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Sample records for bacterium vibrio gazogenes

  1. Aflatoxin-Exposure of Vibrio gazogenes as a Novel System for the Generation of Aflatoxin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummadidala, Phani M; Chen, Yung Pin; Beauchesne, Kevin R; Miller, Kristen P; Mitra, Chandrani; Banaszek, Nora; Velez-Martinez, Michelle; Moeller, Peter D R; Ferry, John L; Decho, Alan W; Chanda, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin and a secondary metabolite, and the most potent known liver carcinogen that contaminates several important crops, and represents a significant threat to public health and the economy. Available approaches reported thus far have been insufficient to eliminate this threat, and therefore provide the rational to explore novel methods for preventing aflatoxin accumulation in the environment. Many terrestrial plants and microbes that share ecological niches and encounter the aflatoxin producers have the ability to synthesize compounds that inhibit aflatoxin synthesis. However, reports of natural aflatoxin inhibitors from marine ecosystem components that do not share ecological niches with the aflatoxin producers are rare. Here, we show that a non-pathogenic marine bacterium, Vibrio gazogenes, when exposed to low non-toxic doses of aflatoxin B1, demonstrates a shift in its metabolic output and synthesizes a metabolite fraction that inhibits aflatoxin synthesis without affecting hyphal growth in the model aflatoxin producer, Aspergillus parasiticus. The molecular mass of the predominant metabolite in this fraction was also different from the known prodigiosins, which are the known antifungal secondary metabolites synthesized by this Vibrio. Gene expression analyses using RT-PCR demonstrate that this metabolite fraction inhibits aflatoxin synthesis by down-regulating the expression of early-, middle-, and late- growth stage aflatoxin genes, the aflatoxin pathway regulator, aflR and one global regulator of secondary metabolism, laeA. Our study establishes a novel system for generation of aflatoxin synthesis inhibitors, and emphasizes the potential of the under-explored Vibrio's silent genome for generating new modulators of fungal secondary metabolism. PMID:27375561

  2. Aflatoxin-exposure of Vibrio gazogenes as a novel system for the generation of aflatoxin synthesis inhibitors

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    Phani M Gummadidala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin and a secondary metabolite, and the most potent known liver carcinogen that contaminates several important crops, and represents a significant threat to public health and the economy. Available approaches reported thus far have been insufficient to eliminate this threat, and therefore provide the rational to explore novel methods for preventing aflatoxin accumulation in the environment. Many terrestrial plants and microbes that share ecological niches and encounter the aflatoxin producers have the ability to synthesize compounds that inhibit aflatoxin synthesis. However, reports of natural aflatoxin inhibitors from marine ecosystem components that do not share ecological niches with the aflatoxin producers are rare. Here we show that a non-pathogenic marine bacterium, Vibrio gazogenes, when exposed to low non-toxic doses of aflatoxin B1, demonstrates a shift in its metabolic output and synthesizes a metabolite fraction that inhibits aflatoxin synthesis without affecting hyphal growth in the model aflatoxin producer, Aspergillus parasiticus. The molecular mass of the predominant metabolite in this fraction was also different from the known prodigiosins, which are the known antifungal secondary metabolites synthesized by this Vibrio. Gene expression analyses using RT-PCR demonstrate that this metabolite fraction inhibits aflatoxin synthesis by down-regulating the expression of early-, middle- and late- growth stage aflatoxin genes, the aflatoxin pathway regulator, aflR and one global regulator of secondary metabolism, LaeA. Our study establishes a novel system for generation of aflatoxin synthesis inhibitors, and emphasizes the potential of the under-explored Vibrio’s silent genome for generating new modulators of fungal secondary metabolism.

  3. Aflatoxin-Exposure of Vibrio gazogenes as a Novel System for the Generation of Aflatoxin Synthesis Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummadidala, Phani M.; Chen, Yung Pin; Beauchesne, Kevin R.; Miller, Kristen P.; Mitra, Chandrani; Banaszek, Nora; Velez-Martinez, Michelle; Moeller, Peter D. R.; Ferry, John L.; Decho, Alan W.; Chanda, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin and a secondary metabolite, and the most potent known liver carcinogen that contaminates several important crops, and represents a significant threat to public health and the economy. Available approaches reported thus far have been insufficient to eliminate this threat, and therefore provide the rational to explore novel methods for preventing aflatoxin accumulation in the environment. Many terrestrial plants and microbes that share ecological niches and encounter the aflatoxin producers have the ability to synthesize compounds that inhibit aflatoxin synthesis. However, reports of natural aflatoxin inhibitors from marine ecosystem components that do not share ecological niches with the aflatoxin producers are rare. Here, we show that a non-pathogenic marine bacterium, Vibrio gazogenes, when exposed to low non-toxic doses of aflatoxin B1, demonstrates a shift in its metabolic output and synthesizes a metabolite fraction that inhibits aflatoxin synthesis without affecting hyphal growth in the model aflatoxin producer, Aspergillus parasiticus. The molecular mass of the predominant metabolite in this fraction was also different from the known prodigiosins, which are the known antifungal secondary metabolites synthesized by this Vibrio. Gene expression analyses using RT-PCR demonstrate that this metabolite fraction inhibits aflatoxin synthesis by down-regulating the expression of early-, middle-, and late- growth stage aflatoxin genes, the aflatoxin pathway regulator, aflR and one global regulator of secondary metabolism, laeA. Our study establishes a novel system for generation of aflatoxin synthesis inhibitors, and emphasizes the potential of the under-explored Vibrio’s silent genome for generating new modulators of fungal secondary metabolism. PMID:27375561

  4. Penetration of the Coral-Bleaching Bacterium Vibrio shiloi into Oculina patagonica

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, E.; Israely, T.; Kushmaro, A.; Y. Loya; Orr, E; Rosenberg, E

    2000-01-01

    Inoculation of the coral-bleaching bacterium Vibrio shiloi into seawater containing its host Oculina patagonica led to adhesion of the bacteria to the coral surface via a β-d-galactose receptor, followed by penetration of the bacteria into the coral tissue. The internalized V. shiloi cells were observed inside the exodermal layer of the coral by electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy using specific anti-V. shiloi antibodies to stain the intracellular bacteria. At 29°C, 80% of the bac...

  5. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (I) Corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Sha; Tian Jintao [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Chen Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lei Yanhua; Chang Xueting; Liu Tao [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Yin Yansheng, E-mail: yys2006@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2009-04-30

    The microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel (SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens) was investigated using surface analysis (atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA)) and electrochemical techniques (the open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization curves ). AFM images corroborated the results from the EIS models which show biofilm attachment and subsequent detachment over time. The SEM images revealed the occurrence of micro-pitting corrosion underneath the biofilms on the metal surface after the biofilm removal. The presence of carbon, oxygen, phosphor and sulfur obtained from EDXA proved the formation of biofilm. The electrochemical results showed that the corrosion of SS was accelerated in the presence of V. natriegens based on the decrease in the resistance of the charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) obtained from EIS and the increase in corrosion current densities obtained from potentiodynamic polarization curves.

  6. Microbially influenced corrosion of 303 stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (II) Corrosion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Yansheng, E-mail: yys2006@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Ocean Materials and Engineering, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai 200135 (China); Cheng Sha [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Chen Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Tian Jintao; Liu Tao; Chang Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2009-04-30

    Electrochemical techniques (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves) and surface analysis (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)) were carried out to determine the possible mechanism of the microbially influenced corrosion of 303 stainless steel (303 SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens). In order to clarify the mechanism, 303 SS coupons were immersed in four different mediums. EIS results were interpreted with different equivalent circuits to model the physicoelectric characteristics of the electrode/biofilm/solution interface. The results showed that N{sub 2}-fixation actually promoted the corrosion of 303 SS; however, the influence of the produced NH{sub 3} was negligible. It can be speculated that the electron transfer and/or the nitrogenase catalyzing the process may influence the corrosion.

  7. Vibrio ruber (S2A1, a Marine Bacterium that Exhibits Significant Antimicrobial Activity

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    Wan Norhana, N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential antimicrobial-producing marine bacterium, designated as S2A1, was isolated from a seagrass collected in Setiu Lagoon, Terengganu. S2A1 was a Gram negative rod that was motile by means of a polar flagellum. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation indicated that strain S2A1 represented a species in the genus Vibrio. The antimicrobial activities of S2A1 against a number of test microorganisms showed a broad antimicrobial spectrum property with inhibition towards 25 out of 29 test microorganisms. The antimicrobial compound(s of S2A1 was more effective against Gram-positive bacteria with 100% inhibition, compared to yeast (88.8% and Gram-negative bacteria (75.0% tested. High activity scores were observed when using whole cells compared to cell free extract.

  8. Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from an artificial oil-spill marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Rim; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, halophilic, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped and nitrogen-fixing bacterium, designated strain S37T, was isolated from an artificial oil-spill sediment sample from the coast of Taean, South Korea. Cells grew at 10-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0, with optimal growth at 28 °C and pH 6.0-8.0. Growth was observed with 1-9 % (w/v) NaCl in marine broth, with optimal growth with 3-5 % NaCl, but no growth was observed in the absence of NaCl. According to the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S37T represents a member of the genus Vibrio of the class Gammaproteobacteria and forms a clade with Vibrio plantisponsor MSSRF60T (97.38 %), Vibrio diazotrophicus ATCC 33466T (97.31 %), Vibrio aestuarianus ATCC 35048T (97.07 %) Vibrio areninigrae J74T (96.76 %) and Vibrio hispanicus LMG 13240T (96.76 %). The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c. The DNA G+C content was 41.9 %. The DNA-DNA hybridization analysis results showed a 30.2 % association value with the closely related type strain V. plantisponsor DSM 21026T. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain S37T represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., is proposed with the type strain S37T ( = KEMB 2255-005T = JCM 30409T).

  9. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. VchCA, the α-CA from this species was investigated earlier, whereas the β-class enzyme, VchCAβ was recently cloned, characterized kinetically and its X-ray crystal structure reported by this group. Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and one sulfamate of this enzyme. The best VchCAβ inhibitors were deacetylated acetazolamide and methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide, which showed inhibition constants of 68.2-87.0nM. Other compounds, with medium potency against VchCAβ, (KIs in the range of 275-463nM), were sulfanilamide, metanilamide, sulthiame and saccharin whereas the clinically used agents such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, zonisamide and celecoxib were micromolar inhibitors (KIs in the range of 4.51-8.57μM). Identification of potent and possibly selective inhibitors of VchCA and VchCAβ over the human CA isoforms, may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzymes. PMID:26850377

  10. Anion inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Dedeoglu, Nurcan; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. Here we report and anion inhibition study of the β-CA, VchCAβ with anions and other small molecules which inhibit metalloenzymes. The best VchCAβ anion inhibitors were sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid, which showed KIs in the range of 54-86μM. Diethyldithiocarbonate was also an effective VchCAβ inhibitor, with an inhibition constant of 0.73mM. The halides, cyanate, thiocyanate, cyanide, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, stannate, selenate, tellurate, divanadate, tetraborate, perrhenate, perruthenate, peroxydisulfate, selenocyanide, trithiocarbonate, and fluorosulfonate showed affinity in the low millimolar range, with KIs of 2.3-9.5mM. Identification of selective inhibitors of VchCAβ (over the human CA isoforms) may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzyme. PMID:26853167

  11. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. VchCA, the α-CA from this species was investigated earlier, whereas the β-class enzyme, VchCAβ was recently cloned, characterized kinetically and its X-ray crystal structure reported by this group. Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and one sulfamate of this enzyme. The best VchCAβ inhibitors were deacetylated acetazolamide and methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide, which showed inhibition constants of 68.2-87.0nM. Other compounds, with medium potency against VchCAβ, (KIs in the range of 275-463nM), were sulfanilamide, metanilamide, sulthiame and saccharin whereas the clinically used agents such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, zonisamide and celecoxib were micromolar inhibitors (KIs in the range of 4.51-8.57μM). Identification of potent and possibly selective inhibitors of VchCA and VchCAβ over the human CA isoforms, may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzymes.

  12. Antibiofilm activity of an exopolysaccharide from marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101.

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    Peng Jiang

    Full Text Available Bacterial exopolysaccharides have always been suggested to play crucial roles in the bacterial initial adhesion and the development of complex architecture in the later stages of bacterial biofilm formation. However, Escherichia coli group II capsular polysaccharide was characterized to exert broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. In this study, we firstly reported that a bacterial exopolysaccharide (A101 not only inhibits biofilm formation of many bacteria but also disrupts established biofilm of some strains. A101 with an average molecular weight of up to 546 KDa, was isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101 by ethanol precipitation, iron-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides showed that A101 is primarily consisted of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, rhamnose and glucosamine. A101 was demonstrated to inhibit biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without antibacterial activity. Furthermore, A101 displayed a significant disruption on the established biofilm produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not by Staphylococcus aureus. Importantly, A101 increased the aminoglycosides antibiotics' capability of killing P. aeruginosa biofilm. Cell primary attachment to surfaces and intercellular aggregates assays suggested that A101 inhibited cell aggregates of both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, while the cell-surface interactions inhibition only occurred in S. aureus, and the pre-formed cell aggregates dispersion induced by A101 only occurred in P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these data identify the antibiofilm activity of A101, which may make it potential in the design of new therapeutic strategies for bacterial biofilm-associated infections and limiting biofilm formation on medical indwelling devices. The found of A101 antibiofilm activity may also promote a

  13. DNA cloning, characterization, and inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; Isik, Semra; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2012-12-13

    We have cloned, purified, and characterized an α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the human pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae, VchCA. The new enzyme has significant catalytic activity, and an inhibition study with sulfonamides and sulfamates led to the detection of a large number of low nanomolar inhibitors, among which are methazolamide, acetazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, benzolamide, and indisulam (KI values in the range 0.69-8.1 nM). As bicarbonate is a virulence factor of this bacterium and since ethoxzolamide was shown to inhibit the in vivo virulence, we propose that VchCA may be a target for antibiotic development, exploiting a mechanism of action rarely considered until now. PMID:23181552

  14. Integrating small molecule signalling and H-NS antagonism in Vibrio cholerae, a bacterium with two chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Charles J

    2015-08-01

    H-NS is a well-established silencer of virulence gene transcription in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Biofilm formation aids V. cholerae in colonizing both its host and its external environments, and H-NS silences biofilm gene expression. Cyclic-di-guanosine monophosphate acts through the DNA binding proteins VpsR and VpsT to overcome H-NS-mediated repression of biofilm genes, driving a transition between a planktonic and a colonial/biofilm lifestyle. The H-NS binding pattern has now been charted on both chromosomes in V. cholerae, but whether or not this abundant DNA-binding-and-bridging protein plays any roles in nucleoid organization in this bacterium remains an open question.

  15. Molecular uptake of chitooligosaccharides through chitoporin from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

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    Wipa Suginta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin is the most abundant biopolymer in marine ecosystems. However, there is no accumulation of chitin in the ocean-floor sediments, since marine bacteria Vibrios are mainly responsible for a rapid turnover of chitin biomaterials. The catabolic pathway of chitin by Vibrios is a multi-step process that involves chitin attachment and degradation, followed by chitooligosaccharide uptake across the bacterial membranes, and catabolism of the transport products to fructose-6-phosphate, acetate and NH(3. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study reports the isolation of the gene corresponding to an outer membrane chitoporin from the genome of Vibrio harveyi. This porin, expressed in E. coli, (so called VhChiP was found to be a SDS-resistant, heat-sensitive trimer. Immunoblotting using anti-ChiP polyclonal antibody confirmed the expression of the recombinant ChiP, as well as endogenous expression of the native protein in the V. harveyi cells. The specific function of VhChiP was investigated using planar lipid membrane reconstitution technique. VhChiP nicely inserted into artificial membranes and formed stable, trimeric channels with average single conductance of 1.8±0.13 nS. Single channel recordings at microsecond-time resolution resolved translocation of chitooligosaccharides, with the greatest rate being observed for chitohexaose. Liposome swelling assays showed no permeation of other oligosaccharides, including maltose, sucrose, maltopentaose, maltohexaose and raffinose, indicating that VhChiP is a highly-specific channel for chitooligosaccharides. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first evidence that chitoporin from V. harveyi is a chitooligosaccharide specific channel. The results obtained from this study help to establish the fundamental role of VhChiP in the chitin catabolic cascade as the molecular gateway that Vibrios employ for chitooligosaccharide uptake for energy production.

  16. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from [1-14C]myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from [14C]C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from [14C]acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development

  17. Characterizing the host and symbiont proteomes in the association between the Bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri.

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    Tyler R Schleicher

    Full Text Available The beneficial symbiosis between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, provides a unique opportunity to study host/microbe interactions within a natural microenvironment. Colonization of the squid light organ by V. fischeri begins a lifelong association with a regulated daily rhythm. Each morning the host expels an exudate from the light organ consisting of 95% of the symbiont population in addition to host hemocytes and shed epithelial cells. We analyzed the host and symbiont proteomes of adult squid exudate and surrounding light organ epithelial tissue using 1D- and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT in an effort to understand the contribution of both partners to the maintenance of this association. These proteomic analyses putatively identified 1581 unique proteins, 870 proteins originating from the symbiont and 711 from the host. Identified host proteins indicate a role of the innate immune system and reactive oxygen species (ROS in regulating the symbiosis. Symbiont proteins detected enhance our understanding of the role of quorum sensing, two-component signaling, motility, and detoxification of ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS inside the light organ. This study offers the first proteomic analysis of the symbiotic microenvironment of the adult light organ and provides the identification of proteins important to the regulation of this beneficial association.

  18. Experimental and predicted acute toxicity of antibacterial compounds and their mixtures using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Sara; Vighi, Marco; Finizio, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    This article investigates the bioluminescence inhibition effects of the antimicrobials triclocarban, triclosan and its metabolite methyl triclosan, using the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri as the test organism (Microtox©). The concentration response analysis was performed for the three individual substances and for a mixture in which the three compounds were mixed in a ratio of the IC50 of the individual components (equitoxic ratio). Toxicity values (the median inhibitory concentration value, in mg L(-1)) in the decreasing order of sensitivity were triclosan (0.73)>triclocarban (0.91)>methyl-triclosan (1.76). The comparison of the experimental data with those obtained by using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) equations indicated that triclosan and triclocarban act as polar narcotic compounds towards V. fischeri, whereas methyl-triclosan acts as a narcotic (baseline toxicity). The toxicity of the mixture was measured experimentally and predicted by two models (CA: concentration addition; IA: independent action). The results showed that the observed mixture toxicity (IC50=0.23 mg L(-1)) had no significant differences from those predicted by both CA and IA models. PMID:24529397

  19. Cell division licensing in the multi-chromosomal Vibrio cholerae bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elisa; Poidevin, Mickaël; Le Bars, Romain; Desfontaines, Jean-Michel; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Barre, François-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Cell division must be coordinated with chromosome replication and segregation to ensure the faithful transmission of genetic information during proliferation. In most bacteria, assembly of the division apparatus, the divisome, starts with the polymerization of a tubulin homologue, FtsZ, into a ring-like structure at mid-cell, the Z-ring(1). It typically occurs at half of the cell cycle when most of the replication and segregation cycle of the unique chromosome they generally harbour is achieved(2). The chromosome itself participates in the regulation of cell division, at least in part because it serves as a scaffold to position FtsZ polymerization antagonists(3). However, about 10% of bacteria have more than one chromosome(4), which raises questions about the way they license cell division(3). For instance, the genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is divided between a 3 Mbp replicon that originates from the chromosome of its mono-chromosomal ancestor, Chr1, and a 1 Mbp plasmid-derived replicon, Chr2 (ref. 5). Here, we show that Chr2 harbours binding motifs for an inhibitor of Z-ring formation, which helps accurately position the V. cholerae divisome at mid-cell and postpones its assembly to the very end of the cell cycle. PMID:27562255

  20. Vibrio plantisponsor sp. nov., a diazotrophic bacterium isolated from a mangrove associated wild rice (Porteresia coarctata Tateoka).

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    Rameshkumar, N; Gomez-Gil, B; Spröer, Cathrin; Lang, Elke; Dinesh Kumar, N; Krishnamurthi, S; Nair, Sudha; Roque, A

    2011-11-01

    Two Gram negative, facultatively anaerobic, halophilic, motile, slightly curved rod-shaped bacterial strains MSSRF60(T) and MSSRF64 were isolated from the roots of a mangrove-associated wild rice collected in the Pichavaram mangroves, India. These strains possess the key functional nitrogenase gene nifH. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA, recA, gapA, mreB, gyrB and pyrH, gene sequences revealed that strains MSSRF60(T) and MSSRF64 belong to the genus Vibrio, and had the highest sequence similarity with the type strains of Vibrio diazotrophicus LMG 7893(T) (99.7, 94.8, 98.5, 97.9, 94.0 and 90.7%, respectively), Vibrio areninigrae J74(T) (98.2, 87.5, 91.5, 88.9, 86.5 and 84.6% respectively) and Vibrio hispanicus LMG 13240(T) (97.8, 87.1, 91.7, 89.8, 84.1 and 81.9%, respectively). The fatty acid composition too confirmed the affiliation of strains MSSRF60(T) and MSSRF64 to the genus Vibrio. These strains can be differentiated from the most closely related Vibrio species by several phenotypic traits. The DNA G+C content of strain MSSRF60(T) was 41.8mol%. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic (multilocus sequence analysis using five genes and genomic fingerprinting using BOX-PCR) and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses, strains MSSRF60(T) and MSSRF64 represent a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio plantipsonsor sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MSSRF60(T) (=DSM 21026(T)=LMG 24470(T)=CAIM 1392(T)).

  1. Crystal structure and kinetic studies of a tetrameric type II β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraroni, Marta; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a zinc enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate (hydrogen carbonate) and a proton. CAs have been extensively investigated owing to their involvement in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Currently, CA inhibitors are widely used as antiglaucoma, anticancer and anti-obesity drugs and for the treatment of neurological disorders. Recently, the potential use of CA inhibitors to fight infections caused by protozoa, fungi and bacteria has emerged as a new research direction. In this article, the cloning and kinetic characterization of the β-CA from Vibrio cholerae (VchCAβ) are reported. The X-ray crystal structure of this new enzyme was solved at 1.9 Å resolution from a crystal that was perfectly merohedrally twinned, revealing a tetrameric type II β-CA with a closed active site in which the zinc is tetrahedrally coordinated to Cys42, Asp44, His98 and Cys101. The substrate bicarbonate was found bound in a noncatalytic binding pocket close to the zinc ion, as reported for a few other β-CAs, such as those from Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. At pH 8.3, the enzyme showed a significant catalytic activity for the physiological reaction of the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, with the following kinetic parameters: a kcat of 3.34 × 10(5) s(-1) and a kcat/Km of 4.1 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The new enzyme, on the other hand, was poorly inhibited by acetazolamide (Ki of 4.5 µM). As this bacterial pathogen encodes at least three CAs, an α-CA, a β-CA and a γ-CA, these enzymes probably play an important role in the life cycle and pathogenicity of Vibrio, and it cannot be excluded that interference with their activity may be exploited therapeutically to obtain antibiotics with a different mechanism of action.

  2. Anion inhibition profiles of α-, β- and γ-carbonic anhydrases from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; di Fonzo, Pietro; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-08-15

    Among the numerous metalloenzymes known to date, carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) was the first zinc containing one, being discovered decades ago. CA is a hydro-lyase, which catalyzes the following hydration-dehydration reaction: CO2+H2O⇋HCO3(-)+H(+). Several CA classes are presently known, including the α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ζ- and η-CAs. In prokaryotes, the existence of genes encoding CAs from at least three classes (α-, β- and γ-class) suggests that these enzymes play a key role in the physiology of these organisms. In many bacteria CAs are essential for the life cycle of microbes and their inhibition leads to growth impairment or growth defects of the pathogen. CAs thus started to be investigated in detail in bacteria, fungi and protozoa with the aim to identify antiinfectives with a novel mechanism of action. Here, we investigated the catalytic activity, biochemical properties and anion inhibition profiles of the three CAs from the bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholera, VchCA, VchCAβ and VchCAγ. The three enzymes are efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values ranging between (3.4-8.23)×10(5)s(-1) and kcat/KM of (4.1-7.0)×10(7)M(-1)s(-1). A set of inorganic anions and small molecules was investigated for inhibition of these enzymes. The most potent VchCAγ inhibitors were N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid, with KI values ranging between 44 and 91μM. PMID:27283786

  3. Comparison of the sulfonamide inhibition profiles of the α-, β- and γ-carbonic anhydrases from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-04-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes, which catalyze the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) and protons (H(+)). In prokaryotes, the existence of genes encoding for α-, β- and γ-classes suggests that these enzymes play an important role in the prokaryotic physiology. It has been demonstrated, in fact, that their inhibition in vivo leads to growth impairment or growth defects of the microorganism. Ultimately, we started to investigate the biochemical properties and the inhibitory profiles of the α- and β-CAs identified in the genome of Vibrio cholerae, which is the causative agent of cholera. The genome of this pathogen encodes for CAs belonging to α, β and γ classes. Here, we report a sulfonamide inhibition study of the γ-CA (named VchCAγ) comparing it with data obtained for the α- and β-CA enzymes. VchCAγ activity (kcat=7.39 × 10(5)s(-1)) was significantly higher than the other γ-CAs. The inhibition study with a panel of sulfonamides and one sulfamate led to the detection of a large number of nanomolar VchCAγ inhibitors, including simple aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides (compounds 2-9, 11, 13-15, 24) as well as EZA, DZA, BRZ, BZA, TPM, ZNS, SLP, IND (KIs in the range of 66.2-95.3 nM). As it was proven that bicarbonate is a virulence factor of this bacterium and since ethoxzolamide was shown to inhibit this virulence in vivo, we propose that VchCA, VchCAβ and VchCAγ may be a target for antibiotic development, exploiting a mechanism of action rarely considered up until now, i.e., interference with bicarbonate supply as a virulence factor. PMID:26972117

  4. Influence of nitrogen substrates and substrate C:N ratios on the nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, K.; Ohkouchi, N.; Chikaraishi, Y.; Fukuda, H.; Miyajima, T.; Nagata, T.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) isotopic compositions of individual hydrolysable amino acids (δ15NAAs) in N pools have been increasingly used for trophic position assessment and evaluation of sources and transformation processes of organic matter in marine environments. However, there are limited data about variability in δ15NAAs patterns and how this variability influences marine bacteria, an important mediator of trophic transfer and organic matter transformation. We explored whether marine bacterial δ15NAAs profiles change depending on the type and C:N ratio of the substrate. The δ15NAAs profile of a marine bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, was examined using medium containing either glutamate, alanine or ammonium as the N source [substrate C:N ratios (range, 3 to 20) were adjusted with glucose]. The data were interpreted as a reflection of isotope fractionations associated with de novo synthesis of amino acids by bacteria. Principal component analysis (PCA) using the δ15N offset values normalized to glutamate + glutamine δ15N revealed that δ15NAAs profiles differed depending on the N source and C:N ratio of the substrate. High variability in the δ15N offset of alanine and valine largely explained this bacterial δ15NAAs profile variability. PCA was also conducted using bacterial and phytoplankton (cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae) δ15NAAs profile data reported previously. The results revealed that bacterial δ15NAAs patterns were distinct from those of phytoplankton. Therefore, the δ15NAAs profile is a useful indicator of biochemical responses of bacteria to changes in substrate conditions, serving as a potentially useful method for identifying organic matter sources in marine environments.

  5. Advanced Microbial Taxonomy Combined with Genome-Based-Approaches Reveals that Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov., an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium, Forms a New Clade in Vibrionaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhidayu Al-Saari

    Full Text Available Advances in genomic microbial taxonomy have opened the way to create a more universal and transparent concept of species but is still in a transitional stage towards becoming a defining robust criteria for describing new microbial species with minimum features obtained using both genome and classical polyphasic taxonomies. Here we performed advanced microbial taxonomies combined with both genome-based and classical approaches for new agarolytic vibrio isolates to describe not only a novel Vibrio species but also a member of a new Vibrio clade. Two novel vibrio strains (Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov. C7T and C20 showing agarolytic, halophilic and fermentative metabolic activity were isolated from a seawater sample collected in a coral reef in Okinawa. Intraspecific similarities of the isolates were identical in both sequences on the 16S rRNA and pyrH genes, but the closest relatives on the molecular phylogenetic trees on the basis of 16S rRNA and pyrH gene sequences were V. hangzhouensis JCM 15146T (97.8% similarity and V. agarivorans CECT 5085T (97.3% similarity, respectively. Further multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA on the basis of 8 protein coding genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA, and topA obtained by the genome sequences clearly showed the V. astriarenae strain C7T and C20 formed a distinct new clade protruded next to V. agarivorans CECT 5085T. The singleton V. agarivorans has never been included in previous MLSA of Vibrionaceae due to the lack of some gene sequences. Now the gene sequences are completed and analysis of 100 taxa in total provided a clear picture describing the association of V. agarivorans into pre-existing concatenated network tree and concluded its relationship to our vibrio strains. Experimental DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH data showed that the strains C7T and C20 were conspecific but were separated from all of the other Vibrio species related on the basis of both 16S rRNA and pyrH gene phylogenies (e.g., V

  6. Vibrio population structure - Genetic and population structure analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) is a marine bacterium capable of causing severe gastroenteritis in humans, usually through the consumption of raw shellfish. Before...

  7. Characterization of 22 Vibrio species by gas chromatography analysis of their cellular fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdaci, M C; Marchand, M; Grimont, P A

    1990-05-01

    The cellular fatty acid compositions of 51 Vibrio strains belonging to 22 species as well as five Aeromonas strains were determined by using capillary gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The major fatty acids were most often hexadecenoic, hexadecanoic and octadecenoic acids. Heptadecenoic acid was present in significant amounts in V. alginolyticus, V. natriegens, V. parahaemolyticus and "Vibrio navarrensis". Twenty fatty acids including branched and hydroxy acids were detected in the genus Vibrio. Quantitative results were treated by principal component analysis to display groups of strains. The first three components (accounting for 69% of the variance) showed the type strains of V. fischeri, V. ordalii, V. damsela, V. mediterranei, V. tubiashii, V. campbellii, V. pelagius, V. gazogenes, and V. nereis to be unclustered. V. alginolyticus (4 strains) and V. parahaemolyticus (4 strains) showed some overlap and the type strain of V. natriegens was in their neighborhood. V. harveyi (4 strains) formed a cluster and V. vulnificus was in its vicinity. V. cholerae (5 strains) overlapped with V. diazotrophicus (3 strains) and was close to the type strain of V. mimicus and V. anguillarum. V. metschnikovii (3 strains) clustered with the type strain of V. cincinnatiensis. A decision tree was devised for the identification of Vibrio species based on qualitative characteristics of fatty acid patterns. However, the following three groups, V. alginolyticus-V. parahaemolyticus-V. natriegens, V. metschnikovii-V. cincinnatiensis and V. cholerae-V. mimicus could not be split into such a decision tree.

  8. Vibrio Cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Amelia

    2006-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae adalah salah satu bakteri yang masuk dalam family Vibrionaceae selain dari Aeromonas dan Plesiomonas, dan merupakan bagian dari genus Vibrio. Bakteri ini pertama kali ditemukan oleh Robert Koch pada tahun 1884 dan sangat penting dalam dunia kedokteran karena menyebabkan penyakit kolera, oleh Sri Amelia

  9. Identification of Vibrio harveyi as a causative bacterium for a tail rot disease of sea bream Sparus aurata from research hatchery in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, S; Maharajan, A; Chatterjee, S; Hunter, S A; Chowdhury, N; Hinenoya, A; Asakura, M; Yamasaki, S

    2010-10-20

    A bacterial disease was reported from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) within a hatchery environment in Malta. Symptoms included complete erosion of tail, infection in the eye, mucous secretion and frequent mortality. A total of 540 strains were initially isolated in marine agar from different infected body parts and culture water sources. Subsequently 100 isolates were randomly selected, identified biochemically and all were found to be Vibrio harveyi-related organisms; finally from 100 isolates a total of 13 numbers were randomly selected and accurately identified as V. harveyi by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and species-specific PCR. Ribotyping of these strains with HindIII revealed total of six clusters. In vivo challenge study with representative isolates from each cluster proved two clusters each were highly pathogenic, moderately pathogenic and non-pathogenic. All 13 isolates were positive for hemolysin gene, a potential virulence factor. Further analysis revealed probably a single copy of this gene was encoded in all isolates, although not in the same locus in the genome. Although V. harveyi was reported to be an important pathogen for many aquatic organisms, to our knowledge this might be the first report of disease caused by V. harveyi and their systematic study in the sea bream hatchery from Malta.

  10. Small RNA target genes and regulatory connections in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Brian K; Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    2011-01-01

    The two-component quorum sensing (QS) system, first described in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi and evolutionarily conserved among members of the genus Vibrio, has been best studied in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae (1, 2). In the V. cholerae QS system, the response to the accumulation...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Shellfish Bacterial Pathogen Vibrio sp. Strain B183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Harold J; Schott, Eric J

    2014-09-18

    We report the draft genome sequence of Vibrio sp. strain B183, a Gram-negative marine bacterium isolated from shellfish that causes mortality in larval mariculture. The availability of this genome sequence will facilitate the study of its virulence mechanisms and add to our knowledge of Vibrio sp. diversity and evolution.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus ZJ-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yiqin; Chen, Chang; Zhao, Zhe; Huang, Xiaochun; Yang, Yiying; Ding, Xiongqi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium which is normally distributed in the coastal and estuarine environments. It has been suggested to be an opportunistic pathogen to both marine animals and humans, Here, the completed genome sequence of V. alginolyticus ZJ-T was determined by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. PMID:27587824

  13. Quorum-sensing regulates biofilm formation in Vibrio scophthalmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aljaro Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study, we demonstrated that Vibrio scophthalmi, the most abundant Vibrio species among the marine aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract of healthy cultured turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, contains at least two quorum-sensing circuits involving two types of signal molecules (a 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and the universal autoinducer 2 encoded by luxS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functions regulated by these quorum sensing circuits in this vibrio by constructing mutants for the genes involved in these circuits. Results The presence of a homologue to the Vibrio harveyi luxR gene encoding a main transcriptional regulator, whose expression is modulated by quorum–sensing signal molecules in other vibrios, was detected and sequenced. The V. scophthalmi LuxR protein displayed a maximum amino acid identity of 82% with SmcR, the LuxR homologue found in Vibrio vulnificus. luxR and luxS null mutants were constructed and their phenotype analysed. Both mutants displayed reduced biofilm formation in vitro as well as differences in membrane protein expression by mass-spectrometry analysis. Additionally, a recombinant strain of V. scophthalmi carrying the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus cereus, which causes hydrolysis of acyl homoserine lactones, was included in the study. Conclusions V. scophthalmi shares two quorum sensing circuits, including the main transcriptional regulator luxR, with some pathogenic vibrios such as V. harveyi and V. anguillarum. However, contrary to these pathogenic vibrios no virulence factors (such as protease production were found to be quorum sensing regulated in this bacterium. Noteworthy, biofilm formation was altered in luxS and luxR mutants. In these mutants a different expression profile of membrane proteins were observed with respect to the wild type strain suggesting that quorum sensing could play a role in the regulation of

  14. Biodiversity of Vibrios

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiano L. Thompson; Iida, Tetsuya; Swings, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Vibrios are ubiquitous and abundant in the aquatic environment. A high abundance of vibrios is also detected in tissues and/or organs of various marine algae and animals, e.g., abalones, bivalves, corals, fish, shrimp, sponges, squid, and zooplankton. Vibrios harbour a wealth of diverse genomes as revealed by different genomic techniques including amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing, repetetive extragenic palindrome PCR, ribotyping, and whole-genome sequencing. ...

  15. VIBRIO CHOLERAE VPIФ/CTXФ/TCP: INTERACTIONS OF PHAGE-PHAGE-BACTERIUM%霍乱弧菌VPIФ/CTXФ/TCP体系:噬菌体-噬菌体-细菌多元作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾云灿; 孟繁梅

    2001-01-01

    @@ 霍乱由霍乱弧菌(Vibrio cholerae)菌株感染人体所引起,可导致重度脱水性腹泻,死亡率高.霍乱弧菌存在于水生环境中,人类因食用被污染的水或食物而受到感染,暴发流行.VPIФ/CTXФ/TCP体系是决定该菌侵染力和毒力的关键,它集中体现了有关噬菌体——噬菌体——宿主细菌多元作用,阐释其分子机制是目前十分活跃的研究领域[1,2].作为典型示例,这个体系突出了噬菌体介导的病原细菌毒力溶源转变、毒力基因水平转移和进化等同题[3],开创了在分子水平上研究流行病学、预防医学的新领域[4-6].

  16. Ecological study of bacteriophages of Vibrio natriegens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachary, A.

    1978-03-01

    Effects of temperature and anaerobic conditions on the replication of two bacteriophages, nt-1 and nt-6, of the estuarine bacterium Vibrio natriegens were studied. Reduction in temperature resulted in longer latent periods and reduced burst sizes for both phages. Replication under anaerobic conditions resulted in longer latent periods; however, phage nt-6 had a reduced burst size, whereas phage nt-1 had an increased burst size, resulting in a rate of phage production nearly equal to that observed under aerobic conditions. Therefore the distribution of the phages in marsh areas could be influenced by temperature and anaerobiosis.

  17. Spatially selective colonization of the arthropod intestine through activation of Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Purdy, Alexandra E.; Watnick, Paula I.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an estuarine bacterium and the human pathogen responsible for the diarrheal disease cholera. In the environment, arthropods are proposed to be carriers and reservoirs of V. cholerae. However, the molecular basis of the association between V. cholerae and viable arthropods has not been elucidated previously. Here, we show that the V. cholerae Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS)-dependent biofilm is highly activated upon entry into the arthropod intestine and is specifically required...

  18. The Polar Flagellar Motor of Vibrio cholerae Is Driven by an Na+ Motive Force

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Seiji; Yamamoto, Koichiro; Kawagishi, Ikuro; Homma, Michio

    1999-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a highly motile bacterium which possesses a single polar flagellum as a locomotion organelle. Motility is thought to be an important factor for the virulence of V. cholerae. The genome sequencing project of this organism is in progress, and the genes that are highly homologous to the essential genes of the Na+-driven polar flagellar motor of Vibrio alginolyticus were found in the genome database of V. cholerae. The energy source of its flagellar motor was investigated. We e...

  19. Small RNA Control of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Vibrio Harveyi and Vibrio Cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-to-cell communication, by which bacteria coordinate gene expression and behavior on a population-wide scale. Quorum sensing is accomplished through production, secretion, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules termed autoinducers. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi incorporate information from multiple autoinducers, and also environmental signals and metabolic cues into their quorum-sensing pathways. At the core of these pathways lie several homologous small regulatory RNA molecules, the Quorum Regulatory RNAs. Small noncoding RNAs have emerged throughout the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms as key regulators of behavioral and developmental processes. Here, I review our present understanding of the role of the Qrr small RNAs in integrating quorum-sensing signals and in regulating the individual cells response to this information.

  20. Vibrio cholerae as a predator: lessons from evolutionary principles

    OpenAIRE

    StefanPukatzki; DanieleProvenzano

    2013-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are the second-most common cause of death among children under the age of five worldwide. Cholera alone, caused by the marine bacterium Vibrio cholerae, is responsible for several million cases and over 120,000 deaths annually. When contaminated water is ingested, V. cholerae passes through the gastric acid barrier, penetrates the mucin layer of the small intestine, and adheres to the underlying epithelial lining. V. cholerae multiplies rapidly, secretes cholera toxin, and ...

  1. Shedding light on bioluminescence regulation in Vibrio fischeri

    OpenAIRE

    Miyashiro, Tim; Ruby, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    The bioluminescence emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a particularly striking result of individual microbial cells coordinating a group behavior. The genes responsible for light production are principally regulated by the LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing system. In addition to LuxR-LuxI, numerous other genetic elements and environmental conditions control bioluminescence production. Efforts to mathematically model the LuxR-LuxI system are providing insight into the dynamics of this a...

  2. Detection of extracellular toxin(s) produced by Vibrio vulnificus.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreger, A; Lockwood, D.

    1981-01-01

    Conditions are described for the production, in high titers, a heat-labile, antigenic, extracellular toxin(s) by Vibrio vulnificus, a recently recognized human pathogen. Bacteriologically sterile culture filtrate preparations obtained from mid-logarithmic-phase cultures of the bacterium possessed cytolytic activity against mammalian erythrocytes, cytotoxic activity for Chinese hamster ovary cells, vascular permeability factor activity in guinea pig skin, and lethal activity for mice. The spec...

  3. Stabile kloningsvektorer til Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Malene; Jakobsen, Henrik; Larsen, Marie B.; Rasmussen, Maria H; Schrøder, Nanna B.

    2005-01-01

    Vi har forsøgt at konstruere stabile, plasmidbaserede ekspressions-/kloningsvektorer til Vibrio cholerae. Ideelt burde sådanne vektorer baseres på naturlige plasmider fra Vibrio cholerae, men idet Vibrio cholerae sjældent indeholder plasmider, tog vi i stedet udgangspunkt i velkarakteriserede kloningsvektorer fra Escherichia coli. I projektet undersøges fire kloningsvektorer med hver deres karakteristika. Det lykkedes at indføre dem i Vibrio cholerae. Med udgangspunkt i den ene vektor vises, ...

  4. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  5. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Cristiane C.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Souza, Rangel C.;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera) from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety...... analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in the birth of the online genomic taxonomy whereby researchers and end-users of taxonomy will be able to identify their isolates through a web...

  6. The two chromosomes of Vibrio cholerae are initiated at different time points in the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tue; Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Skovgaard, Ole

    2007-01-01

    The bacterium Vibrio cholerae, the cause of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, has its genome divided between two chromosomes, a feature uncommon for bacteria. The two chromosomes are of different sizes and different initiator molecules control their replication independently. Using novel methods...

  7. Determining Vaccination Frequency in Farmed Rainbow Trout Using Vibrio anguillarum O1 Specific Serum Antibody Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Lars; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nylén, Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite vaccination with a commercial vaccine with a documented protective effect against Vibrio anguillarum O1 disease outbreaks caused by this bacterium have been registered among rainbow trout at Danish fish farms. The present study examined specific serum antibody levels as a valid...

  8. Exopolysaccharide production by Vibrio fischeri, a fouling marine bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rodrigues, C.L; Bhosle, N.B.

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Biofouling_4_301.pdf.txt stream_source_info Biofouling_4_301.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  9. Efek Antibakteri Ekstrak Daun Mimba (Azadirachta indica A. Juss terhadap Bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus Secara In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uli Ayini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Budidaya udang windu di Indonesia telah berkembang pesat. Salah satu kendala budidaya udang adalah penyakit Vibriosis yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui efek antibakeri ekstrak daun mimba terhadap bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode dilusi untuk mengetahui efek antibakteri ekstrak daun mimba terhadap bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus secara in vitro. Konsentrasi ekstrak yang digunakan (% yaitu: 0; 2,5; 5; 7,5; 10; 12,5 dan sebagai kontrol terdiri dari kontrol positif, dan kontrol negatif. Pengumpulan data untuk menentukan MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration dilakukan dengan membandingkan kejernihan kultur di medium TSB 2% pada berbagai konsentrasi yang berbeda, dengan kontrol positif dan kontrol negatif. Penentuan MBC (Minimum Bacterisidal Concentration dilakukan dengan melihat ada tidaknya dan jumlah koloni bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus yang muncul pada medium subkultur TSA 2% setelah inkubasi 24 jam. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan nilai MIC yaitu konsentrasi 5%, hal ini ditunjukkan dengan tabung yang mulai jernih. Nilai MBC ekstrak daun mimba terhadap bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus adalah konsentrasi 12,5% ditandai dengan sudah tidak munculnya  koloni bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus. Berdasarkan penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa ekstrak daun mimba dapat memberikan efek antibakteri terhadap bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus secara in vitro.Tiger shrimp cultivation in Indonesia has been growing rapidly. The main obstacle is the shrimp farming vibriosis disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio algynoliticus. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of neem leaf extract antibakeri against Vibrio algynoliticus. This study used a dilution method to determine the antibacterial effect of neem leaf extract against Vibrio algynoliticus bacteria in vitro. The concentration of the extract used (%: 0; 2.5; 5; 7.5; 10; 12.5 and as a control consisting of a positive

  10. Vibrio vulnificus endometritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tison, D L; Kelly, M T

    1984-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus most frequently causes wound infections contracted after exposure to seawater or primary septicemias resulting from the consumption of raw oysters. We report a case of endometritis caused by V. vulnificus. The infection was apparently acquired during the act of sexual intercourse in seawater in an area in which V. vulnificus has been frequently isolated. The efficacy of treatment with an antimicrobial regimen which included tetracycline is discussed.

  11. Vibrio vulnificus endometritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, D L; Kelly, M T

    1984-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus most frequently causes wound infections contracted after exposure to seawater or primary septicemias resulting from the consumption of raw oysters. We report a case of endometritis caused by V. vulnificus. The infection was apparently acquired during the act of sexual intercourse in seawater in an area in which V. vulnificus has been frequently isolated. The efficacy of treatment with an antimicrobial regimen which included tetracycline is discussed. PMID:6490813

  12. Temperature-Regulated Bleaching and Lysis of the Coral Pocillopora damicornis by the Novel Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Haim, Yael; Zicherman-Keren, Maya; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of symbioses between coral animals and their photosynthetic microalgal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae). It has been suggested that large-scale bleaching episodes are linked to global warming. The data presented here demonstrate that Vibrio coralliilyticus is an etiological agent of bleaching of the coral Pocillopora damicornis. This bacterium was present at high levels in bleached P. damicornis but absent from healthy corals. The bacterium was isolated in pure ...

  13. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  14. Mortalities of Eastern and Pacific oyster Larvae caused by the pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gary P; Watson, Michael A; Needleman, David S; Church, Karlee M; Häse, Claudia C

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio coralliilyticus, a well-known coral pathogen, has recently been shown to elicit mortality in fish and shellfish. Several strains of V. coralliilyticus, such as ATCC 19105 and Pacific isolates RE22 and RE98, were misidentified as V. tubiashii until recently. We compared the mortalities caused by two V. tubiashii and four V. coralliilyticus strains in Eastern and Pacific oyster larvae. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of V. coralliilyticus in Eastern oysters (defined here as the dose required to kill 50% of the population in 6 days) ranged from 1.1 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml seawater; strains RE98 and RE22 were the most virulent. This study shows that V. coralliilyticus causes mortality in Eastern oyster larvae. Results for Pacific oysters were similar, with LD50s between 1.2 × 10(4) and 4.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml. Vibrio tubiashii ATCC 19106 and ATCC 19109 were highly infectious toward Eastern oyster larvae but were essentially nonpathogenic toward healthy Pacific oyster larvae at dosages of ≥1.1 × 10(4) CFU/ml. These data, coupled with the fact that several isolates originally thought to be V. tubiashii are actually V. coralliilyticus, suggest that V. coralliilyticus has been a more significant pathogen for larval bivalve shellfish than V. tubiashii, particularly on the U.S. West Coast, contributing to substantial hatchery-associated morbidity and mortality in recent years.

  15. Vibrio Parahaemolyticus: The Threat of Another Vibrio Acquiring Pandemic Potential

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramamurthy, T.; Nair, G.B.

    or indirectly via contaminated food and water. Food-borne Vibrio infections tend to occur more frequently in developed countries while transmission of Vibrio infections in developing countries is, by and large, water-borne. Further, the magnitude of food... and established through extensive research. However, there is a burgeoning problem of food-borne illness throughout the globe. The relation between strains isolated from the environment and, those isolated from seafood, and human clinical isolates are poorly...

  16. Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)

    1988-12-31

    Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

  17. The Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III Secretion Systems manipulate host cell MAPK for critical steps in pathogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia

    2010-12-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a food-borne pathogen causing inflammation of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Pathogenic strains of this bacterium possess two Type III Secretion Systems (TTSS) that deliver effector proteins into host cells. In order to better understand human host cell responses to V. parahaemolyticus, the modulation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) activation in epithelial cells by an O3:K6 clinical isolate, RIMD2210633, was investigated. The importance of MAPK activation for the ability of the bacterium to be cytotoxic and to induce secretion of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) was determined.

  18. A transcriptional regulator linking quorum sensing and chitin induction to render Vibrio cholerae naturally transformable

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Scrudato, Mirella; Blokesch, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic bacterium associated with zooplankton and their chitinous exoskeletons. On chitinous surfaces, V. cholerae initiates a developmental programme, known as natural competence, to mediate transformation, which is a mode of horizontal gene transfer. Competence facilitates the uptake of free DNA and recombination into the bacterial genome. Recent studies have indicated that chitin surfaces are required, but not sufficient to induce competence. Two ad...

  19. Coagglutination of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, and Vibrio vulnificus with anti-flagellar monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Simonson, J G; Siebeling, R J

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with serological activity for purified flagellar (H) core protein prepared from Vibrio cholerae were identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Four of these MAbs reacted with the flagella of V. cholerae and V. mimicus exclusively, while eight MAbs reacted with at least 1 of 30 heterologous Vibrio species tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or coagglutination. It appears that V. cholerae and V. mimicus express similar, if not identical, H determinant...

  20. Purification, characterization and production optimization of a vibriocin produced by mangrove associated Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baskar Balakrishnan; Sathish Thadikamala; Prabakaran Panchatcharam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify a potential bacterium which produces antimicrobial peptide (vibriocin), and its purification, characterization and production optimization. The bacteria subjected in the study were isolated from a highly competitive ecological niche of mangrove ecosystem. Methods:The bacterium was characterized by phenotype besides 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.The antibacterial activity was recognised by using agar well diffusion method. The vibriocin was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation, butanol extraction, gel filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and subsequently, by HPLC. Molecular weight of the substance identified in SDS-PAGE. Production optimization performed according to Taguchi’s mathematical model using 6 different nutritional parameters as variables. Results:The objective bacterium was identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The vibriocin showed 18 KDa of molecular mass with mono peptide in nature and highest activity against pathogenic Vibrio harveyi. The peptide act stable in a wide range of pH, temperature, UV radiation, solvents and chemicals utilized. An overall ~20% of vibriocin production was improved, and was noticed that NaCl and agitation speed played a vital role in secretion of vibriocin. Conclusion: The vibriocin identified here would be an effective alternative for chemically synthesized drugs for the management of Vibrio infections in mariculture industry.

  1. Surface-attachment sequence in Vibrio Cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Wong, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the human disease cholera. It is found natively in brackish costal waters in temperate climates, where it attaches to the surfaces of a variety of different aquatic life. V. cholerae has a single polar flagellum making it highly motile, as well as a number of different pili types, enabling it to attach to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. Using in-house built tracking software we track all surface-attaching bacteria from high-speed movies to examine the early-time attachment profile of v. cholerae onto a smooth glass surface. Similar to previous work, we observe right-handed circular swimming trajectories near surfaces; however, in addition we see a host of distinct motility mechanisms that enable rapid exploration of the surface before forming a more permanent attachment. Using isogenic mutants we show that the motility mechanisms observed are due to a complex combination of hydrodynamics and pili-surface interactions. Lauga, E., DiLuzio, W. R., Whitesides, G. M., Stone, H. A. Biophys. J. 90, 400 (2006).

  2. Response of Pathogenic Vibrio Species to High Hydrostatic Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Berlin, Daniel L.; Herson, Diane S.; Hicks, Doris T.; Hoover, Dallas G.

    1999-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802, Vibrio vulnificus ATCC 27562, Vibrio cholerae O:1 ATCC 14035, Vibrio cholerae non-O:1 ATCC 14547, Vibrio hollisae ATCC 33564, and Vibrio mimicus ATCC 33653 were treated with 200 to 300 MPa for 5 to 15 min at 25°C. High hydrostatic pressure inactivated all strains of pathogenic Vibrio without triggering a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state; however, cells already existing in a VBNC state appeared to possess greater pressure resistance.

  3. Ethanolamine utilization in Vibrio alginolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri Neelam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ethanolamine is used as an energy source by phylogenetically diverse bacteria including pathogens, by the concerted action of proteins from the eut-operon. Previous studies have revealed the presence of eutBC genes encoding ethanolamine-ammonia lyase, a key enzyme that breaks ethanolamine into acetaldehyde and ammonia, in about 100 bacterial genomes including members of gamma-proteobacteria. However, ethanolamine utilization has not been reported for any member of the Vibrio genus. Our comparative genomics study reveals the presence of genes that are involved in ethanolamine utilization in several Vibrio species. Using Vibrio alginolyticus as a model system we demonstrate that ethanolamine is better utilized as a nitrogen source than as a carbon source. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Lakshminarayan Iyer and Dr. Vivek Anantharaman (nominated by Dr. L Aravind.

  4. Environmental reservoirs and mechanisms of persistence of Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eLutz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is now well accepted that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the water-borne disease cholera, is acquired from environmental sources where it persists between outbreaks of the disease. Recent advances in molecular technology have demonstrated that this bacterium could be detected in areas where it had not been isolated from before, indicating a much broader, global distribution of this bacterium rather than specifically within regions where cholera is endemic. The environmental persistence of V. cholerae in the aquatic environment can be attributed to multiple intra- and interspecific strategies such as responsive gene regulation and biofilm formation on biotic and abiotic surfaces, as well as interactions with a multitude of other organisms. This review will discuss some of the mechanisms that enable the persistence of the bacterium in the sometimes hostile environment. In particular, we will discuss how V. cholerae can survive stressors such as starvation, temperature and salinity fluctuations as well as how the organism persists under constant predation by heterotrophic protists.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus Isolated from the Mucus of the Coral Fungia danai in the Andaman Sea, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhotra, Tilothama; Singh, Durg V

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus, a halophilic Gram-negative bacterium, which is found in temperate marine and estuarine environments, is known to cause infections in humans and other organisms. We sequenced the genome of sulfamethoxazole-trimthoprim-positive V. alginolyticus strain 4-19 isolated from the mucus of the coral Fungia danai in the Andaman Sea, India. PMID:27151803

  6. Whole-Genome Sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus Isolated from the Mucus of the Coral Fungia danai in the Andaman Sea, India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhotra, Tilothama; Singh, Durg V.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus, a halophilic Gram-negative bacterium, which is found in temperate marine and estuarine environments, is known to cause infections in humans and other organisms. We sequenced the genome of sulfamethoxazole-trimthoprim-positive V. alginolyticus strain 4-19 isolated from the mucus of the coral Fungia danai in the Andaman Sea, India.

  7. Sensitivity of the vibrios to ultraviolet-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultraviolet-inactivation kinetics of a number of strains of Vibrio cholerae (classical), Vibrio cholerae (el tor), NAG vibrios and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were investigated. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences between any two of the four types of vibrio in respect of their sensitivity to U.V. (author)

  8. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Amable J. Rivas; Lemos, Manuel L.; Osorio, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela) is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin) and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role...

  9. Vibrio cholerae as a predator: lessons from evolutionary principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan ePukatzki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheal diseases are the second-most common cause of death among children under the age of five worldwide. Cholera alone, caused by the marine bacterium Vibrio cholerae, is responsible for several million cases and over 120,000 deaths annually. When contaminated water is ingested, V. cholerae passes through the gastric acid barrier, penetrates the mucin layer of the small intestine, and adheres to the underlying epithelial lining. V. cholerae multiplies rapidly, secretes cholera toxin, and exits the human host in vast numbers during diarrheal purges. How V. cholerae rapidly reaches such high numbers during each purge is not clearly understood. We propose that V. cholerae employs its bactericidal type VI secretion system to engage in intraspecies and intraguild predation for nutrient acquisition to support rapid growth and multiplication.

  10. Identification of a Wzy Polymerase Required for Group IV Capsular Polysaccharide and Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis in Vibrio vulnificus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nakhamchik, Alina; Wilde, Caroline; Rowe-Magnus, Dean A.

    2007-01-01

    The estuarine bacterium Vibrio vulnificus is a human and animal pathogen. The expression of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is essential for virulence. We used a new mini-Tn10 delivery vector, pNKTXI-SceI, to generate a mutant library and identify genes essential for CPS biosynthesis. Twenty-one acapsular mutants were isolated, and the disrupted gene in one mutant, coding for a polysaccharide polymerase (wzy), is described here. A wecA gene initiating glycosyltransferase was among the genes ide...

  11. Autophagy plays an important role in protecting Pacific oysters from OsHV-1 and Vibrio aestuarianus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Pierrick; Moreau, Kevin; Segarra, Am?lie; Tourbiez, Delphine; Travers, Marie-Agn?s; Rubinsztein, David C.; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Recent mass mortality outbreaks around the world in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, have seriously affected the aquaculture economy. Although the causes for these mortality outbreaks appear complex, infectious agents are involved. Two pathogens are associated with mass mortality outbreaks, the virus ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) and the bacterium Vibrio aestuarianus. Here we describe the interactions between these 2 pathogens and autophagy, a conserved intracellular pathway playing a key...

  12. NAD metabolism in Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, J. W.; Brestel, C

    1982-01-01

    Extracts of Vibrio cholerae were assayed for various enzymatic activities associated with pyridine nucleotide cycle metabolism. The activities measured include NAD glycohydrolase, nicotinamide deamidase, nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase, and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase. The results obtained demonstrate the existence in V. cholerae of the five-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle and the potential for a four-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle. The data presented also suggest th...

  13. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in a highly pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, has been examined. All three strains of V. cholerae belonging to two serotypes, Inaba and Ogawa, are very sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, having inactivation cross-sections ranging from 0.18 to 0.24 m2/J. Although these cells are proficient in repairing the DNA damage by a photoreactivation mechanism, they do not possess efficient dark repair systems. The mild toxinogenic strain 154 of classical Vibrios presumably lacks any excision repair mechanism and studies of irradiated cell DNA indicate that the ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers may not be excised. Ultraviolet-irradiated cells after saturation of dark repair can be further photoreactivated. (Auth.)

  14. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Quorum Sensing-Regulated Luminescence of Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Addie; Hagen, Steve; Son, Minjun

    2015-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism by which bacteria communicate through the secretion and detection of extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers. This research focuses on the quorum sensing regulated bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium that lives in symbiosis with certain fish and squid species. Previous studies of V. harveyi, a close relative of V. fisheri, indicate that a strong magnetic field has a positive effect on V.harveyi bioluminescence. However the effect of magnetic fields on quorum sensing-regulated luminescence is in general poorly understood. We grew V. fischeri in solid and liquid growth media, subject to strong static magnetic fields, and imaged the bioluminescence over a period of forty-eight hours. Luminescence patterns were analyzed in both the spatial and time dimensions. We find no indication that a magnetic field influences Vibrio fischeri luminescence either positively or negatively. This research was funded by the Grant Number NSF DMR-1156737.

  15. Insights into Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 Response to Artificial Gastric Fluid Stress by Transcriptomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejiao Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis disease. Once consumed, human acid gastric fluid is perhaps one of the most important environmental stresses imposed on the bacterium. Herein, for the first time, we investigated Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 response to artificial gastric fluid (AGF stress by transcriptomic analysis. The bacterium at logarithmic growth phase (LGP displayed lower survival rates than that at stationary growth phase (SGP under a sub-lethal acid condition (pH 4.9. Transcriptome data revealed that 11.6% of the expressed genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 was up-regulated in LGP cells after exposed to AGF (pH 4.9 for 30 min, including those involved in sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, energy production and protein biosynthesis, whereas 14.0% of the genes was down-regulated, such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter and flagellar biosynthesis genes. In contrast, the AGF stress only elicited 3.4% of the genes from SGP cells, the majority of which were attenuated in expression. Moreover, the number of expressed regulator genes was also substantially reduced in SGP cells. Comparison of transcriptome profiles further revealed forty-one growth-phase independent genes in the AGF stress, however, half of which displayed distinct expression features between the two growth phases. Vibrio parahaemolyticus seemed to have evolved a number of molecular strategies for coping with the acid stress. The data here will facilitate future studies for environmental stresses and pathogenicity of the leading seafood-borne pathogen worldwide.

  16. Studies on the pathogenic bacterium of ulcer disease in Epinephelus awoara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the cause of the acute mortality of cage-cultured Epinephelus awoara in the Tong'an Bay of Xiamen, China during the summer of 2002. Predominant bacteria strain TS-628 was isolated from the diseased grouper. The virulence test confirmed that TS-628 was the pathogenic bacterium. Biochemical characteristics of the isolates were determined using the automatic bacterial identification system and standard tube tests. To further confirm the identification, a 1 121 bp 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate was amplified by PCR, which had been deposited into Genbank (accession number: AY747308). According to the biochemical characteristics and by comparing the 16S rRNA gene homology of the isolate, the pathogenic bacterium was identified as Vibrio harveyi. Drug sensitivity tests showed that this pathogenic bacterium was sensitive to 16 antibacterials, especially to chloramphenicol and actinospectacin, but completely resistant to antibacterials likes vancomycin, penicillin, lincomycin, and so on.

  17. PROPERTIES OF PROTEOLYTIC TOXIN OF VIBRIO ANGUILLARUM FROM DISEASED FLOUNDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫照兰; 陈师勇; 张培军

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular products (ECP) produced by Vibrio anguillarum strain M3 originally isolated from diseased flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) were prepared. ECP of M3 showed g elatinase, casinase, amylase and haemolytic activity on agarose plates. High protease activity against azocasin w as detected. Bacterium M3 showed highest growth and protease activity at 25℃. The protease present in ECP showed maximal activity at pH 8 and 55℃; was completely inactivated by application of 80℃ heat for 30 min; was com pletely inhibited by EDTA and HgCl2, and was partially inhibited by PMSF, SDS, MnCl2 and iodoacetic acid; but not inhibited by CaCl2 and MgCl2. The ECP was toxic to flounder fish at LD50 values of 3.1 μg prot ein /g body weight. The addition of HgCl2 and application of heat at 50℃ decreased the lethal toxicity of ECP. When heate d at 100℃, ECP lethality to flounder was completely inhibited. After intramuscular injection of ECP into flo under, it showed evident histopathological changes including necrosis of muscle, extensive deposition of haemosiderin in the spleen, dilated blood vessels congested with numerous lymphocytes in the liver. These re sults showed that ECP protease was a lethal factor produced by the bacterium V. anguillarum M3.

  18. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from retail shrimps in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengadesh eLetchumanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine and estuarine bacterium that has been the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks which leads to a significant threat to human health worldwide. Consumption of seafood contaminated with Vibrio parahaemolyticus causes acute gastroenteritis in individuals. The bacterium poses two main virulence factor including the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh which is a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans and TDH-related hemolysin (trh, which plays a similar role as thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh in the disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains in shrimps purchased from wetmarkets and supermarkets. The toxR-based PCR assay indicated that a total of 57.8% (185/320 isolates were positive for V. parahaemolyticus. Only 10% (19/185 toxR-positive isolate exhibit the TDH-related hemolysin (trh gene and none of the isolates were tested positive for thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh. The MAR index was measured for 14 common antimicrobial agents. The results indicated 98% of the isolates were highly susceptible to imipenem, ampicillin sulbactam (96%, chloramphenicol (95%, trimethoprim-sulfamet (93%, gentamicin (85%, levofloxacin (83% and tetracycline (82%. The chloramphenicol (catA2 and kanamycin (aphA-3 resistance genes were detected in the resistant V. parahaemolyticus isolates. Our results demonstrate that shrimps are contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus, some of which carry the trh-gene thus being potential to cause food borne illness. The occurrence of multidrug resistance strains in the environment could be an indication of excessive usage of antibiotics in agriculture and aquaculture fields.

  19. A model for signal transduction during quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Suman K.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a framework for analyzing luminescence regulation during quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using a simplified model for signal transduction in the quorum sensing pathway, we identify key dimensionless parameters that control the system's response. These parameters are estimated using experimental data on luminescence phenotypes for different mutant strains. The corresponding model predictions are consistent with results from other experiments which did not serve as input for determining model parameters. Furthermore, the proposed framework leads to novel testable predictions for luminescence phenotypes and for responses of the network to different perturbations.

  20. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    OpenAIRE

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11,...

  1. Hydrolysis of Fish Oil by Olive Oil-Induced Vibrio sp. Lipase

    OpenAIRE

    ANDO, Seiichi; アンドウ, セイイチ; 安藤, 清一

    1991-01-01

    A potent marine bacterium of genus Vibrio for lipase production was isolatedfrom the red tides and tentatively named VB-5.The strain VB-5 showed the optimal production of lipase when cultivated at 20°Cfor 48 hr in a medium composed of casitone, proteose peptone, yeast extract, naturalseawater and olive oil. The lipase activity from the strain VB-5 was enhanced byadding 0.33% olive oil to the medium. The olive oil-induced lipase had an optimalpH of 10 for activity at 25°C. The lipase hydrolyze...

  2. Hydrolysis of Fish Oil by Olive Oil-Induced Vibrio sp. Lipase

    OpenAIRE

    ANDO, Seiichi; アンドウ, セイイチ; 安藤, 清一

    1991-01-01

    A potent marine bacterium of genus Vibrio for lipase production was isolated from the red tides and tentatively named VB-5. The strain VB-5 showed the optimal production of lipase when cultivated at 20°C for 48 hr in a medium composed of casitone, proteose peptone, yeast extract, natural seawater and olive oil. The lipase activity from the strain VB-5 was enhanced by adding 0.33% olive oil to the medium. The olive oil-induced lipase had an optimal pH of 10 for activity at 25...

  3. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup;

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case...... reports; however, it has not been previously noted in Denmark. The authors report a case of septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus in an immunocompromised patient. The disease progressed to severe sepsis and subsequent death within 10 h of admission....

  4. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Skaarup Andersen, Nanna; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case reports; however, it has not been previously noted in Denmark. The authors report a case of septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus in an immunocompromised patient. The disease progressed to severe sepsis and subsequent death within 10 h of admission.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Bacteriophage vB_VpaM_MAR

    OpenAIRE

    Alanis Villa, Argentina; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a major pathogen that is mainly associated with seafood and is a global food safety issue. Our objective was to isolate and completely sequence a specific phage against this bacterium. Phage vB_VpaM_MAR is able to lyse 76% of the V. parahaemolyticus strains tested. MAR belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a genome comprised of double-stranded DNA with a size of 41,351 bp, a G+C content of 51.3%, and 62 open reading frames (ORFs). Bioinformatic analysis showed th...

  6. Isolation and identification among cockle isolates of Vibrio vulnificus isolated from Selangor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdi Al-Dulaimi, Mohammed M.; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd.; Ghani, Ma`aruf Abd.

    2014-09-01

    Vibrio vulnificus infections are worldwide public health problems associated with illnesses resulting from consumption of raw or partially cooked seafood. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and identification of V. vulnificus in cockles from local wet (40) and supermarkets (38) from Selangor, Malaysia from July 2013 to February 2014. A total of 78(n=78) cockle were examined for the presence of V. vulnificus and at about 32% (25/78) cockle samples were positive to this bacterium. Colonies morphological observation and biochemical characterization for those isolates showed 60% (15/78) of isolates were classified as biotype 1 and 40% (10/78) belong to biotype 2.

  7. Dethiosulfovibrio peptidovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a new anaerobic, slightly halophilic, thiosulfate-reducing bacterium from corroding offshore oil wells

    OpenAIRE

    Magot, M; Ravot, G; Campaignolle, X.; Ollivier, Bernard; Patel, B.K.C.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Thomas, P; Crolet, J.L.; Garcia, Jean-Louis

    1997-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic thiosulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from a corroding offshore oil well in Congo and was designated strain SEBR 4207(T). Pure culture of the strain induced a very active pitting corrosion of mild steel, with penetration rates of up to 4 mm per year. This constitutes the first experimental evidence of the involvement of thiosulfate reduction in microbial corrosion of steel. Strain SEBR 4207(T) cells were vibrios (3 to 5 by 1 micrometer), stained gram negative, and p...

  8. An intracellular replication niche for Vibrio cholerae in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Henst, Charles; Scrignari, Tiziana; Maclachlan, Catherine; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a human pathogen and the causative agent of cholera. The persistence of this bacterium in aquatic environments is a key epidemiological concern, as cholera is transmitted through contaminated water. Predatory protists, such as amoebae, are major regulators of bacterial populations in such environments. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between V. cholerae and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at the single-cell level. We observed that V. cholerae can resist intracellular killing. The non-digested bacteria were either released or, alternatively, established a replication niche within the contractile vacuole of A. castellanii. V. cholerae was maintained within this compartment even upon encystment. The pathogen ultimately returned to its aquatic habitat through lysis of A. castellanii, a process that was dependent on the production of extracellular polysaccharide by the pathogen. This study reinforces the concept that V. cholerae is a facultative intracellular bacterium and describes a new host-pathogen interaction.

  9. Genome engineering in Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Skovgaard, Ole; Ducos-Galand, Magaly;

    2012-01-01

    Although bacteria with multipartite genomes are prevalent, our knowledge of the mechanisms maintaining their genome is very limited, and much remains to be learned about the structural and functional interrelationships of multiple chromosomes. Owing to its bi-chromosomal genome architecture and its...... importance in public health, Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has become a preferred model to study bacteria with multipartite genomes. However, most in vivo studies in V. cholerae have been hampered by its genome architecture, as it is difficult to give phenotypes to a specific chromosome....... This difficulty was surmounted using a unique and powerful strategy based on massive rearrangement of prokaryotic genomes. We developed a site-specific recombination-based engineering tool, which allows targeted, oriented, and reciprocal DNA exchanges. Using this genetic tool, we obtained a panel of V. cholerae...

  10. Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides in Vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Destoumieux-Garzón

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrios are associated with a broad diversity of hosts that produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs as part of their defense against microbial infections. In particular, vibrios colonize epithelia, which function as protective barriers and express AMPs as a first line of chemical defense against pathogens. Recent studies have shown they can also colonize phagocytes, key components of the animal immune system. Phagocytes infiltrate infected tissues and use AMPs to kill the phagocytosed microorganisms intracellularly, or deliver their antimicrobial content extracellularly to circumvent tissue infection. We review here the mechanisms by which vibrios have evolved the capacity to evade or resist the potent antimicrobial defenses of the immune cells or tissues they colonize. Among their strategies to resist killing by AMPs, primarily vibrios use membrane remodeling mechanisms. In particular, some highly resistant strains substitute hexaacylated Lipid A with a diglycine residue to reduce their negative surface charge, thereby lowering their electrostatic interactions with cationic AMPs. As a response to envelope stress, which can be induced by membrane-active agents including AMPs, vibrios also release outer membrane vesicles to create a protective membranous shield that traps extracellular AMPs and prevents interaction of the peptides with their own membranes. Finally, once AMPs have breached the bacterial membrane barriers, vibrios use RND efflux pumps, similar to those of other species, to transport AMPs out of their cytoplasmic space.

  11. Vibrios associated with red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum.

    OpenAIRE

    Romalde, J L; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1990-01-01

    Vibrios were isolated from red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum and also throughout the year in the Ria de Pontevedra, Spain. The isolates were grouped into 14 phena by numerical toxonomy. Strains associated with red tides were restricted to four phena: phena I and II were Vibrio alginolyticus, and phena III and IV were Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio anguillarum, respectively. V. anguillarum-like strains (phena V through XI) predominated throughout the year outside the red tide areas. Cytotoxic...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vibrio cholerae serological reagents. 866.3930... cholerae serological reagents. (a) Identification. Vibrio cholerae serological reagents are devices that are used in the agglutination (an antigen-antibody clumping reaction) test to identify Vibrio...

  13. Genomic evidence of adaptive evolution in emergent Vibrio parahaemolyticus ecotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Turner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ubiquitous marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of illness associated with seafood consumption. The emergence of two genetically distinct ecotypes (ST3 and ST36 has led to an alarming increase in the size and frequency of disease outbreaks. We conducted a genomic comparison of 30 V. parahaemolyticus genomes that represent a diverse collection of 15 genetically distinct ecotypes, including newly sequenced representatives of ST3 and ST36, isolated from both clinical and environmental sources. A multistep evolutionary analysis showed that genes associated with sensing and responding to environmental stimuli have evolved under positive selection, identifying examples of convergent evolution between ST3 and ST36. A comparison of predicted proteomes indicated that ST3 and ST36 ecotypes laterally acquired tens of novel genes associated with a variety of functions including dormancy, homeostasis and membrane transport. Genes identified in this study play an apparent role in environmental fitness and may confer cross protection against stressors encountered in the human host. Together, these results show the evolution of stress response is an important genetic mechanism correlated with the recent emergence of the ST3 and ST36 ecotypes.

  14. The pathogenesis, detection and prevention of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhi eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a Gram-negative motile bacterium that inhabits marine and estuarine environments throughout the world, is a major food-borne pathogen that causes life-threatening diseases in humans after the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. The global occurrence of V. parahaemaolyticus accentuates the importance of investigating its virulence factors and their effects on the human host. This review describes the virulence factors of V. parahaemolyticus reported to date, including hemolysin, urease, two type III secretion systems (T3SS and two type VI secretion systems (T6SS, which both cause both cytotoxicity in cultured cells and enterotoxicity in animal models. We describe various types of detection methods, based on virulence factors, that are used for quantitative detection of V. parahaemolyticus in seafood. We also discuss some useful preventive measures and therapeutic strategies for the diseases mediated by V. parahaemolyticus, which can reduce, to some extent, the damage to humans and aquatic animals attributable to V. parahaemolyticus. This review extends our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of V. parahaemolyticus mediated by virulence factors and the diseases it causes in its human host. It should provide new insights for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of V. parahaemolyticus infection.

  15. Effects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Pruzzo, Carla

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio-related infections are increasing worldwide both in humans and aquatic animals. Rise in global sea surface temperature (SST), which is approximately 1 °C higher now than 140 years ago and is one of the primary physical impacts of global warming, has been linked to such increases. In this chapter, major known effects of increasing SST on the biology and ecology of vibrios are described. They include the effects on bacterial growth rate, both in the field and in laboratory, culturability, expression of pathogenicity traits, and interactions with aquatic organisms and abiotic surfaces. Special emphasis is given to the effect of ocean warming on Vibrio interactions with zooplankters, which represent one of the most important aquatic reservoirs for these bacteria. The reported findings highlight the biocomplexity of the interactions between vibrios and their natural environment in a climate change scenario, posing the need for interdisciplinary studies to properly understand the connection between ocean warming and persistence and spread of vibrios in sea waters and the epidemiology of the diseases they cause.

  16. Pathogenicity of Vibrios in Fish: an Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; Norman Y.S. Woo

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio are ubiquitously distributed in the marine environment. Due to the rapid expansion of intensive mariculture and the consequent deterioration of culture conditions, more and more Vibrio spp. have been recognized as pathogenic agents in outbreaks of vibriosis, a serious epizootic disease affecting most wild and farmed fish species worldwide, which has become the most important limiting factor for the development of intensive mariculture industry. Attempts have been made to understand the pathogenicity of vibrios in host fish with the ultimate aim of elucidating the best means for disease control. After an extensive literature survey of the recent advances in the field of fish vibriosis, the pathological changes, virulence factors and associated potential pathogenic mechanisms, transmission routes and related environmental factors involved in outbreak of vibriosis, as well as the controlling strategies are reviewed in the present paper.

  17. Biosynthetic Pathways of Vibrio succinogenes growing with fumarate as terminal electron acceptor and sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, M; Mell, H; Stupperich, E; Kröger, A

    1982-05-01

    1. With fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor and either H2 or formate as donor, Vibrio succinogenes could grow anaerobically in a mineral medium using fumarate as the sole carbon source. Both the growth rate and the cell yield were increased when glutamate was also present in the medium. 2. Glutamate was incorporated only into the amino acids of the glutamate family (glutamate, glutamine, proline and arginine) of the protein. The residual cell constituents were synthesized from fumarate. 3. Pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate, as the central intermediates of most of the cell constituents, were formed through the action of malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase was present in the bacterium suggesting that this enzyme is involved in carbohydrate synthesis. 4. In the absence of added glutamate the amino acids of the glutamate family were synthesized from fumarate via citrate. The enzymes involved in glutamate synthesis were present. 5. During growth in the presence of glutamate, net reducing equivalents were needed for cell synthesis. Glutamate and not H2 or formate was used as the source of these reducing equivalents. For this purpose part of the glutamate was oxidized to yield succinate and CO2. 6. The alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase involved in this reaction was found to use ferredoxin as the electron acceptor. The ferredoxin of the bacterium was reoxidized by means of a NADP-ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Enzymes catalyzing the reduction of NAD, NADP or ferredoxin by H2 or formate were not detected in the bacterium. PMID:7103660

  18. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    In contrast to higher eukaryotes, bacteria are haploid, i.e. they store their genetic information in a single chromosome, which is then duplicated during the cell cycle. If the growth rate is sufficiently low, the bacterium is born with only a single copy of the chromosome, which gets duplicated...... before the bacterium divides. Fast-growing bacteria have overlapping rounds of replication, and can contain DNA corresponding to more than four genome equivalents. However, the terminus region of the chromosome is still present in just one copy after division, and is not duplicated until right before...... the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...

  19. Vibrio ecology - Identifying Environmental Determinants Favorable for the Presence and Transmission of Pathogenic Vibrios

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In a tri-coastal collaborative study, the population densities of vibrios are being determined in the Mississippi Sound, Puget Sound, Chesapeake Bay, and Timbalier...

  20. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  1. Vibrio-Infektionen durch Lebensmittel und Meerwasser. Das Netzwerk VibrioNet stellt sich vor

    OpenAIRE

    Alter, T.; Appel, Bernd; Bartelt, E.; Dieckmann, Ralf; Eichhorn, C.; Erler, R.; Frank, Christina; Gerdts, G.; Gunzer, Florian; Hühn, S.; Neifer, Janina; Oberheitmann, B.; Strauch, Eckhard

    2011-01-01

    Vibrionen sind salzliebende Bakterien, die in Oberflächen- und Küstengewässern sowie Meerestieren weltweit verbreitet sind. In vielen Ländern stellen pathogene Vibrio-Spezies eine der Hauptursachen von bakteriell verursachten Durchfallerkrankungen dar, die durch den Verzehr von kontaminierten Meeresfrüchten und Fischprodukten und durch verseuchtes Trinkwasser hervorgerufen werden. Vibrio-Infektionen könnten auch in unseren Breiten aufgrund der globalen Klimaerwärmung und der Zunahme des weltw...

  2. Highly diverse recombining populations of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves, Kévin; Mosser, Thomas; Aujoulat, Fabien; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Monfort, Patrick; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae are ubiquitous to estuarine and marine environments. These two species found in Mediterranean coastal systems can induce infections in humans. Environmental isolates of V. cholerae (n = 109) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 89) sampled at different dates, stations and water salinities were investigated for virulence genes and by a multilocus sequence-based analysis (MLSA). V. cholerae isolates were all ctxA negative and only one isolate of V. parahaemol...

  3. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2011-01-01

    This review highlighted the following: (i) pathogenic mechanism of the thermostable direct hemolysin produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, especially on its cardiotoxicity, (ii) heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, especially structure–activity relationship of heat-stable enterotoxin, (iii) RNA N-glycosidase activity of Vero toxins (VT1 and VT2) produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, (iv) discovery of Vibrio cholerae O139, (v) ...

  4. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERAE INACTIVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association, or modification of antecedent growth conditions. During the course of investigating a major water-borne Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA inv...

  5. Adhesion of Vibrio cholerae to Granular Starches

    OpenAIRE

    Gancz, Hanan; Niderman-Meyer, Orly; Broza, Meir; Kashi, Yechezkel; Shimoni, Eyal

    2005-01-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by specific serogroups of Vibrio cholerae that are pathogenic to humans. Cholera can become epidemic and deadly without adequate medical care. Appropriate rehydration therapy can reduce the mortality rate from as much as 50% of the affected individuals to

  6. Vibrio cholerae bacteremia associated with gastrectomy.

    OpenAIRE

    Toeg, A; Berger, S A; Battat, A; Hoffman, M.; Yust, I

    1990-01-01

    Bacteremia due to Vibrio cholerae is rare. Each of 15 cases previously reported in the English language literature occurred in the setting of immune deficiency. We describe an instance of non-serogroup O1 V. cholerae septicemia in an otherwise healthy patient. Susceptibility to such infection may have been enhanced by a prior gastrectomy for duodenal ulcer.

  7. Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated in Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanaga, M; Mori, K.; Kaviti, J N

    1982-01-01

    Biological and serological analyses of 272 isolates of Vibrio cholerae O1 from six epidemics and from a few sporadic cases in Kenya were carried out. All of the isolates were identified as V. cholerae biotype E1 Tor, and 210 out of 272 isolates were hemolytic as examined by Feeley's method.

  8. Preventing Maritime Transfer of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaten, Douglas D.; Marano, Nina; Tappero, Jordan W.; Wellman, Michael; Albert, Ryan J.; Hill, Vincent R.; Espey, David; Handzel, Thomas; Henry, Ariel; Tauxe, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    Organisms, including Vibrio cholerae, can be transferred between harbors in the ballast water of ships. Zones in the Caribbean region where distance from shore and water depth meet International Maritime Organization guidelines for ballast water exchange are extremely limited. Use of ballast water treatment systems could mitigate the risk for organism transfer. PMID:23017338

  9. Genetically modified Vibrio harveyi strains as potential bioindicators of mutagenic pollution of marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyz, A.; Jasiecki, J.; Bogdan, A.; Szpilewska, H.; Wegrzyn, G.

    2000-02-01

    For biodetection of mutagenic pollution of marine environments, an organism naturally occurring in these habitats should be used. The authors found that marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may be an appropriate bioindicator of mutagenic pollution. For positive selection of mutants, they developed a simple method for isolation of V. harveyi mutants resistant to neomycin. The authors constructed genetically modified V. harveyi strains that produce significantly more neomycin-resistant mutants upon treatment with low concentrations of mutagens than the wild-type counterpart. The sensitivity of the mutagenicity test with the V. harveyi strains is at least comparable to (if not higher than) that of the commonly used Ames test, which uses Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Therefore, the authors consider that the V. harveyi strains described in this report could be used as potential bioindicators of mutagenic pollution of marine environments.

  10. Vibrio vulnificus produces quorum sensing signals of the AHL-class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, E.; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Nielsen, Kristian Fog;

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is an aquatic pathogenic bacterium that can cause vibriosis in humans and fish. The species is subdivided into three biotypes with the fish-virulent strains belonging to biotype 2. The quorum sensing (QS) phenomenon mediated by furanosyl borate diester or autoinducer 2 (AI-2) has...... been described in human strains of biotype 1, and here we show that the luxS gene which encodes AI-2 is present in all strains of V. vulnificus regardless of origin, biotype or serovar. In this study, we also demonstrate that V. vulnificus produces QS signals of the acylated homoserine lactone (AHL......) class (AI-1). AHLs were detected in strains of biotype 1 and 2 from water, fish and human wound infections but not in strains isolated from human septicaemic cases. The AHL compound was identified as N-butanoyl-homoserine-lactone (C4-HL) by both reporter strains and by HPLC-high-resolution MS. C4-HL...

  11. Recreational swimmers' exposure to Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kristi S; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobs, John M; He, Xin; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous in the marine-estuarine environment, but the magnitude of human non-ingestion exposure to these waterborne pathogens is largely unknown. We evaluated the magnitude of dermal exposure to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus among swimmers recreating in Vibrio-populated waters by conducting swim studies at four swimming locations in the Chesapeake Bay in 2009 and 2011. Volunteers (n=31) swam for set time periods, and surface water (n=25) and handwash (n=250) samples were collected. Samples were analyzed for Vibrio concentrations using quantitative PCR. Linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate factors associated with recreational exposures. Mean surface water V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus concentrations were 1128CFUmL(-1) (95% confidence interval (CI): 665.6, 1591.4) and 18CFUmL(-1) (95% CI: 9.8, 26.1), respectively, across all sampling locations. Mean Vibrio concentrations in handwash samples (V. vulnificus, 180CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 136.6, 222.5); V. parahaemolyticus, 3CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 2.4, 3.7)) were significantly associated with Vibrio concentrations in surface water (V. vulnificus, pHandwashing reduced V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus on subjects' hands by approximately one log (93.9%, 89.4%, respectively). It can be concluded that when Chesapeake Bay surface waters are characterized by elevated concentrations of Vibrio, swimmers and individuals working in those waters could experience significant dermal exposures to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, increasing their risk of infection. PMID:25454225

  12. Development of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for detection of Vibrio tubiashii targeting the metalloprotease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Dima N; Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Häse, Claudia C

    2009-03-01

    Vibrio tubiashii has recently re-emerged as a pathogen of bivalve larvae, causing a marked increase in the mortality of these species within shellfish rearing facilities. This has resulted in substantial losses of seed production and thus created the need for specific as well as sensitive detection methods for this pathogen. In this project, quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers were developed and optimized based upon analysis of the V. tubiashii vtpA gene sequence, encoding a metalloprotease known to cause larval mortality. Standard curves were developed utilizing dilutions of known quantities of V. tubiashii cells that were compared to colony forming unit (CFU) plate counts. The assay was optimized for detection of vtpA with both lab-grown V. tubiashii samples and filter-captured environmental seawater samples seeded with V. tubiashii. In addition, the primers were confirmed to specifically detect only V. tubiashii when tested against a variety of non-target Vibrio species. Validation of the assay was completed by analyzing samples obtained from a shellfish hatchery. The development of this rapid and sensitive assay for quantitative detection of V. tubiashii will accurately determine levels of this bacterium in a variety of seawater samples, providing a useful tool for oyster hatcheries and a method to assess the presence of this bacterium in the current turbulent ocean environment.

  13. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Leung Ng

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives.

  14. NMR-based microbial metabolomics and the temperature-dependent coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Vizcaino, Maria I; Meyers, Alexander; Pollock, Elizabeth C; Huynh, Sara Lien; Schock, Tracey B; Morris, Pamela J; Bearden, Daniel W

    2009-10-15

    Coral bleaching occurs when the symbioses between coral animals and their zooxanthellae is disrupted, either as part of a natural cycle or as the result of unusual events. The bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus (type strain ATCC BAA-450) has been linked to coral disease globally (for example in the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Great Barrier Reef) and like many other Vibrio species exhibits a temperature-dependent pathogenicity. The temperature-dependence of V. corallillyticus in regard to its metabolome was investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of methanol-water extracts of intracellula rmetabolites (endometabolome) from multiple samples of the bacteria cultured into late stationary phase at 27 degrees C (virulent form) and 24 degrees C (avirulent form). The spectra were subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and significant temperature-based separations in PC1, PC2, and PC3 dimensions were observed. Betaine, succinate, and glutamate were identified as metabolites that caused the greatest temperature-based separations in the PC scores plots. With increasing temperature, betaine was shown to be down regulated, while succinate and glutamate were up regulated.

  15. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai-Leung; Perez, Lark; Cong, Jianping; Semmelhack, Martin F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives. PMID:22761573

  16. Isolation and characterization of Vibrio ( Listonella) anguillarum from catfish

    OpenAIRE

    Rad, Mehrnaz; Shahsavani, Davar

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum was isolated from several organs of some aquarium catfish in a fish population with high mortality. Macroscopic examination of the affected catfish revealed ascites in the abdomen, site-petechiae, and dorsal erection. Although there are some variations in phenotypic characterization among different isolates of Vibrio anguillarum, the majority show a common biochemical profile with distinct microscopic appearance that can provide presumptive identification of Vibrio anguilla...

  17. Phylogeny of Vibrio cholerae Based on recA Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Stine, O. Colin; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Gou, Qing; Zheng, Siqen; Morris, J. Glenn; Johnson, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    We sequenced a 705-bp fragment of the recA gene from 113 Vibrio cholerae strains and closely related species. One hundred eighty-seven nucleotides were phylogenetically informative, 55 were phylogenetically uninformative, and 463 were invariant. Not unexpectedly, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus strains formed out-groups; we also identified isolates which resembled V. cholerae biochemically but which did not cluster with V. cholerae. In many instances, V. cholerae serogroup desig...

  18. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios.

    OpenAIRE

    Makemson, J C

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration....

  19. Highly diverse recombining populations of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eEsteves

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae are ubiquitous to estuarine and marine environments. These two species can induce infections in humans. Therefore understanding the structure and dynamics of non-pandemic environmental populations in temperate regions, such as Mediterranean coastal systems, is important if we are to evaluate the risks of infection to humans.Environmental isolates of V. cholerae (n=109 and V. parahaemolyticus (n=89 sampled at different dates, stations and water salinities were investigated for virulence genes and by a multilocus sequence-based analysis (MLSA. V. cholerae isolates were all ctxA negative and only one isolate of V. parahaemolyticus displayed trh2 gene. Most Sequence Types (ST corresponded to unique ST isolated at one date or one station. Frequent recombination events were detected among different pathogenic species, V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae, Vibrio mimicus and Vibrio metoecus. Recombination had a major impact on the diversification of lineages. The genetic diversity assessed by the number of ST/strain was higher in low salinity conditions for V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae whereas the frequency of recombination events in V. cholerae was lower in low salinity. Mediterranean coastal lagoon systems housed V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus with genetic diversities equivalent to the worldwide diversity described so far. The presence of STs found in human infections as well as the frequency of recombination events in environmental vibrios populations could predict a potential epidemiological risk.

  20. Genome assortment, not serogroup, defines Vibrio cholerae pandemic strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brettin, Thomas S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bruce, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Detter, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Cliff S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Munik, A C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Choi, Seon Y [SEOUL NATL. UNIV.; Haley, Bradd J [U. MARYLAND; Taviani, Elisa [U. MARYLAND; Jeon, Yoon - Seong [INTL. VACCINE INST. SEOUL; Kim, Dong Wook [INTL. VACCINE INST. SEOUL; Lee, Jae - Hak [SEOUL NATL. UNIV.; Walters, Ronald A [PNNL; Hug, Anwar [NATL. INST. CHOLERIC ENTERIC DIS.; Colwell, Rita R [U. MARYLAND

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a bacterium autochthonous to the aquatic environment, and a serious public health threat. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is responsible for the previous two cholera pandemics, in which classical and El Tor biotypes were dominant in the 6th and the current 7th pandemics, respectively. Cholera researchers continually face newly emerging and re-emerging pathogenic clones carrying combinations of new serogroups as well as of phenotypic and genotypic properties. These genotype and phenotype changes have hampered control of the disease. Here we compare the complete genome sequences of 23 strains of V. cholerae isolated from a variety of sources and geographical locations over the past 98 years in an effort to elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms governing genetic diversity and genesis of new pathogenic clones. The genome-based phylogeny revealed 12 distinct V. cholerae phyletic lineages, of which one, designated the V. cholerae core genome (CG), comprises both O1 classical and EI Tor biotypes. All 7th pandemic clones share nearly identical gene content, i.e., the same genome backbone. The transition from 6th to 7th pandemic strains is defined here as a 'shift' between pathogenic clones belonging to the same O1 serogroup, but from significantly different phyletic lineages within the CG clade. In contrast, transition among clones during the present 7th pandemic period can be characterized as a 'drift' between clones, differentiated mainly by varying composition of laterally transferred genomic islands, resulting in emergence of variants, exemplified by V.cholerae serogroup O139 and V.cholerae O1 El Tor hybrid clones that produce cholera toxin of classical biotype. Based on the comprehensive comparative genomics presented in this study it is concluded that V. cholerae undergoes extensive genetic recombination via lateral gene transfer, and, therefore, genome assortment, not serogroup, should be used to

  1. Vibrio cholerae Infection of Drosophilamelanogaster Mimics the Human Disease Cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholera, the pandemic diarrheal disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae, continues to be a major public health challenge in the developing world. Cholera toxin, which is responsible for the voluminous stools of cholera, causes constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase, resulting in the export of ions into the intestinal lumen. Environmental studies have demonstrated a close association between V. cholerae and many species of arthropods including insects. Here we report the susceptibility of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to oral V. cholerae infection through a process that exhibits many of the hallmarks of human disease: (i death of the fly is dependent on the presence of cholera toxin and is preceded by rapid weight loss; (ii flies harboring mutant alleles of either adenylyl cyclase, Gsalpha, or the Gardos K channel homolog SK are resistant to V. cholerae infection; and (iii ingestion of a K channel blocker along with V. cholerae protects wild-type flies against death. In mammals, ingestion of as little as 25 mug of cholera toxin results in massive diarrhea. In contrast, we found that ingestion of cholera toxin was not lethal to the fly. However, when cholera toxin was co-administered with a pathogenic strain of V. cholerae carrying a chromosomal deletion of the genes encoding cholera toxin, death of the fly ensued. These findings suggest that additional virulence factors are required for intoxication of the fly that may not be essential for intoxication of mammals. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time the mechanism of action of cholera toxin in a whole organism and the utility of D. melanogaster as an accurate, inexpensive model for elucidation of host susceptibility to cholera.

  2. Mechanistic Insights Into Filamentous Phage Integration In Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabatosh eDas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5’-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5’-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the

  3. Occurrence, Diversity, and Pathogenicity of Halophilic Vibrio spp. and Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae from Estuarine Waters along the Italian Adriatic Coast

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Elena; Falzano, Loredana; Fiorentini, Carla; Pianetti, Anna; Baffone, Wally; Fabbri, Alessia; Matarrese, Paola; Casiere, Annarita; Katouli, Mohammad; Kühn, Inger; Möllby, Roland; Bruscolini, Francesca; Donelli, Gianfranco

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence, diversity, and pathogenicity of Vibrio spp. were investigated in two estuaries along the Italian Adriatic coast. Vibrio alginolyticus was the predominant species, followed by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, non-O1 Vibrio cholerae, and Vibrio vulnificus. By using a biochemical fingerprinting method, all isolates were grouped into nine phenotypes with similarity levels of 75 to 97.5%. The production of toxins capable of causing cytoskeleton-dependent changes was detected in a large num...

  4. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  5. Antibiotic-Resistant Vibrios in Farmed Shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Albuquerque Costa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined in 100 strains of Vibrio isolated from the Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp and identified phenotypically. A high antibiotic-resistance index (75% was observed, with the following phenotypic profiles: monoresistance (n=42, cross-resistance to β-lactams (n=20 and multiple resistance (n=13. Plasmid resistance was characterized for penicillin (n=11, penicillin + ampicillin (n = 1, penicillin + aztreonam (n = 1, and ampicillin (n = 1. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs by the other strains (n=86 was possibly mediated by chromosomal genes. The findings of this study support the conclusion that the cultured shrimps can be vehicles of vibrios resistant to β-lactam and tetracycline.

  6. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, K Y; Ma, L; Wong, S S; Ng, W F

    1993-01-01

    A patient who succumbed to fulminant necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela after injury by a rabbitfish is described. Despite the absence of any known underlying illness, he did not respond to appropriate antibiotic therapy and radical surgical intervention. This represents the first documented case of necrotizing fasciitis due to this organism, and is also the first reported case in Southeast Asia inflicted by rabbitfish.

  7. Towards a phylogeny of the genus Vibrio based on 16S rRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsch, M; Lane, D; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    The inter- and intrageneric relationships of the genus Vibrio were investigated by performing a comparative analysis of the 16S rRNAs of 10 species, including four pathogenic representatives. The results of immunological and 5S rRNA studies were confirmed in that the genus is a neighboring taxon of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With regard to the intrageneric structure, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio natriegens, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio proteolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus form the core of the genus, while Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio diazotrophicus, and Vibrio hollisae are placed on the outskirts of the genus. Variable regions around positions 80, 180, and 450 could be used as target sites for genus- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction primers to be used in molecular identification.

  8. Genetic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Troy P; Chao, Michael C; Abel, Sören; Blondel, Carlos J; Abel Zur Wiesch, Pia; Zhou, Xiaohui; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-05-31

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide and a blight on global aquaculture. This organism requires a horizontally acquired type III secretion system (T3SS2) to infect the small intestine, but knowledge of additional factors that underlie V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity is limited. We used transposon-insertion sequencing to screen for genes that contribute to viability of V. parahaemolyticus in vitro and in the mammalian intestine. Our analysis enumerated and controlled for the host infection bottleneck, enabling robust assessment of genetic contributions to in vivo fitness. We identified genes that contribute to V. parahaemolyticus colonization of the intestine independent of known virulence mechanisms in addition to uncharacterized components of T3SS2. Our study revealed that toxR, an ancestral locus in Vibrio species, is required for V. parahaemolyticus fitness in vivo and for induction of T3SS2 gene expression. The regulatory mechanism by which V. parahaemolyticus ToxR activates expression of T3SS2 resembles Vibrio cholerae ToxR regulation of distinct virulence elements acquired via lateral gene transfer. Thus, disparate horizontally acquired virulence systems have been placed under the control of this ancestral transcription factor across independently evolved human pathogens. PMID:27185914

  9. Enterotoxin production by Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus grown in continuous culture with microbial cell recycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Spira, W M; Fedorka-Cray, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the effect of complete cell recycle on the production of cholera toxin (CT) by Vibrio cholerae and CT-like toxin by Vibrio mimicus in continuous culture fermentations. Complete cell recycle was obtained by filtering culture fluids through Amicon hollow fibers with an exclusion limit of 100,000 daltons (H1P100-20) and returning the concentrated cell slurry to the fermentor. A single 1-liter laboratory fermentor system modified with this recycle loop was capable of producing ov...

  10. A VIBRIO ANGUILIARUM STRAIN ASSOCIATED WITH SKIN ULCER ON CULTURED FLOUNDER, PARALICHTHYS OLIVACEUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫照兰; 谭训刚; 徐永立; 张培军

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of a bacterium strain M3, isolated from cultured flounder Paralichthys chthys olivacues with remarkable external sign of skin ulcer during an epizoctic outbreak, indicated that the bacterium belonged to the species Vibrio anguillarum. Challenge by I.M. ( intramuscular injection),bath, and oral administration with M3 showed that it was highly pathogenic for Paralichthys olivacues.The LD50 dose was 5.144×103 CFU/per fish infection by I.M. injection. Recovered inoculated bacteria from the surviving fish revealed that the asymptomatic carriers could be a latent contagious source. Study of the effect of bacterial culture CFS (cell-free-supernatant) showed that the exotoxins produced by M3 play an important role in its pathogenicity for flounder. The resistance of M3 to 36 out of 41 antibiotics indicated that the bacterial disease outbreak was mainly attributable to the frequent and excessive use of anfimicroblal agents; and that vaccination would be an effective precaution against bacterial disease.

  11. A VIBRIO ANGUILLARUM STRAIN ASSOCIATED WITH SKIN ULCER ON CULTURED FLOUNDER, PARALICHTHYS OLIVACEUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫照兰; 谭训刚; 徐永立; 张培军

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of a bacterium strain M3, isolated from cultured flounder Paralichthys olivaceus with remarkable external sign of skin ulcer during an epizootic outbreak, indicated that the bacterium belonged to the species Vibrio anguillarum. Challenge by I.M. ( intramuscular injection), bath, and oral administration with M3 showed that it was highly pathogenic for Paralichthys olivacues. The LD50 dose was 5. 144 × 103 CFU/per fish infection by I.M. injection. Recovered inoculated bacteria from the surviving fish revealed that the asymptomatic carriers could be a latent contagious source. Study of the effect of bacterial culture CFS (cell-free-supernatant) showed that the exotoxins produced by M3 play an important role in its pathogenicity for flounder. The resistance of M3 to 36 out of 41 antibiotics indicated that the bacterial disease outbreak was mainly attributable to the frequent and excessive use of antimicrobial agents; and that vaccination would be an effective precaution against bacterial disease.

  12. Vibrio cholerae O139 in Thailand in 1994.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodhidatta, L.; Echeverria, P; Hoge, C W; Pitarangsi, C; Serichantalergs, O; Henprasert-Tae, N.; Harikul, S.; Kitpoka, P.

    1995-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O139 first appeared in India and Bangladesh in 1992. Surveillance for O139 was started at three hospitals in Thailand in 1993. By 1994 all three hospitals surveyed in Thailand had experienced an increase in Vibrio cholerae O139 infections.

  13. Vibrio cholerae non-serogroup O1 cystitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Dumler, J.S.; Osterhout, G J; Spangler, J G; Dick, J D

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who developed cystitis caused by non-serogroup O1 Vibrio cholerae after swimming in the Chesapeake Bay. Treatment was empirical, with complete symptomatic resolution. Genitourinary tract infections by Vibrio spp. are uncommon but should be considered when cystitis occurs after saltwater exposure in appropriate geographic regions.

  14. Mar Piccolo of Taranto: Vibrio biodiversity in ecotoxicology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narracci, M; Acquaviva, M I; Cavallo, R A

    2014-02-01

    Microorganisms play an indispensable role in the ecological functioning of marine environment. Some species are sensitive while others are insensitive for a specific pollutant. The aim of this work is a preliminary study of the quantitative and qualitative distribution of cultivable vibrios in sediments and water samples characterized by different toxicity levels. For 1 year, in three suitably selected sampling stations of Mar Piccolo in Taranto (Ionian Sea, Italy), we have evaluated the toxicity level by Microtox® system, vibrios, total, and fecal coliform densities. The results of the Microtox® tests showed sediments characterized by an elevated level of toxicity, while the interstitial water of the same sites always showed biostimulatory phenomenon. The quantitative results show that vibrios and coliforms are more abundant in water than in sediment samples. The most often isolated strains were: Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio mediterranei, Vibrio metschinkovii, and Vibrio splendidus II. This work is the first example of study on the distribution of Vibrio species related to toxicity evaluation conducted by the Microtox® bioassay. The results show the different distribution of Vibrionaceae in two environmental matrices analyzed and characterized by different levels of toxicity.

  15. Inactivation of Vibrio anguillarum by attached and planktonic Roseobacter cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Paul; Melchiorsen, Jette; Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate inhibition of Vibrio by Roseobacter in a combined liquid-surface system. Exposure of Vibrio anguillarum to surface-attached roseobacters (10e7 cfu/cm2) resulted in significant reduction or complete killing of the pathogen inoculated at 10e2 – 10...

  16. Pertinence of indicator organisms and sampling variables to Vibrio concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, E G; Huyn, J H; LaRock, P A

    1994-10-01

    Vibrio-indicator relationships and effects of day, depth, and tidal levels on the density of vibrios enumerated by the most probable number technique were investigated. Counts of vibrios taken monthly from Apalachicola Bay, Fla., were either negatively correlated or showed no correlation with counts of indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, enterococci, fecal coliforms, and total coliforms). Water samples collected on two days from the surface and bottom over a complete tidal cycle on each day were analyzed for differences in vibrio concentrations. Concentrations of vibrios in samples taken on different days, in those taken at different depths, and in those taken at different tidal levels were significantly different, indicating that these factors need to be taken into account in health-related studies.

  17. [THE IDENTIFICATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF BACTERIOPHAGES OF HUMAN PATHOGENIC VIBRIO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaevskaia, N E; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Kachkina, G V

    2015-04-01

    The issue of identification and differentiation of large group of bacteriophages of human pathogenic vibrio is still unresolved. In research and practical applied purposes it is important to consider characteristics of bacteriophages for establishing similarity and differences between them. The actual study was carried out to analyze specimens of DNA-containing bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio. The overwhelming majority of them characterized by complicated type of symmetry--phages with double-helical DNA and also phages with mono-helical DNA structure discovered recently in vibrio. For the first time, the general framework of identification and differentiation of bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio was developed. This achievement increases possibility to establish species assignment of phages and to compare with phages registered in the database. "The collection of bacteriophages and test-strains of human pathogenic vibrio" (No2010620549 of 24.09.210).

  18. Selectivity of Vibrio cholerae H-NOX for Gaseous Ligands Follows “Sliding Scale Rule” Hypothesis: Ligand Interactions with both Ferrous and Ferric Vc H-NOX

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Wen; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2013-01-01

    Vc H-NOX (or VCA0720) is an H-NOX (heme-nitric oxide and oxygen binding) protein from facultative aerobic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It shares significant sequence homology with soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a NO sensor protein commonly found in animals. Similar to sGC, Vc H-NOX binds strongly to NO and CO with affinities of 0.27 nM and 0.77 μM, respectively, but weakly to O2. When positioned in “sliding scale” plot {Tsai, A.-L. et. al. (2012) Biochemistry, 51, pp172-86}, the line connectin...

  19. Climate and infectious disease: use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobitz, B.; Beck, L.; Huq, A.; Wood, B.; Fuchs, G.; Faruque, A. S.; Colwell, R.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992-1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked.

  20. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from retail shrimps in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Yin, Wai-Fong; Lee, Learn-Han; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine and estuarine bacterium that has been the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks which leads to a significant threat to human health worldwide. Consumption of seafood contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus causes acute gastroenteritis in individuals. The bacterium poses two main virulence factor including the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) which is a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance V. parahaemolyticus strains in shrimps purchased from wetmarkets and supermarkets. The toxR-based PCR assay indicated that a total of 57.8% (185/320) isolates were positive for V. parahaemolyticus. Only 10% (19/185) toxR-positive isolate exhibit the trh gene and none of the isolates were tested positive for tdh. The MAR index was measured for 14 common antimicrobial agents. The results indicated 98% of the isolates were highly susceptible to imipenem, ampicillin sulbactam (96%), chloramphenicol (95%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (93%), gentamicin (85%), levofloxacin (83%), and tetracycline (82%). The chloramphenicol (catA2) and kanamycin (aphA-3) resistance genes were detected in the resistant V. parahaemolyticus isolates. Our results demonstrate that shrimps are contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus, some of which carry the trh-gene thus being potential to cause food borne illness. The occurrence of multidrug resistance strains in the environment could be an indication of excessive usage of antibiotics in agriculture and aquaculture fields. PMID:25688239

  1. Survey on antimicrobial resistance patterns in Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 in Germany reveals carbapenemase-producing Vibrio cholerae in coastal waters

    OpenAIRE

    Bier, Nadja; Schwartz, Keike; Guerra, Beatriz; Strauch, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species is expected for waters in Northern Europe as a consequence of global warming. In this context, a higher incidence of Vibrio infections is predicted for the future and forecasts suggest that people visiting and living at the Baltic Sea are at particular risk. This study aimed to investigate antimicrobial resistance patterns among Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 isolates that could pose a public health ...

  2. The Role of Vibrios in Diseases of Corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Colin B

    2015-08-01

    The tissue, skeleton, and secreted mucus of corals supports a highly dynamic and diverse community of microbes, which play a major role in the health status of corals such as the provision of essential nutrients or the metabolism of waste products. However, members of the Vibrio genus are prominent as causative agents of disease in corals. The aim of this chapter is to review our understanding of the spectrum of disease effects displayed by coral-associated vibrios, with a particular emphasis on the few species where detailed studies of pathogenicity have been conducted. The role of Vibrio shilonii in seasonal bleaching of Oculina patagonica and the development of the coral probiotic hypothesis is reviewed, pointing to unanswered questions about this phenomenon. Detailed consideration is given to studies of V. coralliilyticus and related pathogens and changes in the dominance of vibrios associated with coral bleaching. Other Vibrio-associated disease syndromes discussed include yellow band/blotch disease and tissue necrosis in temperate gorgonian corals. The review includes analysis of the role of enzymes, resistance to oxidative stress, and quorum sensing in virulence of coral-associated vibrios. The review concludes that we should probably regard most-possibly all-vibrios as "opportunistic" pathogens which, under certain environmental conditions, are capable of overwhelming the defense mechanisms of appropriate hosts, leading to rapid growth and tissue destruction. PMID:26350314

  3. Vibrio Iron Transport: Evolutionary Adaptation to Life in Multiple Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Shelley M; Mey, Alexandra R; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential element for Vibrio spp., but the acquisition of iron is complicated by its tendency to form insoluble ferric complexes in nature and its association with high-affinity iron-binding proteins in the host. Vibrios occupy a variety of different niches, and each of these niches presents particular challenges for acquiring sufficient iron. Vibrio species have evolved a wide array of iron transport systems that allow the bacteria to compete for this essential element in each of its habitats. These systems include the secretion and uptake of high-affinity iron-binding compounds (siderophores) as well as transport systems for iron bound to host complexes. Transporters for ferric and ferrous iron not complexed to siderophores are also common to Vibrio species. Some of the genes encoding these systems show evidence of horizontal transmission, and the ability to acquire and incorporate additional iron transport systems may have allowed Vibrio species to more rapidly adapt to new environmental niches. While too little iron prevents growth of the bacteria, too much can be lethal. The appropriate balance is maintained in vibrios through complex regulatory networks involving transcriptional repressors and activators and small RNAs (sRNAs) that act posttranscriptionally. Examination of the number and variety of iron transport systems found in Vibrio spp. offers insights into how this group of bacteria has adapted to such a wide range of habitats.

  4. Distribution and ecology of Vibrio vulnificus and other lactose-fermenting marine vibrios in coastal waters of the southeastern United States.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, J D; Warner, R. A.; Cleland, D R

    1982-01-01

    Water, sediment, plankton, and animal samples from five coastal sites from North Carolina to Georgia were sampled for their lactose-fermenting vibrio populations. Over 20% of all vibrios tested were sucrose negative and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) positive, suggesting identification as the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. These vibrios were isolated from all sample sites and sources (water, sediment, plankton, and animals). Correlations with several of 19 environmental para...

  5. Water quality in Lake Xochimilco, Mexico: zooplankton indicators and Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Nandini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lake Xochimilco is a eutrophic water body in Mexico City used by the local population for aquaculture and agriculture. Water level is maintained with inputs of partially treated waste water from the Cerro de la Estrella treatment plant. In this study we analysed the water quality at two sites of Lake Xochimilco, Lake Xaltocan and the Santa Cruz Canal using various indicators such as zooplankton diversity, saprobic indices, bacterial concentrations and physico-chemical variables. Eighty litres of water was filtered from Lake Xochimilco from each site, once a month from March to October of 2012, and the rotifers, cladocerans and copepods were enumerated and identified. Physico-chemical parameters such as temperature, pH, Secchi depth, water depth, nitrogen and phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations, and bacterial densities were measured. During the study we recorded 33 species of rotifers, the most abundant being Brachionus angularis, B. calyciflorus and B. havanaensis.  Among the microcrustaceans the most abundant were the cladoceran Moina micrura and the copepods Acanthocyclops americanus and Arctodiaptomus dorsalis. The species diversity was around 2 bits/ind. and the saprobic index between 1.5-2.0, indicating that both sites were β meso-saprobic.  At both sites nitrogen was <1 mg/L and phosphorus ranged between 2.5-7.8 mg/L. Chlorophyll a concentrations were between 66-136 µg/L. The toxigenic (Vibrio cholerae No-O1/No-O139 and the non-toxigenic (Vibrio cholerae No-O135 strains of the bacterium were recorded, closely associated with littoral rotifers and cladocerans particularly Brachionus quadridentatus and  Alona sp. All variables indicate that these sites in Lake Xochimilco are eutrophic and highly contaminated and that the water quality needs to be improved.

  6. Natural plasmid transformation in a high-frequency-of transformation marine Vibrio strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estuarine bacterium Vibrio strain DI-9 has been shown to be naturally transformable with both broad host range plasmid multimers and homologous chromosomal DNA at average frequencies of 3.5 x 10-9 and 3.4 x 10-7 transformants per recipient, respectively. Growth of plasmid transformants in nonselective medium resulted in cured strains that transformed 6 to 42,857 times more frequently than the parental strain, depending on the type of transforming DNA. These high-frequency-of-transformation (HfT) strains were transformed at frequencies ranging from 1.1 x 10-8 to 1.3 x 10-4 transformants per recipient with plasmid DNA and at an average frequency of 8.3 x 10-5 transformants per recipient with homologous chromosomal DNA. The highest transformation frequencies were observed by using multimers of an R1162 derivative carrying the transposon Tn5 (pQSR50). Probing of total DNA preparations from one of the cured strains demonstrated that no plasmid DNA remained in the cured strains which may have provided homology to the transforming DNA. All transformants and cured strains could be differentiated from the parental strains by colony morphology. DNA binding studies indicated that late-log-phase HfT strains bound [3H]bacteriophage lambda DNA 2.1 times more rapidly than the parental strain. These results suggest that the original plasmid transformation event of strain DI-9 was the result of uptake and expression of plasmid DNA by a competent mutant (HfT strain). Additionally, it was found that a strain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, USFS 3420, could be naturally transformed with plasmid DNA. Natural plasmid transformation by high-transforming mutants may be a means of plasmid acquisition by natural aquatic bacterial populations

  7. Growth of Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa Eltor in freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Marius; Füchslin, Hans Peter; Hammes, Frederik; Egli, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Growth of Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa Eltor was studied with a growth assay in which autoclaved and filtered (0.22 microm) freshwater was inoculated at low cell density (5 x 10(3) cells ml(-1)) and proliferation was followed with flow cytometry. Against the common view, V. cholerae was able to grow extensively in different kinds of freshwater. The bacterium multiplied in river water, lake water and effluent of a wastewater treatment plant up to a cell density of 1.55 x 10(6) cells ml(-1). In these samples, apparent assimilable organic carbon (AOC(app)) concentrations ranged from 52 up to 800 microg l(-1) and the results demonstrate a positive trend between the AOC(app) concentration and final cell concentration, suggesting that AOC was a key parameter governing growth of V. cholerae. No growth was observed in waters (tap and bottled drinking water) containing less than approximately 60 microg AOC(app) l(-1). When pure cultures of V. cholerae were grown on identical lake water at different temperatures (20, 25 and 30 degrees C) the maximum specific growth rates (micromax) achieved were 0.22 h(-1), 0.32 h(-1) and 0.45 h(-1), respectively. In addition, growth was characterized in lake water samples amended with different concentrations of NaCl. The highest micromax of V. cholerae was recorded at moderate salinity levels (5 g NaCl l(-1), micromax=0.84 h(-1)), whereas at 30 g NaCl l(-1) (micromax=0.30 h(-1)) or 0 g NaCl l(-1) (micromax)=0.40 h(-1)) specific growth rates were significantly reduced. In the water tested here, micro(max) of V. cholerae was always around 50 % of that exhibited by a freshwater community of indigenous bacteria enriched from the water sampling site. Direct batch competition experiments between V. cholerae and the lake water bacterial community were performed at different temperatures in which V. cholerae was enumerated in the total community using fluorescent-surface antibodies. In all cases V. cholerae was able to grow and constituted around 10

  8. The anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes are encoded in the chromosome of Vibrio harveyi: a possible evolutionary origin for the pJM1 plasmid-encoded system of Vibrio anguillarum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Hiroaki; Actis, Luis A; Crosa, Jorge H

    2013-02-01

    Many Vibrio anguillarum serotype O1 strains carry 65-kb pJM1-type plasmids harboring genes involved in siderophore anguibactin biosynthesis and transport. The anguibactin system is an essential factor for V. anguillarum to survive under iron-limiting conditions, and as a consequence, it is a very important virulence factor of this bacterium. Our comparative analysis of genomic data identified a cluster harboring homologs of anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes in the chromosome of Vibrio harveyi. We have purified the putative anguibactin siderophore and demonstrated that it is indeed anguibactin by mass spectrometry and specific bioassays. Furthermore, we characterized two genes, angR and fatA, in this chromosome cluster that, respectively, participate in anguibactin biosynthesis and transport as determined by mutagenesis analysis. Furthermore, we found that the V. harveyi FatA protein is located in the outer membrane fractions as previously demonstrated in V. anguillarum. Based on our data, we propose that the anguibactin biosynthesis and transport cluster in the V. anguillarum pJM1 plasmid have likely evolved from the chromosome cluster of V. harveyi or vice versa. PMID:23335587

  9. Antibiotic resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in various countries: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmahdi, Sara; DaSilva, Ligia V; Parveen, Salina

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus are the leading causes of seafood associated infections and mortality in the United States. The main syndromes caused by these pathogens are gastroenteritis, wound infections, and septicemia. This article reviewed the antibiotic resistance profile of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in the United States and other countries including Italy, Brazil, Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, China, India, Iran, South Africa and Australia. The awareness of antimicrobial resistance of these two pathogens is not as well documented as other foodborne bacterial pathogens. Vibrio spp. are usually susceptible to most antimicrobials of veterinary and human significance. However, many studies reported that V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus showed multiple-antibiotic resistance due to misuse of antibiotics to control infections in aquaculture production. In addition, both environmental and clinical isolates showed similar antibiotic resistance profiles. Most frequently observed antibiotic resistance profiles involved ampicillin, penicillin and tetracycline regardless of the countries. The presence of multiple-antibiotic resistant bacteria in seafood and aquatic environments is a major concern in fish and shellfish farming and human health. PMID:27052711

  10. Vitroprocines, new antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii, discovered from marine Vibrio sp. QWI-06 using mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Chen, Pei-Chin; Shih, Chao-Jen; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Lai, Ying-Mi; Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Yang, Yu-Liang

    2015-08-01

    A robust and convenient research strategy integrating state-of-the-art analytical techniques is needed to efficiently discover novel compounds from marine microbial resources. In this study, we identified a series of amino-polyketide derivatives, vitroprocines A-J, from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QWI-06 by an integrated approach using imaging mass spectroscopy and molecular networking, as well as conventional bioactivity-guided fractionation and isolation. The structure-activity relationship of vitroprocines against Acinetobacter baumannii is proposed. In addition, feeding experiments with 13C-labeled precursors indicated that a pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate-dependent mechanism is involved in the biosynthesis of vitroprocines. Elucidation of amino-polyketide derivatives from a species of marine bacteria for the first time demonstrates the potential of this integrated metabolomics approach to uncover marine bacterial biodiversity.

  11. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ToxT reveals a mechanism for fatty acid regulation of virulence genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Michael J.; Skorupski, Karen; Pellegrini, Maria; Chiorazzo, Michael G.; Taylor, Ronald K.; Kull, F. Jon (Dartmouth)

    2010-03-04

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. In order for V. cholerae to cause disease, it must produce two virulence factors, the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT), whose expression is controlled by a transcriptional cascade culminating with the expression of the AraC-family regulator, ToxT. We have solved the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of ToxT, which reveals folds in the N- and C-terminal domains that share a number of features in common with AraC, MarA, and Rob as well as the unexpected presence of a buried 16-carbon fatty acid, cis-palmitoleate. The finding that cis-palmitoleic acid reduces TCP and CT expression in V. cholerae and prevents ToxT from binding to DNA in vitro provides a direct link between the host environment of V. cholerae and regulation of virulence gene expression.

  12. Protection against Vibrio alginolyticus in crimson snapper Lutjanus erythropterus immunized with a DNA vaccine containing the ompW gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shuang-Hu; Lu, Yi-Shan; Jian, Ji-Chang; Wang, Bei; Huang, Yu-Cong; Tang, Ju-Fen; Ding, Yu; Wu, Zao-He

    2013-09-24

    The outer membrane proteins of Vibrio alginolyticus play an important role in the virulence of the bacterium and are potential candidates for vaccine development. In the present study, the ompW gene was cloned, expressed and purified. A DNA vaccine was constructed by inserting the ompW gene into a pcDNA plasmid. Crimson snapper Lutjanus erythropterus (Bloch) were injected intramuscularly with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-ompW. The expression of the DNA vaccine was detected in gill, head kidney, heart, liver, spleen and injection site muscle of crimson snapper by RT-PCR 7 and 28 d post-vaccination. The ELISA results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine produced an observable antibody response in all sera of the vaccinated fish. In addition, crimson snapper immunized with the DNA vaccine showed a relative percentage survival (RPS) of 92.53%, indicating effective protection against V. alginolyticus infection.

  13. Extraintestinal Infections Caused by Non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Goutam; Joshi, Sangeeta; Bhattacharya, Sanjay; Sekar, Uma; Birajdar, Balaji; Bhattacharyya, Arpita; Shinoda, Sumio; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an aerobic, sucrose fermentative Gram-negative bacterium that generally prevails in the environment. Pathogenic V. cholerae is well-known as causative agent of acute diarrhea. Apart from enteric infections, V. cholerae may also cause other diseases. However, their role in causing extraintestinal infections is not fully known as it needs proper identification and evaluation. Four cases of extraintestinal infections due to V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 have been investigated. The isolates were screened for phenotypic and genetic characteristics with reference to their major virulence genes. Serologically distinct isolates harbored rtx, msh, and hly but lacked enteric toxin encoding genes that are generally present in toxigenic V. cholerae. Timely detection of this organism can prevent fatalities in hospital settings. The underlying virulence potential of V. cholerae needs appropriate testing and intervention. PMID:26904017

  14. Enhancement of enterotoxin production by carbon dioxide in Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimamura, T; Watanabe, S; Sasaki, S.

    1985-01-01

    We found that Vibrio cholerae 569B produced much more cholera enterotoxin in the presence of added carbon dioxide than in its absence. An atmosphere of 10% carbon dioxide was optimal for maximal enterotoxin production.

  15. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Vibrio spp. within the Sydney Harbour Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siboni, Nachshon; Balaraju, Varunan; Carney, Richard; Labbate, Maurizio; Seymour, Justin R

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio are a genus of marine bacteria that have substantial environmental and human health importance, and there is evidence that their impact may be increasing as a consequence of changing environmental conditions. We investigated the abundance and composition of the Vibrio community within the Sydney Harbour estuary, one of the most densely populated coastal areas in Australia, and a region currently experiencing rapidly changing environmental conditions. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Vibrio-specific 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approaches we observed significant spatial and seasonal variation in the abundance and composition of the Vibrio community. Total Vibrio spp. abundance, derived from qPCR analysis, was higher during the late summer than winter and within locations with mid-range salinity (5-26 ppt). In addition we targeted three clinically important pathogens: Vibrio cholerae, V. Vulnificus, and V. parahaemolyticus. While toxigenic strains of V. cholerae were not detected in any samples, non-toxigenic strains were detected in 71% of samples, spanning a salinity range of 0-37 ppt and were observed during both late summer and winter. In contrast, pathogenic V. vulnificus was only detected in 14% of samples, with its occurrence restricted to the late summer and a salinity range of 5-26 ppt. V. parahaemolyticus was not observed at any site or time point. A Vibrio-specific 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approach revealed clear shifts in Vibrio community composition across sites and between seasons, with several Vibrio operational taxonomic units (OTUs) displaying marked spatial patterns and seasonal trends. Shifts in the composition of the Vibrio community between seasons were primarily driven by changes in temperature, salinity and NO2, while a range of factors including pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen (DO) and NOx (Nitrogen Oxides) explained the observed spatial variation. Our evidence for the presence of a spatiotemporally dynamic Vibrio community within

  16. Glucose- but not rice-based oral rehydration therapy enhances the production of virulence determinants in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Kühn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT, whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings.

  17. Central role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) in sodium bioenergetics of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuber, Julia; Halang, Petra; Vorburger, Thomas; Steffen, Wojtek; Vohl, Georg; Fritz, Günter

    2014-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that lives in brackish or sea water environments. Strains of V. cholerae carrying the pathogenicity islands infect the human gut and cause the fatal disease cholera. Vibrio cholerae maintains a Na(+) gradient at its cytoplasmic membrane that drives substrate uptake, motility, and efflux of antibiotics. Here, we summarize the major Na(+)-dependent transport processes and describe the central role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR), a primary Na(+) pump, in maintaining a Na(+)-motive force. The Na(+)-NQR is a membrane protein complex with a mass of about 220 kDa that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH to the transport of Na(+) across the cytoplasmic membrane. We describe the molecular architecture of this respiratory complex and summarize the findings how electron transport might be coupled to Na(+)-translocation. Moreover, recent advances in the determination of the three-dimensional structure of this complex are reported.

  18. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amable J. Rivas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role in virulence for homeotherms and poikilotherms. The acquisition of the virulence plasmid pPHDD1 that encodes Dly and HlyApl has likely constituted a main driving force in the evolution of a highly hemolytic lineage within the subspecies. Interestingly, strains that naturally lack pPHDD1 show a strong pathogenic potential for a variety of fish species, indicating the existence of yet uncharacterized virulence factors. Future and deep analysis of the complete genome sequence of P. damselae subsp. damselae will surely provide a clearer picture of the virulence factors employed by this bacterium to cause disease in such a varied range of hosts.

  19. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Amable J; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela) is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin) and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role in virulence for homeotherms and poikilotherms. The acquisition of the virulence plasmid pPHDD1 that encodes Dly and HlyApl has likely constituted a main driving force in the evolution of a highly hemolytic lineage within the subspecies. Interestingly, strains that naturally lack pPHDD1 show a strong pathogenic potential for a variety of fish species, indicating the existence of yet uncharacterized virulence factors. Future and deep analysis of the complete genome sequence of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae will surely provide a clearer picture of the virulence factors employed by this bacterium to cause disease in such a varied range of hosts. PMID:24093021

  20. Epidemiology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus outbreaks, southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, Erika; Matsuda, Luis; Hernández, Cristina; Rioseco, Maria L; Romero, Jaime; González-Escalona, Narjol; Martínez-Urtaza, Jaime; Espejo, Romilio T

    2009-02-01

    Disease outbreaks caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Puerto Montt, Chile, began in 2004 and reached a peak in 2005 at 3,600 clinical cases. Until 2006, every analyzed case was caused by the serovar O3:K6 pandemic strain. In the summer of 2007, only 475 cases were reported; 73% corresponded to the pandemic strain. This decrease was associated with a change in serotype of many pandemic isolates to O3:K59 and the emergence of new clinical strains. One of these strains, associated with 11% of the cases, was genotypically different from the pandemic strain but contained genes that were identical to those found on its pathogenicity island. These findings suggest that pathogenicity-related genes were laterally transferred from the pandemic strain to one of the different V. parahaemolyticus groups comprising the diverse and shifting bacterial population in shellfish in this region. PMID:19193258

  1. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia J Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  2. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  3. VISCOSITY DICTATES METABOLIC ACTIVITY of Vibrio ruber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja eBoric

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment.

  4. Interactions between Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes and the bivalve pathogens Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 and Vibrio splendidus LGP32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, T; Fabbri, R; Cortese, K; Smerilli, A; Ciacci, C; Grande, C; Vezzulli, L; Pruzzo, C; Canesi, L

    2013-12-01

    Marine bivalves can accumulate large numbers of bacteria, in particular Vibrio species, whose persistence in bivalve tissues largely depends on their sensitivity to the bactericidal activity of circulating hemocytes and hemolymph soluble factors. The interactions between vibrios and hemolymph have been investigated, in particular in bivalve species susceptible to infection by certain Vibrio spp. and strains. In this work, the effects of two bivalve pathogens, Vibrio splendidus LGP32 (V.s.) and Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 (V.a.), isolated from oyster mortality outbreaks, on the hemocytes of Mytilus galloprovincialis were investigated. In vitro, V.s., but not V.a., induced a dramatic decrease in lysosomal membrane stability-LMS in the hemocytes; both vibrios induced a moderate lysozyme release, with V.s. > V.a.. The V.s.-induced decrease in LMS was mediated by activation of PI-3Kinase, as shown by use of different kinase inhibitors. TEM analysis showed rapid internalization of both vibrios; however, V.s. lead to cellular and lysosomal damage and was able to survive within the hemocytes, whereas significant killing of V.a. was observed. In vivo, in mussels challenged with either vibrio and sampled at 6, 24 and 96 h post-injection, transient decreases in hemocyte LMS and progressive increases in serum lysozyme activity were observed, with V.s. > V.a.. Moreover, whereas V.a. was efficiently cleared from hemolymph, V.s. showed significant growth, that was maximal at 24 h p.i. when lowest LMS values were recorded in the hemocytes. Both vibrios also induced significant decreases in LMS in the digestive gland, again with V.s. > V.a.. The results indicate distinct interactions between mussel hemocytes and the two vibrio strains tested. The effects of V.s. may be due to the capacity of this strain to interfere with the signaling pathways involved in hemocyte function, thus escaping the bactericidal activity of the host cell, as observed for certain mammalian pathogens

  5. Spatiotemporal dynamics of Vibrio spp. within the Sydney Harbour estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachshon eSiboni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio are a genus of marine bacteria that have substantial environmental and human health importance, and there is evidence that their impact may be increasing as a consequence of changing environmental conditions. We investigated the abundance and composition of the Vibrio community within the Sydney Harbour estuary, one of the most densely populated coastal areas in Australia, and a region currently experiencing rapidly changing environmental conditions. Using Quantitative PCR (qPCR and vibrio-specific 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approaches we observed significant spatial and seasonal variation in the abundance and composition of the Vibrio community. Total Vibrio spp. abundance, derived from qPCR analysis, was higher during the late summer than winter and within locations with mid-range salinity (5-26 ppt. In addition we targeted three clinically important pathogens: V. cholerae, V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus. While toxigenic strains of V. cholerae were not detected in any samples, non-toxigenic strains were detected in 71% of samples, spanning a salinity range of 0-37 ppt and were observed during both late summer and winter. In contrast, pathogenic V. vulnificus was only detected in 14% of samples, with its occurrence restricted to the late summer and a salinity range of 5-26 ppt. V. parahaemolyticus was not observed at any site or time point. A vibrio-specific 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approach revealed clear shifts in Vibrio community composition across sites and between seasons, with several Vibrio Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs displaying marked spatial patterns and seasonal trends. Shifts in the composition of the Vibrio community between seasons were primarily driven by changes in temperature, salinity and NO2, while a range of factors including pH, salinity, Dissolved Oxygen (DO and NOx (Nitrogen Oxides explained the observed spatial variation. Our evidence for the presence of a spatiotemporally dynamic Vibrio

  6. The regulatory network of natural competence and transformation of Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Lo Scrudato

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic bacterium frequently encountered in rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal regions. Within these environmental reservoirs, the bacterium is often found associated with zooplankton and more specifically with their chitinous exoskeleton. Upon growth on such chitinous surfaces, V. cholerae initiates a developmental program termed "natural competence for genetic transformation." Natural competence for transformation is a mode of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria and contributes to the maintenance and evolution of bacterial genomes. In this study, we investigated competence gene expression within this organism at the single cell level. We provide evidence that under homogeneous inducing conditions the majority of the cells express competence genes. A more heterogeneous expression pattern was observable on chitin surfaces. We hypothesize that this was the case due to the heterogeneity around the chitin surface, which might vary extensively with respect to chitin degradation products and autoinducers; these molecules contribute to competence induction based on carbon catabolite repression and quorum-sensing pathways, respectively. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of these two signaling pathways to natural competence in detail using natural transformation assays, transcriptional reporter fusions, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunological detection of protein levels using Western blot analysis. The results illustrate that all tested competence genes are dependent on the transformation regulator TfoX. Furthermore, intracellular cAMP levels play a major role in natural transformation. Finally, we demonstrate that only a minority of genes involved in natural transformation are regulated in a quorum-sensing-dependent manner and that these genes determine the fate of the surrounding DNA. We conclude with a model of the regulatory circuit of chitin-induced natural competence in V. cholerae.

  7. Liquid holding recovery and photoreactivation of the ultraviolet-inactivated vibrios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of liquid holding recovery and photoreactivation of the ultra-violet-inactivated vibrios have been investigated. Photoreactivation was highest (about 80%) for Vibrio cholerae (classical) strains but the liquid holding recovery was highest (about 29%) for Vibrio parahemolyticus ones. Significance of the differences between any two of the four vibrio biotypes in respect of their liquid holding recovery and also photoreactivation was analysed statistically. (auth.)

  8. Characterization of vibrios diversity in the mucus of the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum (Annellida, Polichaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabili, Loredana; Giangrande, Adriana; Pizzolante, Graziano; Caruso, Giorgia; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Vibrios are among the most abundant culturable microbes in aquatic environments. They can be either free-living in the water column or associated with several marine organisms as mutualists, saprophytes, or parasites. In the present study we analysed vibrios abundance and diversity in the mucus of the polychaete Myxicola infundibulum, complementing culture-based with molecular methods. Vibrios reached 4.6 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1) thus representing a conspicuous component of the heterotrophic culturable bacteria. In addition, luminous vibrios accounted for about 60% of the total culturable vibrios in the mucus. The isolates were assigned to: Vibrio gigantis, Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio jasicida, Vibrio crassostreae, Vibrio kanaloae, and Vibrio xuii. Two Vibrio isolates (MI-13 and MI-15) may belong to a new species. We also tested the ability of the Vibrio isolates to grow on M. infundibulum mucus as the sole carbon source. All strains showed appreciable growth in the presence of mucus, leading us to conclude that this matrix, which is abundant and covers the animal entirely, may represent a microcosm and a food source for some bacteria, playing a crucial role in the structuring of a mucus-associated beneficial microbial community. Moreover, the trophic relationship between vibrios and M. infundibulum mucus could be enhanced by the protection that mucus offers to vibrios. The results of this study represent a contribution to the growing evidence for complex and dynamic invertebrate-microbe associations present in nature and highlight the importance of exploring relationships that Vibrio species establish with marine invertebrates.

  9. Integration of a laterally acquired gene into a cell network important for growth in a strain of Vibrio rotiferianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labbate Maurizio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral Gene Transfer (LGT is a major contributor to bacterial evolution and up to 25% of a bacterium's genome may have been acquired by this process over evolutionary periods of time. Successful LGT requires both the physical transfer of DNA and its successful incorporation into the host cell. One system that contributes to this latter step by site-specific recombination is the integron. Integrons are found in many diverse bacterial Genera and is a genetic system ubiquitous in vibrios that captures mobile DNA at a dedicated site. The presence of integron-associated genes, contained within units of mobile DNA called gene cassettes makes up a substantial component of the vibrio genome (1-3%. Little is known about the role of this system since the vast majority of genes in vibrio arrays are highly novel and functions cannot be ascribed. It is generally regarded that strain-specific mobile genes cannot be readily integrated into the cellular machinery since any perturbation of core metabolism is likely to result in a loss of fitness. Results In this study, at least one mobile gene contained within the Vibrio rotiferianus strain DAT722, but lacking close relatives elsewhere, is shown to greatly reduce host fitness when deleted and tested in growth assays. The precise role of the mobile gene product is unknown but impacts on the regulation of outermembrane porins. This demonstrates that strain specific laterally acquired mobile DNA can be integrated rapidly into bacterial networks such that it becomes advantageous for survival and adaptation in changing environments. Conclusions Mobile genes that are highly strain specific are generally believed to act in isolation. This is because perturbation of existing cell machinery by the acquisition of a new gene by LGT is highly likely to lower fitness. In contrast, we show here that at least one mobile gene, apparently unique to a strain, encodes a product that has integrated into central

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Hawaiian Sea Slug Symbiont Vibrio sp. Strain ER1A

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jeanette; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Vibrio are prevalent in the marine environment and are known for forming symbiotic relationships with hosts. Vibrio sp. strain ER1A is a dominant symbiont of the Hawaiian sea slug, Elysia rufescens. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Vibrio sp. ER1A.

  11. Vibrio anguillarum and larval mortality in a California coastal shellfish hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, L H; Blecka, J; Zebal, R

    1978-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum was isolated as a pathogen in the commercial culture of oyster spat at Pigeon Point, Calif. A water-soluble, heat-stable exotoxin extracted from cultures of the vibrio inhibited larval swimming and contributed to larval mortality. Although the vibrio was insensitive to penicillin in standard plate testing, this antibiotic proved useful in preventing mass larval mortalities in the hatchery.

  12. Localization of Vibrio vulnificus infection in dendritic cells and its effects on the cytoskeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-gang; XU Shui-ling; SHAO Ping-yang; BAO Yi; CUI Ge; CAI Yu-jie

    2012-01-01

    Background Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) is an estuarine bacterium that can cause primary septicemia as well as serious wound infections.However,little is known about the mechanisms by which Vv infects dendritic cells (DCs) and its effects on cytoskeleton.In this study,we aimed to investigate the invasion,internalization,and the organelles damage of the cultured dendritic cells (a DC 2.4 strain) during Vv infection.Methods The study model was the cultured DCs infected by a Vv 1.758 strain.Electron microscopy was used to observe the localization of bacteria at the different time points of infection,cell morphology,and the process of organelles changes.The cytoskeleton structure including the microfilaments and the microtubules rearrangement was examined under a fluorescence microscope.Results The Vv were pinocytosised into the DC cells through double-sides,and localized at 1-2 μm of the inner side membrane.It took 1.3,1.9,and 3.4 hours to reach the infection ratio of 25%,50%,and 75%,respectively.Using electron microscopy,the DCs had been observed to have developed chromatin aggregation within 4.0 hours,and significant cytoskeleton structure disruption was noted within 6.0 hours.Conclusion The high lethality of Vv infection may be associated with the direct disruption of the DCs cytoskeleton structure.

  13. Assessment of heavy metals bioavailability and toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri in sediment of the Huelva estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Daniel; Usero, José; Morillo, José

    2016-06-01

    Relationship between toxicity and bioavailable metals in sediments from the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence was analyzed. Toxicity was assessed with Microtox(®) bioassay using a marine luminescent bacterium: Vibrio fischeri. Bioavailable metals were considered as both, acid extractable fraction of BCR procedure and the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier sequential extraction. A bioavailable metals index was calculated to integrate results in a single figure. Toxicity and bioavailable metals showed a similar pattern. Higher levels were found in the estuary than in the littoral (140 TU/g). In Huelva estuary, highest levels were found in the Tinto estuary (5725 TU/g), followed by the Odiel estuary (5100 TU/g) and the Padre Santo Canal (2500 TU/g). Results in this area were well over than those in nearby estuaries. Furthermore, they are similar to or even higher than those in other polluted sediments around the world. Bioavailable metal index showed a stronger correlation with acid extractable fraction of BCR (R(2) = 0.704) than that for the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier (R(2) = 0.661). These results suggest that bioavailable metals are an important source of sediment toxicity in the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence, an area with one of the highest mortality risks of Spain. PMID:27002282

  14. Characterization of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus isolated from oysters and mussels in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Virginia Ribeiro Rojas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine bacterium, responsible for gastroenteritis in humans. Most of the clinical isolates produce thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH encoded by tdh and trh genes respectively. In this study, twenty-three V. parahaemolyticus, previously isolated from oysters and mussels were analyzed by PCR using specific primers for the 16S rRNA and virulence genes (tdh, trh and tlh and for resistance to different classes of antibiotics and PFGE. Nineteen isolates were confirmed by PCR as V. parahaemolyticus. The tlh gene was present in 100% of isolates, the tdh gene was identified in two (10.5% isolates, whereas the gene trh was not detected. Each isolate was resistant to at least one of the nine antimicrobials tested. Additionally, all isolates possessed the blaTEM-116 gene. The presence of this gene in V. parahaemolyticus indicates the possibility of spreading this gene in the environment. Atypical strains of V. parahaemolyticus were also detected in this study.

  15. Vibrio cholerae phosphatases required for the utilization of nucleotides and extracellular DNA as phosphate sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, EmilyKate; Kamp, Heather; Camilli, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate is essential for life, being used in many core processes such as signal transduction and synthesis of nucleic acids. The waterborne agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, encounters phosphate limitation in both the aquatic environment and human intestinal tract. This bacterium can utilize extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a phosphate source, a phenotype dependent on secreted endo- and exonucleases. However, no transporter of nucleotides has been identified in V. cholerae, suggesting that in order for the organism to utilize the DNA as a phosphate source, it must first separate the phosphate and nucleoside groups before transporting phosphate into the cell. In this study, we investigated the factors required for assimilation of phosphate from eDNA. We identified PhoX, and the previously unknown proteins UshA and CpdB as the major phosphatases that allow phosphate acquisition from eDNA and nucleotides. We demonstrated separable but partially overlapping roles for the three phosphatases and showed that the activity of PhoX and CpdB is induced by phosphate limitation. Thus, this study provides mechanistic insight into how V. cholerae can acquire phosphate from extracellular DNA, which is likely to be an important phosphate source in the environment and during infection.

  16. Reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine (Prozac) submitted to ionizing radiation to Vibrio fischeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Dymes R.A.; Garcia, Vanessa S.G.; Vilarrubia, Anna C.S.; Borrely, Sueli I., E-mail: vanessagarcia@usp.br, E-mail: sborrely@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The constant use of pharmaceutical drugs by great part of the population and its continuous input into the environment creates a growing need of investigating its presence, behavior and the effects on aquatic biota, as well as new ways to treat wastewater containing such substances. The fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH) present in the drug Prozac is an active ingredient used in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Generally, these compounds enter the aquatic environment by sewage collectors systems after undergoing prior treatment in sewage treatment plants (STPs) or without any treatment. This study focused on evaluating the reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical FH, under its manipulated formula, for the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It was also evaluated the acute toxicity of the aqueous solution containing the FH after its exposition to ionizing radiation from industrial electron accelerator. It was performed acute toxicity tests lasting 15 minutes, where the average EC (50) of the non-irradiated CF water solution was approximately 0.68 mg L-1. While the CF water solution irradiated with 1 kGy, 2.5 kGy, 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy, presented an average EC(50) 1.63 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.34 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.35 mg.L{sup -1} and 1.80 mg.L{sup -1}, respectively, showing a notable reduction of the acute toxicity for this organism. (author)

  17. Prevalence and distribution of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in finfish from Cochin (south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammanamveetil A.M. Hatha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Finfish samples obtained from four retail outlets in Cochin between June 2009 and June 2010 were investigated for the occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A total of 182 samples were collected and suspect isolates were identified using standard biochemical tests and were further confirmed by a species-specific tlh gene. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 45.1% of samples, with demersal fish being more affected than pelagic species. The bacterium was isolated more frequently from the skin and gills of pelagic fish, while the intestine yielded greater numbers of V. parahaemolyticus in demersal fish. The highest incidence of antibiotic resistance was recorded against ampicillin and streptomycin, followed by carbenicillin, cefpodoxime, cephalothin, colistin and amoxycillin; the lowest was against nalidixic acid, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin. Multiple drug resistance was prevalent among isolates. Although only a fraction of strains are pathogenic for humans, the time-temperature abuse in markets provides ample scope for these strains to multiply to dangerous levels. The multidrug resistant nature of the strains adds to the gravity of the problem. High V. parahaemolyticus incidence rates in market finfish samples from areas in and around Cochin clearly indicates that control measures should be adopted to reduce post-harvest contamination in seafood and time-temperature abuse in markets to diminish the risk of V. parahaemolyticus infection associated with seafood destined for human consumption.

  18. Increased isolation frequency of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from environmental monitoring sites in Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meer T Alam

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the first cholera case in 2010, the disease has spread in epidemic form throughout the island nation of Haiti; as of 2014, about 700,000 cholera cases have been reported, with over 8,000 deaths. While case numbers have declined, the more fundamental question of whether the causative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae has established an environmental reservoir in the surface waters of Haiti remains to be elucidated. In a previous study conducted between April 2012 and March 2013, we reported the isolation of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 from surface waters in the Ouest Department. After a second year of surveillance (April 2013 to March 2014 using identical methodology, we observed a more than five-fold increase in the number of water samples containing culturable V. cholerae O1 compared to the previous year (1.7% vs 8.6%, with double the number of sites having at least one positive sample (58% vs 20%. Both seasonal water temperatures and precipitation were significantly related to the frequency of isolation. Our data suggest that toxigenic V. cholerae O1 are becoming more common in surface waters in Haiti; while the basis for this increase is uncertain, our findings raise concerns that environmental reservoirs are being established.

  19. Observing Chemotaxis in Vibrio fischeri Using Soft Agar Assays in an Undergraduate Microbiology Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy R. DeLoney-Marino

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis, the directed movement of cells towards or away from a chemical, is both an exciting and complicated behavior observed in many bacterial species. Attempting to adequately visualize or demonstrate the chemotaxic response of bacteria in the classroom is difficult at best, with good models to illustrate the concept lacking. The BSL-1 marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri (a.k.a. Aliivibrio fischeri is easy to culture, making it an ideal candidate for experiments in an undergraduate microbiology course. A number of chemoattractants for V. fischeri have been identified, including a variety of sugars, nucleosides, and amino acids (1, 2. Below presents how the soft agar-based chemotaxis assay can be implemented in the undergraduate laboratory. As bacterial cells migrate towards one or more attractants in soft agar, students can directly observe the chemotaxic behavior of V. fischeri without the need to learn complicated techniques or use specialized equipment. Once the bands of bacterial cells are observed, the migration can then be disrupted by the addition of excess attractant to the soft agar, thereby visualizing what happens once cells are no longer in a gradient of attractant. In addition, soft agar plates lacking attractants can be used to visualize the random movements of bacterial cells that are non-chemotaxing. These exercises can be used in the microbiology laboratory to help students understand the complex behavior of bacterial chemotaxis.

  20. Inhibition of Vibrio anguillarum by Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2, a possible probiotic treatment of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Spanggaard, Bettina;

    1999-01-01

    To study the possible use of probiotics in fish farming, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antagonism of antibacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AH2 against the fish- pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. As iron is important in virulence and bacterial interactions, the effect....... fluorescens AH2 inhibited the growth of V. anguillarum during coculture, independently of the iron concentration, when the initial count of the antagonist was 100 to 1,000 times greater that of the fish pathogen. These in vitro results were successfully repeated in vivo. A probiotic effect in vivo was tested...... by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss Walbaum) to P. fluorescens AH2 at a density of 10(5) CFU/ml for 5 days before a challenge with V. anguillarum at 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml for 1 h. Some fish were also exposed to P. fluorescens AH2 at 10(7) CFU/ml during the 1-h infection. The combined probiotic...

  1. Determinants governing ligand specificity of the Vibrio harveyi LuxN quorum-sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, release and receptor-driven detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi exclusively detects the autoinducer N-((R)-3-hydroxybutanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OH-C4 HSL) via the two-component receptor LuxN. To discover the principles underlying the exquisite selectivity LuxN has for its ligand, we identified LuxN mutants with altered specificity. LuxN uses three mechanisms to verify that the bound molecule is the correct ligand: in the context of the overall ligand-binding site, His210 validates the C3 modification, Leu166 surveys the chain-length and a strong steady-state kinase bias imposes an energetic hurdle for inappropriate ligands to elicit signal transduction. Affinities for the LuxN kinase on and kinase off states underpin whether a ligand will act as an antagonist or an agonist. Mutations that bias LuxN to the agonized, kinase off, state are clustered in a region adjacent to the ligand-binding site, suggesting that this region acts as the switch that triggers signal transduction. Together, our analyses illuminate how a histidine sensor kinase differentiates between ligands and exploits those differences to regulate its signaling activity.

  2. Reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine (Prozac) submitted to ionizing radiation to Vibrio fischeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The constant use of pharmaceutical drugs by great part of the population and its continuous input into the environment creates a growing need of investigating its presence, behavior and the effects on aquatic biota, as well as new ways to treat wastewater containing such substances. The fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH) present in the drug Prozac is an active ingredient used in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Generally, these compounds enter the aquatic environment by sewage collectors systems after undergoing prior treatment in sewage treatment plants (STPs) or without any treatment. This study focused on evaluating the reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical FH, under its manipulated formula, for the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It was also evaluated the acute toxicity of the aqueous solution containing the FH after its exposition to ionizing radiation from industrial electron accelerator. It was performed acute toxicity tests lasting 15 minutes, where the average EC (50) of the non-irradiated CF water solution was approximately 0.68 mg L-1. While the CF water solution irradiated with 1 kGy, 2.5 kGy, 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy, presented an average EC(50) 1.63 mg.L-1, 2.34 mg.L-1, 2.35 mg.L-1 and 1.80 mg.L-1, respectively, showing a notable reduction of the acute toxicity for this organism. (author)

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIUM TOMATO STEM CANKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goner A. Shaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseased tomato samples were collected from green house was evaluated for isolation, pathogenicity and biochemical tests. The symptoms of the infected tomato plants were as sudden wilting after curled on leaves and necrotic streak regions developed at the crown and base of the stem and the cavities deepen and expand up and down, brown discoloration and necrosis occurring on xylem and phloem vasculer. All of ages of tomato plant were susceptible to bacteria when the weather condition favorable and immediately, seen collapse symptom on tomato plant at once fail and die. The bacterium was isolated from diseased plant in all regions on nutrient Agar; a yellow bacterium was isolated from infected tomato plant in green houses and fields in Abu-Ghraib, Rashiedia and Qanat Al-Geiaysh nurseries in Baghdad provinces of Iraq. The bacterium was found gram positive, rod-shaped, non-motile and capable an aerobic growth and based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics revealed that this bacterium belongs to: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. (smith pathogenicity and hypersensitivity of the bacterium Cmm showed the disease index were 18.33, 6.66, 16.66, 5, 0% for tomato seedlings were inoculated treatments as the wounding roots, without wounding roots, crown of the stem, petiole and control respectively.

  4. High Prevalence of Vibrio cholerae Non-O1 Carrying Heat-Stable-Enterotoxin-Encoding Genes among Vibrio Isolates from a Temperate-Climate River Basin of Central Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Caldini, G.; Neri, A.; Cresti, S; Boddi, V.; Rossolini, G. M.; Lanciotti, E.

    1997-01-01

    Vibrio spp. of clinical interest from the Arno River basin (Tuscany, Italy) were investigated in this study. Vibrios were isolated from 70% of water samples. Vibrio cholerae non-O1 was the most prevalent species (82% of isolates), followed by Vibrio mimicus (10%) and Vibrio metschnikovii (8%). Recovery of vibrios was correlated with temperature, pH, and various indicators of municipal pollution. None of the 150 Vibrio isolates carried ctx-related genomic sequences, whereas 18 (14.6%) of the 1...

  5. Isolation and characterization of five lytic bacteriophages infecting a Vibrio strain closely related to Vibrio owensii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan-Ping; Gong, Ting; Jost, Günter; Liu, Wen-Hua; Ye, De-Zan; Luo, Zhu-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Vibrio owensii is a potential bacterial pathogen in marine aquaculture system. In this study, five lytic phages specific against Vibrio strain B8D, closely related to V. owensii, were isolated from seawater of an abalone farm. The phages were characterized with respect to morphology, genome size, growth phenotype, as well as thermal, and pH stability. All phages were found to belong to the family Siphoviridae with long noncontractile tails and terminal fibers. Restriction analysis indicated that the five phages were dsDNA viruses with molecular weights ranging from c. 30 to 48 kb. One-step growth experiments revealed that the phages were heterogeneous in latent periods (10-70 min), rise periods (40-70 min), and burst sizes [23-331 plaque-forming units (PFU) per infected cell] at the same host strain. All phages were thermal stable and were tolerant to a wide range of pH. The results indicated that these phages could be potential candidates of a phage cocktail for biological control of V. owensii in aquaculture systems.

  6. Relationship of aquatic environmental factors with the abundance of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio mimicus and Vibrio vulnificus in the coastal area of Guaymas, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Robles, A; Acedo Félix, E; Gomez-Gil, B; Quiñones Ramírez, E I; Nevárez-Martínez, M; Noriega-Orozco, L

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Vibrio are common in aquatic environments. Among them are V. cholerae, V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. mimicus. Several studies have shown that environmental factors, such as temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen, are involved in their epidemiology. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to determine if there is a correlation between the presence/amount of V. cholerae, V, vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. mimicus and the environmental conditions of the seawater off the coast of Guaymas, México. Quantification of all four pathogenic bacteria was performed using the most probable number method, and suspected colonies were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations were found using principal component analysis. V. parahaemolyticus was the most abundant and widely distributed bacteria, followed by V. vulnificus, V. mimicus and V. cholerae. Positive correlations between V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. mimicus with temperature, salinity, electric conductivity, and total dissolved solids were found. The abundance of V. cholerae was mainly affected by the sampling site and not by physicochemical parameters.

  7. Dynamics in genome evolution of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rachana; Das, Bhabatosh; Balakrish Nair, G; Basak, Surajit

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of the acute secretary diarrheal disease cholera, is still a major public health concern in developing countries. In former centuries cholera was a permanent threat even to the highly developed populations of Europe, North America, and the northern part of Asia. Extensive studies on the cholera bug over more than a century have made significant advances in our understanding of the disease and ways of treating patients. V. cholerae has more than 200 serogroups, but only few serogroups have caused disease on a worldwide scale. Until the present, the evolutionary relationship of these pandemic causing serogroups was not clear. In the last decades, we have witnessed a shift involving genetically and phenotypically varied pandemic clones of V. cholerae in Asia and Africa. The exponential knowledge on the genome of several representatives V. cholerae strains has been used to identify and analyze the key determinants for rapid evolution of cholera pathogen. Recent comparative genomic studies have identified the presence of various integrative mobile genetic elements (IMGEs) in V. cholerae genome, which can be used as a marker of differentiation of all seventh pandemic clones with very similar core genome. This review attempts to bring together some of the important researches in recent times that have contributed towards understanding the genetics, epidemiology and evolution of toxigenic V. cholerae strains.

  8. Insights into Bacteriophage Application in Controlling Vibrio Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Goh, Bey-Hing; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however, this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non-antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages - viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria - are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy. PMID:27486446

  9. Investigation of household contamination of Vibrio cholerae in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Zenat Zebin; Farhana, Israt; Tulsiani, Suhella;

    The role of in-house transmission on the incidence of Vibrio cholerae, the deadly waterborne pathogen, is still not developed. The aim of the current study was to investigate possible contamination routes in household domain for effective cholera control in Bangladesh. To examine the prevalence...... and water supply may be the reason behind this relatively high presence of virulence factors in food plates and water pots. Direct exposure routes of disease transmission should be a major consideration in cholera prevention policies. Investigation of household contamination of Vibrio cholerae in Bangladesh........ Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305215719_Investigation_of_household_contamination_of_Vibrio_cholerae_in_Bangladesh [accessed Oct 14, 2016]....

  10. Insights into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengadesh Letchumanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages - viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy.

  11. Insights into Bacteriophage Application in Controlling Vibrio Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Goh, Bey-Hing; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however, this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non-antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages – viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy. PMID:27486446

  12. Long-term effects of ocean warming on vibrios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzzo, C.; Pezzati, E.; Brettar, I.; Reid, P. C.; Colwell, R.; Höfle, M. G.; vezzulli, L.

    2012-12-01

    Vibrios are a major source of human disease, play an important role in the ecology and health of marine animals and are regarded as an abundant fraction of culturable bacteria of the ocean. There has been a considerable global effort to reduce the risk of Vibrio infections and yet in most countries both human and non-human illnesses associated with these bacteria are increasing. The cause of this increase is not known, but since vibrios are strongly thermodependant there is good reason to believe that global warming may have contributed. To investigate this possibility we examined historical samples from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) archive using advanced molecular analysis and pyrosequencing. For the first time we were able to recover environmental DNA from CPR samples that had been stored for up to ~50 years in a formalin-fixed format, which is suitable for molecular analyses of the associated prokaryotic community. To overcome the problem of DNA degradation due to the sample age and storage in formalin we develop an unbiased index of abundance for Vibrio quantification in CPR samples termed a 'relative Vibrio Abundance Index' (VAI). VAI is defined as the ratio of Vibrio spp. cells to total bacterial cells assessed by Real-Time PCR using genus-specific and universal primers, respectively, producing small amplicons of similar size (~100bp). We assessed VAI index on 55 samples (each representing 10 nautical miles tow equal to 3 m3 of filtered sewater) collected in August by the CPR survey in the North Sea from off the Rhine and Humber estuaries between 1961 to 2005 showing that the genus Vibrio has increased in prevalence in the last 44 years and that this increase is correlated significantly, during the same period, with warming sea surface temperature. In addition, by applying deep sequencing analysis of a subset of these samples we provide evidence that bacteria belonging to the genus Vibrio, including the human pathogen V. cholerae, not only increased

  13. Microflora of urogenital tract in pregnancy with asymptomatic bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article contains results of research interrelationship from colonization of vagina and urinary tract diseases. E.coli one of the main factors in development asymptomatic bacterium. Presented high effects of penicillin medicaments and nitrofurans in treatment of asymptomatic bacterium

  14. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  15. Characterization of tryptophanase from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuidate, Taiyeebah; Tansila, Natta; Chomchuen, Piraporn; Phattaranit, Phattiphong; Eangchuan, Supachok; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme responsible for the production of indole, an important intra- and interspecies signaling molecule in bacteria. In this study, the tnaA gene of Vibrio cholerae coding for VcTrpase was cloned into the pET-20b(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) tn5:tnaA. Using Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) chromatography, VcTrpase was purified, and it possessed a molecular mass of ∼49 kDa with specific absorption peaks at 330 and 435 nm and a specific activity of 3 U/mg protein. The VcTrpase had an 80 % homology to the Trpase of Haemophilus influenzae and E. coli, but only around 50 % identity to the Trpase of Proteus vulgaris and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The optimum conditions for the enzyme were at pH 9.0 and 45 °C. Recombinant VcTrpase exhibited analogous kinetic reactivity to the EcTrpase with K m and k cat values of 0.612 × 10(-3) M and 5.252 s(-1), respectively. The enzyme catalyzed S-methyl-L-cysteine and S-benzyl-L-cysteine degradation, but not L-phenylalanine and L-serine. Using a site-directed mutagenesis technique, eight residues (Thr52, Tyr74, Arg103, Asp137, Arg230, Lys269, Lys270, and His463) were conserved for maintaining enzyme catalysis. All amino acid substitutions at these sites either eliminated or remarkably diminished Trpase activity. These sites are thus potential targets for the design of drugs to control the V. cholerae Trpase and to further investigate its functions.

  16. Vibrio plantisponsor sp. nov., a diazotrophic bacterium isolated from a mangrove associated wild rice (Porteresia coarctata Tateoka)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rameshkumar, N.; Gomez-Gil, B.; Sproer, C.; Lang, E.; Kumar, N.D.; Krishnamurthi, S.; Nair, S.; Roque, A.

    . Kumar, K. Tamura, M. Nei, MEGA3: integrated software for molecular evolutionary genetics analysis and sequence alignment, Brief. Bioinform. 5 (2004) 150–163. [27] M.A. Lambert, F. W. Hickman-Brenner, J. J. Farmer III, W. Moss, Differentiation..., National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune- 411 007, India 3 CIAD, A.C. Mazatlan Unit for Aquaculture and Environmental Management. AP 711, Mazatlan, Sinaloa. Mexico 82000 4 DSMZ – Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen...

  17. The light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri possesses a homolog of the Vibrio cholerae transmembrane transcriptional activator ToxR.

    OpenAIRE

    Reich, K A; Schoolnik, G K

    1994-01-01

    A cross-hybridizing DNA fragment to Vibrio cholerae toxR was cloned from the nonpathogenic light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri, and three proteins homologous to V. cholerae ToxR, ToxS, and HtpG were deduced from its DNA sequence. V. fischeri ToxR was found to activate a V. cholerae ToxR-regulated promoter, and an antiserum raised against the amino-terminal domain of V. cholerae ToxR cross-reacts V. fischeri ToxR.

  18. Resistencia a antibioticos y presencia de plasmidos en: Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio fluvialis y Vibrio furnissii, aislados de Carassius auratus auratus

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar Negrete Redondo; Jorge Romero Jarero; José Luis Arredondo Figueroa

    2004-01-01

    Se aislaron e identificaron 70 cepas bacterianas del riñón de peces de ornato Carassius auratus con signos y lesiones de infección. Las especies bacterianas aisladas e identificadas, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio fluvialis y Vibrio furnissii, han sido descritas como causantes de diarrea en humano y como patógeno muy agresivo en cultivos de Ciprinus carpio. Por esta razón se ha hecho mal uso y abuso de antibióticos para evitar y controlar la presencia de esta bacteria en los cultivos. El uso fu...

  19. Vibrio salilacus sp. nov., a new member of the Anguillarum clade with six alleles of the 16S rRNA gene from a saline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Can; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive, facultatively aerobic bacterium, strain DSG-S6T, was isolated from Dasugan Lake (salinity 3.1%, w/w), China. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain DSG-S6T were non-spore-forming, slightly bent rods, and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Growth occurred in the presence of 0-7.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.0%), at 4-35 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and at pH 6.0-10.5 (optimum, pH 8.0-8.5). C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c were the major fatty acids. Six alleles of the 16S rRNA gene sharing 98.9-99.9  % similarity were detected in strain DSG-S6T, which showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Vibrio aestuarianus ATCC 35048T (97.7 %), then to Vibrio pacinii LMG 19999T (97.6%) and Vibrio metschnikovii CIP 69.14T (96.8%). Multilocus sequence analysis of four housekeeping genes and 16S rRNA genes clearly clustered it as a member of the Anguillarum clade. Mean DNA-DNA relatedness between strain DSG-S6T and V. aestuarianus NBRC 15629T, V. pacinii CGMCC 1.12557T and V. metschnikovii JCM 21189T was 20.6 ± 2.3, 38.1 ± 3.5 and 24.2 ± 2.8%, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 46.8 mol% (Tm). Based on the data, it is concluded that strain DSG-S6T represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio salilacus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DSG-S6T ( = CGMCC 1.12427T = JCM 19265T).

  20. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc.

  1. Use of phages to control Vibrio splendidus infection in the juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jiancheng; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Lili; Cao, Zhenhui; Xu, Yongping

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we isolated 3 bacteriophages with the ability to control Vibrio splendidus, a bacterium known to cause disease in the juvenile sea cucumber. These bacteriophages were designated as vB_VspS_VS-ABTNL-1 (PVS-1), vB_VspS_VS-ABTNL-2 (PVS-2) and vB_VspS_VS-ABTNL-3 (PVS-3). The ability of the 3 phages to inhibit the growth of V. splendidus VS-ABTNL was tested in vitro using each of the 3 phages individually or in the form of a cocktail of all 3 phages in the proportion of 1:1:1. All treated cultures produced a significant (P  0.05). The levels of nitric oxide synthase and acid phosphatase of sea cucumbers fed phage-containing diets were significantly (P  0.05) were detected among the 4 phage-fed treatments. An additional study was conducted in which 60 healthy sea cucumbers (23 ± 2 g) were randomly assigned to a control, an untreated group and a test group to investigate the effects of injecting phages by coelomic injection on the survival rate and enzyme activities in the coelomic fluid of the sea cucumbers. The control was injected with 1 ml of sterilized seawater while the untreated group and the test group were injected with the same volume of V. splendidus-ABTNL culture (3 × 10(5) CFU/mL). Then, the test group was injected with 1 ml of the 3 phage cocktail (MOI = 10). After 48 h, the activities of lysozyme, acid phosphatase and superoxide dismutase were elevated in the untreated group while the levels of these enzymes in the test group were similar to the blank control. After 10-day observation, the survival rate of the sea cucumber was 100% for the blank control, 80% for the test group and 20% for the negative control. The overall results of this experiment indicate that phage therapy increased the survival of sea cucumber infected with V. splendidus VS-ABTNL. The above results demonstrate that using phages, especially a combination of different phages, may be a feasible way to control Vibrio infection in the sea cucumber

  2. Quorum Sensing Enhances the Stress Response in Vibrio cholerae▿

    OpenAIRE

    Joelsson, Adam; Kan, Biao; Jun ZHU

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae lives in aquatic environments and causes cholera. Here, we show that quorum sensing enhances V. cholerae viability under certain stress conditions by upregulating the expression of RpoS, and this regulation acts through HapR, suggesting that a quorum-sensing-enhanced stress response plays a role in V. cholerae environmental survival.

  3. Highly Potent, Chemically Stable Quorum Sensing Agonists for Vibrio Cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Lark J; Karagounis, Theodora K.; Hurley, Amanda; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2013-01-01

    In the Vibrio cholerae pathogen, initiation of bacterial quorum sensing pathways serves to suppress virulence. We describe herein a potent and chemically stable small molecule agonist of V. cholerae quorum sensing, which was identified through rational drug design based on the native quorum sensing signal. This novel agonist may serve as a useful lead compound for the control of virulence in V. cholerae.

  4. Phage specific for Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal.

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, M J; Bhuiyan, N A; Rahman, A; Ghosh, A. N.; Hultenby, K; Weintraub, A; Nahar, S; Kibriya, A K; Ansaruzzaman, M; Shimada, T

    1996-01-01

    From the stool of a Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal-infected patient, a phage that specifically lysed capsulated V. cholerae O139 strains only was isolated. The phage is useful for the confirmatory diagnosis of V. cholerae O139 infection and for the differentiation of variants that lack the capsule.

  5. Nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae Septicemia in an Immunocompromised Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Kamran Kadkhoda; Heather Adam; Gilmour, Matthew W.; Hammond, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    We report a recent case of non-O1, non-O139, nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae septicemia in a post-liver-transplant immunocompromised patient associated with prior seafood consumption. Non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae strains have been reported in several cases of extraintestinal infections and seem to be emerging infectious agents especially in patients with immunocompromising conditions.

  6. Genome sequence of the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae Amazonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, C.C.; Marin, M.A.; Dias, G.M.; Dutilh, B.E.; Edwards, R.A.; Iida, T.; Thompson, F.L.; Vicente, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 Amazonia is a pathogen that was isolated from cholera-like diarrhea cases in at least two countries, Brazil and Ghana. Based on multilocus sequence analysis, this lineage belongs to a distinct profile compared to strains from El Tor and classical biotypes. The genomic analysis rev

  7. Survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 on fomites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhana, Israt; Hossain, Zenat Zebin; Tulsiani, Suhella Mohan;

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the contamination sources of cholera causing bacteria, Vibrio cholerae, are water and food, but little is known about the transmission role of the fomites (surfaces that can carry pathogens) commonly used in households. In the absence of appropriate nutrients or growth...

  8. Biofilm recruitment of Vibrio cholerae by matrix proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperthuy, Marylise; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-11-01

    The appearance of bacterial biofilms involves secretion of polysaccharides and proteins that form an extracellular matrix embedding the bacteria. Proteases have also been observed, but their role has remained unclear. Smith and co-workers have now found that proteolysis can contribute to further recruitment of bacteria to Vibrio cholerae biofilms.

  9. New tetracycline resistance determinant on R plasmids from Vibrio anguillarum.

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, T.; Satoh, T.; Kitao, T.

    1987-01-01

    Two classes of tetracycline resistance determinants on R plasmids were detected in Vibrio anguillarum strains isolated from ayu (sweat fish; Plecoglossus altivelis) farms in Japan. Tetracycline resistance genes categorized as class B were prevalent from 1973 to 1977; however, a new tetracycline resistance gene, which was not classified into tetracycline resistance determinant class A, B, C, or D, has been prevalent since 1981.

  10. Molecular analysis of the emergence of pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, EF; Cohen, AL; Naughton, LM;

    2008-01-01

    Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is abundant in the aquatic environment particularly in warmer waters and is the leading cause of seafood borne gastroenteritis worldwide. Prior to 1995, numerous V. parahaemolyticus serogroups were associated with disease, however, in that year an O3:K6 serogrou...

  11. Outbreak of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Sequence Type 120, Peru, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Gavilan, Ronnie G.; Toro, Magaly; Zamudio, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, an outbreak of Vibrio parahaemolyticus occurred in Piura, Cajamarca, Lambayeque, and Lima, Peru. Whole-genome sequencing of clinical and environmental samples from the outbreak revealed a new V. parahaemolyticus clone. All the isolates identified belonged to a single clonal complex described exclusively in Asia before its emergence in Peru. PMID:27315090

  12. Sequence determination of rRNA genes of pathogenic Vibrio species and whole-cell identification of Vibrio vulnificus with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, R; Ludwig, W; Amann, R I; Schleifer, K H

    1994-04-01

    A comparative analysis of seven new 16S rRNA gene sequences of pathogenic Vibrio species with previously published vibrio sequences confirmed that Vibrio vulnificus represents a group that is not closely related to the core organisms of the genus Vibrio. In addition, we found that V. vulnificus, Listonella (Vibrio) anguillarum and Vibrio diazotrophicus branch off separately from the core group. A comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of V. vulnificus strains belonging to biotypes 1 and 2 revealed that the sequences of all but four biotype 1 strains were identical to each other but slightly different (17 bases) from the sequences of the rest of the V. vulnificus strains investigated. In addition, the sequences of variable regions of the 23S rRNA genes of Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio furnissii, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio cholerae, and V. vulnificus C7184 and TW1 were determined, aligned, and compared with all available bacterial 23S rRNA sequences in order to search for specific target sites. As a result, four oligonucleotide probes specific for V. vulnificus were synthesized, and the specificities of these probes were evaluated by dot blot hybridization to membrane-bound RNAs from 21 V. vulnificus strains, 13 strains belonging to other Vibrio species, 61 strains belonging to species that are members of the alpha, beta, and gamma subclasses of the Proteobacteria, and 3 eucaryotic microorganisms. Two probes hybridized with all of the V. vulnificus strains tested, and the other two probes distinguished V. vulnificus biotype 1 strains from all other organisms. In situ identification of V. vulnificus by using tetramethylrhodamine- or fluorescein-labelled oligonucleotides is now possible.

  13. Occurrence and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species in the aquatic environments of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamari eKokashvili

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the more than 70 different Vibrio species inhabiting marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, 12 are recognized as human pathogens. The warm subtropical climate of the Black Sea coastal area and inland regions of Georgia likely provides a favorable environment for various Vibrio species. From 2006 to 2009, the abundance, ecology, and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species were studied in different locations in Georgia and across seasons. Over a 33-month period, 1,595 presumptive Vibrio isolates were collected from the Black Sea (n=657 and freshwater lakes around Tbilisi (n=938. Screening of a subset of 440 concentrated and enriched water samples by PCR-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS detected the presence of DNA from eight clinically important Vibrio species: V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi, V. metschnikovii, and V. cincinnatiensis. Almost ninety percent of PCR/ESI-MS samples positive for Vibrio species were collected from June through November. Three important human pathogenic Vibrio species (V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus were detected in 62.8%, 37.8%, and 21.4% of samples testing positive for vibrios, respectively. The results of these activities suggest that natural reservoirs for human-pathogenic Vibrios exist in Georgian aquatic environments. Water temperature at all sampling sites was positively correlated with the abundance of clinically important Vibrio spp. (except V. metschnikovii and salinity was correlated with species composition at particular Black Sea sites as well as inland reservoirs.

  14. Household Transmission of Vibrio cholerae in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Sugimoto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae infections cluster in households. This study's objective was to quantify the relative contribution of direct, within-household exposure (for example, via contamination of household food, water, or surfaces to endemic cholera transmission. Quantifying the relative contribution of direct exposure is important for planning effective prevention and control measures.Symptom histories and multiple blood and fecal specimens were prospectively collected from household members of hospital-ascertained cholera cases in Bangladesh from 2001-2006. We estimated the probabilities of cholera transmission through 1 direct exposure within the household and 2 contact with community-based sources of infection. The natural history of cholera infection and covariate effects on transmission were considered. Significant direct transmission (p-value<0.0001 occurred among 1414 members of 364 households. Fecal shedding of O1 El Tor Ogawa was associated with a 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 0.9%-22.8% risk of infection among household contacts through direct exposure during an 11-day infectious period (mean length. The estimated 11-day risk of O1 El Tor Ogawa infection through exposure to community-based sources was 2.5% (0.8%-8.0%. The corresponding estimated risks for O1 El Tor Inaba and O139 infection were 3.7% (0.7%-16.6% and 8.2% (2.1%-27.1% through direct exposure, and 3.4% (1.7%-6.7% and 2.0% (0.5%-7.3% through community-based exposure. Children under 5 years-old were at elevated risk of infection. Limitations of the study may have led to an underestimation of the true risk of cholera infection. For instance, available covariate data may have incompletely characterized levels of pre-existing immunity to cholera infection. Transmission via direct exposure occurring outside of the household was not considered.Direct exposure contributes substantially to endemic transmission of symptomatic cholera in an urban setting. We provide the first estimate of

  15. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariisa, Ankunda T; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  16. Proteolysis of virulence regulator ToxR is associated with entry of Vibrio cholerae into a dormant state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Almagro-Moreno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI, a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL, and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC. Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state.

  17. Design of Vibrio 16S rRNA Gene Specific Primers and Their Application in the Analysis of Seawater Vibrio Community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; YANG Guanpin; WANG Hualei; CHEN Jixiang; SHI Xianming; ZOU Guiwei; WEI Qiwei; SUN Xiuqin

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic species of genus Vibrio cause vibriosis, one of the most prevalent diseases of maricultured animals and seafood consumers. Monitoring their kinetics in the chain of seafood production, processing and consumption is of great importance for food and mariculture safety. In order to enrich Vibrio-representing 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) fragments and identify these bacteria further real-timely and synchronously among bacterial flora in the chain, a pair of primers that selectively amplify Vibrio 16S rDNA fragments were designed with their specificities and coverage testified in the analysis of seawater Vibrio community. The specificities and coverage of two primers, VF169 and VR744, were determined theoretically among bacterial 16S rDNAs available in GenBank by using BLAST program and practically by amplifying Vibrio 16S rDNA fragments from seawater DNA. More than 88.3% of sequences in GenBank, which showed identical matches with VR744, belong to Vibrio genus. A total of 33 clones were randomly selected and sequenced. All of the sequences showed their highest similarities to and clustered around those of diverse known Vibrio species. The primers designed are capable of retrieving a wide range of Vibrio 16S rDNA fragments specifically among bacterial flora in seawater, the most important natural environment of seafood cultivation.

  18. Distribution and ecology of Vibrio vulnificus and other lactose-fermenting marine vibrios in coastal waters of the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J D; Warner, R A; Cleland, D R

    1982-12-01

    Water, sediment, plankton, and animal samples from five coastal sites from North Carolina to Georgia were sampled for their lactose-fermenting vibrio populations. Over 20% of all vibrios tested were sucrose negative and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) positive, suggesting identification as the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. These vibrios were isolated from all sample sites and sources (water, sediment, plankton, and animals). Correlations with several of 19 environmental parameters monitored at each site were found for total vibrios. The presence of ONPG-positive, sucrose-negative vibrios was correlated with hydrocarbon levels in the water and, in the case of plankton samples, with salinity. A total of 279 sucrose-negative, ONPG-positive isolates were subjected to numerical taxonomic analysis, which resulted in three major clusters. Cluster I corresponded to and included 11 reference strains of V. vulnificus. Cluster II contained the largest number (133) of isolates, of which the great majority were bioluminescent. Although having a resemblance to V. harveyi, the isolates were ONPG positive and many were H2S positive. Cluster III consisted of strains similar to the group F vibrios (V. fluvialis). Of all of the isolates, 55% were luminescent, of which over 20% were lethal when injected into mice. Problems involved in detecting lactose fermentation among marine vibrios and the potential pathogenicity of these organisms are discussed.

  19. Induction of the lateral flagellar system of Vibrio shilonii is an early event after inhibition of the sodium ion flux in the polar flagellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Yael; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the induction of lateral flagella by the action of the sodium channel blocker phenamil, in the marine bacterium Vibrio shilonii, a coral pathogen that causes bleaching. We analyzed the growth and morphology of cells treated with phenamil. A time course analysis showed that after 30 min of exposure to the sodium channel blocker, lateral flagella were present and could be detected by electron microscopy. Detection of the mRNA of the master regulator (lafK) and lateral flagellin (lafA) by RT-PCR confirmed the expression of lateral flagellar genes. We show the simultaneous isolation of polar and, for the first time, lateral flagellar hook-basal bodies. This allowed us to compare the dimensions and morphological characteristics of the 2 structures. PMID:25639364

  20. Vibrio vulnificus phage PV94 is closely related to temperate phages of V. cholerae and other Vibrio species.

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    Mark Pryshliak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1 infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. RESULTS: In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5'-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. CONCLUSION: We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species.

  1. Isolation and molecular identification of Vibrio spp. by sequencing of 16S rDNA from seafood, meat and meat products in Libya

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Azwai; Alfallani, E.A.; S.K. Abolghait; Garbaj, A.M.; Naas, H.T.; Moawad, A.A.; F.T. Gammoudi; Rayes, H.M.; Barbieri, I.; Eldaghayes, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vibrio includes several food-borne pathogens that cause a spectrum of clinical conditions including septicemia, cholera and milder forms of gastroenteritis. Several Vibrio spp. are commonly associated with food-borne transmission including Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus. Microbiological analysis for enumeration and isolation of Vibrio spp. were carried out for a total of 93 samples of seafood, meat and meat products from different geographic localitie...

  2. ANTAGONISM AGAINST VIBRIO CHOLERAE BY BACTERIAL DIFFUSIBLE COMPOUND IN THE FECAL MICROBIOTA OF RODENTS

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    Simone Helena da Silva

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In an ex vivo agar plate assay, we monitored the appearance of an inhibitory halo against Vibrio cholerae from the feces of Wistar and Fischer rats aged 10 to 42 days. The frequency of Wistar rats showing halo increased from 0% (10 days to a maximum of 80.0% (29 days and then decreased to 53.3% (42 days. A similar pattern was obtained with Fischer rats but with a lower intensity (maximum frequency of 50.0% by day 36. In a separate experiment, when Wistar rats were fed a low-protein diet for 7 days, the inhibitory halo decreased drastically. Three apparently different colony morphologies were isolated from the dominant fecal microbiota: a facultative anaerobe (FAN and two strict anaerobes (SAN. The ex vivo inhibitory test showed a halo around the feces of germfree mice monoassociated with the FAN bacterium or one of the SAN bacterium but not of the germfree ones. After oral challenge of all groups with V. cholerae, a permissive and a drastic barrier effects were observed in mice with FAN and SAN associated bacteria, respectively. The FAN and one SAN bacteria used in the in vivo challenges were identified as Escherichia coli and Streptococcus intermedius, respectively. The potent antagonism developed by the rat intestinal microbiota against V. cholerae seems to be due, in part, to diffusible compounds and this phenomenon depends apparently on age, strain and nutrition of the animals. These preliminary results also suggest that this effect was due to more than one bacterial component at any given moment.O aparecimento de halo de inibição contra o Vibrio cholerae a partir das fezes de ratos Wistar e Fischer nas idades de 10 a 42 dias foi observado usando um teste ex vivo em placa. A frequência de ratos Wistar apresentando halo aumentou de 0% (10 dias até um máximo de 80,0% (29 dias antes de decair para 53,3% (42 dias. Um perfil similar foi obtido com os ratos Fischer mas com valores inferiores (frequência máxima de 50,0% no dia 36. Num

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae associated with flood in Brahamputra River valley, Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Soubhagya K; Vairale, Mohan G; Arya, Neha; Yadav, Priti; Veer, Vijay; Singh, Lokendra; Yadava, Pramod K; Kumar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    Cholera is often caused when drinking water is contaminated through environmental sources. In recent years, the drastic cholera epidemics in Odisha (2007) and Haiti (2010) were associated with natural disasters (flood and Earthquake). Almost every year the state of Assam India witnesses flood in Brahamputra River valley during reversal of wind system (monsoon). This is often followed by outbreak of diarrheal diseases including cholera. Beside the incidence of cholera outbreaks, there is lack of experimental evidence for prevalence of the bacterium in aquatic environment and its association with cholera during/after flood in the state. A molecular surveillance during 2012-14 was carried out to study prevalence, strain differentiation, and clonality of Vibrio cholerae in inland aquatic reservoirs flooded by Brahamputra River in Assam. Water samples were collected, filtered, enriched in alkaline peptone water followed by selective culturing on thiosulfate bile salt sucrose agar. Environmental isolates were identified as V. cholerae, based on biochemical assays followed by sero-grouping and detailed molecular characterization. The incidence of the presence of the bacterium in potable water sources was higher after flood. Except one O1 isolate, all of the strains were broadly grouped under non-O1/non-O139 whereas some of them did have cholera toxin (CT). Surprisingly, we have noticed Haitian ctxB in two non-O1/non-O139 strains. MLST analyses based on pyrH, recA and rpoA genes revealed clonality in the environmental strains. The isolates showed varying degree of antimicrobial resistance including tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. The strains harbored the genetic elements SXT constins and integrons responsible for multidrug resistance. Genetic characterization is useful as phenotypic characters alone have proven to be unsatisfactory for strain discrimination. An assurance to safe drinking water, sanitation and monitoring of the aquatic reservoirs is of utmost importance for

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae associated with flood in Brahamputra River valley, Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Soubhagya K; Vairale, Mohan G; Arya, Neha; Yadav, Priti; Veer, Vijay; Singh, Lokendra; Yadava, Pramod K; Kumar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    Cholera is often caused when drinking water is contaminated through environmental sources. In recent years, the drastic cholera epidemics in Odisha (2007) and Haiti (2010) were associated with natural disasters (flood and Earthquake). Almost every year the state of Assam India witnesses flood in Brahamputra River valley during reversal of wind system (monsoon). This is often followed by outbreak of diarrheal diseases including cholera. Beside the incidence of cholera outbreaks, there is lack of experimental evidence for prevalence of the bacterium in aquatic environment and its association with cholera during/after flood in the state. A molecular surveillance during 2012-14 was carried out to study prevalence, strain differentiation, and clonality of Vibrio cholerae in inland aquatic reservoirs flooded by Brahamputra River in Assam. Water samples were collected, filtered, enriched in alkaline peptone water followed by selective culturing on thiosulfate bile salt sucrose agar. Environmental isolates were identified as V. cholerae, based on biochemical assays followed by sero-grouping and detailed molecular characterization. The incidence of the presence of the bacterium in potable water sources was higher after flood. Except one O1 isolate, all of the strains were broadly grouped under non-O1/non-O139 whereas some of them did have cholera toxin (CT). Surprisingly, we have noticed Haitian ctxB in two non-O1/non-O139 strains. MLST analyses based on pyrH, recA and rpoA genes revealed clonality in the environmental strains. The isolates showed varying degree of antimicrobial resistance including tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. The strains harbored the genetic elements SXT constins and integrons responsible for multidrug resistance. Genetic characterization is useful as phenotypic characters alone have proven to be unsatisfactory for strain discrimination. An assurance to safe drinking water, sanitation and monitoring of the aquatic reservoirs is of utmost importance for

  5. Differential complement activation and susceptibility to human serum bactericidal action by Vibrio species.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The ability of Vibrio vulnificus to resist human serum bactericidal action and to activate human complement was compared with similar cultures of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Both V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus had similar survival rates in sera and were much more resistant to killing than was V. cholerae. In contrast, V. vulnificus activated significantly less serum complement than did V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus. The relative ability of V. vulnificus to surviv...

  6. Determining vaccination frequency in farmed rainbow trout using Vibrio anguillarum O1 specific serum antibody measurements.

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    Lars Holten-Andersen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite vaccination with a commercial vaccine with a documented protective effect against Vibrio anguillarum O1 disease outbreaks caused by this bacterium have been registered among rainbow trout at Danish fish farms. The present study examined specific serum antibody levels as a valid marker for assessing vaccination status in a fish population. For this purpose a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was developed and used to evaluate sera from farmed rainbow trout vaccinated against V. anguillarum O1. STUDY DESIGN: Immune sera from rainbow trout immunised with an experimental vaccine based on inactivated V. anguillarum O1 bacterin in Freund's incomplete adjuvant were used for ELISA optimisation. Subsequently, sera from farmed rainbow trout vaccinated with a commercial vaccine against V. anguillarum were analysed with the ELISA. The measured serum antibody levels were compared with the vaccine status of the fish (vaccinated/unvaccinated as evaluated through visual examination. RESULTS: Repeated immunisation with the experimental vaccine lead to increasing levels of specific serum antibodies in the vaccinated rainbow trout. The farmed rainbow trout responded with high antibody levels to a single injection with the commercial vaccine. However, the diversity in responses was more pronounced in the farmed fish. Primary visual examinations for vaccine status in rainbow trout from the commercial farm revealed a large pool of unvaccinated specimens (vaccination failure rate=20% among the otherwise vaccinated fish. Through serum analyses using the ELISA in a blinded set-up it was possible to separate samples collected from the farmed rainbow trout into vaccinated and unvaccinated fish. CONCLUSIONS: Much attention has been devoted to development of new and more effective vaccines. Here we present a case from a Danish rainbow trout farm indicating that attention should also be directed to the vaccination procedure in

  7. Correlations between Clinical Features and Mortality in Patients with Vibrio vulnificus Infection.

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    Hong Zhao

    Full Text Available Vibrio vulnificus is a common gram-negative bacterium, which might cause morbidity and mortality in patients following consumption of seafood or exposure to seawater in Southeast China. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data of patients with laboratory confirmed V. vulnificus infection. Twenty one patients were divided into a survival group and a non-surviving (or death group according to their clinical outcome. Clinical data and measurements were statistically analyzed. Four patients (19.05% died and five patients gave positive cultures from bile fluid, and 16 other patients gave positive culture from blood or blisters. Ten patients (47.62% had an underlying liver disease and marine-related events were found in sixteen patients (76.2%. Patients with heavy drinking habits might be at increased mortality (p = 0.028. Clinical manifestations of cellulitis (47.6%, septic shock (42.9% and multiple organ failure (28.6% were statistically significant when comparing survivors and non-survivors (p = 0.035, p = 0.021 and p = 0.003, respectively. The laboratory results, including hemoglobin < 9.0 g/L (p = 0.012, platelets < 2.0 × 109 /L, prothrombin time activity (PTA <20%, decreased serum creatinine and increased urea nitrogen were statistically significant (p = 0.012, p = 0.003, p = 0.028 and p = 0.028, respectively. Patients may be at a higher risk of mortality under situations where they have a history of habitual heavy alcoholic drink consumption (p = 0.028, OR = 22.5, 95%CI 1.5-335.3, accompanied with cellulitis, shock, multiple organ failure, and laboratory examinations that are complicated by decreased platelets, hemoglobin and significantly prolonged prothrombin time (PT.

  8. ToxR of Vibrio cholerae affects biofilm, rugosity and survival with Acanthamoeba castellanii

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    Valeru Soni P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio cholerae causes the diarrheal disease cholera and utilizes different survival strategies in aquatic environments. V. cholerae can survive as free-living or in association with zooplankton and can build biofilm and rugose colonies. The bacterium expresses cholera toxin (CT and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP as the main virulence factors. These factors are co-regulated by a transcriptional regulator ToxR, which modulates expression of outer membrane proteins (OmpU and (OmpT. The aims of this study were to disclose the role of ToxR in expression of OmpU and OmpT, biofilm and rugose colony formation as well as in association with the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at different temperatures. Results The toxR mutant V. cholerae produced OmpT, significant biofilm and rugose colonies compared to the wild type that produced OmpU, decreased biofilm and did not form rugoes colonies at 30°C. Interestingly, neither the wild type nor toxR mutant strain could form rugose colonies in association with the amoebae. However, during the association with the amoebae it was observed that A. castellanii enhanced survival of V. cholerae wild type compared to toxR mutant strain at 37°C. Conclusions ToxR does seem to play some regulatory role in the OmpT/OmpU expression shift, the changes in biofilm, rugosity and survival with A. castellanii, suggesting a new role for this regulatory protein in the environments.

  9. RNA thermometer controls temperature-dependent virulence factor expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gregor G; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz; Klose, Karl E

    2014-09-30

    Vibrio cholerae is the bacterium that causes the diarrheal disease cholera. The bacteria experience a temperature shift as V. cholerae transition from contaminated water at lower temperatures into the 37 °C human intestine. Within the intestine, V. cholerae express cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), two main virulence factors required for disease. CT and TCP expression is controlled by the transcriptional activator protein ToxT. We identified an RNA thermometer motif in the 5' UTR of toxT, with a fourU anti-Shine-Dalgarno (SD) element that base pairs with the SD sequence to regulate ribosome access to the mRNA. RNA probing experiments demonstrated that the fourU element allowed access to the SD sequence at 37 °C but not at 20 °C. Moreover, mutations within the fourU element (U5C, U7C) that strengthened base-pairing between the anti-SD and SD sequences prevented access to the SD sequence even at 37 °C. Translation of ToxT-FLAG from the native toxT UTR was enhanced at 37 °C, compared with 25 °C in both Escherichia coli and V. cholerae. In contrast, the U5C, U7C UTR prevented translation of ToxT-FLAG even at 37 °C. V. cholerae mutants containing the U5C, U7C UTR variant were unable to colonize the infant mouse small intestine. Our results reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism consisting of an RNA thermometer that controls temperature-dependent translation of toxT, facilitating V. cholerae virulence at a relevant environmental condition found in the human intestine.

  10. Enumeration of viable non-culturable Vibrio cholerae using propidium monoazide combined with quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Liang, Weili; Kan, Biao

    2015-08-01

    The well-known human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, can enter a physiologically viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state under stress conditions. The differentiation of VBNC cells and nonviable cells is essential for both disease prevention and basic research. Among all the methods for detecting viability, propidium monoazide (PMA) combined with real-time PCR is popular because of its specificity, sensitivity, and speed. However, the effect of PMA treatment is not consistent and varies among different species and conditions. In this study, with an initial cell concentration of 1×10(8) CFU/ml, time and dose-effect relationships of different PMA treatments were evaluated via quantitative real-time PCR using live cell suspensions, dead cell suspensions and VBNC cell suspensions of V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain C6706. The results suggested that a PMA treatment of 20 μM PMA for 20 min was optimal under our conditions. This treatment maximized the suppression of the PCR signal from membrane-compromised dead cells but had little effect on the signal from membrane-intact live cells. In addition to the characteristics of PMA treatment itself, the initial concentration of the targeted bacteria showed a significant negative influence on the stability of PMA-PCR assay in this study. We developed a strategy that mimicked a 1×10(8) CFU/ml cell concentration with dead bacteria of a different bacterial species, the DNA of which cannot be amplified using the real time PCR primers. With this strategy, our optimal approach successfully overcame the impact of low cell density and generated stable and reliable results for counting viable cells of V. cholerae in the VBNC state.

  11. Modeling Analysis of Signal Sensitivity and Specificity by Vibrio fischeri LuxR Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Deanna M; Stabb, Eric V; Hagen, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    The LuxR protein of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri belongs to a family of transcriptional activators that underlie pheromone-mediated signaling by responding to acyl-homoserine lactones (-HSLs) or related molecules. V. fischeri produces two acyl-HSLs, N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL (3OC6-HSL) and N-octanoyl-HSL (C8-HSL), each of which interact with LuxR to facilitate its binding to a "lux box" DNA sequence, thereby enabling LuxR to activate transcription of the lux operon responsible for bioluminescence. We have investigated the HSL sensitivity of four different variants of V. fischeri LuxR: two derived from wild-type strains ES114 and MJ1, and two derivatives of LuxRMJ1 generated by directed evolution. For each LuxR variant, we measured the bioluminescence induced by combinations of C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. We fit these data to a model in which the two HSLs compete with each other to form multimeric LuxR complexes that directly interact with lux to activate bioluminescence. The model reproduces the observed effects of HSL combinations on the bioluminescence responses directed by LuxR variants, including competition and non-monotonic responses to C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. The analysis yields robust estimates for the underlying dissociation constants and cooperativities (Hill coefficients) of the LuxR-HSL complexes and their affinities for the lux box. It also reveals significant differences in the affinities of LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 for 3OC6-HSL. Further, LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 differed sharply from LuxRs retrieved by directed evolution in the cooperativity of LuxR-HSL complex formation and the affinity of these complexes for lux. These results show how computational modeling of in vivo experimental data can provide insight into the mechanistic consequences of directed evolution.

  12. Understanding the Role of Host Hemocytes in a Squid/Vibrio Symbiosis Using Transcriptomics and Proteomics

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    Andrew J. Collins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis between the squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, serves as a model for understanding interactions between beneficial bacteria and animal hosts. The establishment and maintenance of the association is highly specific and depends on the selection of V. fischeri and exclusion of non-symbiotic bacteria from the environment. Current evidence suggests that the host’s cellular innate immune system, in the form of macrophage-like hemocytes, helps to mediate host tolerance of V. fischeri. To begin to understand the role of hemocytes in this association, we analyzed these cells by high-throughput 454 transcriptomic and liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses. 454 high-throughput sequencing produced 650,686 reads totaling 279.9 Mb while LC-MS/MS analyses of circulating hemocytes putatively identified 702 unique proteins. Several receptors involved with the recognition of microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs were identified. Among these was a complete open reading frame (ORF to a putative peptidoglycan recognition protein (EsPGRP5 that has conserved residues for amidase activity. Assembly of the hemocyte transcriptome showed EsPGRP5 had high coverage, suggesting it is among the 5% most abundant transcripts in circulating hemocytes. Other transcripts and proteins identified included members of the conserved NFκB signaling pathway, putative members of the complement pathway, the carbohydrate binding protein galectin, and cephalotoxin. Quantitative PCR of complement-related genes, cephalotoxin, EsPGRP5, and a nitric oxide synthase showed differential expression in circulating hemocytes isolated from adult squid with colonized light organs compared to those for which the symbionts were removed. These data suggest that the presence of the symbiont influences gene expression of the cellular innate immune system of the host.

  13. Prevalences of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in mollusks from the Spanish Mediterranean Coast

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    Carmen eLopez-Joven

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a well-recognized pathogen of humans. To better understand the ecology of the human-pathogenic variants of this bacterium in the environment, a study on the prevalence in bivalves of pathogenic variants (tlh + and tdh+ and/or trh+ versus a nonpathogenic one (only tlh+ as species marker for V. parahaemolyticus, was performed in two bays in Catalonia, Spain. Environmental factors that might affect dynamics of both variants of V. parahaemolyticus were taken into account. The results showed that the global prevalence of total V. parahaemolyticus found in both bays was 14.2% (207/1459. It was, however, significantly dependent on sampling point, campaign (year and bivalve species. Pathogenic variants of V. parahaemolyticus (tdh+ and/or trh+ were detected in 3.8% of the samples (56/1459, meaning that the proportion of bivalves who contained tlh gene were contaminated by pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains is 27.1% (56/207. Moreover, the presence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (trh+ was significantly correlated with water salinity, thus the probability of finding pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus decreased 1.45 times with every salinity unit (ppt increased. Additionally, data showed that V. parahaemolyticus could establish close associations with Ruditapes spp. (P-value < 0.001, which could enhance the transmission of illness to human by pathogenic variants, when clams were eaten raw or slightly cooked.This study provides information on the abundance, ecology and characteristics of total and human-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus variants associated with bivalves cultured in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

  14. A metalloprotease secreted by the type II secretion system links Vibrio cholerae with collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo R; Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Mitchell, Kristie C; Withey, Jeffrey H; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program. PMID:25561716

  15. Marine Lactobacillus pentosus H16 protects Artemia franciscana from Vibrio alginolyticus pathogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, M E; Sequeiros, C; Olivera, N L

    2015-02-10

    Vibrio alginolyticus is an opportunistic pathogen which may affect different aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the probiotic properties and the protective mode of action of Lactobacillus pentosus H16 against V. alginolyticus 03/8525, through in vitro and in vivo studies using Artemia franciscana (hereafter Artemia). This strain showed antimicrobial activity against V. alginolyticus 03/8525 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC33658 possibly related to lactobacilli organic acid production. It was able to survive at high rainbow trout bile concentrations and showed high selective adhesion to rainbow trout mucus (1.2×10(5)±8.0×10(3) cells cm(-2)). H16 outcompeted V. alginolyticus 03/8525 and A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC33658, greatly reducing their adherence to rainbow trout mucus (64.8 and 74.1%, respectively). Moreover, H16 produced a cell-bound biosurfactant which caused an important decrease in the surface tension. H16 also protected Artemia nauplii against mortality when it was administered previous to V. alginolyticus 03/8525 inoculation. Furthermore, H16 bioencapsulated in Artemia, suggesting that it is possible to use live carriers in its administration. We conclude that the ability of L. pentosus H16 to selectively adhere to mucosal surfaces and produce cell-bound biosurfactants, displacing pathogenic strains, in addition to its antimicrobial activity, confer H16 competitive advantages against pathogens as demonstrated in in vivo challenge experiments. Thus, L. pentosus H16, a marine bacterium from the intestinal tract of hake, is an interesting probiotic for Artemia culture and also has the potential to prevent vibriosis in other aquaculture activities such as larvae culture and fish farming. PMID:25667335

  16. VibrioBase: A Model for Next-Generation Genome and Annotation Database Development

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    Siew Woh Choo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the ongoing research of Vibrio spp., a dedicated platform for the Vibrio research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. We present VibrioBase, a useful resource platform, providing all basic features of a sequence database with the addition of unique analysis tools which could be valuable for the Vibrio research community. VibrioBase currently houses a total of 252 Vibrio genomes developed in a user-friendly manner and useful to enable the analysis of these genomic data, particularly in the field of comparative genomics. Besides general data browsing features, VibrioBase offers analysis tools such as BLAST interfaces and JBrowse genome browser. Other important features of this platform include our newly developed in-house tools, the pairwise genome comparison (PGC tool, and pathogenomics profiling tool (PathoProT. The PGC tool is useful in the identification and comparative analysis of two genomes, whereas PathoProT is designed for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Vibrio strains. Both of these tools will enable researchers with little experience in bioinformatics to get meaningful information from Vibrio genomes with ease. We have tested the validity and suitability of these tools and features for use in the next-generation database development.

  17. Enterobacteria and Vibrio from Macrobrachium amazonicum prawn farming in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manoel de Arajo Neto Paiva; Rossana de Aguiar Cordeiro; Andr Jalles Monteiro; Jos Jlio Costa Sidrim; Marcos Fbio Gadelha Rocha; Jamille Alencar Sales; Glaucia Morgana de Melo Guedes; Yago Brito de Ponte; Clia Maria de Souza Sampaio; Jos Luciano Bezerra Moreira; Lucas Pereira de Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the isolation of enterobacteria associated with Macrobrachium amazonicum (M. amazonicum) farming and evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio strains. Methods: Strains were isolated from female M. amazonicum prawns and environmental and hatchery water. Biochemical assays were used to identify bacterial genera and those belonging to the genus Vibrio were submitted to further analyses for species identification, through Vitek 2 automated system and serotyping. Susceptibility test was performed according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: The following genera of enterobacteria were recovered: Enterobacter (n=11), Citrobacter (n=10), Proteus (n=2), Serratia (n=2), Kluyvera (n=2), Providencia (n=2), Cedecea (n=1), Escherichia (n=1), Edwardsiella (n=1) and Buttiauxella (n=1). As for Vibrio, three species were identified: Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 (n=4), Vibrio vulnificus (V. vulnificus) (n=1) and Vibrio mimicus (n=1). Vibrio spp. showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values within the susceptibility range established by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute for almost all antibiotics, except for V. vulnificus, which presented intermediate profile to ampicillin. Conclusions:Enterobacteria do not seem to be the most important pathogens associated with M. amazonicum farming, whereas the recovery of Vibrio spp. from larviculture, with emphasis on Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus, deserves special attention due to their role as potentially zoonotic aquaculture-associated pathogens. Furthermore, the intermediate susceptibility of V. vulnificus to ampicillin reflects the importance of monitoring drug use in prawn farming.

  18. The Zymovars of Vibrio cholerae: Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis of Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S Freitas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Zymovars analysis also known as multilocus enzyme electrophoresis is applied here to investigate the genetic variation of Vibrio cholerae strains and characterise strains or group of strains of medical and epidemiological interest. Fourteen loci were analyzed in 171 strains of non-O1 non-O139, 32 classical and 61 El Tor from America, Africa, Europe and Asia. The mean genetic diversity was 0.339. It is shown that the same O antigen (both O1 and non-O1 may be present in several geneticaly diverse (different zymovars strains. Conversely the same zymovar may contain more than one serogroup. It is confirmed that the South American epidemic strain differs from the 7th pandemic El Tor strain in locus LAP (leucyl leucyl aminopeptidase. Here it is shown that this rare allele is present in 1 V. mimicus and 4 non-O1 V. cholerae. Non toxigenic O1 strains from South India epidemic share zymovar 14A with the epidemic El Tor from the 7th pandemic, while another group have diverse zymovars. The sucrose negative epidemic strains isolated in French Guiana and Brazil have the same zymovar of the current American epidemic V. cholerae.

  19. Vibrio bacteria in raw oysters: managing risks to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froelich, Brett A; Noble, Rachel T

    2016-03-01

    The human-pathogenic marine bacteria Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus are strongly correlated with water temperature, with concentrations increasing as waters warm seasonally. Both of these bacteria can be concentrated in filter-feeding shellfish, especially oysters. Because oysters are often consumed raw, this exposes people to large doses of potentially harmful bacteria. Various models are used to predict the abundance of these bacteria in oysters, which guide shellfish harvest policy meant to reduce human health risk. Vibrio abundance and behaviour varies from site to site, suggesting that location-specific studies are needed to establish targeted risk reduction strategies. Moreover, virulence potential, rather than simple abundance, should be also be included in future modeling efforts. PMID:26880841

  20. Establishment and application of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid diagnosis of Vibrio cholerae%霍乱弧菌LAMP快速检测方法的建立及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯雪梅; 陈胤瑜; 高璐璐; 杜正平; 冯雪梅; 廖如燕; 陈志永; 曹以诚; 陈清

    2009-01-01

    目的 建立环介导等温扩增技术(LAMP)快速检测霍乱弧菌.方法 针对霍乱弧菌外膜蛋白的ompW基因设计特异引物,优化反应条件,建立霍乱弧菌的LAMP检测方法.通过对47株细菌及模拟污染现场,检测该方法的灵敏度、特异度和实用性.结果 活菌计数方法表明建立的LAMP方法检测霍乱弧菌的灵敏度为1.6×10~2 cfu/ml.在人工污染霍乱弧菌的粪便及海水标本中检测的敏感度为1.6×10~3 cfu/ml,在牛奶标本中敏感度为1.6×10~4 cfu/ml.检测21株霍乱弧菌均为阳性,26株非霍乱菌则全部阴性,特异度为100%.结论 建立的LAMP方法检测霍乱弧菌灵敏度、特异度高,可用于霍乱现场监测和流行病学调查.%Objective To establish a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for rapid diagnosis of Vibrio cholerae. Method Based on the ompW nucleic sequence of Vibrio cholerae, a pair of primers was designed for LAMP. The reaction conditions were optimized, and the specificity, sensitivity, and practicability of LAMP were tested using 47 baterial strains and simulated contaminated sites. Results The results of viable bacterium count showed that LAMP was capable of detecting Vibrio cholerae at a level as low as 1.6×10~2 cfu/ml. The minimal detectable concentration was 1.6×10~3 cfu/ml for simulated contaminated samples such as feces and seawater, and 1.6×10~4 cfu/ml for contaminated milk. All the 21 strains of Vibrio cholerae yielded positive results in LAMP, and the 26 strains of other bacteria all showed negative results, with a detection specificity of 100%. Conclusion The established LAMP method has high specificity and sensitivity for detecting Vibrio cholerae and is applicable in field monitoring and epidemiological study of Vibrio cholerae.

  1. Occurrence of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus, Vibrio Cholerae and Vibrio Vulnificus in the Clam Ruditapes Philippinarum (Adams & Reeve, 1850) from Emilia Romagna and Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Pier Luca; Zavatta, Emanuele; Bignami, Giorgia; Serraino, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Marine vibrios, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae are responsible of the majority of food-borne human infections by consumption of bivalve shellfish. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the occurrence of these bacteria, and their potential pathogenicity, in the Manila clam R. philippinarum from Emilia Romagna (ER) and Sardinia (SR) regions, Italy. Isolation was performed on CHROMagarTM vibrio with subculture on (thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose) Agar and m-modified-cellobiose-polymyxin b-colistin (-CPC) Agar. Suspected strains were purified, biochemically characterized and genotyped by simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specie-specific and pathogenic gene markers: V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP, tdh and trh); V. vulnificus (vvhA, hsp, vcgC, vcgE, CPS operon allele 1, CPS operon allele 2, 16s-rRNA operon allele A, 16s-rRNA operon allele B; V. cholerae (toxRC, hlya, tcpI, tcpA, ctxA, ctxB, stn/sto). Moreover a multiplex PCR was applied to the SR bivalve shellfish, for the simultaneous detection of the three targets directly on homogenate samples, targeting the species-specific gene for V. cholerae (toxRC), V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP) and V. vulnificus (vvhA). As a result of phenotyping and genotyping of isolates, bivalve shellfish from ER resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (27.8%) and V. vulnificus (10.1%), but negative for V. cholerae. Shellfish from SR resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (30.3%), V. vulnificus (6.1%) and V. cholerae (3%). No significant differences emerged between the two areas (P>0.05).

  2. Ethanolamine utilization in Vibrio alginolyticus

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri Neelam; Khatri Indu; Subramanian Srikrishna; Raychaudhuri Saumya

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ethanolamine is used as an energy source by phylogenetically diverse bacteria including pathogens, by the concerted action of proteins from the eut-operon. Previous studies have revealed the presence of eutBC genes encoding ethanolamine-ammonia lyase, a key enzyme that breaks ethanolamine into acetaldehyde and ammonia, in about 100 bacterial genomes including members of gamma-proteobacteria. However, ethanolamine utilization has not been reported for any member of the Vibrio genus. O...

  3. Ion-swimming speed variation of Vibrio cholerae cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anindito Sen; Ranjan K Nandi; Amar N Ghosh

    2005-09-01

    In the present work we report the variation in swimming speed of Vibrio cholerae with respect to the change in concentration of sodium ions in the medium. We have also studied the variation in swimming speed with respect to temperature. We find that the swimming speed initially shows a linear increase with the increase of the sodium ions in the medium and then plateaus. The range within which the swimming speed attains saturation is approximately the same at different temperatures.

  4. α-Hydroxyketone Synthesis and Sensing by Legionella and Vibrio

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert Hilbi; André Tiaden

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria synthesize and sense low molecular weight signaling molecules, termed autoinducers, to measure their population density and community complexity. One class of autoinducers, the α-hydroxyketones (AHKs), is produced and detected by the water-borne opportunistic pathogens Legionella pneumophila and Vibrio cholerae, which cause Legionnaires’ disease and cholera, respectively. The “Legionella quorum sensing” (lqs) or “cholera quorum sensing” (cqs) genes encode enzymes that produce and sen...

  5. Toxic factors of Vibrio strains pathogenic to shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Goarant, Cyrille; Herlin, Jose; Brizard, Raphael; Marteau, Anne-laure; Martin, C.; Martin, B.(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    Vibriosis is a major disease problem in shrimp aquaculture. 'Syndrome 93' is a seasonal juvenile vibriosis caused by Vibrio penaeicida which affects Litopenaeus stylirostris in grow-out ponds in New Caledonia. This study assessed the toxic activities of extracellular products (ECPs) from V: penaeicida, V. alginolyticus and V, nigripulchritudo using in vivo injections in healthy juvenile L. stylirostris (= Penaeus stylirostris) and in vitro assays on shrimp primary cell cultures and the fish c...

  6. Third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Vibrio cholerae, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Jharna; Sangeetha, Vilwanathan; Ganesan, Vithiya; Parveen, Mohamudha; Preethi, Venkatesan; Harish, Belgode Narasimha; Srinivasan, Sampath; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio cholerae resistance to third-generation cephalosporins is rarely reported. We detected a strain that was negative for extended-spectrum β-lactamase and positive for the AmpC disk test, modified Hodge test, and EDTA disk synergy test and harbored the blaDHA-1 and blaNDM-1 genes. The antimicrobial drug susceptibility profile of V. cholerae should be monitored. PMID:22840562

  7. Population structure of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus from the Pacific Northwest coast of the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Turner

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common marine bacterium and a leading cause of seafood-borne bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Although this bacterium has been the subject of much research, the population structure of cold-water populations remains largely undescribed. We present a broad phylogenetic analysis of clinical and environmental V. parahaemolyticus originating largely from the Pacific Northwest coast of the United States. Repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR separated 167 isolates into 39 groups and subsequent multilocus sequence typing (MLST separated a subset of 77 isolates into 24 sequence types. The Pacific Northwest population exhibited a semi-clonal structure attributed to an environmental clade (ST3, N = 17 isolates clonally related to the pandemic O3:K6 complex and a clinical clade (ST36, N = 20 isolates genetically related to a regionally endemic O4:K12 complex. Further, the identification of at least five additional clinical sequence types (i.e., ST43, 50, 65, 135 and 417 demonstrates that V. parahaemolyticus gastroenteritis in the Pacific Northwest is polyphyletic in nature. Recombination was evident as a significant source of genetic diversity and in particular, the recA and dtdS alleles showed strong support for frequent recombination. Although pandemic-related illnesses were not documented during the study, the environmental occurrence of the pandemic clone may present a significant threat to human health and warrants continued monitoring. It is evident that V. parahaemolyticus population structure in the Pacific Northwest is semi-clonal and it would appear that multiple sequence types are contributing to the burden of disease in this region.

  8. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Southern Brazil - Case report Infecção por Vibrio vulnificus no sul do Brasil - Relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João César Beenke França

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Vibrio is a member of the family Vibrionaceae, and among their disease-causing species, Vibrio vulnificus, a lactose-positive gram-negative bacillus, is one of the most virulent pathogen of the noncholerae vibrios. We describe the case of a 39-year-old male patient, who was using immunosuppressive therapy, admitted to the hospital for liver transplantation. Twelve hours later, the patient presented high fever, myalgia, anuria and erythematous plaques on lower limbs, of rapid growth and proximal progression. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone, meropenem and oxacillin, however he expired within 30 hours. Blood cultures showed growth of a gram-negative bacillus, which was later identified as Vibrio vulnificus.O gênero Vibrio é membro da família Vibrionaceae, e entre as espécies patogênicas, Vibrio vulnificus, bacilo gram negativo lactose positivo, tem sido frequentemente citado. Descrevemos o caso de um paciente masculino de 39 anos, em uso de medicação imunossupressora, admitido no hospital para transplante hepático. Doze horas após a internação, o paciente evoluiu com febre, mialgias, anúria e placas eritematosas em membros inferiores, com rápido crescimento e evolução proximal. O paciente foi tratado com ceftriaxona, meropenem e oxacilina sem melhora, evoluindo para óbito em 30 horas. Hemocultura mostrou crescimento de bacilo gram negativo posteriormente identificado como Vibrio vulnificus.

  9. Toxic dinoflagellates and Vibrio spp. act independently in bivalve larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijcke, M; Van Acker, E; Nevejan, N; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2016-10-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and marine pathogens - like Vibrio spp. - are increasingly common due to climate change. These stressors affect the growth, viability and development of bivalve larvae. Little is known, however, about the potential for interactions between these two concurrent stressors. While some mixed exposures have been performed with adult bivalves, no such work has been done with larvae which are generally more sensitive. This study examines whether dinoflagellates and bacteria may interactively affect the viability and immunological resilience of blue mussel Mytilus edulis larvae. Embryos were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (100, 500, 2500 & 12,500 cells ml(-1)) of a dinoflagellate (Alexandrium minutum, Alexandrium ostenfeldii, Karenia mikimotoi, Protoceratium reticulatum, Prorocentrum cordatum, P. lima or P. micans), a known pathogen (Vibrio coralliilyticus/neptunius-like isolate or Vibrio splendidus; 10(5) CFU ml(-1)), or both. After five days of exposure, significant (p < 0.05) adverse effects on larval viability and larval development were found for all dinoflagellates (except P. cordatum) and V. splendidus. Yet, despite the individual effect of each stressor, no significant interactions were found between the pathogens and harmful algae. The larval viability and the phenoloxidase innate immune system responded independently to each stressor. This independence may be related to a differential timing of the effects of HABs and pathogens. PMID:27554394

  10. Toxic dinoflagellates and Vibrio spp. act independently in bivalve larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijcke, M; Van Acker, E; Nevejan, N; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2016-10-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and marine pathogens - like Vibrio spp. - are increasingly common due to climate change. These stressors affect the growth, viability and development of bivalve larvae. Little is known, however, about the potential for interactions between these two concurrent stressors. While some mixed exposures have been performed with adult bivalves, no such work has been done with larvae which are generally more sensitive. This study examines whether dinoflagellates and bacteria may interactively affect the viability and immunological resilience of blue mussel Mytilus edulis larvae. Embryos were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (100, 500, 2500 & 12,500 cells ml(-1)) of a dinoflagellate (Alexandrium minutum, Alexandrium ostenfeldii, Karenia mikimotoi, Protoceratium reticulatum, Prorocentrum cordatum, P. lima or P. micans), a known pathogen (Vibrio coralliilyticus/neptunius-like isolate or Vibrio splendidus; 10(5) CFU ml(-1)), or both. After five days of exposure, significant (p larval viability and larval development were found for all dinoflagellates (except P. cordatum) and V. splendidus. Yet, despite the individual effect of each stressor, no significant interactions were found between the pathogens and harmful algae. The larval viability and the phenoloxidase innate immune system responded independently to each stressor. This independence may be related to a differential timing of the effects of HABs and pathogens.

  11. Overexpression and export of Vibrio anguillarum metalloprotease in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fengli; Chi Zhenming; Chen Jixiang; Wu Longfei; Liang Likun

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum metalloprotease, an extracellular zinc metalloprotease involved in the virulence mechanism of Vibrio anguillarum, is synthesized from the empA gene as a 611-residue precursor and naturally secreted via Sec secretion pathway in Vibrio anguillarum. In this study, heterologous expression of the empA gene encoding metallopmtease and export of the recombinant metalloprotease in Escherichia coliwere examined. The empA gene was subcloned into pBAD24 with arabinose promoter and sequenced. The sequence encoded a polypeptide(611 amino acids)consisting of four domains: a signal peptide, an Nterminal propeptide, a mature region and a C-terminal propeptide. The empA gene inserted in plasmid pBAD24 was overexpressed in TOP10 strain of E. Coli after arabinose induction. The 36kDa polypeptide of the recombinant metalloprotease as the mature protease was further confirmed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. It was found that recombinant metalloprotease with the EmpA activity and antigenicity wasexported into the periplasm of Escherichia coli cells via Sec translocation pathway, whereas it was secreted into extracellular environments in V. Anguillarum. The results imply that the expression, export and processing mechanism of the protein in E. Coli are similar to those in V. Anguillarum.

  12. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  13. Isolation of a Bacterium Strain Degraded Agar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One in 58 strains of bacteria isolated from the compost showed clear colonies after a few days of growth on the plates containing medium made of only agar and water.Water suspension contained only agar (2 and 8g·L -1 ) with two controls (normal saline,LB medium) was inoculated with the bacterium BR5-1 to see whether there was an increasement of the alive bacteria concentration after 48 h of the growth.The results showed that there was a significant rising of the alive bacteria concentration in the agar susp...

  14. Swimming Efficiency of Bacterium Escherichia Coli

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Wu, X L; Yeung, C; Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Moldovan, Radu; Yeung, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    We use in vivo measurements of swimming bacteria in an optical trap to determine fundamental properties of bacterial propulsion. In particular, we determine the propulsion matrix, which relates the angular velocity of the flagellum to the torques and forces propelling the bacterium. From the propulsion matrix dynamical properties such as forces, torques, swimming speed and power can be obtained from measurements of the angular velocity of the motor. We find significant heterogeneities among different individuals even though all bacteria started from a single colony. The propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power output to the rotary power input provided by the motors, is found to be 0.2%.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus in the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaper, J B; Nataro, J P; Roberts, N C; Siebeling, R J; Bradford, H B

    1986-01-01

    Ten toxigenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1 and V. mimicus strains isolated from clinical and environmental sources in the U.S. Gulf Coast region were examined for genetic relatedness. Restriction digest patterns of chromosomal DNA and Southern blot analysis with a cholera toxin gene probe revealed that the strains exhibited greater genetic divergence than the highly conserved V. cholerae O1 strains isolated from clinical and sewage samples in this region.

  16. The Dynamics of Genetic Interactions between Vibrio metoecus and Vibrio cholerae, Two Close Relatives Co-Occurring in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orata, Fabini D; Kirchberger, Paul C; Méheust, Raphaël; Barlow, E Jed; Tarr, Cheryl L; Boucher, Yan

    2015-10-09

    Vibrio metoecus is the closest relative of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the potent diarrheal disease cholera. Although the pathogenic potential of this new species is yet to be studied in depth, it has been co-isolated with V. cholerae in coastal waters and found in clinical specimens in the United States. We used these two organisms to investigate the genetic interaction between closely related species in their natural environment. The genomes of 20 V. cholerae and 4 V. metoecus strains isolated from a brackish coastal pond on the US east coast, as well as 4 clinical V. metoecus strains were sequenced and compared with reference strains. Whole genome comparison shows 86-87% average nucleotide identity (ANI) in their core genes between the two species. On the other hand, the chromosomal integron, which occupies approximately 3% of their genomes, shows higher conservation in ANI between species than any other region of their genomes. The ANI of 93-94% observed in this region is not significantly greater within than between species, meaning that it does not follow species boundaries. Vibrio metoecus does not encode toxigenic V. cholerae major virulence factors, the cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus. However, some of the pathogenicity islands found in pandemic V. cholerae were either present in the common ancestor it shares with V. metoecus, or acquired by clinical and environmental V. metoecus in partial fragments. The virulence factors of V. cholerae are therefore both more ancient and more widespread than previously believed. There is high interspecies recombination in the core genome, which has been detected in 24% of the single-copy core genes, including genes involved in pathogenicity. Vibrio metoecus was six times more often the recipient of DNA from V. cholerae as it was the donor, indicating a strong bias in the direction of gene transfer in the environment.

  17. Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics Analysis of a Vibrio cholerae O1 Strain Isolated from a Cholera Patient in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osama, Abdulrazak; Gan, Han Ming; Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Yap, Kien-Pong

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence analysis of a clinical Vibrio cholerae VC35 strain from an outbreak case in Malaysia indicates multiple genes involved in host adaptation and a novel Na+-driven multidrug efflux pump-coding gene in the genome of Vibrio cholerae with the highest similarity to VMA_001754 of Vibrio mimicus VMA223. PMID:23209200

  18. Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics Analysis of a Vibrio cholerae O1 Strain Isolated from a Cholera Patient in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Osama, Abdulrazak; Gan, Han Ming; Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Yap, Kien-Pong; Thong, Kwai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence analysis of a clinical Vibrio cholerae VC35 strain from an outbreak case in Malaysia indicates multiple genes involved in host adaptation and a novel Na+-driven multidrug efflux pump-coding gene in the genome of Vibrio cholerae with the highest similarity to VMA_001754 of Vibrio mimicus VMA223.

  19. Biodegradation of heavy oils by halophilic bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia Hao; Anhuai Lu

    2009-01-01

    A halophilic bacterial strain TM-1 was isolated from the reservoir of the Shengli oil field in East China. Strain TM-1, which was found to be able to degrade crude oils, is a gram-positive non-motile bacterium with a coccus shape that can grow at temperatures of up to 58 ℃ and in 18% NaCl solution. Depending on the culture conditions, the organism may occur in tetrads. In addition, strain TM-1 pro-duced acid from glucose without gas formation and was catalase-negative. Furthermore, strain TM-I was found to be a facultative aer-obe capable of growth under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, it produced butylated hydroxytoluene, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid-bis ester and dibutyl phthalate and could use different organic substrates. Laboratory studies indicated that strain TM-1 affected different heavy oils by degrading various components and by changing the chemical properties of the oils. In addition, growth of the bacterium in heavy oils resulted in the loss of aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes, and enrichment with light hydrocarbons and an overall redistribution of these hydrocarbons.

  20. Isolation and characterization of an antibacterium against Vibrio harveyi 11593 from a mixed pond with penaeus japonicus bate, portunus trituberculatus and ruditapes philippinarum in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, X. H.; Xu, Y. J.; Li, F. H.; Ma, G. Z.; Li, L. T.

    2016-08-01

    Aquaculture diseases, particularly Vibriosis, are becoming a pressing concern due to incurred aquacultural loss in China. Commercial antibiotics may be used to control it, but its increased antibiotic resistance to prominent pathogenic bacteria has become a prevalent problem nationwide, and a global threat to public health. Probiotics are recommended instead because they are healthy, environment-friendly, and capable of maintaining productivity. An antibacterium against Vibrio harveyi 11593 was isolated from a mariculture pond with shrimp, crabs, and shellfish in China. The bacterium, E14, has an inhibitory zone diameter (DIZ) of 24.5 ± 0.5 mm. The strain was identified as Bacillus pumilus based on morphological observation, conventional biochemical tests, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The gram-positiveand motile bacterium is around 1.10-1.32 pm × 0.67-0.83 μm in size. Optimized conditions for antimicrobial substance production of B. pumilus E14 require that it be cultured for 26 h at 28 °C, with an initial pH of 7.0 in 100 mL/500 mL LB with 3% NaCl. The B. pumilus E14 cultures were confirmed to be safe and efficacious and actually worked to protect the host animal in shrimp larvae (Penaeus chinensis) culture. The B. pumilus E14 obtained in this study strengthened the strain's defense against aquaculture disease and made a good candidate for an alternative probiotics and benefit to sustainability of aquaculture.

  1. Lack of Outer Membrane Protein A Enhances the Release of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Suppresses Viability of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Priya Valeru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, survives in aquatic environments. The bacterium has developed a survival strategy to grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. It has been shown that V. cholerae expresses outer membrane proteins as virulence factors playing a role in the adherence to interacted host cells. This study examined the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs in survival of V. cholerae alone and during its interaction with A. castellanii. The results showed that an OmpA mutant of V. cholerae survived longer than wild-type V. cholerae when cultivated alone. Cocultivation with A. castellanii enhanced the survival of both bacterial strains and OmpA protein exhibited no effect on attachment, engulfment, and survival inside the amoebae. However, cocultivation of the OmpA mutant of V. cholerae decreased the viability of A. castellanii and this bacterial strain released more OMVs than wild-type V. cholerae. Surprisingly, treatment of amoeba cells with OMVs isolated from the OmpA mutant significantly decreased viable counts of the amoeba cells. In conclusion, the results might highlight a regulating rule for OmpA in survival of V. cholerae and OMVs as a potent virulence factor for this bacterium towards eukaryotes in the environment.

  2. Grimontia indica AK16(T, sp. nov., isolated from a seawater sample reports the presence of pathogenic genes similar to Vibrio genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Singh

    Full Text Available Grimontia indica strain AK16(T sp. nov. is the type strain of G. indica sp. nov. a new species within the genus Grimontia. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from seawater sample collected from southeast coast of Palk Bay, India. G. indica AK16(T is a Gram-negative, facultative aerobic rod shaped bacterium. There are only two other strains in the genus Grimontia one of which, Grimontia hollisae CIP 101886(T, is a reported human pathogen isolated from human stool sample while the other, 'Grimontia marina IMCC5001(T', was isolated from a seawater sample. As compared to the pathogenic strain Grimontia hollisae CIP 101886(T, the strain AK16(T lacks some genes for pathogenesis like the accessory colonization factors AcfA and AcfD, which are required for the colonization of the bacterium in the host body. While it carries some pathogenesis genes like OmpU, which are related to pathogenesis of Vibrio strains. This suggests that the life cycle of AK16(T may include some pathogenic interactions with marine animal(s, or it may be an opportunistic pathogen. Study of the Grimontia genus is important because of the severe pathogenic traits exhibited by a member of the genus with only three species reported in total. The study will provide some vital information which may be useful in future clinical studies on the genus.

  3. Application of the VPp1 bacteriophage combined with a coupled enzyme system in the rapid detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yong; Jin, Yanqiu; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jingxue; Khan, Muhammad Naseem

    2014-03-01

    For rapid and quantitative detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a method combining the specific lysis of bacteriophages with a bacterial luciferase-flavin mononucleotide:nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase bioluminescent system in vitro was developed. A V. parahaemolyticus detection system was established by optimizing three main influencing factors: bacteriophage titer, volume ratio of the bacteriophage to its host bacterium, and lysis time. A standard curve between the number of bacteria and the luminescence intensity of the coupled enzyme system was studied and revealed a good linear relationship. More than 10(7)colony-forming units (cfu)·ml(-1) bacteria in pure culture and >10(8) cfu·ml(-1) bacteria in oyster samples were readily detected without pre-enrichment. Furthermore, >10(0) cfu·ml(-1) bacteria in oyster samples were readily detected after 4h of enrichment culture. Because of its rapid detection, high specificity, and simplicity in operation, this method is an effective tool for detecting living bacteria in food and environmental samples.

  4. Virulence Profiles of Vibrio vulnificus in German Coastal Waters, a Comparison of North Sea and Baltic Sea Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Bier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic bacterium of coastal environments known for sporadically causing severe foodborne or wound infections. Global warming is expected to lead to a rising occurrence of V. vulnificus and an increasing incidence of human infections in Northern Europe. So far, infections in Germany were exclusively documented for the Baltic Sea coast, while no cases from the North Sea region have been reported. Regional variations in the prevalence of infections may be influenced by differences in the pathogenicity of V. vulnificus populations in both areas. This study aimed to compare the distribution of virulence-associated traits and genotypes among 101 V. vulnificus isolates from the Baltic Sea and North Sea in order to assess their pathogenicity potential. Furthermore, genetic relationships were examined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST. A high diversity of MLST sequences (74 sequence types and differences regarding the presence of six potential pathogenicity markers were observed in the V. vulnificus populations of both areas. Strains with genotypes and markers associated with pathogenicity are not restricted to a particular geographic region. This indicates that lack of reported cases in the North Sea region is not caused by the absence of potentially pathogenic strains.

  5. Development of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for the detection of virulent forms of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhim, H M; Miah, A; Munn, C B; Gilpin, M L

    2012-04-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine bacterium and some strains cause gastroenteritis in humans. Clinical isolates are thought to possess virulence factors that are absent from the majority of environmental isolates. Use of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR produced a unique 600 bp amplicon (band Y) in the majority of clinical isolates and rarely in environmental isolates tested. The DNA from band Y was cloned and sequenced and found to code for an outer membrane protein (OMP). Two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed to specifically amplify a 200 bp unique sequence from presumptive virulent strains (PCR-OMP). The virulence of 23 clinical and 32 environmental isolates was assessed in cytotoxicity tests by treatment of Caco-2 cells with extracellular products (ECPs). All but two of the clinical isolates (91%) were positive for the 200 bp PCR-OMP and their ECPs produced a significantly higher (p PCR-OMP is strongly correlated with virulence, as determined by the cytotoxicity assay, and identified virulent forms better than current PCR tests for tdh, trh or T3SS2.

  6. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  7. Virulence Profiles of Vibrio vulnificus in German Coastal Waters, a Comparison of North Sea and Baltic Sea Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Nadja; Jäckel, Claudia; Dieckmann, Ralf; Brennholt, Nicole; Böer, Simone I; Strauch, Eckhard

    2015-12-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic bacterium of coastal environments known for sporadically causing severe foodborne or wound infections. Global warming is expected to lead to a rising occurrence of V. vulnificus and an increasing incidence of human infections in Northern Europe. So far, infections in Germany were exclusively documented for the Baltic Sea coast, while no cases from the North Sea region have been reported. Regional variations in the prevalence of infections may be influenced by differences in the pathogenicity of V. vulnificus populations in both areas. This study aimed to compare the distribution of virulence-associated traits and genotypes among 101 V. vulnificus isolates from the Baltic Sea and North Sea in order to assess their pathogenicity potential. Furthermore, genetic relationships were examined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A high diversity of MLST sequences (74 sequence types) and differences regarding the presence of six potential pathogenicity markers were observed in the V. vulnificus populations of both areas. Strains with genotypes and markers associated with pathogenicity are not restricted to a particular geographic region. This indicates that lack of reported cases in the North Sea region is not caused by the absence of potentially pathogenic strains. PMID:26694432

  8. The thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Sequence variation and implications for detection and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, William B; Turner, Jeffrey W

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of bacterial food-related illness associated with the consumption of undercooked seafood. Only a small subset of strains is pathogenic. Most clinical strains encode for the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). In this work, we amplify and sequence the trh gene from over 80 trh+strains of this bacterium and identify thirteen genetically distinct alleles, most of which have not been deposited in GenBank previously. Sequence data was used to design new primers for more reliable detection of trh by endpoint PCR. We also designed a new quantitative PCR assay to target a more conserved gene that is genetically-linked to trh. This gene, ureR, encodes the transcriptional regulator for the urease gene cluster immediately upstream of trh. We propose that this ureR assay can be a useful screening tool as a surrogate for direct detection of trh that circumvents challenges associated with trh sequence variation.

  9. Onderzoek pathogene vibrio soorten in Nederlandse mosselen en oesters in augustus en september 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, C.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Naar aanleiding van de hoge weerstemperatuur in augustus 2003 zijn in de kweek- en verwatergebieden van mosselen en oesters in Nederland enkele monsters onderzocht op de aanwezigheid van voor de mens pathogene vibrio soorten. In geen van de 18 monsters is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, vulnificus of chole

  10. Bactericidal effect of lactoferrin and lactoferrin chimera against halophilic Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Leon-Sicairos; A. Canizalez-Roman; M. de la Garza; M. Reyes-Lopez; J. Zazueta-Beltran; K. Nazmi; B. Gomez-Gil; J.G. Bolscher

    2009-01-01

    Infections caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an halophilic member of the genus Vibrio, have increased globally in the last 5 years. Diarrhea caused by V. parahaemolyticus results from eating raw or undercooked seafood. The aim of this work was to investigate whether lactoferrin and some lactoferrin

  11. Ecología de Vibrio cholerae en relación al Fitoplancton y variables fisicoquímicas en ríos de Tucumán (Argentina Ecology of Vibrio cholerae in relation to phytoplankton and physico-chemical variables in rivers of Tucumán (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mirande

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae muestra gran diversidad serológica en base a su antígeno somático O, conociéndose al menos 200 serogrupos. De éstos, solamente O1 y O139 son causantes de epidemias o pandemias. En Latinoamérica el serogrupo O1 reapareció en 1991, tras cien años de no presentar brotes en el continente. Esta bacteria sobrevive y se multiplica asociada al plancton, independientemente de la aparición de infecciones humanas. Desde la década del noventa, en Tucumán, se detectaron casos esporádicos de diarrea por Vibrio cholerae no-O1. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue estudiar la posible relación entre la presencia de especímenes de fitoplancton, variables fisicoquímicas y aislamientos de Vibrio cholerae en ríos de Tucumán. Se realizaron 18 campañas en los ríos Lules y Salí entre 2003-2005. Se estudiaron las variables fisicoquímicas del agua (pH, temperatura, conductividad y oxígeno disuelto, el fitoplancton (riqueza y frecuencia relativa y las cepas aisladas de V. cholerae. Los resultados evidenciaron diferencias en la calidad del agua, observándose períodos de anoxia en el río Salí. Las diatomeas sobresalieron en la mayoría de los meses y generalmente estuvieron en porcentajes superiores al 85 %. Sólo se aisló Vibrio cholerae no-O1, no-O139, detectándose más frecuentemente en los meses cálidos, con pH alcalino, aún con baja concentración de oxígeno.Vibrio cholerae shows a great serologic diversity in relation to his O somatic antigen and we know at least 200 serogroups. About these, only O1 and O139 are responsible of epidemics and pandemics. The serogroup O1 reemerged in Latin America in 1991 after being absent from the continent for nearly a century. This bacterium survives and grows up associated to plankton, independently of appearance of human infections. From 90 th decade, there were sporadic cases of diarrhea because of Vibrio cholerae O1 in Tucumán. The aims of this paper were to study the possible

  12. Unsupervised statistical identification of genomic islands using oligonucleotide distributions with application to Vibrio genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Nag; Raghunath Chatterjee; Keya Chaudhuri; Probal Chaudhuri

    2006-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and several other related Vibrio species show distinctly similar two-chromosomal genome organization. However, the modes of pathogenicity are very different among these species, and this is largely attributed to externally acquired genetic elements. We develop some statistical methods to determine these external genetic elements or genomic islands in genomes based on their differential oligonucleotide usage patterns compared to the rest of the genome. Genomic islands identified by these unsupervised statistical methods include integron and pathogenicity islands. After statistical determination of the genomic islands, we investigate their gene contents and their possible association with the pathogenic behaviour of the corresponding Vibrio species. These investigations lead to observations that are of evolutionary and biological significance.

  13. Dangerous hitchhikers? Evidence for potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. on microplastic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, Inga V; Kirmizi, Sidika; Wichels, Antje; Garin-Fernandez, Alexa; Erler, Rene; Löder, Martin; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2016-09-01

    The taxonomic composition of biofilms on marine microplastics is widely unknown. Recent sequencing results indicate that potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. might be present on floating microplastics. Hence, these particles might function as vectors for the dispersal of pathogens. Microplastics and water samples collected in the North and Baltic Sea were subjected to selective enrichment for pathogenic Vibrio species. Bacterial colonies were isolated from CHROMagar™Vibrio and assigned to Vibrio spp. on the species level by MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation - Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry). Respective polymers were identified by ATR FT-IR (Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform - Infrared Spectroscopy). We discovered potentially pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus on a number of microplastic particles, e.g. polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene from North/Baltic Sea. This study confirms the indicated occurrence of potentially pathogenic bacteria on marine microplastics and highlights the urgent need for detailed biogeographical analyses of marine microplastics. PMID:27411093

  14. Vibrio ecology in PNW - The Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Pacific Northwest: Implications for risk assessment and early warning systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in Vibrio parahaemolyticus-related gastroenteritis from the consumption of raw oysters harvested in...

  15. Temperature-dependent inhibition of opportunistic Vibrio pathogens by native coral commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenborg, Beck R; Krediet, Cory J; Teplitski, Max; Ritchie, Kim B

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria living within the surface mucus layer of corals compete for nutrients and space. A number of stresses affect the outcome of this competition. The interactions between native microorganisms and opportunistic pathogens largely determine the coral holobiont's overall health and fitness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that commensal bacteria isolated from the mucus layer of a healthy elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, are capable of inhibition of opportunistic pathogens, Vibrio shiloi AK1 and Vibrio coralliilyticus. These vibrios are known to cause disease in corals and their virulence is temperature dependent. Elevated temperature (30 °C) increased the cell numbers of one commensal and both Vibrio pathogens in monocultures. We further tested the hypothesis that elevated temperature favors pathogenic organisms by simultaneously increasing the fitness of vibrios and decreasing the fitness of commensals by measuring growth of each species within a co-culture over the course of 1 week. In competition experiments between vibrios and commensals, the proportion of Vibrio spp. increased significantly under elevated temperature. We finished by investigating several temperature-dependent mechanisms that could influence co-culture differences via changes in competitive fitness. The ability of Vibrio spp. to utilize glycoproteins found in A. palmata mucus increased or remained stable when exposed to elevated temperature, while commensals' tended to decrease utilization. In both vibrios and commensals, protease activity increased at 30 °C, while chiA expression increased under elevated temperatures for Vibrio spp. These results provide insight into potential mechanisms through which elevated temperature may select for pathogenic bacterial dominance and lead to disease or a decrease in coral fitness. PMID:24370863

  16. Saharan dust nutrients promote Vibrio bloom formation in marine surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Jason R.; Ebling, Alina M.; Landing, William M.; Joyner, Jessica L.; Kemp, Keri M.; Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, Erin K.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio is a ubiquitous genus of marine bacteria, typically comprising a small fraction of the total microbial community in surface waters, but capable of becoming a dominant taxon in response to poorly characterized factors. Iron (Fe), often restricted by limited bioavailability and low external supply, is an essential micronutrient that can limit Vibrio growth. Vibrio species have robust metabolic capabilities and an array of Fe-acquisition mechanisms, and are able to respond rapidly to nutrient influx, yet Vibrio response to environmental pulses of Fe remains uncharacterized. Here we examined the population growth of Vibrioafter natural and simulated pulses of atmospherically transported Saharan dust, an important and episodic source of Fe to tropical marine waters. As a model for opportunistic bacterial heterotrophs, we demonstrated that Vibrio proliferate in response to a broad range of dust-Fe additions at rapid timescales. Within 24 h of exposure, strains of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio alginolyticus were able to directly use Saharan dust–Fe to support rapid growth. These findings were also confirmed with in situ field studies; arrival of Saharan dust in the Caribbean and subtropical Atlantic coincided with high levels of dissolved Fe, followed by up to a 30-fold increase of culturable Vibrio over background levels within 24 h. The relative abundance of Vibrio increased from ∼1 to ∼20% of the total microbial community. This study, to our knowledge, is the first to describe Vibrio response to Saharan dust nutrients, having implications at the intersection of marine ecology, Fe biogeochemistry, and both human and environmental health.

  17. Diffusion of magnetotactic bacterium in rotating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebers, A., E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.l [Department of Physics, University of Latvia, Zellu 8, Ri-bar ga, LV-1002 (Latvia)

    2011-02-15

    Swimming trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium in a rotating magnetic field is a circle. Random reversals of the direction of the bacterium motion induces a random walk of the curvature center of the trajectory. In assumption of the distribution of the switching events according to the Poisson process the diffusion coefficient is calculated in dependence on the frequency of the rotating field and the characteristic time between the switching events. It is confirmed by the numerical simulation of the random walk of the bacterium in the rotating magnetic field. - Research highlights: Random switching of the flagella leads to diffusion of a bacterium in the field. Mean square displacement of the curvature center is proportional to time. Diffusion coefficient depends on the period of a rotating field. At zero frequency diffusion coefficient is the same as for a tumbling bacterium.

  18. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  19. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life.

  20. Presence of vibrios in seawater and Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lam.) from the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Rosa Anna; Stabili, Loredana

    2002-09-01

    During the spring-summer period, vibrios were detected in water and mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected in 30 sampling sites located in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, Italy). In order to evaluate the degree of microbial pollution of the investigated area, fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli densities were also determined. Vibrio alginolyticus constituted the predominant component of the total culturable vibrios. Some Vibrio species such as V. mediterranei, V. parahaemolyticus, V. diazotrophicus, V. nereis, and V. splendidus were present in water as well as in mussel samples; selective retention in mussels, however, was demonstrated for other vibrios (V. vulnificus, V. cincinnatiensis, V. orientalis, V. anguillarum, V. marinus, V. hollisae). The isolation of some potential pathogenic vibrio species shows the importance of Vibrio research to estimate water quality and to avoid transmission of infection to man and to other marine organisms.

  1. Vibrio harveyi Nitroreductase Is Also a Chromate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Young Hak; Lee, Dong Seok; Kim, Han Bok

    2003-01-01

    The chromate reductase purified from Pseudomonas ambigua was found to be homologous with several nitroreductases. Escherichia coli DH5α and Vibrio harveyi KCTC 2720 nitroreductases were chosen for the present study, and their chromate-reducing activities were determined. A fusion between glutathione S-transferase (GST) and E. coli DH5α NfsA (GST-EcNfsA), a fusion between GST and E. coli DH5α NfsB (GST-EcNfsB), and a fusion between GST and V. harveyi KCTC 2720 NfsA (GST-VhNfsA) were prepared f...

  2. In vitro synergism between cefotaxime and minocycline against Vibrio vulnificus.

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Y. C.; Liu, J W; Ko, W C; Lin, K. Y.; Wu, J.J.; Huang, K Y

    1997-01-01

    We conducted time-kill studies to evaluate the inhibitory activities of either cefotaxime or minocycline alone and the two drugs in combination against a clinical strain of Vibrio vulnificus. The MICs of cefotaxime and minocycline were 0.03 and 0.06 microg/ml, respectively. When approximately 5 x 10(5) CFU of V. vulnificus per ml was incubated with cefotaxime at 0.03 or 0.05 microg/ml, the bacterial growth was inhibited during the initial 2 and 8 h, respectively. Thereafter, V. vulnificus reg...

  3. Vibriophages and Their Interactions with the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng; Gram, Lone; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is an important pathogen in aquaculture, responsible for the disease vibriosis in many fish and invertebrate species. Disease control by antibiotics is a concern due to potential development and spread of antibiotic resistance. The use of bacteriophages to control the pathogen...... may offer a non-antibiotic-based approach to reduce vibriosis. A detailed understanding of the phage-host interaction is needed to evaluate the potential of phages to control the pathogen. In this study, we examined the diversity and interactions of 11 vibriophages, 24 V. anguillarum strains, and 13...

  4. Broth medium for enrichment of Vibrio fluvialis from the environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Nishibuchi, M; Roberts, N C; Bradford, H B; Seidler, R J

    1983-01-01

    A medium was designed for the enrichment and enumeration of Vibrio fluvialis from environmental samples. The medium contains 1% peptone plus 4% sodium chloride and 5 micrograms of novobiocin per ml, pH 8.5. This V. fluvialis enrichment medium (FEM) was tested, in comparison with alkaline peptone (AP), in field samplings. A total of 177 samples (estuarine waters and sediment, sewage, and crabs) collected over a 14-month period were examined with FEM and with AP broth. Results showed that FEM w...

  5. Vibrio hispanicus sp. nov., isolated from Artemia sp. and sea water in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gil, B; Thompson, F L; Thompson, C C; Garcia-Gasca, A; Roque, A; Swings, J

    2004-01-01

    Three Gram-negative, small, motile, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from Artemia sp. and sea water in Barcelona, Spain, during 1990 and 1991. They were fermentative, oxidase-positive, sensitive to vibriostatic agent O/129, arginine dihydrolase-positive, lysine and ornithine decarboxylase-negative and grew in the absence of NaCl. They differed from phenotypically related species by their ability to grow at 4 degrees C and utilize L-rhamnose. Cloning of the 16S rRNA gene of the type strain produced two different 16S rRNA gene sequences, which differed by 15 bases (0.99%); comparison of these sequences with those deposited in GenBank showed close relationships with Vibrio proteolyticus (97.6% similarity), Vibrio diazotrophicus (97.9%), Vibrio campbellii (96.8%) and Vibrio alginolyticus (96.8%), among others. DNA-DNA hybridization levels with the closest phylogenetically related Vibrio species were Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio hispanicus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain LMG 13240T (=CAIM 525T=VIB 213T).

  6. Parallel quorum sensing signaling pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sarah A; Hawver, Lisa A; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial signaling process for monitoring population density and complexity. Communication among bacterial cells via QS relies on the production, secretion, and detection of small molecules called autoinducers. Many bacteria have evolved their QS systems with different network architectures to incorporate information from multiple signals. In the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, at least four parallel signaling pathways converge to control the activity of a single regulator to modulate its QS response. By integrating multiple signal inputs, it is believed that Vibrio species can survey intra-species, intra-genus, and inter-species populations and program their gene expression accordingly. Our recent studies suggest that this "many-to-one" circuitry is also important for maintaining the integrity of the input-output relationship of the system and minimizes premature commitment to QS due to signal perturbation. Here we discuss the implications of this specific parallel network setup for V. cholerae intercellular communication and how this system arrangement affects our approach to manipulate the QS response of this clinically important pathogen. PMID:26545759

  7. Invariant recognition of polychromatic images of Vibrio cholerae 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Borrego, Josue; Mourino-Perez, Rosa R.; Cristobal, Gabriel; Pech-Pacheco, Jose L.

    2002-04-01

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infectious disease. It has claimed many lives throughout history, and it continues to be a global health threat. Cholera is considered one of the most important emergence diseases due its relation with global climate changes. Automated methods such as optical systems represent a new trend to make more accurate measurements of the presence and quantity of this microorganism in its natural environment. Automatic systems eliminate observer bias and reduce the analysis time. We evaluate the utility of coherent optical systems with invariant correlation for the recognition of Vibrio cholerae O1. Images of scenes are recorded with a CCD camera and decomposed in three RGB channels. A numeric simulation is developed to identify the bacteria in the different samples through an invariant correlation technique. There is no variation when we repeat the correlation and the variation between images correlation is minimum. The position-, scale-, and rotation-invariant recognition is made with a scale transform through the Mellin transform. The algorithm to recognize Vibrio cholerae O1 is the presence of correlation peaks in the green channel output and their absence in red and blue channels. The discrimination criterion is the presence of correlation peaks in red, green, and blue channels.

  8. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid's light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible programme of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called haemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin released by the symbionts, which can induce haemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that haemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host's detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. PMID:26399913

  9. Toxic factors of Vibrio strains pathogenic to shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goarant, C; Herlin, J; Brizard, R; Marteau, A L; Martin, C; Martin, B

    2000-03-14

    Vibriosis is a major disease problem in shrimp aquaculture. 'Syndrome 93' is a seasonal juvenile vibriosis caused by Vibrio penaeicida which affects Litopenaeus stylirostris in grow-out ponds in New Caledonia. This study assessed the toxic activities of extracellular products (ECPs) from V. penaeicida, V. alginolyticus and V. nigripulchritudo using in vivo injections in healthy juvenile L. stylirostris (= Penaeus stylirostris) and in vitro assays on shrimp primary cell cultures and the fish cell line epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC). Toxic effects of ECPs were demonstrated for all pathogenic Vibrio strains tested both in vivo and in vitro, but for shrimp only; no effect was observed on the fish cell line. ECP toxicity for New Caledonian V. penaeicida was found only after cultivation at low temperature (20 degrees C) and not at higher temperature (30 degrees C). This points to the fact that 'Syndrome 93' episodes are triggered by temperature drops. The assays used here demonstrate the usefulness of primary shrimp cell cultures to study virulence mechanisms of shrimp pathogenic bacteria. PMID:10782343

  10. Mannose-containing oligosaccharides of non-specific human secretory immunoglobulin A mediate inhibition of Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlesh K Murthy

    Full Text Available The role of antigen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA has been studied extensively, whereas there is a limited body of evidence regarding the contribution of non-specific SIgA to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the effects of non-specific SIgA against infection with Vibrio cholerae O139 strain MO10 and biofilm formation. Seven day old infant mice deficient in IgA (IgA(-/- mice displayed significantly greater intestinal MO10 burden at 24 hr post-challenge when compared to IgA(+/+ pups. Importantly, cross-fostering of IgA(-/- pups with IgA(+/+ nursing dams reversed the greater susceptibility to MO10 infection, suggesting a role for non-specific SIgA in protection against the infection. Since biofilm formation is associated with virulence of MO10, we further examined the role of human non-specific SIgA on this virulence phenotype of the pathogen. Human non-specific SIgA, in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly reduced the biofilm formation by MO10 without affecting the viability of the bacterium. Such an inhibitory effect was not induced by human serum IgA, IgG, or IgM, suggesting a role for the oligosaccharide-rich secretory component (SC of SIgA. This was supported by the demonstration that SIgA treated with endoglycosidase H, to cleave the high-mannose containing terminal chitobiose residues, did not induce a reduction in biofilm formation by MO10. Furthermore, the addition of free mannose per se, across a wide dose range, induced significant reduction in MO10 biofilm formation. Collectively, these results suggest that mannose containing oligosaccharides within human non-specific secretory IgA can alter important virulence phenotypes of Vibrio cholerae such as biofilm formation, without affecting viability of the microorganism. Such effects may contribute significantly to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus recovered from recreational and commercial areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi S Shaw

    Full Text Available Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n = 120 and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 77 were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus. Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%. Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p = 0.0166. Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial

  12. Antimicrobial effect of dietary oregano essential oil against Vibrio bacteria in shrimps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracia-Valenzuela M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dietary oregano essential oils on the growth of Vibrio bacteria in shrimps was evaluated. Shrimps were fed: (i food with oregano oil with a high level of thymol; (ii food with oregano oil with a high level of carvacrol, and (iii food without oregano oil (the control. The animals were infected by three species of Vibrio (vulnificus, parahaemolyticus and cholerae. The microbial counts of Vibrio species were significantly lower (p <0.05 in tissues from animals whose food was supplemented with oregano oil. We concluded that dietary supplementation of shrimps with oregano oil provides antimicrobial activity into the body of the penaeids.

  13. Antagonistic Activities of Purple Non-sulfur Bacterial Extracts Against Antibiotic Resistant Vibrio sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran, R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extracts of native purple non-sulfur bacterial (PNSB isolates from the effluents of brackish shrimp culture ponds, near Nagapattinam coast (South India were evaluated for antibacterial activity by the disc diffusion method. Best results were shown by the chloroform extracts against oxytetracycline resistant Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischerii. Among the purple non-sulfur bacterial isolates, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, showed maximum antagonistic activity. The findings suggest that the antagonistic extracts from Rba. sphaeroides could be used as an effective antibiotic in controlling Vibrio spp., in aquaculture systems.

  14. Application of Alternative Technologies to Eliminate Vibrios spp. in Raw Oysters

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaopei

    2004-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) and gamma irradiation were applied to inactivate Vibrio vulnificus (MO624) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (O3:K6 TX2103) in pure culture and in inoculated live oysters. Vibrio pure culture and inoculated oysters were exposed to pressures of 207 MPa (30 kpsi) to 552 MPa (80 kpsi) for 0 min to maximum of 20 min. More than 5.4 log reductions of V. vulnificus occurred at 345 MPa for 0 min in oysters; 345 MPa for 2 min can achieve 4 log reductions on V. parahaemolyticus...

  15. Comparative genomic analysis reveals evidence of two novel Vibrio species closely related to V. cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brettin Thomas S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years genome sequencing has been used to characterize new bacterial species, a method of analysis available as a result of improved methodology and reduced cost. Included in a constantly expanding list of Vibrio species are several that have been reclassified as novel members of the Vibrionaceae. The description of two putative new Vibrio species, Vibrio sp. RC341 and Vibrio sp. RC586 for which we propose the names V. metecus and V. parilis, respectively, previously characterized as non-toxigenic environmental variants of V. cholerae is presented in this study. Results Based on results of whole-genome average nucleotide identity (ANI, average amino acid identity (AAI, rpoB similarity, MLSA, and phylogenetic analysis, the new species are concluded to be phylogenetically closely related to V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Vibrio sp. RC341 and Vibrio sp. RC586 demonstrate features characteristic of V. cholerae and V. mimicus, respectively, on differential and selective media, but their genomes show a 12 to 15% divergence (88 to 85% ANI and 92 to 91% AAI compared to the sequences of V. cholerae and V. mimicus genomes (ANI Vibrio sp. RC341 and Vibrio sp. RC586 share 2104 ORFs (59% and 2058 ORFs (56% with the published core genome of V. cholerae and 2956 (82% and 3048 ORFs (84% with V. mimicus MB-451, respectively. The novel species share 2926 ORFs with each other (81% Vibrio sp. RC341 and 81% Vibrio sp. RC586. Virulence-associated factors and genomic islands of V. cholerae and V. mimicus, including VSP-I and II, were found in these environmental Vibrio spp. Conclusions Results of this analysis demonstrate these two environmental vibrios, previously characterized as variant V. cholerae strains, are new species which have evolved from ancestral lineages of the V. cholerae and V. mimicus clade. The presence of conserved integration loci for genomic islands as well as evidence of horizontal gene transfer between these two new

  16. Detection of Pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Shellfish by Using Multiplex PCR and DNA Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Panicker, Gitika; Call, Douglas R.; Krug, Melissa J.; Bej, Asim K.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the development of a gene-specific DNA microarray coupled with multiplex PCR for the comprehensive detection of pathogenic vibrios that are natural inhabitants of warm coastal waters and shellfish. Multiplex PCR with vvh and viuB for Vibrio vulnificus, with ompU, toxR, tcpI, and hlyA for V. cholerae, and with tlh, tdh, trh, and open reading frame 8 for V. parahaemolyticus helped to ensure that total and pathogenic strains, including subtypes of the three Vibrio spp., coul...

  17. Experimental evolution of aging in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Stephen C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging refers to a decline in reproduction and survival with increasing age. According to evolutionary theory, aging evolves because selection late in life is weak and mutations exist whose deleterious effects manifest only late in life. Whether the assumptions behind this theory are fulfilled in all organisms, and whether all organisms age, has not been clear. We tested the generality of this theory by experimental evolution with Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium whose asymmetric division allows mother and daughter to be distinguished. Results We evolved three populations for 2000 generations in the laboratory under conditions where selection was strong early in life, but very weak later in life. All populations evolved faster growth rates, mostly by decreasing the age at first division. Evolutionary changes in aging were inconsistent. The predominant response was the unexpected evolution of slower aging, revealing the limits of theoretical predictions if mutations have unanticipated phenotypic effects. However, we also observed the spread of a mutation causing earlier aging of mothers whose negative effect was reset in the daughters. Conclusion Our results confirm that late-acting deleterious mutations do occur in bacteria and that they can invade populations when selection late in life is weak. They suggest that very few organisms – perhaps none- can avoid the accumulation of such mutations over evolutionary time, and thus that aging is probably a fundamental property of all cellular organisms.

  18. Characterization and PCR Detection Of Binary, Pir-Like Toxins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates that Cause Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND in Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchanok Sirikharin

    Full Text Available Unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND have previously been identified as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND in shrimp. AHPND is characterized by massive sloughing of tubule epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas (HP, proposed to be induced by soluble toxins released from VPAHPND that colonize the shrimp stomach. Since these toxins (produced in broth culture have been reported to cause AHPND pathology in reverse gavage bioassays with shrimp, we used ammonium sulfate precipitation to prepare protein fractions from broth cultures of VPAHPND isolates for screening by reverse gavage assays. The dialyzed 60% ammonium sulfate fraction caused high mortality within 24-48 hours post-administration, and histological analysis of the moribund shrimp showed typical massive sloughing of hepatopancreatic tubule epithelial cells characteristic of AHPND. Analysis of the active fraction by SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at marker levels of approximately 16 kDa (ToxA and 50 kDa (ToxB. Mass spectrometry analysis followed by MASCOT analysis revealed that both proteins had similarity to hypothetical proteins of V. parahaemolyticus M0605 (contig034 GenBank accession no. JALL01000066.1 and similarity to known binary insecticidal toxins called 'Photorhabdus insect related' proteins A and B (Pir-A and Pir-B, respectively, produced by the symbiotic, nematode bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. In in vivo tests, it was shown that recombinant ToxA and ToxB were both required in a dose dependent manner to cause AHPND pathology, indicating further similarity to Pir-A and -B. A single-step PCR method was designed for detection of the ToxA gene and was validated using 104 bacterial isolates consisting of 51 VPAHPND isolates, 34 non-AHPND VP isolates and 19 other isolates of bacteria commonly found in shrimp ponds (including other species of Vibrio and Photobacterium. The results showed 100% specificity and sensitivity for

  19. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, William R.; Muscarella, Mario E.; Lennon, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments.

  20. Aspects of vibrio parahaemolyticus(SAK) in fish preservation by irradiation 1. The presence of vibrio parahaemolyticus(SAK) in coastal areas of Sumatra and Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was carried out on the presence of vibrio parahaemolyticus in samples of sediment and seafoods originating from the eastern coast of Sumatra and the north coastal areas of Java. In a total of 2.434 samples of sediment and seafoods, 79 (3,3%) were found to contain vibrio parahaemolyticus. Among the 467 sediment samples, 1.650 fish, 133 shellfish, 123 shrimps, and 61 crab samples, 22 (4.7%), 41 (2.5%), 12 (9.0%), 2 (1,6%) and 2 (3.3%) were positive for vibrio parahaemolyticus, respectively. Based on the sampling areas, the high incidence of vibrio parahaemolyticus was found in samples collected from Riau (5.4%), while the samples from East Java was only about 0.4%. The contamination level of vibrio parahaemolyticus in samples collected from coastal areas of Sumatra and Java is relatively lower compared with the data obtained from some other coastal areas in the United States and Japan. (author)

  1. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine...

  2. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  3. Genome Sequence of Vibrio cholerae G4222, a South African Clinical Isolate

    OpenAIRE

    le Roux, Wouter J.; Chan, Wai Yin; De Maayer, Pieter; Venter, Stephanus N.

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative pathogen autochthonous to the aquatic environment, is the causative agent of cholera. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of V. cholerae G4222, a clinical isolate from South Africa.

  4. Pulmonary Cholera Due to Infection with a Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Shannon, Jack D.; Kimbrough, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    We present 2 cases of primary pulmonary non-O1 Vibrio cholerae infection. We believe that these are the first documented cases of primary pulmonary infection due to this organism from a freshwater source.

  5. Gauze Filtration and Enrichment Procedures for Recovery of Vibrio cholerae from Contaminated Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Spira, W M; Ahmed, Q S

    1981-01-01

    Gauze filtration followed by 18-h enrichment in alkaline bile-peptone water is a simple, inexpensive, and efficient method for isolation Vibrio cholerae biotype eltor from contaminated surface waters.

  6. Biofilm formation and phenotypic variation enhance predation-driven persistence of Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; McDougald, D.; Moreno, A.M.;

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae in aquatic environments is the principal cause for seasonal occurrence of cholera epidemics. This causality has been explained by postulating that V. cholerae forms biofilms in association with animate and inanimate surfaces...

  7. Color correlation for the recognition of Vibrio cholerae O1 in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourino-Perez, Rosa R.; Alvarez-Borrego, Josue

    1999-07-01

    Application of color correlation optical systems for the recognition of Vibrio cholerae 01 in seawater samples with matched filters and phase only filters recorded in holographic plates in three channels (RGB).

  8. Prevalence and diversity of Aeromonas and Vibrio spp. in coastal waters of Southern Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumontet, S.; Krovacek, K.; Svenson, S.B.;

    2000-01-01

    % of samples were positive for Vibrio spp. It was interesting to note that 38% of the positive stations for both Aeromonas and Vibrio spp. showed a fecal coliform contamination of water at fecal......A survey was undertaken to examine sea water and sediment for the presence of Vibrio and Aeromonas spp. along approximately 900 km of coast in Southern Italy during early and late summer. A quantitative analysis was also done to evaluate the water fecal contamination at the stations examined....... The results indicate that all the investigated areas were submitted to a wide spatial fluctuation of fecal contamination and that Vibrio and Aeromonas spp. were present in both high and low fecal-contaminated stations. Sixty two percent of the investigated samples were positive for Aeromonas spp., while 42...

  9. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

    2012-06-01

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  10. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; William P. Wagner; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed...

  11. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Vibrio spp. in Retail and Farm Shrimps in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, L; Alter, T; Huehn, S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Vibrio spp. in shrimp at retail and in shrimp farms in Ecuador and to determine the antimicrobial agent resistance patterns of farm isolates. The presence of genes linked to early mortality syndrome (EMS) or acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) also was evaluated. Vibrio spp. were isolated from retail shrimps in Cuenca, Ecuador, and farm shrimps originating from provinces El Oro and Guayas, Ecuador. A total of 229 shrimp samples were collected, of which 71 originated from retail markets in Cuenca and 158 came from shrimp farms. Overall, 219 (95.6%) samples tested positive for Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (80.8%) was the most common species detected, followed by Vibrio alginolyticus (50.2%), Vibrio cholerae (11.3%), and Vibrio vulnificus (3.5%). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the virulence-associated tdh and trh genes. In V. parahaemolyticus shrimp farm isolates, high resistance was found to ampicillin (92.2%), and intermediate resistance was found to tetracycline (51.3%) and amikacin (22.1%). Of the V. parahaemolyticus strains, 68 were resistant to at least three antimicrobial agents, and 2 were resistant to seven antimicrobial agents simultaneously. Up to 18 resistant isolates were found for V. alginolyticus, whereas V. vulnificus and V. cholerae isolates were more susceptible. None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the EMS-AHPND plasmid. The results of this study revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of Vibrio spp. in shrimps at retail and on shrimp farms in Ecuador.

  12. Antagonistic Activities of Purple Non-sulfur Bacterial Extracts Against Antibiotic Resistant Vibrio sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Ashok Kumar, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    Solvent extracts of native purple non-sulfur bacterial (PNSB) isolates from the effluents of brackish shrimp culture ponds, near Nagapattinam coast (South India) were evaluated for antibacterial activity by the disc diffusion method. Best results were shown by the chloroform extracts against oxytetracycline resistant Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischerii. Among the purple non-sulfur bacterial isolates, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, showed maximum antagonistic activity. The findings suggest that the...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence for the Shellfish Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 Isolated from a Shellfish Hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gary P; Bono, James L; Watson, Michael A; Needleman, David S

    2014-12-18

    Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp) and two megaplasmids (380,714 and 319,400 bp).

  14. FK phage for differentiating the classical and El T or groups of Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Takeya, K; Otohuji, T; Tokiwa, H

    1981-01-01

    A new vibrio-infecting phage (FK phage) isolated from sewage lysed all strains of Vibrio cholerae biovar cholerae, whereas all strains of V. cholerae biovar El Tor were resistant to it. FK phage was entirely different from Mukerjee group IV phage in morphology and antigenicity. In addition to group IV phage, the use of FK phage will be useful in the examination and typing of V. cholerae.

  15. Neuraminidase production by Vibrio cholerae O1 and other diarrheagenic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir, S; Ahmad, N.; Ali, S.

    1984-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 strains belonging to both biotypes (classical and El Tor) and both serotypes (Ogawa and Inaba) produced neuraminidase which was released rather than cell bound. Classical strains made more neuraminidase than did El Tor strains. About one-third of V. cholerae non-O1 strains and one-fourth of Aeromonas hydrophila strains were neuraminidase positive. Strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Shigella spp. did not produce detectable neuraminidase.

  16. Natural transformation of Vibrio fischeri requires tfoX and tfoY

    OpenAIRE

    Pollack-Berti, Amber; Wollenberg, Michael S.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that natural genetic transformation occurs in Vibrio cholerae, and that it requires both induction by chitin oligosaccharides, like chitohexaose, and expression of a putative regulatory gene designated tfoX. Using sequence and phylogenetic analyses we have found two tfoX paralogues in all sequenced genomes of the genus Vibrio. Like V. cholerae, when grown in chitohexaose, cells of V. fischeri are able to take up and incorporate exogenous DNA. Chitohexaose-indepen...

  17. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Vibrio spp. in Retail and Farm Shrimps in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, L; Alter, T; Huehn, S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Vibrio spp. in shrimp at retail and in shrimp farms in Ecuador and to determine the antimicrobial agent resistance patterns of farm isolates. The presence of genes linked to early mortality syndrome (EMS) or acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) also was evaluated. Vibrio spp. were isolated from retail shrimps in Cuenca, Ecuador, and farm shrimps originating from provinces El Oro and Guayas, Ecuador. A total of 229 shrimp samples were collected, of which 71 originated from retail markets in Cuenca and 158 came from shrimp farms. Overall, 219 (95.6%) samples tested positive for Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (80.8%) was the most common species detected, followed by Vibrio alginolyticus (50.2%), Vibrio cholerae (11.3%), and Vibrio vulnificus (3.5%). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the virulence-associated tdh and trh genes. In V. parahaemolyticus shrimp farm isolates, high resistance was found to ampicillin (92.2%), and intermediate resistance was found to tetracycline (51.3%) and amikacin (22.1%). Of the V. parahaemolyticus strains, 68 were resistant to at least three antimicrobial agents, and 2 were resistant to seven antimicrobial agents simultaneously. Up to 18 resistant isolates were found for V. alginolyticus, whereas V. vulnificus and V. cholerae isolates were more susceptible. None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the EMS-AHPND plasmid. The results of this study revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of Vibrio spp. in shrimps at retail and on shrimp farms in Ecuador. PMID:26555534

  18. Oligotyping reveals community level habitat selection within the genus Vibrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Thomas Schmidt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus Vibrio is a metabolically and genetically diverse group of facultative anaerobic Bacteria, common in aquatic environments and marine hosts. The genus contains several species of importance to human health and aquaculture, including the causative agents of human cholera and fish vibriosis. Vibrios display a wide variety of known life histories, from opportunistic pathogens to long-standing symbioses with individual host species. Studying Vibrio ecology has been challenging as individual species often display a wide range of habitat preferences, and groups of vibrios can act as socially cohesive groups. Although strong associations with salinity, temperature and other environmental variables have been established, the degree of habitat or host specificity at both the individual and community levels is unknown. Here we use oligotyping analyses in combination with a large collection of existing Vibrio 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequence data to reveal patterns of Vibrio ecology across a wide range of environmental, host, and abiotic substrate associated habitats. Our data show that individual taxa often display a wide range of habitat preferences yet tend to be highly abundant in either substrate-associated or free-living environments. Our analyses show that Vibrio communities share considerable overlap between two distinct hosts (i.e., sponge and fish yet are distinct from the abiotic plastic substrates. Lastly, evidence for habitat specificity at the community level exists in some habitats, despite considerable stochasticity in others. In addition to providing insights into Vibrio ecology across a broad range of habitats, our study shows the utility of oligotyping as a facile, high-throughput and unbiased method for large scale analyses of publicly available sequence data repositories and suggests its wide application could greatly extend the range of possibilities to explore microbial ecology.

  19. [Factors of persistence and (or) pathogenicity in vibrios and aeromonads belonging to different ecotopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukharin, O V; Boĭko, A V; Zhuravleva, L A

    1998-01-01

    Factors of persistence and/or pathogenicity in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Aeromonas hydrophila (hemolytic, lipase, lecithin, DNAase, RNAase, antilysozyme, "anti-interferon", anticomplementary activities and capacity for absorbing Congo red) were studied. The study revealed the interspecific and subpopulation (hospital and extraorganismal parts of the population) differences in the activity of the manifestation of these factors. Strong dependence of the whole complex of persistence and pathogenicity factors of their belonging to the hostal part of Vibrio and Aeromonas populations was shown.

  20. Pathogenicity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Different Food Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rundong; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Yaling; Deng, Yijia; Liu, Ying; Xu, Defeng; Liu, Huanming; Ye, Riying; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenicity and virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in four food matrices--shrimp, freshwater fish, pork, and egg-fried rice--were compared by measuring the thermostable direct hemolysin activity and total hemolytic titer. Significantly high thermostable direct hemolysin and also hemolytic titers (P shrimp > freshwater fish > pork. Filtrates of V. parahaemolyticus in shrimp given intraperitoneally induced marked liver and kidney damage and were highly lethal to adult mice compared with filtrates of V. parahaemolyticus in freshwater fish > egg-fried rice > pork. From in vitro and in vivo pathogenicity tests, it seems the type of food matrix has a significant impact on the virulence of V. parahaemolyticus. These results suggest that hemolysin may not necessarily be the only virulence factor for pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus. This is the first report that shows that virulence factors produced by V. parahaemolyticus in seafood such as shrimp are more toxic in vivo than in nonseafood.

  1. Identification and characterization of Vibrio cholerae surface proteins by radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole cells and isolated outer membrane from Vibrio cholerae (Classical, Inaba) were radiolabeled with Iodogen or Iodo-beads as catalyst. Radiolabeling of whole cells was shown to be surface specific by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole cells and cell fractions. Surface-labeled whole cells regularly showed 16 distinguishable protein species, of which nine were found in radiolabeled outer membrane preparations obtained by a lithium chloride- lithium acetate procedure. Eight of these proteins were found in outer membranes prepared by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and Triton X-100 extraction of radiolabeled whole cells. The mobility of several proteins was shown to be affected by temperature, and the major protein species exposed on the cell surface was shown to consist of at least two different peptides

  2. Comparative genomics of Vibrio cholerae from Haiti, Asia, and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Aleisha R; Van Domselaar, Gary; Stroika, Steven; Walker, Matthew; Kent, Heather; Tarr, Cheryl; Talkington, Deborah; Rowe, Lori; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Frace, Michael; Sammons, Scott; Dahourou, Georges Anicet; Boncy, Jacques; Smith, Anthony M; Mabon, Philip; Petkau, Aaron; Graham, Morag; Gilmour, Matthew W; Gerner-Smidt, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Cholera was absent from the island of Hispaniola at least a century before an outbreak that began in Haiti in the fall of 2010. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of clinical isolates from the Haiti outbreak and recent global travelers returning to the United States showed indistinguishable PFGE fingerprints. To better explore the genetic ancestry of the Haiti outbreak strain, we acquired 23 whole-genome Vibrio cholerae sequences: 9 isolates obtained in Haiti or the Dominican Republic, 12 PFGE pattern-matched isolates linked to Asia or Africa, and 2 nonmatched outliers from the Western Hemisphere. Phylogenies for whole-genome sequences and core genome single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed that the Haiti outbreak strain is genetically related to strains originating in India and Cameroon. However, because no identical genetic match was found among sequenced contemporary isolates, a definitive genetic origin for the outbreak in Haiti remains speculative.

  3. Acute Otitis due to Vibrio fluvialis after Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Jen Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old female presented with purulent exudate through the left auditive duct and pain in the left ear region, which intensified during mastication. After collection of the pus from the left ear lesion, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for seven days was prescribed for a presumed diagnosis of acute otitis. Four days later, the pus culture grew V. fluvialis which is further identified by API 20E identification system (bioMérieux. Following the successful completion of a course of antibiotics, the patient recovered completely and without complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of Vibrio fluvialis otitis after swimming in an immunocompetent patient.

  4. Quorum sensing regulates the osmotic stress response in Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Julia C; Rutherford, Steven T; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress.

  5. Impacts of Climatic Variability on Vibrio parahaemolyticus Outbreaks in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsin-I; Jan, Man-Ser; Chi, Hui-Ju

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate and quantify the relationship between climate variation and incidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Taiwan. Specifically, seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models (including autoregression, seasonality, and a lag-time effect) were employed to predict the role of climatic factors (including temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, ocean temperature and ocean salinity) on the incidence of V. parahaemolyticus in Taiwan between 2000 and 2011. The results indicated that average temperature (+), ocean temperature (+), ocean salinity of 6 months ago (+), maximum daily rainfall (current (-) and one month ago (-)), and average relative humidity (current and 9 months ago (-)) had significant impacts on the incidence of V. parahaemolyticus. Our findings offer a novel view of the quantitative relationship between climate change and food poisoning by V. parahaemolyticus in Taiwan. An early warning system based on climate change information for the disease control management is required in future. PMID:26848675

  6. The role of Vibrio cholerae genotyping in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rituparna; Ghosh, Jayeeta Banerjee; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Nair, G Balakrish

    2013-11-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease cholera, is prevalent in the African continent from the 1970s when the seventh pandemic spread from Asia to Africa. In the past decade, cholera has caused devastating outbreaks in much of Africa, illustrated by the recent cholera epidemics in Zimbabwe and regions of central Africa. Given the extent of cholera in Africa, a robust and efficient surveillance system should be in place to prevent and control the disease in this continent. Such a surveillance system would be greatly bolstered by use of molecular typing techniques to identify genetic subtypes. In this review, we highlight the role that modern molecular typing techniques can play in tracking and aborting the spread of cholera. PMID:24101642

  7. Inhibition of marine Vibrio sp. by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Liang, Weikang; Li, Chenghua

    2016-01-25

    Siderophores are low-molecular-weight chemicals that are secreted by many microorganisms to chelate iron from the external environment in order to facilitate their growth and diverse metabolisms. In this study, a fluorescent siderophore, pyoverdine, secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 was purified by affinity chromatography using Cu-sepharose. Pyoverdine was determined to have a molecular mass of 1333.54 Da, as determined by MALDI-TOF/TOF, and belong to type I pyoverdine, as determined by PCR analysis of its corresponding outer membrane ferri-pyoverdine receptor. Pyoverdine showed different degrees of inhibitory effects on the growth of marine Vibrio sp. strains. It was also shown that the biofilm developed by Vibrio parahaemolyticus WzW1 and Wz2121 and Vibrio cyclitrophicus HS12 was significantly reduced, alone with the repressed growth in the presence of pyoverdine. Siderophore production was determined in the strains of Vibrio sp. in response to the pyoverdine-induced iron-limited conditions. The siderophore production of most Vibrio sp. was up-regulated, with the exception of the bacteria that produced little siderophore. Furthermore, Apostichopus japonicus cultured in pyoverdine pretreated seawater showed a relative percent of survival of 89% when they were challenged by Vibrio splendidus. Our results demonstrated that pyoverdine may be a promising agent that could be potentially applied to treat vibriosis. PMID:26476308

  8. Genetic diversity of culturable Vibrio in an Australian blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Tzu Nin; Bolch, Christopher J S

    2015-09-17

    Bacillary necrosis associated with Vibrio species is the common cause of larval and spat mortality during commercial production of Australian blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. A total of 87 randomly selected Vibrio isolates from various stages of rearing in a commercial mussel hatchery were characterised using partial sequences of the ATP synthase alpha subunit gene (atpA). The sequenced isolates represented 40 unique atpA genotypes, overwhelmingly dominated (98%) by V. splendidus group genotypes, with 1 V. harveyi group genotype also detected. The V. splendidus group sequences formed 5 moderately supported clusters allied with V. splendidus/V. lentus, V. atlanticus, V. tasmaniensis, V. cyclitrophicus and V. toranzoniae. All water sources showed considerable atpA gene diversity among Vibrio isolates, with 30 to 60% of unique isolates recovered from each source. Over half (53%) of Vibrio atpA genotypes were detected only once, and only 7 genotypes were recovered from multiple sources. Comparisons of phylogenetic diversity using UniFrac analysis showed that the culturable Vibrio community from intake, header, broodstock and larval tanks were phylogenetically similar, while spat tank communities were different. Culturable Vibrio associated with spat tank seawater differed in being dominated by V. toranzoniae-affiliated genotypes. The high diversity of V. splendidus group genotypes detected in this study reinforces the dynamic nature of microbial communities associated with hatchery culture and complicates our efforts to elucidate the role of V. splendidus group bacteria in vibriosis.

  9. Effects of Dry Storage and Resubmersion of Oysters on Total Vibrio vulnificus and Total and Pathogenic (tdh+/trh+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Thomas P; Lydon, Keri A; Bowers, John C; Jones, Jessica L

    2015-08-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are the two leading causes of bacterial illnesses associated with raw shellfish consumption. Levels of these pathogens in oysters can increase during routine antifouling aquaculture practices involving dry storage in ambient air conditions. After storage, common practice is to resubmerge these stored oysters to reduce elevated Vv and Vp levels, but evidence proving the effectiveness of this practice is lacking. This study examined the changes in Vv and in total and pathogenic (thermostable direct hemolysin gene and the tdh-related hemolysin gene, tdh+ and trh+) Vp levels in oysters after 5 or 24 h of dry storage (28 to 32°C), followed by resubmersion (27 to 32°C) for 14 days. For each trial, replicate oyster samples were collected at initial harvest, after dry storage, after 7 days, and after 14 days of resubmersion. Oysters not subjected to dry storage were collected and analyzed to determine natural undisturbed vibrio levels (background control). Vibrio levels were measured using a most-probable-number enrichment followed by real-time PCR. After storage, vibrio levels (excluding tdh+ and trh+ Vp during 5-h storage) increased significantly (P 0.1) from levels in background oysters after 14 days of resubmersion, regardless of dry storage time. These data demonstrate that oyster resubmersion after dry storage at elevated ambient temperatures allows vibrio levels to return to those of background control samples. These results can be used to help minimize the risk of Vv and Vp illnesses and to inform the oyster industry on the effectiveness of routine storing and resubmerging of aquaculture oysters.

  10. In-Vitro Antagonistic Characteristics of Crude Aqueous and Methanolic Extracts of Garcinia kola (Heckel) Seeds against Some Vibrio Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Okoh, Anthony I.; Dambudzo Penduka; Omobola O. Okoh

    2011-01-01

    The methanolic and aqueous extracts of Garcinia kola seeds were screened for their anti-Vibrio activities against 50 Vibrio isolates obtained from wastewater final effluents in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The crude extracts at 10 mg/mL exhibited appreciable inhibitory activities against most of the test Vibrio isolates, with zones of inhibition ranging from 10–19 mm for methanol extract and 8–15 mm for the aqueous extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the metha...

  11. Prevalence, Molecular Characterization, and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from Ready-to-Eat Foods in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tengfei; Xu, Xiaoke; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Cheng, Jianheng

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks, particularly outbreaks associated with consumption of fish and shellfish, and represents a major threat to human health worldwide. This bacterium harbors two main virulence factors: the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). Additionally, various serotypes have been identified. The extensive use of antibiotics is a contributing factor to the increasing incidence of antimicrobial-resistant V. parahaemolyticus. In the current study, we aimed to determine the incidence and features of V. parahaemolyticus in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods in China. We found 39 V. parahaemolyticus strains on Chinese RTE foods through investigation of 511 RTE foods samples from 24 cities in China. All isolates were analyzed for the presence of tdh and trh gene by PCR, serotyping was performed using multiplex PCR, antibiotic susceptibility analysis was carried out using the disk diffusion method, and molecular typing was performed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The results showed that none of the isolates were positive for tdh and trh. Most of the isolates (33.3%) were serotype O2. Antimicrobial susceptibility results indicated that most strains were resistant to streptomycin (89.7%), cefazolin (51.3%), and ampicillin (51.3%). The isolates were grouped into five clusters by ERIC-PCR and four clusters by MLST. We updated 10 novel loci and 33 sequence types (STs) in the MLST database. Thus, our findings demonstrated the presence of V. parahaemolyticus in Chinese RTE foods, provided insights into the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains, and improved our knowledge of methods of microbiological risk assessment in RTE foods.

  12. RpoS plays a central role in the SOS induction by sub-lethal aminoglycoside concentrations in Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Baharoglu

    Full Text Available Bacteria encounter sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in various niches, where these low doses play a key role for antibiotic resistance selection. However, the physiological effects of these sub-lethal concentrations and their observed connection to the cellular mechanisms generating genetic diversification are still poorly understood. It is known that, unlike for the model bacterium Escherichia coli, sub-minimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC of aminoglycosides (AGs induce the SOS response in Vibrio cholerae. SOS is induced upon DNA damage, and since AGs do not directly target DNA, we addressed two issues in this study: how sub-MIC AGs induce SOS in V. cholerae and why they do not do so in E. coli. We found that when bacteria are grown with tobramycin at a concentration 100-fold below the MIC, intracellular reactive oxygen species strongly increase in V. cholerae but not in E. coli. Using flow cytometry and gfp fusions with the SOS regulated promoter of intIA, we followed AG-dependent SOS induction. Testing the different mutation repair pathways, we found that over-expression of the base excision repair (BER pathway protein MutY relieved this SOS induction in V. cholerae, suggesting a role for oxidized guanine in AG-mediated indirect DNA damage. As a corollary, we established that a BER pathway deficient E. coli strain induces SOS in response to sub-MIC AGs. We finally demonstrate that the RpoS general stress regulator prevents oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage formation in E. coli. We further show that AG-mediated SOS induction is conserved among the distantly related Gram negative pathogens Klebsiella pneumoniae and Photorhabdus luminescens, suggesting that E. coli is more of an exception than a paradigm for the physiological response to antibiotics sub-MIC.

  13. Antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from fresh shrimps in Shanghai fish markets, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Jin, Lanlan; Sun, Fengjiao; Hu, Qiongxia; Chen, Lanming

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a causative agent of human serious seafood-borne gastroenteritis disease and even death. Shrimps, often eaten raw or undercooked, are an important reservoir of the bacterium. In this study, we isolated and characterized a total of 400 V. parahaemolyticus strains from commonly consumed fresh shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Penaeus monodon, and Exopalaemon carinicauda) in Shanghai fish markets, China in 2013-2014. The results revealed an extremely low occurrence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus carrying two major toxic genes (tdh and trh, 0.0 and 0.5 %). However, high incidences of antibiotic resistance were observed among the strains against ampicillin (99 %), streptomycin (45.25 %), rifampicin (38.25 %), and spectinomycin (25.50 %). Approximately 24 % of the strains derived from the P. monodon sample displayed multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, followed by 19, 12, and 6 % from the E. carinicauda, L. vannamei, and M. rosenbergii samples, respectively. Moreover, tolerance to heavy metals of Cr(3+) and Zn(2+) was observed in 90 antibiotic resistant strains, the majority of which also displayed resistance to Cu(2+) (93.3 %), Pb(2+) (87.8 %), and Cd(2+)(73.3 %). The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)-based genotyping of these strains revealed a total of 71 distinct pulsotypes, demonstrating a large degree of genomic variation among the isolates. The wide distribution of MDR and heavy-metal resistance isolates in the PFGE clusters suggested the co-existence of a number of resistant determinants in V. parahaemolyticus population in the detected samples. This study provided data in support of aquatic animal health management and food safety risk assessment in aquaculture industry. PMID:27083906

  14. Virulence and molecular typing of Vibrio harveyi strains isolated from cultured dentex, gilthead sea bream and European sea bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujalte, M J; Sitjà-Bobadilla, A; Macián, M C; Belloch, C; Alvarez-Pellitero, P; Pérez-Sánchez, J; Uruburu, F; Garay, E

    2003-06-01

    Vibrio harveyi was isolated from internal organs or ulcers of diseased and apparently healthy gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) cultured in several fish farms located on the Spanish Mediterranean coast. The prevalence of the bacterium was significantly higher in European sea bass than in gilthead sea bream, and was closely related to the season in both fish species, occurring almost exclusively on warm months (June to November). After phenotypic characterization, a selection of forty five isolates from gilthead sea bream, sea bass, and several isolates previously obtained from common dentex (Dentex dentex) of the same area, were molecularly typed by automated ribotyping and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Cluster analysis of data established 8 RAPD types and 13 ribotypes among wild isolates, and the combination of both techniques allowed to define fourteen different groups and a clear discrimination of all outbreaks and samplings. Several strains isolated from diseased gilthead sea bream and sea bass and also from asymptomatic sea bream, were tested for virulence in both fish species by intracoelomic injection. All the isolates (11) were pathogenic for sea bass, with nine out of the eleven LD50 values ranging from 1.5 x 10(5) to 1.6 x 10(6) cfu/fish. Gilthead sea bream was unaffected by the seven tested strains, even by those more virulent for sea bass, and only one strain caused a 10% mortality at 4.2 x 10(7) cfu/fish. This is the first report on virulence of V. harveyi for sea bass. PMID:12866856

  15. Toxicological responses of the hard clam Meretrix meretrix exposed to excess dissolved iron or challenged by Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, School of Ocean and Earth Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Zhang, Yong [Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and the Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Peng, Hui-Fang [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Ke, Cai-Huan, E-mail: chke@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, School of Ocean and Earth Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Huang, He-Qing, E-mail: hqhuang@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, School of Ocean and Earth Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and the Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Fe accumulated in hepatopancreas tissues after iron-enriched exposure. • Ferritin expression was positively correlated with iron concentration in seawater. • Ferritin appears to be involved in iron homeostasis and immune defense mechanism of M. meretrix. • mRNAs of cytokine genes responded faster than antioxidant enzyme genes in immune defense mechanism. • The study gives a new potential biomarker for monitoring iron levels in seawater. - Abstract: The responses of genes encoding defense components such as ferritin, the lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha factor (LITAF), the inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB (IκB), metallothionein, and glutathione peroxidase were assessed at the transcriptional level in order to investigate the toxicological and immune mechanism of the hard clam Meretrix meretrix (HCMM) following challenge with iron or a bacterium (Vibrio parahaemolyticus). Fe dissolved in natural seawater led to an increase of Fe content in both the hepatopancreas and gill tissue of HCMM between 4 and 15 days of exposure. The ferritin gene responded both transcriptionally as indicated by real-time quantitative PCR and translationally as shown by western blotting results to iron exposure and both transcriptional and translational ferritin expression in the hepatopancreas had a positive correlation with the concentration of dissolved iron in seawater. Both iron and V. parahaemolyticus exposure triggered immune responses with similar trends in clam tissues. There was a significant post-challenge mRNA expression of LITAF and IκB at 3 h, ferritin at 24 h, and metallothionein and glutathione peroxidase at 48 h. This behavior might be linked to their specific functions in physiological processes. These results suggested that similar signaling pathways were triggered during both iron and V. parahaemolyticus challenges. Here, we indicated that the ferritin of Meretrix meretrix was an intermediate in the pathway of iron homeostasis

  16. Relative contributions of Vibrio polysaccharide and quorum sensing to the resistance of Vibrio cholerae to predation by heterotrophic protists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyang Sun

    Full Text Available Protozoan grazing is a major mortality factor faced by bacteria in the environment. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease cholera, is a natural inhabitant of aquatic ecosystems, and its survival depends on its ability to respond to stresses, such as predation by heterotrophic protists. Previous results show that grazing pressure induces biofilm formation and enhances a smooth to rugose morphotypic shift, due to increased expression of Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. In addition to negatively controlling vps genes, the global quorum sensing (QS regulator, HapR, plays a role in grazing resistance as the ΔhapR strain is efficiently consumed while the wild type (WT is not. Here, the relative and combined contributions of VPS and QS to grazing resistance were investigated by exposing VPS and HapR mutants and double mutants in VPS and HapR encoding genes at different phases of biofilm development to amoeboid and flagellate grazers. Data show that the WT biofilms were grazing resistant, the VPS mutants were less resistant than the WT strain, but more resistant than the QS mutant strain, and that QS contributes to grazing resistance mainly in mature biofilms. In addition, grazing effects on biofilms of mixed WT and QS mutant strains were investigated. The competitive fitness of each strain in mixed biofilms was determined by CFU and microscopy. Data show that protozoa selectively grazed the QS mutant in mixed biofilms, resulting in changes in the composition of the mixed community. A small proportion of QS mutant cells which comprised 4% of the mixed biofilm biovolume were embedded in grazing resistant WT microcolonies and shielded from predation, indicating the existence of associational protection in mixed biofilms.

  17. Survey on antimicrobial resistance patterns in Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 in Germany reveals carbapenemase-producing Vibrio cholerae in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Nadja; Schwartz, Keike; Guerra, Beatriz; Strauch, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species is expected for waters in Northern Europe as a consequence of global warming. In this context, a higher incidence of Vibrio infections is predicted for the future and forecasts suggest that people visiting and living at the Baltic Sea are at particular risk. This study aimed to investigate antimicrobial resistance patterns among Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 isolates that could pose a public health risk. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 141 V. vulnificus and 184 V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains isolated from German coastal waters (Baltic Sea and North Sea) as well as from patients and retail seafood was assessed by broth microdilution and disk diffusion. Both species were susceptible to most of the agents tested (12 subclasses) and no multidrug-resistance was observed. Among V. vulnificus isolates, non-susceptibility was exclusively found toward aminoglycosides. In case of V. cholerae, a noticeable proportion of strains was non-susceptible to aminopenicillins and aminoglycosides. In addition, resistance toward carbapenems, quinolones, and folate pathway inhibitors was sporadically observed. Biochemical testing indicated the production of carbapenemases with unusual substrate specificity in four environmental V. cholerae strains. Most antimicrobial agents recommended for treatment of V. vulnificus and V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 infections were found to be effective in vitro. However, the occurrence of putative carbapenemase producing V. cholerae in German coastal waters is of concern and highlights the need for systematic monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility in potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Europe. PMID:26579088

  18. Survey on antimicrobial resistance patterns in Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 in Germany reveals carbapenemase-producing Vibrio cholerae in coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja eBier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An increase in the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species is expected for waters in Northern Europe as a consequence of global warming. In this context, a higher incidence of Vibrio infections is predicted for the future and forecasts suggest that people visiting and living at the Baltic Sea are at particular risk.This study aimed to investigate antimicrobial resistance patterns among Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 isolates that could pose a public health risk. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 141 V. vulnificus and 184 V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains isolated from German coastal waters (Baltic Sea and North Sea as well as from patients and retail seafood was assessed by broth microdilution and disk diffusion. Both species were susceptible to most of the agents tested (12 subclasses and no multidrug-resistance was observed. Among V. vulnificus isolates, non-susceptibility was exclusively found towards aminoglycosides. In case of V. cholerae, a noticeable proportion of strains was non-susceptible to aminopenicillins and aminoglycosides. In addition, resistance towards carbapenems, quinolones, and folate pathway inhibitors was sporadically observed. Biochemical testing indicated the production of carbapenemases with unusual substrate specificity in four environmental V. cholerae strains. Most antimicrobial agents recommended for treatment of V. vulnificus and V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 infections were found to be effective in vitro. However, the occurrence of putative carbapenemase producing V. cholerae in German coastal waters is of concern and highlights the need for systematic monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility in potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Europe.

  19. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirakar Pradhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  20. Unique and conserved genome regions in Vibrio harveyi and related species in comparison with the shrimp pathogen Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valles, Iliana Espinoza; Vora, Gary J; Lin, Baochuan;

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792 is a marine bacterial strain that causes mortality in farmed shrimp in north-west Mexico, and the identification of virulence genes in this strain is important for understanding its pathogenicity. The aim of this work was to compare the V. harveyi CAIM 1792 genome...

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: serotype conversion and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Ana I

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common cause of foodborne disease. Beginning in 1996, a more virulent strain having serotype O3:K6 caused major outbreaks in India and other parts of the world, resulting in the emergence of a pandemic. Other serovariants of this strain emerged during its dissemination and together with the original O3:K6 were termed strains of the pandemic clone. Two genomes, one of this virulent strain and one pre-pandemic strain have been sequenced. We sequenced four additional genomes of V. parahaemolyticus in this study that were isolated from different geographical regions and time points. Comparative genomic analyses of six strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from Asia and Peru were performed in order to advance knowledge concerning the evolution of V. parahaemolyticus; specifically, the genetic changes contributing to serotype conversion and virulence. Two pre-pandemic strains and three pandemic strains, isolated from different geographical regions, were serotype O3:K6 and either toxin profiles (tdh+, trh- or (tdh-, trh+. The sixth pandemic strain sequenced in this study was serotype O4:K68. Results Genomic analyses revealed that the trh+ and tdh+ strains had different types of pathogenicity islands and mobile elements as well as major structural differences between the tdh pathogenicity islands of the pre-pandemic and pandemic strains. In addition, the results of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis showed that 94% of the SNPs between O3:K6 and O4:K68 pandemic isolates were within a 141 kb region surrounding the O- and K-antigen-encoding gene clusters. The "core" genes of V. parahaemolyticus were also compared to those of V. cholerae and V. vulnificus, in order to delineate differences between these three pathogenic species. Approximately one-half (49-59% of each species' core genes were conserved in all three species, and 14-24% of the core genes were species-specific and in different

  2. A dual-color flow cytometry protocol for the simultaneous detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium using aptamer conjugated quantum dots as labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Yu, Ye [Zhangjiagang Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Zhangjiangang 215600 (China); Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Chen, Xiujuan; Huang, Yukun [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wang, Zhouping, E-mail: wangzp@jiangnan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Two bacteria were simultaneously detected using QD-apt as labels by flow cytometry. •QD-apt were used for recognition and fluorescence detection of two bacteria. •The method was applied successfully for bacteria detection in real samples. -- Abstract: A sensitive, specific method for the collection and detection of pathogenic bacteria was demonstrated using quantum dots (QDs) as a fluorescence marker coupled with aptamers as the molecular recognition element by flow cytometry. The aptamer sequences were selected using a bacterium-based SELEX strategy in our laboratory for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium that, when applied in this method, allows for the specific recognition of the bacteria from complex mixtures including shrimp samples. Aptamer-modified QDs (QD-apt) were employed to selectively capture and simultaneously detect the target bacteria with high sensitivity using the fluorescence of the labeled QDs. The signal intensity is amplified due to the high photostability of QDs nanoparticles, resulting in improved sensitivity over methods using individual dye-labeled probes. This proposed method is promising for the sensitive detection of other pathogenic bacteria in food stuff if suitable aptamers are chosen. The method may also provide another potential platform for the application of aptamer-conjugated QDs in flow cytometry.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of VibE, a vibriobactin-specific 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-AMP ligase from Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports the molecular cloning, protein expression and purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the vibriobactin synthetase VibE from V. cholerae. Vibriobactin synthetases (VibABCDEFH) catalyze the biosynthesis of vibriobactin in the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. VibE, a vibriobactin-specific 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-AMP ligase, plays a critical role in the transfer of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate to the aryl carrier protein domain of holo VibB. Here, the cloning, protein expression and purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of VibE from V. cholerae are reported. The VibE crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.471, b = 45.927, c = 77.014 Å, β = 95.895°. There is one protein molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding Matthews coefficient of 1.63 Å3 Da−1 and solvent content of 24.41%

  4. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the 31 kDa Vibrio cholerae heat-shock protein VcHsp31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat-shock protein from V. cholerae (VcHsp31) has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of VcHsp31 belonged to a monoclinic space group and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. The Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which is responsible for the diarrhoeal disease cholera in humans, induces the expression of numerous heat-shock genes. VcHsp31 is a 31 kDa putative heat-shock protein that belongs to the DJ-1/PfpI superfamily, functioning as both a chaperone and a protease. VcHsp31 has been cloned, overexpressed and purified by Ni2+–NTA affinity chromatography followed by gel filtration. Crystals of VcHsp31 were grown in the presence of PEG 6000 and MPD; they belonged to space group P21 and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. Assuming the presence of six molecules in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient was estimated to be 1.97 Å3 Da−1, corresponding to a solvent content of 37.4%

  5. An ELISA-on-a-chip biosensor system coupled with immunomagnetic separation for the detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus within a single working day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sung-Min; Cho, Il-Hoon; Jeon, Jin-Woo; Cho, Hyun-Kyu; Oh, Eun-Gyoung; Yu, Hong-Sik; Shin, Soon-Bum; Lee, Hee-Jung; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we constructed a rapid detection system for a foodborne pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-on-a-chip (EOC) biosensor technology to minimize the risk of infection by the microorganism. The EOC results showed a detection capability of approximately 6.2x10(5) cells per ml, which was significantly higher than that of the conventional rapid test kit. However, this high level of sensitivity required cultivation of the pathogen prior to analysis, which typically exceeded a day. To shorten the test period, we combined the EOC technology with immunomagnetic separation (IMS), which could enhance the sensitivity of the biosensor. IMS was carried out with magnetic particles coated with a monoclonal antibody specific to the microbe. To test the performance of the IMS-EOC method, fish intestine samples were prepared by artificially inoculating less than 1 or 5 CFU/10 g, allowing for enrichment over predetermined times, and analyzing the sample by using the EOC sensor after concentrating the culture 86-fold via IMS. Using this approach, the bacterium was detected after (at most) 9 h, which approximately corresponds to standard working hours. Thus, the IMS-EOC method allowed for the rapid detection of V. parahaemolyticus, which is responsible for foodborne diseases, and this method could be used for early isolation of contaminated foods before distribution.

  6. Cloning, expression of Vibrio alginolyticus outer membrane protein-OmpU gene and its potential application as vaccine in crimson snapper, Lutjanus erythropterus Bloch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, S H; Lu, Y S; Wu, Z H; Jian, J C

    2013-08-01

    The outer membrane proteins of the marine aquatic animal pathogen, Vibrio alginolyticus, play an important role in the virulence of the bacterium and are potential candidates for vaccine development. In this study, the gene encoding an outer membrane protein-OmpU was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits against the purified recombinant OmpU, and the reaction of the antibody was confirmed by Western blotting using the isolated OmpU and the recombinant OmpU of V. alginolyticus. To analyze the immunogenicity of the recombinant OmpU, crimson snapper, Lutjanus erythropterus Bloch, were immunized by intraperitoneal injection, and antibody response was assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results demonstrated that the recombinant OmpU produced an observable antibody response in all sera of the vaccinated fish. The vaccinated fish were challenged by virulent V. alginolyticus and observed to have high resistance to infection. These results indicate that the recombinant OmpU is an effective vaccine candidate against V. alginolyticus in L. erythropterus.

  7. Evaluation of RAPD-PCR and protein profile analysis to differentiate Vibrio harveyi strains prevalent along the southwest coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Maiti; Malathi Shekar; Rekha Khushiramani; Iddya Karunasagar; Indrani Karunasagar

    2009-12-01

    Sixty five isolates of Vibrio harveyi were subjected to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis and protein profiling to investigate the genetic variability among V. harveyi prevalent along the coast and also assess the discriminating ability of these two molecular methods. A total of 10 RAPD primers were assayed for their specificity in detecting V. harveyi, of which only two primers: PM3 and CRA25 were highly reproducible and found suitable for use in RAPD-PCR. The genetic diversity among V. harveyi isolates assessed by RAPD-PCR using PM3 primer yielded 35 different RAPD patterns which clustered the isolates into 15 groups at 72% similarity level. Similarly, RAPD-PCR with CRA25 clustered the 38 patterns into 10 groups at 74% similarity. The discriminatory index $(D)$ value calculated for RAPD fingerprints generated with PM3 and CRA25 were 0.90 and 0.85, respectively. On the other hand, molecular typing of V. harveyi using whole cell proteins generated profiles that showed no major difference indicating the technique to be not useful in typing strains of this bacterium. However, a few of the isolates showed the presence of unique band of 28 kDa that needs to be further investigated to understand the role of the protein in disease process if any.

  8. Pandemic serotypes of Vibrio cholerae isolated from ships' ballast tanks and coastal waters: assessment of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes (tcpA and ctxA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Fred C; Goodrich, Amanda L; Thomson, Frank K; Hynes, Wayne

    2013-05-01

    There is concern that ships' ballasting operations may disseminate Vibrio cholerae to ports throughout the world. Given evidence that the bacterium is indeed transported by ships, we isolated pandemic serotypes O1 and O139 from ballast tanks and characterized them with respect to antibiotic resistance and virulence genes ctxA and tcpA. We carried out concurrent studies with V. cholerae isolated from coastal waters. Of 284 isolates, 30 were serotype O1 and 59 were serotype O139. These serotypes were overrepresented in ballast tanks relative to the coastal waters sampled. All locations, whether coastal waters or ballast tanks, yielded samples from which serotype O1, O139, or both were isolated. There were three groups among the 62 isolates for which antibiotic characterization was conclusive: those exhibiting β-lactamase activity and resistance to at least one of the 12 antibiotics tested; those negative for β-lactamase but having antibiotic resistance; those negative for β-lactamase and registering no antibiotic resistance. When present, antibiotic resistance in nearly all cases was to ampicillin; resistance to multiple antibiotics was uncommon. PCR assays revealed that none of the isolates contained the ctxA gene and only two isolates, one O139 and one O1, contained the tcpA gene; both isolates originated from ballast water. These results support the bacteriological regulations proposed by the International Maritime Association for discharged ballast water.

  9. A dual-color flow cytometry protocol for the simultaneous detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium using aptamer conjugated quantum dots as labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Two bacteria were simultaneously detected using QD-apt as labels by flow cytometry. •QD-apt were used for recognition and fluorescence detection of two bacteria. •The method was applied successfully for bacteria detection in real samples. -- Abstract: A sensitive, specific method for the collection and detection of pathogenic bacteria was demonstrated using quantum dots (QDs) as a fluorescence marker coupled with aptamers as the molecular recognition element by flow cytometry. The aptamer sequences were selected using a bacterium-based SELEX strategy in our laboratory for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella typhimurium that, when applied in this method, allows for the specific recognition of the bacteria from complex mixtures including shrimp samples. Aptamer-modified QDs (QD-apt) were employed to selectively capture and simultaneously detect the target bacteria with high sensitivity using the fluorescence of the labeled QDs. The signal intensity is amplified due to the high photostability of QDs nanoparticles, resulting in improved sensitivity over methods using individual dye-labeled probes. This proposed method is promising for the sensitive detection of other pathogenic bacteria in food stuff if suitable aptamers are chosen. The method may also provide another potential platform for the application of aptamer-conjugated QDs in flow cytometry

  10. Coral-mucus-associated Vibrio integrons in the Great Barrier Reef: genomic hotspots for environmental adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Jeremy E; Bourne, David G; Curtis, Bruce; Dlutek, Marlena; Stokes, H W; Doolittle, W Ford; Boucher, Yan

    2011-06-01

    Integron cassette arrays in a dozen cultivars of the most prevalent group of Vibrio isolates obtained from mucus expelled by a scleractinian coral (Pocillopora damicornis) colony living on the Great Barrier Reef were sequenced and compared. Although all cultivars showed >99% identity across recA, pyrH and rpoB genes, no two had more than 10% of their integron-associated gene cassettes in common, and some individuals shared cassettes exclusively with distantly-related members of the genus. Of cassettes shared within the population, a number appear to have been transferred between Vibrio isolates, as assessed by phylogenetic analysis. Prominent among the mucus Vibrio cassettes with potentially inferable functions are acetyltransferases, some with close similarity to known antibiotic-resistance determinants. A subset of these potential resistance cassettes were shared exclusively between the mucus Vibrio cultivars, Vibrio coral pathogens and human pathogens, thus illustrating a direct link between these microbial niches through exchange of integron-associated gene cassettes. PMID:21270840

  11. Spiral conformation of Vibrio cholerae as determined by scanning electron microscopy of elongated cells induced by cephalexin treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Konishi, H.; Katayama, A.; Ito, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yoshii, Z

    1986-01-01

    The elongated cells of Vibrio spp. induced by cephalexin treatment were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that Vibrio cholerae has a twisted cell body and a right-handed spiral conformation and that the cell bodies of V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus are straight rather than curved.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Environmental Vibrio cholerae 2012EL-1759 with Similarities to the V. cholerae O1 Classical Biotype

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Lee S.; Turnsek, Maryann; Kahler, Amy; Hill, Vincent R.; Boyd, E. Fidelma; Tarr, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 2012EL-1759 is an environmental isolate from Haiti that was recovered in 2012 during a cholera outbreak. The genomic backbone is similar to that of the prototypical V. cholerae O1 classical biotype strain O395, and it carries the Vibrio pathogenicity islands (VPI-1 and VPI-2) and a cholera toxin (CTX) prephage.

  13. Properties of Lactate Dehydrogenase in a Psychrophilic Marine Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, P; Yen, H. C.; Mathemeier, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) from Vibrio marinus MP-1 was purified 15-fold and ammonium activated. The optimum pH for pyruvate reduction was 7.4. Maximum lactate dehydrogenase activity occurred at 10 to 15 degrees C, and none occurred at 40 degrees C. The crude-extract enzyme was stable between 15 and 20 degrees C and lost 50% of its activity after 60 min at 45 degrees C. The partially purified enzyme was stable between 8 and 15 degrees C and lost 50% of its activity after 60 min at 30...

  14. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishibashi, Matsujiro [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tokunaga, Hiroko [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Florida State University, 1115 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States); Tokunaga, Masao [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Kuroki, Ryota, E-mail: kuroki.ryota@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C{sup α} r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior

  15. Genetic characterization of trh positive Vibrio spp. isolated from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette eBauer Ellingsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH and/or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH genes are carried by most virulent Vibrio parahaemolyticus serovars. In Norway, trh+ V. parahaemolyticus constitute 4.4% and 4.5 % of the total number of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from blue mussel (Mytilus edulis and water, respectively. The trh gene is located in a region close to the gene cluster for urease production (ure. This region was characterized in V. parahaemolyticus strain TH3996 and it was found that a nickel transport operon (nik was located between the first gene (ureR and the rest of the ure cluster genes. The organization of the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster in the Norwegian trh+ isolates was unknown. In this study, we explore the gene organization within the trh-ureR-nik-ure cluster for these isolates. PCR analyses revealed that the genes within the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster of Norwegian trh+ isolates were organized in a similar fashion as reported previously for TH33996. Additionally, the phylogenetic relationship among these trh+ isolates was investigated using Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST. Analysis by MLST or ureR-trh sequences generated two different phylogenetic trees for the same strains analyzed, suggesting that ureR-trh genes have been acquired at different times in Norwegian V. parahaemolyticus isolates. MLST results revealed that some pathogenic and non-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates in Norway appear to be highly genetically related.

  16. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ribosome hibernation promoting factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray crystal structure of ribosome hibernation promoting factor from V. cholerae has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal was phased by two-wavelength MAD using cocrystallized cobalt. The X-ray crystal structure of ribosome hibernation promoting factor (HPF) from Vibrio cholerae is presented at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal was phased by two-wavelength MAD using cocrystallized cobalt. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of HPF linked by four Co atoms. The metal-binding sites observed in the crystal are probably not related to biological function. The structure of HPF has a typical β–α–β–β–β–α fold consistent with previous structures of YfiA and HPF from Escherichia coli. Comparison of the new structure with that of HPF from E. coli bound to the Thermus thermophilus ribosome [Polikanov et al. (2012 ▶), Science, 336, 915–918] shows that no significant structural changes are induced in HPF by binding

  17. Cyclo(valine-valine) inhibits Vibrio cholerae virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Amit; Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Xinyu; Bina, James E

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae has been shown to produce a cyclic dipeptide, cyclo(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), that functions to repress virulence factor production. The objective of this study was to determine if heterologous cyclic dipeptides could repress V. cholerae virulence factor production. To that end, three synthetic cyclic dipeptides that differed in their side chains from cFP were assayed for virulence inhibitory activity in V. cholerae. The results revealed that cyclo(valine-valine) (cVV) inhibited virulence factor production by a ToxR-dependent process that resulted in the repression of the virulence regulator aphA. cVV-dependent repression of aphA was found to be independent of known aphA regulatory genes. The results demonstrated that V. cholerae was able to respond to exogenous cyclic dipeptides and implicated the hydrophobic amino acid side chains on both arms of the cyclo dipeptide scaffold as structural requirements for inhibitory activity. The results further suggest that cyclic dipeptides have potential as therapeutics for cholera treatment.

  18. The repertoire of glycosphingolipids recognized by Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Benktander

    Full Text Available The binding of cholera toxin to the ganglioside GM1 as the initial step in the process leading to diarrhea is nowadays textbook knowledge. In contrast, the knowledge about the mechanisms for attachment of Vibrio cholerae bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium is limited. In order to clarify this issue, a large number of glycosphingolipid mixtures were screened for binding of El Tor V. cholerae. Several specific interactions with minor complex non-acid glycosphingolipids were thereby detected. After isolation of binding-active glycosphingolipids, characterization by mass spectrometry and proton NMR, and comparative binding studies, three distinct glycosphingolipid binding patterns were defined. Firstly, V. cholerae bound to complex lacto/neolacto glycosphingolipids with the GlcNAcβ3Galβ4GlcNAc sequence as the minimal binding epitope. Secondly, glycosphingolipids with a terminal Galα3Galα3Gal moiety were recognized, and the third specificity was the binding to lactosylceramide and related compounds. V. cholerae binding to lacto/neolacto glycosphingolipids, and to the other classes of binding-active compounds, remained after deletion of the chitin binding protein GbpA. Thus, the binding of V. cholerae to chitin and to lacto/neolacto containing glycosphingolipids represents two separate binding specificities.

  19. Malonate inhibits virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Häse, Claudia C

    2013-01-01

    We previously found that inhibition of the TCA cycle, either through mutations or chemical inhibition, increased toxT transcription in Vibrio cholerae. In this study, we found that the addition of malonate, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), decreased toxT transcription in V. cholerae, an observation inconsistent with the previous pattern observed. Unlike another SDH inhibitor, 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), which increased toxT transcription and slightly inhibited V. cholerae growth, malonate inhibited toxT transcription in both the wild-type strain and TCA cycle mutants, suggesting malonate-mediated inhibition of virulence gene expression is independent to TCA cycle activity. Addition of malonate also inhibited ctxB and tcpA expressions but did not affect aphA, aphB, tcpP and toxR expressions. Malonate inhibited cholera toxin (CT) production in both V. cholerae classical biotype strains O395N1 and CA401, and El Tor biotype strain, N16961. Consistent with previous reports, we confirmed that these strains of V. cholerae did not utilize malonate as a primary carbon source. However, we found that the addition of malonate to the growth medium stimulated V. cholerae growth. All together, these results suggest that metabolizing malonate as a nutrient source negatively affects virulence gene expression in V. cholerae.

  20. [The in vitro action of plants on Vibrio cholerae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, J M; Chumpitaz, J; Valencia, E

    1994-01-01

    Natural products of several plants, according to the geographic location, are used by Peruvian people in the popular treatment of diarrhea, with good success. When cholerae cases appeared in Peru, we were interested to know the "in vitro" effect against Vibrio cholerae 01, of these useful plants to treat diarrhea. The following plants were tested: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Punica granatum, Malus sativa, Cydonia oblonga, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Tea chinensis, Daucus carota, Persea gratissima, Psidium guayaba and Lippia dulcis. Decoction or infusion of the plants were used in the "in vitro" experiments. The following plants showed no "in vitro" effect against V. cholerae: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Psidium guayaba, Lippia dulcis and Daucus carota. Decoction of Malus sativa and Cydenia oblonga showed bactericidal effect for their acidity and stone avocado (Persea gratissima) a late bactericidal effect. Tea infusión and the decoction of Punica granatum peel, showed the best bactericidal effect and we suggest to use them as to stop cholera spreading.

  1. Nonredundant Roles of Iron Acquisition Systems in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Eric D; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Mey, Alexandra R; Fisher, Carolyn R; Payne, Shelley M

    2015-12-07

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe diarrheal disease cholera, thrives in both marine environments and the human host. To do so, it must encode the tools necessary to acquire essential nutrients, including iron, under these vastly different conditions. A number of V. cholerae iron acquisition systems have been identified; however, the precise role of each system is not fully understood. To test the roles of individual systems, we generated a series of mutants in which only one of the four systems that support iron acquisition on unsupplemented LB agar, Feo, Fbp, Vct, and Vib, remains functional. Analysis of these mutants under different growth conditions showed that these systems are not redundant. The strain carrying only the ferrous iron transporter Feo grew well at acidic, but not alkaline, pH, whereas the ferric iron transporter Fbp promoted better growth at alkaline than at acidic pH. A strain defective in all four systems (null mutant) had a severe growth defect under aerobic conditions but accumulated iron and grew as well as the wild type in the absence of oxygen, suggesting the presence of an additional, unidentified iron transporter in V. cholerae. In support of this, the null mutant was only moderately attenuated in an infant mouse model of infection. While the null mutant used heme as an iron source in vitro, we demonstrate that heme is not available to V. cholerae in the infant mouse intestine.

  2. Antigenicity analysis of Vibrio harveyi TS-628 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Yingxue; WANG Jun; WANG Shifeng; YAN Qingpi

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi,the major causative agent of vibriosis,affects a diverse range of marine cultured organisms over a wide geographical area.However,reports about screening the effective antigen and research on vaccines of V.harveyi are scarce.Flagellin,lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and outer membrane proteins (OMP) are major immunogenic antigens in many Gram-negative bacteria.In this study,the flagellin,OMP and LPS of the V.harveyi TS-628 strain isolated from infected groupers were extracted and Western blot analysis was used to detect the antigenicity of these extractions.Results of the Western blot assay reveal that there are four positive flagellin bands:35 kDa,38 kDa,43 kDa,and 52 kDa,of which the 43 kDa and 52 kDa bands displayed the strongest positive reaction.There are five positive OMP bands about 35 kDa,38 kDa,43 kDa,47 kDa,and 52 kDa,of which the 43 kDa appeared to have the strongest positive reaction although the other four proteins also displayed strong reactions.However,LPS is Western blot-negative.These results indicate that the 43 kDa and 52 kDa flagellin and OMP of size 43 kDa,52 kDa can be candidates for developing vaccines against V.harveyi.

  3. Molecular tools in understanding the evolution of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Md Habibur; Islam, Tarequl; Colwell, Rita R; Alam, Munirul

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, has been a scourge for centuries. Cholera remains a serious health threat for developing countries and has been responsible for millions of deaths globally over the past 200 years. Identification of V. cholerae has been accomplished using a variety of methods, ranging from phenotypic strategies to DNA based molecular typing and currently whole genomic approaches. This array of methods has been adopted in epidemiological investigations, either singly or in the aggregate, and more recently for evolutionary analyses of V. cholerae. Because the new technologies have been developed at an ever increasing pace, this review of the range of fingerprinting strategies, their relative advantages and limitations, and cholera case studies was undertaken. The task was challenging, considering the vast amount of the information available. To assist the study, key references representative of several areas of research are provided with the intent to provide readers with a comprehensive view of recent advances in the molecular epidemiology of V. cholerae. Suggestions for ways to obviate many of the current limitations of typing techniques are also provided. In summary, a comparative report has been prepared that includes the range from traditional typing to whole genomic strategies.

  4. Immune response of shrimp (Penaeus monodon) against Vibrios furnissii pathogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kumaran Subramanian; Deivasigamani Balaraman; Rajasekar Thirunavukarasu; Suresh Gopal; Pugazhvendan Sampath Renuka; Alagappan Kumarappan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyse experimental infection and immune system of shrimp (Penaeus monodon) against Vibrios furnissii (V. furnissii). Methods: Experimental animals were collected and acclimatized by maintaining specific temperature, pH and salinity to avoid mortality. Shrimps were experimentally infected with V. furnissii and their immune responses were monitored. After the infection all the shrimps were monitored for any symptoms, death rate in 0, 12, 24, 36, 48 h. Then haemolymph were collected and tetrahydrocannabinol, phenol oxidase, nitroblue tetrazolium and lysozyme were monitored in every 12 h at the interval of 48 h. Results: Shrimps infected by live V. furnissii had showed gradual increase in tetrahydrocannabinol, phenol oxidase activity, nitro-blue-tetrazolium and lysozyme activity comparing with the killed and control.Conclusions:The live V. furnissii shows infection in experimental shrimps comparing with killed V. furnissii. So the V. furnissii in nature cause the infection in shrimp Penaeus monodon immune system. This report could be applied to control of the infection in shrimp hatchery.

  5. Starvation effects on pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus in natural seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Jiabo; CHEN Qiang; ZOU Wenzheng; YAN Qingpi; ZHUANG Zhixia; WANG Xiaoru

    2008-01-01

    To get a better understanding of the starvation survival strategy of pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus,log-phase cells were inoculated into sterile natural seawater for starvation studies.The results showed that all of total bacteria number,viable bacteria number and CFU number of V. alginolyticus increased remarkably at the initial starvation stage;after reaching their peaks at 5 d,both total bacteria number and viable bacteria number of V. alginolyricus fell slowly,while the CFU number fell more quickly after reaching its peak at 10 d;V.alginolyticus elongated their cells at the porphase of starvation,and then shrunk their volume and turned their shapes into ovals from rods at the anaphase of starvation;starved cells showed more sensitivity to heating and UV;starved cells showed n0 significant difference from unstarved ones at the lowest detection limit determined by indirect enzyme-linked immu-nosorbent assay(ELISA);starred cells'ability to adhere to the skin mucus of large yellow croaker(Pseudosciaena crocea)shorwed a sharp decline as the starvation time increases;the cellular protein of V.alginotyticus increased remarkably at the ana-phase of starvation.The results indicated that pathogenic V. alginolyticus could survive in starvation for relatively long periods of time(≥2 months)in 28℃ natural seawater due to the morphological and physiological changes;however,starved V. alginolytic-us cells showed Iess virulence and higher sensitivity under environmental stresses.

  6. Sensitivity of Vibrio cholerae cells to lethal and mutagenic effect of UV-irradiation mediated by plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells and its changes mediated by the plasmid R245 have been studied. Vibrio cholerae strains 569B and RV31 have been shown to be considerably more sensitive to lethal effect of UV-irradiation as compared with Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cells. Highly toxigenic strain 569B and practically atoxigenic strain RV31 have the same UV-sensitivity. Lethla effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells is incresed when the irradiated cells are plated on enriched media. UV-induction of mutations was not registered in plasmidless strains of Vibrio cholerae. Plasmid R245 increase UV-resistance of vibrio cells and makes them UV-mutable

  7. First data on the distribution and ecology of Vibrio spp. of the Straits of Magellan (South America).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticelli, L S; Crisafi, E

    1995-07-01

    During the austral summer of 1991 a study was carried out on the presence and distribution of the genus Vibrio in the Straits of Magellan. Vibrios strains were isolated using membrane filters and Marine Agar 2216 in anaerobiosis. Variations of the populations of total heterotrophic bacteria and vibrios were observed both on the surface and along the column of water. All vibrios are psychrotrophic and were grouped in 4 cluster among which cluster 1, identified as presumed V. anguillarum, seems the most important including 73% of strains. A certain habitat segregation of clusters was noted. Cluster 4 was found only in a deep and permanently colder water mass. The relations between 20 environmental parameters and the bacterial population were also studied. Significant positive correlations were observed between the vibrios population and various fractions of suspended particulate matter.

  8. Rnf Genes in Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

    OpenAIRE

    DİNÇTÜRK, H. Benan; DEMİR, Volkan

    2006-01-01

    Allochromatium vinosum is a photosynthetic, diazotrophic purple sulfur bacterium that oxidizes reduced sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, elemental sulfur and thiosulfide. In this article, we report the presence of rnf genes in Allochromatium vinosum, some of which have been reported to take part in nitrogen fixation in some species.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140

    OpenAIRE

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Lief

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain’s superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy.

  10. Genome of a mosquito-killing bacterium decoded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Researchers with the CAS Wuhan Institute of Virology (WHIOV) recently completed the genome sequencing of a mosquitocidal bacterium Bacillus shaericus C3-41. The feat, first of its kind in China, is expected to further promote the bio-control studies of mosquitoes.

  11. An rpoB gene-based PCR-DGGE method for simultaneous detection of multiple Vibrio species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Peng; Hu Chaoqun; Ren Chunhua; Zhang Lvping

    2008-01-01

    Using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting the RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB) gene, a simultaneous detection method for Vibrio species was established. rpoB gene-based PCR-DGGE was carried out with eight Vibrio Reference strains (each from different species), mixed sample (including these Vibrio Reference strains),two non Vibrio strains, four environmental Vibrio strains, and three unidentified environmental strains. For comparison, 16S rRNA gene-based PCR-DGGE of the eight Vibrio Reference strains was performed with universal primers. In addition, three unidentified strains were identified by 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequencing and API20E system in order to confirm the accuracy of rpoB gene-based PCR-DGGE detection. Results revealed that rpoB-based PCR-DGGE could well discriminate eight Vibrio Reference strains and could not discriminate different strains within the same species. The bands derived from two non Vibrio strains could not match with any bands in Reference marker. Meanwhile, 16S rRNA gene-based DGGE failed to distinguish these Reference strains. Furthermore, four out of eight Vibrio species exhibited heterogenous bands in 16S rRNA gene-based DGGE. Sequencing and API 20E identification of unidentified strains coincided with the detection by rpoB gene-based PCR-DGGE. The results demonstrated that rpoB-based PCR-DGGE provided a rapid and efficient method for simultaneous detection of multiple Vibrio species, which can avoid the limitations inherent in 16S rRNA gene-based PCR-DGGE.

  12. Vibrio alginolyticus Associated Chronic Myringitis Acquired in Mediterranean Waters of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citil, Burak Ekrem; Derin, Serhan; Sankur, Funda; Sahan, Murat; Citil, Mahmut Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus was originally classified as biotype 2 of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Most clinical isolates are recovered from superficial wounds or the external ear infections. V. alginolyticus is acknowledged to be nearly nonpathogenic in humans. The reason for presence of V. alginolyticus's virulence is uncertain. We describe a chronic myringitis case in a 47-year-old female due to V. alginolyticus. According to her anamnesis, it was detected that she had sea bathing history in Mugla Coast in Turkey. Pure isolation of V. alginolyticus was obtained from external auditory canal's culture. Investigation and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolate were performed by the automatized BD Phoenix system and Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, respectively. The bacteria were sensitive to all antibiotics. This case was presented to pay attention to Vibrio alginolyticus infections. PMID:26605095

  13. Vibrio alginolyticus Associated Chronic Myringitis Acquired in Mediterranean Waters of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Ekrem Citil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio alginolyticus was originally classified as biotype 2 of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Most clinical isolates are recovered from superficial wounds or the external ear infections. V. alginolyticus is acknowledged to be nearly nonpathogenic in humans. The reason for presence of V. alginolyticus’s virulence is uncertain. We describe a chronic myringitis case in a 47-year-old female due to V. alginolyticus. According to her anamnesis, it was detected that she had sea bathing history in Mugla Coast in Turkey. Pure isolation of V. alginolyticus was obtained from external auditory canal’s culture. Investigation and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolate were performed by the automatized BD Phoenix system and Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, respectively. The bacteria were sensitive to all antibiotics. This case was presented to pay attention to Vibrio alginolyticus infections.

  14. Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from various ecological niches on Vibrio species pathogenic to crustaceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabhakaran Priyaja; Puthumana Jayesh; Neil Scolastin Correya; Balachandran Sreelakshmi; Naduthalmuriparambil S Sudheer; Rosamma Philip; Isaac Sarogeni Bright Singh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To abrogate pathogenic vibrios in aquaculture by testing the potential of Pseudomonas isolates from fresh water, brackish and marine environments as probiotics.Methods:Antagonistic activity of the compound against 7 Vibrio spp. was performed. Influence of salinity on the production of pyocyanin and the toxicity was done through the compound using brine shrimp lethality assay. Molecular characterization was performed to confirm that the isolates werePseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: Salinity was found to regulate the levels of pyocyanin production, with 5-10 g/L as the optimum. All Pseudomonas isolates grew at salinities ranging from 5 to 70 g/L. Isolates of marine origin produced detectable levels of pyocyanin up to 45 g/L salinity. Brackish and freshwater isolates ceased to produce pyocyanin at salinities above 30 g/L and 20 g/L, respectively. Culture supernatants of all 5 Pseudomonas isolates possessed the ability to restrict the growth of Vibrio spp. and maximum antagonistic effect on Vibrio harveyi was obtained when they were grown at salinities of 5 to 10 g/L. The marine isolate MCCB117, even when grown at a salinity of 45 g/L possessed the ability to inhibit Vibrio spp.Conclusions:Purification and structural elucidation of antagonistic compound were carried out. ideal for application in freshwater, MCCB102 and MCCB103 in brackish water and MCCB117 and The present investigation showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCCB119 would be MCCB118 in marine aquaculture systems as putative probiotics in the management of vibrios.

  15. Shotgun Genome Sequence of the Large Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum photometricum DSM122

    OpenAIRE

    Duquesne, K.; Sturgis, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the shotgun genome sequence of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum photometricum DSM122. The photosynthetic apparatus of this bacterium has been particularly well studied by microscopy. The knowledge of the genome of this oversize bacterium will allow us to compare it with the other purple bacterial organisms to follow the evolution of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  16. Ecology of antibiotic resistant vibrios in traditional shrimp farming system (bhery) of West Bengal, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leesa Priyadarsani; Thangapalam Jawahar Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the ecology of antibiotic resistant bacteria with emphasis on sucrose negative vibrios in water and sediments samples of traditional shrimp farming system (bhery) in West Bengal, India. Methods: The vibrios were isolated from traditional shrimp farm samples on thiosulphate citrate bthilee f rseaqltu esunccryo osfe aangtaibr ioatnidc rseuscisrotasnec nee. gative bacterial strains were used as biomarkers to assess Results: The incoming water brought presumptive vibrios ranging from 5.50×101 to 1.00×103 mL in ttoh etrhee wbhase rayb, oauntd 9t hfoelrde ainpcpreeaarseed itno vbiubirlido su. pT hvieb rleiovse lisn othf ev icburlitousr ew seyrest eombs ewrivtehd d taoy sb eo f mcuoldteurraet,e alys higher in outlet water and ranged between 4.15×102 and 4.15×103 mL. The counts of vibrios in pond sediment was found to be 1.00×102–4.90×103 g; while in inlet (2.00×102–4.20×104 g) and outlet (3.00×102–6.85×103 g) their levels were observed to be higher than the pond sediment. Thirteen wdiefrfeer seennt sVitiibvrei oto s cphelcoireasm wpehreen iecnocl,o fuonlltoewreedd ibny tcriapdriotifloonxaalc sinh rainmdp g cautilftluorxea csiyns (t9e8m.2 4a%n)d, gaelnl tvaimbircioins (t9w5o.6 1a%n)t iabniodt ioctsh,e rw aans tinboitoitcicesd. aTmheo nmgu ltiple antibiotic resistance (MAR), i.e., resistance to at least sucrose negative non-vibrios. 43.85% of the sucrose negative vibrios and 41.86% of the was used in the bhery, the preAvalll evnicberi oosf harveyi strains exhibited MAR. Although no antibiotic vibrios is a cause of concern. MAR in 44% of the sucrose negative vibrios and non- The MAR index was higher in inlet water and sediment samples. The MofA iRn loebt ssearmvepdle sin, tbhiuosm caornkfeirrm sitnragi nths eo ffa pcot nthda wt iantecor manindg sweadtiemr ewnat s( 4t0h%e) mwaajso rc osmoupracrea obfl ea ntoti bthiootsiec resistant bacteria. Conclusions: It seems that the shrimp culture in bhery does not favour the proliferation and spread

  17. Survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 on fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhana, Israt; Hossain, Zenat Zebin; Tulsiani, Suhella Mohan; Jensen, Peter Kjær Mackie; Begum, Anowara

    2016-09-01

    It is well established that the contamination sources of cholera causing bacteria, Vibrio cholerae, are water and food, but little is known about the transmission role of the fomites (surfaces that can carry pathogens) commonly used in households. In the absence of appropriate nutrients or growth conditions on fomites, bacteria have been known to assume a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state after a given period of time. To investigate whether and when V. cholerae O1 assumes such a state, this study investigated the survival and viable quantification on a range of fomites such as paper, wood, glass, plastic, cloth and several types of metals under laboratory conditions. The fomites were inoculated with an outbreak strain of V. cholerae and its culturability was examined by drop plate count method at 30 min intervals for up to 6 h. For molecular detection, the viable/dead stain ethidium monoazide (EMA) which inhibits amplification of DNA from dead cells was used in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction (EMA-qPCR) for direct quantitative analyses of viable V. cholerae at 2, 4, 6, 24 h and 7 day time intervals. Results showed that V. cholerae on glass and aluminum surfaces lost culturability within one hour after inoculation but remained culturable on cloth and wood for up to four hours. VBNC V. cholerae on dry fomite surfaces was detected and quantified by EMA-qPCR even 7 days after inoculation. In conclusion, the prolonged survival of V. cholerae on various household fomites may play vital role in cholera transmission and needs to be further investigated.

  18. RpoS controls the Vibrio cholerae mucosal escape response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Toftgaard Nielsen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae causes a severe diarrhoeal disease by secreting a toxin during colonization of the epithelium in the small intestine. Whereas the initial steps of the infectious process have been intensively studied, the last phases have received little attention. Confocal microscopy of V. cholerae O1-infected rabbit ileal loops captured a distinctive stage in the infectious process: 12 h post-inoculation, bacteria detach from the epithelial surface and move into the fluid-filled lumen. Designated the "mucosal escape response," this phenomenon requires RpoS, the stationary phase alternative sigma factor. Quantitative in vivo localization assays corroborated the rpoS phenotype and showed that it also requires HapR. Expression profiling of bacteria isolated from ileal loop fluid and mucus demonstrated a significant RpoS-dependent upregulation of many chemotaxis and motility genes coincident with the emigration of bacteria from the epithelial surface. In stationary phase cultures, RpoS was also required for upregulation of chemotaxis and motility genes, for production of flagella, and for movement of bacteria across low nutrient swarm plates. The hapR mutant produced near-normal numbers of flagellated cells, but was significantly less motile than the wild-type parent. During in vitro growth under virulence-inducing conditions, the rpoS mutant produced 10- to 100-fold more cholera toxin than the wild-type parent. Although the rpoS mutant caused only a small over-expression of the genes encoding cholera toxin in the ileal loop, it resulted in a 30% increase in fluid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Together, these results show that the mucosal escape response is orchestrated by an RpoS-dependent genetic program that activates chemotaxis and motility functions. This may furthermore coincide with reduced virulence gene expression, thus preparing the organism for the next stage in its life cycle.

  19. Survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 on fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhana, Israt; Hossain, Zenat Zebin; Tulsiani, Suhella Mohan; Jensen, Peter Kjær Mackie; Begum, Anowara

    2016-09-01

    It is well established that the contamination sources of cholera causing bacteria, Vibrio cholerae, are water and food, but little is known about the transmission role of the fomites (surfaces that can carry pathogens) commonly used in households. In the absence of appropriate nutrients or growth conditions on fomites, bacteria have been known to assume a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state after a given period of time. To investigate whether and when V. cholerae O1 assumes such a state, this study investigated the survival and viable quantification on a range of fomites such as paper, wood, glass, plastic, cloth and several types of metals under laboratory conditions. The fomites were inoculated with an outbreak strain of V. cholerae and its culturability was examined by drop plate count method at 30 min intervals for up to 6 h. For molecular detection, the viable/dead stain ethidium monoazide (EMA) which inhibits amplification of DNA from dead cells was used in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction (EMA-qPCR) for direct quantitative analyses of viable V. cholerae at 2, 4, 6, 24 h and 7 day time intervals. Results showed that V. cholerae on glass and aluminum surfaces lost culturability within one hour after inoculation but remained culturable on cloth and wood for up to four hours. VBNC V. cholerae on dry fomite surfaces was detected and quantified by EMA-qPCR even 7 days after inoculation. In conclusion, the prolonged survival of V. cholerae on various household fomites may play vital role in cholera transmission and needs to be further investigated. PMID:27430513

  20. Detection of Vibrio splendidus and related species in Chamelea gallina sampled in the Adriatic along the Abruzzi coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, Marina; Acciari, Vicdalia A; Piano, Annamaria; Serratore, Patrizia; Prencipe, Vincenza; Migliorati, Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio species are an important and widespread component of marine microbial communities. Some Vibrio strains are potentially pathogenic to marine vertebrates and invertebrates. The aim of this study was to identify vibrios, in particular Vibrio splendidus and related species, isolated from clams (Chamelea gallina) collected along the coasts of the Abruzzi region from May to October 2007. The isolates obtained were phenotyped and classified as belonging to the genus Vibrio. The strains underwent biochemical testing in accordance with Alsina's scheme for V. splendidus identification. Molecular analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic space region and recA gene was used to identify V. splendidus and related species. All the samples examined were found to contain halophylic Vibrio species, with V. alginolyticus, V. splendidus-related species and V. mediterranei most commonly found. A polymerase chain reaction of the 16S-23S intergenic space region and sequencing of the recA gene from isolates confirmed that phenotyping of Vibrio species is not sufficient to distinguish between different species. Differentiation of the highly related species among V. splendidus-related clusters remains an important issue. In this regard, our data suggests sequencing the recA genes was far more discriminatory than sequencing 16S rDNA for this purpose.

  1. Vibrio vulnificus specie isolation in series blood culture. A case report. Aislamiento de especie de Vibrio vulnificus en hemocultivos seriados. Reporte de un caso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annia Alvarado Borges

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This papers contains a report of a case with Vibrio vulnificuls, gram negative micro organism that ferments carbohydrates and that is positive to the oxidase test and halophile in a patient with history of heart and liver disease who was assisted at the Intensive Care Emergency Unit ( ICU of the ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ University Hospital in July 2003. Thy symptoms were: oedema in lower limbs, orthopnea, chest pain that was interpreted as a case of pneumonia and a Myocardial Infarction. This patient progresses rapidly to cardiac arrest, is reanimated , and is admitted at the ICU with control pressuremetric ventilation. Vibrio Vulnificuls was isolated with a conventional diagnosis from hemo cultures. Anti microbial Susceptibility tests , the micro organism was susceptible to tetracycline, sulphaprim, aztreonam, ampicillin and was resistant to chloranphenicol.

    Se reporta un caso de sepsis por Vibrio vulnificus en un paciente con antecedentes de insuficiencia cardiaca y hepatopatía, atendido en el servicio de Cuidados Intensivos de Emergencia del Hospital Universitario ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨, en julio de 2003. Los síntomas fueron: edema en miembros inferiores, ortopnea y dolor precordial que se interpretaron como bronconeumonía extrahospitalaria e infarto agudo del miocardio. Evoluciona rápidamente al paro cardiorrespiratorio, se reanima e ingresa en Cuidados Intensivos con ventilación presiométrica controlada. Se aisló Vibrio vulnificus por diagnóstico convencional desde hemocultivos. En las pruebas de susceptibilidad antimicrobiana resultó sensible a tetraciclina, sulfaprim, aztreonam, ampicillin y resistente a cloranfenicol.

  2. Risk of Vibrio Transmission Linked to the Consumption of Crustacean in Coastal Towns of Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRAORÉ, S. G.; BONFOH, B.; KRABI, R.; ODERMATT, P.; UTZINGER, J.; ROSE, K.-N.; TANNER, M.; FREY, J.; QUILICI, M.-L.; KOUSSÉMON, M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of Vibrio spp. transmission from crustaceans to humans in two coastal towns of Côte d’Ivoire. Bacteriologic analysis was performed on 322 crustacean samples obtained from six markets in Abidjan and one in Dabou. Suspected colonies of Vibrio spp. were identified by morphological, cultural, biochemical and molecular tests, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to further characterize Vibrio strains. Additionally, a survey on consumption of crustaceans was conducted among 120 randomly selected households in Abidjan. Overall, Vibrio spp. were isolated from 7.8% of the crustacean samples studied, at concentrations as high as 6.3 Log colony forming unit per gram. Vibrio strains identified were divided into 40% Vibrio alginolyticus, 36% Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and 24% non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae with the latter two species potentially causing mild to severe forms of seafood-associated gastroenteritis. Among interviewed households, 11.7% reported daily consumption of crustaceans, confirming the high probability of exposure of human population to Vibrio spp., and 7.5% reported symptoms of food poisoning after consumption of crustaceans. The absence of genes encoding major virulence factors in the studied strains, i.e., cholera toxin (ctxA and ctxB) for V. cholerae and thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and tdh-related haemolysin (trh) for V. parahaemolyticus, does not exclude the possibility of a potential exposure to pathogenic strains. However, food preparation practices prevent human infections, as most households boil crustaceans before consumption (96.7%), usually for at least 45 min (85.9%). PMID:22691466

  3. Isolation and characterization of a new species of Vibrio-Vibrio olivaceus sp.nov. from diseased flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus temminck et schlegel)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hai; Zhang Xiao-jun; Chen Cuizhen; Zhan Wenbin; Jin Xiaomin

    2005-01-01

    One kind of pathogenic bacteria was isolated from diseased (or dead) flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus L.) which expressed bacterial septicaemia. The phenotyic information of the 10 pure cultures was studied extensively, including morphological characteristics, colony characteristics in different media, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and the mol%G+C ratio of the DNA for representative strain. The results showed that the isolates belonged to a new species of Vibrio. In addition, the representative strains have been re-checked by China Center for Type Culture Collection (CCTCC), the results were the same as ours, the examined strains were also regarded as a new species of Vibrio, and designated as Vibrio olivaceus sp.nov. by its isolated fish (Paralichthys olivaceus) based on its biological properties following Rules of International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. In the same time, we conducted studies on the serum homology of isolates, pathogenicity of isolates by experimental infection. The results showed that all the isolates were of serologic similarity and the isolates have strong pathogenicity to flounder. Inspection to pure cultures and isolates from liver of moribund fish from infection experiment by fluorescent antibody technique showed the feasibility of fluorescent antibody technique as an auxiliary method of examination.

  4. An analysis of the V1 and V2 regions of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus 16S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, A; Momen, H; Vicente, A C; Salles, C A

    1994-02-01

    The V1 and V2 variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene of three strains of V. cholerae and one strain of V. mimicus were amplified by PCR. Fragments containing both regions were cloned into M13mp18 using Smal and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The 263-bp sequence from a strain isolated during the 1991 cholera outbreak in Brazil was deposited in Genbank under the accession number L05178. Except for an extra G in one of the strains, the three V. cholerae sequences were identical. The V. mimicus sequence was very similar, with only two substitutions. We compared these sequences with the Vibrio 16S rRNA sequences described by Dorsch et al. in 1992. It was noted that the V1 region, including helix 6 and its associated loop, comprised two different sizes and sequences in the various Vibrio species. While V. cholerae, V. mimicus, V. vulnificus, V. anguillarum and V. diazotrophicus had a 46-nucleotide V1, other species such as V. parahaemolyticus, V. proteolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. campbellii and V. hollisae had longer 54- or 55-nucleotide regions, with a different consensus sequence. The phylogeny of Vibrio was analysed using the sequenced region and its equivalent in other species, by means of the "Phylip" software package. Species with a short helix 6 were grouped together, as were species with a long helix. Dorsh et al.'s analysis is discussed in relation to this "helix 6 split".

  5. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Regulator-Encoding Genes Have an Additive Effect on Virulence Gene Expression in a Vibrio cholerae Clinical Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Bailey M.; Brumfield, Kyle D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae is the etiological agent of the infectious disease cholera, which is characterized by vomiting and severe watery diarrhea. Recently, V. cholerae clinical isolates have demonstrated increased virulence capabilities, causing more severe symptoms with a much higher rate of disease progression than previously observed. We have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four virulence-regulatory genes (hapR, hns, luxO, and vieA) of a hypervirulent V. cholerae clinical isolate, MQ1795. Herein, all SNPs and SNP combinations of interest were introduced into the prototypical El Tor reference strain N16961, and the effects on the production of numerous virulence-related factors, including cholera toxin (CT), the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), and ToxT, were analyzed. Our data show that triple-SNP (hapR hns luxO and hns luxO vieA) and quadruple-SNP combinations produced the greatest increases in CT, TCP, and ToxT production. The hns and hns luxO SNP combinations were sufficient for increased TCP and ToxT production. Notably, the hns luxO vieA triple-SNP combination strain produced TCP and ToxT levels similar to those of MQ1795. Certain SNP combinations (hapR and hapR vieA) had the opposite effect on CT, TCP, and ToxT expression. Interestingly, the hns vieA double-SNP combination strain increased TCP production while decreasing CT production. Our findings suggest that SNPs identified in the four regulatory genes, in various combinations, are associated with increased virulence capabilities observed in V. cholerae clinical isolates. These studies provide insight into the evolution of highly virulent strains. IMPORTANCE Cholera, an infectious disease of the small intestine caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae, often results in vomiting and acute watery diarrhea. If left untreated or if the response is too slow, the symptoms can quickly lead to extreme dehydration and ultimately death of the patient. Recent anecdotal evidence of

  6. Rock Phosphate Solubilization Mechanisms of One Fungus and One Bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-mei; ZHAO Xiao-rong; ZHAO Zi-juan; LI Bao-guo

    2002-01-01

    Many microorganisms can dissolve the insoluble phosphates like apatite. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study was an attempt to investigate the mechanisms of rock phosphate solubilization by an Aspergillus 2TCiF2 and an Arthrobacter1TCRi7. The results indicated that the fungus produced a large amount of organic acids, mainly oxalic acid. The total quantity of the organic acids produced by the fungus was 550 times higher than that by the bacterium. Different organic acids had completely different capacities to solubilize the rock. Oxalic acid and citric acid had stronger capacity to dissolve the rock than malic acid, tartaric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid and succinic acid. The fungus solubilized the rock through excreting both proton and organic acids. The rock solubilization of the bacterium depended on only proton.

  7. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R. [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Begemann, Matthew B [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio anguillarum Phage CHOED Successfully Used for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe; Castillo, Daniel; Middleboe, Mathias; García, Katherine; Ramírez, Carolina; Espejo, Romilio T.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguillarum phage CHOED.

  9. A checkpoint control orchestrates the replication of the two chromosomes of Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Marbouty, Martial; Martins, Francisco de Lemos;

    2016-01-01

    important differences between plasmids and chromosomes is that the latter replicate during a defined period of the cell cycle, ensuring a single round of replication per cell. Vibrio cholerae carries two circular chromosomes, Chr1 and Chr2, which are replicated in a well-orchestrated manner with the cell...

  10. Indole-positive Vibrio vulnificus isolated from disease outbreaks on a Danish eel farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Inger; Høi, L.; Siebeling, R.J.;

    1999-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus was isolated in 1996 from 2 disease outbreaks on a Danish eel farm which used brackish water. A characteristic clinical sign was extensive, deep muscle necrosis in the head region. V. vulnificus was isolated from kidney, mucus, spleen, gill and intestine of diseased eels. Thirty...

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Vibrio splendidus Strains, Isolated from Seagrass Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ruth D; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M; Eisen, Jonathan A; Coil, David A

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Vibrio splendidus UCD-SED7 and UCD-SED10 (phylum Proteobacteria). These strains were isolated from sediment surrounding Zostera marina roots near the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory (Bodega, Bay, California). These assemblies contain 5,334,236 bp and 5,904,824 bp, respectively. PMID:26893436

  12. Host, pathogen and the environment: the case of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruvayipati, Suma; Bhassu, Subha

    2016-01-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii is well-known as the giant freshwater prawn, and is a commercially significant source of seafood. Its production can be affected by various bacterial contaminations. Among which, the genus Vibrio shows a higher prevalence in aquatic organisms, especially M. rosenbergii, causing food-borne illnesses. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a species of Vibrio is reported as the main causative of the early mortality syndrome. Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection in M. rosenbergii was studied previously in relation to the prawn's differentially expressed immune genes. In the current review, we will discuss the growth conditions for both V. parahaemolyticus and M. rosenbergii and highlight the role of magnesium in common, which need to be fully understood. Till date, there has not been much research on this aspect of magnesium. We postulate a model that screens a magnesium-dependent pathway which probably might take effect in connection with N-acetylglucosamine binding protein and chitin from V. parahaemolyticus and M. rosenbergii, respectively. Further studies on magnesium as an environment for V. parahaemolyticus and M. rosenbergii interaction studies will provide seafood industry with completely new strategies to employ and to avoid seafood related contaminations.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VH3, Isolated from an Aquaculture Environment in Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Jun, Jin Woo; D'Alvise, Paul;

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. It has also been identified as an important pathogen in aquatic organisms. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus, strain VH3, isolated from farmed juvenile greater...

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of the Fish Pathogen Vibrio harveyi Strains VH2 and VH5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; D'Alvise, Paul; Middelboe, Mathias;

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is an important marine pathogen that is responsible for vibriosis outbreaks in cultured fish and invertebrates worldwide. Here, we announce the draft genome sequences of V. harveyi strains VH2 and VH5, isolated from farmed juvenile Seriola dumerili during outbreaks of vibriosis...

  15. Prevalence and heterogeneity of Hemolysin gene vhh among hatchery isolates of Vibrio harveyi in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; George, J.; Kumar, S.

    :1239-1247. 11    12. Defoirdt T, Boon N, Sorgeloos P, Verstraete W, Bossier P (2008) Quorum sensing and quorum quenching in Vibrio harveyi:lessons learned from in vivo work. The ISME J 2:19–26 13. Fukui Y, Sawabe T (2007) Improved one-step colony PCR...

  16. The Vibrio parahaemolyticus-infecting bacteriophage qdvp001: genome sequence and endolysin with a modular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyu; Li, Mengzhe; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jingxue; Mao, Xiangzhao

    2016-10-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a marine pathogen, is a causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans after consumption of contaminated seafood. In recent years, infections with V. parahaemolyticus have become an increasingly frequent factor in microbial food poisoning; therefore, it is urgent to figure out ways to control Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Endolysins, lytic enzymes encoded by bacteriophages, have been regarded as a therapeutic alternative to antibiotics in control of bacterial growth and have been successfully utilized in various areas. Here, we report the full genome sequence of the novel phage qdvp001, which lyses Vibrio parahaemolyticus 17802. The qdvp001 genome consists of a 134,742-bp DNA with a G+C content of 35.35 % and 227 putative open reading frames. Analysis revealed that the qdvp001 open reading frames encoded various putative functional proteins with a putative endolysin gene (ORF 60). No holin genes were identified in qdvp001. ORF 60 was cloned and expressed. The results showed that the purified endolysin Lysqdvp001 had a high hydrolytic activity toward Vibrio parahaemolyticus and a broader spectrum compared to that of the parental bacteriophage qdvp001. Thus, purified endolysin Lysqdvp001 has a potential to be used as an antibacterial agent in the future. PMID:27376376

  17. Extinction of Vibrio cholerae in acidic substrata: contaminated cabbage and lettuce treated with lime juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, L; Vargas, C; Saborío, D; Vives, M

    1994-12-01

    Lime juice killed millions of Vibrio cholerae O1, El Tor, Inaba, present on cabbage and lettuce contaminated in the laboratory. The lethal effect was evident within 5 min of exposure to lime juice. No vibrios could be recovered at dilution 1:10 using alkaline peptone water (APW) and thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-saccharose agar (TCBS). More than 99.9% of the initial inoculum was effectively destroyed. The number of vibrios killed by lime juice was 2 to 6 logarithms greater than the maximum infecting dose, and 4 to 8 logs greater than the minimum infecting dose for cholera El Tor. The time interval needed for killing was smaller than the usual waiting time for serving food in homes and restaurants. The addition of lime juice to non-acidic foods, beverages and water, is strongly recommended to prevent infection with cholera vibrios and other acid-sensitive microorganisms. This measure is particularly important for rural and slum populations in the tropics and subtropics.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Emerging Bivalve Pathogen Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinard, Edward J; Dubert, Javier; Nelson, David R; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Barja, Juan L

    2016-07-28

    Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus is a bivalve pathogen isolated during episodes of mortality affecting larval cultures in different shellfish hatcheries. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of the type strain PP-638 and describe potential virulence factors, which may provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Larval Shellfish Pathogen Vibrio tubiashii Type Strain ATCC 19109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gary P; Needleman, David S; Watson, Michael A; Bono, James L

    2014-12-18

    Vibrio tubiashii is a larval shellfish pathogen. Here, we report the first closed genome sequence for this species (ATCC type strain 19109), which consists of two chromosomes (3,294,490 and 1,766,582 bp), two megaplasmids (251,408 and 122,808 bp), and two plasmids (57,076 and 47,973 bp).

  20. Virulence of metalloproteases produced by Vibrio species on Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Gharaibeh, Dima N; Lind, Erin J; Häse, Claudia C

    2009-06-10

    Vibrio tubiashii, a pathogen of shellfish larvae and juveniles, produces several extracellular products. Here, we document that culture supernatants of several marine Vibrio species showed toxicity to oyster larvae. Treatment of these supernatants with EDTA not only severely diminished proteolytic activities, but also dramatically reduced toxicity to the larvae. Culture supernatants of metalloprotease-deficient mutants of V. tubiashii, V. cholerae, and V. splendidus were impaired in their ability to cause larval death compared to the wild type strains. Culture supernatants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, known to contain several secreted proteases, showed virtually no toxicity to oyster larvae. Purified V. tubiashii protease A (VtpA), but not the prototype metalloprotease, thermolysin from Bacillus thermoproteolyticus, was highly toxic to the larvae. In addition, toxicity of purified VtpA was much greater for 6-d-old oyster larvae than for 16-d-old larvae. Together, these results indicated that culture supernatants of a variety of Vibrio species are highly toxic to oyster larvae and that the production of a metalloprotease is required for this effect. We propose that there are, as yet uncharacterized, specific substrates contained in larval tissue that are degraded by VtpA as well as certain homologous metalloproteases produced by other marine Vibrio species which, in turn, may contribute to vibriosis.

  1. Mapping of a gene that regulates hemolysin production in Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    von Mechow, S; Vaidya, A B; Bramucci, M G

    1985-01-01

    A gene that regulates the hemolysin structural gene (hly) was found to be tightly linked to the tox-1000 locus of Vibrio cholerae RJ1 and separated from hly by a large section of the V. cholerae genetic map. This hemolysin regulatory gene was designated hlyR.

  2. Vibrio cholerae tolC Is Required for Bile Resistance and Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Bina, James E.; Mekalanos, John J.

    2001-01-01

    TolC and its homologues are outer membrane proteins that are essential for the transport of many molecules across the cell envelope. In this study we characterized the gene encoding Vibrio cholerae TolC. V. cholerae tolC mutants failed to secrete the RTX cytotoxin, were hypersensitive to antimicrobial agents, and were deficient in intestinal colonization.

  3. Vibrio cholerae O1 from superficial water of the Tucunduba Stream, Brazilian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Sá, L.L.C.; Vale, E.R.V.; Garza, D.R.; A.C.P. Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Isolation and genetic characterization of an environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 from the Amazon is reported. This strain lacks two major virulence factors - CTX and TCP - but carries other genes related to virulence. Genetic similarity with epidemic strains is evaluated and the importance of V. cholerae surveillance in the Amazon is emphasized.

  4. Use of vaginal tampons in sewer surveys for non-O1. Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Pazzaglia, G; Lesmana, M; Tjaniadi, P; Subekti, D; Kay, B.

    1993-01-01

    Vaginal tampons were shown to be a practical alternative to conventional Moore swabs for isolating Vibrio cholerae from sewage. Associated laboratory investigations demonstrated improved isolation of V. cholerae by using 12- or 18-h enrichments in alkaline peptone water, in comparison with 6-h enrichments, when cultures were incubated at ambient temperatures.

  5. Role of Flagella in Virulence of the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Meron, Dalit; Efrony, Rotem; Johnson, Wesley R; Schaefer, Amy L.; Morris, Pamela J.; Rosenberg, Eugene; Greenberg, E. Peter; Banin, Ehud

    2009-01-01

    A recently available transposition system was utilized to isolate a nonmotile mutant of the coral-bleaching pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. The mutation was localized to the fhlA gene, and the mutant lacked flagella. The flhA mutant was unable to exhibit chemotaxis toward coral mucus or to adhere to corals and subsequently cause infection.

  6. Outbreak-associated Vibrio cholerae genotypes with identical pulsotypes, Malaysia, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Suhaili, Zarizal; Lim, King Ting; Khamaruddin, Muhamad Afif; Yahya, Fariha; Sajili, Mohd Hailmi; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2012-07-01

    A cholera outbreak in Terengganu, Malaysia, in November 2009 was caused by 2 El Tor Vibrio cholerae variants resistant to typical antimicrobial drugs. Evidence of replacement of treatable V. cholerae infection in the region with antimicrobial-resistant strains calls for increased surveillance and prevention measures.

  7. Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome I in Escherichia coli: dependence on dam methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Ma, Xiaofang; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We successfully substituted Escherichia coli's origin of replication oriC with the origin region of Vibrio cholerae chromosome I (oriCIVc). Replication from oriCIVc initiated at a similar or slightly reduced cell mass compared to that of normal E. coli oriC. With respect to sequestration...

  8. Molecular Analysis and Toxigenic Potential of Vibrio cholerae Isolated from Hilsha fish (Tenualosa ilisha), Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Zenat Zebin; Farhana, Israt; Tulsiani, Suhella;

    Exposure to contaminated fish may upsurge the virulent strains of Vibrio cholerae, the deadly human pathogen in the households of rural and urban Bangladesh. Since V. cholerae spreading was reported from the Bay of Bengal, this study hypothesized that Hilsha (Tenualosa ilisha), a marine and fresh...

  9. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Vibrio cholerae, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwanda, Berthe; Moore, Sandra; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kabangwa, Ickel Kakongo; Ndjakani, Daniel Yassa; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Thefenne, Helene; Garnotel, Eric; Tshapenda, Gaston; Kakongo, Denis Kandolo; Kalambayi, Guy; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed 1,093 Vibrio cholerae isolates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo during 1997-2012 and found increasing antimicrobial drug resistance over time. Our study also demonstrated that the 2011-2012 epidemic was caused by an El Tor variant clonal complex with a single antimicrobial drug susceptibility profile.

  10. Comparative genomics of 274 Vibrio cholerae genomes reveals mobile functions structuring three niche dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, B.E.; Thompson, C.C.; Vicente, A.C.; Marin, M.A.; Lee, C.; Silva, G.G.; Schmieder, R.; Andrade, B.G.; Chimetto, L.; Cuevas, D.; Garza, D.R.; Okeke, I.N.; Aboderin, A.O.; Spangler, J.; Ross, T.; Dinsdale, E.A.; Thompson, F.L.; Harkins, T.T.; Edwards, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio cholerae is a globally dispersed pathogen that has evolved with humans for centuries, but also includes non-pathogenic environmental strains. Here, we identify the genomic variability underlying this remarkable persistence across the three major niche dimensions space, time, and h

  11. Fuse or die: how to survive the loss of Dam in Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Kennedy, Sean P; Soler-Bistue, Alfonso J.;

    2014-01-01

    Dam methylates GATC sequences in γ-proteobacteria genomes, regulating several cellular functions including replication. In Vibrio cholerae, which has two chromosomes, Dam is essential for viability, owing to its role in chr2 replication initiation. In this study, we isolated spontaneous mutants...

  12. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease.

  13. A checkpoint control orchestrates the replication of the two chromosomes of Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Marbouty, Martial; Martins, Francisco de Lemos;

    2016-01-01

    of the important differences between plasmids and chromosomes is that the latter replicate during a defined period of the cell cycle, ensuring a single round of replication per cell. Vibrio cholerae carries two circular chromosomes, Chr1 and Chr2, which are replicated in a well-orchestrated manner with the cell...

  14. Gene dosage compensation calibrates four regulatory RNAs to control Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Sine L; Tu, Kimberly C; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2009-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinately regulate gene expression in response to changes in cell-population density. At the core of the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal transduction pathway reside four homologous small RNAs (sRNAs), named...

  15. Crystallization of the HigBA2 toxin-antitoxin complex from Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadǽi, San; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio;

    2013-01-01

    The genome of Vibrio cholerae encodes two higBA toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules that are activated by amino-acid starvation. Here, the TA complex of the second module, higBA2, as well as the C-terminal domain of the corresponding HigA2 antitoxin, have been purified and crystallized. The HigBA2 complex...

  16. A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Dolganov, N. A.; Rasmussen, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene...

  17. A Two-Step Synthesis of Virstatin, a Virulence Inhibitor of "Vibrio cholerae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Chriss E.

    2009-01-01

    Virstatin, an "N"-butanoic acid substituted naphthalimide, inhibits the ability of "Vibrio cholerae" to cause disease. A three-week experiment involving synthesis, purification, and spectral characterization of this compound is described. This experiment is appropriate for organic chemistry. It has been performed with three lab sections of about…

  18. Cerebral absces med Vibrio cholerae non-01 efter badning i dansk havvand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Trine; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Olsen, Katharina E P;

    2012-01-01

    We present the first case of intracerebral abscess after blood-borne infection with non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae (non-01). The patient was a 66 year-old woman who was infected after swimming in Danish seawater during an unusually hot summer. She had predisposing haemochromatosis and a skin lesion...

  19. PREVALENCE AND IDENTIFICATION OF VIBRIO SPP. ISOLATED ON AQUACULTURED GILTHEAD SEA BREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scarano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of Vibrio spp isolated from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata farmed on sea cages and to identify and characterize the pathogen by molecular techniques. Eighty fish were collected from two hatcheries located on the North-Est Sardinian Mediterranean coast, and microbiological analysis were performed on different body parts such as skin, gills, muscle and intestinal tract. Subsequently 100 pure colonies with typical morphology and phenotypic characteristics were selected and submitted to the molecular identification. The analysis on the prevalence of Vibrio spp showed the effect of the hatchery rearing system (P<0.001, of the date of sampling (P<0.001, and of the body part (P<0.001. All the strains selected were confirmed to be members of the genus Vibrio spp by the molecular method/techinique/identification, whereas the rpoA gene sequence analyses allowed to identify 89 strains belonging to the species Vibrio harveyi, 6 to V. diabolicus, 2 to V. parahaemolyticus and 1 to V. mediterranei.

  20. csrA Inhibits the Formation of Biofilms by Vibrio vulnificus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Melissa K.; Warner, Elizabeth B.; Oliver, James D.

    2008-01-01

    PCR screening of the shellfish-borne pathogen Vibrio vulnificus revealed csrA-negative strains, and these strains formed increased biofilm compared to csrA-positive strains. Complementation in trans with csrA resulted in reduced biofilm formation, similar to that by csrA+ strains. Our results provide evidence that csrA inhibits biofilm formation in V. vulnificus.

  1. Comparison of Vibrio parahaemolyticus grown in estuarine water and rich medium.

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, J; Chai, T J

    1989-01-01

    Cell envelope composition and selected physiological traits of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were studied in regard to the Kanagawa phenomenon and growth conditions. Cell envelopes were prepared from cells cultured in Proteose Peptone-beef extract (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.) medium or filtered estuarine water. Protein, phospholipid, and lipopolysaccharide contents varied with culture conditions. The phospholipids present in the cell envelopes were identified as phosphatidylethanolamine, ph...

  2. Tandem heterocyclization domains in a nonribosomal peptide synthetase essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Vibrio anguillarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, M.; Stork, M.; Naka, H.; Tolmasky, M.E.; Crosa, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Anguibactin, the siderophore produced by Vibrio anguillarum 775, is synthesized via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Most of the genes required for anguibactin biosynthesis are harbored by the pJM1 plasmid. Complete sequencing of this plasmid identified an orf encoding a 108 kDa p

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of the Fish Pathogen Vibrio harveyi Strains VH2 and VH5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; D'Alvise, Paul; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone; Liu, Siyang; Kalatzis, Panos G; Kokkari, Constantina; Katharios, Pantelis

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is an important marine pathogen that is responsible for vibriosis outbreaks in cultured fish and invertebrates worldwide. Here, we announce the draft genome sequences of V. harveyi strains VH2 and VH5, isolated from farmed juvenile Seriola dumerili during outbreaks of vibriosis in Crete, Greece. PMID:26383670

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VH3, Isolated from an Aquaculture Environment in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Jun, Jin Woo; D'Alvise, Paul; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone; Liu, Siyang; Katharios, Pantelis

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. It has also been identified as an important pathogen in aquatic organisms. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus, strain VH3, isolated from farmed juvenile greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili, in Greece. PMID:26139725

  5. Non-lethal heat shock protects gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana larvae against virulent Vibrios

    OpenAIRE

    Yik Sung, Y.; Van Damme, E.J.M.; Sorgeloos, P.; Bossier, P

    2007-01-01

    Brine shrimp Artemia were exposed under gnotobiotic conditions to a non-lethal heat shock (NLHS) from 28 to 32, 37 and 40°C. Different recovery periods (2, 6, 12 and 24 h) and different heat-exposure times (15, 30, 45 and 60 min) were tested. After these NLHS, Artemia was subsequently challenged with Vibrio. Challenge tests were performed in stressed and unstressed nauplii at concentrations of 107 cells ml-1 of pathogenic bacteria, Vibrio campbellii and Vibrio proteolyticus. A NLHS with an op...

  6. Simple conjugation and outgrowth procedures for tagging vibrios with GFP, and factors affecting the stable expression of the gfp tag

    OpenAIRE

    Sawabe, T.; Fukui, Y.; Stabb, E.V.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Our goal was to develop a simple system for tagging wild-type marine bacteria with gfp. Methods and Results: Escherichia coli strain CC118λpir carrying the conjugative helper plasmid pEVS104 and the gfp-containing plasmid pKV111 was used to transfer gfp to Vibrio recipients. Four different media were tested for their ability to support the growth of recipients, but not the E. coli donor, to allow powerful enrichment of gfp-tagged wild-type vibrios from mating mixes. Forty-three vibrio...

  7. A physical map of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Z; Mages, W; Schmitt, R.

    1994-01-01

    A genomic map of the hyperthermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus was established with NotI (GC/GGCCGC), SpeI (A/CTAGT), and XbaI (T/CTAGA). Linking clones and cross-hybridization of restriction fragments revealed a single circular chromosome of 1.6 Mbp. A single flagellin gene and six rRNA gene units were located on this map by Southern hybridization.

  8. Isolation of a Bacterium Capable of Degrading Peanut Hull Lignin

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Thomas J.; Kerr, Robert D.; Benner, Ronald

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter sp., was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled [14C]lignin-labeled lignocellulose and [14C]cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the...

  9. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and c...

  10. A deep-sea bacterium with unique nitrifying property

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ram, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    cember 2000 A deep - sea bacterium with unique n i trifying property A. S. Pradeep Ram, P. A. Loka Bharathi*, Shanta Nair and D. Chandramohan Department of Microbiology, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004..., nitrite oxidizers have been shown to augment chemolithotrophic lifestyle with heterotrophic me tab o lism of simple carbon substrate 17 . Retaining both the traits enables them to exploit unique niches several centimetres bsf, where carbon or energy...

  11. Coordination of the arc regulatory system and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux operon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecia N Septer

    Full Text Available Bacterial pheromone signaling is often governed both by environmentally responsive regulators and by positive feedback. This regulatory combination has the potential to coordinate a group response among distinct subpopulations that perceive key environmental stimuli differently. We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium that colonizes the squid Euprymna scolopes. Bioluminescence in ES114 is controlled in part by N-(3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC6, a pheromone produced by LuxI that together with LuxR activates transcription of the luxICDABEG operon, initiating a positive feedback loop and inducing luminescence. The lux operon is also regulated by environmentally responsive regulators, including the redox-responsive ArcA/ArcB system, which directly represses lux in culture. Here we show that inactivating arcA leads to increased 3OC6 accumulation to initiate positive feedback. In the absence of positive feedback, arcA-mediated control of luminescence was only ∼2-fold, but luxI-dependent positive feedback contributed more than 100 fold to the net induction of luminescence in the arcA mutant. Consistent with this overriding importance of positive feedback, 3OC6 produced by the arcA mutant induced luminescence in nearby wild-type cells, overcoming their ArcA repression of lux. Similarly, we found that artificially inducing ArcA could effectively repress luminescence before, but not after, positive feedback was initiated. Finally, we show that 3OC6 produced by a subpopulation of symbiotic cells can induce luminescence in other cells co-colonizing the host. Our results suggest that even transient loss of ArcA-mediated regulation in a sub-population of cells can induce luminescence in a wider community. Moreover, they indicate that 3OC6 can communicate information about both cell density

  12. An on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Wen-Jun; Lan, Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Yan, Lei; Wang, Zhe-Li

    2013-09-01

    The polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay has been widely reported. However, the preparation of functional polystyrene bead is still inconvenient. This study describes a simple and easy on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification, in which Staphylococcus aureus (SAC) is used as an antibody-antigen carrier to replace the polystyrene bead. The SAC beads were prepared by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling, paraformaldehyde fixation and antibody binding. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) proteins were used as models in the test system. Using prepared SAC beads, biotinylated proteins, and streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE), the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay was validated by quantifying CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in sample. Obtained data demonstrated a concordant result between the logarithm of the protein concentration and the logarithm of the PE mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The limit of detection (LOD) in this immunoassay was at least 0.25 ng/ml. Precision and accuracy assessments appeared that either the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) or the relative error (R.E.) was CYFRA 21-1. In conclusion, the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay may be of use in the quantification of serum protein. PMID:23739299

  13. First study of Vibrios in larval cultures of pullet carpet shell clam (Venerupis corrugata in hatchery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Dubert Pérez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protocol for hatchery culture of the pullet carpet shell clam Venerupis corrugata spat is currently under development, as the only reliable means of providing spat to replenish natural beds or to support aquaculture activities. Among other variables, the microbiota has been demonstrated to be critical for successful bivalve culture. Shellfish hatcheries are hindered by fatal outbreaks of disease, regardless the bivalve species. These mass mortalities are mainly caused by opportunistic bacteria belonging to genus Vibrio and constitute one bottleneck for this economic activity. Different species, as V. tubiashii, V. pectenicida, V. splendidus, V. neptunius, V. ostreicida and V. bivalvicida, have been identified as responsible of mortalities in hatchery-reared larvae, affecting a wide range of bivalves. This is the first report of the microbiota associated with larval cultures of the pullet carpet shell clam. We present the results of the microbiological analyses of two larval cultures of pullet carpet shell reared in the Centro de Investigacións Mariñas (CIMA, Xunta de Galicia de Ribadeo (Galicia, NW Spain following the procedures developed in the institution. Each batch, A and B, was obtained from broodstocks collected in natural environment but in different geographical locations, the stock A (SW Galicia and the stock B (NW Galicia. Previous records of mortalities led us to divide each batch in two. One sub-batch (A1 and B1 was cultured following the routine procedures. Antibiotic was experimentally added to the other sub-batch (A2 and B2 with the aim of evaluating the effects on the culturable bacterial population (total marine bacteria and presumptive vibrios and on larval survival. Chloramphenicol, formerly the most commonly used antibiotic in bivalve hatcheries, was supplied with each change of seawater during larval development. Microbiological samples of broodstock, larvae and seawater in culture tanks were taken and processed

  14. Selection of the N-acylhomoserine lactone-degrading bacterium Alteromonas stellipolaris PQQ-42 and of its potential for biocontrol in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eTorres

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The production of virulence factors by many pathogenic microorganisms depends on the intercellular communication system called quorum sensing (QS, which involves the production and release of signal molecules known as autoinducers. Based on this, new-therapeutic strategies have emerged for the treatment of a variety of infections, such as the enzymatic degradation of signalling molecules, known as quorum quenching (QQ. In this study, we present the screening of QQ activity amongst 450 strains isolated from a bivalve hatchery in Granada (Spain, and the selection of the strain PQQ-42, which degrades a wide range of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs. The selected strain, identified as Alteromonas stellipolaris, degraded the accumulation of AHLs and reduced the production of protease and chitinase and swimming motility of a Vibrio species in co-cultivation experiments in vitro. In the bio-control experiment, strain PQQ-42 significantly reduced the pathogenicity of V. mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 upon the coral Oculina patagonica showing a lower degree of tissue damage (29.25±14.63 % in its presence, compared to when the coral was infected with V. mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 alone (77.53±13.22 %. Our results suggest that this AHL-degrading bacterium may have biotechnological applications in aquaculture.

  15. The Vibrio cholerae cytolysin promotes chloride secretion from intact human intestinal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucantonio Debellis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenicity of the Vibrio cholerae strains belonging to serogroup O1 and O139 is due to the production of virulence factors such as cholera toxin (CT and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP. The remaining serogroups, which mostly lack CT and TCP, are more frequently isolated from aquatic environmental sources than from clinical samples; nevertheless, these strains have been reported to cause human disease, such as sporadic outbreaks of watery diarrhoea and inflammatory enterocolitis. This evidence suggested the possibility that other virulence factor(s than cholera toxin might be crucial in the pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhoea, but their nature remains unknown. VCC, the hemolysin produced by virtually all Vibrio cholerae strains, has been proposed as a possible candidate, though a clear-cut demonstration attesting VCC as crucial in the pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhoea is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Electrophysiological parameters and paracellular permeability of stripped human healthy colon tissues, obtained at subtotal colectomy, mounted in Ussing chamber were studied in the presence or absence of VCC purified from culture supernatants of V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain. Short circuit current (I(SC and transepithelial resistance (R(T were measured by a computerized voltage clamp system. The exposure of sigmoid colon specimens to 1 nM VCC resulted in an increase of I(SC by 20.7%, with respect to the basal values, while R(T was reduced by 12.3%. Moreover, increase in I(SC was abolished by bilateral Cl(- reduction. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that VCC, by forming anion channels on the apical membrane of enterocytes, triggers an outward transcellular flux of chloride. Such an ion movement, associated with the outward movement of Na(+ and water, might be responsible for the diarrhoea caused by the non-toxigenic strains of Vibrio cholerae.

  16. Clinical manifestations of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections caused by non-O1 Vibrio cholera are uncommon. The aim of our study was to investigate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections. METHODS: The clinical charts of all patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections and who were treated in two hospitals in Taiwan were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: From July 2009 to June 2014, a total of 83 patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections were identified based on the databank of the bacteriology laboratories of two hospitals. The overall mean age was 53.3 years, and men comprised 53 (63.9% of the patients. Liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus were the two most common underlying diseases, followed by malignancy. The most common type of infection was acute gastroenteritis (n = 45, 54.2%, followed by biliary tract infection (n = 12, 14.5% and primary bacteremia (n = 11, 13.3%. Other types of infection, such as peritonitis (n = 5, 6.0%, skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI (n = 5, 6.0%, urinary tract infection (n = 3, 3.6% and pneumonia (2, 2.4%, were rare. July and June were the most common months of occurrence of V. cholera infections. The overall in-hospital mortality of 83 patients with V. cholera infections was 7.2%, but it was significantly higher for patients with primary bacteremia, hemorrhage bullae, acute kidney injury, acute respiratory failure, or admission to an ICU. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that in-hospital mortality was significantly associated with acute respiratory failure (odds ratio, 60.47; 95% CI, 4.79-763.90, P = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Non-O1 V. cholera infections can cause protean disease, especially in patients with risk factors and during warm-weather months. The overall mortality of 83 patients with non-O1 V. cholera infections was only 7.2%; however, this value varied among different types of infection.

  17. gbpA as a Novel qPCR Target for the Species-Specific Detection of Vibrio cholerae O1, O139, Non-O1/Non-O139 in Environmental, Stool, and Historical Continuous Plankton Recorder Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Vezzulli

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae N-acetyl glucosamine-binding protein A (GbpA is a chitin-binding protein involved in V. cholerae attachment to environmental chitin surfaces and human intestinal cells. We previously investigated the distribution and genetic variations of gbpA in a large collection of V. cholerae strains and found that the gene is consistently present and highly conserved in this species. Primers and probe were designed from the gbpA sequence of V. cholerae and a new Taq-based qPCR protocol was developed for diagnostic detection and quantification of the bacterium in environmental and stool samples. In addition, the positions of primers targeting the gbpA gene region were selected to obtain a short amplified fragment of 206 bp and the protocol was optimized for the analysis of formalin-fixed samples, such as historical Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR samples. Overall, the method is sensitive (50 gene copies, highly specific for V. cholerae and failed to amplify strains of the closely-related species Vibrio mimicus. The sensitivity of the assay applied to environmental and stool samples spiked with V. cholerae ATCC 39315 was comparable to that of pure cultures and was of 102 genomic units/l for drinking and seawater samples, 101 genomic units/g for sediment and 102 genomic units/g for bivalve and stool samples. The method also performs well when tested on artificially formalin-fixed and degraded genomic samples and was able to amplify V. cholerae DNA in historical CPR samples, the earliest of which date back to August 1966. The detection of V. cholerae in CPR samples collected in cholera endemic areas such as the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME is of particular significance and represents a proof of concept for the possible use of the CPR technology and the developed qPCR assay in cholera studies.

  18. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a re

  19. Evaluation of the natural prevalence of Vibrio spp. in Uruguayan mussels (Mytilus sp.) and their control using irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria belonging to the Vibrionacea, especially Vibrio cholerae, and of Salmonella spp., was examined in fresh Uruguayan mussels (Mytilus sp.) during two annual seasons. The radiation decimal reduction dose (D10) of various toxigenic strains of Vibrio cholerae was determined to vary in vitro between 0.11 and 0.19 kGy. These results and those from the examination of natural Vibrio spp. contamination in mussels were used to conclude that 1.0 kGy would be enough to render Uruguayan mussels Vibrio-safe. Mussels irradiated in the shell at the optical dose survived long enough to allow the eventual introduction of irradiation as an effective intervention measure without affecting local marketing practices, and making it possible to market the fresh mussels live, as required by Uruguayan legislation. (author)

  20. A Fast and Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Assay for the Vibrio in Large Yellow Croaker Pseudosciaena crocea ( Richardson )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军; 苏永全; 鄢庆枇

    2003-01-01

    A fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assay for the Vibrio alginolyticu s and V.parahaemolyticus infecting the large yellow croaker has been developed. The specific antisera forthe two strains of vibrio were prepared with New Zealand rabbit and the antiserum and cross-reactiveefficacy was tested by coagulation in tube. It showed that the goat anti-rabbit IgG had been labeledby fluorescence isothiocyanate (FITC). The results showed that positive reactions were 100% forthe large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea with typical symptom of vibrio infection, while thepositive reaction to the pathogen in healthy yellow croakers reached 40 %, but seemed negative foraquaculture water. The results demonstrated that this fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assaycan be used not only to test the vibrio pathogen in diseased yellow croaker but also in infected ani-mals with no symptom.

  1. Investigating the decay rates of Escherichia coli relative to Vibrio parahemolyticus and Salmonella Typhi in tropical coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon Weng; Ng, Angie Yee Fang; Bong, Chui Wei; Narayanan, Kumaran; Sim, Edmund Ui Hang; Ng, Ching Ching

    2011-02-01

    Using the size fractionation method, we measured the decay rates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia. The size fractions were total or unfiltered, 0.7 μm) than in the smaller fraction (<0.7 μm) suggesting the more important role played by protists. E. coli and Salmonella also decreased in the <0.02 μm fraction and suggested that these non-halophilic bacteria did not survive well in seawater. In contrast, Vibrio grew well in seawater. There was usually an increase in Vibrio after one day incubation. Our results confirmed that decay or loss rates of E. coli did not match that of Vibrio, and also did not correlate with Salmonella decay rates. However E. coli showed persistence where its decay rates were generally lower than Salmonella. PMID:21146847

  2. A fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assay for the vibrio in large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea (Richardson)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Su, Yongquan; Yan, Qingpi

    2003-03-01

    A fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assay for the Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus infecting the large yellow croaker has been developed. The specific antisera for the two strains of vibrio were prepared with New Zealand rabbit and the antiserum and cross-reactive efficacy was tested by coagulation in tube. It showed that the goat anti-rabbit IgG had been labeled by fluorescence isothiocyanate (FITC). The results showed that positive reactions were 100% for the large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea with typical symptom of vibrio infection, while the positive reaction to the pathogen in healthy yellow croakers reached 40%, but seemed negative for aquaculture water. The results demonstrated that this fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assay can be used not only to test the vibrio pathogen in diseased yellow croaker but also in infected animals with no symptom.

  3. 发光费氏弧菌对常用色素的生物毒性评价%Application of luminescent Vibrio fischeri to evaluation of toxicity of several common pigments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭柔杉; 李翔; 潘力

    2013-01-01

    A method built on the basis of the toxicity effect of pigments on luminescent bacterium Vibrio fisheri was developed for determining the toxicity and content of pigments. Results showed that there was a positive correlation between inhibitory rate of pigments against luminescent intensity of Vibrio fisheri and pigments concentration in aqueous solution,with a correlation coefficient ranging within 0.8760~0.9873. EC50 range was 0.72~2.86mg/L Inhibitory rate of pigments against luminescent intensity of Vibrio fisheri was also positively correlated with positive concentration in fruit juice,and the correlation coefficient was between 0.9136 and 0.9951. EC50 range was 1.02~2.96mg/L This showed that the toxicity of tartrazine was lower and the toxicity of amaranth was larger. Fruit juice played a role of mitigating the toxicity of the synthetic pigments. The bioluminescence inhibition rate by the pigments in the fruit juice increased with the rate significantly was higher than in aqueous solution. The study provided the initial reference for the acute toxicity testing of the food.%在探寻出色素与费氏弧菌发光抑制率存在相关性的基础上,初步建立起评价色素生物毒性的方法,并将其应用于果汁中色素产生的综合毒性的检验.结果:色素溶液质量浓度与发光抑制率呈正相关,相关系数在0.8760~0.9873之间,EC50范围在0.72~2.86mg/L之间;果汁中色素质量浓度与发光抑制率同样呈正相关,相关系数在0.9136~0.9951之间,FC50值在1.02~2.96mg/L之间.柠檬黄毒性较小,苋菜红毒性较大.果汁对人工合成色素的生物毒性具有一定影响.色素在果汁中对费氏弧菌发光抑制率随浓度增加而上升的幅度明显大于在水溶液中.本研究为食品急性生物毒性监测的研究提供初步参考.

  4. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zeena E Nackerdien; Keynan, Alexander; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Lederberg, Joshua; Thaler, David S

    2008-01-01

    Background The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. Methodology/Principal Findings The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sensi...

  5. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zeena E Nackerdien; Alexander Keynan; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Joshua Lederberg; Thaler, David S

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sen...

  6. Exoproteome and secretome derived broad spectrum novel drug and vaccine candidates in Vibrio cholerae targeted by Piper betel derived compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debmalya Barh

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species.

  7. Investigate the frequency of virulence genes Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from fish, lobsters and crabs caught from Persian Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Safarpourdehkordi; Sahar Hosseini; Ebrahim Rahimi; Manouchehr Momeni; Emad Yahaghi; Ebrahim Khodaverdi Darian

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Annually, many reports of occurrence of food poisoning due to the consumption of sea-foods contaminated with Vibrio species have been published. The present study was carried out to study the prevalence rate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. cholera and evaluation of presence of virulence genes of V. parahaemolyticus in sea-food products caught from Persian Gulf. Materials and Methods: In total, 200 samples of fish, lobster and crab caught from Persian Gulf collected in...

  8. Aislamiento de Vibrio sp. a partir de órganos internos de Dormitator latifrons (Richarson, 1844 silvestres – Reporte preliminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Mendoza-Rodríguez

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Se informa el hallazgo de Vibrio sp.utilizando medio de cultivo selectivoTCBS de muestras de tracto intestinal deejemplares de “monengue” Dormitatorlatifrons silvestres, especie que sealimenta principalmente de detritus enambientes inundados de zonas costeras.This report it shows the finding results ofVibrio sp. using selective culture TCBSfrom intestine samples of fishes “Pacificfat sleepers” Dormitator latifronssavages, species that is fed mainly ondetritus in flooded environments ofcoastal zones.

  9. Prevalence and Distribution of Vibrio spp. in Wild Aquatic Birds of the Southern Caribbean Sea, Venezuela, 2011-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Sanz, Virginia; Giner, Sandra; Suárez, Paula; Contreras, Monica; Michelangeli, Fabian; García-Amado

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio spp. are associated with waterbirds mainly in temperate latitudes. We evaluated the prevalence and distribution of Vibrio spp. from fecal samples of resident and migratory aquatic birds collected during October 2011 and March 2012 at two coastal sites in the tropical southern Caribbean Sea. We amplified DNA by PCR in 40% of samples, resulting in 47% and 36% estimated prevalence for resident and migratory birds in Cuare Wildlife Refuge, and 33% and 44% in Margarita Island, respectively. We found nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae in Cuare Wildlife Refuge with a higher prevalence in resident birds (18%). Our PCR results for Vibrio and V. cholerae were not significantly different between sites or bird migratory status. The 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis sequences from fecal samples from Cuare Wildlife Refuge were highly similar to V. cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus , whereas sequences from Margarita Island samples formed clusters with species related to the Harveyi clade. Our findings indicate that several species of Vibrio are common in aquatic birds along the southern Caribbean Sea and contribute to our understanding of the role of birds as possible reservoirs of potentially pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27224211

  10. Free living and plankton-associated vibrios: assessment in ballast water, harbor areas and coastal ecosystems in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Nelly G. Rivera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballast water is a major transport vector of exotic aquatic species and pathogenic microorganisms. The wide-ranging spread of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from harbor areas has been frequently ascribed to discharge of contaminated ballast water into eutrophic coastal environments, such as during the onset of the seventh cholera pandemic in South America in the early 1990s. To determine the microbiological hazards of ballast waters transported to Brazilian ports, we evaluated water and plankton samples taken from (i ballast water tanks of recently arrived ships, (ii port areas along the Brazilian coastline from ~1 to 32 oS and (iii three coastal areas in São Paulo State. Vibrio concentration and toxigenic V. cholerae O1 occurrence were analyzed. Plankton-associated vibrios were more abundant than free-living vibrios in all studied environments. Vibrio cholerae was found in 9.5% of ballast tanks and 24.2% of port samples, both as free-living and attached forms, and was absent off São Paulo State. Toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates (ctxA+, tcpA+, involved in cholera disease, were found in ballast water (2% and harbor (2% samples. These results confirm that ballast water is an important carrier of pathogenic organisms, and that monitoring of vibrios and other plankton-attached bacteria is of paramount importance in ballast water management programs.

  11. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eTout

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2-3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i the whole Vibrio community and (ii the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by 4 orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems.

  12. Research Progress and Perspectives of Nitrogen Fixing Bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, in Monocot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen fixing bacterium originally found in monocotyledon sugarcane plants in which the bacterium actively fixes atmosphere nitrogen and provides significant amounts of nitrogen to plants. This bacterium mainly colonizes intercellular spaces within the roots and stems of plants and does not require the formation of the complex root organ like nodule. The bacterium is less plant/crop specific and indeed G. diazotrophicus has been found in a number of unrelated plant species. Importantly, as the bacterium was of monocot plant origin, there exists a possibility that the nitrogen fixation feature of the bacterium may be used in many other monocot crops. This paper reviews and updates the research progress of G. diazotrophicus for the past 25 years but focuses on the recent research development.

  13. Occurrence and antibiotic resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from shellfish in Selangor, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengadesh eLetchumanan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High consumer demand for shellfish has led to the need for large-scale, reliable shellfish supply through aquaculture or shellfish farming. However, bacterial infections which can spread rapidly among shellfish poses a major threat to this industry. Shellfish farmers therefore often resort to extensive use of antibiotics, both prophylactically and therapeutically, in order to protect their stocks. The extensive use of antibiotics in aquaculture has been postulated to represent a major contributing factor in the rising incidence of antimicrobial resistant pathogenic bacteria in shellfish. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus and determine the antibiotic resistance profile as well as to perform plasmid curing in order to determine the antibiotic resistance mediation. Based on colony morphology, all 450 samples tested were positive for Vibrio spp; however, tox-R assay showed that only 44.4% (200/450 of these were Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Out of these 200 samples, 6.5% (13/200 were trh-positive while none were tdh-positive. Antibiotic resistance was determined for all Vibrio parahaemolyticus identified against 14 commonly used antibiotics and the multiple antibiotic resistance index (MAR was calculated. The isolates demonstrated high resistance to several antibiotics tested- including second and third-line antibiotics- with 88% resistant to ampicillin, 81% to amikacin ,70.5% to kanamycin, 73% to cefotaxime and 51.5% to ceftazidime. The MAR index ranged from 0.00 to 0.79 with the majority of samples having an index of 0.36 (resistant to 5 antibiotics. Among the 13 trh-positive strains, almost 70% (9/13 demonstrated resistance to 4 or more antibiotics. Plasmid profiling for all Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates revealed that 86.5% (173/200 contained plasmids - ranging from 1 to 7 plasmids with DNA band sizes ranging from 1.2kb to greater than 10kb. 6/13 of the pathogenic V. pathogenic strains contained

  14. Transcriptome Analysis and Discovery of Genes Involved in Immune Pathways from Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) after Vibrio splendidus Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Qiong Gao; Meijie Liao; Yingeng Wang; Bin Li,; Zheng Zhang; Xiaojun Rong; Guiping Chen; Lan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is identified as one of the major pathogenic factors for the skin ulceration syndrome in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), which has vastly limited the development of the sea cucumber culture industry. In order to screen the immune genes involving Vibrio splendidus challenge in sea cucumber and explore the molecular mechanism of this process, the related transcriptome and gene expression profiling of resistant and susceptible biotypes of sea cucumber with Vibrio splendi...

  15. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  16. Dietary supplementation of Pediococcus pentosaceus enhances innate immunity, physiological health and resistance to Vibrio anguillarum in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-Bin; Wu, Yu-Chi; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2014-08-01

    Groupers (Epinephelus spp.) are economically important fish species in Southeast Asian aquaculture. Vibriosis caused by Vibro spp. is one of the severe bacterial diseases that devastate the grouper aquaculture industry. Probiotics have been reported to show the potential to enhance fish immunity and to antagonize pathogens. In our previous study, a lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus pentosaceus strain 4012 (LAB4012), isolated from cobia intestine, protects cobia from photobacteriosis after a 2-week feeding. In this study, we examined the potential of LAB4012 to be a probiotic for the orange-spotted grouper through feeding, thus to guard against vibriosis. In vitro, LAB4012 culture supernatant with low pH suppressed the growth of Vibrio anguillarum, and lactic acid in the metabolite of LAB4012 appeared to be the major factor to the growth inhibition of V. anguillarum. In vivo, the challenge test showed that the cumulative mortality of the LAB4012-fed groupers was significantly lower than that of the control fish after V. anguillarum infection. Supplementation of LAB4012 in commercial diet not only enhanced the growth rate and erythrocyte numbers of the groupers, but also regulated the gene expression of the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines. One day post-infection of V. anguillarum, the leukocyte numbers in the peripheral blood and the phagocytic activity of the head-kidney phagocytes in the LAB4012-fed groupers were found significantly increased, when compared with those without LAB4012-feeding. These results suggested that LAB4012 can be a dietary probiotic for groupers in modulating the immunity and protecting the groupers from V. anguillarum infection.

  17. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of two low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases from Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two protein tyrosine phosphatases, namely VcLMWPTP-1 and VcLMWPTP-2, from V. cholerae have been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMWPTPs) are small cytoplasmic enzymes of molecular weight ∼18 kDa that belong to the large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Despite their wide distribution in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, their exact biological role in bacterial systems is not yet clear. Two low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (VcLMWPTP-1 and VcLMWPTP-2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae have been cloned, overexpressed, purified by Ni2+–NTA affinity chromatography followed by gel filtration and used for crystallization. Crystals of VcLMWPTP-1 were grown in the presence of ammonium sulfate and glycerol and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å. VcLMWPTP-2 crystals were grown in PEG 4000 and diffracted to a resolution of 2.7 Å. Analysis of the diffraction data showed that the VcLMWPTP-1 crystals had symmetry consistent with space group P31 and that the VcLMWPTP-2 crystals had the symmetry of space group C2. Assuming the presence of four molecules in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient for the VcLMWPTP-1 crystals was estimated to be 1.97 Å3 Da−1, corresponding to a solvent content of 37.4%. The corresponding values for the VcLMWPTP-2 crystals, assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, were 2.77 Å3 Da−1 and 55.62%, respectively

  18. Crystal structure of HutZ, a heme storage protein from Vibrio cholerae: A structural mismatch observed in the region of high sequence conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiuhua

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HutZ is the sole heme storage protein identified in the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae and is required for optimal heme utilization. However, no heme oxygenase activity has been observed with this protein. Thus far, HutZ’s structure and heme-binding mechanism are unknown. Results We report the first crystal structure of HutZ in a homodimer determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The HutZ structure adopted a typical split-barrel fold. Through a docking study and site-directed mutagenesis, a heme-binding model for the HutZ dimer is proposed. Very interestingly, structural superimposition of HutZ and its homologous protein HugZ, a heme oxygenase from Helicobacter pylori, exhibited a structural mismatch of one amino acid residue in β6 of HutZ, although residues involved in this region are highly conserved in both proteins. Derived homologous models of different single point variants with model evaluations suggested that Pro140 of HutZ, corresponding to Phe215 of HugZ, might have been the main contributor to the structural mismatch. This mismatch initiates more divergent structural characteristics towards their C-terminal regions, which are essential features for the heme-binding of HugZ as a heme oxygenase. Conclusions HutZ’s deficiency in heme oxygenase activity might derive from its residue shift relative to the heme oxygenase HugZ. This residue shift also emphasized a limitation of the traditional template selection criterion for homology modeling.

  19. Host cell contact induces expression of virulence factors and VieA, a cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase, in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Amit K; Bhagat, Abha; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2013-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae, a noninvasive bacterium, colonizes the intestinal epithelium and secretes cholera toxin (CT), a potent enterotoxin that causes the severe fluid loss characteristic of the disease cholera. In this study, we demonstrate that adherence of V. cholerae to the intestinal epithelial cell line INT 407 strongly induces the expression of the major virulence genes ctxAB and tcpA and the virulence regulatory gene toxT. No induction of toxR and tcpP, which encode transcriptional activators of toxT, was observed in adhered bacteria, and the adherence-dependent upregulation of toxT expression was independent of ToxR and TcpP. A sharp increase in the expression of the vieA gene, which encodes a cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterase, was observed in INT 407-adhered V. cholerae immediately after infection. Induction of toxT, ctxAB, and tcpA in INT 407-adhered vieA mutant strain O395 ΔvieA was consistently lower than in the parent strain, although no effect was observed in unadhered bacteria, suggesting that VieA has a role in the upregulation of toxT expression specifically in host cell-adhered V. cholerae. Furthermore, though VieA has both a DNA binding helix-turn-helix domain and an EAL domain conferring c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity, the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity of VieA is necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of toxT expression.

  20. Obtaining of a rapid diagnostic test for Cholera, based on latex particles coupled with a monoclonal antibody against Vibrio cholera O1 lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Reyes-López

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cholera is an acute contagious intestinal disease caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with O1 and O139 serotypes of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. Cholera is characterized by abundant secretory diarrhea leading to dehydration. Death occurs within hours without treatment, so early diagnosis is very important, especially at the beginning of the disease, because it is difficult to differentiate from other acute diarrheal diseases. The diagnostic golden test is the stool culture; however, it does not guarantee a rapid detection of the disease. Rapid tests have been recently developed; they are based on test strips and agglutination with latex particles, which are very effective, but difficult to acquire for their high prices. The objective of this research was to obtain a quick assay based on latex particles coupled with a monoclonal antibody (mAb against V. cholerae O1 lipopolysaccharide obtained in Finlay Institute. Latex particles of 0.8 µm were used in a 10% suspension, and they were coupled to the mAb (0.25 mg/ml for 2 hours at 37°C. The sensitivity, specificity and performance were evaluated in 84 stool samples from patients with presumptive diagnosis of cholera. The diagnostic test obtained showed no cross-reactivity against no-O1 strains and other enteropathogens. Latex diagnostic test showed values of sensitivity, specificity and efficacy of 97.87; 97.29 and 97.6% respectively, very similar to the commercial diagnostic test CTK- Biotech. The latex reagent obtained can be used in the rapid diagnosis of the disease.

  1. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5

    OpenAIRE

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotro...

  2. A Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium That Decreases Nickel Toxicity in Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Genrich I.; Dixon, D. George; Glick, Bernard R.

    1998-01-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and CrO4−, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride w...

  3. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain. PMID:26972517

  4. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  5. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  6. Species Richness and Spatial Distribution of Pathogenic Vibrio (Bacteria, Vibrionaceae in Tropical Surface Waters: Yaoundé Metropolis Case (Cameroon, Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamatcho Kweyang Blandine Pulchérie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, six species of Vibrio that are potential human pathogens have been isolated from surface water resources in an urban environment and have been identified. The variation of some physico-chemical factors known to have significant effects on bacterial growth and spread are also considered. The latter include: electrical conductivity, pH, total suspended solids, temperature, dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide, and rate of water flow. All investigations were conducted according to standard methods. Application of classical bacteriological techniques led to the identification of six species of the genus. Vibrio cholera, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio mimicus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. Vibrio cholerae was isolated in all water sampling points, with the highest frequency 79% upstream the Mfoundi River at Etoa-Meki. Rates of isolation of Vibrio mimicus increased with increased O2 (p<0.05. Identification of these potential pathogens is a serious public health hazard highlighting the needs for resource management.

  7. Antibiotic resistance of vibrio cholerae: special considerations of R-plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, S

    1978-09-01

    Studies on the transmission of R plasmid by conjugation between enterobacteria and vibrio or related bacteria were reviewed. The majority of the reports confirmed successful transmission from enterobacteria to Vibrio cholerae and related species, although the transmission frequencies were extremely low and the transmitted R plasmid was very unstable except for thermosensitive kanamycin plasmid and usual R plasmid coexisting with P plasmid. Strains of V. cholerae and Aeromonas liquefaciens as well as A. salmonicida bearing R plasmid were detected in nature. R plasmid was relatively unstable in V. cholerae strains with which transmission of R plasmid to enterobacteria was confirmed. At present, only 3 R plasmids have been obtained from naturally occurring strains of V. cholerae. Although the 2 European plasmids belong to the C incompatibility group with 98 megadalton closed covalent circular DNA molecule, one plasmid belongs to the J group with more than 25 megadalton molecular weight, and no CCC of satelite DNA was detected in bacteria harboring this plasmid.

  8. Complete genome sequence of virulent bacteriophage SHOU24, which infects foodborne pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lin; Cui, Zelin; Wang, Yanchun; Guo, Xiaokui; Zhao, Yong

    2014-11-01

    A novel lytic Vibrio parahaemolyticus phage (SHOU24) belonging to the family Siphoviridae was isolated from aquatic market sewage. The phage is only able to infect V. parahaemolyticus containing a tdh gene. SHOU24 has a linear genome of 77,837 bp with a G+C content of 46.0 %. In total, 88 predicted proteins have homologues in databases, and the majority of the core genes share high sequence similarity with genes from unrelated viruses and bacteria. Genes related to lysogeny and host lysis were not detected. However, the detection method, the results of a one-step growth experiment and analysis using the Phage Classification Tool Set (PHACTS) indicate that SHOU24 is lytic. A bioinformatics analysis showed that SHOU24 is not closely related to other Vibrio phages.

  9. Tropical Atlantic marine macroalgae with bioactivity against virulent and antibiotic resistant Vibrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Cristina Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of ethanol, methanol, hexane and acetone-based extracts of the macroalgae Padina gymnospora (PG, Hypnea musciformes (HM, Ulva fasciata (UF and Caulerpa prolifera (CP was investigated. The disk diffusion method was used to evaluate the algae antimicrobial effect against standard strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica and five virulent antibiotic-resistant strains of V. brasiliensis, V. xuii and V. navarrensis (isolated from the hemolymph of Litopenaeus vannamei. Ethanol extracts of PG and HM inhibited all Vibrio strains. E. coli and P. aeruginosa were only susceptible to ethanol extracts of PG. Among the methanol extracts, only UF was bioactive, inhibiting V. navarrensis. The observed inhibitory effect of ethanol extracts of PG, HM and UF against virulent antibiotic-resistant bacteria suggests these macroalgal species constitute a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  10. Fimbrolide Natural Products Disrupt Bioluminescence of Vibrio By Targeting Autoinducer Biosynthesis and Luciferase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weining; Lorenz, Nicola; Jung, Kirsten; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-18

    Vibrio is a model organism for the study of quorum sensing (QS) signaling and is used to identify QS-interfering drugs. Naturally occurring fimbrolides are important tool compounds known to affect QS in various organisms; however, their cellular targets have so far remained elusive. Here we identify the irreversible fimbrolide targets in the proteome of living V. harveyi and V. campbellii via quantitative mass spectrometry utilizing customized probes. Among the major hits are two protein targets with essential roles in Vibrio QS and bioluminescence. LuxS, responsible for autoinducer 2 biosynthesis, and LuxE, a subunit of the luciferase complex, were both covalently modified at their active-site cysteines leading to inhibition of activity. The identification of LuxE unifies previous reports suggesting inhibition of bioluminescence downstream of the signaling cascade and thus contributes to a better mechanistic understanding of these QS tool compounds.

  11. Siderocalin outwits the coordination chemistry of vibriobactin, a siderophore of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Benjamin E; Correnti, Colin; Clifton, Matthew C; Strong, Roland K; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2013-09-20

    The human protein siderocalin (Scn) inhibits bacterial iron acquisition by binding catechol siderophores. Several pathogenic bacteria respond by making stealth siderophores that are not recognized by Scn. Fluvibactin and vibriobactin, respectively of Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio cholerae , include an oxazoline adjacent to a catechol. This chelating unit binds iron either in a catecholate or a phenolate-oxazoline coordination mode. The latter has been suggested to make vibriobactin a stealth siderophore without directly identifying the coordination mode in relation to Scn binding. We use Scn binding assays with the two siderophores and two oxazoline-substituted analogs and the crystal structure of Fe-fluvibactin:Scn to show that the oxazoline does not prevent Scn binding; hence, vibriobactin is not a stealth siderophore. We show that the phenolate-oxazoline coordination mode is present at physiological pH and is not bound by Scn. However, Scn binding shifts the coordination to the catecholate mode and thereby inactivates this siderophore.

  12. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant flagellin A from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Liu, Yang; Ge, Hui; Qiu, Xuemei

    2010-11-01

    The Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. Bacteria flagellins play an important role during infection and induction of the host immune response. Thus, flagellin proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified the complete flagellin subunit gene ( flaA) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 62.78 kDa. We purified and characterized the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for further studies into the utility of the FlaA protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified FlaA protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  13. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Aaron; Persson, Cecilia; Mayzel, Maxim; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Öhman, Anders; Karlsson, B Göran; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    The metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae serves an important function for the ability of bacteria to invade the mammalian host cell. The protein belongs to the family of M6 proteases, with a characteristic zinc ion in the catalytic active site. PrtV constitutes a 918 amino acids (102 kDa) multidomain pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications to form a catalytically active protease. We report here the NMR structure of the PrtV N-terminal domain (residues 23-103) that contains two short α-helices in a coiled coil motif. The helices are held together by a cluster of hydrophobic residues. Approximately 30 residues at the C-terminal end, which were predicted to form a third helical structure, are disordered. These residues are highly conserved within the genus Vibrio, which suggests that they might be functionally important.

  14. DETECTION OF VIRULENCE GENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL STRAINS OF Vibrio cholerae FROM ESTUARIES IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Gleire Rodrigues de Menezes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to detect the presence of Vibrio cholerae in tropical estuaries (Northeastern Brazil and to search for virulence factors in the environmental isolates. Water and sediment samples were inoculated onto a vibrio-selective medium (TCBS, and colonies with morphological resemblance to V. cholerae were isolated. The cultures were identified phenotypically using a dichotomous key based on biochemical characteristics. The total DNA extracted was amplified by PCR to detect ompW and by multiplex PCR to detect the virulence genes ctx, tcp, zot and rfbO1. The results of the phenotypic and genotypic identification were compared. Nine strains of V. cholerae were identified phenotypically, five of which were confirmed by detection of the species-specific gene ompW. The dichotomous key was efficient at differentiating environmental strains of V. cholerae. Strains of V. cholerae were found in all four estuaries, but none possessed virulence genes.

  15. Environmental surveillance for toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in surface waters of Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Amy M; Haley, Bradd J; Chen, Arlene; Mull, Bonnie J; Tarr, Cheryl L; Turnsek, Maryann; Katz, Lee S; Humphrys, Michael S; Derado, Gordana; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Colwell, Rita R; Huq, Anwar; Hill, Vincent R

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic cholera was reported in Haiti in 2010, with no information available on the occurrence or geographic distribution of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in Haitian waters. In a series of field visits conducted in Haiti between 2011 and 2013, water and plankton samples were collected at 19 sites. Vibrio cholerae was detected using culture, polymerase chain reaction, and direct viable count methods (DFA-DVC). Cholera toxin genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction in broth enrichments of samples collected in all visits except March 2012. Toxigenic V. cholerae was isolated from river water in 2011 and 2013. Whole genome sequencing revealed that these isolates were a match to the outbreak strain. The DFA-DVC tests were positive for V. cholerae O1 in plankton samples collected from multiple sites. Results of this survey show that toxigenic V. cholerae could be recovered from surface waters in Haiti more than 2 years after the onset of the epidemic.

  16. Involvement of penaeidins in defense reactions of the shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris to a pathogenic vibrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, M; Vandenbulcke, F; Garnier, J; Gueguen, Y; Bulet, P; Saulnier, D; Bachère, E

    2004-04-01

    The present study reports for the first time the involvement of an antimicrobial peptide in the defense reactions of a shrimp infected by a pathogenic Vibrio, Vibrio penaeicida. New members of the penaeidin family were characterized in the shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris by RT-PCR and RACE-PCR from hemocyte total RNAs, and by mass spectrometry detection and immunolocalization of mature peptides in shrimp hemocytes. In infected shrimps, bacteria and penaeidin distribution colocalized in the gills and the lymphoid organ that represented the main infected sites. Moreover, the shrimp immune response to infection involved massive hemocyte recruitment to infection sites where released penaeidin may participate in the isolation and elimination of the bacteria, We show that the ability of the shrimps to circumvent shrimp infections is closely related to a recovery phase based on the hematopoietic process. PMID:15095016

  17. Continuous Exposure Of Vibrio Anguillarum To Tropodithietic Acid: Genetic Changes And Influence On Virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bastian Barker; D'Alvise, Paul; Grotkjær, Torben;

    2015-01-01

    exposure affects V. anguillarum focusing on the development of resistance towards TDA and changes in virulence.Methods: Seven lineages of V. anguillarum were exposed to increasing TDA concentrations over 300-400 generations and were subsequently genome sequenced. Virulence of the lineages is currently......Introduction: The fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum is a major problem in aquaculture causing Vibriosis. Bacteria of the Roseobacter clade can antagonize pathogenic vibrios in cultures in live feed such as microalgae, rotifers and Artemia, as well as in fish larvae. Therefore, roseobacters could...... being tested in fish cell infection trials.Results: Following exposure, four linages reached 1.75 x wild-type MIC and three reached 1.5 x wild-type MIC. Genome sequencing revealed no major changes in the genomes of the lineages. The only virulence-related gene affected was fliM, encoding a flagella...

  18. Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from biofouling on commercial vessels and harbor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Castellanos, Valeria J; Guerrero, Abraham; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Navarro-Barrón, Erick; Lizárraga-Partida, Marcial L

    2015-01-01

    Ballast water is a significant vector of microbial dissemination; however, biofouling on commercial vessel hulls has been poorly studied with regard to pathogenic bacteria transport. Biofouling on three commercial vessels and seven port structures in Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, was examined by qPCR to identify and quantify Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a worldwide recognized food-borne human pathogen. Pathogenic variants (trh+, tdh+) of V. parahaemolyticus were detected in biofouling homogenates samples from several docks in Ensenada and on the hulls of ships with Japanese and South Korean homeports, but not in reference sampling stations. A total of 26 tdh+ V. parahaemolyticus colonies and 1 ORF8+/O3:K6 strain were also isolated from enriched biofouling homogenate samples confirming the qPCR analysis. Our results suggest that biofouling is an important reservoir of pathogenic vibrios. Thus, ship biofouling might be an overlooked vector with regard to the dissemination of pathogens, primarily pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus.

  19. Short Chain N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Production in Tropical Marine Vibrio sinaloensis Strain T47

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pui-Wan Tan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS, acts as one of the gene regulatory systems that allow bacteria to regulate their physiological activities by sensing the population density with synchronization of the signaling molecules that they produce. Here, we report a marine isolate, namely strain T47, and its unique AHL profile. Strain T47 was identified using 16S rRNA sequence analysis confirming that it is a member of Vibrio closely clustered to Vibrio sinaloensis. The isolated V. sinaloensis strain T47 was confirmed to produce N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL by using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. V. sinaloensis strain T47 also formed biofilms and its biofilm formation could be affected by anti-QS compound (cathechin suggesting this is a QS-regulated trait in V. sinaloensis strain T47. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of AHL and biofilm production in V. sinaloensis strain T47.

  20. Screening, identification and desilication of a silicate bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong-bo; ZENG Xiao-xi; LIU Fei-fei; QIU Guan-zhou; HU Yue-hua

    2006-01-01

    The strain Lv1-2 isolated from the Henan bauxite was characterized by morphological observation, biochemical and physiological identification, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The influences of temperature, initial pH value, the volume of medium, shaking speed and illite concentration on the desilicating ability of the strain Lv1-2 were investigated. The results show that the bacterium is a Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium with oval endspores and thick capsule, but without flagellum. The biochemical and physiological tests indicate that the strain Lv1-2 is similar to Bacillus mucilaginosus. In GenBank the 16S rDNA sequence similarity of the strain Lv1-2 and the B. mucilaginosus YNUCC0001 (AY571332) is more than 99 %. Based on the above results, the strain Lv1-2 is identified as B. mucilaginosus. The optimum conditions for the strain Lv1-2 to remove silicon from illite are as follows: temperature is 30℃ ;initial pH value is 7.5; medium volume in 200 mL bottle is 60 mL; shaking speed of rotary shaker is 220 r/m; illite concentration is 1%.

  1. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeong Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla.

  2. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-07-01

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. This review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkable ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications. PMID:27263016

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Vibrio vulnificus Infection in Korea and the Influence of Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chaeshin; Do, Younghae; Kim, Yongkuk; Saito, Yasuhisa; Lee, Sun-Dong; Park, Haemo; Lee, Jong-koo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the possible link between Vibrio vulnificus population size in seawater and water temperature. Methods We collected incidence and water temperature data in coastal regions of Korea and constructed a mathematical model that consisted of three classes; susceptible fish, infected fish available to humans, and infected humans. Results We developed a mathematical model to connect V. vulnificus incidence with water temperature using estimated bacterial population sizes and...

  4. Vibrio Zinc-Metalloprotease Causes Photoinactivation of Coral Endosymbionts and Coral Tissue Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Meir Sussman; Mieog, Jos C.; Jason Doyle; Steven Victor; Willis, Bette L.; Bourne, David G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coral diseases are emerging as a serious threat to coral reefs worldwide. Of nine coral infectious diseases, whose pathogens have been characterized, six are caused by agents from the family Vibrionacae, raising questions as to their origin and role in coral disease aetiology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on a Vibrio zinc-metalloprotease causing rapid photoinactivation of susceptible Symbiodinium endosymbionts followed by lesions in coral tissue. Symbiodinium pho...

  5. Interaction of Vibrio spp. with the Inner Surface of the Digestive Tract of Penaeus monodon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wipasiri Soonthornchai

    Full Text Available Several species of Vibrio are the causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. In aquaculture, Vibrio harveyi (Vh and V. parahaemolyticus (Vp have long been considered as shrimp pathogens in freshwater, brackish and marine environments. Here we show by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM that Penaeus monodon orally inoculated with each of these two pathogens via an Artemia diet had numerous bacteria attached randomly across the stomach surface, in single and in large biofilm-like clusters 6 h post-infection. A subsequent marked proliferation in the number of V. harveyi within the biofilm-like formations resulted in the development of infections in the stomach, the upper and middle midgut, but neither in the posterior midgut nor the hindgut. SEM also revealed the induced production of peritrichous pili-like structures by the Vp attaching to the stomach lining, whilst only a single polar fibre was seen forming an apparent physical bridge between Vh and the host's epithelium. In contrast to these observations, no such adherences or linkages were seen when trials were conducted with non-pathogenic Vibrio spp. or with Micrococcus luteus, with no obvious resultant changes to the host's gut surface. In naive shrimp, the hindgut was found to be a favorable site for bacteria notably curved, short-rod shaped bacteria which probably belong to Vibrio spp. Data from the current study suggests that pathogens of P. monodon must be able to colonize the digestive tract, particularly the stomach, where chitin is present, and then they use an array of virulent factors and enzymes to infect their host resulting in disease. Oral infection is a better way of mimicking natural routes of infection; investigating the host-bacteria interactions occurring in the digestive tract may lead to new strategies for the prevention or control of bacterial infections in penaeids.

  6. Berberine inhibits intestinal secretory response of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli enterotoxins.

    OpenAIRE

    Sack, R B; Froehlich, J L

    1982-01-01

    Berberine, an alkaloid from the plant Berberis aristata, which has been known since ancient times as an antidiarrheal medication in India and China, inhibited by approximately 70% the secretory responses of the heat-labile enterotoxins of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli in the rabbit ligated intestinal loop model. The drug was effective when given either before or after enterotoxin binding and when given either intraluminally or parenterally; it did not inhibit the stimulation of adenyla...

  7. Molecular characteristics and antibiotic resistance of Vibrio cholerae O139 in Shandong province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁玉起

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular epidemiological characteristics and antibiotic resistance profiles of Vibrio cholerae O139 in Shandong province.Methods A total of 13 strains of V.cholerae O139(9 clinical strains and 4 environmental strains)isolated from cholera epidemics in Shandong province since 1997 were recovered and confirmed with serum agglutination and biochemical reaction.Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis(PFGE)was carried out for molecular subtyping.Virulence genes and

  8. Vibrio parahemolyticus septicaemia in a liver transplant patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairweather Morgan G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vibrio parahemolyticus is the leading cause of vibrio-associated gastroenteritis in the United States of America, usually related to poor food handling; only rarely has it been reported to cause serious infections including sepsis and soft tissue infections. In contrast, Vibrio vulnificus is a well-known cause of septicaemia, especially in patients with cirrhosis. We present a patient with V. parahemolyticus sepsis who had an orthotic liver transplant in 2007 and was on immunosuppression for chronic rejection. Clinical suspicion driven by patient presentation, travel to Gulf of Mexico and soft tissue infection resulted in early diagnosis and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Case presentation A 48 year old Latin American man with a history of chronic kidney disease, orthotic liver transplant in 2007 secondary to alcoholic end stage liver disease on immunosuppressants, and chronic rejection presented to the emergency department with fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, left lower extremity swelling and fluid filled blisters after a fishing trip in the Gulf of Mexico. Samples from the blister and blood grew V. parahemolyticus. The patient was successfully treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Febrile patients with underlying liver disease and/or immunosuppression should be interviewed regarding recent travel to a coastal area and seafood ingestion. If this history is obtained, appropriate empiric antibiotics must be chosen. Patients with liver disease and/or immunosuppresion should be counselled to avoid eating raw or undercooked molluscan shellfish. People can prevent Vibrio sepsis and wound infections by proper cooking of seafood and avoiding exposure of open wounds to seawater or raw shellfish products.

  9. Immunochemical Properties of the Major Outer Membrane Protein of Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir, Shahjahan

    1983-01-01

    Antisera to the major outer membrane protein of Vibrio cholerae (molecular weight, 48,000) raised in rabbits (i) agglutinated several strains of V. cholerae and (ii) immunoprecipitated outer membrane proteins prepared from both the biotypes and serotypes of V. cholerae. Antibodies of all isotypes to the major outer membrane protein were detected in immune human sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These results suggest that the major outer membrane protein was the common outer membrane ...

  10. Purification and characterization of pili of a Vibrio cholerae non-O1 strain.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashiro, T.; Nakasone, N; Iwanaga, M

    1993-01-01

    Pili of the Vibrio cholerae non-O1 strain V10 were purified and characterized. The V10 pili were physicochemically and immunologically different from those of the previously reported V. cholerae non-O1 strain S7, although the pili of the two strains had homologous N-terminal amino acid sequences. V10 plus antigen was detected only in V. cholerae non-O1 strains.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of the cholera enterotoxin operon of Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    We report a set of oligonucleotide primers and amplification conditions for the polymerase chain reaction to detect the ctx operon of Vibrio cholerae. The results of this assay on strains of V. cholerae and related organisms were identical with those obtained by the DNA colony hybridization test with the polynucleotide probe. The detection limit of this system was 1 pg of chromosomal DNA or broth culture containing three viable cells. The polymerase chain reaction method could directly detect...

  12. Vibrio cholerae expresses iron-regulated outer membrane proteins in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Sciortino, C V; Finkelstein, R A

    1983-01-01

    A comparison was made, using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, of the outer membrane proteins of four strains of Vibrio cholerae grown in vivo in infant rabbits and in vitro in low-iron and iron-supplemented defined media. In vivo-grown V. cholerae expressed novel outer membrane-associated proteins which, in part, were similar to those observed on V. cholerae grown in vitro under conditions of iron deprivation.

  13. Differential Management of the Replication Terminus Regions of the Two Vibrio cholerae Chromosomes during Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Gaëlle Demarre; Elisa Galli; Leila Muresan; Evelyne Paly; Ariane David; Christophe Possoz; François-Xavier Barre

    2014-01-01

    The replication terminus region (Ter) of the unique chromosome of most bacteria locates at mid-cell at the time of cell division. In several species, this localization participates in the necessary coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division, notably for the selection of the division site, the licensing of the division machinery assembly and the correct alignment of chromosome dimer resolution sites. The genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of the deadly human disease choler...

  14. Phenotypic diversity of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 E1 Tor strains identified in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵璇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the phenotypic diversity of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 E1 Tor strains isolated from different provinces in China during the last 50 years.Methods Traditional biotyping testings including susceptibility to polymyxin B,sensitivity to groupⅣphage,Voges-Proskauer test and haemolysis of sheep erythrocytes were conducted.Results Data from Biotype-specific phenotype analysis revealed that only 133 isolates carried the typical E1 Tor phenotypes while the other 251

  15. Extracts of Edible and Medicinal Plants Damage Membranes of Vibrio cholerae▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Eduardo; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2010-01-01

    The use of natural compounds from plants can provide an alternative approach against food-borne pathogens. The mechanisms of action of most plant extracts with antimicrobial activity have been poorly studied. In this work, changes in membrane integrity, membrane potential, internal pH (pHin), and ATP synthesis were measured in Vibrio cholerae cells after exposure to extracts of edible and medicinal plants. A preliminary screen of methanolic, ethanolic, and aqueous extracts of medicinal and ed...

  16. Factors affecting phaeomelanin production by a melanin-producing (mel) mutant of Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Ivins, B E; Holmes, R K

    1981-01-01

    In a previous study we isolated melanin-producing (mel) mutants of Vibrio cholerae and demonstrated that production of melanin during growth on solid media was stimulated by L-tyrosine and L-cysteine. In the studies reported here we analyzed factors that affected melanin production in liquid media and determined the abilities of radioactively labeled amino acids to serve as precursors for the formation of melanin by V. cholerae. Radioactivity from L-cysteine and from L-tyrosine was preferenti...

  17. Virulence of an emerging pathogenic lineage of Vibrio nigripulchritudo is dependent on two plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Labreuche, Yannick; Davis, Brigid M.; Iqbal, Naeem; Mangenot, Sophie; Goarant, Cyrille; Mazel, Didier; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Vibrioses are the predominant bacterial infections in marine shrimp farms. Vibrio nigripulchritudo is an emerging pathogen of the cultured shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris in New Caledonia and other regions in the Indo-Pacific. The molecular determinants of V. nigripulchritudo pathogenicity are unknown; however, molecular epidemiological studies have revealed that recent pathogenic V. nigripulchritudo isolates from New Caledonia all cluster into a monophyletic clade and contain a small...

  18. Searching for genetic markers of virulence in Vibrio nigripulchritudo, a Litopenaeus stylirostris shrimp pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Reynaud, Yann

    2007-01-01

    Since 1997, a new pathology seasonally occurs in new caledonian shrimp farms during the warm season. Diseased Litopenaeus stylirostris shrimp suffer from a systemic vibriosis which was attributed to highly pathogenic Vibrio nigripulchritudo. At the present time, only two farms among 17 are affected by the so called "summer syndrome". In such a context it appears urgent to develop reliable diagnostic tools to detect V. nigripulchritudo strains and to differentiate highly virulent strains from ...

  19. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio nigripulchritudo, a pathogen of cultured penaeid shrimp (Litopenaeus stylirostris) in New Caledonia

    OpenAIRE

    Goarant, Cyrille; Reynaud, Yann; Ansquer, Dominique; De Decker, Sophie; Saulnier, Denis; Leroux, Frederique

    2006-01-01

    A collection of 57 isolates of Vibrio nigripulchritudo from either diseased or healthy shrimp and from shrimp farms environment was studied in order to gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of this pathogen, notably isolated from two distinct shrimp disease complexes. Molecular typing using two different techniques, arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), studied together with experimental pathology data allowed a relevant epidemiological insight into...

  20. A Metalloprotease Secreted by the Type II Secretion System Links Vibrio cholerae with Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Bo R.; Ryszard A Zielke; Wierzbicki, Igor H.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Withey, Jeffrey H.; Sikora, Aleksandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the m...