact with the PG0189 outer membrane protein. Furthermore, we established that PorN was required for the stable expression of PorK, PorL and PorM. Collectively, these results suggest that the ring-shaped PorK/N complex may form part of the secretion channel of the T9SS. This is the first report showing the structural organization of any T9SS component.

  13. Structural Insights into the PorK and PorN Components of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhana G Gorasia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The type IX secretion system (T9SS has been recently discovered and is specific to Bacteroidetes species. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen for periodontitis, utilizes the T9SS to transport many proteins including the gingipain virulence factors across the outer membrane and attach them to the cell surface via a sortase-like mechanism. At least 11 proteins have been identified as components of the T9SS including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN and PorP, however the precise roles of most of these proteins have not been elucidated and the structural organization of these components is unknown. In this study, we purified PorK and PorN complexes from P. gingivalis and using electron microscopy we have shown that PorN and the PorK lipoprotein interact to form a 50 nm diameter ring-shaped structure containing approximately 32-36 subunits of each protein. The formation of these rings was dependent on both PorK and PorN, but was independent of PorL, PorM and PorP. PorL and PorM were found to form a separate stable complex. PorK and PorN were protected from proteinase K cleavage when present in undisrupted cells, but were rapidly degraded when the cells were lysed, which together with bioinformatic analyses suggests that these proteins are exposed in the periplasm and anchored to the outer membrane via the PorK lipid. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the interaction between PorK and PorN and further revealed that they interact with the PG0189 outer membrane protein. Furthermore, we established that PorN was required for the stable expression of PorK, PorL and PorM. Collectively, these results suggest that the ring-shaped PorK/N complex may form part of the secretion channel of the T9SS. This is the first report showing the structural organization of any T9SS component.

  14. Using Tn-seq To Identify Pigmentation-Related Genes of Porphyromonas gingivalis: Characterization of the Role of a Putative Glycosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Brian A; Cornacchione, Louis P; Collins, Marisha; Malamy, Michael H; Duncan, Margaret J; Hu, Linden T

    2017-07-15

    Cellular pigmentation is an important virulence factor of the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Pigmentation has been associated with many bacterial functions, including but not limited to colonization, maintaining a local anaerobic environment by binding oxygen molecules, and defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by immune cells. Pigmentation-associated loci identified to date have involved lipopolysaccharide, fimbriae, and heme acquisition and processing. We utilized a transposon mutant library of P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 and screened for pigmentation-defective colonies using massively parallel sequencing of the transposon junctions (Tn-seq) to identify genes involved in pigmentation. Transposon insertions at 235 separate sites, located in 67 genes and 15 intergenic regions, resulted in altered pigmentation: 7 of the genes had previously been shown to be involved in pigmentation, while 75 genes and intergenic regions had not. To further confirm identification, we generated a smaller transposon mutant library in P. gingivalis strain W83 and identified pigment mutations in several of the same loci as those identified in the screen in ATCC 33277 but also eight that were not identified in the ATCC 33277 screen. PGN_0361/PG_0264, a putative glycosyltransferase gene located between two tRNA synthetase genes and adjacent to a miniature inverted-repeat transposable element, was identified in the Tn-seq screen and then verified through targeted deletion and complementation. Deletion mutations in PGN_0361/PG_0264 glycosyltransferase abolish pigmentation, modulate gingipain protease activity, and alter lipopolysaccharide. The mechanisms of involvement in pigmentation for other loci identified in this study remain to be determined, but our screen provides the most complete survey of genes involved in pigmentation to date. IMPORTANCE P. gingivalis has been implicated in the onset and progression of periodontal disease. One important virulence

  15. Structural insights into a high affinity nanobody:antigen complex by homology modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major periodontitis-causing pathogens. P. gingivalis secrete a cysteine protease termed RgpB, which is specific for Arg-Xaa bonds in substrates. Recently, a nanobody-based assay was used to demonstrate that RgpB could represent a novel diagnostic target, thereby...

  16. Commensal Bacteroides species induce colitis in host-genotype-specific fashion in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Seth M.; Bijanki, Vinieth N.; Nava, Gerardo M.; Sun, Lulu; Malvin, Nicole P.; Donermeyer, David L.; Dunne, W. Michael; Allen, Paul M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal microbiota is important for induction of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with complex shifts in microbiota composition, but it is unclear whether specific bacterial subsets induce IBD and, if so, whether their proportions in the microbiota are altered during disease. Here we fulfilled Koch’s postulates in host-genotype-specific fashion using a mouse model of IBD with human-relevant disease-susceptibility mutations. From screening experiments we isolated common commensal Bacteroides species, introduced them into antibiotic-pretreated mice, and quantitatively re-isolated them in culture. The bacteria colonized IBD-susceptible and non-susceptible mice equivalently, but induced disease exclusively in susceptible animals. Conversely, commensal Enterobacteriaceae were >100-fold enriched during spontaneous disease but an Enterobacteriaceae isolate failed to induce disease in antibiotic-pretreated mice despite robust colonization. We thus demonstrate that IBD-associated microbiota alterations do not necessarily reflect underlying disease etiology. These findings establish important experimental criteria and a conceptual framework for understanding microbial contributions to IBD. PMID:21575910

  17. Quantitative metabolomics of a xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylose isomerase on glucose and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, M J; Rose, S H; la Grange, D C; Bamba, T; Hasunuma, T; Kondo, A; van Zyl, W H

    2017-10-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot utilize xylose, but the introduction of a xylose isomerase that functions well in yeast will help overcome the limitations of the fungal oxido-reductive pathway. In this study, a diploid S. cerevisiae S288c[2n YMX12] strain was constructed expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylA (XI) and the Scheffersomyces stipitis xyl3 (XK) and the changes in the metabolite pools monitored over time. Cultivation on xylose generally resulted in gradual changes in metabolite pool size over time, whereas more dramatic fluctuations were observed with cultivation on glucose due to the diauxic growth pattern. The low G6P and F1,6P levels observed with cultivation on xylose resulted in the incomplete activation of the Crabtree effect, whereas the high PEP levels is indicative of carbon starvation. The high UDP-D-glucose levels with cultivation on xylose indicated that the carbon was channeled toward biomass production. The adenylate and guanylate energy charges were tightly regulated by the cultures, while the catabolic and anabolic reduction charges fluctuated between metabolic states. This study helped elucidate the metabolite distribution that takes place under Crabtree-positive and Crabtree-negative conditions when cultivating S. cerevisiae on glucose and xylose, respectively.

  18. Structure of a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) family protein from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of a novel MACPF protein, which may play a role in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to host environments in the human gut, was determined and analyzed. Membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) proteins are transmembrane pore-forming proteins that are important in both human immunity and the virulence of pathogens. Bacterial MACPFs are found in diverse bacterial species, including most human gut-associated Bacteroides species. The crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF-domain-containing protein BT-3439 (Bth-MACPF) from B. thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the mammalian intestinal microbiota, has been determined. Bth-MACPF contains a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and two novel C-terminal domains that resemble ribonuclease H and interleukin 8, respectively. The entire protein adopts a flat crescent shape, characteristic of other MACPF proteins, that may be important for oligomerization. This Bth-MACPF structure provides new features and insights not observed in two previous MACPF structures. Genomic context analysis infers that Bth-MACPF may be involved in a novel protein-transport or nutrient-uptake system, suggesting an important role for these MACPF proteins, which were likely to have been inherited from eukaryotes via horizontal gene transfer, in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to the host environment

  19. Analysis of the outer membrane proteome and secretome of Bacteroides fragilis reveals a multiplicity of secretion mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena M Wilson

    Full Text Available Bacteroides fragilis is a widely distributed member of the human gut microbiome and an opportunistic pathogen. Cell surface molecules produced by this organism likely play important roles in colonization, communication with other microbes, and pathogenicity, but the protein composition of the outer membrane (OM and the mechanisms used to transport polypeptides into the extracellular space are poorly characterized. Here we used LC-MS/MS to analyze the OM proteome and secretome of B. fragilis NCTC 9343 grown under laboratory conditions. Of the 229 OM proteins that we identified, 108 are predicted to be lipoproteins, and 61 are predicted to be TonB-dependent transporters. Based on their proximity to genes encoding TonB-dependent transporters, many of the lipoprotein genes likely encode proteins involved in nutrient or small molecule uptake. Interestingly, protease accessibility and biotinylation experiments indicated that an unusually large fraction of the lipoproteins are cell-surface exposed. We also identified three proteins that are members of a novel family of autotransporters, multiple potential type I protein secretion systems, and proteins that appear to be components of a type VI secretion apparatus. The secretome consisted of lipoproteins and other proteins that might be substrates of the putative type I or type VI secretion systems. Our proteomic studies show that B. fragilis differs considerably from well-studied Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli in both the spectrum of OM proteins that it produces and the range of secretion strategies that it utilizes.

  20. Preventive effects of the novel antimicrobial peptide Nal-P-113 in a rat Periodontitis model by limiting the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis and modulating IL-1β and TNF-α production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Lin, Li; Fu, Wei; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Yu, Ning; Tan, Li-Si; Cheng, Jya-Wei; Pan, Ya-Ping

    2017-08-29

    P-113 (AKRHHGYKRKFH-NH2) is a 12-amino-acid histidine-rich peptide derived from histatin 5 that is highly degradable in high salt concentrations and biological fluids such as serum, plasma and saliva. Nal-P-113, a novel antimicrobial peptide whose histidine residues are replaced by the bulky amino acids β-naphthylalanine, causes the antimicrobial peptide to retain its bactericidal activity even in physiological environments. This study evaluated the effect of the novel antimicrobial peptide Nal-P-113 in a rat periodontitis model and the mechanisms of action of Nal-P-113 for suppressing periodontitis. Periodontitis was induced in mandibular first molars in rats receiving a ligature and infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis. Animals were randomly divided into six groups: a, P. gingivalis W83 alone; b, P. gingivalis W83 with 6.25 μg/mL of Nal-P-113; c, P. gingivalis W83 with 25 μg/mL of Nal-P-113; d, P. gingivalis W83 with 100 μg/mL of Nal-P-113; e, P. gingivalis W83 with 400 μg/mL of Nal-P-113; and f, control without P. gingivalis W83 or Nal-P-113. Morphometric analysis was used to evaluate alveolar bone loss. Microbiological assessment of the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and total bacteria was performed using absolute quantitative real-time PCR and scanning electron microscopy. Gingival tissue was collected for western blot and immunohistochemical assays of IL-1β and TNF-α levels. Alveolar bone loss was inhibited by 100 μg/mL or 400 μg/mL of Nal-P-113 compared to the control group (P Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced periodontitis in rats by limiting the amount of bacteria and modulating IL-1β and TNF-α production. The use of Nal-P-113 in vivo might serve as a beneficial preventive or therapeutic approach for periodontitis.

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, CXCL8 and CCL2 by neutrophils from localized aggressive periodontitis and healthy donors: modulating actions of red blood cells and resolvin E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, C; Kantarci, A; Holmstrup, P; Hasturk, H; Nielsen, C H; Van Dyke, T E

    2017-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is regarded as a significant contributor in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and certain systemic diseases, including atherosclerosis. P. gingivalis occasionally translocates from periodontal pockets into the circulation, where it adheres to red blood cells (RBCs). This may protect the bacterium from contact with circulating phagocytes without affecting its viability. In this in vitro study, we investigated whether human peripheral blood neutrophils from 10 subjects with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) and 10 healthy controls release the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8; also known as IL-8) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2; also known as monocyte chemotactic protein-1) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to challenge with P. gingivalis. In addition, the impact of RBC interaction with P. gingivalis was investigated. The actions of resolvin E1 (RvE1), a known regulator of P. gingivalis induced neutrophil responses, on the cytokine and ROS responses elicited by P. gingivalis in cultures of neutrophils were investigated. Upon stimulation with P. gingivalis, neutrophils from subjects with LAgP and healthy controls released similar quantities of IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL8, CCL2 and intracellular ROS. The presence of RBCs amplified the release of IL-6, TNF-α and CCL2 statistically significant in both groups, but reduced the generation of ROS in the group of healthy controls, and showed a similar tendency in the group of subjects with LAgP. RvE1 had no impact on the production of intracellular ROS, TNF-α, IL-6, CXCL8 and CCL2 by neutrophils from either group, but tended to reduce the generation of ROS in subjects with LAgP in the absence of RBCs. Our data support that binding to RBCs protects P. gingivalis from ROS and concomitantly enhances neutrophil release of proinflammatory cytokines providing a selective

  2. Human sensitization to Ganoderma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Bell, B; Srinivasan, J; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1979-07-01

    Continuous air sampling with a Hirst volumetric spore trap over 3 yr has identified basidiospores of Ganoderma applanatum, a bracket fungus, as the most numerous fungal spores in two southern Ontario locations. The particle size is small and the calculated total spore mass approximates that of the spores of Cladosporium and Alternaria. Extracts of Ganoderma applanatum bracket fungus and spores in w/v, 1:10 concentration were prepared after collection of samples of the fungus from local woods. Skin prick tests with the extracts were performed in 294 consecutive children and adults attending two chest/allergy clinics. Of these patients, 182 (61.9%) reacted to 1 or more of the common inhalant allergen extracts and 24 (8.2%) reacted to Ganoderma antigen. There was no consistent relationship between reactivity to Ganoderma antigen and any of the common inhaled allergens. IgE-dependent sensitization to Ganoderma was confirmed by the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Rabbit antisera to Ganoderma antigen preparations did not appear to cross-react with preparations of the various clinically important allergens. The findings indicate that Ganoderma antigen is commonly encountered, can induce human sensitization, and has unique antigenicity among common allergens of clinical importance.

  3. LPS from P. gingivalis and Hypoxia Increases Oxidative Stress in Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts and Contributes to Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gölz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is characterized by an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and plays a key role in the progression of inflammatory diseases. We hypothesize that hypoxic and inflammatory events induce oxidative stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL by activating NOX4. Human primary PDL fibroblasts were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (LPS-PG, a periodontal pathogen bacterium under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. By quantitative PCR, immunoblot, immunostaining, and a specific ROS assay we determined the amount of NOX4, ROS, and several redox systems. Healthy and inflamed periodontal tissues were collected to evaluate NOX4 and redox systems by immunohistochemistry. We found significantly increased NOX4 levels after hypoxic or inflammatory stimulation in PDL cells (P<0.001 which was even more pronounced after combination of the stimuli. This was accompanied by a significant upregulation of ROS and catalase (P<0.001. However, prolonged incubation with both stimuli induced a reduction of catalase indicating a collapse of the protective machinery favoring ROS increase and the progression of inflammatory oral diseases. Analysis of inflamed tissues confirmed our hypothesis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the interplay of NOX4 and redox systems is crucial for ROS formation which plays a pivotal role during oral diseases.

  4. Histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and alters HagB-induced chemokine responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgwardt, Derek S.; Martin, Aaron D.; van Hemert, Jonathan R.; Yang, Jianyi; Fischer, Carol L.; Recker, Erica N.; Nair, Prashant R.; Vidva, Robinson; Chandrashekaraiah, Shwetha; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Drake, David; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Vali, Shireen; Zhang, Yang; Brogden, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Histatins are human salivary gland peptides with anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we hypothesized that histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and attenuates HagB-induced chemokine responses in human myeloid dendritic cells. Histatin 5 bound to immobilized HagB in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy-based biosensor system. SPR spectroscopy kinetic and equilibrium analyses, protein microarray studies, and I-TASSER structural modeling studies all demonstrated two histatin 5 binding sites on HagB. One site had a stronger affinity with a KD1 of 1.9 μM and one site had a weaker affinity with a KD2 of 60.0 μM. Binding has biological implications and predictive modeling studies and exposure of dendritic cells both demonstrated that 20.0 μM histatin 5 attenuated (p < 0.05) 0.02 μM HagB-induced CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, and TNFα responses. Thus histatin 5 is capable of attenuating chemokine responses, which may help control oral inflammation.

  5. The Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinins HagB and HagC are major mediators of adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E; Millhouse, E; Doyle, R; Culshaw, S; Ramage, G; Moran, G P

    2017-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a bacterium associated with chronic periodontitis that possesses a family of genes encoding hemagglutinins required for heme acquisition. In this study we generated ΔhagB and ΔhagC mutants in strain W83 and demonstrate that both hagB and hagC are required for adherence to oral epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, a double ΔhagB/ΔhagC mutant had less severe adherence defects than either of the single mutants, but was found to exhibit increased expression of the gingipain-encoding genes rgpA and kgp, suggesting that a ΔhagB/ΔhagC mutant is only viable in populations of cells that exhibit increased expression of genes involved in heme acquisition. Disruption of hagB in the fimbriated strain ATCC33277 demonstrated that HagB is also required for stable attachment of fimbriated bacteria to oral epithelial cells. Mutants of hagC were also found to form defective single and multi-species biofilms that had reduced biomass relative to biofilms formed by the wild-type strain. This study highlights the hitherto unappreciated importance of these genes in oral colonization and biofilm formation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of chemical composition and efficacy of Chinese propolis extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Garima; Vemanaradhya, Gayathri G; Mehta, Dhoom S

    2012-07-01

    Propolis as a natural remedy has maintained its popularity over long periods of time. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition in terms of total phenolic compounds and flavonoids present in Chinese propolis and to carry out an in vitro evaluation of its antimicrobial activity and the minimal inhibitory concentrations for Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). From the ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP), total phenol content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method, flavones and flavonols by the modified aluminum chloride colorimetric method, and flavanones by the 2.4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNP) method. Agar well diffusion assay was used to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of propolis against Pg and Aa. The minimum inhibitory concentration of propolis against the two bacteria was determined using serial tube dilution technique. The total concentration of phenol in the EEP was 19.44%, flavones and flavonols 2.616%, and flavanones 16.176%. The inhibitory zone depicting antimicrobial activity ranged from 18 to 25 mm for Pg and from 12 to 14 mm for Aa. The concentration range of Chinese propolis that is sensitive to inhibit the growth of Pg was 0.1-0.0125 μg/ml and for Aa it was 0.1-0.025 μg/ml. These data suggest that Chinese propolis has potent antimicrobial activity against the two periodontopathogens, suggesting its possible use as a natural alternative to the widely used synthetic antibiotics for periodontal therapy.

  7. Estudos de freqüência, morfologia e diagnóstico de Entamoeba gingivalis, Gros, 1849

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Favoreto Junior

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizamos estudos de freqüência de Entamoeba gingivalis entre 100 pacientes atendidos nos ambulatórios odontológicos da Ufiiversidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU, utilizando-se esfregaços corados pela técnica de Papanicolaou modificado, revelando um expressivo índice de 62% de positividade. A afinidade do corante pelo conteúdo vacuolarfagocítico impede uma nítida visualização das cromatinas central e periférica do núcleo do parasita. Lavados bucais de outros 10 pacientes foram utilizados para avaliar em qual método parasitológico de diagnóstico (a fresco e em coloração por hematoxilina férrica, Giemsa e Papanicolaou ocorre melhor visualização do parasita. O exame afresco do sedimento do lavado bucal revelou 100% de positividade e nítida visualização do parasita. Nenhuma técnica de coloração dos esfregaços se mostrou adequada, apresentando o núcleo freqüentemente mascarado pelos vacúolos fagocíticos. Em preparações coradas por azul de toluidina e na microscopia eletrônica de transmissão pode-se observar caracteres morfológicos típicos do protozoário.

  8. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation.

  9. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Influence of age and immunization on development of gingivitis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekic, P; Klausen, B; Friis-Hasché, E

    1989-01-01

    To study the effect of age and antigenic priming on the development of gingivitis, 33 healthy rats were placed in contact with Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Bacteroides gingivalis. On days 0, 3, 7, and 14 after inoculation, the gingival condition...... was judged clinically and histologically, and serum antibody titers against the bacteria were measured. The rats were divided into three groups: 1 month old, 3 months old, and 3 months old immunized. None of the young rats developed gingivitis during the experiment, whereas half of the adult and all...

  11. Cell envelope and cell wall immunization of Macaca fascicularis: effect on the progression of ligature-induced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, S C; Brunsvold, M; Jones, A; Wood, R; Ebersole, J L

    1995-12-01

    The nonhuman primate, Macaca fascicularis, was used to study the role of immunization with selected members of the periodontopathic microbiota in the longitudinal progression of ligature-induced periodontitis. Animals were immunized with cell envelope antigens prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, and a mixture prepared from Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, and Actinomyces viscosus. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM and IgA isotype antibodies increased significantly in all immunization groups and were specific for each of the immunogens. P. gingivalis and P. intermedia immunization resulted in a stabilization of the proportions of these species throughout most of the experiment. The high P. gingivalis antibody titer resulted in low P. gingivalis numbers being recovered. P. gingivalis immunization, while lowering recoverable viable P. gingivalis, resulted in significantly increased levels of Prevotella loescheii, Prevotella buccae, Bacteroides macacae and Prevotella melaninogenica compared with preligation and preimmunization levels. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp. and Eikenella spp. remained at preligation levels postimmunization. Campylobacter spp. increased significantly during the course of the experiment in all groups, whereas the levels of Fusobacterium spp. decreased. Plaque indices and bleeding on probing showed significant increases in all groups following ligation, with the placebo group showing the greatest increase. Pocket depth measurements revealed that , whereas the placebo animals showed an approximate 5% increase, the P. gingivalis- and P. intermedia-immunized groups showed nearly a 20% increase in pocket depth. Attachment level measurements showed significantly greater attachment loss in the P. gingivalis- and P. intermedia-immunized groups, and the F. nucleatum + C. rectus + A. viscosus immunization appeared to prevent significant changes in pocket depth/attachment level loss

  12. Biochemical and Structural Analyses of Two Cryptic Esterases in Bacteroides intestinalis and their Synergistic Activities with Cognate Xylanases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Daniel; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Schendel, Rachel R; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Wang, Kui; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Mackie, Roderick I; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Cann, Isaac

    2017-08-04

    Arabinoxylans are constituents of the human diet. Although not utilizable by the human host, they can be fermented by colonic bacteria. The arabinoxylan backbone is decorated with arabinose side chains that may be substituted with ferulic acid, thus limiting depolymerization to fermentable sugars. We investigated the polypeptides encoded by two genes upregulated during growth of the colonic bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis on wheat arabinoxylan. The recombinant proteins, designated BiFae1A and BiFae1B, were functionally assigned esterase activities. Both enzymes were active on acetylated substrates, although each showed a higher ferulic acid esterase activity on methyl-ferulate. BiFae1A showed a catalytic efficiency of 12mM s -1 on para-nitrophenyl-acetate, and on methyl-ferulate, the value was 27 times higher. BiFae1B showed low catalytic efficiencies for both substrates. Furthermore, the two enzymes released ferulic acid from various structural elements, and NMR spectroscopy indicated complete de-esterification of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides from wheat bran. BiFae1A is a tetramer based on the crystal structure, whereas BiFae1B is a dimer in solution based on size exclusion chromatography. The structure of BiFae1A was solved to 1.98Å resolution, and two tetramers were observed in the asymmetric unit. A flexible loop that may act as a hinge over the active site and likely coordinates critical interactions with the substrate was prominent in BiFae1A. Sequence alignments of the esterase domains in BiFae1B with the feruloyl esterase from Clostridium thermocellum suggest that both domains lack the flexible hinge in BiFae1A, an observation that may partly provide a molecular basis for the differences in activities in the two esterases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Degradation of fructans and production of propionic acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are enhanced by shortage of amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe eAdamberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by the catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae, two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (DP > 3. Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h, followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of D-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will be studied in

  14. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis by metallo-β-lactamase CcrA from Bacteroides fragilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Le; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Ya-Jun [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Ke-Wu, E-mail: kwyang@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2013-03-20

    Highlights: ► First report the thermokinetic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with CcrA. ► The hydrolysis is a spontaneous and exothermic reaction with order of 1.4. ► Summarized that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among β-lactam antibiotics. - Abstract: One of the most common way that bacteria become resistant to antibiotics is by the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) to hydrolyze the β-lactam-containing antibiotics. In this paper, the thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with B1 subclasses MβL CcrA (carbapenem and cephamycin resistance) from Bacteroides fragilis were determined by microcalorimetry. The activation free energy ΔG{sub ≠}{sup θ} is 87.90 ± 0.03, 88.99 ± 0.01, 89.93 ± 0.04 and 90.93 ± 0.05 kJ mol{sup −1} at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15 K, activation enthalpy ΔH{sub ≠}{sup θ} is 29.21 ± 0.03 kJ mol{sup −1}, activation entropy ΔS{sub ≠}{sup θ} is −200.34 ± 0.08 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, the reaction order is 1.4, and the apparent activation energy E is 31.71 kJ mol{sup −1}. The thermodynamic characterization indicated that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among three kinds of β-lactam-containing antibiotics.

  15. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis by metallo-β-lactamase CcrA from Bacteroides fragilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Le; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Ya-Jun; Yang, Ke-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► First report the thermokinetic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with CcrA. ► The hydrolysis is a spontaneous and exothermic reaction with order of 1.4. ► Summarized that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among β-lactam antibiotics. - Abstract: One of the most common way that bacteria become resistant to antibiotics is by the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) to hydrolyze the β-lactam-containing antibiotics. In this paper, the thermodynamic parameters of benzylpenicillin hydrolysis with B1 subclasses MβL CcrA (carbapenem and cephamycin resistance) from Bacteroides fragilis were determined by microcalorimetry. The activation free energy ΔG ≠ θ is 87.90 ± 0.03, 88.99 ± 0.01, 89.93 ± 0.04 and 90.93 ± 0.05 kJ mol −1 at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15 K, activation enthalpy ΔH ≠ θ is 29.21 ± 0.03 kJ mol −1 , activation entropy ΔS ≠ θ is −200.34 ± 0.08 J mol −1 K −1 , the reaction order is 1.4, and the apparent activation energy E is 31.71 kJ mol −1 . The thermodynamic characterization indicated that CcrA prefer to hydrolyze penicillins among three kinds of β-lactam-containing antibiotics

  16. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  17. Bactericidal effect of visible light in the presence of erythrosine on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum compared with diode laser, an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiboallah, Ghanbari; Mahdi, Zakeri; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Sina, Faghihi; Majid, Zakeri

    2014-12-27

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Besides, the ability of laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitizing agent to lethal effect on oral bacteria is well documented. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of plaque disclosing agent erythrosine as photosensitizer on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation, comparing with the near-infrared diode laser. Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440-480 nm) used to photopolymerize composite resine dental restoration in combination with erythrosine (22 µm) up to 5 minutes. Bacterial sample were also exposed to a near-infrared diode laser (wavelength, 830 nm), using identical irradiation parameters for comparison. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, erythrosine-only group and light or laser with erythrosine group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Exposure to visible blue light and diode laser in conjugation with erythrosine significantly reduced both species examined viability, whereas erythrosine-treated samples exposed to visible light suggested a statically meaningful differences comparing to diode laser. In addition, bactericidal effect of visible light or diode laser alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria possess endogenous porphyrins was noticeably. Our result suggested that visible blue light source in the presence of plaque disclosing agent erythrosine could can be consider as potential approach of PDT to kill the main gram-negative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this regimen could be established as an additional minimally

  18. PURIFICACIÓN DE LIPOPOLISACÁRIDO DE Porphyromonas gingivalis LIBRE DE POLISACÁRIDOS UTILIZANDO CROMATOGRAFÍA DE ALTA RESOLUCIÓN SEPHACRYL S-200

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gualtero

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue mejorar un método estándar para la purificación de lipopolisacárido (LPS de Porphyromonas gingivalis libre de polisacáridos usando una estrategia de extracción, digestión enzimática y cromatografía de alta resolución. La bacteria P. gingivalis se cultivó en condiciones de anaerobiosis y se hizo extracción de las membranas con el método de fenol-agua. Luego de una digestión enzimática (DNAsa, RNAsa y proteasa se separó el extracto por filtración por gel con Sephacryl S-200. La muestra purificada se caracterizó por electroforesis en gel de acrilamida con tinción de plata y por el método Purpald se detecto el ácido 2-ceto-3-desoxioctulosónico (KDO. Se obtuvo una preparación libre de ácidos nucleicos, proteínas y polisacáridos. La separación por cromatografía fue de alta resolución al permitir la obtención de dos picos con diferentes componentes. El protocolo de purificación nos permitió obtener LPS de P. gingivalis con alto grado de pureza, el cual podría ser usado en próximos ensayos para evaluar su función en ensayos in vitro e in vivo; así como iniciar la obtención de LPS de otras bacterias períodontopáticas, con el fin de investigar la asociación de enfermedad períodontal con enfermedades cardiovasculares.

  19. Acyl-CoA reductase PGN_0723 utilizes succinyl-CoA to generate succinate semialdehyde in a butyrate-producing pathway of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuo; Sato, Mitsunari; Kezuka, Yuichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Nagano, Keiji; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-04-15

    The molecular basis of butyrate production in Porphyromonas gingivalis has not been fully elucidated, even though butyrate, a short chain fatty acid (SCFA), can exert both beneficial and harmful effects on a mammalian host. A database search showed that the amino acid sequence of PGN_0723 protein was 50.6% identical with CoA-dependent succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) in Clostridium kluyveri. By contrast, the protein has limited identity (19.1%) with CoA-independent SSADH in Escherichia coli. Compared with the wild type, growth speed, and final turbidity were lower in the PGN_0723 deletion strain that was constructed by replacing the PGN_0723 gene with an erythromycin resistance cassette. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry revealed the supernatant concentrations of the SCFAs butyrate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate, but not propionate, in the PGN_0723 deletion strain were also lower than those in the wild type. The wild-type phenotype was restored in a complemented strain. We cloned the PGN_0723 gene, purified the recombinant protein, and computationally constructed its three-dimensional model. A colorimetric assay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that the recombinant PGN_0723 produces succinate semialdehyde, which is an intermediate in the P. gingivalis butyrate synthesis pathway, not from succinate but from succinyl-CoA in the presence of NAD(P)H via a ping-pong bi-bi mechanism. Asn110Ala and Cys239Ala mutations resulted in a significant loss of the CoA-dependent PGN_0723 enzymatic activity. The study provides new insights into butyrate production, which constitutes a virulence factor in P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic transformation of an obligate anaerobe, P. gingivalis for FMN-green fluorescent protein expression in studying host-microbe interaction.

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    Chul Hee Choi

    Full Text Available The recent introduction of "oxygen-independent" flavin mononucleotide (FMN-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs is of major interest to both eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial biologists. Accordingly, we demonstrate for the first time that an obligate anaerobe, the successful opportunistic pathogen of the oral cavity, Porphyromonas gingivalis, can be genetically engineered for expression of the non-toxic green FbFP. The resulting transformants are functional for studying dynamic bacterial processes in living host cells. The visualization of the transformed P. gingivalis (PgFbFP revealed strong fluorescence that reached a maximum emission at 495 nm as determined by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry. Human primary gingival epithelial cells (GECs were infected with PgFbFP and the bacterial invasion of host cells was analyzed by a quantitative fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays. The results showed similar levels of intracellular bacteria for both wild type and PgFbFP strains. In conjunction with organelle specific fluorescent dyes, utilization of the transformed strain provided direct and accurate determination of the live/metabolically active P. gingivalis' trafficking in the GECs over time. Furthermore, the GECs were co-infected with PgFbFP and the ATP-dependent Clp serine protease-deficient mutant (ClpP- to study the differential fates of the two strains within the same host cells. Quantitative co-localization analyses displayed the intracellular PgFbFP significantly associated with the endoplasmic reticulum network, whereas the majority of ClpP- organisms trafficked into the lysosomes. Hence, we have developed a novel and reliable method to characterize live host cell-microbe interactions and demonstrated the adaptability of FMN-green fluorescent protein for studying persistent host infections induced by obligate anaerobic organisms.

  1. Antibacterial Activities of Glycyrrhiza gabra Linn. (Licorice Root Extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis rand Its Inhibitory Effects on Cysteine Proteases and Biofilms

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    Suttipalin Suwannakul

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the antibacterial activity of licorice root extract. Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial and anti-proteolytic activities of root extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis in both planktonics and bioflm cells. Methods: Glycyrrhiza glabra (G. glabra roots were extracted by 95% ethanol freeze dried and kept at -20˚C prior experiments. P.gingvalis (ATCC 33277 were cultured and used for experiments. Determination of antibacterial activities of G.glabra extracts (lico rice against P.gingvalis planktonic the MIC and MBC were evaluated by agar well diffusion, broth microdilution, and time-killing methods. The crystal violet assay was used to assess the bioflm growth inhibition and the disruption of established bioflm. The Arg - specifc proteolytic activities were analyzed using the chromogenic substrates assays using N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-4-nitroanilide hydrochloride and N-(p-tosyl-Gly Pro-Lys 4-nitroanilide acetate salt to assess the enzymatic inhibition effects of the extracts compared with the controls. Results: The licorice root extract had antimicrobial activities on P.gingivalis with MIC and MBC of 62.5µg/ml and 25 µg/ml respectively. The assay showed that Licorice root extronidazole. Licorice root extract also had effect on P.gingivalis bioflms. Quantifcation by crystal violate staining showed the reduction of bioflm mass in the presence of Licorice root extract. The Arg-and Kgp- proteases activities were also inhibited by the extract in dose dependent manner. Conclusion: The results suggested that licorice root extract may has potential therapeutics values as a candidate for periodontal disease

  2. Age-dependent changes in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella species/phylotypes in healthy gingiva and inflamed/diseased sub-gingival sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Chhour, Kim-Ly; Browne, Gina V; Byun, Roy; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Chapple, Cheryl C; Jacques, Nicholas A; Hunter, Neil

    2015-05-01

    Early colonisation of oral surfaces by periodontal pathogens presents a significant risk factor for subsequent development of destructive disease affecting tissues that support the dentition. The aims of the present study were to establish the age-dependent relationship between sub-gingival profiles of 22 Prevotella species/phylotypes in children, adolescents and adults from an isolated Aboriginal community and, further, to use this information to identify Prevotella species that could serve as microbial risk indicators. DNA isolated from sub-gingival plaque samples (three healthy sites and three inflamed/diseased sites) from adults, adolescents and children was screened for Porphyromonas gingivalis load and 22 Prevotella species/phylotypes by species-specific PCR. A noticeable feature in adolescents was the marked increase in colonisation by P. gingivalis across all test sites. The mean number of Prevotella species/phylotypes colonising inflamed/diseased sub-gingival sites increased with age. Progressive partitioning of selected Prevotella species/phylotypes to healthy or inflamed/diseased sites was evident. Prevalence of Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella oral clone P4PB_24 and Prevotella oris increased significantly with age in diseased sites. Similarly, significant age-dependent increase in colonisation of healthy as well as inflamed/diseased sub-gingival sites was apparent for Prevotella oralis, Prevotella multiformis, Prevotella denticola, Prevotella strain P4P_53 and Prevotella oral clone BR014. Early colonisation of children by P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and Prevotella oral clone P4PB_24 provides indication of risk for subsequent development of periodontal disease. In the present study, the complexity of Prevotella species within gingival sites is explored as a basis for evaluating contribution of Prevotella species to disease.

  3. Detection of Increased Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Prevalence of Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus in the Feces of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Aline Zazeri; Rodrigues, Nathália de Campos; Gonzaga, Marina Ignácio; Paiolo, João Carlos Cicogna; de Souza, Carolina Arantes; Stefanutto, Nadine Aparecida Vicentini; Omori, Wellington Pine; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Brisotti, João Luiz; Matheucci Junior, Euclides; Mariano, Vânia Sammartino; de Oliveira, Gislane Lelis Vilela

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and metabolic endotoxemia have been associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients and correlate these data with inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plasma concentrations. This study was approved by the Ethics Committees from Barretos Cancer Hospital and all individuals signed the informed consent form. Stool samples were required for DNA extraction, and the V3/V4 regions of bacterial 16S were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Peripheral blood was used to quantify inflammatory cytokines and plasma LPS concentrations, by CBA flex and ELISA, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann–Whitney and Spearman’s tests. Analysis of variance, diversity indexes, and analysis of alpha- and beta-diversity were conducted using an annotated Operational Taxonomic Unit table. This study included 20 patients and 22 controls. We observed significant differences (P Prevotella copri, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides rodentium, and Bacteroides xylanisolvens. The proinflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly increased (P Prevotella species, and a positive correlation between the LPS levels and P. copri reads. The P. copri and B. vulgatus species were associated with insulin resistance in previous studies. In this study, we suggested that the prevalence of Gram-negative species in the gut and the increased plasma IL-6 in patients could be linked to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. In conclusion, the P. copri and B. vulgatus species could represent an intestinal microbiota signature, associated with T2D development. Furthermore, the identification of these Gram-negative bacteria, and the detection of inflammatory markers, such as increased IL-6, could be used as diabetes predictive markers in overweight, obese and in genetically predisposed

  4. Detection of Increased Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Prevalence ofPrevotella copriandBacteroides vulgatusin the Feces of Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Aline Zazeri; Rodrigues, Nathália de Campos; Gonzaga, Marina Ignácio; Paiolo, João Carlos Cicogna; de Souza, Carolina Arantes; Stefanutto, Nadine Aparecida Vicentini; Omori, Wellington Pine; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Brisotti, João Luiz; Matheucci Junior, Euclides; Mariano, Vânia Sammartino; de Oliveira, Gislane Lelis Vilela

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and metabolic endotoxemia have been associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients and correlate these data with inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plasma concentrations. This study was approved by the Ethics Committees from Barretos Cancer Hospital and all individuals signed the informed consent form. Stool samples were required for DNA extraction, and the V3/V4 regions of bacterial 16S were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Peripheral blood was used to quantify inflammatory cytokines and plasma LPS concentrations, by CBA flex and ELISA, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann-Whitney and Spearman's tests. Analysis of variance, diversity indexes, and analysis of alpha- and beta-diversity were conducted using an annotated Operational Taxonomic Unit table. This study included 20 patients and 22 controls. We observed significant differences ( P  Prevotella copri, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides rodentium , and Bacteroides xylanisolvens . The proinflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly increased ( P  Prevotella species, and a positive correlation between the LPS levels and P. copri reads. The P. copri and B. vulgatus species were associated with insulin resistance in previous studies. In this study, we suggested that the prevalence of Gram-negative species in the gut and the increased plasma IL-6 in patients could be linked to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. In conclusion, the P. copri and B. vulgatus species could represent an intestinal microbiota signature, associated with T2D development. Furthermore, the identification of these Gram-negative bacteria, and the detection of inflammatory markers, such as increased IL-6, could be used as diabetes predictive markers in overweight, obese and in genetically predisposed

  5. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in endothelial cells through NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, M; Liu, J; Ouyang, X

    2015-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis has been shown to actively invade endothelial cells and induce vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) overexpression. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an intracellular pattern recognition reporter, and its involvement in this process was unknown. This study focused on endothelial cells infected with P. gingivalis, the detection of NOD1 expression and the role that NOD1 plays in the upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. The human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (ECV-304) was intruded by P. gingivalis W83, and cells without any treatment were the control group. Expression levels of NOD1, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, phosphorylated P65 between cells with and without treatment on both mRNA and protein levels were compared. Then we examined whether mesodiaminopimelic acid (NOD1 agonist) could increase VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression, meanwhile, NOD1 gene silence by RNA interference could reduce VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and phosphorylated P65 release. At last, we examined whether inhibition of NF-κB by Bay117082 could reduce VCAM-1 and ICAM- 1 expression. The mRNA levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels by western blot or electrophoretic mobility shift assays (for phosphorylated P65). P. gingivalis invasion showed significant upregulation of NOD1, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. NOD1 activation by meso-diaminopimelic acid increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression, and NOD1 gene silence reduced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 release markedly. The NF-κB signaling pathway was activated by P. gingivalis, while NOD1 gene silence decreased the activation of NF-κB. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB reduced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced by P. gingivalis in endothelial cells. The results revealed that P. gingivalis induced NOD1 overexpression in endothelial cells and that NOD1 played an important role in the process of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells infected with P. gingivalis

  6. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  7. Analysis of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and S. aureus levels in edentulous mouths prior to and 6 months after placement of one-piece zirconia and titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Allauddin; Milne, Trudy; Cullinan, Mary P; Seymour, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that completely edentulous patients harbour fewer periodontopathic bacteria compared with dentate patients, due to the removal of the subgingival periodontal environment. However, reappearance of certain microbes has been reported after the placement of implants in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether the periodontopathic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia, as well as the non-periodontopathic bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus, emerged in edentulous patients 6 months after placement of one-piece zirconia and titanium implants. Twenty-six patients were included in the study (titanium = 13, zirconia = 13). Microbial samples were collected from the tongue prior to implant placement and 6 months after implant placement from both the tongue and from around the implants. A qRT-PCR assay using SYBR green/ROX chemistry was used for the detection and quantification of rgp, nuc and karilysin single-copy gene of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and S. aureus, respectively. Positive controls used in the study were pure bacterial gDNA purified from cultures of P. gingivalis and S. aureus, a cloned sequence of the karilysin gene for T. forsythia, a plaque sample positive for P. gingivalis and T. forsythia, and nasal gDNA for S. aureus. The results show that prior to implant placement, all three bacterial species were below the lower limit of quantification in all edentulous patients. The samples collected from the tongue and around the implants remained below the lower limit of quantification for each of the three species. However, all positive controls used in the study were detectable in the samples. qPCR standard curves showed correlation coefficients >0.97 and efficiencies >94.5% (slope range -3.19 to -3.46) for each of the SYBR green PCR assays. The results of this study indicate that the tested organisms did not emerge 6 months after implant placement irrespective of the nature of the implant biomaterial. A

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal fragment of PorM, a subunit of the Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopulos, Julien; Cambillau, Christian; Cascales, Eric; Roussel, Alain; Leone, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    PorM is a membrane protein involved in the assembly of the type IX secretion system (T9SS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major bacterial pathogen responsible for periodontal disease in humans. The periplasmic domain of PorM was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. A fragment of the purified protein was obtained by limited proteolysis. Crystals of this fragment belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2. Native and MAD data sets were recorded to 2.85 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation.

  9. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using a diode laser with a potential new photosensitizer, indocyanine green-loaded nanospheres, may be effective for the clearance of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, A; Mitani, A; Fukuda, M; Yamamoto, H; Tahara, K; Morita, I; Ting, C-C; Watanabe, T; Fujimura, T; Osawa, K; Sato, S; Takahashi, S; Iwamura, Y; Kuroyanagi, T; Kawashima, Y; Noguchi, T

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a new treatment method for the removal of infectious pathogens using a photosensitizer and light of a specific wavelength, e.g., toluidine blue with a wavelength of about 600 nm. We explored a new photosensitizer and focused on indocyanine green (ICG), which has high absorption at a wavelength of 800-805 nm. We investigated the bactericidal effect of PDT on Porphyromonas gingivalis using a new photosensitizer, ICG-loaded nanospheres with an 805 nm wavelength low-level diode laser irradiation. We designed ICG-loaded nanospheres coated with chitosan (ICG-Nano/c) as a photosensitizer. A solution containing Porphyromonas gingivalis (10(8)  CFU/mL) with or without ICG-Nano/c (or ICG) was prepared and irradiated with a diode laser or without laser irradiation as a negative control. The irradiation settings were 0.5 W with a duty ratio of 10%, for 3-100 ms in repeated pulse (RPT) or continuous wave mode. CFU were counted after 7 d of anaerobic culture. We observed that ICG-Nano/c could adhere to the surface of P. gingivalis. When ICG-Nano/c was used for aPDT, irradiation with RPT 100 ms mode gave the lowest increase in temperature. Laser irradiation with ICG-Nano/c significantly reduced the number of P. gingivalis (i.e., approximately 2-log10 bacterial killing). The greatest bactericidal effect was found in the RPT 100 ms group. However, laser irradiation (RPT 100 ms) with ICG, as well as without photosensitizer, had no effect on the number of bacteria. Within the limits of this study, ICG-Nano/c with low-level diode laser (0.5 W; 805 nm) irradiation showed an aPDT-like effect, which might be useful for a potential photodynamic periodontal therapy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Monocolonization with Bacteroides ovatus protects immunodeficient SCID mice from mortality in chronic intestinal inflammation caused by long-lasting dextran sodium sulfate treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudcovic, Tomáš; Kozáková, Hana; Kolínská, Jiřina; Štěpánková, Renata; Hrnčíř, Tomáš; Tlaskalová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2009), s. 101-110 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/04/0849; GA ČR GA303/08/0367; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/05/2249; GA ČR GA303/06/0974; GA MŠk 2B06053; GA MŠk 2B06155; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : bacteroides ovatus * ulcerative colitis * dextran sulfate sodium colitis Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  11. Detection of Increased Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Prevalence of Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus in the Feces of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Zazeri Leite

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal dysbiosis and metabolic endotoxemia have been associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients and correlate these data with inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides (LPS plasma concentrations. This study was approved by the Ethics Committees from Barretos Cancer Hospital and all individuals signed the informed consent form. Stool samples were required for DNA extraction, and the V3/V4 regions of bacterial 16S were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Peripheral blood was used to quantify inflammatory cytokines and plasma LPS concentrations, by CBA flex and ELISA, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann–Whitney and Spearman’s tests. Analysis of variance, diversity indexes, and analysis of alpha- and beta-diversity were conducted using an annotated Operational Taxonomic Unit table. This study included 20 patients and 22 controls. We observed significant differences (P < 0.01 in the microbiota composition (beta-diversity between patients and controls, suggesting intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients. The prevalent species found in patients’ feces were the Gram-negatives Prevotella copri, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides rodentium, and Bacteroides xylanisolvens. The proinflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6 was significantly increased (P < 0.05 in patients’ plasma and LPS levels were decreased. We find correlations between the proinflammatory interferon-gamma with Gram-negatives Bacteroides and Prevotella species, and a positive correlation between the LPS levels and P. copri reads. The P. copri and B. vulgatus species were associated with insulin resistance in previous studies. In this study, we suggested that the prevalence of Gram-negative species in the gut and the increased plasma IL-6 in patients could be linked to low

  12. Periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis drives periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and insulin resistance via an impaired adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Garidou, Lucile; Pomié, Céline; Escoula, Quentin; Loubieres, Pascale; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Lemaitre, Mathieu; Nicolas, Simon; Klopp, Pascale; Waget, Aurélie; Azalbert, Vincent; Colom, André; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Kemoun, Philippe; Serino, Matteo; Burcelin, Rémy

    2017-05-01

    To identify a causal mechanism responsible for the enhancement of insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia following periodontitis in mice fed a fat-enriched diet. We set-up a unique animal model of periodontitis in C57Bl/6 female mice by infecting the periodontal tissue with specific and alive pathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis ( Pg ), Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia . The mice were then fed with a diabetogenic/non-obesogenic fat-enriched diet for up to 3 months. Alveolar bone loss, periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and features of glucose metabolism were quantified. Eventually, adoptive transfer of cervical (regional) and systemic immune cells was performed to demonstrate the causal role of the cervical immune system. Periodontitis induced a periodontal microbiota dysbiosis without mainly affecting gut microbiota. The disease concomitantly impacted on the regional and systemic immune response impairing glucose metabolism. The transfer of cervical lymph-node cells from infected mice to naive recipients guarded against periodontitis-aggravated metabolic disease. A treatment with inactivated Pg prior to the periodontal infection induced specific antibodies against Pg and protected the mouse from periodontitis-induced dysmetabolism. Finally, a 1-month subcutaneous chronic infusion of low rates of lipopolysaccharides from Pg mimicked the impact of periodontitis on immune and metabolic parameters. We identified that insulin resistance in the high-fat fed mouse is enhanced by pathogen-induced periodontitis. This is caused by an adaptive immune response specifically directed against pathogens and associated with a periodontal dysbiosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis y su relación con la expresión de quorum sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Díaz Caballero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Los mecanismos de señalización bacteriana desempeñan un papel fundamental en el establecimiento y progresión de la enfermedad periodontal. Dadas estas circunstancias es crucial profundizar en el entendimiento de estos mecanismos para intentar proveer estrategias terapéuticas novedosas. El presente artículo de revisión, de carácter narrativo, tiene como objetivo conducir un análisis crítico de la evidencia disponible sobre la influencia de Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg y expresión de quorum sensing (Qs en enfermedad periodontal. Se realizó una búsqueda a través de bases de datos como Ovid (MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Hinari. El conocimiento actual de estos mecanismos ofrece la posibilidad de desarrollar nuevos y profundos estudios (teóricos y experimentales sobre la expresión del QS en pacientes con enfermedad periodontal y permitirá un novedoso campo de investigación con el que no se cuenta en la actualidad. Desde su descubrimiento, el QS se vislumbra como un espacio de investigación valioso en el cual se debe insistir de manera permanente. La anterior evidencia permite concluir que a través de la regulación de la expresión de determinados genes en bacterias como la PG, se puede efectuar la inhibición de la formación de las biopelículas que tiene efectos directos e indirectos sobre el desarrollo de la enfermedad periodontal.

  14. Evaluation of chemical composition and efficacy of Chinese propolis extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Propolis as a natural remedy has maintained its popularity over long periods of time. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition in terms of total phenolic compounds and flavonoids present in Chinese propolis and to carry out an in vitro evaluation of its antimicrobial activity and the minimal inhibitory concentrations for Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa. Materials and Methods: From the ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP, total phenol content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method, flavones and flavonols by the modified aluminum chloride colorimetric method, and flavanones by the 2.4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNP method. Agar well diffusion assay was used to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of propolis against Pg and Aa. The minimum inhibitory concentration of propolis against the two bacteria was determined using serial tube dilution technique. Results: The total concentration of phenol in the EEP was 19.44%, flavones and flavonols 2.616%, and flavanones 16.176%. The inhibitory zone depicting antimicrobial activity ranged from 18 to 25 mm for Pg and from 12 to 14 mm for Aa. The concentration range of Chinese propolis that is sensitive to inhibit the growth of Pg was 0.1-0.0125 μg/ml and for Aa it was 0.1-0.025 μg/ml. Conclusion: These data suggest that Chinese propolis has potent antimicrobial activity against the two periodontopathogens, suggesting its possible use as a natural alternative to the widely used synthetic antibiotics for periodontal therapy.

  15. Effect of alendronate on the progression of periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum: a study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrer, Carmen L Mueller; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda; Giovanini, Allan Fernando; Crivellaro, Viviane; Zielak, João Cesar; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of alendronate (ALN) on the inhibition of alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis in Wistar rats. Periodontitis was induced by oral inoculation of Porphyromonas gingivalis with Fusobacterium nucleatum. The rats (n = 80) were randomized as follows: negative control (n = 10); positive control (n = 10); ALN groups: test 8 (n = 10), test 12 (n = 10), and test 16 (n = 10); and placebo groups: control 8 (n = 10), control 12 (n = 10), and control 16 (n = 10). Two milligrams per kilogram of ALN or placebo was administered twice weekly for 8, 12, and 16 weeks. Bone loss was determined by morphological and histological analyses. One independent, blinded examiner (ICC, 0.91) performed the measurements. The distance from the cement enamel junction to the alveolar bone crest of the second lower molar was measured: distal-vestibular (d), furca (f), mesial-vestibular (h), and area. Histometry was performed on the second contralateral molar. Sections (6 μm) were used to determine the furcation bone area (A-FB). The following statistical analyses were conducted: Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis. PC group developed periodontitis (p  0.05). ALN was effective against bone loss in relation to A-FB after 12 weeks (p < 0.0001). According to the methodology used, the results suggest that oral administration of ALN could influence alveolar bone loss in rats submitted to experimental periodontitis. ALN could be a potential therapeutic approach when associated with periodontal treatment.

  16. Screening Donors for Rare Antigen Constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F

    2009-01-01

    SCREENING BLOOD DONORS FOR RARE ANTIGEN CONSTELLATIONS HAS BEEN IMPLEMENTED USING SIMPLE PCR METHODS: PCR with enzyme digestion has been used to type donor cohorts for Dombrock antigens, and PCR with sequence-specific priming to identify donors negative for antigens of high frequency. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods as well as their current state is discussed.

  17. The Structural Diversity of Carbohydrate Antigens of Selected Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms have evolved for millions of years to survive in the environments characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, e.g., high pressure, low temperature or high salinity. Marine bacteria have the ability to produce a range of biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents, and as a result, they have been a topic of research interest for many years. Among these biologically active molecules, the carbohydrate antigens, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, O-antigens found in cell walls of Gram-negative marine bacteria, show great potential as candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock due to their low virulence. The structural diversity of LPSs is thought to be a reflection of the ability for these bacteria to adapt to an array of habitats, protecting the cell from being compromised by exposure to harsh environmental stress factors. Over the last few years, the variety of structures of core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been discovered. In this review, we discuss the most recently encountered structures that have been identified from bacteria belonging to the genera Aeromonas, Alteromonas, Idiomarina, Microbulbifer, Pseudoalteromonas, Plesiomonas and Shewanella of the Gammaproteobacteria phylum; Sulfitobacter and Loktanella of the Alphaproteobactera phylum and to the genera Arenibacter, Cellulophaga, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Flexibacter of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention is paid to the particular chemical features of the LPSs, such as the monosaccharide type, non-sugar substituents and phosphate groups, together with some of the typifying traits of LPSs obtained from marine bacteria. A possible correlation is then made between such features and the environmental adaptations undertaken by marine bacteria.

  18. The structural diversity of carbohydrate antigens of selected gram-negative marine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Evgeny L; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2011-01-01

    Marine microorganisms have evolved for millions of years to survive in the environments characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, e.g., high pressure, low temperature or high salinity. Marine bacteria have the ability to produce a range of biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents, and as a result, they have been a topic of research interest for many years. Among these biologically active molecules, the carbohydrate antigens, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, O-antigens) found in cell walls of gram-negative marine bacteria, show great potential as candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock due to their low virulence. The structural diversity of LPSs is thought to be a reflection of the ability for these bacteria to adapt to an array of habitats, protecting the cell from being compromised by exposure to harsh environmental stress factors. Over the last few years, the variety of structures of core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been discovered. In this review, we discuss the most recently encountered structures that have been identified from bacteria belonging to the genera Aeromonas, Alteromonas, Idiomarina, Microbulbifer, Pseudoalteromonas, Plesiomonas and Shewanella of the Gammaproteobacteria phylum; Sulfitobacter and Loktanella of the Alphaproteobactera phylum and to the genera Arenibacter, Cellulophaga, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Flexibacter of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention is paid to the particular chemical features of the LPSs, such as the monosaccharide type, non-sugar substituents and phosphate groups, together with some of the typifying traits of LPSs obtained from marine bacteria. A possible correlation is then made between such features and the environmental adaptations undertaken by marine bacteria.

  19. Identification of an Antigen from Normal Human Tissue That Crossreacts with the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, S. Von; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1972-01-01

    A glycoprotein present in normal human tissue is characterized that is neither organ- nor tumor-specific (nonspecific crossreacting antigen) and that crossreacts (by the Ouchterlony double-diffusion technique) with the carcinoembryonic antigen. This immunological relationship indicates common determinants on the molecules of both antigens. We demonstrate that the nonspecific crossreacting antigen is not a fragment of the carcinoembryonic antigen molecule. Images PMID:4115954

  20. In Vitro Anaerobic Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model to Simulate the Bactericidal Activity of Levornidazole Against Bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiali; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yuancheng; Liang, Wang; Wu, Shi

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to correlate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters with PD indices of levornidazole against Bacteroides fragilis and to calculate the PK/PD target value for levornidazole to attain its expected maximal bactericidal effect using an in vitro anaerobic dynamic PK/PD model. An anaerobic dynamic PK/PD model was developed in vitro. The scheme for PK modeling was designed according to the PK parameters of levornidazole in the human body. The device of 2-compartment PK/PD model was constructed by using digital control of flow rate to simulate 4 regimens of single-dose intravenous infusion of levornidazole to determine the bactericidal activity of levornidazole against the 3 strains of B fragilis within 72 hours. PD parameters such as reduction of colony count within 24 hours (∆Log 24h ), area under bactericidal curve (AUBC), and 2-hour initial killing rate (IKR) were calculated and correlated with PK/PD parameters. Sigmoid E max model of levornidazole was established to calculate PK/PD target values to attain corresponding PD effect. PK and PD validation proved the stability of the model in simulating levornidazole against B fragilis and the precision and accuracy in the results of PK modeling. C max and AUC 0-24h found only -1.46% and -6.72% differences from the values in vivo. Our study found that ∆Log 24h , AUBC, and IKR were more correlated with AUC 0-24h /MIC and C max /MIC than with %T>MIC. According to ∆Log 24h , the PK/PD target values of AUC 0-24h /MIC, C max /MIC, and %T>MIC of levornidazole against B fragilis were 157.6%, 14.1%, and 56.4%, respectively. Our findings are useful for optimizing the clinical dosing regimen of levornidazole sodium chloride injection to attain maximal bactericidal effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Consistency in the host specificity and host sensitivity of the Bacteroides HF183 marker for sewage pollution tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W; Masters, N; Toze, S

    2012-10-01

    The host specificity (H-SPF) and host sensitivity (H-SNV) values of the sewage-associated HF183 Bacteroides marker in the current study were compared with the previously published studies in South East Queensland (SEQ), Australia, by testing a large number of wastewater and faecal DNA samples (n=293) from 11 target and nontarget host groups. This was carried out to obtain information on the consistency in the H-SPF and H-SNV values of the HF183 marker for sewage pollution tracking in SEQ. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used to determine the presence/absence of the HF183 marker in wastewater and faecal DNA samples. Among the human composite wastewater (n=59) from sewage treatment plants and individual human (n=20) faecal DNA samples tested, 75 (95%) were PCR positive for the HF183 marker. The overall H-SNV of this marker in target host group was 0·95 (maximum of 1·00). Among the 214 nontarget animal faecal DNA samples tested, 201 (94%) samples were negative for the HF183 marker. Six chicken, five dog and two bird faecal DNA samples, however, were positive for the marker. The overall H-SPF of the HF183 marker to differentiate between target and nontarget faecal DNA samples was 0·94 (maximum of 1·00). The H-SNV (0·95) and H-SPF (0·94) values obtained in this study was slightly lower than previous studies (H-SNV value of 1·00 in 2007 and 1·00 in 2009; H-SPF value of 1·00 in 2007 and 0·99 in 2009). Nonetheless, the overall high H-SNV (0·98) and H-SPF (0·97) values of the HF183 marker over the past 4 years (i.e. 2007-2011) suggest that the HF183 marker can be reliably used for the detection of sewage pollution in environmental waters in SEQ. In the current study, the HF183 marker was detected in small number nontarget animal faecal samples. Care should be taken to interpret results obtained from catchments or waterways that might be potentially contaminated with dog faecal matter or poultry litter. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied

  2. Salmonella-induced changes in the gut microbiota and immune response genes transcriptome during administration of vancomycin and Bacteroides fragilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Bukina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim. To study Salmonella-induced changes in the intestinal wall microbiota, the expression of Salmonella effector proteins SipA, SopB, SopE2 and transcriptional activity of genes FFAR2, Foxp3, RORγt in rat GALT during administration of vancomycin and B.fragilis. Methods. Investigations of qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbiota of the wall of the small intestine were carried out, and the expression level of rat genes Foxp3, Rorc (Royt, FFAR2 and Salmonella effector proteins SipA, SopB and SopE2 were determined by RT-PCR, the relationship between groups of microorganisms was established. Results. Administration of B.fragilis against the background pre-treatment with vancomycin and Salmonella infection alters the quantitative composition of the microbiota in the wall of the small intestine contents: a decrease in Salmonella spp., E.coli, P.aeruginosa, Proteus spp., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp. and Shigella spp., as well as increasing Bacteroides spp., E.faecalis, E.faecium and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius. The level of expression of Salmonella effector proteins in animals with the combined administration of vancomycin and S.enteritidis (I group, S.typhimurium (II group increased: SopB – 101 and 20 times; SopE2 - 80 and 2 times; SipA - 613 times (II group, and also 5-fold decrease was noted in the I group. Relative normalized number of mRNA of genes FFAR2, Foxp3, RORγt in GALT of rats in groups III and IV increased: FFAR2 - 2.7 and 5.4 times; Foxp3 - 2.5 and 85 times, RORγt level decreased by 70% and only in IV group. Conclusions. Using B.fragilis creates conditions for the correction of Salmonella-induced changes of the intestinal microbiome. Pretreatment of animals with vancomycin causes increased transcriptional activity of genes SipA, SopB and SopE2, except SipA after administration of S.enteritidis. Administration of B.fragilis increases the level of mRNA of genes FFAR2 and Foxp3 in GALT and reduces ROR

  3. In silico identification of a therapeutic target for photo-activated disinfection with indocyanine green: Modeling and virtual screening analysis of Arg-gingipain from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a momentous bacterial etiological agent associated with periodontitis, peri-implantitis as well as endodontic infections. The potential advantage of Photo-activated disinfection (PAD) as a promising novel approach is the choice of a suitable target site, specific photosensitizer, and wavelength of light for delivery of the light from source to target. Since Arg-gingipain is a cysteine proteinase that is involved in the virulence of P. gingivalis, it was evaluated as a target site for PAD with indocyanine green (ICG) as a photosensitizer. In this study, we used a range of in silico strategies, bioinformatics tools, biological databases, and computer simulation molecular modeling to evaluate the capacity of Arg-gingipain. The predicted structure of Arg-gingipain indicated that it is located outside the cell and has nine domains and 17 ligands, including two calcium ions and three sodium ions with positive charges which can be a site of interaction for anionic ICG. Based on the results of this study, anionic ICG desires to bind and interact with residues of Arg-gingipain during PAD as a main site to enhance the yield of treatment of endo-periodontal lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential quantitative proteomics of Porphyromonas gingivalis by linear ion trap mass spectrometry: Non-label methods comparison, q-values and LOWESS curve fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiangwei; Wang, Tiansong; Park, Yoonsuk; Lamont, Richard J.; Hackett, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Differential analysis of whole cell proteomes by mass spectrometry has largely been applied using various forms of stable isotope labeling. While metabolic stable isotope labeling has been the method of choice, it is often not possible to apply such an approach. Four different label free ways of calculating expression ratios in a classic "two-state" experiment are compared: signal intensity at the peptide level, signal intensity at the protein level, spectral counting at the peptide level, and spectral counting at the protein level. The quantitative data were mined from a dataset of 1245 qualitatively identified proteins, about 56% of the protein encoding open reading frames from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen being studied under extracellular and intracellular conditions. Two different control populations were compared against P. gingivalis internalized within a model human target cell line. The q-value statistic, a measure of false discovery rate previously applied to transcription microarrays, was applied to proteomics data. For spectral counting, the most logically consistent estimate of random error came from applying the locally weighted scatter plot smoothing procedure (LOWESS) to the most extreme ratios generated from a control technical replicate, thus setting upper and lower bounds for the region of experimentally observed random error.

  5. Mfa4, an Accessory Protein of Mfa1 Fimbriae, Modulates Fimbrial Biogenesis, Cell Auto-Aggregation, and Biofilm Formation in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikai, Ryota; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Izumigawa, Masashi; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Kitai, Noriyuki; Lamont, Richard J; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative obligate anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a key pathogen in periodontal disease. The bacterium expresses Mfa1 fimbriae, which are composed of polymers of Mfa1. The minor accessory components Mfa3, Mfa4, and Mfa5 are incorporated into these fimbriae. In this study, we characterized Mfa4 using genetically modified strains. Deficiency in the mfa4 gene decreased, but did not eliminate, expression of Mfa1 fimbriae. However, Mfa3 and Mfa5 were not incorporated because of defects in posttranslational processing and leakage into the culture supernatant, respectively. Furthermore, the mfa4-deficient mutant had an increased tendency to auto-aggregate and form biofilms, reminiscent of a mutant completely lacking Mfa1. Notably, complementation of mfa4 restored expression of structurally intact and functional Mfa1 fimbriae. Taken together, these results indicate that the accessory proteins Mfa3, Mfa4, and Mfa5 are necessary for assembly of Mfa1 fimbriae and regulation of auto-aggregation and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis. In addition, we found that Mfa3 and Mfa4 are processed to maturity by the same RgpA/B protease that processes Mfa1 subunits prior to polymerization.

  6. Diaminopimelic acid (DAP) analogs bearing isoxazoline moiety as selective inhibitors against meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase (m-Ddh) from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongguang; Stone, Victoria N; Wang, Huiqun; Kellogg, Glen E; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Yan

    2017-08-15

    Two diastereomeric analogs (1 and 2) of diaminopimelic acid (DAP) bearing an isoxazoline moiety were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activities against meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase (m-Ddh) from the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Compound 2 showed promising inhibitory activity against m-Ddh with an IC 50 value of 14.9µM at pH 7.8. The two compounds were further tested for their antibacterial activities against a panel of periodontal pathogens, and compound 2 was shown to be selectively potent to P. gingivalis strains W83 and ATCC 33277 with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 773µM and 1.875mM, respectively. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the inversion of chirality at the C-5 position of these compounds was the primary reason for their different biological profiles. Based on these preliminary results, we believe that compound 2 has properties consistent with it being a lead compound for developing novel pathogen selective antibiotics to treat periodontal diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Scientific Opinion on the safety of ‘heat-treated milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Poulsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA NDA Panel was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘pasteurised milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food (NF) in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97. Pasteurised or ultra-high-temp......Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA NDA Panel was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘pasteurised milk products fermented with Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964’ as a novel food (NF) in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97. Pasteurised or ultra......-high-temperature-treated milk is used for the fermentation process with B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964. After fermentation the product is heat treated for one hour at 75 °C to ensure the absence of viable B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964. The Panel considers the information provided on the identity and characterisation of B....... xylanisolvens DSM 23964 to be sufficient. The production process encompasses standard techniques used by the dairy industry, is sufficiently described by the applicant and does not give rise to safety concerns. The Panel considers that the information provided on the production process and on the content...

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis Differentially Modulates Cell Death Profile in Ox-LDL and TNF-α Pre-Treated Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Maximiliano Bugueno

    Full Text Available Clinical studies demonstrated a potential link between atherosclerosis and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, one of the main periodontal pathogen, has been associated to atheromatous plaque worsening. However, synergism between infection and other endothelial stressors such as oxidized-LDL or TNF-α especially on endothelial cell (EC death has not been investigated. This study aims to assess the role of Pg on EC death in an inflammatory context and to determine potential molecular pathways involved.Human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs were infected with Pg (MOI 100 or stimulated by its lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS (1μg/ml for 24 to 48 hours. Cell viability was measured with AlamarBlue test, type of cell death induced was assessed using Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. mRNA expression regarding caspase-1, -3, -9, Bcl-2, Bax-1 and Apaf-1 has been evaluated with RT-qPCR. Caspases enzymatic activity and concentration of APAF-1 protein were evaluated to confirm mRNA results.Pg infection and Pg-LPS stimulation induced EC death. A cumulative effect has been observed in Ox-LDL pre-treated ECs infected or stimulated. This effect was not observed in TNF-α pre-treated cells. Pg infection promotes EC necrosis, however, in infected Ox-LDL pre-treated ECs, apoptosis was promoted. This effect was not observed in TNF-α pre-treated cells highlighting specificity of molecular pathways activated. Regarding mRNA expression, Pg increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes including caspases-1,-3,-9, Bax-1 and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In Ox-LDL pre-treated ECs, Pg increased significantly the expression of Apaf-1. These results were confirmed at the protein level.This study contributes to demonstrate that Pg and its Pg-LPS could exacerbate Ox-LDL and TNF-α induced endothelial injury through increase of EC death. Interestingly, molecular pathways are differentially modulated by the infection in function of the pre-stimulation.

  9. Association between Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque and clinical parameters, in Argentine patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Acquier, Andrea B; De Couto, Alejandra; Busch, Lucila; Mendez, Carlos F

    2015-05-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) have been associated with aggressive (AgP) and chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of Aa and Pg in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with AgP and its relation with clinical parameters. Sixteen females and fourteen males with clinical diagnosis of AgP aged 17-23 years and their match's controls, were included in this study. Clinical recording concerning probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, plaque index and gingival bleeding index were performed at baseline, 30 and 60 days after baseline. After clinical examination GCF samples were analyzed for Aa and Pg with a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique. Patients group was treated with a combined of mechanical and oral antibiotic therapy (doxycycline 100 mg/day, during 21 days). A multivariate analysis was used to determine the relationship between Aa and Pg counts with clinical parameters. GCF from all subjects was positive for Aa and PG. In controls Pg concentration was higher than Aa (Pg: 42,420 ± 3,034 copies/ml; Aa: 66.6 ± 5.4 copies/ml p < 0.001) while in patients both microbes showed the same concentration (Aa: 559,878 ± 39,698 Pg: 572,321 ± 58,752). A significant and positive correlation was observed between counts of Aa and Pg (R square: 0.7965, p < 0.0001). Female showed more counts/ml. Aa might be closely associated with clinical parameters while Pg did not. At 30 and 60 days Aa counts in patients were similar to controls while Pg counts were equal to baseline. However, in spit